<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Introduction
 Administration
 Academics
 Greeks
 Activities
 Organizations
 Band
 Features
 Sports
 Classes
 Seniors
 Senior index
 Freshmen index
 Sophomore index
 Junior index
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine


FAMU



The rattler
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000319/00005
 Material Information
Title: The rattler
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida A&M University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1978
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. VI (1957); title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 86123550
System ID: AM00000319:00005

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Administration
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Academics
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Schools and colleges
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
    Greeks
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Activities
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Organizations
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Band
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Features
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Sports
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    Classes
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
    Seniors
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
    Senior index
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
    Freshmen index
        Page 322
        Page 323
    Sophomore index
        Page 324
        Page 325
    Junior index
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
    Advertising
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






























ttoillewloala 0044iottom

RESERVE











AT I ILE OKUN-
AENIAN DUDU
BE.OKOERU-
.ATI AIMO-
.BE / JOBA

SE5 AWON
t xASALA
.E-0AIYE-


,-,


OF HUMAN SLAVERY.
THERE WAS THE AMER-
ICAN INFLICTED PLAGUE
OF ILLITERACY AND
IGNORANCE. FROM 'i
THOSE DARK DAYS, ;!
THOSE MEN OF COLOR
ESCAPED, SEARCHING
FOR THE LIGHT. BUT ALL :
THE TIME THERE WAS.'
THE LIGHT OF GOD, AND#'
BLACK MAN'S OWN PE;
SERVERENCE OF EQ'
TION. A PERSERVER
., -TO SUDDENLY
POSED TO:
ULATE'BAU'R


::












GORE'S


ROOTS


ROOTS WE'VE HAD -NOW A REALIZATION,
INTELLECTUAL,
PROUD CULTIVATION,
KNOWLEDGE FOR FERTILIZATION
FAMU'S INSTITUTE FOR UTILIZATION,
AMEN,.... NOW WE ... GROW.


WE DESIRE FLOWERS TO GROW
THE FRUIT OF FERTILIZATION,


AMEN, ...
NOW WE CAN GROW.


THE WEEDS MUST GO,
INSPIRING THE FRUIT OF UTILIZATION,









Thus
the fruit
will not contemplate
for the weeds,
FAMU
must excavate,
Transformation
is not too late,
The concern is FAMU's sake,


. .. '


~ti'* ~JhU~WbL 2'


Now we can grow


Listen to Gore's verbal blow,
"UNDERSTAND, ACTIVATE, ... Know,
FAMU must reach for the high, ...
not the low",
Grow, ... Grow
Grow to Go.. .. by Tyrone G. Jones


Dr. G. W. Gore

FAMU President


.,* ~


Amen, .





CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ................. 1
ADMINISTRATION .......... 20
SCHOOLS AND
COLLEGES ......................... 60
GREEKS ................................ 86
ACTIVITIES ....................... 104
ORGANIZATIONS ........... 136
BAND .................................. 184
FEATRURES ........................ 190
SPORTS ............................... 202
CLASSES ............................. 228
SENIORS ............................. 264
SENIOR INDEX ............... 310
INDEX ................................. 322
ADVERTISEMENTS ....... 329






































A mind dual in a chess game.


Dr. Smith, new president, presides.


SGA President, Roger Cobb and cabinet members
show school spirit enroute to FAMU vs. Tennessee
State game.


Alpha's ...... back on the yard.













Left, Dr. Perry departs his presidential
chair and will always be remembered for
his struggle at this institution. Below, Dr.
Perry forever sings the Alma Mater.

*'


Left, Dr. Finley accompanies the No. 1
Rattler of FAMU. Making his Grand
entrance Dr. Water L. Smith.
















DR. WALTER L.
SMITH IS PRESENT-
ED THE KEY TO THE
CITY OF TAMPA BY
ALTON WHITE DUR-
ING FAMU VS.
SOUTHERN FOOT-
BALL GAME.


PRESIDENT
FIRST CONVOCA-
TION, HELD IN J.
GATHER GYMNA-
SIUM.






HOMECOMING 1977

THEME: FAMU AN INTELLECTUAL
ODYSSEY


THE QUEEN IS HERALDED.


MISS EVE HALL, MISS FAMU 1977,
SENIOR FROM MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.


MISS FAMU 1976, LORI TAYLOR, CROWNS
THE NEW QUEEN. UNIVERSITY PRE-
SIDENT AND WIFE LOOKS ON.


IT'S DONE! SHE IS CORONATED IN LEE HALL AUDITOR-
IUM.





















