Group Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Title: CARIFESTA and C'bean nation : Burnham's plea for the little man
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA00199797/00001
 Material Information
Title: CARIFESTA and C'bean nation : Burnham's plea for the little man
Series Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: New Nation
Publication Date: 8/26/1972
 Subjects
Subject: Carifesta (1st : 1972 : Guyana), Festivals - Caribbean Area
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: South America -- Guyana -- Georgetown
Caribbean
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA00199797
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Holding Location: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CARIFESTA I 1972

Full Text








Carifesta


and


C'bean nation

Bumham's plea for the


"' HUNDREDS of
w artistes from Ift g
the Wect Indies ald M
Lat Rn America that is what
YeAtaeday joined with various parts
thousands of. their shrewtho,
Guyanuse brother and We may
SiBterg in compete!
loudly u super-poweru
o Y a G 8 said the Co
Le s iLotter Cde. the tech
Forbes Burnhain, economics
a m bra ed tb we can be s
mbP ed tfno longer
concept of 'a single culture, our
Caribbean nation. Nmores an
Carifcsta
In a well-received Carifsta
discover 01
address at the launching of strains,our
Carifesta 1972 at the lfe "and th
National Park, Cde. can take fro
Burnham noted that no warship."
Guyana, the little
republic", decided to take The Pr
on the "big task" of expressed
hosting Carifesta not for aifesta w
9 -festival and,
the sake of exhibiting out the cha
extravagance but as part of for Carifesta
the Guyanese commitment that it need n
''to Caribbean in Guyana.
independence, to the The cult
concept of the Caribbean Carifesta se
as a nation, to the right of marks a corn
the Caribbean to speak out Caribbean pe
to the world not as a particularly
satellite or the appendage "homecomii
to other nations but as one
single nation". He hope
becomes
Ode. Burnham, whose Carifesta wi
contribution to the meansto "b
development of the idea not only p
and the reality of Carifesta psychol
dates, back to the first emotional
"We in
Conference of Caribbean Cde. Burnha
Writers and Artists in not dare to
1966, stressed the theworldbu
relationship between the change our
growing political of the Caribl
independence of the mould to o
Caribbean and the need to "We musl
match this with prepared
c. o n c o m m i-a n t excellence o
independence in the before."
economic and cultural trsCin
fdCarifesta a c
fields. said: "We
have bee
Ue- looked at the sprint, bu
contributions of the various need now
Caribbean peoples to the rununrsand
cultural melting pot of the "I have
region both in historical and
geographial perspective.
Said he: "Our history,
whether you ae talking about
Cuba or vbether you are
taking about Surinam, our
Sense.'C of rhythm, our
expressiveness and the love for
bright sunshine and that
laughter a h we display to
preventou2ve from crying
are al part of o'i iltore and


man
all of us from the
of the Caribbean
r brothers."
not be able to
e with the
I in our region,
made Leader, in
nological and
heres but "at least
ure that they can
Dominate our
way of life, our
d our ethic"
is an attempt to
ur history, our
habits, our way of
st is what no man
m us, no bomber,

'ime Minister
the hope that
u be an annual
as if to throw
Ilenge for a host
1973. he stressed
ot always be hel4
al heritage which
eks to protray
ing together of all
oples but to some
it is a cultural
n>f"
s that when it
institutionalized
ll be one of the
ring us back home
physically but also
ogically and
"*
the Caribbean",
in went on, "may
dream to change
it we can dream to
world our world
bean which we can
ur heart's desire."
t become a people
to achieve the
f those who went
the need to make
constantt reality, he
in the Caribbean
some of the best
t we recogise the
to be distance
aeopeevry
every hope,'every


Cae. Leader
confidence, that what we start
here today will continue and
live on and posterity will
praise us for this lie
beginn'mp"
Cde. Burnham ended his
address on a dramatic note
with a welcome to the artistes
and a trilbi to the "little
men" of the region.
"On behalf of the BUle
Republic of Guyana," he
declared, "on behalf of the
little men of Guyana, let me
thank those of you who have
come from across the Mas for
coming
"Let me thank also the
little men who have made this
possible, the little men who
worked night and day without
such sophisticated props as
sedatives, who worked hour
after hour in sun and dew -
the carpenters, the plumbers
and masons and others who
swept the tarmac. Let me
thank them for without them
this oild mneer have been."
To the painters, dancers,
musicians, sculptors and other
artists in his audience he said:
"What we hope you wil
portray actively and
accurately for the wodd is the
culture of the little man."




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