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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Title Page
 Opening
 Student life
 Students
 Special events
 Greeks
 Organizations
 Schools & colleges
 Sports
 Closing
 Advertising
 Back Cover


PALMM FAMU



The rattler
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000319/00012
 Material Information
Title: The rattler
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida A&M University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1995
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. VI (1957); title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 86123550
System ID: AM00000319:00012

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Opening
        Page 2-3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
    Student life
        Page 8-9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20-21
        Page 22-23
        Page 24-25
        Page 26-27
        Page 28-29
        Page 30-31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34-35
        Page 36-37
    Students
        Page 38-39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Special events
        Page 84-85
        Page 86-87
        Page 88-89
        Page 90-91
        Page 92-93
        Page 94-95
        Page 96-97
        Page 98-99
        Page 100-101
        Page 102-103
        Page 104-105
        Page 106-107
        Page 108-109
        Page 110-111
        Page 112-113
        Page 114-115
        Page 116-117
    Greeks
        Page 118-119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122-123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131-134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154-155
        Page 156-157
        Page 158-159
    Organizations
        Page 160-161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164-165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168-169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172-173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176-177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180-181
        Page 182-183
        Page 184-185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188-189
        Page 190-191
        Page 192-193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196-197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200-201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206-207
        Page 208-209
        Page 210-211
    Schools & colleges
        Page 212-213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
    Sports
        Page 238-239
        Page 240-241
        Page 242-243
        Page 244-245
        Page 246-247
        Page 248-249
        Page 250-251
        Page 252-253
        Page 254-255
        Page 256-257
        Page 258-259
        Page 260-261
        Page 262-263
        Page 264
        Page 265
    Closing
        Page 266-267
        Page 268-269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
    Advertising
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text















































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The Rattler


Volume 41


Tallahassee, Florida


(904) 599-3000


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Revolution goes synon-
ymous with change,
and nothing repre-
sented change more
than FAMU's Stu-
dent Government As-
sociation (SGA) 1994-95. Student em-
powerment was exemplified through the
leadership of SGA President Larry
Tait, and Vice-President, Nyesha Cook.
They exercised their powers through a
year filled with controversial ideas and
demanding protests; Larry Tait and
Nyesha Cook were the energy of SGA
94-95-
Not to overlook the efforts of many
others who put endless hours into SGA,
but it was the excitement of the Tait/
Cook combination that made this year
a driving force in compelling FAMU
students to ameliorate policies and as-
sess new initiatives.
Even before its conception, the Tait/
Cook campaign brought about contro-
versy. As a result of unauthorized cir-
culation of Tait's "Thoughts Maga-
zine", the duo was deleted from the
presidential ballot. After a court settle-
ment with FAMU, the Tait/Cook
team won the student vote by an over-
whelming majority. Larry and Nyesha
had gained the support of the student
body.
One of the most visible events of
the year took place at an inspirational


2 Uj Student Government
OPENING


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Gtto img oM

consistent with the
SFlorida A & M Uni-
versity (FAMU) tra-
dition of growth and
excellence, The
School of Business
and Industry (SBI) is growing and
continuing to receive national recog-
nition. The current SBI facility was
designed to accommodate the unique
SBI methodology, often called the
sanctuary approach. The present build-
ing is organized as a holding company
with an array of firms which constitute
internal labs. The building design con-
sists of a corporate environment super-
imposed on an academic setting, per-
mitting SBI students to internalize the
important personal, interpersonal, or-
ganizational and cultural competencies
of the business world.
Parallelling FAMU's quest to be a
trend setter in innovative teaching and
research, SBI found it necessary to ex-
pand it's facilities to accommodate
growth and continued effectiveness of
existing new programs. The first phase
of this expansion was the new East
Wing, which will soon be followed by
the completion of the North and West
Wings to the World Culture's Plaza.
The East Wing, a 3 million dollar
project, is only one component of a
long range plan for the build-out of
the existing facilities into a globe shaped



4 SBI
OPENING


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2W Joe

TMMhe Rattler's are back
in stride again! And
who was more respon-
sible for this come-
back than the new
head coach, William
(Billy) Joe? Billy Joe's personal history
as both a coach and a player was put
to test as he took on the challenge of
revitalizing the rich tradition of Rattler
Football ... And he passed with flying
colors! Joe came to FAMU in Spring
'94 only to take college football by
storm in the fall.
Prior to coaching at FAMU, Billy
Joe was at Central State University
(CSU) in Ohio where he was the head
football coach and Director of Athlet-
ics for 13 years. Even before Central
State, Coach Joe was head Coach at
Cheyney State University, and an as-
sistant coach at the University of Mar-
yland, College Park. His career as a
coach in professional football was spent
as an offensive backfield coach with the
Philadelphia Eagles.
Billy Joe grew up in Coatesville,
Pennsylvania. He won a scholarship to
Pennsylvania's Villanova University,
where he starred in football and track.
As a fullback, Joe earned several MVP
Honors, including the title in the 1961
Sun Bowl and the 1962 Liberty Bowl.
In addition to his numerous football
honors, Billy Joe also earned a Silver


) Billy Joe
OPENING





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Omar Harris, a FAMU student from
Dallas, Texas takes a minute to
strike a "hip-hop" pose for the
Yearbook photographer.


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Apreal Mitchell


race, beauty and style are just
a few ways to describe the twen-
ty-one year old daughter of Ora
Douglas and Larry Mitchell.
Apreal Mitchell, Miss Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical
University 1994-95, exudes a queenly manner
in everything she does.
Among her many life's pleasures, Apreal
enjoys dancing, exercising, playing the pianb
and reading. She was employed at the univ-
ersity's radio station, WAMF, as the official
promotions spokesperson.
Although Apreal
had a double major in
Business Economics
and Broadcast Journal-
ism, she managed to
stay active in the com-
munity. She partici-
pated in various clubs
and organizations such
as the Images Model- i
ing Troupe, Tallahas- .
see Chapter of the
NAACP, and Big
Brothers/Sisters of
Tallahassee. Apreal's
long term goals include
establishing a wedding
consultant firm, a fine
arts school for minor-
ity students and hav-
ing a booming career in the area of Broadcast
Journalism.
Representing Florida A & M University
with dignity and pride, Apreal attributes her
successes to God, her family and her self-
motivation.

"In all thy ways, acknowledge God and He

will direct your path."






10 Miss FAMU
STUDENT LIFE

















































. .


































Miss FAMU
STUDENT LIFE









AVA NICHOL SMITH



SeRkObt


ATTENDANT






Senior Attendant, Ava Smith, models
paraphernalia for her sorority, Alpha
Kappa Alpha, in the annual
Homecoming Fashion Show.
native of Atlanta, Georgia,
Ava Nichol Smith repre-
sented FAMU's senior class
with elegance and poise. Ava
is a Broadcast Journalism major who
was not only an outstanding student,
but actively involved in many clubs
and organizations on Florida A & M
University's campus. She was a mem- -
ber of Women in Communications,
The National Association of Black
Journalists, The White and Gold
Honor Society, Phi Eta Sigma Hon-
or Society, The National Dean's List,
and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Inc. Ava was also a talented singer
and performed in various states in
different talent shows and gospel
choirs. Her future plans include at-
tending graduate school upon com-
pletion of Florida A & M University
to obtain a masters degree in jour-
nalism. After graduate school, Ava
aspires to become an anchor for a d a th gs hgh h
major television network and ulti- can do all thing through Christ
mately teach journalism on a college which strengthens me."
level and own her own television sta-
tion.




12 Senior Attendant
U STUDENT LIFE









"If you do not strongly believe in yourself, then no
one else will."


MONICA X DAVIS






ATTENDANT


Junior Attendant, Monica Davis, waves
to the crowd at the Rattler Pep Rally
before one of the home football games.
M onica Xernona Davis, the
twenty-four year old daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
E. Davis displayed spirit and enthu-
siasm as she carried out the many
duties of the Junior Attendant to
Miss FAMU. A native of Warner
Robbins, Georgia, Monica excelled
during her high school years at
Northside High School. She was in-
volved in a variety of clubs and or-
ganizations such as: cheerleaders, stu-
dent council and marching band. As
a student at Florida A & M Uni-
versity, Monica continued to achieve
and work actively in the community.
She received many accolades includ-
ing the Dean's List, Honor Student
in the College of Education and
Freshman Honor Award. During her
sophomore year, she worked closely
with the sophomore class cabinet on
the Special Projects and Activities
committee. In addition, Monica
stayed involved in the FAMU Chap-
ter of the NAACP and the Golden
Bridge Mentor Program.


Junior Attendant 13
STUDENT LIFE





















J


Sophomore Attendant Leontyne Brown,
takes a moment to smile for the
Yearbook photographer at a Rattler
home game.
L eonontyne Denae Brown, a
psychology and pre-medi-
cine major from West Palm
Beach, Florida represented
the 1994-95 sophomore class with in-
telligence and charisma. The nine-
teen year old daughter of William
and Brenda Brown enjoyed meeting
new people, drawing, discussing social
issues, and collecting teddy bears.
While at Florida A & M University,
she has received a certificate for ac-
ademic excellence, participated in the
1994 Honor's Convocation and was
a NCA Superstar Girl for Jazz. Dur-
ing her high school years, Leontyne
was a member of the Suncoast Com-
munity High School Drill Team, Flag
Corp, Sigma Gamma Rho's Rhoer's
Club and Delta Sigma Theta's Del-
teens. Her long term goals include
earning a Ph.D. in Psychology. Soon
after, she aspires to attend the Uni-
versity of Miami Medical School.
Leontyne plans to devote her career
to assisting in the fight of and curing
diabetes.

I


;_ U.~:~L
Is
P",/~YI~(LLI~r4


"If circumstances don't work out the way you plan, it
is because the Lord has something even better planned."


14 Sophomore Attendant
l/' STUDENT LIFE


LEONTYNE BROWN





ATTENDANT

ATTENDANT









"In all thy ways acknowledge him and he

will direct your path."


KIMBERLY NELSON








ATTENDANT


I I"... V


Freshman Attendant, Kimberly Nelson
watches as Miss FAMU is crowned for
the 1994-95 school year.
T he daughter of Henry and
Annie Nelson, Kimberly
Vashae Nelson, is a per-
fect example of an all-around student.
Kimberly, a Pharmacy major from
Dallas, Texas, actively participated in
campus activities and community
service. She served as the chairperson
for the Public Relations committee in
the Student Government Association
and the executive board in the Col-
lege of Pharmacy for the Freshman
Class.
During her high school career,
Kimberly was involved in the Student
Council and Jack-n-Jill of America,
Inc. She also participated on the swim
team, was a cheerleader, Junior
Homecoming Princess and Home-
coming Queen for the 1993-94 sea-
son.
Kimberly's future aspirations are
to finish FAMU with a Doctorate
of Pharmacy degree and manage a
major pharmaceutical company.


Freshman Attendant 5l
STUDENT LIFE
























Ast


King of Orange and Green, Jason Carter
entertains the crowd at the Rattler
Weekend pep rally before the first home
game.

Speaking the gender barriers of
Miss FAMU and her court is
the position of FAMU's King
of Orange and Green. Much
like traditional student officers, the King of
Orange and Green is an elected position.
Yet, its solidarity stands in being the only
male position that surpasses the realms of a
political office. The King of Orange and
Green is responsible for boosting FAMU's
support and representing the practical, yet
enthusiastic personality of the FAMU stu-
dent body. No one has done that better than
FAMU's King of Orange and Green, Jason
Carter. Carter, 21, is a senior Business Ec-
onomics major from Atlanta, Georgia.
A naturally charismatic person, Jason has
been a motivating personality on FAMU's
campus, winning the King of Orange and
Green election with 7070 of the vote. Al-
though he holds the duties of King and
Orange and Green, Jason's talents are mul-
tifaceted. Some of his largest projects this
year were his position as director of mer-
chandising at Rainforest Productions, a stu-
dent based production company. As a mem-
ber of the company's executive staff, Jason
also portrayed Kiwaan, the main character
on Rainforest's 1994 production of the mov-
ie, "Chocolate City."
Carter definitely used his potentials to be
an exemplary student at FAMU and he un-
B edly brought a new definition to the
SKing of Orange and Green.


Jason Carter





rg Gr

of Orange & Green


"Though I work for today, I definitely have to work
for tomorrow."


16 King of Orange & Green
STUDENT LIFE








"I feel FAMU in my heart and express my love for this
institution in the only way I can ... my spirit."


TERRI-LYNN PRICE





Qre ree

of Orange & Green


1% Ah


Queen of Orange & Green, Terri-Lynn
Price gets the crowd "hyped" for the
Rattler's first home football game.
Terri Lynn Price, FAMU's
spirited Queen of Orange
and Green for the 1994-
95 school year exhibited
"Rattleration" on a daily basis. In her
spare time, Terri-Lynn enjoyed par-
ticipating in a variety of sports ac-
tivities such as: track, basketball, soft-
ball, football, wrestling and cheer-
leading. She also played the flute and
piccolo, wrote poetry and liked to
read.
Along with her hobbies, Terri-
Lynn participated in various com-
munity service activities. She was a
special friend at Bond Elementary
School and a mentor at FAMU
High.
Her accomplishments included two
singles under Paradise/Ichiban Re-
cords, first female wrestler in the State
of Florida and Most Outstanding
Cheerleader.


Queen of Orange & Green 17
STUDENT LIFE U




Shoneji Robinson, a sopho-
more from Sarasota, FL, puts
in some "set time" with her
friends.


Jamila Jones, Robyn Bussey,
and Kristin Dixon enjoy each
others company often.


Fri
"I don't know what I would mem
do if my friends weren't Me
here to help me make it agree
through the day," said Tina they 1
Miller. friend
One of the most lasting hard t
of all college experiences is them
the development of friend
friends. They helped ease for fa
the stress of academia and dreds
added a sense of comfort to "It
those in need. that a
"Since I've been in col- the fl
lege, my roommate has be- gone
come a good friend of them
mine," said Gennean Mitch
Scott. "We've laughed and gin' c
cried together and already boys,
we have tons of good Of


ust



en(


ories," she added.
any other students
id on the good times
have shared with their
Is and they found it
to imagine life without
. For most students,
Is became a substitute
imilies that were hun-
of miles away.
's difficult to believe
Ifter this year, many of
friends I made will be
and I may never see
again," said Timothy
lell. "I enjoyed han-
>ut on the set with my
" he added.
course, good friends


S


vowed to always keep in
touch
through Friends
phone or
mail. Students
at FAMU Are
formed lasting
relationships with class-
mates,
room- Forever
mates and faculty mem-
bers.
"The friends that I made
in college," said Kristin
Dixon, "will be my friends
for a lifetime. They were al-
ways there when I needed
them."
Jamila Jones


Friendship
STUDENT LIFE


Wendy Douglas takes time Part of being friends is just sit-
from her study group to share ting back, relaxing, and enjoy-
some juicy gossip with a class- ing the scenery.
mate and friend.