QUEEN AND HER COURT 1977
MISS FRESHMAN CLASS, DENESSA STONE; MISS JUNIOR CLASS, ANGELA
COEFIELD; MISS JUNIOR ATTENDANT, CHERYLL MERKERSON; MISS FAMU, EVE
HALL; MISS SOPHOMORE ATTENDANT, SANDRA SEASON; MISS SENIOR CLASS,
PATTY WALKER; AND MISS SOPHOMORE CLASS, TRINECE PATTERSON.

UI i __ _


MISS FAMU IS ESCORTED BY SGA PRESIDENT
DURING CORONATION BALL.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND AS-
SOCIATIONS GAVE GIFTS TO THE
QUEEN DURING THE CORONATION.
HERE IS THE REPRESENTATIVE FROM
THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION.


THE FINALE FOR THE EVENING OF THE
QUEEN'S CORONATION WAS THE CORON-
ATION BALL 1977.














Fi I; i'"`-~1


BRAGG
STADIUM

WASN'T
ENOUGH TO CON-
TAIN THE RAT-
TLERS AT THE
HOMECOMING
GAME.
HERE UNIVER-
SITY POLICE CAU-
TION RATTLER
FANS AGAINST
BEING TOO CLOSE
TO THE FIELD.













CHEERS!


THESE YOUNG LADIES HAVE PLENTY TO SMILE
ABOUT. THE RATTLERS BEAT THEIR RIVALS. THE
MORRIS BROWN WOLVERINES, TO THE DEVASTATING-
TUNE OF 47-18.



GREAT MUSIC!

FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
INFAMOUS "MARCHING 100" CAME
BACK THIS TIME THEY PAR-
TICIPATED IN THE HOMECOMING
GAME FESTIVITIES AS THE FAMU
ALUMNI BAND.















Presentation of
Miss FAMU Eve Hall,
and her attendants,
during Homecoming
Game Half-time Show.


Dr. Leonard Johnson, National Alumni
President talks to jubilant crowd. In the
background is Al McCoy, former FAMU Director
of Alumni Affairs.


FAMU students tell it all .. Rattlers victories
sparked crowds in the 1977 Homecoming Game.






FLAG
CORPS .
sets the
stage for the
band.


Professor Julian White, former
FAMU drum major, escorts the
band through downtown Tallahas-
see.


The FAMU Female Drill team and the AROTC Color Guard added
their dynamic features to the Homecoming Parade.


Ii~ 1 =


LU
























I!z











Everyone enjoyed the Rattler Homecoming Parade, even the student participants.


This queen graces the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity float
which won 2nd place in the homecoming parade


Stephanie Rolle, President of the Clorettes Fashion and
Modeling Club exhibits poise as parade spectators look on.


To the left-A salute from the NROTC and Ms. Adriane Bryant
to a FAMU victory over Morris Brown of Atlanta, Ga.


14 -









Mr. M. S. Thomas still believes in FAMU.


Beauty is everywhere at FAMU.


Drill Team member displays coordinations during
routine in the homecoming parade.


RE1RE CLU



































Norris White and Curtis Ford started celebrating homecoming early by
attending the FAMU vs. TSU football game in Tennessee.


Everyone got into the act including these two coeds.


A young FAMUan and an old FAMUan meditate about what is to
come of the old Rattler call Strike, Strike, and Strike again.


Even Miss FAMU must relax. She bites into 2 sandwiches the way
the Rattler Football team stung their opponents.



































PAINTINGS PROVIDED
BY PROLIFIC
STUDENT ARTIST -
ANTHONY C. FLETCHER.
SHINING HIS LIGHT
OF CULTURE...
HERITAGE.






















S.r


Y/4





























































II
lows



















ta Sigma 4etal~~ii







0 19














DR. WALTER L. SMITH JR.
UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT
1977-


A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
"WHAT IS FAMU"


Z



C)


-Il


Handicapped? Minority Citizens? Majority
Citizens? What is their society- the campus?
The neighborhood around campus? Tallahas-
see? Florida? The Nation? The World? Do we
measure quality of life by economic security?
Political Power? Cultural Impact? Is "Learn-
ing" Technical Training? Intellectual Inves-
tigation? Sponsored Research? Retaining
Facts and Formuli? As famuans, are we the
privileged or the responsible? The benefac-
tors or the beneficiaries? While there is no
finite answer to the questions posed, it is
obvious that FAMU is a composite of all of
these and more.
Therefore, as we all work together to
translate our FAMU vision into admission
policies, recruitment programs, curricula,
student activities, grading standards, selec-
tion of faculty and staff, research and
service... We must not forget that a true
university transcends place and buildings and
becomes a rational spirit to direct and sustain
us as individuals and as a great institution of
higher learning- Florida A & M Univer-
sity
Walter L. Smith
President


