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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Centennial opening
 Rattler opening
 Greeks
 Sports
 Student life
 Students
 Clubs & organizations
 Academics
 Special events
 Closing
 Advertising
 Back Cover


PALMM FAMU



The rattler
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 Material Information
Title: The rattler
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida A&M University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1987
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. VI (1957); title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 86123550
System ID: AM00000319:00009

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Centennial opening
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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    Rattler opening
        Page 16
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    Greeks
        Page 32-33
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    Sports
        Page 62-63
        Page 64
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        Page 66
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    Student life
        Page 88-89
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    Students
        Page 104-105
        Page 106
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        Page 109
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        Page 111
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        Page 157
    Clubs & organizations
        Page 158-159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
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        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
    Academics
        Page 198-199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
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        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
    Special events
        Page 240-241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
    Closing
        Page 250-251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
    Advertising
        Page 258
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        Page 260
        Page 261
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    Back Cover
        Page 272
        Page 273
Full Text














THE RATTLER

1987
AfroeAmrlol a Colleotitl
RESERVE


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Table of


Contents

CENTENNIAL OPENING
RATTLER C)PENING
GREEKS
SPORTS
STUDENT LIFE
STUDENTS
CLUBS/ORGANIZATIONS
ACADEMICS
SPECIAL EVENTS
CLOSING


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A LEGACY TO PRESERVE ...


RATTLER 1987


CENTENNIAL OPENING / 1








UNIVERSITY HISTORY
-\

Florida A&M University, founded on October 3, 1887, as the State Normal College for Colored Students, began classes
with fifteen students and two instructors. Its destiny: to become an institution of higher learning, striving toward an even
greater height of academic excellence. Today, Florida A&M University is one of nine institutions in Florida's State University
System, and excellence "excellence with caring" remains its goal.
In 1891, the school received a share of the $7,500 allocated to states for agricultural and mechanical education, and it was
then that President Tucker initiated his plan for growth. The school was moved from Copeland Street (now the site of Florida
State University) to its present location and its name was changed to the State Normal and Industrial College for Colored
Students.
In 1905, management of the school was transferred from the Board of Education to the Board of Control. This event was
significant because it officially designated the school as an institution of higher education.
In 1909, the name was changed to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes (FAMC). The following year,
with an enrollment of 317 students, the college awarded its first degrees.
During the years 1924-44, Florida A&M University acquired much of the physical and academic image it has today.
Buildings were constructed, more land was purchased, more faculty was hired, courses were upgraded, and accreditation
was received from several state agencies. In 1944, Florida A&M had constructed 48 buildings, accumulated 396 acres of
land, had 812 students and 122 staff members. In 1949, expansion, along with reorganization, continued; the school had
obtained an Army ROTC unit and student enrollment had grown to more than 2,000.
But perhaps the greatest achievement was the elevation of the school to university status. In 1951, the school's name was
changed from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College. And
in 1953, by legislative action, the school was renamed Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University.
During the years 1950-68, the school experienced its most rapid growth. Twenty-three buildings were erected; the
hospital (now Foote-Hilyer Administration Center) was completed; staff increased,by more than 500; the four-quarter plan
(the semester plan) was implemented and the school became the first Negro institution to become a member in the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools. Enrollment increased to more than 3,500.
The 1970's brought further growth and development to Florida A&M University, and in 1971, FAMU was recognized as a
full partner in the nine-university, public higher education system of Florida.
The 1980's have been exemplary of productive development at Florida A&M University. The University grew to 12
schools and colleges. In 1984 authority was granted.to offer the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the Ph.D. in Pharmacology and
in 1985 the University graduated its first engineer from the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering. The '80's also was the
expansion of the Gaither Athletic Center the construction of the Lua S. Bartley Women's weight training rooms, and
softball and baseball fields. Bragg Memorial Stadium was renovated and expanded to provide seating for some 25,000
spectators and the Galimore/Powell Fieldhouse was erected. New facilities were constructed to house the Schools of Allied
Health Sciences, Architecture, Business and Industry and Nursing. Early in 1986 a groundbreaking ceremony was held for a
$12 million facility to house FAMU/FSU College of Engineering. Construction is scheduled for completion by spring, 1988.
Construction and renovation projects have amounted to more than $34 million.
For nearly a century, Florida A&M University has served as a beacon of hope for countless numbers of young men and
women in pursuit of their dreams and aspirations. On October 3, 1986, the University began its "Centennial Celebration."
During the ensuing months through December, 1987 programs will be staged to call attention to and to remind
Floridians, and all Americans, of the significant contributions made by FAMU and FAMUans.


2 / UNIVERSITY HISTORY








BLACK ARCHIVES


The Black Archives when it %as the Carnegie Library


The Black Archives, Research Center and
Museum, one ot the oldest brick buildings
on the FAMU campus is located in the Car-
negie Center Building.
This building is on the National Register
of Historical Places as a national historical
site.
In 1906, Andrew Carnegie granted Dr.
Nathan Young, then president of Florida
State Normal and Industrial School.
$10,000 for construction of the Carnegie
Library. A two-story, brick veneer building.
the new library, was dedicated in February.
1908.
In addition to serving as library, the new
building housed the President's and other
administrative offices. From 1935 to 1969,
the building provided offices and studios
for the Art Department. Later, it was con-
verted into a religious center that included


a small chapel, conference room. and or-
ces for the faculty and staff of the Department of Philosophy and Religion.
In 1971, a bill was passed by the Florida legislature providing a place to ser\ e the state bN supporting and collecting source
material on the Black or African-Americans from the earliest beginnings to the present. Opened in 1977, the Black Archives
as acknowledged as a Bicentennial project.



BLACK A


ARCHIVES / 3








LEE HALL


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TODAY


Lee Hall was constructed in 1928 as
an Auditorium-Administration Build-
ing at the cost of $250,000 and is con-
sidered one of the finest school build-
ings on the campus of any Southern
Negro college or university. Located
atop what is reputed to be the highest
of seven hills in Tallahassee and sur-
rounded by moss-covered oaks, it
makes the campus a highly pictur-
esque place.


YESTERYEAR


4 / LEE HALL






FOOTE-HILYER


ADMINISTRATION BUILDING


* 1 31 1111g I lii

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Foote-Hileer Adminislralion building loda\


Foo Hier dminiraon bu g wa once a hohe Black community.
Foote-Hilver Administration building was once a hospital lor the Black community.


FOOTE-HILYER ADMIN. BLDG. / 5


G








DORMITORIES

McGuinn Hall was the first wom-
en's dormitory at FAMU. On May 25,
1893, President Thomas DeSalle
Tucker was authorized space for the ..
dormitory at a cost of $9,000. How-
ever, McGuinn Hall, originally known
as "South Hall for Women," was built
the summer of 1894, at a cost $2,875.

honor of Nannie S. McGuinn, dean of
women at FAMU. She served from
1919 to 1943.
The summer of 1984, McGuinn
Hall was repainted inside and had
some minor repairs done on the ceil-
ings. The walls were painted from
pale yellow to white and the doors Diamond Hall and McGumn Hall
are now orange and green.
Now the luxurious McGuinn Hall, a
freshman dormitory for women, is a
four-story brick and fire resistant
building. With a housing capacity for
200 students, it has a social room,
laundry, kitchen and lounge with new
snack and cookie machines. This dor-
mitory was constructed with the aid -
of a federal grant at a cost of u Ti,
$175,000. -


J. T. Diamond Hall's construction
began in 1947, during President Wil-
liam H. Gray's administration. The
dormitory for young women was con-
structed at the cost of $260,000.
Truth, Wheatley, and Cropper Hall

Lula B. Cropper Hall was built in
1948 during President Gray's admin- .
istration. A dormitory for women,. ,, .
named for the former Dean of Wom-
en. Cropper Hall was constructed at
the cost of $350,000.


Phyllis Wheatley Hall was con-
structed in 1947 as a dormitory for ~ '
Sophomore women. Its cost of con-
struction was $352,000. -
Paddyfote Housing Center

Truth Hall is one of the five facilities that house female students at Florida A&M University. The residence hall, which was
named in March of 1959, after Sojourner Truth, an American abolitionist, was built in 1958. After construction was
completed in 1958, the building was simply called "Women's Dormitory."


6 / DORMITORIES








DORMITORIES


Gibbs Hall


i


S-Sampson Hall
Sampson Hall


Gibbs Hall, the first dormitory for
men at FAMU was rebuilt the summer
of 1954. It was named after Thomas
Vanns Gibbs, who was the first black
legislator from Duval County. He was
also vice-president and one of the co-
founders of the University.
Gibbs Hall, was originally designed
for the young men, however, in 1924
it was converted to a women's dor-
mitory. During the same year, it was
totally destroyed by a fire. Three stu-
dents were suspected of the crime
and brought before the judicial com-
mittee. They were questioned and
expelled from school. In 1953, the
dormitory was reconstructed at a cost
of $800,000.
Now, again, Gibbs Hall, a dormi-
tory for young men, is one of FAMU's
most modern dormitories on campus.
It was remodeled the summer of 1984
at a cost of 2.9 million dollars. The six-
floor, fire-resistant, brick structure ac-
commodates 313 male students. It
has a spacious general lounge, a study
lounge, and a recreation room with a
kitchen.


Paddyfote Housing Center is a
four-unit, five-story modern air-
conditioned dormitory complex that
accommodates 444 students and was
constructed at a cost of $1,456,021.
This residence hall was named after
Caleb J. Archer Paddyfote, a native of
Jamaica, British West Indies. He re-
ceived his education at Tuskegee In-
stitute and served as Commandant
and Dean of Men at Florida A&M Col-
lege.


Young Hall


DORMITORIES / 7


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FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY


S/ VIEW OF FAMU YESTER
8/VIEW OFFAMU YESTER


YEAR


VIEW OF FAMU / 9








UNIVERSITY COMMONS
"A


The beginning of something new


Getting closer to some new information

The new and beautiful addition to the univer-
sity campus












PHOTO FURNISHED BY
DR. GEORGE CLARK JR.


A new Orange Room in the making


10 / UNIVERSITY COMMONS


Before renovations began







COLEMAN LIBRARY







S I Coleman Library, constructed in
1947, is a facility which includes
rooms designed for, and utilized spe-
cifically for, reading, browsing, peri-
odicals, reference, reserve, catalog-
ing, and special collections, as well as
space for work in Library Science. The
library was constructed at a cost of
$580,000. In July, 1968, Coleman Li-
brary started utilizing the major por-
S. tion of the Law Building after the

.. .. Library reading room stacks and sev-
.. _.. p,-te.
..., ..eral offices at the Law Building are
-..' being used solely for the resources of
S Coleman Library. The former Law
S' Building Annex was completed in
1953 at a cost of $400,000.



JACKSON-DAVIS HALL

S* Jackson-Davis Hall was constructed
during President Lee's administration
g as a College Women's Hall. It is now
called Jackson-Davis Hall and was
completed in 1926 at the cost of
S,.$84,000. Jackson-Davis Hall formerly
housed the School of Nursing, and it
now provides office space for the
:. _ University.


JACKSON-DAVIS HALL AND COLEMAN LIBRARY / 11








FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY'S


THOMAS DE SALLE TUCKER, the first president of what is now Florida
A&M University, was born July 21, 1844, in Sierra Leone, West Africa. He
came to the United States as a youth and graduated from Oberlin.College in
1886. Mr. Tucker taught in the public school systems of Kentucky and
Louisiana and practiced law in Pensacola before coming.to Tallahassee in
1887, to head the Colored Normal School now Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University.












NATHAN BENJAMIN YOUNG was educated at Oberlin and Talladega
Colleges. He came to the Colored Normal School as president in 1901. It
was during his tenure that the management of the institution was transferred
from the State Board of Education to the State Board of Control, and the
school changed to the Florida A&M College for Negroes. He served as
president until 1923.











J. R. E. LEE, SR., a graduate of Bishop College, was appointed president in
1924 and served until April, 1944. During his administration he enlisted the
aid of several out-of-stale agencies in expanding the physical plant of the
college, building a stronger faculty and extending the services of the
Institution. Among the buildings constructed during his administration were
the Administration (now Lee Hall), N. B. Young Hall, Jackson Davis Hall,
Lucy Moten Demonstration School, McGuinn Hall, and Sampson Hall. In
addition, numerous improvements were made to the physical appearance
of the campus. The college became accredited as a class "A" institution and
was admitted to membership in the Association of American Colleges and
Universities and the American Council on Education.


PHOTOS FURNISHED BY KEITH POPE


12 / PRESIDENTS








EIGHT GREAT PRESIDENTS




WILLIAM H. GRAY, JR., a graduate of Bluefield State College and the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, served as president from September 1, 1944, to July 6,
1949. An extensive building program took place during his administration. The
construction included additions to the Dining Hall, Diamond Hall, Cropper and
Wheatley Halls, the Central Heating Plant, the Gymnasium, and Coleman Li-
brary. The $2,000,000 Hospital and Health Center and the new laundry were
started during his administration. Other physical expansions included
Polkinghorne Village, a large amount of paving, renovation of building, and other
campus improvements.










