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 Title Page
 Signature page
 Table of Contents
 Preface
 Introduction
 Facility description
 Summary and conclusions
 Appendix






Group Title: Post occupancy evaluation : Wakulla Middle School
Title: Post occupancy evaluation
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000290/00001
 Material Information
Title: Post occupancy evaluation Wakulla Middle School
Physical Description: vi, 155 leaves, ill., plans : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Peterson, J. Terry
Publication Date: 1991
 Subjects
Subject: School buildings -- Evaluation -- Florida -- Wakulla County   ( lcsh )
Architectural design -- Evaluation   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.) -- Florida A&M University, 1991.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references leaves 140-141.
Statement of Responsibility: by J. Terry Peterson.
General Note: Typescript.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000290
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 85855269

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Signature page
        Unnumbered ( 2 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Preface
        Preface 1
        Abstract
            Unnumbered ( 5 )
        Goals and objectives
            Unnumbered ( 6 )
            Unnumbered ( 7 )
            Unnumbered ( 8 )
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Study introduction and methodology
            Page 1a
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Introductory overview: Building type
            Page 9
            Page 10
        Historical overview: Study facility
            Page 11
        General description: Physical plant
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        General description: Organization
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
    Facility description
        Page 20a
        Page 20b
        Space list: North wing
            Page 22
        Organizational areas
            Page 21
        North wing: Space descriptions
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
        North wing: Observations
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        East wing: Space list
            Page 44
        East wing: Description
            Page 45
        East wing: Observations
            Page 46
        South wing: Space list
            Page 47
        South wing: Space descriptions
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        South wing: Observations
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Unified arts wing: Space list
            Page 67
        Unified arts wing: Space descriptions
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
        Unified arts wing: Observations
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
        North core: Space list
            Page 80
        North core: Description
            Page 81
        North core: Observations
            Page 82
            Page 83
        Center core: Space list
            Page 84
        Center core: General description
            Page 85
            Page 86
        Center core: Observations
            Page 87
            Page 88
        South core: Space list
            Page 89
        South core: Description
            Page 90
        South core: Observations
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
        Gymnasium: Space list
            Page 95
        Gymnasium: Description
            Page 96
        Gymnasium: Observations
            Page 97
            Page 98
    Summary and conclusions
        Page 98a
        Page 98b
        Issues of spatial organization
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Issues of proximics & circulation
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
        Issues of growth & expansion
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Issues of comfort & aesthetics
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
        Issues of technical concern
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
        Summary & recommendations
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
    Appendix
        Page 139
        Bibliography
            Page 140
            Page 141
        Faculty and staff questionnaire
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
        Miscellaneous documents
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
Full Text






A POST OCCUPANCY EVALUATION:
WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL


MASTER'S PROJECT
FOR
FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE


J. TERRY PETERSON


[ I


1










MASTER'S PROJECT


POST OCCUPANCY EVALUATION: WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL





A MASTERS THESIS


Presented to the Faculty of the School of Architecture
Florida A & M University
Tallahassee, Florida
In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements
for the Degree of Master of Architecture



by


J. Terry Peterson

April 1991





Approved:


C --: Edward_ T White, Professor
ri A & M University


t, Associate Professor
Florda A & M University


Bob Myhre, Prficipal
Wakulla Middle School


Charles U. Smith, Dean Graduate Studies
Florida A & M University







TABLE OF CONTENTS


PREFACE
ABSTRACT
GOALS & OBJECTIVES
P;
INTRODUCTION
STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY ..............
INTRODUCTORY OVERVIEW BUILDING TYPE ..........
HISTORICAL OVERVIEW STUDY FACILITY ...........
GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT ...........
GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION .............

FACILITY DESCRIPTION
ORGANIZATIONAL AREAS ..........................
NORTH WING SPACE LIST ........................
NORTH WING SPACE DESCRIPTIONS ................
NORTH WING OBSERVATIONS ......................
EAST WING SPACE LIST .........................
EAST WING GENERAL DESCRIPTION ...............
EAST WING OBSERVATIONS ......................


SOUTH WING -
SOUTH WING -
SOUTH WING -
UNIFIED ARTS
UNIFIED ARTS
UNIFIED ARTS
NORTH CORE -
NORTH CORE -
NORTH CORE -
CENTER CORE
CENTER CORE
CENTER CORE
SOUTH CORE -
SOUTH CORE -
SOUTH CORE -
GYMNASIUM -
GYMNASIUM -
GYMNASIUM -


SPACE LIST ........................
SPACE DESCRIPTIONS ...............
OBSERVATIONS .....................
WING SPACE LIST ................
WING SPACE DESCRIPTIONS .........
WING OBSERVATIONS ...............
SPACE LIST ........................
GENERAL DESCRIPTION ...............
OBSERVATIONS .....................
- SPACE LIST ......................
- GENERAL DESCRIPTION ..............
- OBSERVATIONS .....................
SPACE LIST ........................
GENERAL DESCRIPTION ..............
OBSERVATIONS ...................
SPACE LIST .........................
GENERAL DESCRIPTION ................
OBSERVATIONS .......................


SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS
ISSUES OF SPATIAL ORGANIZATION .................
ISSUES OF PROXIMICS & CIRCULATION ..............
ISSUES OF GROWTH & EXPANSION ................
ISSUES OF COMFORT & AESTHETICS .................
ISSUES OF TECHNICAL CONCERN .................
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS & RECOMMENDATIONS ..........

APPENDIX
BIBLIOGRAPHY
DATA COLLECTION FORMS
MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS


AGE NO.

1
9
11
12
16


21
22
23
40
44
45
46
47
48
65
67
68
77
80
81
82
84
85
87
89
90
91
95
96
97


99
105
112
118
123
129























PREFACE I







ABSTRACT


The performance of this work is in partial fulfillment of
the Master of Architecture degree at Florida A & M
University.

The project involves the conduct of a post occupancy
evaluation of an existing facility, the Wakulla Middle
School.

The purpose of the evaluation is to determine how well the
existing facility meets the performance criteria and
philosophies for which it was intended. Conclusions and
recommendations drawn should be useful for corrective
actions as applicable on this facility or as input for
future similar buildings as to factors to be repeated or
avoided.

The evaluation was done at an investigative level with an
emphasis on the functional aspects and to a lesser degree
on the technical factors.

The evaluation process was guided by three major aspects of
the middle school philosophy: school within a school, team
teaching, and block scheduling.

The data were gathered through site surveys, archival
research, questionnaires, interviews, and group discussions.

The findings and concluding recommendations were categorized
into issues of spatial organization, proximics &
circulation, growth & expansion, comfort & aesthetics, and
technical concerns.

The Wakulla Middle School was found to perform successfully.

The shortcomings recorded were in aspects where the facility
did not optimally facilitate the operational philosophies.







GOALS & OBJECTIVES


GOAL:

To perform a Post Occupancy Evaluation on the Wakulla Middle
School with an emphasis on the effectiveness of the physical
facility in meeting the middle school conceptual and
organizational needs.

OBJECTIVE ONE:

The delineation of the middle school philosophies and
curricula goals.

OBJECTIVE TWO:

The description of the existing facility.

OBJECTIVE THREE:

The establishment of critical form/function issues.

OBJECTIVE FOUR:

The collection of data relating to the established critical
issues.

OBJECTIVE FIVE:

The analysis and display of collected data.

OBJECTIVE SIX:

The statement of conclusions and recommendations.




PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE ONE:


Literature search for documentation on the middle
school building type
Interviews
Facility program committee members
Educational professionals
Summary of pertinent information







GOALS & OBJECTIVES


PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE TWO:


Collection of documentation on the existing facility
Facility program
Construction documents
Plant surveys
Self studies
Maintenance and utility records

Interviews
Architect
School board facilities director
Assistant principal head of school physical plant
Head custodian

Surveys
Facility walk-throughs

Questionnaires
Preparation of questionnaires
Target group selected
Intro. of process & distribution of questionnaires
Collection of questionnaires


Summation of findings
Overview narrative
Graphical representation for
reference
Space lists
Critical areas identified


PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE THREE:


annotation


Form/function review
Discussion sessions
Surveys
Identification of
relationships


special


areas and


critical


PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE FOUR:

Indepth site survey
Completion of checklists
Annotation of plan
Recording of critical features & dimensions
Recordings of functional & technical observations


and







GOALS & OBJECTIVES


Conduct of indepth interviews
Group discussions on critical areas of concern
Review of data
Narrative and graphical delineation of findings
Recycle through above as required


PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE FIVE:

Listings of findings by areas
Narrative and graphical summation of general area findings
Individual space descriptions narrative and graphical


PROCEDURAL OUTLINE for OBJECTIVE SIX:

Summary of findings by issue categories
General summary of conclusions
General recommendations
























I INTRODUCTION







STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY






STUDY INTRODUCTION AND METHODOLOGY

Origin

A middle school, and in particular the Wakulla Middle School
site, was selected for the performance of a post occupancy
evaluation with two primary factors in mind.