Friendship
STUDENT LIFE


Members of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority, Inc., Tengemana
Hill, and Kim Hills are the best
of friends.


18


19





King & Queen of Orange &
Green Jason Carter and Ter- Sophomore Alan Williams
ri-Lynn Price are the epitome gets his "groove on" at the
of school spirit at FAMU. Rattler Weekend Pep Rally.


How much spirit do the
Rattler's have? More than
you can stand. This year
school spirit was found
any and everywhere as a
revival of hope spread
through football and bas-
ketball season. At each
game, the spirit was
there, alive and striking,
and spirit days were filled
with excitement, partici-
pation, decorations, wild
attitudes and even a few


painted faces. As a group,
no one showed more loy-
alty to the years theme,
"Reliving the Tradition"
than Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity Inc. with their af-
ro's and fly collars.
At the beginning of the
year, the football season
kicked off the wave of FA-
MU pride. The Rattler
Strike, the first annual
pep rally of the year, was
so large that it had to be


moved to the Intramural dent chants and support
Field. Home football of the cheerleaders, who
games had week long in previous seasons had a
preparations and were full tough time getting crowd
of yelling, dancing, laugh- participation. The elec-
ing and excitement. Ex- tricity felt in Gaither gym
cept for a short losing after a slam dunk would
streak, the team fulfilled shock anyone entering
students' hopes and the the Venom Zone. With as
spirit of the season was much spirit as the Rattlers
present unconditionally. have, the question an-
Basketball season car- swers itself. "Rattlers
ried on the energy of the have all that spirit and
fall season through stu- then some."


LeighAnne Shervington, a
freshman participates in the
butterfly contest during the
pep rally at the beginning of
the school year.


School Spirit
STUDENT LIFE


Venom, the esteemed mascot
for FAMU, prepares to
"strike" one of the band
members from Tuskegee Uni-
versity.

School Spirit 2
STUDENT LIFE


U



FA^?


IlI


20


AC


II 1i









Chilling



on


Set


It seemed like it had
been there
HEART since the
beginning
of time, a land-
OF mark that has
withstood
many changes. It is .
THE SET.
FAMU The Set,
the strip that runs through
the heart of campus, has
served as the campus "hot
spot" for years. It was
swarmed on a daily basis
by students intermingling,
checking mailboxes in the
post office and visiting the
bookstore and market-
place.
Cheron Reid, a freshman
from Champaigne, Illinois,
liked to spend time on the
set getting to know her fel-


low FAMUans. "This gives
me the opportunity to meet
people that I don't have
classes with or would oth-
erwise not even see."
It also served as the main
gathering place and meet-
ing spot for FAMU stu-
dents, friends and visitors.
Everything from dating
games and fashion shows
to the "coming out" of new


fraternity and sorority
members took place on
The Set. Even if there were
no major events, The Set
still held a magical attrac-
tion for students.
The Set was where you
could go to relax after
class, waste time before
class or just chill. You
could see many sights on
The Set, especially that of
people trying to get their
"mack on". The Set was
most often "thick" when
the weather was just right.
Putting in Set time re-
mained an age-old tradi-
tion at FAMU.
For those new students
to FAMU, a class in "The
Art of Putting in Set Time"
is one that comes highly
recommended.
Robyn Bussey


FAMU students enjoy just sitting
back and relaxing between clas-
ses on The Set.


The Set I 23
STUDENT LIFE U


22 The Set
STUDENT LIFE


The





C.C 's hairst.lene o of
those reminiscent of the disco
era.


Freshman Shayla Bassie
models an outfit accented by
the well known platform
shoe.


Remember when we
used to play kickball, "0-
U-T Out" and "Slide" all
day? Do you remember
wearing shell toe Adidas,
afros, African medallions,
and platform shoes? If
you did, you could sit on
"The Set" everyday and
reminisce as people all
over campus recreated
"old school" styles.
The wave of "old
school" returned in mu-


241


sic, as well. It was rare to
hear a song on the radio
that didn't have an under-
lying "old school" beat
like "Juicy Fruit" or "Be-
tween the Sheets." Clas-
sic Michael Jackson and
Isley Brothers tunes found
rebirth during this time of
retrospect. One could al-
ways hear "Planet Rock"
or "My Radio" from pass-
ing cars. When freshman
Ebony White from Way-


cross, Georgia, was asked
about her thoughts on the
subject, she said. "I think
it's cool because it gives
me a chance to see and
hear some of the things I
missed out on." The dec-
ades of the 70's and 80's
were not the only decades
being revisited .. so
were the 60's. The music
of Marvin Gaye and the
Temptations and the ide-
as of Malcolm X and An-


gela Davis were also cele-
brated.
Sophomore Keysha El-
lis, a chemistry major
from Jacksonville, Flori-
da, summed up the resur-
gence of "old school"
with her statement, "I
love 'Old School.' It was a
time when things were
much more simple and
free, a time to which we
should all like to return."
Robyn Bussey


Bridgette's silver shirt with
the wide collar was and still is
a favorite among party goers.


Old School
STUDENT LIFE


Shaw.n "rAnimal" Jones' de-
cided to wear his hair in the
style his father did in the
70's.


Old School1
STUDENT LIFE


..*
Ar


i
.. .".;




,,'.'*"*,.,
.,,L3
,. '. ,,


rS '*


,;,,nrs"r
~~F


F F! p ,,


c~
I'




Mrs. Washington goes through
the paperwork on her desk in an
effort to assist one of the schol-
arship students.


Beggin'




Buck


Thumbing through end-
less applications for college
funds, students continued
to worry about finding tui-
tion money. "My parents
have been struggling to pay
for college. When I was in
high school, I was con-
stantly being prepared for
admission and campus life,
but nobody warned me
about the expenses," said
sophomore Derrick
Bryant.
Many students voiced
how much harder it was for
the middle class to get fi-
nancial aid. "Just because
our parent's salaries are
greater doesn't mean we


can afford to pay full tui-
tion," said freshman Gen-
nean Scott. Consequently,
students searched for pri-
vate scholarships while
others joined the ROTC, or
turned to the work force for
money. "I got a part time
job," said freshman Mar-
cus Watkins, "so tuition
won't be as much of a bur-
den on my parents."
Often overlooked is the
lack of funds for upper-
classmen. "They have so
much 'money for freshman
that end up leaving FAMU.
Why not invest it in stu-
dents that you know are
loyal to their education at


for




S

FAMU?" said sophomore
Garrick Gibson from Mi-
ami, Flori-
da. MONEY
Inevitably, students con-
tinued their struggle be-
cause it
didn't MONEY
look as if the trend of rising
tuition would stop any time
in the near M
future.
Jamila Jones


A work study recipient picks
up her time sheet for her cam-
pus work study job.


STUD


A FAMU student inquires
about why she has been placed
on financial hold during the
fall semester.


26 Financial Aid
STUDENT LIFE


FAMUAN's wait patiently in Anthony Jackson, a junior
line at the Student Accounts Of- from Washington, D.C. uses
fice in Foote-Hilyer Administra- work study to earn extra mon-
tion Center. ey to go toward his college tu-
ition.

Financial Aid 27
STUDENT LIFE


I -----




Vanessa Weatherspoon and
Keanna Henson do a "party
strut" at one of the parties
thrown by Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority. Inc.


FAMUAN's always enjoy a
good party after a long and
tiring week of classes,
homework and exams.


When all the classes
were over, all the home-
work was put away, and
all the studying done, Rat-
tlers were anxious to vent
their frustrations from the
long school days by so-
cializing and partying dur-
ing the evenings.
While some students
enjoyed relaxing at home,
others preferred the club
scene. Students could al-
ways be found at Club Di-
amonds and Pearls. The


Underground and many
others. "1 like The Under-
ground the best. I like the
way it's set up." said Kia
Lewis. Others disagreed.
"My favorite is The Lou-
vre." said Sean Johnson.
"It doesn't get quite as hot
in there because most of
the club is outside." With
so many things to do,
there was rarely a dull
night. Parties featured
music from reggae and
hip hop to Miami bass


music.
When students eventu-
ally got tired of the club
scene, most moved on to
house parties. Be it a
huge event, or simply a
small gathering, people
were bound to be in atten-
dance. "I like the small get
together better than the
clubs," said Tiffany
Woods. "You can actually
hear your friends when
they are talking to you,"
she added. "Small gath-


erings are also a good
time to meet with friends
that you may not see very
often," remarked Andrea
Talcott.
Getting together with
friends always helped re-
lieve the stress that FA-
MUans faced during the
course of the week. The
night life helped put a
sweet end to many bitter
days.
Jamila Jones


Anthony Moultrie and Ri-
chard Butler stand in line out-
side of Club Fahreheit wait-
ing to get in a party.


FAAMU student chills at the
bar at a local Tallahassee
club


Night Life
STUDENT LIFE


29


Night Life
STUDENT LIFE


r ..
"


;.. 4fe


7 '~p `
-.


28~


-;


'A?. 't


c~T
4e-
'Ylr


c
-------~ ,


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LY. r













Brs




lurs


Live from the Rattler's den,
it's Thurs-
Jordan d a y
night!!!
Thursday
Comes nights took on
a whole new
meaning this spring thanks
to the
Back! Jackson-
ville Student Alliance and
the Turner Broadcast Sys-
tem (TBS). "TBS Thursday
Night" was an activity held
in the Rattler's Den during
which students gathered to
watch NBA Basketball
games on TBS. The op-
portunity to watch profes-
sional basketball games
with friends was not the on-
ly attraction to the activity.
Free food and games also
added to the fun and festiv-


ity. The activity, which was
offered twice a month, was
hosted by James Moran,
Assistant Director of the
University's Student Activ-
ities Office.
Students responded with
overwhelming approval.
"It's straight because I get
to see games that I nor-
mally wouldn't see due to a
lack of cable on campus -


and the free food helps,
too.", said Kenny Hender-
son, a freshman from Tam-
pa, Florida. Jamel
Toombs, a sophomore
Criminal Justice major,
stated, "I already enjoyed
spending time in the Rat-
tler's Den, and now with
the basketball games, more
people come, and it's more
fun." Another student,
Damien Crumbley, a junior
from Dayton, Ohio, said
"Hey, this gave me a
chance to see Jordan's
comeback."
TBS Thursday Nights
gave FAMU students a
chance to hang out with
friends, watch a good
game and get your "eat"
on until the pizza ran out.


In a one-man promotional
scheme on the first game
night, James Moran tells stu-
dents, "Thursday night just got
bigger."


30 TBS Thursday
LJ STUDENT LIFE


pool



IA






"But these were a Christmas
present from my Aunt Bea!"


"I thought it looked good
when I bought it."


7
r/ I-


rrli; i
:-:~P

isi~: i
"I
.d


Over the years we have
seen many crime sprees
nationwide, but none
were so gruesome, so hid-
eous, so common as FA-
MU's own FASHION
FAUX PAS! Day by day,
this overwhelming wave
of fashion injustice crept
into our classrooms, the
cafe, the set and into eve-
ry other nitch and cranny
of campus.
Intolerable clothing


32 Fashion Faux Pas
STUDENT LIFE


ranged from cloakers and
dangerously oversized
Cross Colours to white
shoes after labor day. The
central grounds of Fash-
ion offense off-campus
was the mall, where one
was inevitably subjected
to the atrocities of fashion
injustice. The Fashion Po-
lice raided stores that con-
tinuously perpetuated
crime. They cited the
trendy "JW" for hundreds


of rayon shirts, "Jodeci"
vests, and fake "Tommy
Hilfiger," the primary
paraphernalia of the fash-
ion felonies.
Following the tone of
the fashion revolution,
FAMUANS advocated
student rights and organ-
ized Fashion Faux Pas
watch groups. Maximum
sentences were given to
anyone flanked in black
pantyhose with white


shoes, pre-season leath-
er, black lip liner, sheer
sleeved shirts and color
weave; but it was impos-
sible to eliminate all of-
fenders. As an officer of
the Fashion Police, I au-
thorize all FAMUans past,
present, and future, to
make citizen's arrests of
all offenders.
Your faithful guardian
against injustice,
Sgt. Style Robyn Bussey


.I


Don't laugh Grandma made
this."


Fashion Faux Pas
STUDENT LIFE


"I took the bow off. Now,
doesn't it look like a regular
pair of jeans?"


B 33


I


13~





I 5


I


'Jg WI4~~2.1i



4eA/1~ll

a~R


It seemed as if the
weeks would never end.
The days crept by and the
nights were even longer.
Students everywhere
were making plans to get
home and find employ-
ment for the break. "This
summer, I plan to get an
internship with a major
corporation," said Harold
Robinson. "That way, I
will have a chance to
make money and get
hands on experience in
my chosen field."
Others had different
plans for the summer.


34 Home for Holidays
STUDENT LIFE


Some planned to travel
and do volunteer work,
while others made plans
to attend summer school.
"Since I've changed my
major, I'm a little behind
so I have to attend the
summer sessions to do
some catching up," said
Anthony Brown. While
some students had jobs
lined up and others had to
attend summer school.
some still had not decided
what they would do over
the holidays. "I may go to
summer school," said
Sherri Andrews. "I'm not


sure, though, because I'm
burned out from classes
and I really do not want to
work," she added.
"I'm probably going to
attend the FGAMP Sum-
mer Program this sum-
mer," said Kemberlee
Pugh. "I can attend clas-
ses and possibly get credit
for them."
With an internship ac-
ceptance letter in their
pockets, or plans to at-
tend summer school, stu-
dents were ready to tackle
the summer months. One
of the hardest things,


though, was leaving
friends. "I've met man.
new friends, but I know I'I
always keep in touch witt
the real good ones," saic
Janine Sumter. Rattlers
were ready for the sum-
mer months and deter-
mined to make the mosi
of their holiday.
Jamila Jones


Tiana Copeland and her
stud' partner get some last
minute stludy.ng done before
their final er'am


Jelina Phoenix makes plans
to go out with her friends
onrce she gets home lor the
holidays


Home for HoliJdays
STUDENT LIFE


~kl~ ~ig~p~~ R~

~ ~2~2.6

ilE~uPYls~i r;8
'sB3~3~aQ.
:::e 5~1s~E~3~ ~JY

~'~-


-i

d..