SDR. GEORGE W. GORE, JR., a graduate of DePauw, Harvard, and Columbia
Universities, assumed the presidency of Florida A&M University on April 1, 1950.
Growth in enrollment, faculty and staff personnel, and physical plant char-
acterized his administration. Academically, the institution experienced several
important changes among which were the attainment of university status, and
admission as a full-fledged member of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools.









DR. BENJAMIN L. PERRY, JR., a native of Eatonville, Florida, was educated
S through the public schools of Leon County. He graduated from Florida A&M
Demonstration High School in Tallahassee, and received his B.S. degree from
Florida A&M College. He received his M.S. degree from Iowa State College and
the Ph.D. degree from Cornell University.
Dr. Perry is the sixth president of Florida A&M University. Prior to becoming
president he served the community as professor of economics, Director of
Research and Grants, and Dean of Administration.
Dr. Perry belongs to many national, state and local organizations and has
published numerous articles on education and economics. He has been honored
by the president of the Republic of Nigeria for outstanding services to the
University of Nigeria, and was recently selected Kappa Man of the Year by the
Tallahassee Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.


PHOTOS FURNISHED BY KEITH POPE


PRESIDENTS /13








EIGHT GREAT PRESIDENTS




A true son of Florida A&M, Dr. Walter L. Smith spent much of his youth in
Tallahassee in the home of his grandfather just south of the campus, and he
earned two degrees from the institution the Bachelor of Arts in biology
and chemistry, and the Master of Education in Administration and Su-
Spervision. Additionally, Dr. Smith served as assistant to the dean of FAM U's
School of Education from February 1972, through January 1973.
Dr. Smith is credited with establishing the first statewide center for human
relations in Florida under sponsorship of the Florida Education Association.
The FEA presented him its Leadership Award in Human Relations in 1973.
He has published and edited several papers and other works, and holds
membership in Phi Delta Kappa. His other affiliations and memberships
include the National Council on Research and Development, the Board of
Education Advisors of the Permanent Charity Foundation, and the board of
directors of the Council of Black American Affairs.
He has served as court appointee of the Citywide Coordinating Council
of Boston, Massachusetts, and as Governor's appointee on the Post-
Secondary Education Commission of Massachusetts.




When the call went out in the summer of 1984 from Florida A&M Uni-
versity for someone to assume the reigns of power and give direction to the
school as it faced its second century, Frederick S. Humphries answered the
call.
The Apalachicola-born native returned to his alma mater after a 10-year
stint as president of Tennessee State University in Nashville. In fact, Hum-
phries became the second FAMU president to assume the role after a
similar tour of duty at Tennessee State. The late George W. Gore, Jr. (1950-
1968), the school's fifth president, was the first to do so.
Humphries was a magna cum laude graduate of Florida A&M University
in 1957, the 50-year old Humphries served as an officer in the United States
Army Security Agency (1957-1959). Following completion of his post-
graduate studies at the University of Pittsburgh, he worked as an associate
professor of chemistry at FAMU (1964-66), and assistant professor of chem-
istry at the University of Minnesota (1966-67), then came back to FAMU as
a professor of chemistry (1967-68).
During his latter stint as professor of chemistry at FAMU, he also directed
the school's Thirteen College Curriculum Program. He moved on to direct
the Institute for Services to Education's (ISE) Summer Conference Program
and was vice president of the ISE from 1970-1974.
Humphries has authored numerous articles on education, especially per-
taining to the historically black colleges and universities and their role in
educating Black Americans and their role in relation to American higher
education in general.
He became president of Tennessee State University in 1974 and along
with this work in education, he was also very active in the community of
Nashville and in the state of Tennessee. He was honored by the Governor
of Tennessee (1981) for his service to the State and was awarded a Cer-
tificate of Appreciation from the Department of Health anid Human Serv-
ices, Office of Human Development Services, Administration for Children
and Youth Families,. Region IV (1983).
FAMU's new president has also been honored for his work specifically in helping to advance the education' of Black
Americans. Accolades have come from the Institute for Service to Education; Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity (Nashville chapter);
Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Society (FAMU chapter) and by Florida A&M University.
He holds membership in the American Association of Higher Education; the American Association f6r Advancement of.
Science; the American Association of University Professors and the American Chemical Society.
Humphries is married to former Antoinette McTurner of Pittsburgh, PA, and they are the parents of three children;
Frederick Jr., Robin Tanya and Laurence Anthony.

PHOTOS FURNISHED BY KEITH POPE



14/ PRESIDENTS






CENTENNIAL FAMILY


V A


THE HUMPHRIES Frederick Ir.. Robin Tanya. Frederick. Antoinette, Laurence


III.


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PRESIDENT'S FAMILY/ 15


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ALMA MATER


College of love and charity
We gather 'round thy noble shrine:
We lift our voice in praise to thee,
And ask a blessing all divine.
CHORUS
FAM-U! FAM-U! I love thee
I'll fight and win whatever the battle be
The Orange and the Green thy Sons shall e'er defend
And loyal to thy voice of love attend
FAM-U! FAM-U! FAM-U! I love thee!
On gridiron, diamond, track and field,
Thy sons the victory never yield, -
And while they tread a broader life
Thy love shall stay them in the strife.
God ever keep us true to thee;
Thy faith that truth shall make men free.
Shall guide thy loyal sons aright
And fend them thru' the skeptic night.




FLORIDA SONG


Dear old Florida, we are yearning.
We will fight for you:
While our loval hearts are burning,
We'll be ever true.
Florida! Florida! Bless her name,
Orange and Green will proudly wave;
We will honor and protect your
Sons and Daughters brave.


16 / SCHOOL SONGS































































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ZIP CODE: 32307

FREDERICK S. HUMPHRIES. PRESIDENT

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

GREETINGS FOR THE
CENTENNIAL EDITION OF "THE RATTLER" YEARBOOK
1987


"There are few earthly things more beautiful than a university. It is a place where
those who hate ignorance may strive to know, where those perceive truth may strive
to make others see; where seekers and learners alike, banded together in search
of knowledge, will honor thought in all its finer ways, will welcome thinkers in
distress or in exile, will uphold ever the dignity of thought and learning and will
exact standards in those things. They give to the young in their impressionable
years the bond of a lofty purpose shared, of a great corporate life whose link will
be not be loosed until they die. They give young people that close companionship
for which youth longs, and that chance of endless discussion of the themes which
are endless, without which youth would seem a waste of time."

John Masefield, late poet laureate of England


For one hundred years, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University has stood as an old story
which has become a classic. Young men and women have come here with their dreams unfurling,
seeking truth, honorin thought, searching for knowledge and preparing for duty. This Centennial
Year Senior Class stands on the records and achievements of the students before you -- students,
who in the fine tradition of "excellence with caring," give substance and meaning to Masefieldian
standards for a university.

The Centennial Edition of "The Rattler Yearbook" will portray in words and pictures "the
wondrous things" of your FAMU. This publication has a significant role to play in helping us
interpret to the world the role Florida A&M University played in developing a major segment
of this nation's human resources.

On behalf of the administration, faculty, staff, student body and alumni, I thank and congratulate
the editor, staff and advisor for producing the Centennial cameo of our University. The value
of this publication will increase -- like precious gems -- as the years and generations come and
go. It vividly demonstrates that we have "a legacy to preserve and a future to design."

Readers, please join me for a pleasantly nostalgic review of "100 years of excellence!"

Sincerely,




Frederick S. Humphries
President

FSH/DPW/mbg


FAMU IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ EQUAL ACCESS UNIVERSITY


MR. PRESIDENT/19













































Governor Bob Graham speaks with President Humphries and his daughter, Robin Tanya Humphries, during the "Inaugural Ball."


i ." ; S,,

.L


0







President Humphries anxiously marches to his inauguration ceremony.


Two great minds FAMU's President Humphries and Board of Regents
Chancellor Charles Reed.


20 / MR. PRESIDENT





PRESIDENT INTERACTS WITH


PUBLIC





President Humphries gives support from the
sidelines to the Rattler 1986-87 football squad.






O *
i* 0*
e I I














z
< During a very proud moment in his life, Dr.
d Humphries gazes in deep thought during his
inaugural address.
Even the rain doesn't stop President Hum-
phries from serving the community.






V F





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MR. PRESIDENT/ 21














41















A01




FAM~






1986,87'



























Miss FAMU Ebony Magazine, April 1987


Cynthia Williams, a member of Delta Sigma Theta, was honored by her sorors.
























Miss Cynthia A. Williams

Cynthia A. Williams, 22, is a Senior Public Relations major from
Hastings, Florida. Her hobbies include singing, reading and playing
sports.


Miss FAMU was escorted by SGA President Andrew Whigham
during the football games.


MISS FAMU / 23









MISS FAMU AND HER COURT



The 80th Annual Coronation for Miss Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University Miss Cynthia A. Williams of Hastings,
Florida was one of the events that marked the beginning of the
"Centennial Celebration."
The coronation production began elegantly with the Ar-
my/Navy ROTC presenting the colors of the Florida and
American flags. Musical proclamations from eight trumpeters of
the "Marching 100" hailed the royal court.
The pageantry also included: Sophomore Attendant, Melanie
Speight; Junior Attendant, Pia Boston; Class Queens including
Freshman Terena Jolley; Sophomore Sarah Wells; Junior -
Lori Holton and Senior Marcia Boston.
The very active Miss FAMU, Ms. Cynthia Williams is a member
of various organizations on campus: the FAMU Gospel Choir
(America's First Black Collegiate Choir), a former member of the
Rattlerette Basketball Team, the Rattler Yearbook staff, and Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Her campaign motto was "Look To The
Rainbow" the rainbow signifying the diverse participation on
"The title of Miss FAMU should not be rated by the beauty of
the candidates but by the participation in campus and communi-
ty activities, and the ability of the candidates to relate to the
students at all levels," said Williams.
During her reign, Miss FAMU participated in various functions
of the university such as: the Inauguration of President Frederick
S. Humphries, meetings with ad hoc committees, convocation
and commencement meetings and a variety of speaking
engagements throughout the Centennial Celebration.
"I'd like to thank God for giving me this opportunity to repre-
sent the students of Florida A&M University, and a special thanks
to my parents, the FAMU students, Faculty and administration. I
C Love FAMU."
Cynthia Williams
Centennial Miss FAMU
1986-1987















0I













o o







0'








CENTENNIAL PREPARATIONS KEPT QUEENS

BUSY



































5'1

_


A d 0


MISS FAMU/ 25







SGA SPEAKS...
It has truly been a pleasure serving you this school year. I may not have ac-
complished everything I se1 out to do or you, but I have enjoyed working with
you, the student body.
Despite the fact that the Centennial year has been filled with ups-and-downs,
we can sit back and be thankful for the efforts that those who have gone before
us put forth in establishing our university. Florida A&M University is picking up
momentum each day and we share the impact in helping it to make a mark on
this nation.
As far as ups-and-downs are concerned, Student Government was no excep-
tion. Many obstacles stood in our way. At times I would ask myself, "Why?" But
realizing that being a leader of a group of people is not always a "bowl of cher-
ries," I constantly reminded myself to just "Keep a-Goin':"

If you strike a thorn or rose,
Keep a-goin'
If it hails or if it snows
Tain't no use to sit an' whine,
When the fish ain't on your line
Bait your hook an'
keep a-tryin'
Keep a-goin'
When the weather kills your crop
Keep a-goin'!
Though it's work to reach the top
Keep a-goin'!
'Spose you're out o' every dime,
Gittin' broke ain't no crime ...
Tell the world you're feeling' prime,
Keep a-goin'!
When it looks like all is up, keep a-goin',
Drain the sweetness from the cup,
Keep a-goin'!
See the wild birds on the wing,
Hear the bells that sweetly ring,
When you feel like sighing, sing
Keep a-goin'!

An institution rich in tradition and heritage, Florida A&M University has provided this nation with many outstanding an 1
productive professionals. The Student Government Association, of which I had the honor to serve as a president, has als
provided our student body with many programs of excellent educational, cultural and entertainment value.
It has also been responsible for bringing some of the nation's most prominent men and women to our campus; and one 1f
the highlights of my tenure as SGA president has been meeting many distinguished and influential persons. The experience s
that I have gained during this year will last for a lifetime.
With the help of my supportive staff, I was able to accomplish the following things this year: Student Participation in th?
FAMU Credit Union, Saving the Centennial Yearbook, Whodini and Beau Williams Concerts, Jazz Forum with Wynton Ma -
salis, SGA's First Annual Poetry Contest, SGA's Tutorial Program, Class Evaluations, Pizza Parties, SGA's Fun Day, SGA trip t
Bethune Cookman Beach Party, SGA Fashion Shows, Stevie Wonder's visit this term and proposed visit for next yea,
Seminars, Legal Services Program, Introduction of City Commission Candidates, Reception for State, Local and Count/
Government Officials, FSA Conference, Title III Conference, SGA Retreat, Participated in Centennial Ten Thousand Doll. r
Drive, Participated in Centennial Phonathon, Institution of Student Proactive Commitment Committee and FAM J
Hook-Up.
In summary, I'd like to thank all the students who so confidently elected me as SGA President. A special thanks to ol r
cabinet and staff.
Finally, I am grateful to my constituents for the opportunity to prove as an SGA administrator that students were rr
number one priority. As I venture out into the real world FAMU will always be in my heart. Remember.
I'm not afraid of tomorrow
For I've seen yesterday,
And I love today!

FAMU forever,

Andrew Whigham, III
Centennial Student Body President
1986-87


26/ SGA PRESIDENT














Andrew Whigham, II, SGA President, is a senior respiratory therapy major from
Tampa, Florida. He is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., and an
Outstanding Young Man of America for 1987. His future plans are to live and to
work in Dallas, Texas.


-%dr: highi im III %%a 4%v,- in nl(- (-)nice h Dir Rmi hord vI Ijrrr
.ar ihe- begmnn~nm vI umrriter. 118


SGA president and Miss
Cynthia Williams.


FAMU enjoy a dance at the coronation honoring Miss


inmr rjrt,mdlnl %%.i uuil. I unml bu-;ik 31 % orl in (lAlicein


SGA Cabinet: Annex Director Kenneth Brinson, Under Secretary of Com-
munications Jackie Brinson, Vice President Avis McLaughlin, Under
Secretary of Academic Affairs Deanna McKinnie, President Andrew
Whigham, III, Comptroller Timothy Brantley, Deputy Attorney General Earl
Olden, Yvette Pugh.


SGA PRESIDENT/ 27








WYNTON MARSALIS IN AN OPEN FORUM

















0













7-


28/ SPECIAL GUESTS







INSPIRING GUESTS, LIKE DICK GREGORY,
Speak On Black Culture


SPECIAL GUESTS/ 29


~~p~i~i8~"s~
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DR. ALVIN POUSSAINT SPEAKS ON THE BLACK
FAMILY


30 / SPECIAL GUESTS







HOMECOMING CONVOCATION SPEAKER DR.
JACK WHITE


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SPECIAL GUESTS/ 31













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Members of Sigma Gamma Rho.


of the Pan-Helleiic


Members of Phi Beta Sigma.


Members of Omega Psi Phi.


Members of Kappa Alpha Psi.


34 / GREEKS






























Members of Zeta Phi Beta.


Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha


"It is the hope of the Pan-Hellenic Council that by unifying itself
into one constructive body that it can better serve this university
and bring all Famuans together under the president's motto, "Ex-
cellence with Caring," according to Alan Armstrong, Pan-Hellenic
Council president.
The Pan-Hellenic Council was organized to serve as the govern-
ing body for all social greek letter organizations on the campus of
Florida A&M University. There are eight Greek letter organizations
in the Council: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Sigma
Theta, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Sigma
Gamma Rho, and Zeta Phi Beta.
The Pan-Hellenic Council serves as a medium for the greeks to
come together, collectively as one productive unit, to share views
on important topics that affect all African-Americans and to better
Serve the community they live in. Some of the major community
projects that the Pan-Hellenic Council has completed within the
S 1986-87 academic year were: City-Wide "Say No To Drugs" a
> peer perspective, City-Wide sponsor for a Food Drive, and Big
SBrother/Big Sister program for the kids of Gretna, Florida. The
social events included: Fall '86 Meet the Greek Stepdown, Fall and
Spring Probate shows all proceeds donated to Miracle Hill Nurs-
ing Home, and a variety of parties and cookouts.























Members of Delta Sigma Theta.























O-
0


0


Members of Alpha Phi Alpha.


GREEKS/ 35







L I 1 I 11.!J


Sometimes it's the little things
a difference. Alphas enjoy re,
our youth.


Omega Psi Phi is represented well as the Lampanos and Omega men participate in phonathon.



















that make
adding with


~-t .i -4w- -. N.- .. D ,,. . T-.. I.a aa l .fSKHW eH
Delta Sorors anxiously await'the "Just Say No To Drugs" rally which was held during Delta Week '87.


36/ GREEKS


%3,--1-






















































A warm heart and a gentle smile is shared with students.


Kappa Probates prepare for much anticipated set-show.


.. --* : '* .|'




.--r _







Destination .. .AKA Ivies all the way, pledges of Alpha Kappa Alpha sing as they march through the set.


CREEKS/ 37

















MEMBERSHIP


Rena Adams
Shirlyn Archie
Terri Avent
Gena Avery
Sophia Avery
Dawn Baker
Armalia Barry
Carolyn Bell
Karen Bertha
Pam Black
Rita Braswell
Tia Breckenridge
Jamie Brown
Jocelyn Brown
Lisa Brown
Sunday Brown
Debra Bryant
Cherelle Calhoun
Diondrea Calvitt
Monique Casey
Marcia Chandler
Rhonda Claybourne
LaSonja Cooley
Avont'e Cunningham
Davelin Daniels
Deborah Daniels
Tamela Daniels
Gena Dennis
Yolanda Dowling
Michelle Easley
Dorothy Ellison
Lisa M. Evans
Tamara Farmer
Angela Ferguson
Chandra Fleming
Jakathryn Ford
Valerie George
Cassandra Hall
Cheryl Harria
Kimberly Hendon
Natalia Herd
Carla Hills
Terri Hines
Lennette Hodges
LeonedaInge
Petrie Inge
Clarissa Johnson


Edwina Johnson
Joyce-Ann Johnson
Tina Johnson
Trina Johnson
Shella Knight
Sherelle Lee
Valerie A. Lewis
Valerie Lowe
Melanie Martin
Eileen May
Lisa McClellam
Letra McCoy
Buhilda McGuiff
Jennifer Meeks
Michelle Michael
Eve Miller
Kim Neighbors
Rae Nicklos
Karen Patterson
Sharon Patterson
Shelley Payne
Felyicia Pemberton
Angela Pittman
Ingrid Pittman
Sonja Reddick
Terrion Resse
Constance Richardson
Lydia Roberson
LaShonna Ross
Gena Shannon
Valerie Small
Kimberly Smith
Krista Smith
Selecia Smith
Tammy Smith
Melanie Speight
Nedra Speight
Messeret Stroman
Audra Strong
Nicole Tinsley
Lorye Truesdale
Darlene Walls
Lenese Walls
Jovetta White
Marinette White
Jacqueline Williams
Tammy Woodruff


As you can see, AKAs look good in any color.


Paraphernalia is very popular with the sorors of Alpha Kappa Alpha.


OFFICERS

Rae Nicklos Basileus
LaSonja Collins Anti-Basileus
Valerie George Grammateus
Kim Neighbors Tamiouchos
Monique Casey Dean of Pledgees


Ivies jammin' to the beat at the Spring 1987 "Greek Extravaganza."


38/AKA


Alpha Kappa Alpha





























The "Pee-Wee Herman" was a popular dance performed during "Meet the Greek."


Terrion Reese and Jamye Brown sang to their "big sisters" of Alpha Kappa Alpha.


Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.,
the oldest Greek letter organization
established by black college women,
was founded in 1908 on the campus
of Howard University. From its hum-
ble beginnings, Alpha Kappa Alpha
has matured into an international
organization which encompasses
Some 90,000 women. The sorority's
0
z purpose is to cultivate and encourage
high scholastic achievement, to pro-
mote unity and friendship among col-
lege women and to be of service to all
mankind.
On March 17, 1932, the Beta Alpha
Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha was
established on the campus of Florida
A&M University, by five illustrious
women; Vivian Henry, Vivian Ellis,
Richie Bell Walker, Bernice Green,
and Rhoda Carlyle who saw the need
to perpetuate the ideals of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
In the past year the Beta Alpha
Chapter has held a variety of com-
munity, and social events including
the "See-Saw for Sickle Cell," Walker
Ford Tutorial Service, the NACCP
membership drive, and the "Miss
Young Gifted and Black Pageant."


Any Ivy's dream --- smiling big sisters after an
"on the set" step show.
Z
z

Z
SOH! Just to be an AKA-skee-weet.
















Z


AKA/ 39

















Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., was founded on December 4,
1906, on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. MU M
Because of the prevalent prejudice and ostracism that blacks suf-
fered during the early 1900s seven great men of vision and foresight
came together and formed the nation's first black Greek letter
fraternity. They stood for the aims of Scholarship, Manly Deeds,
and Love for all mankind. Today Alpha Phi Alpha has approximately
600 individual chapters in existence and over 120,000 members
throughout the United States as well as Nassau, Bahamas, Ger-
many, Korea, and the Virgin Islands.
Some of its many prestigious members include Martin Luther
King, Jr., Duke Ellington, Jesse Owens, Andrew Young, Gene Up-
shaw, Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, and FAMU's president,
Dr. Frederick S. Humphries.
The Beta Nu chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha was founded on Florida
A&M University's campus April 23, 1932. The Beta Nu brothers
work as tenaciously as all Alphas to uphold the motto, "First of all,
Servants of all, we shall transcend all." Some of their activities in-
clude: "Just Say No To Drugs" project; Project Alpha (teenage
pregnancy program); visiting Miracle Hill Convalescent home; cam-
paining for Henry Lewis, the first black County Commissioner of
Talahassee; Thanksgiving drives, etc. On the social scene, the OFFICERS Front Row: Frank Bryant Historian Dave eff
Alphas have been consistent as winners of social events from the O FFICERS Front Row: Frank Bryant -- Historian, Dave Jeff,-
exciting Pan-Hellenic Council Step Competition and Homecoming Alan Armstrong President. Second Row: Kevin Denis -
parties, to the ultimately entertaining Alpha Week '87 theme Editor of the Sphinx, Pierre Rutledge Recording Secretar',
"Black and Gold in Control." Gregory A. Salters Treasurer. Third Row: Bennie Clark -
Sergeant-At-Arms, Kenneth Washington Comminity Pr -
jects. Back Row: Reginald Mitchell Parliamentarian.
< -. I
i


n







-.- // _ ,1


SWEETHEARTS Front Row: Tina Ray, Vanessa From Left to Right: Byron Sims, Gregory A. Salters, Errol Wilson, Bennie Clark, Ronald Robin
Wade, Willette Givens, Yvette Harper, Elisia Dames, son, Will Palmer, Brian Williams, Kenneth Washington, Greg Johnson, Darryl Smith, Mart,
Shalena Spencer, Candace Fields. Second Row: Verna Lee, George Bell, Tyrous Ingram, Curtis Johnson, Travis Lucas, Terrence Buggs, Kennetl
Hamilton, Erin Wilson, Veta Dawson, Yolanda Round- Huduson, Dwannal McGahee, Reggie Ike, Edward Stowe, Frank Bryant, Melvin Dockett, Kevi
tree, Kimberly Davis, Dawn Allen. Third Row: Phyllis O. Dennis, Pierre Rutledge, Dave Jefferson. Middle Row: Michael Atcherson, Michael Raile\
Sparks, Trelawnia Steele, Stephanie Aldridge, Marcia Alan Armstrong, Michael Gay, Reginald Mitchell.
Thompson, Kimberly Brown, Alecia Kemp, Shawn
Killins. Fourth Row: Tracey Checks, Domonique
Bowman, Lisa McKellery, Davrye Gibson.


40 / ALPHA PHI ALPHA








































Kenneth Dozier ... leads his brothers at the
Fall step down.


The Alpha walk a tradition at FAMU extravaganza.


The Alphas step their way to a victory in the Fall'86 "Meet the Greek."


111[, "L_ -.. L?.-Z:-.--'-.. __. __'_. .. .e "
SPRING 1987 PLEDGE LINE Arnell Brown, Kirk McCall, Roderick Palmer, Nathaniel Windbush,
Robert Philpott, Rodney Rose, and James Bush.


Alpha Probates gather for a nourishing breakfast.


The brothers celebrate an outstanding performance of the Probates of
Spring '87.


ALPHA PHI ALPHA / 41































Some of the best decisions are made after taking time out to remember old times and look to the future.


..a 1 ,.
14 A411


E Ul -i W.',7" J 2
The Alphas have the students' undivided attention as they share important tips on the dangers of drug
abuse.


42/ ALPHA PHI ALPHA


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1


4i





























F, I



2 -10

Alpha Probates show "the way it should be done."










You can always count on the Alphas to have creative ex-
"I travaganza outfits.























S performed by the Alphas.


ALPHA PHI ALPHA/ 43



















"I will join hands with my sisters and my hands will touch non-Deltas as well. I will join hands with my sisters and my
sisters will be Zetas, AKAs, and Sigma Gamma Rhos.
The Black College may not always be my alma mater, but I will project its merit, support its being and direct scholars to its
door." Thelma T. Dailey National President AtO 1975-79.
The history of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., is a tribute to the spirit and imagination of the 22 college women who
founded the organization of January 13, 1913, at Howard University. The founders envisioned an organization of college
women pledged to serious endeavor and community service.
As a sisterhood of approximately 175,000 predominantly Black college-trained women, the sorority has over 800 chapters
nation-wide and internationally in West Germany, Haiti, Liberia, the Virgin Islands and Nassau, Bahamas. The major pro-
grammatic focus of the sorority is centered around the organization's Five-Point Program Thrusts of: EDUCATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT (Career Awareness and Development); ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (How the U.S. Economic System
works); PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH (The impact of hypertension among Blacks); POLITICAL AWARENESS and IN-
VOLVEMENT (Voter registration and Education impacting the Legislative Process); INTERNATIONAL AWARENESS AND IN-
VOLVEMENT (Increasing Awareness and Involvement in International Issues).
In light of the standards that were set by the sorority's founders, the Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,
Inc., was established on the campus of Florida A&M College on January 30, 1937 by Soror Beatrice Clark. There were five
charter members: Gladys Anderson, Althea Miller, Grace Brooks, Sarah Wilson and Doreen Young.
This year, Beta Alpha chapter has accomplished many goals of the Five-Point Program. Activities include: Black Women's
Convocation; Just Say No To Drugs Campaign; Canned goods drive (Thanksgiving); Halloween Carnival (Walker Ford);
Decorated Homes of Disabled (Christmas); Black History Month tour (Black Archives); Delta Kitchen; Blood pressure
checks; Voter Registration; Black-On-Black Crime Seminar; Brownie Troop #181 (Sponsor); NAACP drive; and
Adopt-A-Business.
The Beta Alpha Chapter also hosted the America's Black College Convocation which generated a $1,000 donation to
FAMU.
The members of the Beta Alpha Chapter have many leadership roles at FAMU, yet they continue to maintain the academic
standards that enable them to be great campus achievers.
Nationally, Delta sisters can be numbered among the most successful Black Women in America. These names have made
history: Leontyne Price (famous singer); Mary McLeod Bethune (founder of Bethune Cookman College); Barbara Jordan (first
black to be elected to the Texas State Senate); Edith Irby Jones (first woman elected President of the National Medical
Association); Arthenia Joyner (Past National President of the National Bar Association). Other famous Deltas are: Sadie T.
M. Alexander, Nikki Giovanni, and Lena Home. In the political arena, there have been four U.S. black women ambassadors
to date: the late Patricia Roberts Harris and Barbara Watson; Ann Holloway and Ambassador Cynthia Perry now serving in
Sierra Leone; all were Members of Delta Sigma Theta.

Deltas took time out of their busy schedule
during "Delta Week" to come together and
show some Delta symbols.









0


0 ,
2.


44 / DELTA SIGMA THETA




























Delta pyramids of Fall '86 got a chance to come together and show some of their hard working smiles.


During Delta week, Deltas had a lawn picnic by the music building as a recreational activity.


"Just Say No To Drugs" was just one of the
many projects of the Deltas.














I












During their step show, Cheryl Clisby and
Frenita Combs proudly watched their sorors
jam.

The "Peppermint Ball"
was also a highlight of the
events during "Delta
Sigma Theta Week." It was
an opportunity to meet the
ladies of Deltas Spring
1985 line-T2.


DELTA SIGMA THETA / 45


5. ~+ler-~ ~-Y O
~ci
~1~,



i~ ~rit~'ite~e_







Latricia Allen
Port St. Joe, Fla./CIS
Lori Alien
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Maria Alexander
Atlanta, Ga./CIS
Treasurer
Kelley Bailey
Tampa, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Claire Barrett
Tallahassee, Fla./CIS

Joan Baskett
Jamaica, NY/Accounting
Delida Batiste
Eunice, La./Accounting
Lynn Bowens
Atlanta, Ga./Bus. Adm.
Keeper of the Muses and Graces
Jacqueline Brinson
Ft. Pierce, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Pamela Brown
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./CIS
Sherrie Chatmon
Tampa, Fla./Medical Records Adm.
Cheryl Clisby
Portsmouth, Va./Bus. Economics
Corresponding Secretary
Frenita Combs
Lake City, Fla./Public Relations
Secretary
Michelle Curry
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Historian
Sonja Delley
Augusta, Ga./Bus. Adm.
Lillian Dickey
Patterson, NJ/Bus. Adm.
Carla Eccles
Atlanta, Ga./Pharmacy
Parliamentarian
Pamela Greene
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./Public Relations
Assistant Dean of Pledges
Wendy Greene
Montclaire, NJ/Bus. Adm.
Yvonne Holt
Jacksonville, Fla./CIS


F W


Garlene Lemon Mrs. R. R. Caswell
Beta Alpha Deltas gave their soror, Mrs. Mona Humphries Bailey, a warm Jacksonville, Fla./Pharmacy Adviser
welcome on her visit to her alma mater, FAMU. President Director of Student Orientation
Delta of the Year

Not pictured: Dapne Artis, Janine Batie, Sherriett Campbell, Sabrina Eaton, Karla Eccles, Terri Hairston, Geneva Harrell.
Telva Hodge, Sharon James, Kimela Overstreet, Lucretia Pitts, Lydia Roston, Annette Singleton, Monique Stewart, Rosalind
Taylor, Arlene Walters, Tymira Williams.


46 /DELTA SIGMA THETA


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Wanda Kha Jackson
Eustis, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Jewel Jenkins
Daytona Beach, Fla./Public Relations
Veronica Jones
Atlanta, Ga./Public Relations
Lisa Kemp
Vancouver, Wash./Accounting
Keeper of Property
Tiawanna Keyes
Miami, Fla./Pharmacy

Carla Knight
Miami, Fla./PublicAdm.
1 st Vice President
Kimberly McLean
Philadelphia, Pa./Pharmacy
2nd Vice President
Elaina Niblack
Orlando, Fla./Pre-Med.
Financial Sec.
TroyLynn Payne
Jacksonville, Fla./Bus. Adm.
Jocelyn Porter
St. Petersburg, Fla./Broadcast
Journalism


Euodia Rambo
Atlanta, Ga./Health Care Management


lr r rw
CHARTER CHAPTER MEMBERS O. Young, A. Miller, G. Brooke, S. Wilson, and G. Anderson. Chapter establish-
ed on January 30, 1937.


Maranda Riddle
Chicago, III./CIS


Kimberly Robinson
Hillcrest Heights, Md./Broadcast
Journalism
Kim Rouse
Tallahassee, Fla./Pharmacy
Alicia Smith
Jacksonville, Fla./Public Relations
Delta Editor
Angela Smith
Chicago, III./Health Care Management
Priscilla Smith
Jacksonville, Fla./Office Adm.

Cecka Trueblood
Tallahassee, Fla./Pharmacy
Seturah Walker
Forestville, Md./Bus. Adm.
Cynthia Williams
Hastings, Fla./Public Relations
Chaplain/P.R. Reporter
Twanna Woodson
Tallahassee, Fla./Pharmacy
Laureatte Wright
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./Accounting
Step Coordinator


DELTA SIGMA THETA / 47


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J. Omar Ahmad
Emmett Baylor
Randolph Brooks, II
Nelson Grillo
Kendall Jones
Jonathan Ogburn
Bruce Street
Clavin Rollins
Gary Shipman
Karl White*
Keenan Walker
Derrick Lewis
Barry Cobb
Keith Daniels
Duane Brown
Edward Bryant
Kenneth Neighbors
Edwin Miller
Sean Gilliam
Alfred Calhoun
Bruce Williams
Adrian Flint
James Young
Carl Goodman
Ricardo Pratt
Jonathan Bell


- --. --


,~~~i,~iiM- --esa ra~n~~


Lorenzo Melton
Walter Fordham
Marc Campbell
Sean Hubbard
Randall Ballard
Ronnell Bright
Shelby Chipman
Mark Wilder
Robert Mosely
Stillman Saunders
William Bush, III
Michael Pearis
Andrew Whigham, III
Marvin Campbell
Roderick Crawford
Wayne Kirkland
J. Oscar Simmons
Danny Oliver
Roger Campbell
Glen Sapp
Edward German
Michael Ratliffe
N. Troy Walker
John Cooke
Willie Johnson
Merlon Jones


Christopher Power
James Holt
Aaron Yarbrough
Reggie Sapp
Kevin Phillips
Anthony Lewis
Gregory Williams
Jerry Burgess
James Marable
James McLemore
Rodney Williams
Victor Boiling
Reginald Smith
Miles Flowers
James Hicks
Cornelious Redo
Raymond Payne
Ernest Smith
Nark Sledge
Terrance Johnson
Howard Gaston
Darryl Davis
Michael McCray
Carlos McGill
Junior Grand *
Vice Polemarch


Prophytes show off the benefits of cane
practice.


OFFICERS
Nelson J. Grillo, Jr. Polemarch
William Bush, II, Vice Polemarch
Shelby Chipman, Keeper of Records
Marvin Campbell, Keeper of Exchequer
Board of Directors:
Emmett Baylor, Derrick Lewis, Calvin Rollins
Gary Shipman, Strategus, Keenan Walker, Lt. Strategus


48/ KAPPA ALPHI PSI


.I -- .- .
'nc


6-:Z



































Everyone likes to see men of KAY twirl their canes. Here,
Rod Crawford shows his skill by twirling two canes.


Nothing but class act two Alpha Xi brothers strike a "classic" pose at the 1987
Playboy Jazz.


Yo baby, Yo baby, Yo-Guardians of the Diamond Legacy perform at the Spring
1987 greek Extravaganza.


Edward Bryant presents Dr. Ann C. Hooper with the Black Educator
of The Year Award KAY's annual salute to educators.



Excitement always fills the air when pledgees cross those burning
sands. Brothers, old and new, hang out the morning after.


KAPPA ALPHA PSI / 49














KA,



Making The



Ordinary
o
Z
0
z
Extraordinary
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.
was founded on January 5, 1911 on
the campus of Indiana University.
The ten founders led by Elder Watson
Diggs, the first Grand Polemarch, had
the dream of initiating "an organiza-
tion driven by the force of achieve-
ment in every field of human
endeavor."
The Alpha Xi Chapter, known as
the "Rock" of the Southern Province,
was founded on April 22, 1933 on the
campus of Florida A&M University.
1986-87 proved to be a very pros-
perous year for the Alpha Xi Chapter.
The chapter started the year by in-
itiating a city-wide "Say No To
Drugs" campaign, highlighted by a <
news conference. Other service o
projects included: The contribution
of food baskets complete with
turkeys to needy families during
Thanksgiving, a Halloween program
for area youths, and the awarding of
Michael D. Austin Memorial Scholar-
ship Awards to Tracey Lawrence and
Lorie Roach, two FAMU freshmen.
Kappa Alpha Psi continued to
represent quality social events to the
students of FAMU. The Alpha Xi
Chapter, along with SGA brought
Wynton Marsalis to FAMU for an
open forum. Kappa Week '87
culminated with the Playboy Jazz:
"An Excursion Into Excellence ... All
The Way Live!!" The 2nd Annual
"Catch A Rising Star" talent contest
showcased Tallahassee's finest young
talent and featured up-and-coming
comedian Rondell Sheridan in a
special guest act.

z

0
Z
1/


Scrollers get last minute pep talk before set show.


Members of Knights of Kontraversy Spring 1986.


50 / KAPPA ALPHA PSI






























Dean of Pledgees poses proudly with some new brothers.


Those pretty boys of KAY at the Playboy Jazz '87.


Kappas can often be found hanging out a their fraternity house.


Nothing like hanging' out on the set with the Nupes.
Nothing like hangin' out on the set with the Nupes.


Kappa pledgees were a sharp act to see on the set.


KAPPA ALPHA PSI / 51
















b?2W- 7--w-


Front Row: Allan Hankinson Keeper of Finance, Leslie Hopkins ..u
- Basileus, Deon Price Vice Basileus. Back Row: Jimmy Watts
- Parliamentarian, Michael Pleasants Editor to the Oracle, Vic- z
tor Inge and Roscoe Hightower Dean of Education, Clarence
Lewis, Jr. Keeper of Records and Seals.


Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., was founded on November 17,
1911 on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C. It
was the first black Greek letter fraternity to be founded on a black
college campus. The four founders, Edgar A. Love, Oscar J. Cooper,
Frank Coleman, and Ernest E. Just, established to the fraternity's mot-
to "Friendship is essential to the soul," and chose four cardinal prin-
ciples by which all members live by: Manhood, Scholarship,
Perseverance, and Uplift. Omega Psi Phi was incorporated on Oc-
tober 28, 1914, and has since grown internationally to a membership
over 125,000.
On May 13, 1932, the Mighty Melodic Upsilon Psi Chapter of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., was established at Florida A&M
University. Over the years the Upsilon Psi Chapter has carried on a
tradition of excellence in all endeavors and has striven to become
the premiere undergraduate chapter in Omega Psi Phi.
In 1986, Upsilon Psi Chapter was awarded the 7th District Com-
munity Action Award for having the most extensive community
service program. During the 1986-87 school year, the chapter has
continued its commitment of service to the Tallahassee community.
This year's activities included the sponsorship of an annual road race
for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the Walker Ford Communi-
ty Center Spring Carnival, an essay contest for area high school
students, FAMU Centennial Phon-a-thon, and visits to the Criswell
House for Boys.
On campus, Upsilon Psi has been very active. Omegas are
members of every major campus organization from the Student
Government Association to the "Marching 100" to the Rattler foot-
ball team. The chapter has continuously had members taking on
leadership positions. Recently, Brothers Mark Islar and Roscoe
Hightower have been appointed Assistant State Representatives for
Flordia.
Socially, Upsilon Psi is the campus leader in providing entertain-
ment and activities such as various dances and Omega Week Featur- z
ing the nationally renowned MARDI GRAS.


Joseph "Filly Joe" Mannings showed his Omega pride during "Omega
Week" Spring'87.


52 / OMEGA PSI PHI




































Omegas rejoiced after they showed their stuff during a step show on the set.


MEMBERSHIP
Leslie B. Hopkins -- Basileus
Deon L. Price Vice Basileus
Clarence Lewis, Jr. Keeper of Records and Seals
Allen L. Hankinson, Jr. Keeper of Finance
Jimmy N. Watts Parliamentarian
Tyrone Moore Chaplain
Micheal D. Pleasants Editor to the Oracle
Victor Inge & Roscoe Hightower Dean of
Education
Micheal Allen LaDon Clemmons
Victor Duncan Marion J. Scott, Jr.
Ronnie Mackey Earnest R. Wyatt
Mark Islar Carl Campbell
James Witherspoon Douglas Thornton
Lamont Carson Leonard King
Darryl Bohler Edgar Mathis
Kenneth Perry Oscar Williams
Cleveland Boyer Anthony Davis
Norman Wilkerson Eric Parker
Knute Hanchard Kendrick Meek
Dan Mathis, Jr. Joseph Mannings
Odell Stroud, Jr. Curtis L. Adams
Andre Howard Rondall Allen
Micheal Shannon James Benjamin
Kenneth Brinson Maurice Clay
Steve Everett Alfred Henry
Micheal Hicks Wallace Chester


Col. Bernard Hendricks


Faculty Adviser


James Witherspoon and Marion Scott sold tickets to the popular "Mardi Gras" during "Omega
Week."


The Ques "set it out" during "Omega Week '87."


Omegas showed the way it should be done at the "Meet the Greeks."


OMEGA PSI PHI / 53





































Members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. proudly assemble on "Sigma Hill."


MEMBERSHIP


Joseph Bailey
Everett Blakely
Kenny Bowie
James Brown
Gig Brown
Cornelius Bussel
Brian Collier
Victor Cherry
Mark Felton
Maurice Freeman
Darren Fudge
Glenn Harris
Reggie Howell
Alfonso Johnson
Clarence Johnson
Dwayne Kennedy
Malvin Lofton
Steve Mathews
Chris McKaskil
Rick McHardy
Don Milhouse
Mark S. Williams


Vincent Moore
Thallon Polk
Fred Porter
Richard Redding
Ira Robinson
Derrick Ross
Terrance Robinson
Matt Sampson
Ed Stewart
Keith Stubs
Karlton Taylor
Guy Thomas
Nick Thomas
Melvin Washington
Ralph White
Chris Whittaker
Lorenzo Williams
Lewis Williams
Michael P. Williams
Harris Wiltsher
Brian Jackson


Malvin Lofton leads Sigmas in a well-precisioned step performance.


OFFICERS President Ira C. Robinson II,
1st vice president Reginald Howell, 2nd
vice president Keith Gerald, Treasurer -
Ralph White, Financial Secretary Terrence
Robinson, Corresponding Secretary M.
Thallon Polk.


The Sigma brothers make their mark with their greek symbols shining in the quadrangle.


54/PHI BETA SIGMA


























There is no stopping the stepping Sigmas during a step
down.


Sigmas enjoy "togetherness" on their special spot or


Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., was founded on the campus of
Howard University on January 9, 1914, by brothers A. Langston
Taylor, Leonard F. Morse, and Charles I. Brown. It was their mission to
develop ideals of brotherhood, service and scholarship and to pro-
mote the general welfare of all persons. The organization's goal is to
return to the community what it had done for the college community
through programs such as Bigger and Better Business, Education, and
Social Action. The purpose can best be described in its motto,
"Culture for service and service for humanity."

Some of the school activities for the 1986-87 academic year in-
clude: intramural football, basketball and softball; stepshow; NAACP
Drive; special olympics. Their fundraisers include car washes, parties,
and stepshows all proceeds go towards a Centennial fund for
S FAMU.

Z The Alpha Eta (AH) chapter, located at Florida A&M University, was
founded in December, 1935, based on the same principles of its
founding fathers.




















n campus.





Sigmas' paraphernalia has a unique style.
















Sigmas' stepping skills are an original class act.


Cane action is a must with the Sigma stepping crew.


PHI BETA SIGMA/ 55











































Front Row: Tonya Darnell, Erika Peace, Sharon Kong, Jacqueline Valentine, and Marjorie Miller. Back Row: Cheryl Biggs.


MEMBERSHIP

Jacqueline Valentine Basileus
Tonya Darnell Anti-Basileus
Erika Peace Grammateus
Marjorie Miller Tamias

Sharon Kong
Cheryl Biggs
Kathy Brown
Glenda Bass
Monica Franklin
Lorna Wilson
Jennifer Ball

LaJoycea Condry, Adviser


Spring, 1987 line Monica Franklin, Lorna Wilson, and Jennifer Ball.


56/ ZETA PHI BETA















Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., was founded January 16,
1920, on the campus of Howard University in Washington,
D.C. by five women along with the aid of two men of Phi
Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. The founders were Zeta Phi Beta
sorors; Arizona Cleaver-Stemons, Myrtle Tyler-Faithful,
Viola Tyler-Goings, Pearl Neal, and Fannie Pettie-Watts
and A. Langston Taylor and Charles Robert Taylor Phi Beta
Sigma.
The Gamma Alpha Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta was found-
ed May 14, 1932, by 10 charter members who made Zeta
Phi Beta the first Greek letter organization on the campus
of Florida A&M University. Founding members were: Mary
Martin Dansby, Ruby Washington Anderson, Ida Lee
SBradley, Susie McMeekin Britt, Edna Cross Burton, Iveta
Martin Crosby, Ruth Bates Orr, Sue Kelker Russell, Beatrice
Hill Stewart and Anita Prater Stewart.
During the 1986-87 academic year, Gamma Alpha
Chapter has been involved in such activities as volunteers
for the Special Olympics, Walker-Ford Community Center
and work with the Pan-Hellenic Council.
Along with our founders and our many other sorors
throughout the U.S. and Africa, the ladies of the Gamma
Alpha Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., believes in
the ideals with much pride and dignity, which allows us to
Jacqueline Valentine was a favorite with the audience in the "meet the "dare to be different!"
Greek" show.


Zetas really showed their talents off well at the Greek show in the Fall of 1986.


ZETA PHI BETA/57




















































Brothers of Alpha Phi Omega stop for a quick
shot at one of their favorite hang-outs.


Organization and use of the drug seminar
theme, "Say No To Drugs," or "Say No To
Crack," earned Kappa Delta Chapter of Alpha
Phi Omega Fraternity the Award of Most
Outstanding Florida Chapter in 1987. One of
589 chapters with some 300,000 members of
all races located on campuses throughout the
United States, Kappa Delta Chapter won the
statewide honor out of 16 chapters.
Founded on the Florida A&M University
campus December 16, 1952, Kappa Delta
Chapter strives consistently to fulfill its purpose
of promoting friendship and giving service on
the campus as well as in the community. Its
goals were set by the national organization that
was founded December 25, 1925, at Lafayette
College in Eason, Pennsylvania.
Organized and operated to provide service
at every level of community need, Kappa Delta
Chapter's activities during 1986-87 have in-
cluded a number of community service proj-
ects. Among these have been the drug
seminar, "Say No To Crack!" plus NAACP and
Urban League membership drives. The
chapter's award-winning seminar project will
be submitted for Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity
competition at the national level.


Chapter officers discuss important issues that need to be presented to chapter.


58 / ALPHA PHI OMEGA
































Kappa Delta chapter of Alpha Phi Omega Fall '86 line
"The Fourteen Faces Of Death"


This Fraternity knows how to enjoy a barbecue.


Alpha Phi Omega jams on the set with a step show.
Alpha Phi Omega jams on the set with a step show.


Men of Alpha Phi Omega show their serious side.


Members of Alpha Phi Omega hanging out on "their spot."


ALPHA PHI OMEGA/59












































Kappa Kappa Psi performed at the downtown Hilton Hotel for the FSU Delta Ball.


Wycliff Gordon performed an original song "For You"
which will be featured on the "Psi Guys" upcoming
album.


Brothers of K KI sang and stepped on "the Core" on March 12, 1987.


60/ KAPPA KAPPA PSI











Kappa Kappa Psi National Honorary Fraternity for college
band members is an organization operated exclusively in the
field of college bands. Its purpose is to stimulate campus leader-
ship, foster a close relationship between college students and to
provide a pleasant and helpful social experience for all engaged
in college band work. The main goal of the organization is to
"Build Better Bands and Brotherhood."
The Delta lota Chapter was founded at FAMU May 26, 1960,
and the National Chapter was founded on November 27, 1919,
at Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College. Currently,
there are 62 active members who give continued service to the
band and the community. FAMU's chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi is
the first largest number of brothers since 1960. They are also
recognized as being the fastest growing of any fraternity national-
ly and noted for over 13 million dollars in contributions each
year.
Activities for the 1986-87 academic year included: Perfor-
mances during the Ratter Strike, the Delta Ball at FAMU and
Florida State University, and for the STEVIE WONDER concert in
1986; gifts to the needy and carolling during Christmas Holidays,
"Sing-A-Grams" on Valentine's Day, Performances at Cobb Mid-
dle School (Say No To Drugs Concert), Benefit concert for the
homeless in Gretna, Performance for Bacchus talent show, Per-
formance on the quadrangle for the "Rattler Hook-up Day"
command performance in West Palm Beach; Debute Video (Frat
Workshop) on "Video Vibrations," and Performances for Excell-
sion Talent Agency.
Kappa Kappa Psi in also scheduled to perform with Stevie
Wonder during the Centennial Celebration week on October,
1987.


The brothers take a break to show their pride.


The brothers sat back and watched the Spring '87 recital.


The Clefs showed their stuff at the "Greek Extravaganza."


KAPPA KAPPA PSI / 61















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64 / FOOTBALL


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The 1986 Rattler Football Team took to the field against
Tuskegee with new found optimism for a good season. A
new head coach, a talented runningback and a new sense
of commitment seemed to be the necessary factors for a
successful season.
The first year head coach, Ken Riley, is a 1969 graduate of
FAMU. He was also a star quarterback for the Rattlers dur-
ing his collegiate years. Riley says that a team has to learn to
lose just as it learns to win. This year the coaching staff tried
to incorporate a positive attitude on and off the field. Riley
and his staff felt that the team needed a positive perspec-
tive on all facets of school life not just football.
This 1986 season not only saw a new head coach, Ken
Riley, but it also saw some new assistants as well. The
assistant coaches this year were: Walter Highsmith
(defensive coordinator), Joseph Redmond (offensive coor-
dinator), Jimmy McCaskill (offensive line), Allen Bogan
(defensive backs), Johnnie Williams (linebackers) and
Melvin Jones (receivers). Highsmith, Redmond, Jones and
Williams were all in their first years on the Rattler coaching
staff. Other assistant coaches and support staff are Len An-
derson (secondary asst.), Rick Kravitz (linebacker asst.), Ty-
rone McGriff (offensive line asst.), Phillip Horton (head
trainer), George Thompson (equipment manager) and Tony
Messina (film and kicking coach).
In his first year, Head Coach Riley said that he and his
staff were "pleased with the reception that they received
-<-.~ E from the faculty, students, alumni and fans." They are look-
.ing forward to greater success in the future.
Rattler football head coach Ken Riley James Spencer


FOOTBALL / 65






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66 / FOOTBALL








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The first season in the Ken Riley Era may not have seemed a success; but with a fast finish and some key returnees for the
1987 season, things could get even better this year.
Riley, a 1969 graduate of Florida A&M, who was a star quarterback for the Rattlers, came back to head up the sagging
football program, after 15 years as a defensive back in the National Football League and two years as an assistant coach with
the Green Bay Packers.
FAMU finished the 1986 season 5-6, winning four of its' last five games. Spearheading the late rush was the Rattlers'
running attack for years the staple of FAMU's offensive legacy but a weapon which was not used as much, while the
new staff attempted to employ a highly-charged passing attack.
That passing game never caught on and the Rattlers suffered through the first six games, posting a 1-5 mark, with a five-
game losing streak included in the record.
But the running of Tony Barber, Bryan Moore and Reggie Jones, plus the advent of Andre Williams into the quarterback
slot, figuratively "turned on the juice," offensively, accounting for 18 touchdowns and over 1,800 yards in rushing offense.
Barber, who finished his career in 1986, ended up with 3,238 yards, ranking him second all-time at Florida A&M on the
rushing charts and fourth all-time in the State of Florida's collegiate rushing annals. Tony finished the 1986 season as the
club's leading rusher (629 yards, 5 TDs) and leading receiver (22 catches, 214 yards).
Fullback Reggie Jones, a 6-2, 225-pounder, accounted for nine touchdowns and 395 yards rushing; Bryan Moore, the heir
apparent to Barber at tailback, ranked as the team's second leading rusher with 406 yards and 2 TDs.
Andre Williams, who took over for Oscar Williams (no relation) at quarterback, led the Rattlers to four wins in their last five
games, finishing with 278 yards rushing and two touchdowns, while passing for 397 yards more.
Oscar Williams, hit on 59 of 158 passes for 619 yards and 4 TDs, but threw 14 interceptions during the early season in
1986. Split end Rodney Boiling caught 16 passes for 232 yards, while tight end Ricky West made 11 catches for 92 yards and a
pair of TDs.
Defensively, the Rattlers had some old and new faces involved which helped out quite a bit. Veterans Bruce Norflee (74
stops, four quarterback sacks) at tackle and strong safety Gene Atkins (67 stops, four interceptions) helped provide the
leadership, while youngsters like end Brian Brewer (43 tackles, nine sacks), linebacker Eddie Metcalf (69 stops, two sacks)
and defensive backs, William Evers (43 stops, five interceptions) and Lowell Crawford (three interceptions), came up with
both enthusiasm and performance to make the defensive unit solid by season's end.
The Rattlers' kicking game provided some solid performances too, as seniors Rod Dawson and Maurice Freeman took their
final bows as punter and placekicker, respectively, in 1986.
Dawson averaged a nifty 41.6 yard per boot on 62 attempts, while Freeman set the school record for career kick scoring,
logging 171 points in four seasons, going over the top in 1986 with 48 points. Freeman booted 18 of 24 extra points, while
hitting 10 of 18 field goal tries.
Freshman Howard Huckaby, who should establish himself as one of the country's premier track stars in a few years,
averaged nearly 19 yards per kick return last year, as he became the primary kickoff and punt return man for the Rattlers.
Alvin Hollins


FOOTBALL / 67








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FOOTBALL / 69









FAMU FOOTBALL ROSTER


1 Oscar Williams .......... QB
5-10, 185, So., Tampa (Jefferson HS)
2 Andre Williams .......... QB
6-0, 185, Jr., Miami (Butler JC/NWHS)
3 Robert Gentile ............ SE
6-0, 160, Sr., Jacksonville (Jackson HS)
4 David Burke.............. QB
6-0, 180, Fr., Ft. Lauderdale (Dillard HS)
5 Tracy Ellis .............. WR
5-9, 190, So., Tallahassee (FAMU HS)
6 Bryan Moore ............ RB
5-9, 195, Jr., Orlando (Jones HS)
7 Lowell Crawford ......... DB
5-81/2, 161, Fr., Miami (Northwestern HS)
8 Joseph Watson ........ QB/SE
5-11, 165, Fr., Miami (South Miami HS)
9 Bernard Shavers .......... WR
6-2, 170, Jr., Columbus, Ga. (Carver HS)
10 Kenneth Johnson ......... DB
6-2'/2, 180, So., Thomaston, Ga. (Lee HS)
11 Thomas Franklin.......... DB
6-2, 200, So., Crawfordville (Wakulla HS)
12 Howard Huckaby ......... WR
5-10, 175, Fr., Baton Rouge, La. (Capitol
HS)
13 Bennie Niles ............. DB
5-11, 185, Fr., Dunedin (Dunedin HS)
14 Maurice Freeman ......... PK
6-4, 215, Sr., Quitman, Ga. (Brooks Cnty.
HS)
15 Darrin Reagan ........... DB
5-10, 186, So., Gifford (Vero Beach HS)
16 Marcellus Evans ........... SS
6-2, 215, Fr., Lake Wales (Lake Wales HS)
17 William Evers ............ DB
6-1, 185, Fr., Cairo, Ga. (Cairo HS)
18 Antoine Bennett.......... DB
5-11, 185, Fr., Opa Locka (Edison HS)
19 Nathaniel Shorter ......... DB
5-8/2, 176, Fr., Orlando (Jones HS)
20 Emery Williams .......... DB
5-11, 180, So., Pensacola (Washington
HS)
21 Fred Porter ............. DB
5-10, 175, So., Tampa (Tampa Bay Tech)
23 Marcus Boston ............ SS
6-1, 185, So., Gainesville (Buchholz HS)
24 Thenell McCloud ......... RB
6-0, 190, So., Greensboro (Greensboro
HS)
25 Rod Dawson ............. P
6-0, 200, Sr., Cross City (Dixie County HS)
26 Albert Forney............ FB
5-10, 200, Fr., Cleveland, Ohio
27 Chris Blue .............. RB
5-10, 210, Fr., Warner Robins, Ga.
(WRHS)
28 Gene Atkins .............. SS
6-0, 200, Sr., Tallahassee (Rickards HS)
29 Rodney Boiling........... WR
5-7, 145, So., Pensacola (Pine Forest HS)
30 Isaac Gardner ........... RB
5-9, 170, Fr., Ft. Lauderdale (Dillard HS)
31 Matthew Fair ............ DB
6-3, 190, Jr., Deland (Deland HS)
32 Reginald Jones ............ FB
6-2, 225, Sr., Wabasso (Vero Beach HS)
33 Antonio Barber .......... RB
5-8, 185, Sr., Gifford (Vero Beach HS)
34 Derrick Gainer........... RB
5-10, 190, Jr., Plant City (Plant City HS)
35 Emil Ganim ............. RB
5-5, 178, So., Tallahassee (Lincoln HS)
36 Sean Gilliam ............ RB
5-11, 210, Fr., Tallahassee, (FAMU HS)
37 Gregory Ferguson ........ DB


38 Oscar Harris ............ RB
6-1, 220, So., Tampa (Jefferson HS)
39 Kelvin Madison .......... RB
6-1/2, 190, Fr., Tallahassee (FAMU HS)
40 Alfred Simmons .......... RB
5-111/2, 195, Jr., Crystal River (Crystal River
HS)
41 Winfred Hudson .......... LB
5-10, 200, Jr., Tallahassee (Navarro JC)
42 Jarrold McCullom ........ DB
6-2, 205, Fr., Warner Robins, Ga. (WRHS)
43 Clarence Johnson ......... RB
6-1, 190, Jr., Monticello (Jefferson County
HS)
44 Vincent Montgomery ....... LB
6-2, 210, Jr., Baton Rouge, La. (Southern
HS)
45 Marvin Scarlett ........... LB
5-10, 235, Jr., Miami (Navarro JC)
46 Ron Shelburne ........... RB
6-1, 195, Fr., Boston, Mass.
47 Dwayne Butler ........... DB
6-2, 200, So., Miami (Carol City HS)
48 Keith Austin .............. LB
6-0, 200, Fr., Miami (Edison HS)
51 Darryl Davis ............. LB
6-1, 205, So., Miami (Pace HS)
52 Vaughn Wilson ......... C/P
6-4, 205, So., Tallahassee (FAMU HS)
53 Lawrence Jett............. LB
6-2, 220, So., Gifford (Vero Beach HS)
54 Theodore Floyd ........... LB
6-0, 225, Sr., Orange Park (Orange Park
HS)
55 Patrick Hargrett .......... LB
6-2, 230, Sr., Plant City (Plant City HS)
56 Cecil Austin .............. LB
6-5, 220, Fr., Mobile, Ala. (LeFlore HS)
57 Everett Blakely ........... NT
6-0, 255, Jr., Tallahassee (Leon HS)
58 Ed Metcalf ............... LB
6-1, 230, So., Panacea (Wakulla HS)
59 Reginald Ervin ........... OT
6-3, 250, Sr., Ft. Lauderdale (Dillard HS)
60 Dedrick Bethea .......... OL
6-4, 250, Fr., Key West (Key West HS)
61 Richard Lawson .......... OL
6-2, 265, Sr., Sylvester, Ga. (Worth City
HS)
62 Kirkland Louis ............ LB
5-10, 214, Fr., Baton Rouge, La. (Southern
HS)
63 John Jordan ............. OG
6-0, 260, So., Tampa (Tampa Bay Tech)
64 Anthony Jamison ......... OC
6-1, 255, Jr., Quincy (Shanks, HS)
65 Clifford Sams ............ OG
6-0, 235, Fr., Orlando (Jones HS)
66 Robert Frost ............ OL
6-0, 230, Fr., Clewiston (Clewiston HS)
67 Leron Strong ............ OG
6-0, 250, So., Bartow (Bartow HS)
68 Charles Gordon .......... OT
6-5, 270, Jr., Miami (North Miami HS)
69 Marcus Bates ............ OC
6-3, 235, Fr., Lauderhill (Anderson HS)
70 Donnie Davis ............ DT
6-4, 350, So., Fernandina Beach (FBHS)
71 Timothy Davis ............ LB
5-11, 230, Jr., Albany, Ga. (Dougherty HS)
72 Joseph John Cardiello ..... OL
6-3, 270, Fr., Safety Harbor (Countryside
HS)
73 Terry Beauford ........... DL
6-3, 265, Fr., Ft. Pierce (Central HS)
74 Bernard Terry ........... DL


6-4, 318, Jr., Manchester, Ga. (Mnchstr.
HS)
75 Leroy Montgomery ........ OL
6-2, 250, Sr., Miami (Norland HS)
76 Bruce Norflee ........... DL
6-2, 255, Sr., Eustis (Eustis HS)
77 Eric Ennis ............... DL
6-0, 240, So., Tampa
78 Vernice Smith ........... OL
6-3, 260, Sr., Orlando (Oak Ridge HS)
79 Herbert Moore ........... NG
6-3, 265, Fr., Titusville (Titusville HS)
80 Ronald Bell ............. WR
5-014, 165, So., DeFuniak Springs (Walton
HS)
81 Roderick Campbell ....... WR
5-9, 155, Sr., Gainesville (Buchholz HS)
82 Reginald Schofield ........ WR
6-3, 190, Fr., Vero Beach (Vero Beach HS)
83 Sean Williams ......... SE/TE
6-3, 225, Fr., Decatur, Ga. (SW Dekalb
HS)
85 Vencent Bostick .......... SE
6-1, 190, So., Cairo, Ga. (Cairo HS)
86 Troy Allen ............... TE
6-3, 221, Fr., Everton, Ga. (Everton HS)
87 Rudy Porter .............. TE
6-3, 200, So., Baton Rouge, La. (Southern
HS)
88 Harry Brown ............. TE
6-4, 215, Fr., Miami (Hialeah HS)
89 Ricky West ............... TE
6-2, 227, Sr., Perry, Ga. (Perry HS)
90 Ernest Danson ........... OL
6-2V/2, 230, Jr., Belle Glade (Belle Glade
HS)
91 Curtis Green .............TE
6-1, 220, Jr., Bagdad (Milton HS)
92 Terrance Lundy .......... DE
6-3, 260, Fr., Jacksonville (Forest HS)
93 Maverick McKinney ........ LB
6-1, 230, Jr., Albany, Ga. (Dougherty HS)
94 Brian Brewer ............ DL
6-4, 220, Fr., Orlando (Jones HS)
95 Lamar Glover ............. LB
5-11, 220, Fr., Ocala (Lake Weir HS)
96 Raymond Coleman ........ DL
6-2, 225, Sr., Hastings (Hastings HS)
97 Robert Jordan ........... DL
6-3/2, 209, So., South Bay
98 William Madison .......... TE
6-2, 240, Fr., Jacksonville (Ribault HS)
99 Kendrick Meek ........... LB
6-2, 220, Jr., Miami (Miami Springs HS)
Jerry Burgess ......... . LB
6-2, 200, So., Miami (Carol City HS)
Lowell Crawford ......... DB
5-8/2, 161, Fr., Miami (Northwestern HS)
Denzlow Evans............ LB
6-2, 220, Fr., Baltimore, MD (Baltimore
Tech)
Albert Forney ............. FB
5-10, 200, Fr., Cleveland, Ohio
Thomas Franklin.......... DB
6-2, 200, So., Crawfordville (Wakulla HS)
Alfred Johnson........... WR
5-11, 190, Fr., Miami (Edison HS)
Willie Mitchell ........... DB
6-1/2, 175, Fr., Thomasville, Ga. (TVHS)
Lucious Pearce ........... DL
5-11, 250, Fr., Miami (Northwestern HS)
Jeff Thomas ............. DB
5-9, 163, Fr., Cocoa
Mikel Whiting ............ LB
6-2, 205, Fr., Tallahassee (FAMU HS)