The middle school as a building type is relatively new and
to some degree still evolving and developing.

The Wakulla facility was programmed, designed, and
constructed to function as a middle school. The traditional
junior high school was still the predominant format at that Z
time. O

The Wakulla Middle School is now ten years old and thus has
become an ideal site to evaluate the success and failure of
those building type planning concepts.

Methods
0
The study began with a generalized investigation of the
middle school building type. The emphasis was on
establishing the functional and philosophical issues that
had the strongest impact on the physical form.

This investigation was begun with archival research,
interviews, and informal discussions with faculty and staff
at several middle school sites.

From those discussions, identification began of those issues
unique to a middle school as presently being incorporated.
Those interviewed also provided suggested curriculum guides,
reference texts, and educational specifications for a more
indepth understanding of the direction the middle school
concept was taking.

After the literature search, the interview process was
repeated this time with prepared questions to discuss.
Both hand-out questionnaires and direct discussions were
utilized.

After the second series of interviews, a building type
overview was developed.



1







STUDY INTRODUCTION &: METHODOLOGY






Three basic concepts emerged as organizationally critical:

School within a School
Team Teaching
Block Scheduling

The "School within a School" concept is based upon self-
contained divisions within the facility in which the
students will be assigned and will remain throughout the
three years at the middle school.

"Team Teaching" is the grouping of teachers for a specific
grade level and collection of students for individualizing,
structuring, and teaching their academic subjects.

"Block Scheduling" allows flexibility in instructional
period lengths to best support the individualization of the
other two concepts.

It was then determined to formulate the study with those
three ideas as the steering structure.

The next step in the methodology was the investigation of
the study site itself.

That phase was begun with an archival review of the facility
program and the construction documents, as well as an
interview with the architect and the county school board
construction director.

After a broad base understanding of the facility was
established through documentation review and preliminary
interviews, the indepth site surveys were begun.

These site surveys were categorically separated into:

General familiarization
Equipment and furnishing description
Technical observations
Curriculum and daily routine observations
Circulation study.
General familiarization This aspect was done with the
guidance of the assistant principal whose responsibilities
included the overseeing of the physical plant. Observations
were recorded with a 35 mm camera, a microcassette recorder,
and notes on a school key plan.


2







STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY


Equipment & furnishings description This survey portion
was done during "after hours" with the assistance of the
head custodian. Notes were taken on a microcassette
recorder and keyed on a plan of the facility that was CAD
developed for this study.

The physical plant equipment HVAC, electrical,
communication & alarm subsystems, and similar support
functions, were investigated at that time. Those systems
were further studied through equipment documentation and
subsequent interviews with the Wakulla County School Board
Construction Director.

Technical observations The technical observations were
focused on signs of success and failure in systems,
materials & furnishings, and general functional aspects.
This was done first in a general view with input from both 0
the assistant principal and the head custodian, and then -
with closer visual inspection done with an emphasis on those
aspects linked directly to the middle school concepts and U
unique functions. A camera and microcassette recorder were
used for these notations.

Curriculum and daily routine observations Informal 0
discussions were held with a representative sampling of
faculty and staff from the various departments and wings. A
list was generated of individualized aspects to the daily
routine. That list structure was used as a focusing guide
to the observations.

The goals of this important section of the study were to see
the functional realization of the curriculum concepts and
philosophies, and then make note of those areas that
appeared either enhanced or hampered by the physical form
and appurtenances.

This part of the study was conducted over an extended period
with a number of site and classroom visits. The data were
recorded with the microcassette and annotations on a plan.

Circulation Although the issues of circulation were
discussed and analyzed through-out all site surveys, they
were separately addressed because of their importance to the
functioning of the facility.

The circulation study was begun by establishing with the
administrative staff the movement patterns by schedule and
policy.


3







STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY


The circulation patterns are strongly linked to the three
philosophical steering concepts, as well as to the support
needs, the site restraints, arrival/departure schemes, and
obvious physical plan controls.

The circulation descriptions were taken in notes,
observations were recorded with the camera & microcassette,
and additionally annotated on a plan in an attempt to reveal
areas of criticality.

At the conclusion of those site survey categories, further
discussions with members of the faculty and staff were used
to confirm and validate the findings.

After a review of all of the preceding, an organizational
structure for the documentation of the study was developed Z
and the written description began. O

The documentation was organized into three major divisions:
introduction, facility description, and summary & )
conclusions.

The introduction explains the study process, goals, and
methods and provides an overview of the building type and 0
particular study site.

The facility description section breaks the school into its
operational components. Each of the components is first Z
provided a space list, and then each space is individually
described. The last portion of that section is a compilation
of observations for that component.

Because of the direct similarities between the East Wing and
the North Wing, the East was provided a general description
rather than the individual space description.

The gymnasium and the "core area", administration, media,
and food services, were similarly provided only the general
descriptions. These areas were felt to be more of a
standard educational facility element and not unique to the
middle school building type.
The third organizational division, summary & conclusions,
compiled the findings under five individual issue
categories. Conclusions and recommendations were then
summarized with those categories, as well as the three
philosophical concepts as the organizational format.




L4






STUDY INTRODUCTION METHODOLOGY
STUDY INTRODUCTION &: METHODOLOGY


Considerations of the Methodology

The process that was incorporated seems to have been very
appropriate and effective for the goals selected. With an
unfamiliar building type the extended preparation and lead
in is important.

The gradual introduction to the building type with the
interviews, literature search, and site visits made it an
easy transition and perhaps avoided some pitfalls of
misunderstanding. The recycling back through those same
steps filled in the gaps, established a working relationship
with the faculty and staff, and provided a substantial
understanding of the middle school goals and composition.

The early archival research was a very beneficial phase in
the initial introduction to the project. 0

Comparing the original facility program, written in 1974 for
a junior high school, to the 1978 version, written for the
middle school, was the first clear recognition of the
building type differentials.

The next stage was the comparison of the middle school 0
program and goals to the final design construction
documents.

This procedure could become a very rigorous step and could
be worthy of a separate study. It was used in this project
to provide clues as to any apparent slippages in the
translation of the planning goals to the physical form and
to simply assist further understanding of the facility.

The questionnaire phase that followed revealed the areas of
concern, provided issues to investigate, and gave a general
sense of how successful the facility was perceived to be.

Comparing the respondents' points of view in relationship to
their roles and their areas of use within the building gave
insights into performance conflicts and provided subject
matter for the subsequent interviews.

The interview process was clearly an important portion of
the methodology.

Some of the factors noted in the conduct of that segment:

- It is critical that a broad base of respondents be
selected varying departments and roles. That insures a,-







STUDY INTRODUCTION &: METHODOLOGY





balanced representation and assists accuracy.
- The interviewer should have a clear structure and
objective before beginning each session.
- Group versus individual sessions influence responses. Some
individuals are less likely to talk in groups than alone,
and vice versa.
- The nature of the mix in a group discussion is important.
Sometimes supervisory hierarchy is inhibiting to the
respondent.
- The interviewed individual must understand the purpose of
the study and the use of the information provided. There
must be an establishment of trust in how the responses are Z
recorded and interpreted.