S.4*


35


*-i~

.*'*


-"! 2aa


Tia Williams and Pam Cun-
ningham move their refriger-
ator to storage during the
winter break.


Freshman Tiffloan Bell walls
on the steps of !McGuirnDia-
mond Hall for her ride home.


~:~w~~B~


_;-;ki








Members of Delta Sigma The- Khari Hairston-El demon-
ta Sorority, Inc. prepare to states self-defense tech-
help the Student Govern- niques at a seminar spon-
ment Association with their scored by the Beta Nu Chapter
road clean-up, of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraterni-
ty, Inc.


The third annual com-
munity service week
kicked off a successful
year of volunteer support
within the FAMU com-
munity. Campus groups
worked with visiting or-
ganizations to better the
Tallahassee community
and ultimately benefit FA-
MU students.
To begin the week, the
NAACP sponsored a
membership drive which
was instrumental in adver-
tising their first annual


meeting. FAMU student
Willie Miller said "The
NAACP is an organiza-
tion that is here for the ad-
vancement of "us" and
we must utilize it in every
possible way."
Tuesday was designat-
ed as AIDS AWARE-
NESS DAY. Members of
SGA gave out pamphlets
and issued condoms in
conjunction with the Leon
County Health Depart-
ment. Paul Mazotta, head
of AIDS education at the


Health Department, stat-
ed, "If you are ignorant
about AIDS, you will allow
simple mistakes like sim-
ply looking at someone
determine your destiny."
The Tallahassee Urban
League membership drive
was sponsored by Denise
Cottman, director of the
Urban League. Ms. Cott-
man's goal was "to
achieve awareness of the
services the Urban
League had to offer Tal-
lahassee and the students


of FAMU."
Campus clean-up was
another activity highlight-
ed during the week of
service. Coriey Preston of
West Palm Beach, Flori-
da, said, "Keeping the
campus clean is all a part
of making FAMU what it
is. What drew me to FA-
MU was how clean the
campus was, and I'd like
to keep it that way."
Mia King


Community Service 37
STUDENT LIFE '3


Community Service
STUDENT LIFE


36









































Cu
Cu-

-oL.J
cbu


An enthusiastic FAMUan tries to see
over the crowd at the Rattler
Weekend Kickoff Pep Rally.
in


I.


J


' "


000


. I-






















Abdul-Waarith, Zaheera
Health Care
Management
Chicago, IL


Adams, Delane
Theatre Education
Anchorage, AK


Adams, Lesia
Mathematical Minor
Vienna, GA


Adkins, Melissa
Elementary Education
Columbus, SC


Aikins, Alyndria
Psychology
Orlando, FL


Alan, Amy
Broadcast Journalism
Tallahassee, FL


Alvin, Kalonda
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Albritton, Kimberly
Business Economics
Brandenton, FL


Alvin, Melanie
Political Science
Tampa, FL


Alexander, Carla
Economics
Tallahassee, FL


Anderson, Gregory
Agriculture Business
Tallahassee, FL


Alien, Anita
Electrical Engineering
Memphis, TN


Anderson, Jenaya
Business Administration
Tallahassee, FL


Anderson, Precious
Journalism/Political
Science
Quincy, FL


Anderson, Tia
Elementary Education
Pt, Salerno, FL


Andrews, Felicia
Accounting
Detroit, MI


Andrews, Jerry Jr.
Criminal Justice
Atlanta, GA


Andrews, Michael
History
Madison, WI


40 j Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Akil, Jabari
Psychology
New York, NY


Allen, Yoko
Psychology
Mobile, AL






















Ardley, Regina
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Ashmore, Candice
Business Economics
Cleveland, OH


Barnes-Mitchell,
Jeanette
CIS
Tallahassee, FL


Armster, Monica
Agricultural Business
Thomasville, GA


Bailey, Carol
Physical Therapy
West Palm Beach, FL


Bates, Lewis
Business Administration
Silver Springs, MD


Ash, Dawn Marie
Chemistry
Orlando, FL


Bailey, Mellonie
Math Education
Miami, FL


Batista, Casmiro
Industrial Engineering
Chitre, Republic of
Panama


Ashford, Dianne
CIS
Atlanta, GA


Baker, Gloria
Business Administration
Fairmont, CT


Bell, Erik
Physical Therapy
Miami, FL


Ashford, Leslie
African-American
Studies
Detroit, MI


Ballentine, Nina
Business Economics
Chicago, IL


Bellamy, Donna
Criminal Justice
Orlando, FL


L&IR


Benson, Shermanitta
Elementary Education
Montgomery, AL


Bishop, Sabrina
Theatre
West Palm Beach, FL


Black, Latara
Biology
Jacksonville, FL


Blaine, Falithian
CIS
Pensacola, FL


Blakemore, Vincent
Construction
Engineering
Chicago, IL


Grad. Seniors \ j 41
STUDENTS L






















Blue, Shezette
Elementary Education
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Bostic, Kendra
Social Work
Pompano Beach, FL


Brazelton, Leslie
Business Economics
Detroit, MI


Brown, Chamona
Political Science
Miami, FL


Boatwrlght, Larmond
Public Management
Ocala, FL


Bowens, Tameca
Mathematics
Dade City, FL


Breaux, David
Physical Therapy
Lafayette, LA


Brown, Christi
Health Care
Management
Covington, GA


Bolden, Twila
Elementary Education
Belle Glade, FL


Boyd, Latoshia
Business Economics
St. Louis, MO


Briley, Angela
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Brown, Curtis
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Booner, Tel Aviv
Psychology
Chicago, IL


L_

Bradwell, Monica
Elementary Education
Quincy, FL


Brinson, Cassandra
CIS
Monticello, FL


Brown, Felicia
Psychology
Jacksonville, FL


Bostic, Diron
Biology, Pre-Medicine
Miami, FL


Bradwell, Roosevelt
Religion/Philosophy
Midway, FL


Brookins, Shariff
Criminal Justice
Washington, D.C.


Brown, Jamelle
Agribusiness
Tallahassee, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


42























Brown, Keith
Criminal Justice
Gainesville, FL


Brown, Marci
Physical Therapy
Miami, FL


Brown, Naima
Sociology
Philadelphia, PA


Brown, Ouida Brown. Pamela
Physical Therapy Pharmacy
Brookhaven, MS Tallahassee, FL


Brown, Cherie
English Education
Pompano Beach, FL


Bryant, Aundra
Political Science
Tallahassee, FL


Burns, Elisa
Spanish
Tallahassee, FL


Bronson, Michelle
Criminal Justice
Panama City, FL


Bryant, Kimberly
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Butler, Kendra
CIS
Lawtey, FL


Brunson, Michael
Journalism


Bryant, Nikki
Agribusiness
Winter Haven, FL


Bynum, Kyle
Business Administration
St. Louis, MO


Brunson, Sabrina
Business Economics
Pensacola, FL


Bryant, Raymond
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Byrd, Daniel
Chemical Engineering
Pensacola, FL


Bryant, Acquinonette
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Havana, FL


Bunch, Nicole
Pre-Medicine
West Palm Beach, FL


Byrd, Latasha
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Monticello, FL


Grad, Seniors 43
STUDENTS























Byrd, Tylana
Accounting
Los Angeles, CA


Campbell, Monica
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Cheeks, Keisha
Criminal Justice
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Cobb, Wallisa
Business Economics
Tallahassee, FL


Caldwell, LaTonya
Accounting
Chicago, IL


Capers, Latoya
Jacksonville, FL


Clark, Sherrial
Elementary Education
Belle Glade, FL


Cone, Tamara
Business Economics
St. Louis, MO


Caldwell, Melanie
Elementary Education
Orlando, FL


Caraway, Jennifer
Psychology
Teaneck, NJ


Clark, Teresa
Nursing
Melbourne, FL


Cohens, Kimberly
Social Work
Starke, FL


Caldwell, Roslyn
Social Work
Tallahassee, FL


Castraphen, Juana
Business Administration
Pensacola, FL


Clark, lan
Electrical Engineering
West Palm, FL


Cole, Serese
Broadcast Journalism
Kansas City, MO


Campbell, Keith
Mathematics
Orlando, FL


Chapman, Chayrsse
Psychology
Ta lahassee, FL


Cobb, Melissa
Accounting
Clearwater, FL


Collins, Corey
Pharmacy
Tampa, FL


44 U Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS























Collins, Tiffany Comerie, Laverne
History Education Finance
Mobile, AL Atwater, CA


Company, Eric
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Pensacola, FL


Cooke,. Christopher
Accounting
Atlanta, GA


Cooke, Tanya
Business Economics
Orlando, FL


b~1d


Costin, Dexter
Mechanical Engineering
Sicklerville, NJ


Copeland, Renee
Nursing
Monticello, FL


Covington, Karlton
Print Management
Miami, FL


Cox, Tessie
Music Education
Panama City, FL


Crawford, Lena
Chemistry/Pre-Medicine
Milwaukee, WI


Jrawford, Sandra
health Care Admin.
?iviera Beach, FL


Croskey, Djenebra
Pre-Medicine
Miami, FL


Cross, Lena
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Cross, Taressa
Psychology
Miami, FL


Cunningham, Camille
Business Administration
Portland, OK


Daniel, Arica
Business Administration
Atlanta, GA


Dassie, Wylin
Agricultural Business
Tallahassee, FL


Davis, Angela
Psychology
Miami, FL


Davis, Carla
Industrial Engineering
Detroit, MI


Grad, Seniors
STUDENTS


Curry, Erica
ampa, FL


45























Davis, Cleon Davis, Kimberli
Electrical Engineering Sociology
Riviera Beach, FL Jacksonville, FL


Day, Darrell
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Columbus, GA


Davis, Michael
Business Economics
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Days, Paula
Civil Engineering
Washington, D.C.


Davis, Monica
Business Economics
Miami, FL


Dean, Edward
Social Work
Gainesville, FL


Davis, Patrice
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Debnam, Dwight
Civil Engineering
Washington, D.C.


Delaney, Velvette
Graphic Design
Altadena, CA


Demps, LaMonte
Economics
Bristol, FL


DeYampert, Nicole
Chemical Engineering
Ft. Washington, MD


Dickerson, William
Electrical Engineering
Jacksonville, FL


Dixon, Ruth
Public Relation
Daytona Beach, FL


p..
-ii~


Dones, Sheniqua
Criminal Justice
Miami, FL


Dorsey, Marcus
Accounting
Decatur, GA


Dorsey, Tisha
Business Economics
St. Petersburg, FL


Douglas, Faye
Accounting
Miami, FL


Douglas, Melody
Agribusiness
Jacksonville, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Davis, Tamika
Accounting
Tampa, FL


46 V






















Douglas, Phyllis
Social Work
Decatur, GA


Dukes, Tamika
Elementary Education
St. Petersburg, FL


Dunnon, Corey
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Miami, FL


Dycks, Shawn
Accounting
Cleveland, OH


Earst, Makeba
Chemistry
Tallahassee, FL


Edwards, Carla
Music Education
Quincy, FL


Edwards, Kelli
Psychology
St. Louis, MO


Edwards, Monica
Occupational Therapy
Ocala, FL


Ellison, Monica
Accounting
New Orleans, LA


Evans, Wendel
Criminal Justice
Clearwater, FL


Everett, Nicole
Business Administration
Miami, FL


Everett, Paulette
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Ezeanya, Josephine
Elementary Education
Ames, FL


Fagan, Kimberli
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Fort Worth, TX


Ferguson, Jermalne
Broadcast Journalism
Miami, FL


Ferguson, Rameisha
Public Management
Miami, FL


Fisher, Kelli
Business Administration
Plainfield, NJ


Fleming. Bridget
Business Administration
Ft. Myers, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Eaton, Gerald
Finance
Vallejo, CA


Esters, Levon
Agribusiness
Chicago, IL


47





















Flint, Mia
Accounting
Riviera Beach, FL


Flowers, Barbara
Theatre Education
Winter Haven. FL


Flowers, Sophia
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Floyd, Katrice
Nursing
Tampa, FL


Floyd, Raquel
Business Economics
Miramar, FL


A I


Ford, Glenn Jr.
Business Administration
Minneapolis, MN


Ford, Odell Jr.
Accounting
Orlando, FL


Forman, Ghian
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Fowlkes, Holly
Broadcast Journalism
Los Angeles, CA


Freeman, Dawn
Office Administration
St. Thomas, VI


Franklin, Alicia
Math Education
Wakulla County, FL


Fregia, Ray Jr.
Business Administration
Naperville, IL


Franklin, Linda
Nursing
Orangeburg, SC


Frenney, Nikita
Journalism
Orlando, FL


Franklin, Phynedra
Criminal Justice
St. Petersburg, FL


Fuller, David
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Freeman, Adrian
Business Education
Lakeland, FL


Furlow, Melba
Criminal Justice
Jacksonville, FL


Grad, Seniors
STUDENTS


Floyd, Trent
Accounting
Atlanta, GA


Fortson, Kaye
English
Orlando, FL


i ". ,et


48 7


Wad WdAAA 41ji ..A


~-rr J
If,























Garvey, Jacqueline
Nursing
Kissimmee, FL


Gibbs, Stephen
Accounting
Newark, NJ


Garvin, Carlina
Social Work
Monticello, FL


Gibson, Joi
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Gentry, Diallo
Chemical Engineering
Columbus, OH


Gilbert, Ella
Business Administration
West Palm Beach, FL


Gentry, Tamara
Physics
St. Louis, MO


Gilbert, Lori
Business Education
Miami, FL


Gilliam, Barbara
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Gordon, Michelle
Business Education
Cranford, NJ


Gilmore, William E.
English
Birmingham, AL


. Grady, Tonya
Elementary Education
Hopewell, NY


Glass, Dawn
Chemistry
Jacksonville, FL


Graham, Shaun
Accounting
White Springs, FL


Glenn, James III
Criminology
Tallahassee, FL


Granberry, Leslie
Pharmacy
Miami, FL


Gonzalez, Betzabel
Biology
Miami, FL


Grandison, Johnny
Civil Engineering
Mobile, AL


Grad, Seniors j 49
STUDENTS _


Gibbs, Carla


Gill, Carmen
Agribusiness
St. Louis, MO






















Grant Angela Grant, Tammy
Mathematics Nursing
Cincinnati, OH Jacksonville, FL


Green, Julian
Political Science
Wildwood, FL


Green, Terrell
Health
Ft. Lauderdale. FL


Gregory, Pamela
Physical Therapy
Utica, MS


Hagan, Evelyn
Sociology
Monticello, FL


Hand, Tammye
Broadcast Journalism
Trenton, NJ


Harley, Kisa
Pre-Dentistry
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Hall, Brichelle
Business Administration
St. Petersburg, FL