0


Every university president enjoys an
opportunity to talk about his vision for his
institution, but as your new president, I
particularly appreciate this opportunity to
share with my fellow Rattlers some philoso-
phical thoughts about our university.
Although I "inherited" FAMU's official
statement of purpose as it had been
formalized, I accepted and endorsed it, and I
was pleased to note that the results of our
campus-wide questionnaire revealed the entire
FAMU family's concurrence with this
concept: The university, including the
administration, faculty, staff, and student
body, is indeed dedicated to the traditional
ideals of learning, and, thereby, contribute to
improving the quality of life for those
individuals it serves and their society.
Thus we share a common, worthy vision.
But vision, like faith, must be translated into
practical, day-to-day activity or else it never
becomes a reality. My request and challenge
to you is to help me make visible and concrete
our philosophical concept of FAMU. I am
sure that our interpretations will involve
heated, but stimulating and vitalizing debate.
Who are our students-Young? Old? Rich?
Poor? Gifted? Underprepared? Healthy?


-l


Z











1






II


Dr. Smith Right, chats with immediate past president,
Dr. Benjamin L. Perry Jr.


qm~J, )..~


Walter L. Smith III with the new first
lady, Jeri Smith.



Right Photo: Mr. Al
McCoy, EEO officer
of Tallahassee,
Florida left concen-
trates on the discus-
sion which include
Rev. Ernest Ferrell
director of The
Tallahassee Urban
League and the new
president, Dr. Smith
is active in promot-
ing the university
locally, statewide,
nationally and
internationally.


The president congratulates a member
of the mighty Rattler football squad that
went 11-0. The only unbeaten football
team in the nation.








































47 I
.; ~ = --







C44,
k: 4,~? ~i~- PII






w~~v w
t"~~pj.-"~i.. ii- X' *` +





I -AF :NtZ4 f 4-~ Cg~







Y 4o.- Ppjr:*










p '4
Or 4r. 4 AA

fF(I
L~ ~~~ ~ ~J:.;:U: r


















"Aunt* Harie a g f 0 *,S I a E to
ll I
t Sh was a w ne* u s m sa as













































I *- -I


Ed*ucan a *n c u


a .s .


.

























Frank Olds
Administration Coordinator
of Special Programs
Josh Williams
Director of Internship
Education


Dr. Arthur Teele
Administration Supervisor


Dr. Henry Finley
Vice-President of Administration


I -W t;;iS

B r
B



































Dr. Herb Reinhard
Assistant to the President


Dr. Gertrude Simmons
Vice-President for Academic Affairs
















Samuel Washington, Jr.
Director of Admissions































Clinton Cunningham
Director of Student Placement


Hardy Paul
University Registrar


ki~id/


I'


r
1


^









..
i"

"- i

~ i.

i-: rsr
r


Parren J. Mitchell
Chariman. Congressional
Black Caucus


Mr. Mal Goode
National Black Network


Renouned guest speakers pre-
sent at the Annual Howard Commun-
ications Conference of which jour-
nalism students were present.


-ILI~14 LbJ1Ep























V-00


Rudy Hubbard
Head Football Coach


Nathaniel S. Davis
Supervisor of Recreation


James R. Barrett
Comptroller









V



.1:


Mr. Cornelius M. Speed
Physical Plant Director


Bonnie Peace
Materials Manager
Media Center


Dr. Tyler Combs
Director of Special
Programs and Services


Col. William E. Jenkins
Director of Development


>^hh
l?1-.- '.


