- Each person interviewed must be individually addressed as
to his or her particular role in the facility's delivery or
operation. There are significant differences possible in the
positions of those who were involved in the planning
process, from the architect, and from the ultimate users.
0
Those involved in the planning process may perceive that
they are being evaluated as to the appropriateness of their
planning. The architect may feel that he or she is being
judged as to the success of the solution to the planning
process.
- There is generally "ownership," and an evaluation will
typically reveal some negatives no matter what the study
site.
- Any implied criticism may provoke defense and reduce the
effectiveness of the process.
It must first be asked of the planners if their goals were
met in the facility produced. It must then be separately
determined if the architect feels successful in that the
final product met those goals.
- The user of the facility is generally in a different
position of opinion from the planners and the architect.
When it is understood that the physical form is the primary
target of evaluation, the users of the facility are much
more apt to openly respond.



(LI







STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY





There is still often an extended sense of "ownership," and
care must be taken in being judgmental. Even a lack of
adaptability to the building's shortcomings may be taken as
an implied criticism.
- A series of individual interviews with a gradual increase
of informational depth assists project understanding and
allows more efficient sessions.
- The establishment of a working relationship and agreeable
"ground rules" between the evaluator and the faculty/staff
is very important. This must be done to ensure avoidance of
interference or inconvenience with the facility's functions.
This is even of greater importance with an extended period
of presence and interaction.
- The ability to process and evaluate the data received is
obviously critical and develops with the experience.
This study was conducted over a three year period.
Guidelines and benchmarks had to be established as to how
changes over time would affect the study.
Spatial allocations were altered, and portable classroom
buildings were added after descriptions were recorded.
The 1989-90 academic year was "locked-in" as to matters of
space usage, whereas other issues affecting the building's
performance were continuously monitored over the time frame.
This extended period of time became inadvertently
advantageous in many areas of observation.
There were various "adjustments" incorporated in the
facility during the study period.
The attempts to resolve the conflicts between aspects of
physical facility and the curriculum through policy or other
changes could be evaluated. These conflicts were generally
minor and were adapted to and worked around. Often these
"work around" went unnoticed and became a part of the
routine to the faculty and staff.
Special locker breaks during class times to reduce traffic
conflicts or policy setting as to particular corridor paths
to be taken for certain class changes are examples of minor
work around.



e7_







STUDY INTRODUCTION & METHODOLOGY


The shifting of teacher teams away from the area of
instruction to find available planning rooms represents a
much more serious adaptation to a facility misfit problem.
Conclusions
This project was undertaken as partial fulfillment of
educational requirements. The study process was conducted
over a longer period and in a less time efficient and
compact format than would be otherwise possible.
If conducted as a professional project, the front-in
research could be more thorough and concentrated. That
phase should take one from familiarization of building type
to study format outline and questionnaire preparation.
Interview sessions could probably be limited to two or three
well organized and perhaps extended sessions. A video
camera would lessen the number of site surveys required,
especially if it was thoughtfully goal oriented beforehand.
It is apparent that each building type and each study site
is unique. Every project will have similar structure and
goals, but each will have to be customized and addressed
through its individuality.


C)


F-H


LI_



Isi--







INTRO. OVERVIEW BUILDING TYPE


The concept of a middle school is a relatively recent and
innovative development in the educational field. The
philosophies and associated goals of what a middle school
should be are so interwoven into the organizational
structure that the traditional form of the junior high
school facility will not accommodate the new curriculum.

The impetus of the middle school philosophy was an effort to
provide a better transition from the single classroom
teacher setting of the elementary school to the fast paced
anonymity often found in the high school characterized by
the changing of classes and changing of peers at every bell.

The primary middle school emphasis is on a "student based -
not subject based" program. The goal is then the holistic
development of the individual child. Objective statements
such as "individualization through organization" fused 0
methodologies, and a delivery system, though borrowing
elements from both the elementary and the high school
formats, was formulated that was quite unique.

The organizational structure is built around three
techniques:

1. SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL

2. TEAM TEACHING
3. BLOCK SCHEDULING

The SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL concept consists 'of a self-
contained wing or quad, as the division is often called.
Students begin the sixth grade on a wing, attend all
standard academic classes within that wing and will continue
to do so for the three years at that school.

Some of the objectives of this idea include: the high
school change of class pattern, but within a small area,
vertical familiarity with faculty and other students,
reduction of anonymity and the establishment of "community"
- wing pride.
This idea is deeply interconnected with the whole
educational program and has strong form giving implications.

TEAM TEACHING, although not a new concept in itself, is an
integral part of what makes the middle school philosophy
work. It is a method by which two or more teachers are
assigned to a specific group of students for each grade


S9-







INTRO. OVERVIEW BUILDING TYPE






level. The subjects are interdisciplinary and
interdependent with the teachers planning together how and
by whom the academic subjects will be taught. Daily
meetings are required to allow adjustments and to reinforce
the closeknit group concept. Special areas must be available
for these team needs although they may be multifunctional
spaces, the location and size are critical.

BLOCK SCHEDULING is an outgrowth of the team teaching
structure. It allows the flexibility of period lengths and
student class changes to be individually set by the team.
There are thus no class bells, and traffic patterns are
important and are certainly different from the conventional
setting. Proximics and circulation are items of high
criticality in facility planning.

Wakulla Middle School is a facility that was planned from Q
its conception to perform as a model middle school. i-i

U


0



I-i






HISTORICAL OVERVIEW STUDY FACILITY


A facility program was completed in 1974 for a new Wakulla
County Junior High School. However, before an architect was
contracted for the design of that facility, new directions
were taken. A planning committee was formed to consider a
"middle school" instead. The new facility type would house
three grade levels instead of the two as is conventional in
a junior high school. This would alleviate some of the
growth problems in the other schools. The middle school was
also the apparent new educational direction across the
nation.
A building facility program for the new Wakulla Middle
School was completed in the end of 1978. The program called
for a 97,000 square foot facility to house 722 students in
grade levels six, seven, and eight and to perform under the
accepted guidelines of the new middle school concepts.
The Tallahassee architect, Mays Leroy Gray, was commissioned
for the design, and the project was started. The design and
construction of the facility was begun in 1979, and the
building was occupied in August of 1980.
The school has now been in operation for ten years, and thus
should be an excellent facility to evaluate both for its
functional performance as well as the operational and
maintenance aspects.


S--


WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL


11
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GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT


SCHOOL ENTRY
The roof is a sloped built-up system with a deep fascia.
There are pre-finished graveled panels making a transition
from the brick to the eave. All buildings are contiguous
under the roof system.
The school is laid out with a linear core with parallel
corridors along either side. The four wings join the core,
two on each of the long sides.


SOUTH CORE SUPPORT


GYMNAS I UM


KEY PLAN


J -LLJ--J BUS LOADING
:NORTH CORE ADMIN.
--- NORTH CORE ADM I N


The wings themselves have central corridors from the core to
the exterior with classrooms and support spaces off both
sides.


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GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT


GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT
The Wakulla Middle School is built on a donated 20 acre site
in a rural area of Wakulla County off U.S. Highway 98.


P~e~ eieow~


N'VeOcQ2A


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AREA SITE PLAN


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GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT


The site is restrictive in size and meets only the legal
minimum area requirement for the facility as designed.
Expansion would be very difficult.
The unbuilt area of the site is fully utilized. The vehicle
traffic areas, physical education fields, and the additional
land required for the on-site sewage treatment plant occupy
the remaining portions. The recent installation of portable
classrooms have already begun to interfere with the outdoor
activity spaces


SCHOOL SITE PLAN


The site is positioned with the main entry and the vehicle
parking on the northeast side of the facility. The bus loop
and loading platform are on the northwest. The P.E. fields
are removed from the building on the southeast side, and the
sewage treatment plant is located to the southwest. The
kitchen support areas and the HVAC equipment yard are
immediately adjacent to the building on the south. The
Gymnasium is attached by a covered walkway to the East Wing.
The school is constructed of concrete block walls, painted
on the interior and brick veneered on the exterior.


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[,,







GENERAL DESCRIPTION PHYSICAL PLANT


The wings are separated from each other
courtyards. Small secondary mechanical rooms,
wing, protrude into the courtyard spaces.


by
two


exterior
for each


The building HVAC system is centralized. It is cooled by
two air cooled chillers and is heated by a fuel oil
boiler/hot water system. The four pipe system serves air
handler units, two for each wing located in the courtyard
rooms. One air handler conditions one side of a wing, and
thus thermostatic control is for that orientation only.
Pneumatic dampers control air volume in each room for
individual levels.

The electrical system consists of 277/480 volt distribution
for lighting and major equipment and 120/208 volt secondary
for the receptacles and small equipment needs.

Water to the facility is from a local well. The sewage is
treated through the on-site packaged plant.







GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION


GENERAL DESCRIPTION PLAN & ORGANIZATION

The Wakulla Middle School is divided into four instructional
wings and a core area. The Gymnasium is a separate
structure and is the only one indirectly attached to the
core.



P.E. FIELDS


SOUTH CORE SUPPORT

UNIFIED ARTS



CENTER CORE MEDIA

/--- NORTH WING

\-BUS LOADING


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KEY PLAN


CORE ADMIN.


Three of the wings support standard academics. The fourth is
designated Unified Arts and houses vocational education and
music.


D16


GYMNASIUM







GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION


The core area contains Administration, Media Center, Support
Services to include a self-contained kitchen, and "spill
over" Unified Arts sections.













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U3
SOUTH CORE








CENTER CORE


*7 US m


NORTH CORE ADMIN.


L17i







GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION


The three academic wings are identified by orientation -
North, East, and South wings. The Unified Arts wing is west
of the core, but is simply known as "the U.A. Wing."

Each academic wing contains all three grades. The number
and space assignment of classes for each grade level varies
year to year based upon the student population. The
divisions described in this study represent the 1989-90
academic year.

An academic wing serving all three grades, contains the
necessary immediate support needs within, including
restrooms, lockers, and teachers' offices and planning
areas.






122 124 126 130


JANITOR'S CLOSET
121 129



,.I


Book Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Eighth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Restroom Male (2)
Restroom Female (2)
Teacher Planning Room
Teacher Planning Room
Janitor's Closet


#122A/#124A
#126
#126A
#130
#130A

#123
#128


Eighth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Eighth Grade Science
Seventh Grade Science
Science Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Sixth Grade Team Class


#129
#129A
#127
#125
#125A/#127A
#121
#121A
#122/124


NORTH WING


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18








GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION





The Unified Arts wing contains Industrial Arts, Home
Economics, Business Education, and Music.



Industrial Arts Lab #154
Office #154C
Wood Storage #154B
Project Storage #154A
Home Economics #152 "2 ,aC .n"rm
Office #153
Project Storage #152A ,.. ,, u ,. '" ', i
Storage Room #152C
Business Education #151 ~. -- aW on
Book Storage #151A
Storage Room #151C "
Restroom Male (2)
Restroom Female (2) r
Janitor's Closet
Music .155 S
Office #155E "
Instrument Storage #155A
Instrument Storage #155C
Practice Room #155F
Music Storage #155G

UNIFIED ARTS WING



The core section is divided physically into three areas by
internal circulation. The North section is administrative.
It serves as the main point of entry and orientation. It
houses reception, the administrative staff, and all offices.




Office/Reception #101
Office Storage Room #101E 0
Principal's Office #102
Assistant Principal Office #103
In-School Suspension Room #104 0) O .. .,.o
Mail & Equipment Room #105
Bookkeeper's Office #106
Bookkeeper's Storage #106A
Guidance Office #109 -
Curriculum Coord. Office #108 10 '"
Records Room #108A
Clinic #110
Chapter One Room #111/#112
Admin. Secretary Office #107 [ -l






NORTH CORE






19








GENERAL DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATION


The center section is primarily occupied by the Media
Center. The Teachers' Lounge and a Specific Learning
Disabilities (SLD) classroom are also in this section and
are aligned on the south side of the grouping.


Media Center Reading Room
Media Director Office
Audio/visual Storage
Technical Processing
Conference Room
Teachers' Lounge
Teachers' Restroom Male
Teachers' Restroom Female
Special Education Classroom


#113
#113A
#115
#114
#113B
#117

#116


CENTER CORE


The south portion of the core area contains the Cafetorium,
Kitchen, and Custodial spaces. The stage is part of the
Cafetorium on the north end. It adjoins the Art classroom,
a U.A. subject separated from the U.A. wing.


Cafetorium
Chair Storage
Stage
Kitchen
Office
Pantry
Restrooms
Art Classroom
Office
Art Storage
Custodial Office
Storage


#119
#119E I
#119F
#1191
#119G
#119N
#118
#118A
#118C
#120


SOUTH CORE


Li

























FACILITY DESCRIPTION

















ORGANIZATIONAL AREAS
NORTH WING SPACE LIST
NORTH WING SPACE DESCRIPTIONS
NORTH WING OBSERVATIONS
EAST WING SPACE LIST
EAST WING GENERAL DESCRIPTION
EAST WING OBSERVATIONS
SOUTH WING SPACE LIST
SOUTH WING SPACE DESCRIPTIONS
SOUTH WING OBSERVATIONS
UNIFIED ARTS WING SPACE LIST
UNIFIED ARTS WING SPACE DESCRIPTIONS
UNIFIED ARTS WING OBSERVATIONS
NORTH CORE SPACE LIST
NORTH CORE GENERAL DESCRIPTION
NORTH CORE OBSERVATIONS
CENTER CORE SPACE LIST
CENTER CORE GENERAL DESCRIPTION
CENTER CORE OBSERVATIONS
SOUTH CORE SPACE LIST
SOUTH CORE GENERAL DESCRIPTION
SOUTH CORE OBSERVATIONS
GYMNASIUM SPACE LIST
GYMNASIUM GENERAL DESCRIPTION
GYMNASIUM OBSERVATIONS


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SPACE LIST NORTH WING


NORTH WING


North Wing is a typical academic wing. There are two
standard sized classrooms, two double sized rooms divisible
with moveable panel walls, and two classrooms designated for
science. North Wing contains the following:


Eighth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Eighth Grade Science
Seventh Grade Science
Science Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Sixth Grade Team Class
Book Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Eighth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Restroom Male (2)
Restroom Female (2)
Teacher Planning Room
Teacher Planning Room
Janitor's Closet


#129
#129A
#127
#125
#125A/#127A
#121
#121A
#122/124
#122A/#124A
#126
#126A
#130
#130A


#123
#128








ORGANIZATIONAL AREAS


P.E. FIELDS


SOUTH CORE SUPPORT


GYMNASI UM


\--BUS LOADING


KEY PLAN


The facility is physically divided into eight areas by the
corridor system. The four instructional wings link to a
core area which is itself divided into three sections. The
Gymnasium is a separate building with a covered walkway
connecting it to one of the academic wings.

The eight areas are:

North Wing
East Wing
South Wing
U.A. Wing
North Core Area
Center Core Area
South Core Area
Gymnasium






ROOMS #122/#124 NORTH WING


-SIXTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:
Rooms #122 and #124 are multi-subject divisible
sixth grade classrooms combined for a design
capacity of 56 students.
The space as presently used is 1,680 square feet
and has a standard classroom plan. <
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage
unit, one on each side, is the only major item of
fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Rooms #122A and #124A, 70 square feet each, are
book storage rooms dedicated to these classrooms
and accessible from within.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:
The rooms are assigned to a two teacher team.
Those teachers conduct all classes for sixth


[23 ]







ROOMS #122/#124 NORTH WING


graders on North Wing. The team shares planning
room #123 with the seventh grade team.
Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the North Wing sixth graders are taught in these
rooms.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are across the corridor from the
classroom. The student lockers for the sixth
graders are located on the U.A. Wing. A water
fountain is in the corridor. Bus loading is at the
opposite end of the corridor. The Administration
and Media Center are the most adjacent core areas
and the Cafetorium the most remote.


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124 1






ROOM #121 NORTH WING


- SEVENTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:
Room #121 is a multi-subject seventh grade
classroom with a design capacity of 28 students.
The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #121A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:
The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a three person team for the seventh
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#123 with the sixth grade team.



25







ROOM #121 NORTH WING



Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the North Wing seventh graders are adjacent or
across the corridor.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is at
the opposite end of the corridor. The
Administration and Media Center are the most
adjacent core areas and the Cafetorium the most
remote.