Hanks. Richard
Accounting
Moss Point, MS


Harrelson, Treshena
Pharmacy
Tampa, FL


Hall, Ira
Business Economics
St. Petersburg, FL


Hargrett, Brian
Chemical Engineering
Riviera Beach, FL


Harris, Anika
Elementary Education
Boca Roton, FL


Hamilton, Nikki
Biology


Hargrett, Kimyatta
Business Administration
Plant City, FL


Harris, Dawn
Print Management
Memphis, TN


Hamilton, Sonya
Psychology
Atlanta, GA


Hargrove, Consuela
Electrical Engineering
Orlando, FL


Hawkins, Sharon
Elementary Education
Bartow, FL


50 Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS























Hayes, Shannon
Business Administration
Adel, GA


Hemmans, William III
Political Science
Bradenton, FL


Henderson, Cathy
Elementary Education
Atlanta, GA


Henderson, Gregory
Occupational Therapy
Tampa, FL


Henderson, Jason
Physical Therapy
Philadelphia, PA


Henson, Keanna
Business Administration
Flossmoor, IL


Henderson, Marlene
Business Administration
Cleveland, OH


Hepburn, Trinette
Criminal Justice
Miami, FL


Henderson, Varndura
Health Care
Management


Herbert, Elnora
Criminal Justice
Orlando, FL


Hennings, Brandi
Psychology
Detroit, MI


Herring, Kim
Political Science
Lake Park, FL


Henry, Cynthia
English
Newark, NJ


Herring, Nichole
Business Administration
Hawthorne, FL


Herriott, William
Music Education
Miami, FL


. Hester, Regina
Elementary Education
Orlando, FL


Hewitt, Raymond
Mechanical Engineering
Pensacola, FL


Hicks, Linda
Nursing
Brooklyn, NY


Hill, Earl III
Business Administration
Milwaukee, WI


Grad. Seniors j 51
STUDENTS


Hayes, Allister
Agribusiness
St. Louis, MO






















Hills, Kimberly
Business Administration
Chicago Heights, IL


Hines, Keisha
Business Economics
Warrior, AL


Hines, Tarsha
Broadcast Journalism
Jacksonville, FL


Hobbs, W. Cecyl
Accounting
Tallahassee, FL


Hogen, Tammy
Social Work
Ft. Pierce, FL


Holloway, LaTonya
Health Information
Management
West Palm Beach, FL


Holmes, Krista
CIS
Chicago, IL


Holmes, Yulanda
Health Information
Management
Ft. Pierce, FL


Hopson, Mitchell
Business Administration
Grand Rapids, MI


Howard, Akima
Pharmacy
St. Thomas, VI


Howard. Terri
Mathematics
Los Angeles, CA


Hughes, Natarsha
Elementary Education
Hastings, FL


Howard, Treasa
Agriculture
Chicago, IL


Hughes. Terria
Elementary Education
Ft. Myers, FL


Hubert, LaTrice
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Humphrey, Stephanie
Electrical Engineering
Pittsburgh, PA


Hudson, William
Psychology
Jacob City, FL


Hunter, Sean
Business Economics
Orlando, FL


Hughes, Aquilina
Pharmacy
Perry, FL


Hunter, Tory
Actuary Science
Miami, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


52j






















Husband, Kenya
Business Economics
Lansing, MI


Jackson, Nimon
Business Economics
Jacksonville, FL


Jackson, Carmelia
Business Administration
Gainesville, FL


Jackson, Stephanie
Mathematics
Atlanta, GA


Jackson. Dawnita
Business Administration
Malone, FL


Jackson, Tameka
Elementary Education
Midway, FL


Jackson. Gary
Elementary Education
St. John, VI


Jackson, Wendy
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Jacksonville, FL


Jackson. Gerald
Elementary Education
Detroit, MI


James, Kateena
Health Information
Management
Gainesville, FL


James, Phaedra
Office Administration
Kendleton, TX


Jamison, Stephanie
Graphic Arts Technology
Chicago, IL


Jean, Attania
Biology
Lake City, FL


Jefferson, Jeannie
Health Information
Management
Tallahassee, FL

: ...i


Jenkins. Yavonkla
Broadcast Journalism
Detroit, MI


Jennings, Dametrice
Math/Actuarial Science
Atlanta, GA


Jervier, Gregory
Chemical Engineering
Avon Park, FL


Jervis, Patrice
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Jester, Jasen
Biology/Pre-Dentistry
Delray Beach, FL


Johnson, Amanda
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS






















Johnson, George
History
Wauchula, FL


Johnson, Kenya
Economics/Elementary
Education
Columbia, SC


Johnson, Gladys
Office Administration
Tallahassee, FL


Johnson, Pamela
Nursing
Miami, FL


Johnson, James
Business Economics
Orlando, FL


Johnson, Sabrina
Accounting
Hollywood, FL


Johnson, Joye
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Johnson, Sylvester
Chemistry Education
Taylorsville, MS


Johnson, Kelvin
Elementary Education
Belle Glade, FL


Jones, Amiri
Mechanical Engineering
Tallahassee, FL


Jones, Chassity
CIS
Rochester, NY


Jones, Christina
Sociology
Jacksonville, FL


Jones, Shawate
Office Administration
Jacksonville, FL


Jones, Shawanna
Animal Science
Pompano Beach, FL


Jones, Tangela
Psychology
Miami, FL


Jones, Waymond
Nursing
Miami, FL


Jordan, Tony
Psychology/Art
Education
Tallahassee, FL


Joseph, Patricia
Mathematical Science
Miami, FL


SI Grad, Seniors
STUDENTS


Jones, April
CI S
Memphis, TN


Justice, April
Education
Detroit, MI


YWW -.1






















Kaigler, Dana
Elementary Education
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Kaigler, Delphia
Elementary Education
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


James, Kelly III
Psychology
Palatka, FL


Kendall, Angela
Pharmacy
Marianna, FL


Keitt, Lonay
Elementary Education
Philadelphia, PA


Kennedy, Christopher
Physical Therapy
Palatka, FL


Khan, Rahman
Counselor Education
Washington, D.C.


Kinder, Dawn
Health Information
Management
Florence, SC


King, Doran
Public Relations
Oakland, CA


King. Lisa
Biology
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Kinney, Shelly
Psychology
Cleveland, OH


Kirby, Liegh
College Education
Jacksonville, FL


Knight, Katrina
Nursing
Jefferson County, FL


Koonie, Dustin
Criminal Justice
Tallahassee, FL


a J


Ill


Lamback, Deanna
CI S
Augusta, GA


Lane, Veronica
Business Economics
Clearwater, FL


Larson, Alexa
Nursing
Gulf Breeze, FL


Lawrence, Stacey
Pharmacy
Tallahassee, FL


Lawson, Kimberly
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Grad, Seniors 55
STUDENTS


Kenley, Keir
Accounting
Detroit, MI






















LeCounta, Tasha
Criminal Justice
Miami, FL


Lewis, Nikki
Journalism
Washington, D.C.


Little, Sheniqua
Business Administration
Detroit, MI


Long, Latasha
Accounting
Detroit, MI


Lee, Bakari
Business Administration
Plain Field, NJ


Lewis, Rana-Jamila
PrintManagement
Antigua, WI


Little, Vicki
Elementary Education
West Palm Beach, FL


Long, Travis
CIS
Daytona Beach, FL


Lee, Novik
Business Administration
Jacksonville, FL


Lewis, Stacia
Physical Therapy
Atlanta, GA


Livingston, Melissa
Social Work
Palmetto, FL


Lopez, Jennifer
Occupational Therapy
North Ft. Myers, FL


Lee, Russhlawn
Business Administration
Detroit, MI


Lindsey, Janice
Political Science
Hattiesburg, MS


Lockett, Notcha
Political Science
Thomasville, GA


Loveless, CaLana
Sociology
St. Louis, MO


Lewis, Amy
Health Care
Management
Tallahassee, FL


Little, Rufus Ill
Business Economics
Meridian, MS


Lomax, Kimalie
Criminal Justice/Political
Science
Miami, FL


Lovett, Malcolm
Broadcast Journalism
Tampa, FL


56 Grad Seniors
U/ STUDENTS























Lovings, Denese
Health Information
Management
Jacksonville, FL
i:,:. ,.-:. :.,),.., 5qi,


Malcolm, Glenford
Business Economics
Pembroke Pines, FL


Mathews, Antonio
Criminal Justice
Tallahassee, FL


McCants, Derrick
Business Economics
Mobile, AL


Lowery, Danielle
Accounting
Detroit, MI


Marsh, Kristal
Business Administration
Silver Springs, MD


May, Ericka
Accounting
Columbus, GA


McCartney, Traci
Political Science
Miami, FL


Lucas, Jacinta
CIS
Mobile, AL


Martin, Audrey
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Mayo, Shawn
Mechanical Engineering
New Haven, CT


McCaskill, Johnny Jr.
Business Economics
Tallahassee, FL


Mackey, Tonya
Office Administration
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Mason, Derinda
Business Economics
Atlanta, GA


Mays, Brenda
Political Science
Lake Helen, FL


McConnehead, Lord
Electrical Engineering
Daytona Beach, FL


Magee, Kimberly
Physical Therapy
Bellwood, IL


Mason, Robbyn
Accounting
Houston, TX


Mason, Robbyn
Accounting
Houston, TX


McDaniel, Tara
Occupational Therapy
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Grad. Seniors 57T
STUDENTS






















McGill, Shelandra
Accounting
Lafayette, IN


McGuire, Aquilla
Pharmacy
Alachua, FL


McKay, Arnold
Public Relations
Florida City, FL


McKee, Alison McMorris, Kimberly
Marketing Actuarial Science
Detroit, MI McComb, MS


Merritt, Monica
Broadcast Journalism
Comilla GA


Merrix, Roderick
Business Administration


Mickens, Stace6
CIS
Cleveland, OH


Mickle, Nicole
Business Economics
Orlando, FL


Middlebrooks, Earl
Mechanical Engineering
Boston, MA


Miles, J'Nai
Business Administration
Tampa, FL


Miles, Katasha
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Miller, Alfreda
Biology
Donalds, SC


Miller, Ayanna
Physical Therapy
Pompano Beach, FL


Miller, Karmon
Mechanical Engineering
Chicago, IL


Miller, Monica
Political Science
Orlando, FL


Miller, Winston
Electrical Engineering
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Millines, Fiona
Spanish
Boynton Beach, FL


Mingo, AnneMarie
Business Administration
Gainesville, FL


Mitchell, Apreal
Business Education
Atlanta, GA


58 Grad, Seniors
STUDENTS























Mitchell, Michelle
Psychology
Hollywood, FL


Moore, Allen Jr.
Agronomy
Jacksonville, FL


Mobley, Robin
Marketing
St. Petersburg, FL


Moore, Anthony
Electrical Engineering
Tampa, FL


Mobley, Tatia
Elementary Education
Tallahassee, FL


Moore, Carla
CIS
Athens, GA


Moise, Jacqueline
Broadcast Journalism
Miami, FL
















Moore, Darrick
Business Economics
Ocala, FL


Montgomery, Derek
Criminal Justice
Suffolk, VA


Moore, Denise
Elementary Education
Ocala, FL


.


Moore, Geneva
Office Administration
High Springs, FL


Moore, Rachel
CIS
Miami, FL


Mordica, Thelma
Business Economics
Tallahassee, FL


Moultrie, Nathaniel
English Education
Jacksonville, FL


Mumford, Kimberly
Chemistry, Pre-Medicine
Jacksonville, FL


Murphy, Kendna
Health Information
Management
Atlanta, GA


Murray, Joyce
Psychology
Richmond, VA


Murry, Eric
Psychology
Chicago, IL


Mynatt, KImberly
CIS
Atlanta, GA


Nelson, Angela
Electrical Engineering
Michigan City, IN


Grad, Seniors
STUDENTS


y59


9 1 'V


__






















Nelson, Robbie
Business Administration
Gainesville, FL


Nesbitt, LaKesia
Business Economics
St. Petersburg, FL


Newton, Valerie
Chemistry
Tampa, FL


Nichols, Cristal
Agricultural Science
Detroit, MI


Noble, Meko
Broadcast Journalism
Tallahassee, FL


Nolley, Shametria
Health Care
Management
Covington, GA


Norman, Kuwana
Accounting
Chicago, IL


O'Conner, Rona
Psychology
Ft. Lauderdale. FL


Paramora, Felicia
Office Administration
Tallahassee, FL


Parham, Valore
Nursing
Memphis, TN


Parker, Adrian
Health Care
Management
Miami, FL


Parker, Barry
Psychology
New York, NY


Parker, Daphne
Political Science
Heidelberg, MS


Parkers, Stephanie
Elementary Education
Milton, FL


Parson, Tim
Mechanical Engineering
Thomasville, GA


Parson, Yolanda
Political Science
Orlando, FL


Patino, Jesus
Electrical Engineering
Gualaca, Panama


Paul, Patrice
Elementary Education
Cleveland, OH


60 U Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Nickson, Kim
CIS
Tampa, FL


Parker, Lee
Accounting
Brooklyn, NY
























Peters. Tonya
Pharmacy
Thomasville, GA


Petty, Nelson
Civil Engineering
St. Thomas. VI


Philips, Dyelan
Civil Engineering
Palm Bay, FL


Phillips, Lizona
Business Administration
Champagne. IL


Pierce. Natalie
St. Petersburg, FL


Pimento, Cheria
Pharmacy
Tampa, FL


Pollard, Nichole


Pittman, Jennifer
Business Administration
West Point, MS


Pope, Evelyn
Broadcast Journalism
Graceville, FL


Pittman, Maria
Elementary Education
Jacksonville. FL


Porter, Kimberly
Business Administration
Maywood, IL


Pitts, Lechel
Print Journalism
Warner Robbins, GA


Porter, Rhonda
Mathematics
Cuthbert, GA


Powell, Sophia
Mathematics Education
Ft, Lauderdale, FL


Preciado, Felisa
Industrial Engineering
David, Panama


Presley, Debby
Chemistry/Pre-Medicine
Lake City, FL


Presley, Sharon
Elementary Education
Lake City, FL


Pressley, Akiwono
Theatre
Orlando, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Pigue, Kristy
Biology
Pensacola, FL


Powell, Robin
Journalism
Miami, FL


61






















Pressley, Lynnetta
Electrical Engineering
Jacksonville, FL


Price, Kelandra
Agribusiness
Palm Beach, FL


Ragins, Marianne
Business Administration
Macon, GA


Randall, Anika
Economics
Bronx, NY


Randall, Shalonda
Business Economics
Bradenton, FL


Rapack, Joel
Pharmacy
Apalachicola, FL


Rawls, DeVita
Mechanical Engineering
Lexington, SC


Redden, Gwendolyn
Physical Therapy
Charleston, SC


Redding, Jeffery
Choral Music Education
Orlando, FL


Reid, Adowa
Elementary Education
Decatur, GA


Richardson, Vinnette
Business Economics
Irvington, NJ


Reid, Dharvette
Elementary Education
St. Petersburg, FL


Ritchie, Marilyn
Health Care
Management
Brooklyn, NY


Rhodes, Adria
Pharmacy
Daytona Beach, FL


Ritola, Dianne
Occupational Therapy
Lake Worth, FL


Rhodes, Yanisse
Elementary Education
Inkster, MI


Rivera, Michael
History/Newspaper
Journalism
Pensacola, FL


Richardson, Johnnita
Nursing
Jacksonville, FL


Roberts, Gloria
Elementary Education
Monticello, FL


62 Grad. Seniors
\JI STUDENTS


Reed, Tonya
Psychology
Miami, FL


44*























Roberts, Robin
Political Science
Jacksonville, FL


Robinson, Rachel
Architecture
Chicago, IL


Ross, Robin
Mechanical Engineering
Orlando, FL


Robinson, Andrew
Business Administration
Kingston, Jamaica


Robinson, Shondel
Health Care
Management
Jacksonville, FL


Roundtree, Luciashia
Business Administration
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Robinson, Chandra
Business Economics
Plant City, FL


Rogers, Traci
Criminal Justice
Jacksonville, FL


Rouse, Patricia
English


Robinson, Cheryl
Business Economics
Racine, WI


Rogers, Yolanda
Psychology
St. Petersburg, FL


Rowe, Kendia
History
Birmingham, AL


Robinson, Phaylicia
Business Economics
Jacksonville, FL


Rolle, Ricardo
Health Care
Management
Nassau, Bahamas


Sanders, Nichelle
Political Science
West Palm Beach, FL


Sapp, Rhonda
Psychology
Ft. Myers, FL


Scarlett, Juan
Accounting
Daytona, FL


Scott, Farell
Mechanical Engineering
Valdosta, GA


Scott, Kacey
Sociology
Tallahassee, FL


Scott, Victor
Math Education
Orlando, FL


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


1 /63






















Scriven, Darryl
Mathematics/Philosophy
Jacksonville, FL


Silvers, Tameka
Social Work
Atlanta, GA


Simon, LaQusia
Health Care
Management
Jacksonville, FL


Scrivens, Jevin
Mechanical Engineering
Tampa, FL


Simmons, Audrey
Business Education
Tallahassee, FL


Simpson, Patricia
Criminal Justice
Atlanta, GA


Seabrooks, Lisa
Business Economics
Jacksonville, FL


Simmons, Kimberly
CIS
Quincy, FL


Sims, Karen
English Education
Miami, FL


Sears, Brent
Biology/Pre-Dentistry
Nassau, Bahamas


Simmons, Shawnda
Broadcast Journalism
Miami, FL


Singleton, Andrea
Bio ogy/Pre-Dentistry
Virginia Beach, VA


Sherman, Yameche
Political Science
Quincy, FL


Simmons, Tory
Business Economics
Dania, FL


Slater, Ayanna
Elementary Education
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Slater, Monique
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Smith, Calvin
Criminal Justice
Tallahassee, FL


Smith, Dewi
Psychology
Topeka, KS


Smith, Katherine
Business Administration
Tampa, FL


Smith, LaShawn
Business Economics
Daytona, FL


Grad, Seniors

STUDENTS


64k























Smith, Leonard
Music Education
Moncks Corner, SC


Smith, Tracey
Psychology
Sanford, FL


Smith, Walter
History/Education
Jacksonville, FL


Sneed, Desir6
Psychology
New Orleans, LA


Soloman, Katrina
CIS
St. Petersburg, FL


Soloman, Lenora
CIS
Pensacola. FL


Speed, Brenda
Business Education
Quincy, FL


Sprouse, Narsaunika
CIS
Greenville, MS


Stephens, Denna
Psychology
Orlando, FL


Stephens, Ingrid
Business Administration
Kansas City, MO


Stokes, Romero
English/Theatre
Atlanta, GA


Taylor, Danielle
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Summerford, Anthony
Public Relations
Melbourne, FL


Taylor, Nicole
Physical Therapy
Grand Rapids, MI


Summerville, Dakiti
Business Economics
Chicago, IL


Taylor, Tracey
Biology
Ft. Louderdale, FL


Sutton, Jerri
Public Relations
Chattanooga, TN


Thomas, Empish
Journalism
Dallas, TX


Grad. Seniors '\ / 65
STUDENTS


Sweeting, Niki
CIS
Miami, FL


Thomas, Erinn
Pre-Dentistry
Atlanta, GA





















Thomas, Kimberly
Elementary Education
Punta Gorda, FL


Thomas, Nona
Business Administration
Orlando, FL


Thomas, Shundrawn Thompkins, Eddie Jr.
Accounting Physical Education
Chicago, IL Starke, FL


Thompson, Jermaine
Criminal Justice
White Plains, NY


A


Thompson, Joyce
Physical Therapy
Jacksonville, FL


Vaden, Karen
Graphic Design
Los Angeles, CA


Walker, Kimberly
Mechanical Engineering
Dallas, TX


Thompson, Lisa
Elementary Education
Ocala, FL


Vance, Sylvia
Chemical Engineering
Atlanta, GA


Walker, Shere6
Cl S
Atlanta, GA


Tillman, Tonya
Public Relations
Palm Bay, FL


Vann, Oby
Elementary Education
Madison, FL















Walker, Valencia
Biology/Pre-Medicine
Columbus, GA


Tolbert, Karen
Business Economics
Chicago, IL


Walker, Andrea
Criminal Justice
Tallahassee, FL


Walker, Ykisha
Elementary Education
Ft. Lauderdale, FL


Tucker, Tanji
Elementary Education
Los Angeles, CA


Walker, Cicely
Psychology
Sylvester, GA


Waller, Daniel
Construction
Engineering
Rochester, NY


66 U Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


0&!-r --'-A 6 & T-"' o'























Walson, Mari
Physical Therapy
Atlanta, GA


Ward, Leslie
Health Care
Management
St. Louis, MO


Walton, Yvette
Business Administration
Detroit, MI


Ward, Marie
Health Information
Management
Woodbridge, NJ


Waltower, Tamara
Business Economics
Brockton, MA


Ware, Melanie
Business Economics


Wanga, Sheneida
Business Administration
Curacao Netherlands
Antilles


Warner, Lamar
Electrical Engineering
Orlando, FL


Ward, Ayanna
Accou-iting
Detroit, MI


Washington, Alma
Elementary Education
Orlando, FL


Washington, Angela
Pharmacy
Chicago, IL


Washington, Drucilla


Washington, Johnnie
Business Education
Pensacola, FL


Waterman, Jermaine
Business Economics
Chicago, IL


Waymon, Tarolyn
Office Administration
Gainesville, FL


West, Angel
Social Work
Miami, FL


West, Damien
English
New Orleans, LA


Weston, Kim
Political Science
Kissemmee, FL


White, Angela
Social Work
Cottondale, FL


Grad. Seniors 67I
STUDENTS 67
STUDENTS


Watts, Lona
Business
Ft. Myers, FL























White, LaTamia
Biology
Wauchula, FL


White, SaKeisha
Chemistry/Pre-Medicine
Orangeburg, SC


White, Sean
Political Science
Orlando, FL


Whitehead, Sharmeen
Elementary Education
Miami, FL


Whites, Sherman
Mechanical Engineering
Deland, FL


Whitten, Julia
Health Care
Management
Jacksonville, FL


Wider, Johnnetta
Nursing
Jacksonville, FL


Wilder, Shawanna
Nursing
Lynn Haven, FL


Williams, Aares
Social Work
Jacksonville, FL


Williams, Audrey
Biology
Atlanta, GA


Williams, Janiece
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Williams, CaSonia
Office Administration
Live Oak, FL


Williams, Kevin
Criminal Justice
Atlanta, GA


Williams, Deidra
Elementary Education
Deland, FL


Williams, LaShawn
Business Economics
Orange Park, FL


Williams, Donald
Architecture
Bronx, NY


Williams, Leonard
Business Economics
Brandenton, FL


Williams, Felicia
Psychology
Miami, FL


Williams, Lucretia


683 U Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


Williams, April
Nursing
Jacksonville























Williams, Natasha
Criminal Justice
St. Croix, VI


Williams, Penny
Psychology
Winter Garden, FL


Williams, Nikki
Business Economics
Jacksonville, FL


Williams, Reginald
Business Administration
Chicago, IL


Williams, Nina
Economics
Chicago, IL


Williams, Pamela
Business Education
Wewahitchka, FL


Williams, Robin Williams, Sharon
Accounting Psychology/Social Work
Ft. Lauderdale, FL Springfield, VA


Williams, Paul
Business Administration
Indianapolis. IN


Williams, Tajuana
Criminal Justice
Orlando, FL


Williams, Tanisha Williams, Thomas
Pharmacy Biology
Daytona Beach, FL Rockville, MD


Willingham, Seandrika
Pre-Medicine
Atlanta, GA


Wilson, Daryl
CIS
Roswell, GA


Williams, Trinetta
English
Tampa, FL


Wilson, David
English
Chicago, IL


Williams, Tunji
Broadcast Journalism
Miami, FL


Wilson, Jerome
Business Administration
Atlanta, GA


Williams, Villssa
Psychology
Malone. FL


Wilson, Melissa
Sociology
Tallahassee, FL


Grad. Seniors 69

STUDENTS





















Wilson, Nathaniel
Electrical Engineering
Miami, FL


Woodard, Odestaphan
Actuarial Science
Winter Haven, FL


Wilson, Orlan
Accounting
Washington, DC
i: : :, -


Worthy, Phalice
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Wilson, Stephanie
Public Management
Jacksonville, FL


Wright, Camille
Elementary Education
New Milford, NJ


Winfrey, Darrell
Electrical Engineering
Houston, TX


Wright, Mary
Elementary Education
Jacksonville, FL


Wise, Stephanie
Chemistry/Pre-Medicine
Summerville, SC


Yearby, Tanisha
Business Economics
Miami, FL


AII
Ft


Young, Kelly
Occupational Therapy
Dade City, FL


Youngblood, Vivian
Accounting
Stanford, FL


Zeno, Monica
Business Administration
New Orleans, LA


Saying Goodbye

Jevin Scrivens, a Mechanical
Engineering major from Tampa,
Florida, found out just how hard
it was to say goodbye when
the time for graduation quickly
approached. He will cherish
the friendships that have grown since freshman year
and the special bond he formed with his fraternity
brothers of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.






70 Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS





























Some prospective FAMU
graduates began to get
"senioritis" during the middle
part of the spring semester.


Mcvine On


Oliver Gilbert, stops at
a campus advertising
booth for the last
time.


Grad. Seniors
STUDENTS


S71
















Adams, Angela
Junior


Adkins, Pamela Ali, Haziq
Freshman Sophomore


Alston, Tonya Adoff, Amankwaa
Junior


F* 77-
L/S ^&-


Anderson, Quanesha
Sophomore


Barnes, Kenya
Freshman


Anderson, Theresa
Senior


Bashir, Natasha
Junior


Ashwood, Cheri


Battle, Charissa
Freshman


Baker, Rhodeo
Freshman


Belcher, Armand
Sophomore


Balidawa, Jacqueline
Sophomore


Bellamy, Melissa
Junior


Berry, Lashaundra
Sophomore


Berry, Wendell
Freshman


Binnie, Nicole
Freshman


Black, Jametta
Freshman


I7


Bledsoe, Angela
Junior


Bond, Julian
Sophomore


Bonner, Darren
Junior


Undergraduates
STUDENTS


71


Bellard, Jomo
Freshman


Blake, Sandra


Blanks, Ellhu
Freshman


72


i

















Booker, Millicent
Sophomore


Bootle, Latoya
Freshman


Boston, Karimah Bowles, Felicia
Sophomore Senior


Bozeman, Robert
Senior


Bradley, Tameka
Sophomore


w.-


Brantley, Eric
Junior


Brantley, Geanee
Freshman


Brimage, Regina
Junior


Brinson, Latisha
Freshman


Briscoe, Jill-Nicole
Senior


Brooks, Angel
Junior


Brown, Carlos
Junior


Brown, Jon
Junior


Brown, Kenneth
Junior


Brown, Victoria
Freshman


Burns, Joseph Jr
Junior


Browne, Lorraine
Sophomore


Burns, Toya
Sophomore


Broxey, Felicia
Junior


Campbell, Kendall
Junior


Brynson, Bryant
Freshman














Cannon, Leigh
Freshman


Buggs, Harrelun
Sophomore


-~,'


Carrol, Joe
Freshman


Undergraduates 73
STUDENTS


I- I


~gu








b;n-J j -1














*~


Carrol, Timicka
Junior


Carter, Jason
Senior


Champion, Daryl Champion, Dionne
Senior Freshman


Chapman, Monique
Senior


Claire, Aisha
Freshman


Clark, Carol
Sophomore


Clarke, Leslie
Senior


Clayton, Nekia
Sophomore


Cleveland, Elena
Junior


Coates, Dennis
Sophomore


Cobaris, Bryan
Sophomore


Coleman, Bettina
Freshman


Coleman, Alexia
Sophomore


Collins, Delicia
Junior


Colvin, Kenya
Freshman


Cooper, Wendy
Sophomore


A


Cornish, LaShaundra
Freshman


Crawford, Jakae
Freshman


Crump, Raymond
Junior


Curry, Mannietea
Sophomore


Davis, Nicole
Freshman


Davis, Patrice
Sophomore


Davis, Shiwana
Junior


Undergraduates
STUDENTS


Chapman,
Christopher
Senior


74


,i


"




lilr: "D


p"i
W1P1

















Dobbins, Diane
Junior


Donald, Angela Dore, Marrin
Senior Junior


Drafton, Damian
Sophomore


a'


Dukes, Dion Dunn, Angela
Junior Sophomore


Eatmon, Kevin
Sophomore


Edmonds, Kim
Senior


Edmonds, Wakeen
Senior


Ellsworth, Preston
Freshman


Evans, Brandi
Freshman


Farmer, Jennifer
Sophomore


Farmer, Paula
Senior


Farrington, Paul
Junior


Fedd, Ronald
Junior


Finch, Terrell
Freshman


Fisher, Latasha
Freshman


Fleming, Shaun
Senior


Franklin, Tameika
Junior


Franklin, Tanika
Sophomore


Frazler, Antonio
Junior


Freeman, Erickrica
Freshman


Undergraduates 75
STUDENTS


Davis, Valesia
Sophomore


Forna, Fatu
Junior


Flanagan
Sherwanna
Senior


Iw:P"-
:' ,'A


II

















Freeman, Lorenzo
Junior


Gilcrest, Chineta
Senior


-jt '




Cft
AL





i/^ i/ ,. **


Freeman, Marcus
Junior


Glascow, Drexel
Sophomore


Fuller, Donji
Freshman


Grant, Nicole
Senior


Gainer, Ben
Senior


Gray, Little
Freshman


Galloway, Adrian
Junior


Green, Crystal
Sophomore


Greene, Tamara
Junior


Griffith, Stephanie
Junior


Gullett, Natasha
Junior


Hadley, EI'Tanya
Freshman


Hardy, Donnell
Freshman


Harris, Omar
Sophomore


Harrison, Indi
Senior


.,."- ..