Dr. William P. Foster
Director of Music and Bands


Dr. Nicholas Gaymon
Director of Coleman Library


Otha Brandon
Director of Media Center































Alton Royal
Director of Student Financial
Aid


Prince Hinson
Assistant Systems Director


Dr. John W. Boaddly
Director of Cooperative Education





































Willie Jenkins
Director of Univ. Development


Dr. Ansley Abraham
Director of Testing Bureau


Ronald Norvelle
Graphic Coordinator






























Joseph Roach
TV Art Studio Manager


Dr. Eva C. Wanton
Director of Graduate
Studies and Summer Session


- ..\ v


Edward H. DuBose
Director of Housing






































Ralph Coleman
Director of Purchasing


43


Darnley Jones
University Photographer


Dr. Herbert Alexander
Director of Community Affairs
























-- |
'. "
Dr. Ju u Br.
3. ., -2







i a t E u a
.. --


























Rosell Gaswell..
DireDirector of Community Relations































Rosell Gaswell
Director of Alumni Affairs


-~s~


t

~ 'cl
i, P


1


--
,,,.
Y



















Dr. Eunice Burgess
Dean of School of Nursing


Dr. Sybil Mobley
Dean of School of Business
and Industry


Dr. Richard Chalmers
Dean of School of
Architecture


Dr. Charles A. Walker
Dean and Professor of Pharmacy


fcI -


Lr




I -- -loa m


I::
' C::~I


LT~I~I~L!I1 I LI~ L


01






































Annie L. Cooper
Dean of Student Affairs


Dr. Paul Mohr
Dean of School Education

























I-A-


Dr. Joseph C. Awkard, Chairman
Psychology Department


Dr. James Eaton
Director of Academic Affairs


Dr. Leedell Neyland
Dean of College of and Social Science






























Dr. George Auzenne
SBI Division Head-Management Science


Samuel Gilliam, Director
FAMU Police Department


Dr. Victoria Warren
Chairperson of Sociology,
Antropology and Human Services


lsI


~"~*i


































Dr. C. U. Smith
Chairman Division of Social and Behavioral Science


Dr. George Clark
Asst. Professor Division of Management and
Science


Dr. Herbert Jones
Division of Natural Science






























Roy Lett
Media Center


4





S.1
4:


Dr. Shirley Burggraf
Division Head of Economics and
Development


i
Dr. Ronald Bailey
Chairman of Political Science


r
--
-r




































Dr. Howard E. Lewis
Division Head and Social Science and
Humanities


Dr. Lowell L. Simmons
Head Division of Communications, Humani-
ties and Social Science


Dr. Walter Johnson
Professor and Division Head of Science and
Technology





















L h
. *'


Dr. Charles Russell
Business


'9 '


Hazel Wilkes
Secretary Media Center


Dr. Marion Tinsley
Mathematics























Dr. Grace Maxwell
Political Science Asst.
Prof.


Dr. Ralph Turner
Professor of Chemistry


AC


Ronald F. Yrabedra
Asst. Prof. Humanities
and Social Science
(Military Science)


4-II


P


&


. Nftwm


In
I .1 -**. .


''
F'


^fl





"There is still a double standard,

Blacks must be twice as good as

their white counterparts."

He advised young black journalists in particular to
think about breaking in as copy readers because so few
blacks are in editing positions.
"About 95 percent of the blacks in newspapers are
reporters," said Moore, a founder of the Association of
Black Journalists.. Few are in management positions, he
said.
Young black journalists should also consider pursuing
long-range goals of reporting on the Third World, he said.
Most of the reporters covering African news now, he said,
are white, and they are missing the stories because they are
talking with embassy sources instead of talking with the
people of the countries.


By JAMES CRAMER
Democrat staff writer
If Acel Moore hadn't been given a three-inch
Associated Press story to re-write, he may never
have won the Pulitzer Prize last year.
Moore, a visiting instructor in journalism at
Florida A&M University for the spring quarter, said
Thursday his life has changed significantly since he
won the prize last April for an investigative series
about a Pennsylvania state hospital for the
criminally insane.


"Since our white colleagues
aren't quoting the right people,
there is an opportunity for blacks
to try," he said.
Moore called himself "a
product of


Acel Moore, a pulitzer Prize Winner and
a reporter of the Philadelphia Inquire
visited FAMU's Journalism Department an,
gave a seminar on the "Importance and :
Need for Black journalist in the print media.'
Mr. Moore also gave a lecture in ;i
news-reporting class during his visit.


Jobs hard to find,


Pulitzer winner


tells FAMU groui
Moore said there were only 600
black people -
among 40,000 peo-
ple on the staffs of
newspapers with
more than 10,000 ,
circulation.


- U5- _


.j
;K
,u
.. r
I~


,





Alice Peacock, a re-
tired School teacher ac-
cepts a plaque from
FAMU's SGA President
Roger Cobb during a
convocation last Fall
Quarter 1977.


Left Cynthia Barnes, is the
first Black Entomologist in
the state of Florida, and a
graduate of FAMU.









STUDENTS
HANGOUT...


STATE
CAPITOL


OUR
CAMPUS


I _






S1'
Il
er'




r;rr r
~i,~ ~i:




:~I


4.


J'


c?
,


He who reads, thinks; he who thinks, reasons; and he
reasons, unselfishly, and honestly, will advance
Sthe light of truth.


"
w: T~? J ~::
~ ai 8

~r 3~ ~1


PS04! .1


....,

4


A i i
7,-4


P.-:
I.-.PE1:
~c I'
ai 1~6~ ~k





SNGELA

DAVIS


2;


Angela Davis visited the campus on February 24, 1978. Her
presence aroused the interest of students and Faculty alike.


















