Group Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Title: Lovely pan music
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA00199857/00001
 Material Information
Title: Lovely pan music
Series Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Guyana Graphic
Publication Date: 9/16/1972
 Subjects
Subject: Carifesta (1st : 1972 : Guyana), Festivals - Caribbean Area
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: South America -- Guyana -- Georgetown
Caribbean
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA00199857
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Holding Location: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CARIFESTA I 1972

Full Text




Lovely pan music


- THE tuneful melodies of
the Trinidad Catelli 'All-
Stars Steelband rendered in
styles of orchestration not
familiar to Guyanese ears,
east a lovely spell over the
audience that attended the
ninth International Presenta-
tion at Queen's College.
The sad-bappy poetry of
"Shake" Keane, St. Vincent-
born master of jazz and
verse, recited by the poet
himself in rumbling and at
timej plaintive tones, was
uimdbtedfy one of the high-
lights of this multi-culture
presentation which featured
the folk-art of Trinidad and
Tobago. St. Vincent, tuyana
and Surinam. Scores of per-
sons packed the QC audi-
torium determined to see as
much as possible of the clos-
ing stages of this cultural
explosion which had 'Guy-na
in the spotlight for the -at
three weeks.
~he Surinam show corn-
prised Athe sho rt-ersed,
angry and graphic poetry af
cRobin-Dobru and the fan-
tastic, many-layered costumes
and intricately-w rapped
head-ties of the Kotomissi
ladies, wvho delighted the
audience with their bub.
bling dances and songs. Tri-
nidad's contribution -was
outstanding. Beginning with
the classical renditions of
the CatelU Steelband- and
'continuing wih the creolese
version of the MiM-Can', in


which the girls, high!kleng
and sensuous with wide,
trilled skirts, pranced and
danced zestfully and with
ty)'cal Trinidad exuberance.
The members of the South-
ern Academy of Dance did
a beautiful rhythmic Indian
Dance. while the druaniers,
who opened the programme,
offered an arrangement of
rhythms so pristine in origin
that many in- the audience
felt like casting propriety
to the. winidS and jumping
about uninhibitedly.
hip Woodside Choir tner
the direction. f MIr.-'AUrey
J9;Bph represented U
at h/e show and their soig
repertoire included egro
spirituals and rousing "an
imaginative foklcksong. S'
Vincent performed two opera-
folk styled stories, one en-
titled "To Hairoun" (St.
Vincent) and the othe.
"Sarh and Dalfus." Cj.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs