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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Title Page
 Opening: Like you've never seen...
 Student life: an new generation...
 Special events: FAMU shows hospitality...
 Sports: The mighty rattlers show...
 Greeks: Greek letter organizations...
 Students: FAMU plays host to a...
 Schools/colleges: FAMU rises to...
 Organizations: FAMU organizations...
 Faculty/staff: FAMU faculty and...
 Closing: Like you never saw...
 Advertising


PALMM FAMU



The rattler
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000319/00010
 Material Information
Title: The rattler
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida A&M University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1992
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. VI (1957); title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 86123550
System ID: AM00000319:00010

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Front Cover 3
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Opening: Like you've never seen before
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6-7
        Page 8-9
    Student life: an new generation of FAMU students get socailly and politically involved like you've never seen before
        Page 10-11
        Page 12-13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
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        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Special events: FAMU shows hospitality to spectacular events like you've never seen before
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
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        Page 58-59
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        Page 62-63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66-67
        Page 68-69
        Page 70-71
    Sports: The mighty rattlers show strength and determination like you've never seen before
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74-75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78-79
        Page 80-81
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        Page 106
        Page 107
    Greeks: Greek letter organizations strut their stuff like you've never seen before
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
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        Page 128
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        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Students: FAMU plays host to a group of students like you've never seen before
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
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        Page 164
        Page 165
    Schools/colleges: FAMU rises to the level of excellence like you've never seen before
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
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    Organizations: FAMU organizations get involved like you've never seen before
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
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        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
    Faculty/staff: FAMU faculty and staff show a genuine concern for students like you've never seen before
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
    Closing: Like you never saw before
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262-263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    Advertising
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
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        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
Full Text

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OPENING
STUDENT LIFE



SPECIAL EVENTS


SPORTS


GREEKS


STUDENTS


Like you've never seen before........ 2
A new generation of FAMU
students. get. socially and
politically involved Like
you've never seen before ........... 10

FAMU shows hospitality to
spectacular events Like
you've never seen before........... 44


The mighty Rattlers show
strength and determination
Like you've never seen before..

Greek -letter organizations
strut their stuff Like you've
never seen before.............


FAMU plays host to a group of
students Like you've never
seen, before ,.............. .. ..


SCHOOLS/COLLEGES


ORGANIZATIONS

FACULTY/STAFF


CLOSING


FAMU rises to the level of
excellence Like you've never
seen before .. ..........


FAIU organizations get involved
Like you've never seen before.

FAMU faculty and staff show a
genuine concern for students
Like you've never seen before..

Like you never saw before .....


. 72


108


134


166


S.. 192


.... 242

.... 260


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She lovely Dei-
dra Denise Henry holds the title of
Miss Florida Agricultural and Mechani-
cal University for the 1991-92 aca-
demic year. Deidra was born on Octo-
ber 31, 1969 in Fort Sill, Oklahoma to
the proud parents of Bertha and Char-
lie Henry, Jr.
Deidra is a 22 year old, Master of


hard work and a personal commit-
ment to excel." Miss FAMU plays an
important role in representing the uni-
versity and its student body. Deidra
feels that it is also important to project
a positive image to our youth in the
community. Among her community
service activities, Deidra feels that ad-
vocating higher education to younger


candidate.


students is a


"The quest to
become Miss
FAMU was
not an easy
one for me."


shows in my work. I respond well to a
challenge and enjoy the opportunity
to reap the rewards of hard work and
dedication. '
Deidra Henry made the decision to
attend Florida A & M University be-
cause it was in line with family tradi-
tion. When asked why she decided to
attend a historically black institution,
Deidra replied, ''there is no experi-
ence like the black experience." Dei-
dra feels that the title of Miss FAMU is
a great honor. She stated. "the quest
to become Miss Florida A & M Univer-
sity was not an easy one for me, but
then anything worth having involves


a a 0


ing Ensemble, where she has served as
an official hostess and recruiter for the
university. Among many other activi-
ties, Deidra was also recognized as a
Who's Who Among College Students
Nominee.
Deidra's greatest accomplishment
to date is being close to fulfilling her
parents expectation of getting a col-
lege degree with minimal difficulties.
Her philosophy about life is quite pre-
cise: Make each day productive, take
advantage of worthwhile opportuni-
ties, and always give back to others a
portion of what you have been
blessed.


top priority.
At FAMU, Deidra
has been an honor
roll student, member
of Couture Modeling
Troupe and a Rattler
Pride nominee. Dei-
dra served as Sopho-
more Attendant to
Miss FAMU, served
as a tutor for the
Center of Excellence
after school pro-
gram, and was a
ie Connection Perform-


Business Administration
Deidra's career ob-
jective is to obtain a
sales or marketing
position with a major
corporation seeking
an individual with
strong leadership
and analytical skills.
Deidra stressed, "I
have always had an
interest in sales and
marketing and I be-
lieve that enthusiasm


MISS
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RATTLER


Tradition stood tall at the 1991 Homecom-
ing Rattler Strike. This year, eager students
gathered on FAMU's "new Set" to watch the
Snake Coil. The event then proceeded with
over ten talented high school marching
bands performing the latest dance routines
and hottest songs. The occasion also brought
forth some very special guests, including
three-year-old Ashton Giles. The talented
toddler wooed her audience with her rendi-
tion of Anita Baker's "You Bring Me Joy." The
"Strikers" and "the Fly Girls" were also in
attendance. Featured artist, "Raptina," daz-
zled the crowd with her vocal talent. With
artist-after-artist ... the fun never ended!


FAMU Rattlers and Rattlerettes play it
cool at the Rattler Strike


Famuans "strike a pose!"


Rattlers give it their all during the Rattler
Strike.


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Eurocentric? "NOT!"


Ashton Giles sings a solo at the Rattler
Strike.


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Not sleet, nor snow, nor cold weather could effect
FAMU's 1991 Homecoming parade. The event, which
kicked-off at 8 a.m. at the Leon County Civic Center,
was attended by hundreds of enthusiastic students.
Leading the event were university President, Dr. Fred-
erick S. Humphries, SGA President Daryl Parks, and
Parade Marshal, professor James Eaton.
The sounds of the evening's festivities were matched
only by the many aromas which lingered in the air.
There was the smell of Popeye's breakfast dishes, fried
catfish, barbecue, and other delights sold by vendors.
Still, the strongest scent was that of the Morgan
State Hornets being pre-cooked for the later Home-
coming game. Participators and spectators of the pa-


C--


FAMU's President, Frederick S. Humph-
ries, stands tall while reviewing the Rattler
parade.


AROTC Drill team members have an in-
tense look of concentration while per-
forming a routine in the parade.


The fruits of the garden ... Sophomore
Attendant, Karmen Roann is all smiles.


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rade exhibited enough "pep" for the Hornets "Roast".
As expected, the mighty Rattlers had no trouble in
devouring their Morgan State meal during the Home-
coming match-up. "I think the energy radiated from
the crowd during the parade really got the players
psyched up to win," speculated Wayne Williams, an
avid football fan. If the way the Hornets hung their
heads and walked off the field was any indication of
how much pain was inflicted upon them by FAMU, it
seemed as if Wayne's speculation hit the Hornet right
on the head!


The Marching "100" leads the pa-
rade of proud Rattlers through
the city of Tallahassee.


The Honda All-Star Classic Cham-
pions ... the FAMU Brain Bowl
Team have much to be happy
about.


Daryl Parks, SGA President,
shows that he can be the leader
of a parade as well as a political
debate.


I I






,RATTLER WEEKEND

vRattler 'Weekend started with a
BANG! -The day1. .ti&QKn Fry
where the Student G'ovvrner-tit trie /
football team, the band, the cheer-
leaders, aahd -various sororities and
fraternities ,sponsored a bon-fire to
pump up FAMU spirit and to start the
football season.
Student Government President,
* Daryl Parks, took the mic to tell the
crowd to support FAMU and that.
true Rattlers, "Strikel Strike! and
Strike again!"
The next morning, there was a pa-
rade that led up to the Governor
Square Mall, where FAMU held their
official pep rally. There were various '
platform guests including Coach Ken "S
Riley and FAMU's own Carmen Cum- '
.mirigs of WCTV. f






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Rattier-weekend called for the Marching 100 to out do itself one more time


The cheerleader captains lead the crowd in a Rattler cheer, while Carmen Cummings
gives a brief interview

Col. Hendrcks shares the pride of his Alma mater with his beloved Rattlers




Orgarnzatns 4





































The Rattler weekend banner greeted all motorists at
the Wanish Way and Gamble Intersection


Carmen Cummings talks with Tony Ezell and the Rattler football team coaches during
the pep rally at Governor's Square Mall.



FAMU students and local residents come out to support FAMU Rattler weekend.















4 S1tucenU Llte


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FAMU's Homecoming spirit was not con-
fined to the hallowed halls of the university.
On the contrary, that "Ole FAMU spirit" was
widespread across Tallahassee. FAMU pride,
as well as paraphernalia, was displayed in
various stores of the city's malls, on office
buildings, and on a variety of other objects.
Still, the best display of Rattler pride was
found within the university. Numerous campus
facilities, including dormitories, were deco-
rated in vibrant orange and green. Banners,
signs, and posters were rampant. The mes-
sage was conveyed to all. It was evident.
FAMU was truly the Home of Champions!


The residents of McGuinn Hall "showed
out" with orange and green.


Army ROTC went all out decorating How-
ard Hall for "Decoration Day."


The residents of Gibbs Hall hung life-size
sports equipment to decorate their build-
ing.


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Palmetto Street Apartments display their
Rattler spirit by decorating the building.


The School of Architecture says, "Rattler
Fever: Catch It!", for Homecoming 1991.


Gibbs Hall displays Rattler pride by utiliz-
ing the theme "Home of Champions."








NEW



Every year in the second week of August the campus
becomes a yard of chaos and anxiety. For approxi-
mately 2000 young men and women, the first day of
college is a 'trying experience'. These young men and
women converge on the rattler yard hoping to begin
their transition from high-school to college life. For
many of these young people, this will be the first taste
of adulthood that they will experience. With college,
comes a new found sense of freedom and responsibil-
ity. "Finally being able to make your own decisions
about things that affect you and not having to be con-
stantly scrutinized, is probably the best feeling I have
ever had, said one freshman from Atlanta". Many of
these first year students handle this transition well,
some do not. "It was my first time away from home
and it didn't feel so good, but I got use to it." said one

Future Famuan looks Iorward to becoming
a Rattler





A winning smile makes the difference dur-
ing the first year of college





Freshman band member enjoys the com.
raderie with the Marching 100












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Ladies from the freshman class wait pa-
tiently tor their interview


Sheniqua Little models her normal attire


A Freshman attendant candidate poses for
the audIience


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LIFE


young man. With this new found freedom, comes the
decisions, stress of responsibility and accountability.
As the years goes by freshman realize it's rough being
on your own. "I couldn't wait to go to college, so I
could have some freedom, but now I wish my parents
were around to help me make some decisions," said a
freshman.


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LIFE ON CAMPUS


The major problem students face
when attending college is finding
adequate housing. Most students
live on campus their first year, some
continue to live on campus well into
their college careers. "Campus life
could be a lot better considering a
few minor things," said Paula Hart, a
junior Political Science major.
Learning to live with complete
strangers and sharing restrooms is a
major argument against dorm life.
"You have to know how to get
along with people. I had to learn to
live with someone I had never met,"
said Krystal Jones a Broadcast Jour-
nalism major. "Still, dorm life is a
good character builder. My room-
mate and I are now best friends!"
Vince takes a hearty bite of sandwich in the University
Commons (The Caf).


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Two freshman girls converse in McGuinn Hall
lobby about the upcoming freshman orienta-
tion.
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Students and merchants alike. hang Out and chill on the
set


"It sure beats eating in the ca "


Couples say goodbye and families split-up on freshman
moving day


' ,nStudent Life








ACT LIKE




Some students will truly wear anything to
class. It doesn't matter what anyone else
thinks as long as they're comfortable. It's
called "expression". It's called "individual-
ism". It's called "stylin"'.
FAMU's campus is known for its students'
impressive fashion statements. In any given
classroom, there can be anything from a se-
quin blouse to a crisp business suit.
In some cases, students will go as far as to
wear their clothes backwards or inside-out.
Still it is always good to remember "it's what's
inside a person that counts".


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When dressing for class, lor some, "Bare
Essence" is a must


At the Governors Square Mall, students
may find some FAMU paraphernalia.


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To combat the sweltering heat on the Hill,
some students opt for designer shades


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IS BE VING



.. Various styles are sported on campus "to
each it, own





For some business ma ors, wearing a dou-
ble-breasted suit I s definitely making the
grade.




The latest hairstyles vary for each indiveid.
ual. dreads are ohen seen on campus






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Students gather around the pool for yet another
Fun In The Sun party.


S Student Life


FE, /"






WATER, ANYONE?


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Leaving home and coming to
college is not only a big step
but a drastic change for many.
For some students this is the
first time away from home
while for others its nothing
new. The biggest adjustment
for many students is the hu-
midity and heat found here in
Tallahassee. Students who re-
side in the north as well as
Florida residents find the
weather to be truly appalling.
"This humidity is a cruel
joke," says Sabrina Mobley of
Lakeland, Florida. While Ron-
etta Lewis of Chicago, Illinois
states "I love the weather but
it is kind of humid".


- Relief from the heat is the
S only thought in the minds of
Many students. Some students
head for their dorm rooms.
There is only one thing miss-
ing a functional air condi-
F tioner. Eventually, the only
:-!ZAC solution is water. Students
slowly begin to congregate at
Sthe university pool. The pool is
not only a place to meet new
friends and socialize but most
importantly find temporary
relief from the heat. Cecy]
Hobbs, a Tallahassee native
says, "Although I've been a
resident of Tallahassee for 18
years I have not yet adapted
to the summers in this city.
Ever since my early youth, the
swimming pool has symbol-
ized an oasis of solace from
the summer sun!"
Before long, the pool has at-
tracted quite a crowd. Some
searching for relief from the
heat while others are investi-
gating the various scantly
clad bodies. Students have
S come to enjoy their swims and
various pool activities. FAMU
has become notorious for
elaborate pool parties which
include drinks, food and lots of
music.


16 Student Life
I "^---------'


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FINANCIAL

We have all stood in line to get classes and then another
to get books. Granted both lines are long but there is no
comparison to the lines in the financial aid office. Of course
financial aid is there to help students receive as much aid as
possible, answer questions and make sure individual files are
complete. There are some students who encounter no
problems. Most however, are not so lucky. Those who plan
ahead, get to financial aid early, but most of the time
there's a line waiting when you arrive. Regardless of what
strategy students use there will always be a line waiting. The
financial aid office deals with thousands of students every
year. They have offered workshops and pamphlets for stu-
dents in hopes of resolving the problems of long lines. The
best advice offered yearly to students is complete your
financial aid packets early and then you can avoid the line.



The financial aid office is located on the
first floor of the Foote-Hilyer Administra-
tion Building.




The dreaded "closed" window in the fi-
nancial aid office.




DeLane Adams fills out a stafford Loan
packet.



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The Financial Aid staff takes time from
their busy schedule to take a group photo.


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Signs at each window clarify what can be
done at that window; this is to eliminate
waiting at the wrong window.


The Financial Aid office gets oh so hot
when crowded with students.


I I


Student Life 1 I








LIMITED

A rare sight on campus is an empty parking lol
or a car without a parking ticket. Every yeai
parking problems drastically increase. Parking is
made even more difficult because of the facl
that each decal is designated for a certain park-
ing area. If your parking area is full ... Touglh
Luck.
Parking citations are generally $15. If they are
not paid or appealed within fifteen days, a $5
late fee is applied.
Everyday begins the fight to get a parking
space. The old cliche applies: The early bird gets
the worm. Therefore, if you have late classes ...
be prepared to walk.


Some students do not have to battle
for a parking space. The SGA presi-
dent's space is reserved.


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Now that the Union has been re-
opened, the parking lot is always full.


During the school year, this dirt area
is filled with FAMU cars.


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Teddy Gilmore received a special present
from the FAMU police department.


Students without decals must fight for a
parking space along the streets of the uni-
versity.


Tommy Johnson, a patrol officer, enjoys
riding in their new vehicles.


PARKING


' i / .





NO


MAIL
Have you ever heard the expression it's lonely at the -. -.--
top? Well imagine being alone on the highest of seven .. .-
hills with no mail. This is a phenomena experienced by .
every student. Waiting all day to check your mailbox .. .
only to find it empty. This can be mental torture for most
freshman. Being away from home is tough enough but,
receiving no mail makes one wonder if they have been
forgotten. This anguish is in no way relieved when fellow
classmates are receiving letters daily. Sheer desperation
and lonliness has caused friends to send each other let-
ters.
Mail definitely becomes an important issue when you
arrive at college. A suggestion to some if you have
cheap friends send a self-addressed stamped envelope.
It may help solve the empty mailbox problem.

Hundreds of mailboxes are housed in the
post office.



Mr. Henry Brown is hard at work making
sure mail is received promptly.



The new Post Office is part of the Student
Union Building ..-. -



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AGAIN


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Mail, such as report cards, it sifted
through this machine and sent to your
permanent address.


Every lock in the new post office must be
set before students arrive.


Ms. Washington assists Claudia Childs in
forwarding her mail home.



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Florida A & M University is known as a historically Black university.
Diversity is very evident on the highest of seven hills. People from
around the world matriculuate to "the Hill". Students come in all
shades of black, white, red and yellow. They come from as far as
Africa, yet as near as FAMU's home of Tallahassee.
Students colors and faces may vary but their goal is the same ...
a higher education. Students are given the opportunity to express
their individuality. "FAMU can be called the melting pot of Tallahas-
see, we have so many different people from all over the world,
which provides our campus with its uniqueness", said Jamal Lerner.
This individuality is expressed in the way students dress, style their
hair, and talk. Students most importantly grow mentally and intellec-
tually. FAMU provides the environment for the growing and nurturing
that students need.


This is the face of a determined, venom-
ous Rattler!


This rattler came decked out to the Paja-
ma Party showing he was not afraid to be
seen in his morning face.


Shenique Little talks with high school stu-
dents about FAMU'S diversity.


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SHADES


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-MAKE


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Miss FAMU not only is the epitome of style
and grace but of rattler spirit!


Mrs. Schley has graced FAMU with her
powerful voice during many convocations.


The many faces of the band form one
urlique, precise unit.


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FAC







Students trom Dade County mixed
angrier voice.


I I


with FAMU students to create a louder,


Florida schoolsfr.om.all over the state came in droves to protest the Judget
cuts.


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.Over one-thousand' dedicated FAMU students marched to the capitol via Martin Luttier King Blvd.'in protest of


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MONEY, HONEY!


Members of the Florida A & M Universi-
ty Student Government Association, ac-
companied by over 1,000 concerned FAMU
students, rallied in front of the Capitol to
voice their opinions on state budget cuts.
"Loose my money, honeyl" chanted some
FAMU students who represented just a
small portion of those who would be effect-
ed by the lack of educational funding.
Due to the recessive economy and de-
creasing lottery funds, all state universities
were warned by Governor Lawton Chiles to
prepare for millions of dollars less than
they had in past years. Not only were these
funds used to increase the overall quality of
education, it was also necessary for other
essential reasons such as paying staff and
faculty salaries.
Eager students congregated in front of
the "New Set" at 10:45 a.m. Their presence
alone made it obvious that they were deter-
mined to let their disapproval of the budget
cuts be known.


Si.



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FAMU students anxiously await the arrival of Gover-
nor Lawton Chiles. The opportunity to confront him
had finally come to pass.


Students applaud vigorously after Senator Carrie
Meeks' speech supporting no cuts in education.


WE'RE

OFF

OUR

DUFFS


S Student Lite


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FAMU shows hos

spectacular ever

YOU'VE NEVE

BEFORE ...


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Special Events


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GRA

Graduation is one simple word
that means many things to many
people. For some it was the culmi-
nation of a dream, for others it
was the fulfillment of their parents
wishes from the moment they
were born. Although, some fulfilled
their own personal victories just
by crossing the stage. There were
those who faced nearly impossible
odds with parents urging us to
"just give up and come home, -
its cheaper", to friends who al-
ways doubted our abilities, to tak-
ing the "easy way out" by joining
the military or getting a job "to
hell with all this school stuff".
As I sit here writing this I am
reminded of my first days here at
FAMU, full of excitement, promise
and the haunting words of Dr. C.U.
Smith, "Take a good look around,
some of the people you see today
won't be here when its all over."
He was right, my classmates be-
came fewer and fewer as the se-
mesters went on.
For those of us who remained,
college became a testing ground
on all levels. We were faced with
choices: stay home and work on
this paper that's due Monday,
(that you put off for three weeks
anyway) or go to that fraternity or
sorority party that EVERYBODY
was going to. Now that we've re-
ceived our degrees I won't lie -
most of us went to the party. Diffi-
cult as things became we made it
through. From being in a room
with four other people and be-
tween the five of us we couldn't
gather enough money for peanut
butter and water to April 25,
1992 when our hopes, dreams and
fears culminated with the shaking
of hands and the passing out of
those green symbols of our strug-
gles.
The largest graduating class ever, 900 students fill
the civic center.
This graduate felt so good about graduating he
placed the words, "I MADE IT", on his cap.

Special Events '


IDUATIO
From A Graduates Point Of View


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The band, led by Dr. Foster, played school songs the graduates are not soon to forget.


Last minute preparations behind the scenes before that big moment.


Graduation was ultimately a
time to reflect on your four, five,
six or more years at FAMU. It was
a time to remember people be-
cause that's what college is ulti-
mately about. The people we met
in the dorms our first days here,
those we met in classes, those we
loved and hated, and the classic
... those who stared us in the
face for four years without speak-
ing, then at graduation these are
the people who want to "keep in
touch". Yeah Right/ll
Ultimately I know that I'll take a
piece of all of these people and our
experiences on "The Hill" with me
wherever I go. I'll remember the
laughter, the sorrow, the joys and
the tears. I'll think back to April 25,
1992 when we sat there 900 strong
and I'll remember ... WE MADE
IT/!l Go get 'em Rattlers Class of
1991-92.
With love fellow ALUMNI, Mar-
sette R. Mangum
-et g.m .- ,,,


All graduates to be, stand and are officially declared graduates of FAMU!


( Special Events







- SENIOR RECEPTION

r. Frederick S. Humphries and
Mrs. Antoinette Humphries
sponsored a senior reception
for the class of 1992. The gala event
was held in the lower courtyard of
the H. Manning Efferson Student
Union.
The President and Mrs. Humph-
ries, Dr. Clifford Smith, Vice Presi-
dent and Mrs. Hogg, Vice President
and Mrs. Flamer, Daryl Parks, Roder-
ick Stovall, and Ms. Dorothy Williams
severed on the receiving line.
The senior reception gave parents
the opportunity to conversate with
school officials and graduating sen-
iors the opportunity to say good-bye
to friends and faculty.
The evening was topped by deli-
cious hours d'oeuvres and moving
speeches.


Diedra Henry, Miss FAMU, signs the guest book at the senior reception


48_ Special Events









I




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$170,000!

during the weeks of September 9
through September 20, the Florida A
& M University Alumni Association
sponsored a phone-a-thon to help
raise funds for student scholarships and en-
dowments and also to provide overall finan-
cial support to the university. Charles Man-
ning, former Director of Special Programs
and Services, Ralph Coleman, Keith Miles,
and many other concerned faculty members
were major forces behind this exciting activ-
ity. "This is an opportunity for us to commu-
nicate with our Alumni. I feel as though it is a
good start and we will do better each year,"
said an optimistic Keith Miles.
Many students and faculty members ea-
gerly volunteered their services for the two
week venture. They made hundreds of calls
to FAMU Alumni and encourage them to
"give back" to their alma mater and give
back they did, in the amount of $170,000 in
contributions. Volunteers were also reward-
ed for their services. Each night, these dili-
gently working students were served meals
catered by Gourmet Services. Students who
accumulated the highest amount of contri-
butions for the evening also received incen-
tives such as door prizes which included an
orange and green FAMU jacket, a FAMU
"Go" Bag, and a FAMU stadium seat.
The most prosperous night of the fund-
raiser also turned out to be a friendly com-
petition between two Greek organizations.
On the night of September 18, members of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., along with
FAMU Caring, and the Baseball Team vied
against each other for the most contribu-
tions. Though no winner was formally de-
clared, FAMU students in general gained
$24,253 that evening. "It feels good. Every-
one has been very enthusiastic," said Man-
ning with a smile. "My hat's off to all stu-
dents, they have done a fantastic job!"
Carmen Goldsmith
(upper left) Randall Brown waves as he takes a call.


(upper right) A concerned rattler raises her hand acknowledging a contribution.



(cenlir I D[ rr[l jie Tii; .Tl,, jnr jlrr l ae


bottom right) With aj1 htr ". :, ith.; vlunire- .i' in I hr, r aj *.ra birio i v,il'
-T_


14 SecialEvents 71



























































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Dr. Wanton and President Humphries escort
Dr. Cosby to the platform.



Bill Cosby admires FAMU's astute student body.


-*ci-- -Et



50 Special Events


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LIVE AND UP CLOSE


ou've seen him on the cover of Es-
sence. You've seen him hundreds of
times in Ebony. You've seen him on
thousands of Cosby Show episodes. But on
November 1, 1991, you saw him for the first
time ever, live and up close, at Florida A & M
University.
William H. Cosby, Ph.D, one of the most
respected entertainers in America, was the
much anticipated guest speaker of FAMU's
traditional Homecoming Convocation. The
gathering, which is usually held in Gaither
Gymnasium, had to be transferred to Bragg
Memorial Stadium in order to accommodate
some 12,000 anticipated spectators.
During the ceremony, University Presi-
dent Dr. Frederick S. Humphries presented
Dr. Cosby with an Honorary Doctorate of
Humane Letters. Dr. Cosby also received a
FAMU National Association membership
card and was recognized for his past dona-
tion of $325,000 to the university. Though
delighted with the presentations, Mr. Cosby


said jokingly that his wife wanted to be "an
honorary member of the Florida A & M
Marching Band".
As Cosby addressed the entranced audi-
ence, his tone transformed from one of hu-
mor to one of deep sincerity. Mr. Cosby
stressed the need for African-American stu-
dents to take every educational advantage
offered. "Pick up the pace," he urged with
deep concern. "The march is too slow.
We're not going anywhere and we're mov-
ing slowly enough that George Bush can
stop us and move us back."
The festivities were over all too soon when
Dr. Cosby announced his departure for an-
other engagement. Still, Florida A & Univer-
sity was truly honored to have held such a
distinguished member of the African-Amer-
ican community in its midst. Dr. Cosby's
presence touched the entire FAMU com-
munity. It was funny. It was sincere. But most
importantly, it was live and up close.


Bill Cosby accepts his Doctorate of Humane Letters from President Frederick S. Humphies while platform guests applaud.


Bill Cosby jokes with platform guests while enter-
tainmg the crowd.


After accepting his honorary Doctorate of Humane
Letters, Bill Cosby received a standing ovation
from platform guests.


51
f t Special Events


- -








RATTLER 'JAMMIE' JAM

t was a night for a "House Party." Every-
one was dressed in their bedroom best -
"ESLEEP" attire to silk pajamas. Eager
FAMU students awaited the premier of
Kid 'N' Play's new movie "House Party II."
With free pizza and the latest sounds, stu-
dents kicked off the first event of Home-
coming Week ... the Pajama 'Jammie' Jam.
The Pajama Party was an idea inspired by
Regional Harris, Secretary of Student Welfare.
With the help of the Student Activities De-
partment and the Student Government As-
sociation, Reggie was able to give FAMU one
of the hottest Homecoming events ever. "I j
felt students needed a party that they did
not have to dress up for or go off campus to
get to. A Homecoming Pajama Party with
free food at Perry Paige was the answer,"
Reggie decided. _
As students ate pizza and danced with
their peers inside Perry Paige, a long line of
other students waited anxiously to be a part
of FAMU's first Jammie Jam. Jamese Carey, a
sophomore senator, remarked "the party
the atmosphere. was filled with Rattler pride
and love." Claudia Childs agreed, "I thought
it was great! I really enjoyed watching every- ,
one get wild and crazy." The sophomore
English Education major then added, "It was
a very nice break from the regular routine of
campus life." B A
Like most Homecoming celebrations,
there is always an event that remains in one's
memories long after the night has passed.
The Rattlers Jammie Jam will probable be
one that goes down in history.









FAMU students show that they can really do a pajama party.



Michael, Greg, Shun, Cedric, Rich and Thad pose for a photo; but where is Snow
White and th seventhh dwarf'



-e Silu&fil 1Ira.er.I m.rjnt 1rl I 1-1 fIr Hi y Pr I ia






Special Events



































































Students search no further than their lingerie drawer for the attire of the Pajama
Jam.


*I


James Cole proved that he could be suave in any attire.






Credell Wingate's eyes go crazy over women in pajamas.


Sonia, Jennifer, Jamese, Claudia, Michelle, Kendra, Crystal, and Kuwana let their
hair down to jam.


Special Events


Im I





V -q_ __


I


IFT


\-


(Above) Curtis Johnson and Ken
Rioland help with the cooking at
the barbeque.
(To the Right) James Moran and
Julian White wait patiently for the
ribs to come off the grill.


N.J!


Special Events


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II,








- SAVOR THE FLAVOR


orida A & M University's annual "Set It
Out" barbeque was held, as tradition
has fostered, on the wide-open land-
scape of Paddyfoote green. The Student
Government Association, along with Colo-
nel Bernard D. Hendricks, provided a tasty
array of food and refreshments for nearly
2,000 faculty and student body members.
The tantilizing aroma of freshly grilled
spareribs and sausage filled the sunny Hal-
loween afternoon air. Colonel Hendricks,
provided the food for this event. Although
the festivities did not officially begin until
noon, lines were being formed at 11:30. Usu-
ally students are first in line, but this year the
faculty beat them to it!
After everyone received their food, there
were tables and chairs set-up for students
and faculty to sit and mingle. As they ate


they were entertained by the sounds of mu-
sic dee-jayed by the Beta Nu Chapter of Al-
pha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. "Tucker Hall
was empty and I knew it had to be free food
somewhere," said Chris Jackson a freshman
Elementary Education major.
Despite the long lines, Park BraiO fur un-
seve Freundo (Barbeque for our Friends) was
a great success. No one left the cook-out
ground hungry or disappointed. "I really
thought it was a great idea to have a barbe-
que for all students during Homecoming
1991," said Kuwana Norman a well-fed soph-
omore Accounting major.
With all the catering done "Rattler Style"
there was no wonder why the title of this
Homecoming festivity was called "Set It Out
Barbeque."


(To the Right) Col. Hendricks, Activities Director, and Lanese Harris, Senior Attendant, work together in opening and preparing Col.'s famous baked beans.


Pr I k




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(Above) Students partake in all of the food that
was provided during the Homecoming barbeque.


55
Special Events~r


L I I-IIII








BOY


n November 4, 1991, FAMU held
its annual Homecoming Talent
Show Blow-Out. As always,
Gaither Gymnasium was filled to
capacity by eager FAMU students. The
show began with an array of incredibly
talented singers, rappers, and dancers
hand-picked from hundreds of gifted uni-
versity students. Still, the anxious crowd
restlessly awaited the featured act: the hit
quartet Boyz II Men.
After hours of impatient waiting, Mas-
ter of Ceremonies Thomas Cunningham
appeared on stage to appease the enthusi-
astic audience. Once Thomas was able to
stop the crowd form chanting, "Boyz II
Men, Boys II Men," the Tallahassee group
Unit Four was allowed to introduce the
evening's guests.
Boyz II Men was all everyone expected
and more. In fact, they provided their loy-
al fans with a "personal concert." Hey, no
lipsyncing here Not only did they sing -
the group danced and extended them-
selves to the audience. Group member
"Alexander Vanderpool," even provided
the audience with a brief exposition of
how the group was formed.
"The show was well worth the wait,"
exclaimed Crystal Knight, one of the
group's biggest fans. "I did not expect
them to perform so much material at a
simple talent show," said an overwhelmed
Zenzile Sewer. By the look of content on
the dispersing crowd, it was evident that


FAMU's '91 Homecoming Talent Show
satisfied even the most impatient audi-
ence member.


56 Special Events







OOH LA


LA
elegance, sophistication, and style
were three components displayed at
the Homecoming fashion show on
-October, 28. The fuse was promptly
lit. Vibrant colors and beautiful people sud-
denly exploded onto the scene. The night
was filled with anxious students waiting to
see the glamourous clothes to be modeled
by some of FAMU's most gorgeous young
ladies.
"Colors of Champions" was the theme for
the evening. Epicurean Fashion Experience,
Couture, Images, as well as various sororities
and fraternities participated in the fashion
extravaganza. The runway glowed with bold,
vibrant colors accented by Mondrian prints.
A variety of attire was modeled providing
something for everyone. Business attire was
f; I I sported for the conservative; while "After
Five" wear was modeled for those who were
more contemporary. And, of course, both
male and female audience members were
set aflame with the lingerie scene. For the
ladies, the males paraded in G-strings; while
male hearts were set aflutter by ladies wear-
ing sexy and tantalizing bedroom wear.
The highlight of the evening was the guest
appearance of the "Strikers." The dancers
mesmerized the audience with their strong
pelvic thrusts and choreographed routines.
They brought the evening to a close. "I think
the show went well. The crowd seemed to
enjoy it because the clothes were geared
toward college students and were incorpo-
rated with hip-hop music," said fashion di-
rector for Epicurean, Bridgette White. Her
perception was correct. The audience truly
did enjoy the event. "I thought it was spec-
tacular," said Dana Harrell, a junior Criminal
justice major. "I could have watched the
guys in the lingerie scene a few more
times!," she exclaimed.
Grace and Sophistication describe these two models as they reveal their lingerie.


Miles Flowers exhibits his patented "Magnificent Seven" pose. ii




Ladies with an attitude ... Strike a pose ... and Vogue.




Telita Perry leads the pack with attitude and style






SSpecial Events





I I


THE DREAM


anuary 15 of every year is recognized as
a national holiday. This holiday ac-
knowledges not only the birth, but also
the undeniable Civil Rights accomplish-
ments of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
This year, Florida A & M University held its
Fifteenth Annual Observance Birthday Cele-
bration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This
glorious event was presented by the FAMU
Campus Ministry, the Beta Nu Chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Florida A &
M University Student Government Associa-
tion and Student Activities. The theme of
the convocation was "Remember the Dream
and the Dreamer ... Strive for Achievement
in 1992."
The Birthday Celebration began promptly
at 10:10 with a welcome address by Daryl
Parks, SGA President. The crowd was then
uplifted as everyone stood and sang the Ne-


gro National Anthem, "Lift Ev'ry Voice and
Sing." The occasion was delivered by Jona-
than Allen, Alpha Phi Alpha President. As
the keynote speaker approached the podi-
um, the audience was on the edge of its seats
to listen to the distinguished guest Major
General Matthew A. Zimmerman.
Chaplain (Major General) Matthew A.
Zimmerman, Jr., a Rock Hill, South Carolina
native, holds a Bachelor of Science degree in
Biology and Chemistry from Benedict Col-
lege (Columbia, South Carolina) and a Master
of Divinity degree from Duke University. His
honors and awards include the Legion of
Merit, Bronze Star Medal, and NAACP's Roy
Wilkins Meritorious Service awards. General
Zimmerman's speech quickly captured the
audience. He emphasized the importance of
"keeping the dream alive" with his honest
words of concern and wisdom.


(To the Left) President Humphries and Deidre Henry, Miss FAMU '91 stands for the welcoming of the speaker, General
Zimmerman.


*. 4^-


E-sp-ial Events


59
Special Events
-[:]E











Curious student secretly peaked
through the doors of Charles
Winterwood Theatre on the
night of February 26. To his
complete surprise, he saw members of the
FAMU Essential Theatre roaming through
the aisles and parading on the stage. Ev-
eryone was doing his own thing. In fact, .
the "Opening-night-last-minute hustle"
basically comes with the territory for
those in the theatre business.
"Pill Hill," a play by Samuel L. Kelley,
was brought to life by six talented actors
and the supporting members of the
FAMU Essential Theatre. Jacksonville,
Florida native Earl Palmer did an excellent
performance in one of the lead roles. As
"Joe", carefree mill worker who continu-
ously put off going to college, Earl showed I
the audience the sad consequences of example, "Ed" went on to be a prestigious
procrastination. "Ed," on the other hand, lawyer; Joe never made it to college. This
played by senior mathematical sciences powerful message forced many students
major Leon Rogers resigned from his to appreciate te opportunities provided
dead-end position to find a better oppor- to them at FAMU.
tunity in college. Other members of
FAMU Essential's Theatre played support-
ing roles. Thomas Cunningham, Ralph (
Gantt Jr., Walter Powell, Jr. and Cordell
Thorn were instrumental in adding sub-
stance to the play.
Set in "Joe's" basement apartment dur-
ing the 1970's, "Pill Hill's" theme encir-
cled the audience and took them through
the characters' lives over a fifteen year
period. As the story unfolded, some char-
acters matured while others did not. For :









Ed dl,:;,: ulule SIan o at led,, ii o ,,,i




r "1e says ": s ycs r. I gl my br l .. ur Ihr y ,flrr pjy jlh ri iiuln Ir.e inill




r.IaChjrJ ie r, and Ea tii,:,,re a garie o sipad.






S Special Events








1 ACHIEVE!
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AL.


Shis year, Florida A & M University
could only be described as the
-.- "Home of Champions". The 1991
edition of FAMU's American Honda
Campus All-Star Challenge Team, not only
brought home a national championship in its
first year of inception, but proved once
again FAMU is on the cutting edge of excel-
lence. The individuals primarily responsible
4 for bringing home over $60,000 in institu-
tional grants were as follows: Martin Barnes;
Team MVP, Thomas Cunningham, IV; David
Hogan; Brandon Moore; and team Captain,
N MBrian K. Ross. Coach Vivian Hobbs, Assistant
Coach James Moran, Danielle Jackson, Allin-
iece Taylor, and Dwanna Wanton provided
support combined with an effort to ensure
the team's academic success. Still, the team
would not have been manifested without
the diligent work of Colonel Bernard Hen-
dricks, Director of Student Activities, and
Daryl Parks, SGA President.
President Humphries, administrators, and
other distinguished guests of the team at-
tended a reception at the Governor's Man-
; sion, where each team member was present-
ed with a solid lead crystal paperweight.
Brian K. Ross, Team Captain, stated, "This
... reception was the highlight of the FAMU
Campus All-Star Challenge Team's era and
definitely a high point in my matriculation
.fr through FAMU."
Brandon W. Moore, Team Member




(upper left) Mrs. Vivian Hobbs and Mr. James Moran are congratulated by the
a ( Governor for a job well done, as the coaches for the champion brain brawl team.



(upper right) Roderick Stovall and Johnathon Allen really seem to enjoy the
Governor's reception.



(center) The brain brawl participants, along with President Humphries, and
Governor Chiles, pose for a picture to capture this unforgettable moment. ,.



(bottom right) David Hogan beams as he receives a token of appreciation from
Governor Chiles.

K:ll I


g% Special Events


I ,






- I


THE NCBCSG 1992


I.


OF


BLACK COLLEGE

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

...Together We Shall Lead The Masses



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(to the left) Diane Hall informs students at a
workshop.


(above) Representatives of the conferences listen
lucidly during one of the many workshops.


Special Events 63


62 Special Events


F lorida A & M University held the distin-
guished honor of hosting the National
Coalition of Black College Student Gov-
ernments during the weekend of April 2-5.
Only the second of its kind, FAMU's Student
Government Association members were de-
termined to ensure the event was a success.
The coalition was founded in 1990 by stu-
dents with the intent of providing an "um-
brella" for historically Black college student
governments. Its purpose is to foster team
work, professionalism, and self-develop-
ment in all members. In the past, prestigious
universities such as Alabama A & M, Jackson
State, and Morehouse College ha\e partici-
pated in the convention. This year was no
different.


The 1992 NCBCSG conference focused
upon the African-American student's pivotal
role and responsibility to his community.
Three specific aspects (social, educational,
and economical) were discussed. The con-
ference also encouraged political activism
and economic empowerment in the Afri-
can-American community. Workshops fo-
cused on developing effective leadership,
Black entrepreneurship and improving the
Black community as a whole. "NCBCSG was
a ver\ uplifting experience allowing leaders
from historically Black colleges and universi-
ties to pool their resources and learn from
each other. After all, we are all one people,"
said Cedric Mobley, freshman Senator.


I


.. . ,


I







- FAMU ALUMN
oming home means coming back
to Florida A & M University for
thousands of alumni each year. In
fact, every homecoming weekend
FAMU graduates travel hundreds (even
thousands) of miles to return to the hol-
lowed halls of their beloved alma mater.
Alumni have their own personal way of
expressing how much love is felt for
FAMU. This year was no different.
Over three hundred alumni, garbed in
an array of orange and green, greeted
each other with big and bright smiles at
the annual homecoming reception held at
the University Club House on South Ad-
ams Street. On that cool November 2,
morning, alumni had the opportunity to
reflect on past experiences at FAMU.
Most of them agreed that the spirit of
their alma mater would never die. "FAMU
has given us a closeness in the black expe-
rience without it, we would have no
meaning," reflected Gracie Lewis Chan-
dler, Class of '63.
For many graduates, the annual alumni
picnic and reception are the highlights of
the fall season. The alumni Rattlers glow K
throughout the events exchanging hugs
and sharing memorable college lessons
learned at FAMU as they make their way '
to the tables of food for seconds, while o
they continue in their joyous celebration.
Undergraduates are inspired by the alum-
ni who return each year, as they hope to
one day participate in such annual events.



























Special Events
111 '-:.



t .


Floyd Patterson, of the New Jersey Alumni Chapter, converses with a guest at t
reception.








BLACK COLLEGE DAY


during the fall semester of this
year's academic term, the
Student Government Associ-
ation (SGA) coordinated
Black College Day in honor of
historically black institutions. The
1 speaker for this auspicious occasion
was Dr. Deloris Spikes, president of
Southern University. Dr. Spikes ad-
dressed the audience on the impact
that historically black schools have on
the advancement of African-Ameri-
cans. In addition, she spoke about the
importance of supporting our black
institutions beyond graduation.
Preceeding the close of the event,
Dr. Spikes was presented with several
awards: one from the university presi-
dent, Fredrick S. Humphries; one
from the SGA president, Daryl Parks;
and one from FAMU's Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority president, Shannon
Smith. Two members of the Tallahas-
see Alumni Chapter of Southern Uni-
versity also presented Dr. Spikes with
a bouquet of flowers. Black College
Day was a memorable occasion for
Florida A & M University and will no
doubt continue to be an annual one.












Nugustus Pearson, Director of the FAMU Concert Choir,
eads the group in song.


rwo members of the Tallahasse Alumni Chapter of
southern University present Dr. Spikes with a bouquet of
Flowers.


)aryl Parks, Dr. Deloris Spikes, and Mr. Leo Sams take a
picture after the event.





Special Events 65








SGA ELECTIONS


v : '-", ,,
S--,. ,.


free pass to attend the Miss FAMU
and Attendants Pageant. Though the
official debate and speech program
was less crowded, students found it to
be a most informative event. At this
program, candidates were given an
opportunity to express their views and
explain their platforms.
The offices up for election were
SGA president and vice-president,
Miss FAMU and her court, electoral
commissioner and junior senate.


The Electoral Commission and onlookers wail for the computer to tally up the votes


Supporters ol Ihe
Walker Hilliard and
Tymesa tones
tickets, campaign
in Iront of the
Student Union.


~4~
4... ;


Darryl Jones commentates at the speech,'
debate program.

Green and Stovall gather a crowd in tront
of the Student Union


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r- Special Events 6


Special Events 6E


Che 1992-1993 Student Govern-
S ment Elections were full of antici-
pation and excitement. This year's
elections were the first to have rallies,
voting and debates on the Union
grounds since its renovation.
A more involved student body in
addition to the close proximity of the
Union prompted Richard McCloud,
Electoral Commissioner 1991-1992, to
predict a five percent increase in vot-
Ser turn out. In fact, to avoid over-
crowding, students had to obtain a


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TBM BREK4fW


n March 6, 1992, Mr. Tom Bro-
kaw of NBC Nightly News jour-
neyed to Florida A & M University to
complete a special assignment. The
feature was entitled "Young Black
Voters." The Democratic and Re-
publican Presidential Primary Elec-
tions were to be held March 10,
1992. The nightly news team chose
FAMU as a reliable cross section for
student views.
Mr. Brokaw interviewed President
Frederick S. Humphries, Student
Government Association President
Daryl Parks, Christina Samuels and El-
lis Gainey. Mr. Brokaw and the NBC
news team went to the class: Seminar


A wide shot
shows Brokaw,
the class, and the
camirramen


in Political Analysis, to discuss the
Presidential elections and relevant
national issues. This gave FAMUANS
the opportunity to voice their opin-
ions. Overall, students did not feel
the Presidential candidates were ad-
dressing the wants and needs of the
black community. Economically, stu-
dents felt that there was limited op-
portunity for equitable employment
or taxation.
Florida A & M University students
proved to be excellent representa-
tions of the young black community.
Proving that positive young black
role models exist.


Mr. Brokaw intently questions the class, Seminar in Political Analysis, to ascertain their views on the presidential elections.


FOR yVou


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A group of FAMU musicians provide enter-
tainment at the Who's Who Banquet.

Mr. George Vellett, Asst. Vice-President of
Chubb and Son Inc. introduces the guest
speaker.


L


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WHO'S WHO


',17


Easily the most distinguished an-
nual student ceremony is the
Annual Who's Who Banquet. It
is held in honor of those special stu-
dents of Florida A & M University
who have proved themselves to be
worthy of not only campus commen-
dation, but also of national recogni-
tion as Who's Who Among Students
in American Universities and Col-
leges and Universities for 1991-92.
This distinction is not based solely on
scholarship, but also leadership,
character and other distinguishable
qualities.
In order to be eligible, a very strict
criteria must be met by undergradu-
ate and graduate students. Some of


Mr. Leroy Topps, Vice President of Chubb and Son Inc. accepts an award from Dr. Flamer.


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71
14 special EvntsEE


El-~Specal Events 6.1


the major criteria that an undergrad-
uate must meet are: they must have a
grade point average of 3.0 or better,
be classified as a junior or senior, and
submit a typewritten resume along
with their application. Graduates
must also have a minimum grade
point average of 3.0, but they must
also be enrolled in the university's
graduate program and have complet-
ed at least 16 credit hours.
The Who's Who ceremony is a
very important and honorable occa-
sion. As has been the tradition for the
past two years, this event was under-
written by Chubb and Son, and well
over seventy students were recog-
nized, far more than ever before.


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iRATTLER FOOTBALL IS

A FEVER THAT TAKES
OVER THE CAMPUS EV-
ERY FALL, NEW, OLD,
YOUNG AND JUST BE-
GUN RATTLERS HEAD
IN DROVES TO BRAGG
MEMORIAL STADIUM
AL




TO WATCH THE RAT




Ai
/ TLER FOOTBALL TEAM
STRIKE AND STRIKE
AND STRIKE AGAIN
RAIN OR SHINE1
NIGHT OR DAYJ WIN
OR LOSE ...RATTLERS
ALWAYS SUPPORT
THEIR FOOTBALL
. "rEAMt


i




R attlers take "era down with venom!
Sports~





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1 Ken Riley III...
2 James Godwin


3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47


............D B
. . . D B


Keino Taylor .........................
Tim Camron ....................
Craig Hall .......... ...........
Greg Bethune ................. .. .
Tony Sm ith ......... ..................
Tracy W eldon ........................
Travis G reen ........... .............
Keith Brown ........................ ..
Vincent McDuffie .....................
Antonio Ross .........................
James Thurman ......................
Antoine (Tony) Ezell ..................
Edwin Carter ....................
Eddie Battle .................. ........
Antar Rivers ..........................
Arthur Hightower .....................
Tyrone Davis ............ ..........
Chris W hite ................ ......
Alonzo Ashwood ............. .........
Arrington Carter ......................
Sha-m ell Sim pkins.....................
Louis (Salt) W illiam s ...................
David Lucas ..........................
William Carroll.......... .... .. ..
Jacob Turnipseed .....................
James C. Rainey......................
M ike M itchell .........................
Darrell Sm ith ..........................
Earl Reeves ...........................
Johnathon Jones...................
Patrick Reddick ............. .. .....
Louis (Pepper) Williams ...............
Gerald (Chuck) Duffey ................
Darnay Hogan ........ .... ............
Brian Bostick .......... ................
Joe Burden ...........................
Jasen Jester........ ...............
Frankie Wilkins .......... ........
Robert Gordon ........................
Marty Lee .......... .............
Eaion Conner .......... .... .....
Cedric Jones ......... ............
Lee Greene ............ .........
Sean Lam bert ...................... .


..........LB


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.......... D B
.... ..... PK
.......... D B
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.......... D B
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..........D B
.......... D B
.......... FB
.......... D B
.......... R B
.......... LB
.......... FB
.......... LB
..........LB
..........LB


..


I:














Bruce Daniels ...............
Barney Knight............ ..
Kwame Akkebala...........
Greg Richardson ............
Jabaar Flukers..............
Demetrus Boney ............
Jerome Hamlet .............
W illie Huntley ...............
Sam Stockton ...............
Terry Sim ms ................
Travis McKee ...............
Chris Horne ...............
Wally Williams .............
Jullo Sanchez ...............
Mario Jones ................
Travis Mobley...............
Leon Skillens ................
Marcus Durant ..............
Kwame Kllpatrick ...........
Timothy Green ..............
Dexter Nottage .............
Roosevelt Deleveaux .......
Doby Ingram ................
Keith Hyde ..................
David Farquhar .............
Ivory Dillard ................
Marcus Lampkin ............
J.R. Reed ...................
Terry Mickens...............
George Terrell ..............
W illiam Davis .......... ....
Timothy Daniels.............
Keith Kelly ...... .. .......
Chad Fann..................
Morisse Daniels .............
Corey Mosley...............
Gregory Wynn ..............
Maress Scott.............
David Prosser...............
Ben Gainer .................
James McDuffey ............
Tory Kirby ............ .
Randall Marsh ..............
Sean Brantley............ ...
Wayne Key .............


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........D L
........D E
........D L
........D L
........D L
........D L


..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............


~RR


I5B
NA


18 B-~






RATTLER


he Rattlers finished 6-5
overall and 3-3 in the Mid-East-
ern Athletic Conference, after
winning the MEAC with a perfect
6-0 mark in 1990. Quarterback
Tony Ezell completed a fabulous
career as the school's all-time
passing leader, with over 6,600
career yards and 52 touchdown
passes, while senior defenders
Cedric Jones and Sean Brantley
were ranked among the MEAC
leaders in tackles.
Jones, a linebacker, led the
MEAC with an average of 16.7
tackles per game, while Brantley,
a defensive end, led the club in
quarterback sacks (13/2) and
tackled for loss (27).


AIl-Americca status went to
safety William Carroll, whose
eight (8) interceptions ranked
him third in the nation, while
leaving him one shy of equalling
the school career interception
mark of 22, as well as halfback
Chuck Duffey, who led the team
and the MEAC in scoring with 13
touchdowns.
Twelve FAMU players also
earned All-MEAC honors, the
most of any team in the league,
this despite a third-place finish
in the 1991 title race.
Alvin Hollins


Before each game, the band welcomes the team as they run on the
field.


>4


) TBALL


[78 Sports


Tony Ezell, Mike Mitchell, Wally Williams, and Marcus Durant get ready
for the next play.





Sports


I I w N we -- --- -~l-^I - -- C- --


I















CROWDS COME
FROM FAR AND NEARt
JAKE GA17HER GYM-
NASIUM IS FILED TO
ITS CAPACITYi LATE
COMERS ARE BEING
TURNED AWAY. ELEC-
TRICITY FILLS THE AIR
AS WE WAIT FOR TrlHE
RATTLERS TO PUT
SOME VENOlM IN 'EM.
ONCE AGAIN IT IS
BASKETBALL SEASON.


4^w


SSports


*'I'8.


'I


FLot


c~~


$); Ph~


8-





MEN'S RATTLER







With MEAC Player of the Year
DeLon Turner and guard forward
Reginald Finney, the FAMU bas-
ketball team reached the MEAC
Tournament finals for the fourth
time in five years, losing a heart-
breaking 67-65 decision to How-
ard.
The Rattlers posted a 16-14 fin-
ish overall and a second-place
finish in the league at 11-5, be-
hind Howard and North Carolina
A & T. Turner and Finney led the
Rattlers in virtually every catego-
ry and finished first-team ALL- w
MEAC and first and second in the
Player of the Year balloting.
FAMU tackled possibly its'
most ambitious schedule ever, .
with nationally-ranked Setson ; 3
Hall, Florida State and Missouri
on their schedule, all of whom
made the NCAA Tournament.
Alvin Hollins










Delon Turner dribbles around the Morgan State defense.




SKETBALL

Sports




&I .%


V


'1


- ~'~a


- I


4


Joey McGrear goes up and over an oppo-
nent for the jump shot.


I Sports 83


, fP -4.





Colson, Kevin .......................... G
Daniels, Kelvin .......................... F
Davis, Clarence ....... ............... G
Davis, Renaldo ...................... ... G
Finney, Reginald ....... ........ ......... G
Graham, Djuan ........ ................. G
Hunt, Lester ......... .... ................ F
Jackson, Copeland................ G
Lawson, Alfred ......... ................ G


00
34
10
32
24
21
31
20
12


B


:1





















Lovett, Andrew ..
McGrear, Joey...
Pitts, Ibn .........
Pritchett, Brian ...
Turner, Delon .
Walton, Anton ...
Williams, Curtis...
Williams, Darrell..
Wingate, Credale


11
42
44
22
50
55
30
15
35


. G
.F-C
...F
G
S. F
. C
G-F
. G
G-F


=I


MMI 0"










f A


t,


I
~
-4
":
0


r '


A' ~ ~ fr Zeel,)rJ
J' A,


FAMU pitching coach Clarence Giddy gives advice to
one of the members of the baseball team.


6 I Sports 4


L


~iif~





MEN'S RATTLER


0 SEBALL


I4 Spors


The FAMU Baseball team (23-25 Overall Record) won its' third straight MEAC title in
April, winning three games on the final day of the tournament, including a two-game sweep
of Howard University.
Led by a foursome of outfielders Morisse Daniels (ranked fourth nationally in triples) and
Willie Brown (team home run leader) and infielders Curtis George (Tournament MVP) and
Adrian West (1991 Tourney MVP), the Rattlers came out of the loser's bracket in the
tournament to win the title for the fifth time overall in the last six years.
Pitchers David Prosser (6-6), the tournament's top pitcher, and Malcolm Hamilton (1991
Tournament Top pitcher), hurled the Rattlers to key victories. George, the FAMU shortstop,
pitched a complete-game win over Howard, to send FAMU into the championship final.
Alvin Hollins
















Adrian West .. ....................
David Watkins .......................
G reg Russel ..........................
M ichael Ray .........................
Dem etrius Milner .....................
Gaylon Williams.. .................
Corey Battey ....... .................
Edie Odom .. .....................
James White .. ...................
Derrick Townsend ....................
M orisse Daniels ......................
Carlos LaGuardia ..................


:4


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13


.INF
.INF
.OF
.OF
. P
.INF
.OF
.INF
.OF
.. P
.OF
.INF


:I


,1---1~121




i 1m










14 Ricky M ontz ........................... P
15 Derrick Richardson ..................... C
16 Zach Hoyrst .. .....................INF
17 Brett Richardson .................... C
18 Rodell Felton .. ..................... OF
19 Antonio Rivers ...................... P
20 DeArmas Graham ..................... OF
22 Willie Brown ... ..................... OF
I 24 Malcolm Hamilton ................... P
25 Randall Pannell ..................... OF
26 Edwin Griffin .. ...................... P
27 David Freeman............. ......... P
28 Dana Campbell ............ ......... C
29 Curtis George ..................... IN-P
30 David Prosser......... .............. P







MEN'S


T
E
N
N
I
S


Balogun, Suru .......... Soph.
Burls, Chris ............... Sr.
George, Sadeo............ Sr.
Daniel, Brent ........... Soph.
Alston, Melvin ...... .... Jr.
Vickers, Marcus ........... Jr.
Cooper, Sean ...... . Sr.


The men's tennis team shows off their surplus of awards.


Sports 4'I


s. Pam Riley is the coach of the women's tennis
team and has been for the past three years; and
Mr. Robert Mungen has been coaching the men's
tennis team for 32 years. Both coaches this year
had very successful seasons.
Coach Mungen's men's tennis team won their
second straight MEAC title, outlasting Howard Uni.
versity and South Carolina State. In all, the men's
team won four of the six singles' finals and two of
the three doubles' finals to take home the crown.
Coach Riley's women's tennis team placed sec.
ond in the MEAC Tournament, after winning three of
the last four championships, to Howard University.


R


O














The men's tennis team Just knows that they are number one.


TE


, i


0


E


R


d sports


I


WOMEN'S


T
E
N
N
I
S



Barnes, Sherrie............ Jr.
Cratton, Tamara ....... Soph.
Darden, Monica ........ Soph.
Fearon, Stephanie ........ Fr.
Karran, Kathleen .......... Fr.
McCoy, Eleanor ........... Jr.
Moore, Diane ............. Fr.
Peterson, Nicole ....... Soph.



R




I


swim



TERM











The swimming and diving team
ended their season, which spans
from November up until March,
under, favorable circumstances.
The ladies had 7 wins and 3 losses,
while the men had 6 wins and 4
losses. In short, the overall team
had a winning season.
The 1991-92 team consisted of
28 swimmers, making It the larg-
est team Florida A & M University
has ever had. The coach, Mr.
George Ellis, has, been coaching
the swimming and diving team for
nearly 17 years, and he was ex-
tremely proud of this years team.
He described it as being the best
team he has ever coached.
The team's last meet of the sea-
son is the Spring Carnival. This
year their opponents were More-
house and Spellman College.
Coach Ellis was really impressed
with the teams performance; and
with the exception of one gradu-
ate, next year's team will consist
of all the same members. Coach
Ellis is almost certain that next
year, this year's team will have an
even greater season.


Sabrina Taylor of the FAMU swim team practices the Butterfly Stroke.

The swim team takes time during the FAMU relays to celebrate a great
season.

A member of the swim team prepares for his event.


F 'i *'


92 Sports


* -~ C
0~


*


d Sports

















Brigitte Barr ............ ... ......... Sophomore
Angela Beale ... ...................Freshman
Jennifer Beale ......................Sophomore
Shawn Betts ... ....................Freshman
Michelle Floyd ... ...................Senior
Shalanda Giles .....................Sophomore
Dara Grisby .... ....................Freshman
Remera Jones .................. ...... Junior
Roberta Orr ........................... Senior
Lisa Rawlins ........................... Sophomore
Ayana Royster ... ..................Senior
Kim Scott .............................Freshman
Madeline Scott .......................Senior
Sabrina Taylor ... ...................Junior
Leslie Waldon ... ...................Freshman
Vonkeli Williams ....................Freshman














Richard Brooks ..................... Junior
Kevin Brooks .... ...................Freshman
Carlos Bumes ................ ...... Senior
Patrick Cotton ........... ....... ... Senior
Michael Davis ......................Sophomore
Norvell Davis .... ...................Sophomore
Anthony Dixon .............. ... .... Junior
Torr Gilyard .... ....................Sophomore
Todd Gunn .... .....................Freshman
Marc Hamilton................ ...... Junior
Robert Jenkins ........ ............. Junior
Kenneth Jefferson ..................Sophomore
Alex Marshall ......................Sophomore
Jason Montgomery .................... Senior
Curtis Ricks .... ....................Freshman
Stanley Scott ..........................Sophomore
Samuel Stockton ...................Junior
Anthony Taft ... ....................Senior
Franklin Tumer ......................Sophomore
Patrick Wilkerson ...................Junior















































.1"- '


*


Assuming her leadership role, Shelly' Boston sets up
a play.


P 9 Sports


'1' ~' ~ '





WOMEN'S RATTLER




I U


" A SKETBALL


I Sports


The Rattlerettes suffered through their first losing season since the 1988-89
campaign, with a 10-18 record. Still, there were some notable accomplishments
which can't be overlooked.
Senior Polly Innerarity, became the school's all-time scoring and rebounding
leader, finishing with over 830 rebounds and over 1,400 career points. She
scored 40 points against South Florida, the second-highest single game effort by
a women's player in school history.
Freshman Natalie White, who earned Freshman All-American honors, led
NCAA Division One in steals, averaging 5.1 per game, the best-per-game
average by any college basketball player, male or female in any division in
1991-92.
White set an NCAA single-game record with 14 steals against South Alabama
in December of 1991, and her singular performance at point guard was the best-
ever by a Rattlerette freshman, as she completed her collegiate debut with 143
steals and 150 assists.
Alvin Hollins















Donyale Ferguson
Theodora Allen
Polly Innerarity
Shelly Boston


13
32
40
15


: ::-

















Sherrie Barnes
Sherrall Bass
Demetria McMillan
Sandra Locklear


31
24
14
25





AMw1U
t,


HA


In track, FAMU placed sec-
ond in both the men's and
women's indoor and men's and
women's outdoor track champi-
onships. Nevertheless, the
women's track team kept alive
its streak of having an out-
standing performer named
from its ranks ... Freshman
Dana Kaigler was the outdoor
meets most outstanding female
performer, marking the fourth
straight year a FAMU women's
trackster was the top performer.
Senior Kanyon Singletary, the
aspiring decathlete, was the
outstanding female performer
last year (1991) in both the in-
door and outdoor champion-
ships in the 1992 indoor and
MEAC Championships.
Alvin Hollins


P


I


Sports


ft


piZ P"g






























Ugochi Nwaogwugwu gets out in front of her opponents at the FAMU relays.


WOMEN'S TRACK TEAM
Shontory Brown
Rena Cash
Monyette Chattam
Lamika Johnson
Crystal Jones
Dana Kaigler
Keshia King
Shantell Littles
Sylvia Martin
Tamara Mitchell
Ugochi Nwaogwugwu
Veleria Reid
Kanyon Singletary
Jerri Sutton
Rhonda Thompson
Kim William


MEN'S TRACK TEAM


David Akin
Maurice Barnett
Jamal Bell
Keith Blake
Tharus Bradley
Dwayne Carpenter
Mario Dickens
Troy Gray
Brian Hargett
Jason Henderson
Chris Jackson
Brent Johnson
Christopher Kelly


Brim Lawrence
Chris McCoy
Terrance McNell
Vic Miller
Ervin Montgomery
Corey Mosley
Rodrick Roberts
Ricky Scale
Trent Smith
David Stargel
Derek Tillman
Dwight Mazlon


Id SO~tsI







RATTLERETTE


The Florida A & M University
Rattlerette Volleyball team
started off their season with a
bang. Coaching her third year,
Pam Reilly, spurred the team to
an early season record of 14-1
and a final record of 22-16. Led
by a sensational trio: Nina Bell
(Vero Beach), setter/
hitter Valerie King (Orlando) and
setter/hitter Nicole Wells (Win-
ter/Haven) the Rattlerettes won
13 consecutive on-court
matches and two early season
tournaments. Contributing to
this early success were hitter/
middle blocker Kristi Pratt (Del-
ray Beach), hitter Kendia Rowe
(Chicago) and hitter/middle
blocker Randi Lee (Detroit).
Nicole Wells, was the club
leader in kills and was once
named Trans America Athletic
Conference Player of the Week.
To add to her list of accomplish-
ments, she was recorded for 89
kills during the Rattlerette's eight
match sweep through the
MEAC Tournament. The Team
recruited two prospective play-
ers: Shreen Benedict (Jackson-
ville) and Kathleen Karran (Car-
rol City) to ease into the spots
vacated by seniors. Other key
players were Sheere Barnes,
Tiombe Jenkins and Aquilla
McGuire.
Coach Reilly stated, "al-
though the team has an overall
lack of confidence, they make
up for it with versatility and a
solid returning nucleus."


NAME


Tiom be Jenkins ..................
Aquilla McGuire .............. .
Alliniece Taylor ............... .
Nina Bell .........................
Chineta G ilchrist .............. ..
Valerie King ......................
LeChita Taylor ............... .
Natasha W illiams .................
Chaom Graham ............. .
Kristi Pratt .......................
Kendia Row e ....................
G illian Nolden ....................
Randi Lee . .................
Nicole W ells .....................


POSITION


...... H-S
. . S
. ... H-MB
...... S-H
. ... DS
S
. . H
...... H-MB
. . S

...... H-MB
...... H-DS


LLEYBALL


S1 Sports






RATTLERETTE


PLAYER

Tamara Cohen .............. .
Psauntia Andrews ................
Jill Klundt . ..................
Tameca Bowens .................
Kendra Butler ................ .
Marcelina Sm ith .............. .
Janelle Beasley . . . . .
Russhlawn (Randi) Lee . . .
Jennifer Moncur .............. .
Sandra Locklear ............. .
Shelbi Lucas .....................
A lissa Sm ith ......................


POSITION


.OF
.P
.P-OF
.OF
.OF
. C-IF
.SS
.IN-P
.INF
.OF-
.C-IF
.INF


FTBALL


i Sports 103


The women's softball team
went through a great deal of
reorganization with its new head
coach, Veronica Wiggins. The
team is very young; over 50 per-
cent of the members are either
freshmen or sophomores. De-
spite a losing season, the team
was recognized for having an
outstanding player of the year.
Sophomore Marcelina Smith
ranked in the top five in the
Trans America Conference in
home runs and triples per game.
With such young players the
women's softball team is head-
ed for victories in the coming
years.




















IS CR


RATTLER FOOTBALL

Opponent

Tuske g e e ................................................................................................................. 4 7-24
H o w a rd ................................................................................................................... 21 -2 8
Georgia Southern .......................................................................................................... 21-28
Te nne sse e Sta te ............................................................................................................ 43-7
North Carolina A & T ....................................................................................................... 19-41
Delaware State ............................................................................................................ 20-10
So uth C a ro lina Sta te ....................................................................................................... 7-2 1
M o rg a n Sta te .............................................................................................................. 55-7
So uthe rn-La .............................................................................................................. 24 -20
G ra m b ling ................................................................................................................. 22-25
Bethune-C o okm a n ......................................................................................................... 46-28


VOLLEYBALL

Opponent

University of Central Florida .................................................................................... 3, 42, 12-15, 15, 15
Florida Memorial College ................................................................................................. FORFEIT
ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY INVITATIONAL
South Carolina State University ..................................... .................. 15, 9, 14, 15, 15-13, 15, 16, 9, 3
Paine (Ga.) College ...................................................... ..................... 15, 15, 15-8, 3, 2
Southern-Baton Rouge ................................................ ................. 16, 15, 13, 15-14, 13, 15, 5
Alcorn State University ............................................ ................... 13, 6, 15, 15, 15-15, 15, 5, 8, 9
Southern-Baton Rouge ................................................................ ............ 12, 15, 2, 15, 15-15, 7, 15, 2, 5
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC MID-SEASON TNY
South Carolina State University ............................................... ................... 15, 15, 15-8, 7, 12
Bethune-Cockman College .................................................... ................... 15, 15, 15-7, 3, 3
North Carolina A & T ..................................................................................... 15, 14, 15, 15-6, 16, 7, 5
Howard University ......................................................................... 15, 15, 15-11, 11, 12
Coppin State College ......................................................................................... 15, 15, 15-13, 6, 10
Morgan State University ....................................................................... 15, 15, 15-6, 3, 1
Maryland-Eastern Shore ...................................................... .................. 15, 15, 15-2, 6, 10
Delaware State College ............................................................ 15, 15, 15, 15, 15-5, 6, 17, 6, 7
University of S. Alabama .................................................... .................. 7, 12, 9-15, 15, 15
Tro y Sta te .................................................................................................... 9 7, 10-15, 15 15
Mercer University ............................................... ................... 10, 15, 9, 16, 17-15, 5, 15, 14, 15
G eorgia State University . . ............................................................................. 5, 4, 1-15, 15, 15
College of Charleston ........................................................................................... 4, 3, 9-15, 15, 15
Stetson University ................................................... .................. 11, 6, 15, 12-15, 15, 10, 15
Sam ford University ..................................... ....................................................... 3, 11, 5-15, 15, 15
Florida State University ........................................................................ 1, 8, 3-15, 15, 15
Alabama State University ................................................................................. 13, 15, 15, 15-15, 8, 4, 6
Albany State College .............................................................. ........... 45, 15, 15-0, 2, 6
Nicholls State University . . .............................................................................. 5, 6, 6-15, 15, 15
SE Louisiana University ...................................................... .................. 9, 14, 11-15, 16, 15
Texas Southern University ....................................................................................... 10, 7, 6-15, 15, 15
A labam a State University . . . .......................................................................... 15, 15, 5-2, 11, 12
Alcorn State University ...................................................... ................... 15, 15, 15-7, 7, 12
Univ. of Central Florida ...................................................... .................. 2, 1, 7-15, 15, 15
Coppin State College ................................................................................... 15, 13, 15, 15-7, 15, 11, 9
S. Carolina State College ............................................... .................. 7, 15, 1I, 9-15, 13, 15, 15
Morgan State University ............................................................. 15, 9, I5, 6, 2-1, 15, 10, 15, 15
Stetson University ........................................................................................ 2, 6, 16, 8-15, 15, 14, 15
Centenary College ....................................................... .................. 15, 15, 17-12, 9, 15
G eorgia Southern University . . .............................................................. 5, 15, 2, 10, 15-8, 13, 15, 15, 8
Sam ford University ............................................................................................. 4, 4, 11-15, 15, 15
WINS 22
LOSS 16






Sports





NIT


ISS C .


Rattlerette Basketball


Opponent


Alabama State ............ .75-67
Southeastern Louisiana ............. 71-70
Bethune-Cookman ................. 75-77
Central Florida ..................... 81-100
South Alabama .................... 67-65
McNeese (La.) State ............... 76-77
Texas El-Paso ...................... 55-96
Georgia State ...................... 62-81
Mercer ........................... 66-78
Florida International ................ 65-91
South Alabama .................... 68-69
SE Louisiana ....................... 82-73
Stetson .. ....................... 92-79
Georgia Southern .................. 69-72
South Carolina State ........ .... 74-90
Bethune-Cookman ......... ..... 76-71
Mercer ..........................59-88
Georgia State ..................... 71-75
Georgia .......................... 63-101
South Florida ...................... 89-85
Florida International ......... .... 85-95
Delaware State ........... ..... 86-84
Stetson ..........................94-88
Bethune-Cookman ......... . .... 71-61
Florida State ...................... 71-100
Georgia ....................... 66-93
Georgia Southern .......... ..... 89-97/OT
TAAC Tourney *Mercer ............. 60-76


WINS 10
LOSS 17


Basketball


Opponent


Florida .......................... 66-76
Florida Memorial ................. 88-69
Bethune-Cookman ............... 94-79
M issouri . ...... ............ 6 1-86
Florida Atlantic .................. 80-69
Florida State .................... 0-2
Southern-Baton Rouge ........... 72-88
San Diego State ................. 90-94
George Washington .............. 65-71
Seton Hall ....................... 59-100
Maryland-E.S ............ . 80-79
Delaware State ................. 80-83
South Carolina State ...... .... 71-68
Morgan State ................... 98-67
Coppin State ........... . 89-90
Howard .................. ....... 78-67
South Carolina State ............. 69-70
North Carolina A & T............. 93-89/OT
Jacksonville ............. ..... 65-81
Bethune-Cookman .............. 88-65
Morgan State ................... 96-78
Coppin State......... ...... 78-76
Howard ...................... 68-72
Maryland-E.S.......... ......... 96-69
Delaware State ................. 90-81
Bethune-Cookman............... 94-81
North Carolina A & T ............. .78-80
MEAC *Delaware State .......... 78-73
MEAC *Morgan State ............ 74-69
MEAC *Howard.................. 65-67


WINS 17
LOSS 13


Sports


N


S


A


TI






INSTANT



l*= i.U= t.~


BASEBALL

Opponent

Florida Atlantic ............ ...................................... 6-1
Florida Atlantic ............ ...................................... 7-9
Jacksonville ........... .......................................... 6-5
Alabama State .................. ................................ 1-5
Alabama State ................. ................................. 7-6
Virginia State ................. ................................... 1-1
Virginia State ................. .................................. 10-2
Virginia State ................. .................................. 10-4
Bethune-Cookman . ......... .......................................... 8-7
Bethune-Cookman . ......... .......................................... 8-7
South Florida ................. ............................................ 4-17
South Florida ............ ........................................ 4-11
Valdosta State ............ ...................................... 8-15
Florida Southern ................. .................... ............. 4-6
Florida Southern ............ ..................................... 5-11
Troy State ..................................................... 2-10
Troy State ..................................................... 0-7
Jacksonville ............ ......................................... 8-7
Columbus College ................. ............................... 1-8
Columbus College ................. ............................... 0-10
Troy State ..................................................... 8-3
Deleware State .................. ............................... Rained Out
Deleware State .................. ............................... Rained Out
Albany State .......... .......................................... 5-2
Florida Memorial ........... ...................................... 7-1
Tuskegee ...................................................... 12-2
Bethune-Cookm an . ......... .......................................... 7-6
Mercer ........................................................ 4-19
Mercer ........................................................ 3-4
Alabama State ................ .................................. 4-7
Southern-Baton Rouge ................ ............................ 6-4
Southern-Baton Rouge . ........... ....................................... 1-5
South Alabama ................. ................................. 7-8
South Alabama ................. ................................. 3-11
Valdosta State ............ ...................................... 7-16
Florida Southern . .... .............................. .............. 1-10
Florida Southern ............ ..................................... 8-5
Columbus College ................. ....................................... 5-2
Columbus college ................................................ 0-3
South Florida ................................................... 5-10
South Florida ................. ............... .................... 3-5
Mercer ........................................................ Rained Out
Mercer ........................................................ Rained Out
Tampa ........................................................ 2-8
Tampa ........................................................ 7-11
Florida Atlantic ............ ...................................... 3-4
Florida Atlantic ........... . ..... ...................................... Rained Out
MEAC *South Carolina State . ........... ................................. 3-2
MEAC *North Carolina State . ........... ................................. 3-2
MEAC *Howard .................. ................................ 6-9
MEAC *North Carolina State ............... ......................... 8-6
MEAC *Howard ................. ................................. 4-2

WINS 18
LOSS 24





Sports






NS


RATTLERETTE SOFTBALL

Opponent

Samford ....................................................... 2-7
Samford ................ ................................................. 0-10
Valdosta State................ ........................................... 3-9
Valdosta State............ ...................................... 0-10
Florida State .............. ... ....................... ............ 0-12
Florida State ........... .... ......................... ............ 0-10
Troy State .................. ................................... 0-7
Troy State .................. ................................... 3-2
West Florida ................. ........ ........................... 1-5
West Florida .................. .................................. 0-8
NW Louisiana .................. ................................. 2-8
NW Louisiana ................ ...... .............................. -8
North Carolina A & T ............... .............................. 22-0
North Carolina A & T ................ ............................. 14-0
Jacksonville State . . ........ ........................................... 7-2
Valdosta State ................................................. 2-5
Rutgers ........... ............................................ 1-12
Rutgers ........... ............................................ 0-5
Virginia ............ ........................................... 0-8
Virginia .................. .......................... ............ 1-4
Northern Iowa ................................................... -9
Northern Iowa .................................................. 0-3
Rutgers ........... ............................................ 0-12
Miami of Ohio ................. .................................. 0-3
Virginia ....................................................... 0-6
Southern Illinois . . .. ........................... ................... 1-2
Georgia State .................. ................................ 0-3
Georgia State .................. ................................ 7-14
Bowling Green ................. ................................. 0-11
Bowling Green ................. .................................. 1-1 1
North Florida . . ....... .............................................. .. Rained O ut
North Florida . . ...... ............................................... .. Rained O ut
UWF Tny *West Florida ................ ............................ 1-5
UW F Tny *Valdosta State . . ........ ................................... 7-8
UWF Tny *Faulkner ................ ............................... 6-7
UW F Tny *M obile C college . . ....... ................................... 3-10
Georgia Southern . . ........ ........................................... 4-3
Georgia Southern ................. ............................... 0-5
Florida State ................. .................................. 0-6
Florida State ................................................... 0-7
Edward Waters ................. ................................ 15-3
Edward Waters ................ ................................. 9-1
Mercer .................. ..................................... 0-6
Mercer .................. ...................................... -5
Edward Waters ................ ................................. 17-3
Edward Waters ................. ................................ 7-1
North Florida ............... ... ...................... ............ 4-14
North Florida ......... ....... ........... .....................6-10
TAAC Tourn. *Stetson ................ ............................ 0-12
TAAC Tourn. *SE Louisiana ............... .......................... 0-13
Troy State ..................................................... 2-10
Troy State ..................................................... 4-10

WINS 9
LOSS 41





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PANHLNC


On the campus of Florida A & M University "Greek-
dom", as it is often called, is alive and well. FAMU is
proud to have seven zealous, energetic, and active
Greek lettered organizations including the Beta Alpha
Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, The Beta Nu Chapter
of Alpha Phi Alpha, The Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta, The Alpha Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha
Psi, The Gamma Alpha Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta, The
Alpha Eta Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma, and The Upsi-
lon Psi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi. These organiza-
tions, and the individual members of these organiza-
tions are at the forefront of political, academic, and
cultural movements on FAMU's campus. Many of these
organizations have achieved notoriety both within
their respective sororities and fraternities, as well as
local, state and national acclaim for dedicated and
outstanding service to the African-American commu-



President, Joseph Youngblood, conducts elections for the up corn
ing year.
Represenraties and interested parties attend council meetings.


110 Greeks






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nity. The Pan-Hellenic Council serves as the official
umbrella government for all of the eight African-
American Greek lettered organizations chartered un-
der The National Pan-Hellenic Council. The Pan-Hel-
lenic Council sponsors a host of community service
activities, activities that promote Greek unity, and two
annual Greek Extravaganzas. Together, as a unified
front, and through the shields of each of the eight
organizations, the FAMU Pan-Hellenic Council has
greatly enriched campus and community life at Florida
A & M University, and in the Tallahassee community.



Joe Youngblood entertains a question from the floor.
Representatives of ihe Greek letter organizations gather in front of :


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