MARTYR IN LIFE


Vicissitudes
describe her
ever embodied
in change
The sway of
variation -
leaning
meaning
naught can lead
her astray.
Solidarity
breathes within
her soul
acting as a
catalyst
The spiritual
chain-
reaching,
contacting
brothers lost
sisters turned
askance.
Spring .
Spring so
that belched
up foulness won't
suffocate you.
Sing .
but sing
with the
everlasting glory
that's yours from
a higher source.


Dance .
but dance to
the thump
bump, bump,
of your
heart.
Live in
life -
TODAY
See now
Be now
Know now,
that crabs
are among
YOU!!
Shout out your
thoughts
And never
preclude -
never repress
yourself.
Awake,
Awake,
says dear Angela,
Get away
from the wound
of that other self
and Fly .

Fly 'til that
repressive sore
bother you no more.
By Cheryl Mobley


























1ST ANNUAL FAMU


MEDICAL SEMINAR


FAMU ALUMNI WHO ARE *
NOW PHYSICIANS SPON-
SORED THE FIRST MEDICAL """ *-. .. --" '; -:
SEMINAR AT THIS INSTITU- "S "'
TION... A MILESTONE CON-
SIDERING THE FACT THAT
FAMU NO LONGER HAS THE
ILLUSTRIOUS 2 MILLION
DOLLAR HOSPITAL AND
HEALTH UNIT THAT WAS
BUILT IN THE 40s. LEFT: DR.
LASALLE LEFALL, CANCER
SPECIALIST, GAVE KEYNOTE
ADDRESS.


"5


wp,






11TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY

PEOPLE HELPING FOR




























1ST BLACK EDITORS WORKSHOP

ATTENDING THE AFFAIR WERE FREDDIE
-- ,,, .. GROOVES, ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT
S. ..' OF MINORITY AFFAIRS, FSU, ROY WOOD,
NATIONAL BLACK NETWORK VICE-PRES-
Sk..,., ,-.-.. : IDENT, THELMA GORHAM, ASSOCIATE
.-' PROFESSOR OF JOURNALISM, FAMU, AND
LIS HUMPHREY, PUBLISHER OF THE
PENSACOLA VOICE.












CONGRESSMAN
SPARREN
0MITCHELL OF
BALTIMORE,
MD, WAS
ANOTHER
VISITOR TO
TALLAHASSEE



RESOURCE CONFERENCE

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT




































THE LITERARY
GUILD
HAS ITS ANNUAL
FESTIVAL


J
gbCI
~c b


w.-
CI





























AS JOURNALIST, COMMENTATOR,
EDUCATOR IN RESIDENT, FAMU
WELCOMES MR. ROY WOOD ON THE
NATIONAL BLACK NETWORK. ABOVE
HE IS ACCOMPANIED BY ATTORNEY
TEELE AND DISTINGUISHED GUESTS.


^ ^**,71


I7
K
I


.1.i







r *SiA4I F'4











































ZELLA MCDUFFIE, ONE OF OUR CAMPUS BEAUTIES, IS
CAUGHT IN AN UNEXPECTED SHOWER.


JUST WAIT UNTIL I GROW UI
I'LL BE ANOTHER EVE HALI
MISS FAMU.


CYNTHIA ASKEW COMPLETES AN EXAM WITH A SMILE.




1'`" -l rw rrauw
r rrnrwFI


STEP step STEP step STEP SAY THE PERSHING RIFLE MEN


NOW I THINK WE HAVE MIXED THE RIGHT
POTION TO GET RID OF ALL THE PROFESSORS.


NOW WHERE DID HE SAY THE POST OFFICE
WAS.
































RATTLERS


RATTLERS


RATTLERS RATTLERS RATTLERS


L--
..








RATTLERS RATTLERS


pr




RATTLERS RATTLERS


...^aa *!I
* **-i .,:. "" ,.-
^- S"" I laB

,- -


hi

.,<
Ilrr
X'" ~ 51q Hi.-
I~""r;~_~L= IIL
u~^3
Irr t.


RATTLERS RATTLERS



















I I I I


"-F


-..... r..


Cio
L
L
E
G
E

I0
F

-S
C
I
E
N
C


I I : i I 1 I


* w-C,
,s tjUUL~e


The College of Science and Technology assists the student in understanding and
appreciating the Black Social heritage and the importance of individual integrity and respect
for the Black personality in its development; in developing appreciation of and devotion to
higher ideals of the black man's moral and spiritual life; and in developing habits of critical
thinking that may be applied in the solution of individual and social problems.


! I i I


r I


ISls~
'
1

~





I.- W
H
E
R
E








INVENTIONS


B
E
G
I
N





C
O
L
L
E
G
E

O


H
U
A




Sin al p t l

A A
N
D

S

C
I
L

S
C
I
E
N
The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a variety of well designed C
educational programs which provide opportunities for qualified students to acquire
basic fundamentals of a liberal education, concentrate in several fields of humanities E
and social sciences, obtain sound preparation for professional and graduate school, S
engage in the internship and practical programs that are useful in the world of work.














Caffie Jenkins, Jen-
ise Griffin and Cheryl
Mobley search for jobs,
scholarships and intern-
ships


Gail, you are not supposed to look at the keys!

















Students utilize
their time by checking
out the Journalism
Resource Center locat-
fi ed in Tucker Hall









-~ -'i


I
N
G


dlI N1
:: up ~


A'


hi,'-


To remedy the countless ills of
a sick and troubled society that
sinks deeper into disease with
each turn of the world is the
School of Nursing. Each student
represents the external search for
mental and physical health and
each is but another starlit long
ago by Florence Nightingale to
burn forever.


/


S
C
H
O
0
O
L

O
F

N
U






K

9 1 E E
........ P



& i f' l(f '


,; _' 1 "'" .'' ''"
a-
p. .+ .



F







I .....Y "




JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT
STEADILY GROWING
i1 1! I




P
A
V
IL
N


(~ ~




SBI


- ENVIRONMENT FOR


SUCCESS


S
C
H
O
0
L

0
O
F


He who Reads, Thinks; He who Thinks, Reasons; and He who Reasons, Unselfishly and
Honesty, will Advance into the light of truth.


Accounting Economics -
Management -
Marketing Business
Administration -
Finance -Areas of SBI.



Florida A&M University's School of Business and Industry is a complete educational school where the college
student may prepare to fill key roles in the business world. Emphasizing the complexity of the modern business world,
this school utilizes techniques recently innovated in the field.


B
U
S
I
N
E
S
S




THE SBI TOTAL

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM


SENSITIVITY
AGGRESSIVENESS
INTEGRITY
RESULTS
ORIENTATION
INTELLECTUAL


ABILITY
TOUGH-
MINDEDNESS
MATURITY
DECISIVENESS
OPENNESS
ENERGY










ER ST4








CONTRIBUTORS


FOR


1977


ADDISON, JEFFERY
ALSTON, MANUEL
ASKEW, CYNTHIA E.
AUZENNE, GEORGE
BARBER, KATHERINE E.
BARNES, SHERYL L.
BLAKELY, ARTHUR
BLAKLEY, BARBARA
BOYKIN, CAROLYN
BOWLES, CYNTHIA
BOZEMAN, JOSEPH C.
BRADSHAW, ROSEMARY
BROWN, ERSKINE
BROXTON, BRENDA
BRYANT,HERBERT
BRYANT, JAMES
BUCHANAN, WAYNE
BURCH, INGRID
BURGGARF, SHIRLEY
BURKS, RENEE
BUREY, CHARLES
BUTLER, DIETRA
BUTLER, GAIL W.
CALDWELL, WILLIE
CAIN, ANGELA
CARR, ELIZABETH
CARTER, ETHEL
CLARK, GEORGE W.
COLEMAN, ALBERT C.
CONDRY, EVERETT
COX, JANIS FAY
CRUTHIRD, MARGO D.
DAVIS, STARLEE
DOBBINS, MARGARET
DOUGLAS, YVONNE
DUDLEY, YOLANDA Y.
DUNN, ROBERT A.
EDWARDS, MARION
FALL, BARBACAR
FERGUSON, ARLINGTON
FLOYD, TINSLEY
FOOTMAN, BERNARD
FORBES, JOHN
FOSTER, GWENEVERE
FOUNTAIN, VERNON
FRANKLIN, CAROLYN W.
FRESE, CLAUDIA
FULLER, MIKE
GEORGE, STEPHEN
GHENENE, FEYISSA
GIBSON, GEORGE L.
GILBERT, VIVIAN D.
GORDON, JERRY
GREENE, DAVID C.
GRIFFIN, LARRY
GUEMPLE, RANDY
HADLEY, CONNIE D.
HAYNES, FLOZELL
HAMILTON, WILLIE


HARRIS, ROOSEVELT
HARRIS, SHELIA B.
HARRISON, PATRICA D.
HATCHER, BEVERLY
HELM, TERESA M.
HEMMINGWAY, BEULAH
HENDERSON, AUSTRALIA
HIGHTOWER, OSSIE
HILL, IRVIN K.
HUGE, BELINDA
HONEYCUTT, ANDREW
HUNDLEY, MICHELE
HUNTER, JERRY III
IVEY, LORETTA A.
JACKSON, DONALD E.
JAMES, EDWARD
JENKINS, WILLIAM III
JOHNSON, CAROLYN L.
JOHNSON, JACQUELYN
JOHNSON, KATHY S.
JOHNSON, PRISCELLA
JONES, FELICIA
JONES, GLORIA JEANETTE
JONES, RACHEL L.
JONES, RENEE M.
KAGLER, EARL
LARKINS, GEORGE
LEE, VERONICA A.
LEWIS, REGINALD
LOGAN, LYLE
LOPEZ, DEE DEE
MADDEN, DIANA C.
MARSHALL, LOUISE
MARTIN, HENRY S.
McCLAIN, PAT
McFADDEN, JOSEPH C.
McGRIFF, AUDREY
McKIE, BRYON C.
MELTON, VALARIE C.
MERRITT, ALFREDDIE
MILLER, SAMUEL
MILLS, STEPHANIE
MITCHELL, CYNTHIA Y.
MOBLEY, SYBIL C.
MONROE, CLAYTON D.
MONTGOMERY, LETITIA
MOODY, LEONARD
MOORE, MICHEAL ANTHONY
MOUTRIE, MILDRED
NEAL, ALTHEA
NORWOOD, VERA
ODUOR, CHARLES D.
OKOLI, CONSTANCE
PAIGE, NELLIE
PARKS, GLORIA
PARKS, KEVIN
PARROTT, VICTOR
PATTERSON,JOYCE
PEACOCK, GILBERT


PETERSON, IRA
PILATE, PATRICIA
POLK, JIMMY
POLLARD, ANTHONY
POPE, RICKEY
PRATT, RENEE
PRICE, KENNETH LEON
REED, EVA C.
REINBRECHT, CHARLES
RICHARDS, CHERYL
RICHARDSON, SONYA
RIGGINS, BRENDA
RIGGINS, GWENDOLYN
ROWE, GAIL A.
RUSSELL, CHARLES
SANFORD, DELYENE
SCHULTZ, JAMES
SCOTT, DEREK
SCURRY, GWENDOLYN
SHIVER, ANDRE
SIMPKINS, EDDIE L.
SMALL, ALICE
SMITH, GREGORY
STEELE, RHONDA
SWEET, GERTRUDE
TAYLOR, ADDIS
TAYLOR, MICHAEL
THOMAS, CAROLYN
THOMAS, CLARENCE JR.
THOMAS, LORRETTA
THOMAS, LORETTA R.
THOMAS, WALTER H.
TRIPLETT, CLAINETTA
URQUIOLA, PEDRO
VARREW, VINCENT L.
WADE, KEVIN
WALDON, DI ANE
WARD, SHEILA T.
WATSON, REGINALD B.
WEIMERN, SARAH E.
WHEELER, DEVORA
WHITEHEAD, LOUISE
WHITEHEAD, ROBERT A.
WILLIAMS, ANTHONY K.
WILLIAMS, DEBRAH
WILLIAMS, ERIC
WILLIAMS, JOAN
WILLIAMS, JOHN W.
WILLIAMS, KAREN SANDERS
WILLIAMS, LARRY
WILLIAMS, MARY HELEN
WILLIAMS, PAMELA E.
WILLIAMS, SANDRA
WINEGLASS, ANNARINE
WINSTON, CLIFFORD A.
WRIGHT, WILLIAM DARNELL
YORK, LYDIA E.
YORK, MILLICENT


*k


4


4


*r




































































































75





The promise of the College of Education when meeting the needs of its constituency is to
provide an academic delivery system utilizing scholarly modes of knowledge which recognized
the unique differences of all learners, and guarantees that today's younger generation will not
be segregated intellectually from the rest of the world.


C
0
O
L
L
E
G
E

0
F

E
D
U
C
A
T
I
O
N




I '''""A


STUDY


fI


--r


; It


H
A
R
D


. And you will
slowly achieve your goal


,






SCHOOL


OF


PHARMACY


Majestically illustrating the wide open door to the world of medical science
is the School of Pharmacy. Far from the ancient Black Caldron used by the
Medieval Sorcerers, the Pharmacy Department at FAMU prepares its students
for the professional areas of community pharmacy











1r


4*"4J


BETTER


TOMORROW


B
U
I
L
D
I
N
G


-4.


a: J


I


~,, r
Ic~-~1I1*1P~c '"


Rm






THE

SCHOOL

OF


ARCHITECTURE


The domestic and household phases of education are confined within the competent
fences of the School of Agriculture for the future farmer, horticulturist, clothing expert
or housewife, The School of Agriculture offers a sound program for educational
achievement.
The purpose of the School of Agriculture is to prepare students in both the effective
and operative instruction of Agricultural activities ranging from poultry industries to
ornamental horticulture enterprises. This sector of FAMU's educational program has
concentated its efforts particularly on the high schools as well as on training other
interested persons in special classes.