ROOM #125 NORTH WING


SEVENTH GRADE SPACES

GENERAL:
Room #125 is a designated seventh grade science
room, although additional subjects are also taught
there. There is a design capacity of 28 students.
The space is 980 square feet with a laboratory work
counter along one wall and the remainder open
classroom area.
There are standard student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. There are in addition to those
standard furnishings, lab work areas, sinks, and an
emergency shower and eye wash.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #125A, 250 square feet, is accessed from
within and serves as a chemical storage room for
both #127 and #125.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is


0








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27







ROOM #125 NORTH WING



part of a three person team for the seventh
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#123 with the sixth grade team.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the North Wing seventh graders are adjacent or
across the hall.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
directly out of the north exit. The Media Center
is the most adjacent core area and the Cafetorium
is the most remote. O







ROOM #126 NORTH WING


--


SEVENTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:


Room #126 is being utilized as a multi-subject
seventh grade single classroom with a design
capacity of 28 students. The space is divided from
room #130 with a moveable panel wall that is for
this academic year maintained closed.

The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.

There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment. The
moveable partition limits use of that wall,
although it is presently being utilized as a
tachboard surface.

The lighting system is recessed parabolics.

Room #126A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.


5
Y
4


29








ROOM #126 NORTH WING



Room #128, Teachers' Planning Room, contains an
observation window to #126 and is directly
accessible to it, however is not utilized at this
time by that team.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a three person team for the seventh
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#123 with the sixth grade teacher team.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., the other classes
for the North Wing seventh graders are across the
corridor.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are directly across from the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is out
of the north exit. The Media Center is the most
adjacent core area and the Cafetorium the most
remote.







ROOM #127 NORTH WING


EIGHTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:
Room #127 is a designated eighth grade science
room, although additional subjects are also taught
there. There is a design capacity of 28 students.
The space is 980 square feet with a laboratory work
counter along one wall and the remainder open
classroom area.

There are standard student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. There are in addition to those
standard furnishings, lab work areas, sinks, and an
emergency shower and eye wash.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #127A, 250 square feet, is accessed from
within and serves as a chemical storage room for
both #127 and #125.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is


0




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Hq







ROOM #127 NORTH WING



part of a three person team for the eighth
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#128.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the North Wing eighth graders are adjacent or
across the hall.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
directly out of the north exit. The Media Center
is the most adjacent core area and the Cafetorium
is the most remote.






ROOM #129 NORTH WING


EIGHTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:
Room #129 is a multi-subject eighth grade classroom
with a design capacity of 28 students.
The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #129A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:


The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a three person team for the eighth
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#128 for coordination meetings on subjects taught


1 33


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ROOM #129 NORTH WING



and scheduling.
Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the North Wing eighth graders are adjacent.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
directly north of the space. The Media Center is
the most adjacent core area and the Cafetorium the
most remote.


341






ROOM #130 NORTH WING


EIGHTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:


Room #130 is being utilized as a multi-subject
eighth grade single classroom with a design
capacity of 28 students. The space is divided from
room #126 with a moveable panel wall that is for
this academic year permanently closed.

The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment. The
moveable partition limits use of that wall,
although it is presently being utilized as a
tachboard surface.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #130A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.


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35 1
^W^----^-tI







ROOM #130 NORTH WING



CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a three person team for the eighth
grade/North Wing. The team shares planning room
#128 for coordination meetings on subjects taught
and scheduling. The planning room is directly
accessible from within #130. There is also a one
way observation window from #128 into #130.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all other classes
for the North Wing eighth graders are across the
corridor.

SUPPORT ISSUES: Z

Student restrooms are directly across from the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
directly north of the space. The Media Center is
the most adjacent core area and the Cafetorium the
most remote.

cf


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ROOM #128 NORTH WING


NORTH WING


GENERAL:

Room #128 is one of two teacher planning rooms
shared by the teachers and teachers' aides on North
Wing.
The space is 250 square feet. It can be entered
from rooms #126 and #130 or from the corridor.

The furnishings vary, but typically consist of four
work desks, a telephone desk, and storage units.
There are two one way observation windows for
viewing room #126 and room #130.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

There are three teacher teams per wing serving the
three grade groups housed there. With only two
teacher planning rooms on the wing, the spaces are
shared the method varies year to year.
SUPPORT ISSUES:

Faculty restrooms are located in the Teachers'
Lounge and limited ones in the Administrative area.


37







JANITOR'S CLOSET NORTH WING


NORTH WING

GENERAL:

The Janitor's Closet on North Wing is typical of
those on other wings. The space, 50 square feet,
contains a floor sink, a water heater, and supply
storage.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

There are custodial staff personnel specifically
assigned to North Wing.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

The central custodial area is located at the
southwest corner of the facility.






RESTROOM NORTH WING


NORTH WING
GENERAL:
There are typically two student restroom groupings
on each wing, a male and a female located adjacent
to each other near the ends of the corridors.
Each grouping consists of an open vestibule with
lavatory and mirror, and then two enclosed toilet
rooms. All facilities are handicap accessible.
There are acrylic sketch boards mounted on the
walls of the toilet rooms.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
The restrooms are located near all classrooms.


39







OBSERVATIONS NORTH WING







NORTH WING OBSERVATIONS


North Wing and East Wing are identical in spatial
arrangement. They each contain two pairs of divisible
rooms, two teacher planning rooms, two science rooms, two
standard sized classrooms, science storage, and the basic
supports book storage, restrooms, and a janitor's closet.

The North Wing has the attachment of the bus loading area,
and the East Wing has a covered walkway connection to the
Gymnasium. O

The following observations apply to both wings.

Corridor

The corridors are carpeted pathways from the exterior at one
end to the core at the other. Classrooms, lockers, and
restrooms are off either side. There is no visual
connection from the corridors to the classrooms.

There is one water fountain per corridor. It is inadequate
judged by the crowding at class changes. There is a small
stool stored under the fountain to assist the shorter -
students.

The wing corridors sharply branch off of the core. There is
very little orientational information. The corridor entries
have been painted to assist in identification and wing pride
or "school within a school." The North Wing is green, and
the East Wing is blue.

The corridor is 7'-8" wide. Approximately 30" was removed
to recess the student lockers along the corridor walls.
The width is uncomfortably narrow. During the times of
movement to and from the buses, there is considerable
confusion and conflict with locker access.

Spaces

There are two teacher planning rooms on each wing. There is
a room of similar dimension that may have been originally
intended as a third planning room, but has been dedicated to
science storage.

The two teacher planning rooms are insufficient for the







OBSERVATIONS NORTH WING


three team concept.

Each teacher team needs as a minimum:

- a desk with lockable storage for each member of the team.
- a telephone for parent calls and conferences. The
telephone is an important aspect of the individualization
curriculum goal.
- a work area for aides & assistants. That area may be
shared depending on the specific role.
- a conference table or similar for team planning meetings.

Sharing team planning rooms is disruptive, inefficient, and
adds to the scheduling burden already inherent in the Q
system.

A third planning room would enhance the facility functions f
significantly. The provision of the minimum furnishings as
listed above would also improve the working of the team
concept.

The standard classrooms are within the 1978 Department of
Education guidelines in terms of dimensions, occupancies,
and appurtenances.

- Typical classrooms are designed for 28 students.

- Standard student desks, teacher desk, in-room storage,
display boards etc., are part of all rooms.

- The ITV, instructional television, was not part of the U
original construction. Cabling for the ITV was awkwardly <
added later typically routed down the wall. The
television units are often poorly positioned taking the
remaining open wall area wherever that occurred and
obtaining power where available.
- Insufficient wall receptacles were provided, and those are
frequently poorly placed for optimum use.
- There are built-in storage shelves. Most were little
utilized. The shelf dimensions were too high and too deep
for typical needs.

- Each classroom has an associated book storage room. These
are very useful and function well. They are often utilized
as a discipline "time out" room, and the proximity to the
classroom allows minimum disruption.


41







OBSERVATIONS NORTH WING


- The double classrooms have a motorized partition wall for
division as required. The partition system works well. It
is acoustically effective. The motorized operation adds the
ease and convenience for the flexible use required in the
team teaching concept. The only complaint noted on this
system was the difficulty in repair when a operation
malfunction did occur.

The science rooms are set-up to serve the seventh grade in
physical science and the eighth grade in earth/space
science. The two rooms have a common wall and share a
science storage room.

- Laboratory work counters run along one wall. The 0
remaining portion of the classroom contains the standard
student desks.

- The one lab counter at the front of the room makes
demonstrations difficult. The instructor must be turned away
from the students while conducting the work.
- There are only two gas cocks provided on the lab work
counter one on either side of the sink. This limited
number does not allow group participation nor is the
separated placement ideal. The gas valves are also too near
the sink to freely set up demonstrations.
- There are no master electricity kill switches nor master
gas shut-off valves as presently required in laboratory
spaces.

- The provision of more science work counters or at the
minimum an island instructor demonstration counter would
apparently enhance the science room functions.
There are four restrooms on each wing two for each sex.
Each restroom contains two toilet rooms and a lavatory in
the open vestibule.

- Each pair of restrooms is arranged to serve four
classrooms, and is centered in those groupings.

- Proximity is excellent.
- Private toilet rooms eliminate the problems associated
with groups of students in the gang toilet arrangements.

- Private toilet rooms reinforce the "individualization
through organization" concept.


42J







OBSERVATIONS NORTH WING


- The open vestibule/lavatory design allows easy supervision
without deliberate watchfulness.

_ Acrylic panels have been installed over the interior face
of the wooden toilet room doors to reduce vandalism
problems.
- Chalkboards have been added to the interior walls to allow
controlled graffiti.
- The floors are low maintenance ceramic tile, and the walls
are epoxy painted concrete block.
General
The physical condition and level of apparent maintenance of
these wings is very good.
- There are custodial staff assigned to each wing. This
promotes accountability, individualization, and wing pride -
all in keeping with the school goals.
- Corridors were vacuumed twice daily.
- The general physical condition, in particular after ten
years of operation, is exceptional.


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L43E







I SPACE LIST EAST WING


EAST WING

East Wing is an academic wing duplicating North Wing in
physical form. The classroom space usage varies slightly.
There are only two eighth grade rooms and three each for
sixth and seventh. The following spaces are contained on
East Wing:


Eighth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Eighth Grade Science
Seventh Grade Science
Science Storage
Sixth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Seventh Grade Team Class
Book Storage
Sixth Grade Team Class
Book Storage
Restroom Male (2)
Restroom Female (2)
Teacher Planning
Teacher Planning
Janitor's Closet


#139
#139A
#137
#135
#135A/#137A
#131
#131A
#136/#140
#136A/#140A
#132/#134
#132A/#134A

#133
#138


144






DESCRIPTION EAST WING


EAST WING GENERAL DESCRIPTION


The East Wing is a typical eight classroom
matching the North Wing almost exactly.


arrangement


The spatial assignment for the East Wing provides only two
eighth grade spaces and three each for the other two grade
levels.
There are two divisible classrooms, two teacher planning
rooms, and a science area configuration identical to that on
North Wing.
All other aspects of the East Wing are equal to the North.


45






OBSERVATIONS EAST WING


EAST WING OBSERVATIONS

East Wing is virtually identical to North Wing in spatial
configuration and usage.
The primary difference between the two is the circulation
connections.
East Wing joins the main core corridor on the one end and a
covered walkway link to the gymnasium on the other.
There is considerable traffic through wing to the gym for
physical education. The South Wing and the doorway between
East and South Wings are used when the weather allows. In
inclimate weather the East corridor is use by all students.
Other observations of North Wing apply directly to the East.


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(46







S SPACE LIST SOUTH WING


SOUTH WING

South Wing differs from the other two academic wings in both
physical layout and curriculum functions housed. There are
only one dedicated science room, one teacher planning room,
and one divisible team classroom. South Wing contains the
following spaces:


Eighth Grade SLD Classroom
Book Storage
Sixth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Sixth Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Seventh Grade Classroom
Book Storage
Teacher Planning
Eighth Grade Team Class
Book Storage
E.H. Classroom
Book Storage
Chapter One Classroom


#141 Restroom Male (2)
#141A Restroom Female (2)
#144 Janitor's Closet
#144A
#145
#145A
#146
#146A
#150
#150A
#148
#147/#149
#147A/#149A
#142
#142A
#143


L i







ROOM #144 SOUTH WING


SIXTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:

Room #144 is a multi-subject sixth grade classroom
with a stated design capacity of 10 students,
however with seating for 23.

The space is 720 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.

There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.

The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #144A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is


0




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ROOM #144 SOUTH WING



part of a two person team for the sixth grade/South
Wing. The team shares planning room #148 with the
seventh and eight grade teams. The adjoining room
#143, previously a planning room, is accessible
from within and has an observation window into
#144. Room #143 is however presently used as a
separate classroom.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., the other class
for the South Wing sixth graders is across the
corridor.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are across the corridor. The
student lockers are on the U.A. Wing. A water o
fountain is in the corridor. Bus loading is remote _
at the north end of the facility. The Media Center
and the Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas
and the Administration the most remote. -

U


u-






ROOM #145 SOUTH WING


GENERAL:
Room #145 is a multi-subject sixth grade classroom
with a design capacity of 25 students.
The space is 720 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #145A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:
The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a two person team for the sixth grade/South


50








ROOM #145 SOUTH WING



Wing. The team shares planning room #148 with the
seventh and eight grade teams.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., the other class
for the South Wing sixth graders is across the
corridor.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers are on the U.A.
Wing. A water fountain is in the corridor. Bus
loading is remote at the north end of the facility.
The Media Center and the Cafetorium are the most
adjacent core areas and the Administration the most
remote.










ct







ROOM #146 SOUTH WING


SEVENTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:


Room #146 is a designated seventh grade science
room, although additional subjects are also taught
there. There is a design capacity of 28 students.
The space is 980 square feet with a laboratory work
counter along one wall and the remainder open
classroom area.

There are standard student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. There are in addition to those
standard furnishings, lab work areas, sinks, and an
emergency shower and eye wash.

The lighting system is recessed parabolics.

Room #146A, 125 square feet, is accessed from
within and serves as a book and supply storage
room.


52








ROOM #146 SOUTH WING



CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
part of a two person team for the seventh
grade/South Wing. The team shares the adjoining
planning room #148 with the sixth and eighth grade
teacher teams.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the South Wing seventh graders are here or in the
adjacent room.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are across the corridor. The
student lockers and a water fountain are in the
corridor. Bus loading is remote at the north end
of the facility. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas and the
Administration is the most remote.







ROOM #150 SOUTH WING
L^


1144
146
1-->
S143
V.-1^-------------l --


149 1 47 145 14 1




149 147 1457141






SEVENTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:

Room #150 is a multi-subject seventh grade
classroom with a design capacity of 28 students and
seating for 30.

The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.

There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.

The lighting system is recessed parabolics.

Room #150A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is


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54








ROOM #150 SOUTH WING



part of a two person team for the seventh
grade/South Wing. The team shares planning room
#148 with the sixth and eighth grade teacher teams.
Room #148 is directly accessible from within and
has an observation window into room #150.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the South Wing seventh graders are taught here or
in the adjacent classroom.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are across the corridor. The
student lockers and a water fountain are in the
corridor. Bus loading is remote at the north end
of the facility. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas and the O
Administration the most remote.







ROOM #141 SOUTH WING


EIGHTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:

Room #141 is dedicated to eight grade Specific
Learning Disabilities. There is a design capacity
of 15 students.
The space is 840 square feet and has a standard
classroom plan.

There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Room #141A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is self-contained and assigned one


56








ROOM #141 SOUTH WING



teacher. That teacher is not part of a standard
wing/grade team, although some of the SLD students
will be mainstreamed for certain subjects.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all additional
classes taken by these students will be on the wing
of their individual homeroom.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The student lockers and a water
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
remote, at the north end of the facility. The Media
Center and the Cafetorium are the most adjacent
core areas to South Wing.



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57
<*^^^-^







ROOMS #147/#149 SOUTH WING


EIGHTH GRADE SPACES


GENERAL:


Rooms #147 and #149 are multi-subject divisible
eighth grade classrooms combined for a design
capacity of 56 students.
The space as presently used is 1,680 square feet
and has a standard classroom plan.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage
unit, one on each side, is the only major item of
fixed equipment.
The lighting system is recessed parabolics.
Rooms #147A and #149A, 70 square feet each, are
book storage rooms dedicated to these classrooms
and accessible from within.


58








ROOMS #147/#149 SOUTH WING



CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The rooms are assigned to a two teacher team.
Those teachers conduct all classes for eighth
graders on South Wing. The team shares planning
room #148 with the sixth and seventh grade teacher
teams.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all classes for
the South Wing eighth graders are taught in these
rooms.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classrooms. The student lockers and a water O
fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
remote, at the north end of the facility. The Media
Center and the Cafetorium are the most adjacent
core areas and the Administration the most remote. _








><







ROOM #142 SOUTH WING


SPACES SOUTH WING


GENERAL:


Room #142 is dedicated to Emotionally Handicapped
students from all grades. There is a design
capacity of 8 students.

The space is very rectilinear with 500 square feet
and a standard classroom plan.

There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc. A built-in counter/storage unit
is the only major item of fixed equipment.

The lighting system is recessed parabolics.

Room #142A, 70 square feet, is a book storage room
dedicated to this classroom and accessible from
within.


The room is self-contained and assigned one


CURRICULUM ASPECTS:







ROOM #142 SOUTH WING


teacher. That teacher is not part of a standard
wing/grade team, although some of the E.H. students
will be mainstreamed for certain subjects. The
adjoining room, #143, previously a planning room,
is accessible from within and has an observation
window into #142. Room #143 is however presently
used as a separate classroom.

Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all additional
classes taken by these students will be on their
homeroom wings.

SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are across from the classroom.
The student lockers and a water fountain are in the
corridor. Bus loading is remote, at the north end
of the facility. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas to
South Wing.


CO


61







ROOM #143 SOUTH WING


SOUTH WING

GENERAL:
Room #143, originally designed as a teacher
planning room, is now the Chapter One Classroom.
The typical capacity is 8 to 10 students.
The space is 325 square feet. It can be entered
from rooms #142 and #144 or from the corridor.
There are separate student chairs and desks and
typical furnishings: chalkboard, ITV, intercom,
master clock, etc.
The lighting is recessed fluorescent.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is self-contained and assigned one
teacher. The students are mainstreamed for certain
classes and go to those on an individual basis.
Except for Unified Arts and P.E., all additional
classes taken by these students are on the wing of


62







ROOM #143 SOUTH WING



the student's homeroom.

SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are across from the classroom.
The student lockers and a water fountain are in the
corridor. Bus loading is remote, at the north end
of the facility. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas to
South Wing.




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I-







ROOM #148 SOUTH WING


SOUTH WING


GENERAL:

Room #148 is the only teacher planning room on
South Wing. It is shared by the teachers and
teachers' aides for all grade levels on South Wing.

The space is 250 square feet. It can be entered
from rooms #146 and #150 or from the corridor.

The furnishings vary, but typically consist of four
work desks, a telephone desk, and storage units.

There are two one way observation windows for
viewing room #146 and room #150.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

There are three teacher teams on this wing serving
the three grade groups housed there. This planning
room is utilized by the sixth, the seventh, and the
eighth grade teams.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Faculty restrooms are located in the Teachers'
Lounge and limited ones in the Administrative area.






OBSERVATIONS SOUTH WING


SOUTH WING OBSERVATIONS

South Wing varies in spatial arrangement from the North and
East Wings. There is only one divisible classroom and a
single shared teacher planning room. The classrooms vary
from the standard dimensions and provide for smaller group
special program needs.
Corridor
- The South Wing corridor, as to dimensions, finishes, z
furnishings, etc. are the same as the North and East Wings.
- The South Wing is the only corridor system that does not
directly serve an exterior connection buses, gymnasium, P
etc.

- The South Wing corridor has become the primary route to
the recently added portable classroom buildings. Cf/
- Because it does not directly route people to other school
sections, the traffic volume is considerably less in this
wing than the others.
- The entry to the wing from the core corridor has been
painted red as a wing identifying element.
- Due to the less dense traffic, the lockers along this
corridor are reserved for the sixth graders. This assists
the younger students in the reduction of conflicts when
lockers are used. However, allocating sixth graders' lockers
to this wing detracts from the wing self-containment goal,
as well as, creates proximity problems.
Spaces
- There is presently only one teacher planning area. A
second room originally intended to serve as a planning room
has been converted into a Chapter One class, special
remediation program in reading and math.
- One planning room on this wing is completely inadequate
for the needs of the three teacher teams.
- Planning sessions are often held on North and East Wings
as availability allows.--


65







OBSERVATIONS SOUTH WING


The South Wing classrooms are allocated as follows:

- The eighth grade uses the divisible classroom spaces.
- The seventh grade has one standard classroom and one set-
up for Physical Science.
- The sixth grade has two smaller than standard rooms one
on either side of the corridor.

- The three remaining classrooms are dedicated to
Emotionally Handicapped, Chapter One, and eighth grade
Specific Learning Disabilities programs.
- The eighth grade does not have a room with the typical
science laboratory equipment. There is a counter and sink
in room 149, and that area is utilized for limited science
classes.

- The seventh grade science class, room 146, is set up
similarly to those rooms on the North and East Wings. The
laboratory counter is against the wall and makes
demonstrations and group activities very difficult.

- The Chapter One classroom, a converted teacher planning
room, is completely interior. The only windows are the
observation type into the adjoining classrooms those have
been screened for privacy.
General

Those observations noted on the North and East Wings as to
support spaces, maintenance, and so forth apply similarly to
this wing.


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66 ]






SPACE LIST UNIFIED ARTS WING


UNIFIED ARTS

Unified Arts Wing approximates the dimensions of the other
instructional wings, but has a considerably different
physical design. It is located on the west side of the
facility. It serves Industrial Arts, Home Economics,
Business Education, and Music. The following spaces are
contained in the U.A. Wing:


Industrial Arts Lab
Office
Wood Storage
Project Storage
Home Economics
Office
Project Storage
Storage Room
Business Education
Book Storage
Storage Room
Restroom Male (2)
Restroom Female (2)
Janitor's Closet


#154 Music
#154C. Office
#154B Instrument Storage
#154A Instrument Storage
#152 Practice Room
#153 Music Storage
#152A
#152C
#151
#151A
#151C


0


IIe


#155
#155E
#155A
#155C
#155F
#155G


1 67 1







ROOM #151 UNIFIED ARTS WING


BUSINESS ED 155F






SPACES UNIFIED ARTS WING


GENERAL:


Room #151 is a Business Education Laboratory with a
design capacity of 24 students.

The space is a total of 1,080 square feet. The
center area is dedicated to typewriter desks; there
are 14 total. There are 13 computer stations
positioned around the exterior walls.

The lab is lighted with recessed fluorescent
fixtures.

Room #151A is a 100 square foot space for book
storage.

Room #151C is an 85 square foot equipment storage
room.

There is no longer a designated teacher planning
room for this wing.







ROOM #151 UNIFIED ARTS WING


CURRICULUM ASPECTS:


The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
responsible for all Business Education classes for
all grade levels.
Except for Unified Arts, all classes are taught on
the other three wings or in the gym.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The sixth grade students' lockers and a
water fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is
out of the corridor and then north. The Media
Center and the Cafetorium are the most adjacent
core areas and the Administration the most remote.


'-0



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69D







ROOM #152 UNIFIED ARTS WING


HOME ECONOMICS INDU
152

152A 152C 153 A
--JANITOR'S CLOSET


1s5C 1 S5E
155G

BUSINESS ED 155F
151







SPACES UNIFIED ARTS WING


GENERAL:


Room #152 is a Home Economics Laboratory with a
design capacity of 24 students.

The space is a total of 1,175 square feet with 700
s.f. dedicated to standard classroom space and 475
s.f. utilized for cooking and sewing.

The lab is lighted with recessed fluorescent
fixtures.

The classroom area has 24 student desks. The
cooking lab is kitchen assembly with three ranges,
two refrigerators, work counters, and cabinets.
The sewing area is small and wraps the west wall
with three sewing machine stations. There is also
a washer/dryer area on the north wall.

Room #152A is a 125 square foot space for project
storage.

Room #154C is a 105 square foot materials storage
room.


70 i







ROOM #152 UNIFIED ARTS WING



Room #153, accessed from within room #152 and the
corridor, was previously the wing teacher planning
room. The space is now the office of an
administrative assistant, and there is not a
designated group planning area.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:
The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
responsible for all Home Economics classes for all
grade levels.
Except for Unified Arts, all classes are taught on
the other three wings or in the gym.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
Student restrooms are across the corridor. The
sixth grade students' lockers and a water fountain
are in the corridor. Bus loading is out of the
corridor and then north. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas and the
Administration the most remote.