70 / FOOTBALL








RATTLER BASKETBALL ROSTER


Name
Joseph Williams
Terry Giles
Chester Coffee
Carl Campbell
Robert Smith
Derrick Byrd
Aldwin Ware
Craig Allen
Walter Little
Marcus Johnson
Jeremy Martin
Kelvin Arnold
Edward Sharpe
Leonard King
Wayne Howard
Derek Webster


Height
5-11
5-9
5-10
5-10
5-111/2
6-31/2
6-11/2
6-4
6-21/2
6-7
6-6
6-6
6-3
6-4
6-7
6-6


Hometown
Plant City, Florida
Conyers, Georgia
Plant City, Florida
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Washington, D.C.
Monticello, Florida
Hastings, Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
Brooklyn, New York
Daytona Beach, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
Miami, Florida
Belle Glade, Florida
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Bainbridge, Georgia
Crawfordville, Florida


BOYS' BASKETBALL/ 71


No.
10
11
12
13
15
20
24
25
30
33
35
40
41
42
45
54





RATTLERS SHOOT FOR AN

IMPRESSIVE SEASON


I


C *a


The Florida A&M men's basketball team posted yet another sub .500 overall finish (12-16) in 1986-87, but some of the
performers, and some of the performances give new hope for the future of Rattlers' basketball under Willie Booker.
The Rattlers got some great performances from veterans like junior swingman Leonard King, who led the club in scoring
with a 17.5 average; sophomore guard Robert Smith, who finished with a third-best 10.5 scoring touch and the team lead in
assists and steals, plus a curtain-call performance from fifth-year senior Jeremy Martin, who played center at 6-6, averaging
8.9 points and nearly six rebounds per game.
Newcomers to the Rattlers' fold provided some much-needed punch. Transfer Reggie Henry, a 6-6 forward, scored a
season-high 34 points against U.S. International in early February, finishing the season with a 17.4 scoring average and a
rebounding norm which was a nifty 7.1, best on the club.
Freshman Derrick Byrd, a 6-3 small forward, led the team in rebounding in nine different games, finishing with a 5.1
rebounding average, while guard Terry Giles, a 5-9 spark plug, finished with over 100 assists and helped elevate the Rattler's
offensive prowess to a new level.
The Rattlers scored 80 or more points 15 times; 90 or more points eight times and over 100 points twice, including a 121-
64 demolition of Edward Waters College and a 110-89 romp over U.S. International.
Alvin Hollins


72 / BOYS' BASKETBALL


111 4r~--



































































































... -4 0..^
I


BOYS' BASKETBALL/ 73


-New





LADIES LIVE UP TO RATTLER

PRIDE
x


%. i

1.

Br i,.~t:-
---':-"


Name
Sharon Cliett
Gail Myrick
Jackie Paramore
Latrice Shotwell
Estelle Thompson
Sandra Gay
Sherice Willis
Kumzea Jackson
Esther Myrick
Shelley Hart
April Manning
Cynthia Williams


Hgt.
5-7
6-0
5-10
5-8
5-6
6-4
6-0
5-8
6-2
5-11
5-8
6-0


Class
Jr.
Sr.
Fr.
So.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Sr.
So.
Jr.
So.


Hometown
Macon, Georgia
Marianna, Florida
Apopka, Florida
Cleveland, Ohio
Monticello, Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
Valdosta, Georgia
Atlanta, Georgia
Marianna, Florida
Shaker Heights, Ohio
St. Petersburg, Florida
Orlando, Florida


74 / GIRLS' BASKETBALL













































































'6 1AW ,


GIRLS' BASKETBALL/ 75






It was an up-and-down-year for the Rattlerettes, but
Coach Mickey Clayton's crew still put together a winning
season, posting a 16-13 mark.
Five Rattlerettes finished the season scoring in double
figures and it was this balanced scoring that helped them
during the year. Junior, Sharon Cliett led the club with a
12.8 average, followed by senior, Esther Myrick, and junior,
April Manning, (12.0) each; sophomore, Cynthia Williams
at 11.3 and senior, Gail Myrick at 10.9.
Williams finished as the club's top rebounder (8.0), fol-
lowed by sisters Esther (7.4) and Gail Myrick (6.8). Manning
dished out 137 assists and made 79 steals this season,
moving to point guard after the school's all-time assist
leader, Valerie Seay, left school prior to what would have
been her senior season last year.
The Rattlerettes also got some good help in critical sit-
uations from reserves like Latrice Shotwell, Shelley Hart,
both of whom started several games, and freshmen, Jackie
Paramore, Sherice Willis and Estelle Thompson.
The Rattlerettes, winners of the first New South Wom-
en's Athletic Conference regular season and tournament
championship in 1985-86, placed second in this year's
regular season standings and lost a heartbreaking 74-69
decision to Georgia Southern in the finals of the New South
Tournament.
Latrice Shotwell and Sharon Cliett earned spots on the
NSWAC All-Tournament Team. April Manning was named
to regular season All-Conference Team.
Gail Myrick earned second team honors, while Esther
Myrick and Cynthia Williams were named honorable men-
tions.
Alvin Hollins


Kir


-Ad


76/ GIRLS' BASKETBALL


.*;. ., *'


:


o.
o ---
I
Y
u a


























.14



























GIRLS' BASKETBALL/ 77






RATTLERS WIN MEAC BASEBALL


TITLE
4k


A winning season and a league cham-
pionship were the two major accom-
plishments on the 1987 Rattler baseball
team, which after six years of wandering
through the wilderness of losing sea-
sons, emerged into the sunlight of a new
day.
Before the season, team members
sold bumper stickers proclaiming "the
best is yet to come." And how prophetic
they were, as the team compiled an 18-
14 record, its first winning mark since
going 29-11 in 1980.
But the crowning glory to this winning
campaign was a three-day trip to Bur-
lington, N.C., where the Rattlers went 4-
1 in winning the Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference baseball title. They out-
scored Howard University, 13-10 in the
title game, after losing to the Bison, 14-
13 in the first championship game.
FAMU blasted North Carolina A&T
(12-5), Coppin State of Maryland (12-9)
and Howard (9-3) to reach the final
round unbeaten. Howard, the defending
champ, came out of the loser's bracket,
edging FAMU, to force the decisive bat-
tle.
Catcher Stacy Pough's .448 batting av-
erage was tops on the club, although
infielder Marvin Lancaster (.402), out-
fielder Henry Harris (.406) and outfield-
er-pitcher Marquis Grissom (.393)
played in more games.
Grissom, a freshman from Atlanta, was
named the most valuable player, after
hitting eight home runs and driving in
32. Another freshman, Sean Gilliam, hit
.354, but had five homers and 31 RBI.
Junior Darren Fudge (.311), led the
club in stolen bases (25), walks (24),
while placing third in RBIs (28).
Alvin Hollins


A .lf-.. 35
-. *. W M


I,'


0
z --


78 / BASEBALL


C1~ _



















1. Javan Melton INF.
2. Stacy Strickland P.
3. Mark McGuire INF.
4. Jeff Thomas INF./OF.
5. Larry Aaron COACH
S6. Richard Sacorne INF.
S7. Willie Powers OF.
8. Marvin Lancaster UTL.
9. Shawn Clark OF.
10. Stacy Pouch INF/C.
11. Mike Brown INF/OF.
12. Mitchell Burke C/INF.
14. Henry Harris OF.
15. Robert Lucas HEAD
COACH
16. Clarence Cole COACH
17. John Lewis P.
18. Harry Caldwell P.
19. Shawn Gilliam LB
20. Robert Jackson P.
21. Desmond Cole OF.
22. Robert McMilliam INF.
23. Darin Fudge OF.
24. Marquis Grissom P/OF.
25. Dolphus Peppers P.
26. Hollis Stepens UTL.
27. Oscar Williams P.
28. Mike Massey LB.
29. Anderson Fluellen P.
30. Cliffrod Nelson P.
31. Fred Davis P.
Artis Cambrell UTL.
S.. ,







Z


BASEBALL/ 79





TEAM DISPLAYS DEDICATION,


SKILL


Player
Jennifer Brady
Terria Grant
Nichol Poyntz
Michelle Williams
Sherry Agee
Jovanka Beckles
Ladeema Smith
Tonya Knight
Sharon Bramble
Infanta Shirley
Niquita Jackson
Luevenia Moore
Jessica Brown
Kimberly Willis
Georgetta Bennett
Edith McCray
Deatra Baker
Loren Abramson


HEAD COACH: Donna Parsons
ASSISTANTS: Teska Dillard, Joseph Tolliver


P-2 B
OF
1B-OF
SS-OF
C-OF
OF
OF
SS-OF
P-OF
OF
1 B-OF
3B-OF
2B
1B
C-2B
3B-OF
OF
P-3B


Class
Jr.
Sr.
Fr.
So.
Fr.
Jr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Sr.
Fr.
Jr.
Fr.


Hometown
St. Croix, Virgin Islands
Freeport, Bahamas
Detroit, Michigan
Miami, Florida
Ft. Walton Beach, Florida
Fairfield, California
Miami, Florida
Mascoutah, Illinois
St. Croix, Virgin Islands
Miami, Florida
Wakulla, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
Miami, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
St. Croix, Virgin Islands


80 / SOFTBALL


No.
1-1
2-2
4-4
5-5
7-9
10-10
11-11
12-12
14-14
15-15
16-16
17-17
18-18
20-20
21-21
22-22
23-23
24-24







































In their first year back after a year's hiatus, the
women's softball team went on to post an 8-29 finish
in 1987.
The Rattlerettes finished fifth in the New South
Conference Tournament, after losing a quartet of
close games, including a 3-0 decision to Georgia
Southern and a 1-0 decision to Georgia State in the
second round.
Pitcher Jennifer Brady earned the Team's
Workhorse Award, for her durable pitching perfor-
mance. Brady pitched almost every game the last
three weeks of the season.
Tonya Knight earned Most Valuable Player honors
for her leadership and clutch hitting.
Brady was named first-team all-conference, with
teammates Luevenia Moore, Jessica Brown, and Dea-
tra Baker also earning spots on the All-League squad.
Alvin Hollins


...'., -11


SOFTBALL/ 81







TENNIS


... GAME, SET, MATCH


-~----I ---


Earl Wade
Carl Goodman
William Bush
Rodney Goodwine
Anthony Turner
Aaron Walker
Victor Christian
Kenneth Parson
Ron Hills
Darrell Finney


Senior
Graduate
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Freshman
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Freshman


~ ----- --


Donna Millington
Maria Kimbro
Elena Evans
Crystal Swan
Donneva Falson
Micky Polite


"" '^ ;^ 'r
.. .I..
S "Q


Freshman
Junior
Freshman
Freshman
Senior
Senior


82 / TENNIS





VOLLEYBALL SETS THROUGH ANOTHER

SEASON

Although short of players, Coach Paula Redo's Rattlerette women's volleyball team finished in both the regular season and
tournament competition.
Four of the eight players on the team received All Conference honors. Kim Funchess, sophomore, was the New South
Conference most valuable player and joined Voncille Mills on the AII-NSWAC first team All-conference club. Team captains,
Teralyn Dickey and Pamela Woulard, also received NSWAC honors. They were named second team and honorable mention
respectively.
When asked about the season, Redo said, "We had a great season. I think everyone played well and we should be very
strong next year. Being new into the program, I had to make adjustments and so did they. I look forward to going very far next
year."
James Spencer


GIRLS' TENNIS

Coach Monique Francois' team finished 10-8 over-
all, with a triumph in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Con-
ference (MEAC) Tennis Championships at FAMU, giv-
ing them the 1987 title.
A week later, the Rattlerettes lost a hard-fought
semifinal match to Stetson University, going on to
place third in the New South Women's Athletic Con-
ference championships.
In the MEAC, Donna Millington, Elena Evans, Crys-
tal Swann and Maria Kimbro won singles' titles, with
those four combining to win two of the doubles finals.
FAMU's tennis team could be a strong in the future,
since there is only one player (Lorraine Polite), who
was listed as a junior and other five players either
sophomores or freshmen.
In fact, Millington, Evans and Swann are the three
freshmen on the 1987 team, who could be among the
rising stars in tennis in collegiate circles in the coming
years.
James Spencer


BOYS' TENNIS

The Rattler tennis team finished 5-7 in 1987, with a club which
had ups-and-downs during the year, due to injuries and eligibility
problems.
Coach Robert Mungen, head coach was assisted by former
Rattler tennis star Norman Wilkerson, and the pair piloted the
youth-laden club to a third-place finish in the Mid-Eastern Ath-
letic Conference Tennis Championships.
Alvin Hollins


VOLLEYBALL


ROSTER

Christina Hightower Sr.
Pamela Woulard Jr.
Teralyn Dickey Jr.
Kimberly Funchess So.
LaTonja Walker Fr.
Voncille Mills Fr.
Erica Faulkner Fr.
Simone Pratt Fr.