Harvey, Michael
Junior


,o 0P

I fj^


Hawthorne, LaPortia
Sophomore


Hemsley, Harrisford
Sophomore


Henry, Nadine
Sophomore


Hill, Tony
Freshman


Hinton, Jerry Jr.
Senior


Hitchman, Desirae
Freshman


.Undergraduates
STUDENTS


Hall, Crystal
Sophomore


76 U


' '*'^.


-; I i
:9r


R7

















Home, Garrett
Senior


Hughes, Cicely
Sophomore


Jackson, Arlena
Freshman


Jenkins, Eric
Senior


Hudley, Randolph
Sophomore


Jackson, Boris
Freshman


Jewell, Roderica
Freshman


Houston, Rashada














Hudson, LaKisha
Freshman


Jackson, Malcolm
Freshman







V


Johnson. Aesha


Howell, LeAmber Huggins, Michelle
Freshman Sophomore


Hunter, Rhonda
Junior


Jackson, Regina
Freshman


Johnson, Anthony
Sophomore


Ireland, Camille
Freshman




./'
) ..


James, Jimmy
Freshman


Johnson, Crystal
Freshman


Johnson, Eric II
Senior


Johnson, Jia
Freshman


Johnson, LaKeisha
Freshman


Johnson, La'Torri
Freshman


Johnson, Natasha
Sophomore


Undergraduates 77
STUDENTS J


Hood, Carla
Junior


, ww-.a















.4"

Jones, Carucha
Senior


Jones, Christopher
Junior


Jones, Felicia Jones, Jabari
Sophomore Sophomore


Kelly, Douglass
Junior


Kemp, Kemberlee
Senior


Rentz, Makeba
Junior


Kilpatrick, Bernice
Sophomore


Lee, Donald
Freshman


King, Mia
Sophomore




W.C~jF


Lee, Michael
Freshman


Kinnon, Alfreda
Senior


Lennard, John
Sophomore


Lawrence, Natachia
Freshman


Leonard, Deldrick
Freshman


Levy, Lancelot
Junior


Little, Lakita
Sophomore


Lewis, Mary
Freshman


t Li


Madison, Ebony
Junior


Lovely, Gina
Freshman


Johnson, Teri
Freshman


r


I'


Jones, Jamila
Freshman


Kaigler, Dana
Senior


Khatib, Elijah
Senior


Lawson, Joy
Sophomore


- IK


* 1 2 .


Y
















Manns, Cynthia Martin, Courtney
Freshman Freshman


McineIsa




V I


McKinney, Isaac
Junior













Mhotep, Hanna
Senior


Massey, Kyra Mason, Akil
Senior Freshman


McDaniel, Kelvin
Sophomore


Meeks, Wanda
Junior


McGhee, Kimberly
Sophomore


Meuse, LaNovia
Sophomore


McRogerson, D,
Maurice
Junior


Michael, George
Sophomore

ggyS tf


Meeks, Kali
Freshman


Millender, Pam
Sophomore


Miles, LaTonya
Freshman


Mitchell, Lynita
Sophomore


Mitchell, Sonya
Freshman


Morgan, Shamita
Sophomore


Morris, Erica
Freshman


Morrison, Kamisha
Freshman


Moore, Sherellia
Junior


Undergraduates
STUDENTS


Manderville, Neosha
Freshman


Miller, Mitzi
Sophomore


Moore, Diane
Senior


Moore, Kathy
Junior


r 79


'i


I
.I:Ji
















Morson-Matra,
Yanique
Freshman


Murray, Anika
Sophomore


Neal, Tiffany
Junior


Newkirk, Selisa Nickerson, Kamau
Freshman Sophomore


tIl~~


Norwood, Melma
Senior


Parker, Kia Parker, Larry
Freshman Sophomore


Pittman, Joy
Freshman


Packard, Virginia
Freshman


Payton, Geoffrey
Junior


Pitts. Raheem
Junior


Packer, William
Senior


Peterson, Tameka
Freshman


Polk, Artisha
Junior


Parker, Jefferson
Junior


Phillips, Latacha
Senior












Powell, Ryan
Sophomore


Iki


President, Charles
Freshman


Preston, Coriey


Price, Terri
Sophomore


Pugh, Kemberlee
Freshman


o80 Undergraduates
LJ STUDENTS


Norris, Etosha
Junior


pg


Pinnock, Nell
Senior


Ray, Aurelia
Junior

















Reid, Cheron
Freshman


Reddick, Jermaine
Freshman


-~ w ~


Reed, Earnest Jr.
Freshman


Richardson, Thais
Junior


Riley, Viva
Senior


Robert Jjuuko
Senior


Robinson, William Ill
Senior










,,- --- /


Sellman, Jacqueline
Freshman


Rogers, Rashelle
Junior


Seymour, Amir
Junior


Roberts, Pamela
Sophomore


Royster, Ayana
Senior


Shervington,
Leighanne
Freshman


Robinson, Alana
Senior


Sargent, Larry
Senior


Simmons,-' TeAk


Simmons, Te'Anka
Freshman




0g^


Robinson, Nakia
Freshman


Savariau, Kimberly
Freshman


Singleton, Tiffani
Freshman


Smith, Charles
Freshman


Smith, Erica
Junior


Smith, LaShant6
Junior


Spears, Kwame
Senior


Undergraduates
STUDENTS


Rigby, Greg
Senior


Speights, Fred


u81


.- .*-

















Stafford, Anika
Sophomore


Stewart, Tamika
Sophomore


Sweeting, Christopher
Junior


Talley, Anastasia
Freshman


Tate, H. Granville III
Sophomore


Teate, Javelle
Sophomore


Thomas, Ceretha
Sophomore


Thomas, LaTonya
Junior


".
'i'
r
I


Thompson, LaToya
Sophomore


Triplett, Gregory
Senior


Tolliver, Paul
Freshman


Turner, Katrina
Freshman


Townsend, Andrea
Freshman


Tyus, Traci
Senior


, "'
r"'J


Townsend, Rhonda
Junior




vrnl


Underwood, LaKesha
Freshman


Travis, Sharrone


Travis, Sharrone
Junior












Vance, Cicely
Junior


Vanterpool, Lester
Sophomore


Walker, Levly
Junior


Walker, Nakesha
Freshman


Walker, Sonya
Junior


Walton, Dawnie
Freshman


Undergraduates
STUDENTS


Spiva, Pietro
Senior


Thomas, Lori
Sophomore


82 U


,i .rd. 1$-
I .r.
se


















Warren, Melodue
Senior


Warwell, Marcus Washington, John
Junior Freshman


Washington, Takeshia


Waters, Chato
Freshman


Weatherspoon,
Vanessa
Junior


Wells, Diedra Wells, Tara
Sophomore Freshman


Welmaker, Ryan
Freshman


1r 4


Whitfield, Kara
Sophomore


Whittley, Terrell
Senior


Williams, Javacia
Sophomore


Williams, Sheila
Freshman


Wooten, Benjamin


Williams, Tonya
Junior














Wright, Dametria
Sophomore


Wilson, Joya
Junior


Yancy, Jamila
Senior


Wilson, Velencia
Junior


Winfrey, Melanie
Junior


Young, Suzette
Freshman


Undergraduates 83
STUDENTS


West, Cedric
Junior


Williams, Keith
Sophomore


Williams, Lisa
Freshman


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As a tradition on the FA-
MU campus, the fall Presi-
dent's Convocation served
as an assembly that further
introduced freshmen to
FAMU while reacquainting
upperclassmen with "the
hill". Students, professors
and faculty were afforded
the opportunity to re-
flect on the past
while concentrat-
ing and pre-
paring for the
challenges of the
coming year.
This year's convoca-
tion celebrated the goals
of all FAMUans as admin-
istrators and professors
alike proudly marched into
the gym accompanied by
the University Symphonic
Band. An enthusiastic wel-
come was given by SGA
President Larry Tate, who


FAMUstudents listen attentively as
Dr. Humphries gives a challenge
to the student body.


86 President's Convocation
SPECIAL EVENTS


urged the student body to
remember their duties as
good stu- dents
while tak- i n g
the up- per


hand in their
destiny.
The program went on to
introduce new cam-


Dr. Frederick S. Humphries, the
eighth president of FAMU en-
courages students to keep the tra-
dition ofHBCU's alive.


pus personalities, includ-
ing Apreal Mitchell, Miss
FAMU, Dr. Hogg, Vice
President for Student Af-
fairs, and Billy Joe, the
University's enthusiastic
new football coach. Before
closing with the Univer-
sity's Alma Matter,
President Hum-
phries gave an
enlightening
reflection
S on the ori-
gin, history,
contributions
and roles that His-
[orically Black Col-
leges and Universities
have played in educating
Africa n-American students.
The President's Convoca-
tion of 1994 definitely put
the upcoming year in per-
spective.


President's Convocation
SPECIAL EVENTS


W "Continue the legacy of the
co- ntributions and roles historically
black colleges and universities have
played in educating African-American stu-
dents."
Dr. Frederick S. Humphries

President's Convocation 87
SPECIAL EVENTS


President's



Convocation







Samuel Adams, a drummer and
African Folk Tale griot performs
with one of the many cultural
acts on program.


Ben Chavis made FAMU his first
public appearance after his ex-
pulsion from the NAACP.

Nyesha Cook and Larry Tait look
at the fanfare that welcomes the
new team to the leadership of
Student government.


Ber

Last year, after much
controversy and debate,
Larry Tait and Nyesha
Cook were elected Presi-
dent and Vice-President of
FAMU's Student Govern-
ment Association. Their
student support and school
spirit was rekindled during
the 1994 SGA Inaugural
ceremony. Symbolic of
Larry Tait's own te-
nacity was the ev-
ent's keynote
speaker, Mr.
Benjamin
Chavis, former
Executive Direc-
tor of the National
Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored
People (NAACP).
In his first public appear-
ance since his dismissal
from the NAACP, Mr. Chav-
is said to Black students,
"All of the chains (of slav-


ery) have not been re-
moved ... the remaining
chains that are left, we our-
selves must take off."
Reflecting on African tra-
dition, the Presi-
dent and Vice-
PrLe- sident
en-


ter-
ed t h e
Gra- nd Ba!l-
r o o m with a pro-
cessional of drummers
and an entourage in Afri-


can garb. Before continu-
ing ritual, the event's host-
ess asked the permission of
the audience's eldest mem-
ber to proceed with the
ceremony. With her bless-
ing, FAMU's Kuumba
Dance Ensemble per-
formed an upbeat African
dance which received a
standing ovation.
After libation was
poured, Nyesha Cook,
Vice President, gave
an inspirational
speech, fol-
lowed by Larry
Tait, who encour-
aged students to "estab-
lish a model for the future
of human kind." The event
ended with another African
Dance that encouraged au-
dience participation and
was followed by an open
reception.


Vo "' Establish
1i t- the future
kind."


Larry Tait


88 Ben Chavis
CDV-TAT AlTVTaTTC


During Ben Chavis' speech, a FA-
MU student writes down a ques-
tion he intends to ask during the
question and answer period.


Ben Chavis 89
SPECIAL EVENTS


Chavis






An Allied Health student smiles
for the camera during a break in
the flow of students going
through the health fair.


Mind, Body & 9oul


Health Fair '94, entitled
"Mind, Body and Soul",
was held on September 19,
1994. The major objective
of the event, which was
sponsored by Student Ac-
tivities, was to increase
the level of knowledge
and health con-
sciousness of the
students at FA-
MU. Contra-
ceptives
were
freely dis-
tributed,
emphasizing
the importance of
living responsibly,
and many organizations
in and around Tallahassee
and Florida A & M Univer-
sity came with messages of
healthy living and general
well being.
Blood pressure checks


were given to help stu-
dents become more aware
of the threats of heart dis-
ease, even at an ear-
ly age, and
health foods
were
provid-
e d


b
local
retailers
to educate
FAMUans
about the advantages
of eating the right foods
and maintaining a bal-


anced diet. Other associa-
tions such as The Leon
County Health Depart-
ment, FAMU Student
Health Services and vari-
ous sororities were present
with helpful information
covering a wide range of
topics.
Chimeka Foster, a junior
journalism major and mem-
ber of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority, Inc. com-
mented, "I think that
the Health Fair is a
wonderful way to get the
school year started and
moving in a positive direc-
tion. Taking a proactive ap-
proach to problems that
plague our community is
one way of insuring that
the level of awareness will
be heightened."


A Winn-Dixie Pharmacy employ-
ee listens as a FAMU student de-
scribes the side effects she had as
a result of taking a prescribed an-
tibiotic.

0 Health Fair
SPECIAL EVENTS


.K.-


2- r
-.

i

'T~Y~dLPlliS ~9
"diu.trilivi i

ce~V~ai


I --U -


"In order to maintain a bal-
S /.a anced diet, make sure you
have the right combinations of vi-
tamins and minerals."
Wal-Mart Pharmacy Volunteer



Health Fair 91
SPECIAL EVENTS


11







Diana Gowins, a senior Nursing
major from Ft. Lauderdale, Flor-
ida, regularly buys jewelry from
FAMU vendors.


Fall Extravaganza


One of the first annual
activities sponsored by the
office of Student Activities
was the Annual Fall Extrav-
aganza. The purpose of the
event was to give student
organizations an opportu-
nity to introduce them-
selves to the student body.
unfortunately, this year's
extravaganza had a
tough break trying to
reach it's full po-
tential. Pouring
rains washed
away pass-
ers by on one
occasion, but it
didn't wash away the
spirit of student interest.
The extravaganza n-as a
success on it's second at-
tempt.
Members of Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity incorporat-
ed were on the wheels of
steel, and local merchants
sold tapes, jewelry, and


fine handbags. Members of
the Carribean Student As-
sociation sold jerk chicken
and rice and peas, adding
some cul- tural flavor to
t h e event. Oth-
e rpartici-
pat-
-i


Sn g
or- gan 1i-
z a tons
were F A M U
Campus Ministry,
Christian Students, Boy's of
Poison, and the Brain Bowl


Team.
Christian Students Vice-
President, Sean Isaac
(pharmacy Jacksonville)
said his organization at-
tended to expand their
membership and be of bet-
ter service to the Universi-
ty. They also wanted to
alert students to their Bible
Studies and group activi-
ties. Isaac states, "We'll
do whatever it takes
to encourage the
Student body to
have a strong re-
lationship with
God."
The Fall Extravaganza
was definitely a success in
presenting the other side of
Florida A & M University;
the diversity it offers in stu-
dents' lives and interests.

Anika Stafford


'V "Fall Extravaganza is a
1 W^ success because it brought
together FAMU and the
Tallahassee community by
inviting local vendors."
James Cole

92 Fall Extravaganza
9 SPECIAL EVENTS


On one of it's most successful
dates, the event was moved to
"the set".


Fall Extravaganza 93
SPECIAL EVENTS U





Dr. Dana Dennard, a Professor
in the Psychology department,
poors liabation to honor our Af-
rican ancestors during the cele-
bration.


On Friday, December 9,
1994, the Student Alliance
for Cultural Development,
Psychology Club, and Psi
Chi Honor Society spon-
sored the annual campus-
wide celebration of Kwan-
zaa. The celebration,
which was held in the
Grand Ballroom, al-
so incorporated
the New Be-
ginnings
Day Care Cen-
ter.
Kwanzaa, which
means the "first fruits"
is celebrated December
26th through January 1st.
The African-American hol-
iday was created by Malu-
lani Karenga in 1966. Kar-
enga created the holiday so
African Americans could


have a holiday uniquely for
themselves. Kwanzaa is
based upon
seven Swahi-
1 i prin-


ples. These
are
Umoja unity, Kuji-
chaculia self determi-


nation, Ujamaa coop-
erative economics, Ujima
- collective work and re-
sponsibility, Kuumba -
creativity, Nia purpose,
and Imani faith.
The organizations cele-
brated Kwanzaa with po-
etry readings, songs,
recitations and tra-
ditional African
Dances. The
festivities
were only one
night on campus,
however, due to
time constraints. FA-
MU's Kwanzaa provided
the student body with an
informative as well as en-
tertaining production.
Diane Moore


Anedra Nanabuluka and her
son, Adjoni, are among the
many participants of the 15th
annual Kwanzaa celebration.
Stephanie Fearon and Diane
Moore pose by the symbols of
Kwanzaa after giving presenta-
tions on the meaning of Kwan-
zaa.


The children of New Beginnings
Day Care Center dance and sing
"Funga Alafia" for the audience.

94 Kwanzaa
SPECIAL EVENTS


Kawnzaa 95
SPECIAL EVENTS


Celebrating





Kwanzaa


I I




Vanessa Weatherspoon, a can-
didate for Senior Attendant, ex-
plains to Cedric Mobley why she
is most qualifiedfor the position
she is seeking.


90A Elections


*111;


"I feel I can best represent my class-
mates in the senate because I can
give them what they want instead of
what I think they want ... I'm more
in touch with the students."
Terrence Murray


96 Elections
S STUDENT LIFE


Somehow, among all of
the flyers, food, promises
and confusion, there really
was an election going on.
SGA Elections for the 1995-
96 school year officially
took off at 7:00 a.m. on
March 6, 1995. By the time
FAMUans began to arrive
on campus, the set was
already covered up
with colorful
posters and
banners.
There were
several groups of
candidates seeking
votes with cheerful smiles
and flyers. Positions which
all students voted for were
Miss FAMU, King and
Queen of Orange & Green
and SGA President and Vi-
ce-President. Each class al-
so voted for a class atten-
dant to Miss FAMU.
The March elections be-
came an unusual challenge
for the Electoral Commis-


sion. This year, they imple-
mented a new program
which allowed
students t o
vote atA a


pre-
cinct
within \r their
school or college.
This service was de-
signed to offer conven-
ience, boost voter turnout
and decrease the traffic in
the Grand Ballroom.


Although the program
was implemented with
good intentions, controver-
sy emerged. The Sturrup-
Farrington presidential
ticket and Rhonda Town-
send, a candidate for Miss
FAMU agreed that the
elections were con-
ducted improperly
and felt that this
resulted in
their de-
feat. The
case was tak-
en to the student
Supreme Court, but
the court decided that
the elections were fair
and the results would
stand. The discrepancies
did result in the re-election
of attendants and junior
senators.
Arlisa Flagg


One of the many colorful campaign banners that adorned the set during the week of elections.


Elections
STUDENT LIFE


97







The men ofAlpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity, Inc. step at promotional
activitiesfor the opening of Rob
Hardy's "Chocolate City"


Chocolate City


On Thursday, Septem-
ber 8, 1994, FAMU took on
a Nation-wide identity as
the famed "Chocolate
City." The University' cam-
pus became home for
"Darren" and "Chermaine"
in the fictitious yet real-
istic world of college
life in the black tie de-
but of "Chocolate
City."
"Chocolate
City," a film
written and di-
rected by Rob Hardy
(junior, Philadelphia,
PA) was produced by
Rainforest Productions, a
student owned and oper-
ated video company. Set
on FAMU's campus, the
movie depicted activities
that define Black college
life, focusing on issues
such as academics, rela-


tionships and sexuality.
When the movie premi-
ered in early fall, its
opening cere-
monies


spanned an
entire week and in-
cluded many of the same
activities featured in the


movie. "Chocolate City
Week" ended with the
movie debut, which was a
formal affair by invitation
only.
A student project,
"Chocolate City" experi-
enced serious budget
problems at the onset
of filming, but after
a large campaign
lobbying sup-
port form
communi-
ty and Nation-
wide businesses
and individuals, the
producers were able
to increase the budget by
50%. Some of the Choco-
late City supporters were
BET (Black Entertainment
TV), Fashion Fair Cosmet-
ics, and the Public Broad-
casting Company.


"Chocolate City" cast members
and staffpose with the FAMU Cin-
ema advisor, Ms. Vivian Hobbs.


98 Chocolate City
SPECIAL EVENTS


F "Chocolate City" is the re-
Ssuit of much hard work and
San undying commitment from
an extremely dedicated group of
individ-uals."
William Packard


Chocolate City 99
SPECIAL EVENTS W_


__I















































































100 'l Chocolate City
SPECIAL EVENTS


)i
..!
a, ^^^ H

,.. .




'^ ..:


d
c
,,,
1
P ';- C~
, 6


Chocolate City
SPECIAL EVENTS


Q 101


'' r':
IC .-L






Jermaine Waterman, a senior
from Chicago, IL, helps himself to
a cold drink.


Be Out


Day 3


On April 15, 1995, Flori-
da A & M University's stu-
dent body leaders spon-
sored the third annual Be
Out Day festival on FAMU's
Intramural field. The event
brought in a crowd of
3500+ students, locals,
and out-of-town visitors
to join in on the fun of
"Be Out Day '95."
Everyone en-
joyed the free
food, enter-
tainment, and the
comfort of a vio-
lence-free crowd.
The day started off hec-
tic with over 100 volun-
teers in the heat preparing
for the crowd and antici-
pating attitudes they would
encounter during the day.
Ribs, chicken, hot dogs,
hamburgers, and Louisiana
shrimp were all cooked to
perfection the night before,
while popcorn, cotton can-
dy, and snow cones made


the festival worthwhile to
students because every-
thing was "free."
The par- ticipa-


tion c


to go down, the crowd also
started to part, and all that
was left was a field full of
empty boxes, soda bottles,
cups, plates, napkins, and
100 volunteers drained and
tired from the sun. "Be Out
Day '95" was another
successful event "by
the students, for the
students." In
closing, the
Student
Body dedi-
cated "Be Out
Day III" in Lov-
ing Memory of
Tamika Stewart.
Terrell Middleton


Greek Or-
ganiza- tions
showed their
dedication to unity be-
tween themselves and for
the entire student body.
Once the food became
scarce and the sun began


FAMU Rattlers enjoy a day with
family and friends, alike.


"I really appreciate SGA
sponsoring "Be Out Day"
for the campus. It just
brings us closer together."
Christopher Lynch


Be Out Day
SPECIAL EVENTS


Be Out Day
SPECIAL EVENTS


\ 103


of





Dr. Frederick Humphries deliv-
ers his traditional FAMURattler
charge during convocation.


Homecoming


Convocation


FAMU Cheerleader


104 Homecoming Convocation
\ SPECIAL EVENTS


Homecoming Convocation 105
SPECIAL EVENTS






One of FAMU's biggest talents,
"The Ladies Men" performed at
the annual Homecoming Fash-
ion Show. They were favorite of
the audience.


Tradition in Fashion


The annual Homecom-
ing Fashion show was def-
initely in sync with the
homecoming theme of
"Reliving the Tradition."
Djena Graves, Mistress of
Ceremonies, was accom-
panied by Master of Cere-
monies, William Packard,
who was no stranger to
tradition in his 70's
style bell-bottoms,
fly collar shirt
and afro wig.
The show
began with a
slide presentation
of African styles and
the showing of the music
video "Chocolate City."
The opening scene includ-
ed Miss FAMU 1994-95
Apreal Mitchell and her
court, who modeled FAMU
apparel. Representatives
from various Greek let-
tered organizations sported
current paraphernalia. Also


featured in this year's
Homecoming Fashion
Show was lingerie,
business wear,
a n d A


winter W
and formal
attire. Appear-
ances were made by both
Epicurean Fashion Experi-


ence and Images Modeling
Troupe. The chairperson of
the Homecoming Fashion
Show, Lynette Paul, had
her own interpretation of
the Homecoming theme..
S"if you want to know your
future, look to the past, to
those who have paved
the roads which you
now travel. Edu-
cate yourself
culturally and
Spiritually.
Relive the
tradition of
Unity, Peace,
and Love."
The Homecoming
Fashion Show, pro-
duced annually by Ms. Ly-
nette Paul was indeed as
successful, entertaining
and intriguing as it has al-
ways been!
Arlisa Flagg


Djena Graves and William Pack-
ard hosted the fashion show,
which was full of "love, peace,
and soul."


Homecomoming Fashion Show
106 SPECIAL EVENTS


Lynette Paul
Chair Homecoming Fashion Show


Homecoming Fashion Show 107
SPECIAL EVENTS








Robyn Bussey, a freshman from
Waycross, GA, models her Rattler
pride during homecoming week.


Homecoming '94


Deya Smith, Miss Black USA
1994, addresses Miss FAMU and
her court, along with represen-
tatives from each of the clubs
and organizations.

Tajua Williams andJeron Wim-
berly enjoy a Homecoming BBQ
plate during a quick break be-
tween classes.


"Playing the flute in the
symphonic band gives me
great pleasure."
Jewel Marable,
Principal Flute


108 \V Homecoming
SPECIAL EVENTS


Defining "homecoming"
with a dictionary may be
easy, but, trying to explain
Homecoming '94 at FAMU
was a difficult task.
As Homecoming ap-
proached, Rattler pride and
spirit heightened as the tra-
ditional orange, green
and white streamers
decorated the canm-
pus. This year's
homecoming
theme, "Reliv-
ing the Tradi-
tion," brought back
memories for FA-
MUans across the United
States. Mr. Brodus Harve\,
the leader of the Tallahas-
see Bus Boycott of 1956,
remembered his cay -is Stu-
dent Government Associa-
tion president.
The week kicked off
with a Homecoming Fash-
ion Show, followed by the
"Queen for a Day Lunch-
eon," with keynote speak-


er Deya Smith, Miss Black
USA. "Orange day" was the
day of the annual
SGABar B Q
which


provid- \yN e d
free food a n d
drinks. Later that eve-
ning, step teams from each
residence hall competed
for a grand prize in the
Dorm Step show.


Green day was dedicat-
ed to Miss FAMU and her
royal court. Miss Apreal
Mitchell, was crowned as
the queen for the 1994-95
school year at the corona-
tion ball.
Game day was the day
every Rattler was wait-
S ing for as the FAMU
Rattlers, wearing
original Rat-
tler uni-
forms,
played Mor-
gan State Uni-
\ersity. Rattlers old
and new displayed
"Rattlerarion" through-
out the game (even though
we lost). The week closed
with a Sunday morning
worship service with FA-
MU's Campus Ministry.


Miya Alexander, Apreal Mitchell's
younger sister, Brian A. Alexander, and
Evan N.G. Nottage serve asjunior atten-
dants to Miss FAMU at 1994 Coronation.


Homecoming 109
SPECIAL EVENTS l








Bettfy hal

This year's Martin Luther many capacities. Currently
King, Jr. Convocation be- she serves as Director of
gan promptly at 10:10 a.m. Community and Public Re-
on Thursday, January 12, lations at Medgar Evers
1995 in Gaither Gymnasi- College of New York City.
um. The program was pre- Along with being a
sided over by Rev. Lawr- former U.S. Presi-
ence Q. Barriner, Director dent
of the FAMU Campus Min-
istry.
Following the invoca-
tion, given by Rev. Larry
Hunt, Nyesha Cook,
Vice President of the
Student Govern-
ment Associa-
tion, gave an
inspiring wel-
come which urged
students to bypass
complacency and the
FAMU Symphonic Band
performed a hauntingly
beautiful rendition of
"America the Beautiful"
with a recitation of Dr.
King's "I Have a Dream" appointee,
speech. a member of
Dr. Betty Shabazz was Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,
the distinguished guest at Inc. and the NAACP, Dr.
convocation. Not only is Shabazz is the author of
Dr. Shabazz a greatly wel- "The Search: The Scholas-
comed friend of FAMU's tic Black Literature Series,"
President, Dr. Frederick S. which discusses issues
Humphries, but she active- such as the economic and
ly serves the community in sociological conditions of


bazz


minorities.
In her inspirational
speech, Dr. Shabazz ap-
proached the audience
with several fundamental
ideas. She pointed out how
many African-Americans
have sacrificed in the past,
only to result in a nation of
people who have failed to
fully appreciate those ef-
forts. She also noted
that many people
still have a lot to
learn about the
provisions
of the Con-
stitution.
Her question to
the audience,
"What's freedom?"
was followed by a chal-
lenge for all to accept re-
sponsibility for and utilize
that freedom. On a lighter
note, Dr. Shabazz added
that we should have an
agenda, and even if our
agenda is to party, "party
with an agenda!" In clos-
ing, she warned us, in the
words of her late husband,
Malcolm X to "beware of
the pupil of the eye that
looks upon all things, but
to thine own self is blind."


Dr. Humphries goes over the pro-
gram with Dr. Shabazz shortly be-
fore convocation is scheduled to
begin.

0 Betty Shabazz
SPECIAL EVENTS


Dr. Betty Shabazz emphatically
stressed to a capacity crowd the
"importance of appreciating the
efforts of those that paved the
way for us."


"Dr. Shabazz, a ovi-
sionary role model,
serves the community in
many capacities."
Dr. Frederick S. Humphries


Betty Shabazz 111
SPECIAL EVENTS \/


f


If





Dr. Frederick Humphries gra-
ciously accepts the award from
the American Bandmasters As-
sociation.


President's Concert


"Homecoming to FAMU stu-
dents is like Christmas to little
kids. It's what school spirit re-
volves around." Tasmia
Henry


112 President's Concert
\ SPECIAL EVENTS


Dr. Frederick S. Hum-
phries, the eighth president
of Florida A & M Universi-
ty, has served the institu-
tion with a commitment
and dedication to the ex-
panding the horizon of op-
portunities for students.
His belief is that, "The
FAMU experience
transcends knowl-
edge and skills
taught in
classrooms and
laboratories. Flori-
da A & M University
offers its students a real
sense of tradition and her-
itage acquired through
more than one hundred
years of service. "Under his
leadership, the university
established the one million
dollar Foster-Edmonds Em-
inent Scholar Chair in the
Department of Music, Hu-
manities, Visual Arts and
Theatre.
During the second an-


nual President's Concert in
his honor, the band per-
formed a beauti-
ful and ^ mov-
ing


nitely a crowd pleaser. An
original piece by Dr. Foster
concluded the program.
Dr. Humphries was pre-
sented with the American
Bandmasters Association's
Edwin Franko Goldman
Memorial Citation. This
recognition is the
highest honor that
The American
BandMasters
Associa-
tion can be-
_- stow upon a
S / non-member.
Other recipients in
1994 were President Bill
Clinton and Dr. H. Owen
Reed, noted composer of
American music.


arrange- ment
of America T b e
Beautiful, arranged
by Carmen Dragon. High-
lights from Sophisticated
Ladies, arranged by John
Cacavas, included many fa-
miliar tunes and was defi-


The symphonic band performs
the difficult piece Marche Slave
with passion.


President's Concert 113
SPECIAL EVENTS


I






Joe Torry, host of HBO's Def
Comedy Jam entertained a
crowd of students and faculty in
FAMU's Lee Hall auditorium.


Jo(


Policeman: Sir, do you
know how fast you were
going?
Torry: No, I thought that's
what you was gone' tell
me.
Policeman: Where were
you going?
Torry: I was going to the
... moon. You wan-
na go ... ?

It was only
five days be-
fore finals were
to begin and FAMU
anxiously awaited the
Tallahassee debut of Def
Comedy Jam's host Joe
Torry. The show, sched-
uled for eight o'clock, be-
gan an hour late due to a
slight contract dispute that
threatened to cancel the
show. Opening the concert
was 40 B-Lo, a local band,
along with their "Expres-
sions" dancers.


Getting
funny be
MU gradi
Gilmor
the


next. R
ing exp
women,
children
compared
and strewn


Torry

ig the audience to that of the Power Rang-
one warmed, FA- ers.
uate William Finally, Joe Torry himself
e t o o k took the stage. He talked
about his relationship with
the law, the effects of al-
cohol, and his boredom
with the lengthy O.J.
Simpson trial. On his
childhood experi-
ences, Torry told
a story about
his first en-
counter
with food
stamps. He had
gladly accepted his
book of "new money"
from his mother, but was
left standing outside of a
carnival sellingg to friends
as the rode the ferris wheel.
e- call At least he wasn't hungry.
)eriences with The show, although too
laundromats, and steep for many student
, Gilmore even budgets, was worth the
d the masculinity wait.
Lgth of Superman


Joe Torry poses with two of FA-
MU's own aspiring comedians.


114 \ Joe Torry
11 SPECIAL EVENTS


Joe Torry


Joe Torry
SPECIAL EVENTS


115





Carla Moore, a CIS major from
Athens, Georgia, receives con-
gratulatory hugs from family
and friends.


Graduation '95
On Saturday, April 29, Time Magazine, Ebony, tory of Black people, their
1995, the largest class to and the Los Angeles Times, culture, religion, ethics,
ever graduate from the il- to mention a few. and role in this country.
lustrious Florida A & M A su- perb Then he reminded the
University marched down speak- graduating class of their
the isle of the Leon County role in the continuation of
Convention Center. The this legend. At one point,
1995 graduation proces- Rev. Murray reminded
sional, boasted just over students now holding
1500 students. college degrees,
Commencement that "It doesn't
exercises opened matter what
with selections n a m e
by FAMU's you re
University Sym- called. It only
phonic Band, and matters what
an invocation by Rev- name you answer
erend Lawrence Barriner, to."
Director of FAMU's Cam- Kenya Wilson
pus Ministry. Following a
parade of greetings, FAMU
President, Dr. Frederick
Humphries introduced er, Rev. Mur-
Reverend Cecil Murray, ray deviat- ed from
pastor of First A.M.E. the traditional C o m -
Church of Los Angeles, Cal- mencement speech focus-
ifornia. Rev. Murray, a 1951 ing on a charge for the fu-
graduate of Florida A & M ture. Instead, Rev. Murray
University, was featured in eloquently recalled the his-


"Graduation is a time to
celebrate the completion
of a milestone in our
lives."
Nikki Lewis


I:


* T


Parents and friends enjoy the
Senior Reception, which was
held in the Grand Ballroom.


116 I Graduation
1 U SPECIAL EVENTS
SPECIAL EVENTS


Graduation 117
SPECIAL EVENTS






































-0
Q4 Q

o Li







118


FFlrt~~1111







Pan-Hellenic

Council


Pan Hellenic Council


FAMU Chapter


Hellenic Council *


Pan-Hellenic Council President Quinton Washington, one of the
Chuck Lewis presents Lashawndra representatives for Alpha Phi alpha,
Newton, Vice-President of the puts a motion on the floor.
council, with an award.


Pan-Hellenic Council Advisor, Mrs.
Rosell Caswell thanks the council
for her token of appreciation.


Lashawndra Newton, Vice Presi-
dent; Charles Lewis III, President;
Stephanie Hunter, Secretary


Pan-Hellenic Council
GREEKS


Pan-


120








Pan-Hellen


ic


Council Pan-Hellenic


The 1994-95 school year was a
productive one for FAMU's Pan-
Hellenic Council. This year
marked the first time the Pan-Hel-
lenic Council planned a week of
events and activities to promote
unity and harmony among the
eight Pan-Hellenic organizations.
Unity Week '95 began with a
canned food and clothing drive to
collect items to donate to the local
homeless shelter. It included other
activities such as a: Health Fair,
reception for Dr. Leonard Jeffries,
fashion show on the set, movie
night, and toy drive for Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital children's
ward. The overall aim of unity
week was to plan events which re-
quired participation from each or-
ganization so that they could get
to know each other better while
providing services to both the cam-
pus and Tallahassee community.


PRESIDENT
Charles Lewis III

VICE PRESIDENT
Lashandra Newton

SECRETARY
Stephanie Hunter

TREASURER
Kuwana Norman

PARLIAMENTARIAN
Johnny Grandison
Members of the 1994-95 Pan-Hel-
lenic Council include three repre-
sentatives from each organization.


Pan-Hellenic Council
GREEKS


Marlott Lang, a member of Kappa
Alpha Psi, receives an award for his
participation in Unity Week 95.


\ 121


I I I -









































































122 Pan-Hellenic Council
GREEKS


Pan-Hellenic Council 3
GREEKS








ZOB ZOB

FOUNDED
1920

WHERE
Howard University

COLORS
Royal Blue & White

MOTTO
Zeta An Action-Oriented
Community Organization
Zeta's offered new and re-
turning students treats at the
beginning of the school
year.


Karin Davis, Leslie Harriot
and Wanda Green represent
Zeta Phi Beta at the annual
"Meet the Greeks" seminar.

124 U' Zeta Phi Beta
U GREEKS


Zeta's congratulate each
other on a job well done at
the Fall stepshow.












Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. was
founded on the campus of Ho-
ward University in 1920. Since
then, the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta
have flourished throughout the
United States, having a total mem-
bership of more than 75,000.
The Gamma Alpha Chapter of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority was estab-
lished on the campus of FLorida A
& M University on May 14, 1932,
making the Zeta's one of FAMU's
earliest sororities. This year, mem-
bers participated in service pro-
jects, including the "Adopt a
Highway" Program and the Public
Television Membership Drive. In
illustrating their concern for the
less fortunate and handicapped,


the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta partic-
ipated in a penny drive for the In-
dependence for the Blind Organ-
ization, and participated in the an-
nual "Walk America."
The ladies of Zeta Phi Beta did
more than their share of commu-
nity work during the '94-'95 year.
They were obviously more than
just a group of women wearing
blue and white and throwing par-
ties. Their presence in the com-
munity, on campus, and abroad
has had an extremely positive im-
pact on the community.
Leslie Harriot, Dawnita Jackson, Vallie
Holloway, Juanice Middleton and April
Jones pose for a picture at the penny
drive.


Zeta Phi Beta 125
'GREEKS
GREEKS i


Zeta Phi Beta had hot dog sales and
bake sales as fundraisers during the
school year.


I


* Z(B i


ZOB 0


ZOB *






KAT


Kappa Alpha


Psi


Alpha Xi Chapter


KA


'P


FOUNDED
1911
WHERE
Indiana University
COLORS
Crimson & Cream
MOTTO
Achievement in all fields of human
endeavor
John Webb, Rashaan Ow-
ens and Jason thrower wait
for the program to begin be-
fore the annual NAACP/
MLK march.


Brian Thomas, a senior from The brothers of Kappa Alpha
Atlanta, Georgia, twirls his Psi promote their party at
cane during one of the the annual SGA Bar B-Q.
homecoming festivities.
126 Kappa Alpha Psi
126 EE5-







KA'P


KA'P


Since the founding of Kappa Al-
pha Psi Fraternity Inc., the focus
has been on Achievement in every
field of human endeavor. During
this school year, their focus re-
mained unchanged. Through their
diligent work in the community to
their "all the way live" parties and
events, the Alpha Xi Chapter of
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc.
continued to show its strength and
diversity. This year the Alpha Xi
Chapter worked with the Muscu-
lar Dystrophy Association, Walk-
er-Ford Community Center, Sickle
Foundation and continued to
reach out into the community.


The third annual Luau was held
in the serene environment of The
Brothers' 3 Bar-B-Que/Ranch. It
was a day (and night) of fun, food
and partying.
The Alpha Xi Chapter of Kappa
Alpha Psi continues to move for-
ward. They are preparing men for
the future; through adversity and
circumstance relying on their
creed of brotherhood they contin-
ue to Achieve in Every Field of
Human Endeavor. Many are
called, but few are chosen -
those chosen men are members of
this infamous brotherhood.


Oklahoma, watches the Pan-Hel- The brothers of the Alpha Xi Chapter of
lenic Council fashion show. Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.


Kappa Alpha Psi
GREEKS


\ 127


1,~nn Skillens. .a sninr frnni Tuksa.







FP


Rho


IFP


FOUNDED
1922

WHERE
Butler University

COLORS
Royal Blue & Gold

MOTTO
Greater Service, Greater Progress

The ladies of Sigma Gamma
Rho pose for a Kodak mo-
ment at the "Meet the Greek
seminar.


Viva Riley, Karen Sims, Ste-
phanie Hunter and Takisha
Fields welcome new mem-
bers.

128 -. Sigma Gamma Rho
GREEKS


Sigma Gamma Rho pre-
pares a beautiful display ta-
ble.


Sigma Gamma


Alpha Epsilon Chapter








ITFP*


Y2FP


xFP.0


XI7P


Founded by seven young
school teachers, Sigma Gamma
Rho Sorority, Inc. prides itself on
taking action in the face of adver-
sity. Unlike most historically
Black Greek lettered organiza-
tions, which emerged within the
supportive and communal social
atmosphere provided by black
college campuses, Sigma Gamma
Rho was founded on a predomi-
nately white campus. This historic
action generated a unique brand
of sisterhood that emphasizes
reaching out to women in need.
With over 70,000 members inter-
nationally, National projects in-
clude Project Reassurance, Pro-
ject Africare, Judie Davis Bone


Marrow Donor Project, and Pro-
ject Mwanimujimu to mention a
few.
Florida A & M's chapter of Sig-
ma Gamma Rho was founded on
March 9, 1936 by Minerva Ad-
ams. Some of the activities held
this year by the Alpha Epsilon
Chapter included participation in
the Sickle Cell Anemia 5K Run,
Safer Sex Party, and workshops for
eighth graders participating in the
Buds of Spring, (Self-Esteem,
Study Habits/Tips, Abstinence/
Safe Sex, Criminal Avoidance,
etc).
The ladies of the Alpha Epsilon Chapter
of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority. Inc.


Sigma Gamma Rho
GREEKS


An ice sculpture of the Greek sym-
bols Sigma Gamma Rho is an at-
tractive decoration.


I


""6;AIRSK 7' 7- 1- 777777rPII


d=. ---A







KA AKA


L27~


.


Members of Spring 94 pose
at the Halloween Costume
party.

130 Alpha Kappa Alpha
Xji GREEKS


FOUNDED
1908


WHERE
Howard University


COLORS
Salmon Pink & Apple Green

MOTTO
By merit and by culture


The Beta Alpha Chapter
welcomed Rosa Parks to
Tallahassee to receive an
award.


Jamilla Anne Bethune and
Nicole Holman tutor chil-
dren at a local school.


A






Pages
131-134
Missing
From
Original