'r ,',
i y.




















m-b

Mt h-. 1
^


.I -
7 ;'


F
U
T
U
R
E


81


C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I
N
G


1im


O
U
R


'"~ ''
r,-*.
%.+`-


r,/Y I~
Y
r
~iiBTsar;ge~-~--.j~ 'r
Z1
~; -~
I
~I""
g


i-. .~lni-
..:II


it/





X
P
R
E

S
I
0
N
S


WISDOM


0















PROFESSIONAL
SOCIAL AND
SERVICE
ORGANIZATIONS


__


























Arr
4,
JF4















A~+r






BETA NU CHAPTER


OF


ALPHA PHI ALPHA


-U -- .-.- -,..-..-..


1 ,.


.~:' '-nd
I-~l~np T


First row: Gerald Wilcox, Jerry McMillian, Brodes Hartley III, Michello Williams Second Row: Kirkland Floyd, Paul Fields, Howard McKinney,
Terrance McCain, Rupert Seals, Roderick Wilmore, Johnny Johnson, Fred Ware, Delbert Floyd, Cicero Hartsfield, Frederick Allen Third row: Danny
Whitfield, Jasper Watkins, Gary Brown, Ricky Seabrooks, William Hill, Vernon Williams Top: Daryl Wilcox, & Wellington Craig Lawson. Not shown:
Dwight Walton, Edgar Perry, Edwardo Williams, Anthony Johnson, & Keith Miles.


~. n'l r~r '~: jl. .


*
r~:' .I


'" ~ '"





TAU

BETA

SIGMA

SORORITY


left to right Shelia Battle Parliamentarian, Kim P. Clayton -
Vice-President and Chaplain, Eileen Wade Kneeling Sonja L. Smith -
President







KAPPA KAPPA

PSI


FRATERNITY


left up Ronald Jones, Evils Allen, Francis
Solomon, Richard Overton, Bobby Humphries,
Robert White, Dawryl Wilson, Calvin Whitmore,
Michael Barr, Chevon Jackson, Jeffrey Chad
Matthews, Linzerl J. Rutledge, Mathew Simmons,
Arnold Lamar Gamble, Freddie L. Mathis, Bill
Hill, and Reggie May Middle Faye Neal, Ralph
Henry, Angela Prater





PHI BETA I
LAMBDA
PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATION
FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS








1st Row: Clayton Monroe, Norris White President, Vivian Gilbert, Anthony Williams
2nd Row: Vera Neely, Don Jackson, Carolyn Thomas, John Forbes, Audrey McGriff,
Brenda Broxton, Gertrude Sweet, Denise Bryant, Loretta Thomas, Patricia Davis, Mary
Walker, Mary Williams 3rd Row: Stephen George, Albert Coleman













KAPPA EPSILON PROFESSIONAL SORORITY

FOR WOMEN

IN PHARMACY




A 1st Row Argretta Jenkins,
Margaret Peoples, Cheryl Barge,
Gilda Laing, Leslie Taylor -
President, Sandra Inge 2nd Row -
Corraine Ford, Audrey Nelson,
Brenda Sowell, Rochelle Green,
'Kathy Smith 3rd Row Con-
stance Johnson, Alma Ragin,
Brenda Green, Marie Mattox,
Darelle Brown, Carolyn Ford 4th
Row Sharon White, Kathy
Grisby, Marilyn Carter, Gloria
Roberson, H. Alexis Roberts,
Priscilla Newborn














































'I.~






'"I






1V.



IA










*1. .1

































t 4-
I

/las .^


4.


traur~~~I?~;


;-.,~ ~~ 3 t
kat f


:i .: =;
, ~kdt~l


4
L1









)t
WA
zd B




































































Lr
''
.

1
'~' U
+~ ''
r-.
P
1
"' ;:b'
'5 ~-
~d
:-
,


_I~






.:

'"

--rw
.. .:



: ---
Ir-. ;....I


r=
:.,.. .... =,..,.. -,.I: .... : '''
I:: _.."_;i *"~~.
"-. .~t.'. ,-.,,,.,
5~P~"
''' ""~"" '~' ` FI


I -I TA-




T





















WCN
-Y -- t.
1. -'11 I I


You over there, you better move
the Kappa's are coming.


out of the way because


Kappa Scrollers
Robot Display


Yr


1-1


A
"EL


-rr