Manager Mary Hill
Coach Paula Redo


TENNIS / 83





TRACK TEAM GOES THE

DISTANCE



y '" '" -'... -
















.'" ,* .track teams at Florida A&M University last year, there were no
seniors and just five juniors.
'FAMU Head Coach Bobby Lang, a member of the Florida Track
and Field Hall of Fame, looked to his youth to lead the way through
the 1987 season.
The group of young Rattlers and Rattlerettes showed signs of
living up to their potential, and Lang is expecting continued im-
'provement as they get more experience.
The girl's team had an outstanding season and they won the Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Championship last year with a
Score of 130 points. Tracy Coefield, a Tallahassee native, took in-
Sdividual honors by winning the 400 meters and taking second in the
200 meter dash. Coach Lang was named outstanding women's
Si coach in the MEAC.
The boy's team also showed continuing signs of improvement.
They took third in the conference tournament. Howard Huckaby,
who was named the Outstanding Individual Performer in the tour-
nament, won both the 100 meter and the 200 meter dash.
The boy's team also had some other outstanding performances.
Team captain, Robert Clark, junior, set a school record in the triple
jump at the FAMU relays. There were also strong performances
from freshmen Bruce Jamison, Lemuel McEachin and junior Le-
ander Pickett.
James Spencer
James Spencer


84/ TRACK



















~i~PcS~IC~T~ .
~~ :I.:?P''1 ~~~~T~n~~
,.,..,,,
.~a-'r~-~~ .-.~.;~
:~;..- ~-s.. ::~ ~L~~_l__ :~~ ~PPii?
."C. JIC-~L~a~T
.. :-
*-~c ~n~ ~
~L- z
--


Name
Baskett, Joan
Bryant, Tracy
Cofield, Tracey
Dawson, Tenese
Field, Evelyn
Hospedales, Pearl
Hunter, Samantha
Martin, Peggy
McGee, Patricia
McKnight, Stacey
Mims, Traci
Mouton, Deidra
Parker, Alfredia
Walker, Katrina
Walls, Demetria
Reddick, Diane


Class Specialty
So. High Jumper
Fr. Jumper
Fr. Sprinter/Quarter Miler
Fr. Quarter Miler
So. Field
Jr. Quarter Miler
Fr. Quarter Miler
So. Quarter Miler
So. Sprinter
Fr. Jumper
So. Hurdles
So. Distance
So. Quarter Miler
So. Quarter Miler
So. Middle Distance
So. Hurdles


Name
Banks, William
Clark, Robert
Campbell, Rod
Grey, Leigh
Heath, Floyd
Hill, Andre
Huckaby, Howard
Jamison, Bruce
Kitt, Gary
Lucas, Mark
MeEachin, Lemuel
Pickett, Leander
Smith, Keith
Waugh, Tim
Young, Roosevelt


Class Specialty
Fr. Middle Distance
Jr. Jumper
Jr. Sprinter
Fr. Jumper
So. Middle Distance
Jr. Jumper
Fr. Sprinter
Fr. Middle Distance
Fr. Jumper
Fr. Quarter Miler
Fr. Middle Distance
Jr. Middle Distance
So. Quarter Miler
Fr. Hurdles
Fr. Middle Distance


-J


TRACK / 85


V


S .4"-








FOOTBALL


Season Record (5-6-0)
TUSKEGEE (Ala.) UNIVERSITY ................. 17-9
Georgia Southern (Bold City Classic) ............ 12-35
at Temple University ..................... 17-38
at Tennessee State ........................... 12-34
ALBANY STATE (Ga.) COLLEGE ................. 2-13
Central (Ohio) State (Circle City Classic) .......... 3-41
Alcorn (Miss.) State (Orange Blossom Classic) ..... 33-30
HAMPTON (Va.) UNIVERSITY (Homecoming)..... 44-9
SOUTH CAROLINA STATE .................... 26-3
at Southern (La.) University .................... 14-30
Bethune-Cookman (Fla.) College (Florida Classic) .. 16-6




SOFTBALL


Season Record (8-29)

Placed fifth in New South Championship Tournament




VOLLEYBALL


Season Record (16-24)

Placed third in New South Tournament




MEN'S TRACK


Finished third in Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Outdoor
Championships and third in Indoor Championships



WOMEN'S TRACK


Won Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference title for Outdoors;
Qualifies Tracey Cofield for NCAA Nationals in 400 meter
run


MEN'S


BASKETBALL

Season Record (12-16)


OPPONENT
Bethune-Cookman
SOUTH CAROLINA ST.
*Youngstown State
*Jackson State
at Prairie View
at Southeastern Louisiana
at Marshall
at Georgetown
WESTERN ILLINOIS
PRAIRIE VIEW
at Armstrong State
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL
at Cleveland State
at St. Louis University
at Paine College
FLORIDA MEMORIAL
EDWARD WATERS
ALABAMA STATE
at Eastern Washington
at U.S. International
at S.C. State
BETHUNE-COOKMAN
at Alabama State
at Tennessee State
at Southwestern Louisiana
at Bethune-Cookman
TENNESSEE STATE
**NORTH CAROLINA A&T


72-65
71-69
68-76
46-59
56-57
61-62
85-90
65-94
87-80
52-59
80-58
87-56
87-95
65-82
74-88
90-78
121-64
94-99
73-63
110-89
80-66
93-63
88-74
94-105
73-76
53-56
81-90
65-80


*Greater Youngstown Holiday Invitational
**Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Tournament


IE~j
I-
0
r ZW M


86 / SCOREBOARD


SCORE WINNER


FAMU
FAMU
YSU
JSU
PVU
SLU
MU
GU
FAMU
PVU
FAMU
FAMU
CSU
SLU
PC
FAMU
FAMU
ASU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
TSU
USL
BCC
TSU
NCA&T








WOMEN'S



BASKETBALL


Season Record (16-13)
OPPONENT
Alabama
Georgia State
Grambling State*
Edward Waters
Miami-Ohio
Delaware**
Alabama State @
Prairie View @
Delaware State #
Dartmouth #
Bucknell #
Mercer
Georgia State
Stetson
South Carolina State
Mercer
Central Florida
Georgia Southern
Georgia State
Stetson
Florida State
Georgia Southern
Central Florida
South Carolina State
Bethune-Cookman
Georgia
Bethune-Cookman
Stetson***
Georgia Southern***
*Southern Invitational (Atlanta, Ga.)
**Lady Friar Classic (Providence, RI)
***NSWAC Tournament
@ Corning Invitational (Tall.)
# Lady Paladin Classic
(Greenville, SC)


SCORE
81-60
70-93
65-61
53-91
63-57
57-63
73-67
66-57
67-83
49-62
62-69
76-81
67-74
70-73
63-68
89-94
73-86
83-82
83-82
73-76
79-72
70-56
83-92
47-43
63-72
89-51
55-49
74-78
74-69


WINNER
ALA
FAMU
GS
FAMU
M-O
FAMU
ALA
PV
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
FAMU
GS
GS
FAMU
FSU
GS
FAMU
SCS
FAMU
Geo.
BCC
FAMU
GS


WOMEN'S TENNIS

Season Record (10-8)
(Won MEAC Tennis Title; Placed third in New South Tournament


BASEBALL


Season Record (18-14)


M ercer (Ga.) University ......................... 2-9
at St. Leo (Fla.) .......................... 5-13, 2-9
ST. LEO COLLEGE (Fla.) 7-2, 6-7
EDWARD WATERS (Fla.) ................. 7-1, 15-4
BALL (Ind.) STATE .............................1-8
@ TUSKEGEE (Ala.) ............................ 4-1
@ FLORIDA MEMORIAL ................ ..... 11-4
@ BETHUNE-COOKMAN ...................... 9-4
@ EDWARD WATERS ......................... 13-0
W ILLIAM JEW ELL (Mo.) ........................ 7-0
at Edward W aters (Fla.) ............ .. ..11-1, 4-5
at M ercer (Ga.) .......................... 4-6, 8-12
at Stetson (Fla.) ........... ................... 8-7
at Savannah State ............................ 13-6
at Valdosta (G a.) ............................. 4-13
at Bethune-Cookman (Fla.) ................. 9-2, 0-9*
at Tuskegee (Ala.) ........................ 11-0, 6-7
# North Carolina A&T ......................... 12-5
# Coppin State (Md.) .......................... 12-9
# Howard (D.C.) University ......... 9-3, 13-14, 13-10
Valdosta State (Ga.) ............................ 4-6
Stillman College (Ala.) ..................... 9-2, 7-10

@ Spring Carnival
# MEAC Tournament
"Forfeit (0-9)




MEN'S TENNIS


Season Record (5-7)


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JOE COOL'S



DECISION

Yo, home boy, what's up?
What's going down?
There ain't much to it,
On this side of town.

Me, Joe Cool?
I've just been chilling and killing.
You know how it is
When you get this feeling,

But every since I quit school,
Things haven't been right.
I've gotten involved in drugs,
And my money is tight.

You know, there was no reason
For me to stay in school,
I wasn't learning anything,
And the teachers weren't cool.

So I went ahead and quit,
And tried to make it on my own.
But it's not very easy
Because I'm doing it alone.

But I've been thinking,
And I've thought about it before.
I've decided to go back
Through that school door.

Man, it ain't easy without an education,
It's just not easy at all,
So you'll see me back in class ...
This coming Fall.

And when I go back,
I am not going to quit again,
Because you must stay in school,
If you really want to win.
Clinton L. Black


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STUDENT LIFE / 91







NATIVE



LAND

Native home I never knew
Why am I in love with you
Because you're hidden deep within
The sacred color of my skin
You are my heritage, my native kin
We'll be a family until the end. 0
Though we're strangers we are as
one
our true battle has just begun
I am here to do my share
I'm willing to help, to love, to care
As a race we are the best,
We have the power to stand any test.
I have not faced the pain as you
your suffering I never knew .
But I must say, I understand
and I give my helping hand A l
You'll always have me distant kin,
because I love my native land ...
Aleathea Wiggins













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94 / STUDENT LIFE









FACES


From the darkest ebony to the fairest pecan
tan Faces, they are distinguished here in Rat-
I tier Land. Some faces are accented with those
' unique Negro features. Bright shiny eyes,
, varying color, shape and size. Brown, hazel
S and green are the ones that come to mind.
, The wide flat noses or the narrow, thinner
ones are gently embedded between those
S high cheek bones. Large, thick lips, although
thinner ones do exist. Despite the size they
fj are all perfect for a Rattler kiss!
SBridget Taylor
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STUDENT LIFE / 95
























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96 / STUDENT LIFE





LADIES, LADIES,

LADIES .
































I have been known to be ashamed to show my face,
because they told me I was from an unfortunate race.
I have been known to be tortured for many years









by my master, the overseer and all of his peers.
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and sometimes grew up to my brother.
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I AM THE BLACK WOMAN
I have been known to be ashamed to show my face,
because they told me I was from an unfortunate race.
I have been known to be tortured for many years
by my master, the overseer and all of his peers.
I have been known to be sold a child from my mother
and sometimes grew up to my brother.
I AM THE BLACK WOMAN





Today I don't have to be sold, because now I know
that I am vital in any man's show.
From the country towns to the cotton mill,
to one of the seats up on Capitol Hill!
I AM THE BLACK WOMAN
Tubman, Turner, Parks and King, these dear people fought hard for
thatme, and now in am striving for the victor's key.
I AM THE BLACK WOMAN
Bridget Taylor


STUDENT LIFE / 97







THE SET
If walls could talk, the walls of FAMU's
students union building, post office, re-
ligious center, yearbook office, and book-
store would have a lot to say about the
happenings on the set!
Rain or shine, night or day, someone can
always be found on the set. Whether step-
ping to a Greek chant, campaigning for a
student representative, sponsoring a fund-
raiser, or just: "hanging out."
Although there is no known origin of the
set and development, its name has become
a daily pit-stop in the lives of many stu-
dents.
"On the average, I put in about six hours
of set-time between classes during the
week," said Tasha Osborne, elementary
education major.
Over the years the set has endured its
share of criticism by those who feel that it
has no place in a university such as FAMU.
Some educators here say the set serves a
valuable need.
"Students need some sort of lines of
communications," said Attorney Robert
Williams, associate history professor, "The
set is the foremost form of communication
on campus." "It's a recreational center of
sorts, a place for exchanging ideas or just
killing time," Williams added. "The set has
a very rich history, and some of our best
students spent a lot of time there, and so
did some of their parents."
The set, about one block long, begins at
the stop sign adjacent to the steps leading
to Adams Street, passes the University
Commons, Bookstore Union, Post-Office,
Rattler Office, Religious Center, and ends
just beyond the university hotel unit across
the parking lot before Perry-Paige.
Dolvanya M. Mosby


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100 / STUDENT LIFE





FAMUANS
SHOWCASE

THEIR TALENTS









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STUDENT LIFE / 101




RATTLERS MAKE THINGS
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102 / STUDENT LIFE