H
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Ec















171






ROOM #153 UNIFIED ARTS WING


SPACES U.A. WING
GENERAL:
Room #153 has been converted from a Teacher
Planning room to the Resource Teacher's Office.
The space is 175 square feet. It can be entered
from room #152 and from the corridor.
The furnishings consist of a work desk, a telephone
desk, and storage units.
There is a one way observation window for viewing
room #152. It is presently blocked out.
CURRICULUM ASPECTS:
The Resource Teacher utilizing this office has
administrative responsibilies throughout the
facility.
SUPPORT ISSUES:
Faculty restrooms are located in the Teachers'
Lounge and limited ones in the Administrative area.


7
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C/D







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( 721







ROOM #154 UNIFIED ARTS WING


SPACES UNIFIED ARTS WING


GENERAL:


Room #154 is an Industrial Arts Laboratory with a
design capacity of 24 students.

The space is 2,280 square feet of open work area
with a concrete slab floor.

The lab is lighted with industrial fluorescent
fixtures.

The student areas are large wooden work tables and
stools. There is an in-place chip and dust
collection system, but there are no electrical
tools presently being utilized. An overhead door
allows easy delivery and removal of materials.

Room #154A is a 150 square foot space for project
storage.

Room #154B is a 175 square foot materials storage
room.


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U1







ROOM #154 UNIFIED ARTS WING



The teacher's office, room #154C, is a 105 square
foot room in the west corner of the lab.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
responsible for all Industrial Arts classes for all
grade levels.

Except for Unified Arts, all classes are taught on
the other three wings or in the gym.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are across the corridor. The
sixth grade students' lockers and a water fountain
are in the corridor. Bus loading is out of the 0
corridor and then north. The Media Center and the
Cafetorium are the most adjacent core areas and the
Administration the most remote.


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ROOM # 155


UNIFIED ARTS WING


SPACES UNIFIED ARTS WING


GENERAL:


Room #155 is the Band and Chorus Laboratory with a
design capacity of 50 students.

The space is a total of 1,470 square feet.

There are metal folding chairs and sheet music
stands for 50 students in the main room. There are
collapsible risers against the north wall for
chorus.

Room #155A is an 80 square foot instrument storage
room.

Room #155E is an 105 square foot room used as the
teacher's office.

Room #155C is a 200 square foot instrument storage
room with two access doors from within #155.

The practice room, #155F, is a 300 square foot
space in the northeast corner of #155.


0






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^ -- ^ ^^* -^- ^-^^ ^^^->- -- -- ^> -- -* --- ^ ^ -- -- -- i^ -^^ --_ __^_ _^I _^_ ____ ^^_ ^__







ROOM #155 UNIFIED ARTS WING



There is also a small, 70 square foot, music
storage closet, #155G.

CURRICULUM ASPECTS:

The room is assigned one teacher. That teacher is
responsible for all Band and Chorus classes for all
grade levels.

Except for Unified Arts, all classes are taught on
the other three wings or in the gym.

SUPPORT ISSUES:

Student restrooms are immediately outside of the
classroom. The sixth grade students' lockers and a
water fountain are in the corridor. Bus loading is 0
out of the corridor and then north. The Media
Center and the Cafetorium are the most adjacent -
core areas and the Administration the most remote.







II







OBSERVATIONS UNIFIED ARTS WING


UNIFIED ARTS WING OBSERVATIONS

The Unified Arts Wing is similar in form and dimensions to
the three standard academic wings.
This wing contains business education, home economics,
industrial arts, and band/music. There is also an
administrative office, a space similar to the teachers'
planning room on the other wings, used by the school
resource director.
0
The teachers on this wing are not in team groupings as they i
are on the other wings. They teach their particular
subjects to all three class levels, and thus team teaching
concepts do not apply. Rather than team teacher planning
rooms, there are individual offices within instructional
areas.
Corridor
- The corridor runs from the southwest bus loading area to
the core corridor adjacent to the cafetorium.
This corridor system is designated during
arrival/departure times for sixth graders only.
- There are lockers off of both sides as per the other
wings. They are assigned to students homeroomed on the
academic wings and usage is at special locker breaks.
- There are the standard student restrooms and the custodial
closet along the corridor identical to the other wings.
Spaces
Business education is a fairly standard classroom.
- There are typing desks in the center and computer work
stations around three walls. The teacher's desk is on the
fourth wall.
- Power pole distribution causes clutter.
- Space lay-out works best with individual instruction since
there is not a "front" to the classroom arrangement.


n77






OBSERVATIONS


UNIFIED ARTS WING ]


Home economics is a typical classroom size.
- There are student desks for standard instruction, a sewing
area, and a kitchen for cooking classes.
- There are internal project storage, material storage, and
a teacher's desk.
- The kitchen equipment seems inadequate in work stations
and can not accommodate the equal number of students as at
the sewing stations when alternating tasks.
- There is some apparent difficulty in supervising both 0
sewing and cooking simultaneously with the wall division.-
- The space is otherwise efficient and appropriate.
Industrial arts is the largest area on the wing.
- Typical of that type laboratory concrete slab floor, rn
painted block walls, and industrial type fluorescent
lighting fixtures.
- The room was designed as a complete working shop with an
array of electrical tools and a chip & dust collection
system.
- The electrical tools are no longer used by the students.
The large wooden tables are stations for hand work, gluing,
painting, and assembly only.
- Being positioned with two exterior walls and at the "rear"
of the facility works very well with the functions and
assists in the inherent acoustical problems.
- An overhead door serves material delivery and removal.
- Project storage, material storage, and the teacher's
office are convenient and internal to the space.
The band/music room is the second largest area on the wing.
- The space appears to work very well.
- There are folding chairs for band instruction, and
collapsible risers for chorus.
- The area is positioned with two exterior walls and towards


L78_


k







OBSERVATIONS UNIFIED ARTS WING


the "rear" of the school. There is little
acoustical affect on the rest of the facility.
- Having immediate access to the bus loading
convenient for movement with the band instruments.


apparent

area is


- Instrument storage, music storage, practice room, and the
teacher's office are all conveniently accessed from within.
Since the U.A. Wing has specialized programs and does not
fit the pattern of team teaching and self-containment, it
seems appropriately grouped.


The location does cause some considerations.
this wing are scheduled by grade and paired
education. Students must thus move between
remote points in the school, the gymnasium
wing, in subsequent periods.


The classes on
with physical
the two most
and the U. A.


179 1








SPACE LIST NORTH CORE


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NORTH CORE AREA


The North Core Area is the primary entry point of
facility. It contains only administrative functions.
following spaces are included:


Office/Reception
Office Storage Room
Principal's Office
Assistant Principal Office
In-School Suspension Room
Mail & Equipment Room
Bookkeeper's Office
Bookkeeper's Storage
Guidance Office
Curriculum Coord. Office
Records Room
Clinic
Chapter One Room
Admin. Secretary Office


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DESCRIPTION NORTH CORE
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NORTH CORE GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The North Core houses the primary administrative functions.

The two largest spaces, the main/reception office and the
principal's office, protrude beyond the.face of the building
and are the first areas encountered in entering the
facility.

There are two short corridors branching off of the main
office.

One borders the principal's office and provides access to 0
the mail room, the in-school suspension disciplinary room,
the assistant principal's office, and then connects to the
central core circulation system.

The other branch leads to the administrative secretary's
office with storage, the bookkeeper's office, the guidance
office, the curriculum coordinator's office, and restrooms (I
accessed along the way. The administrative secretary's
office is at the end of this branch and opens into the core
corridor.

There is not a separated circulation system through these
areas, and there is considerable movement through work
stations.

There is a small room, part of this grouping, accessed only
from the main corridor system that serves as a school
clinic. It is furnished with two beds and has an internal
restroom.
The northwest corner of the core, previously two small
offices, has been converted into one larger room now serving
as a Chapter One classroom for remedial reading and math.
Except for the main/reception office and the principal's
office, all of the administrative area is interior and
without visual connection to the outside.








81









OBSERVATIONS NORTH CORE









NORTH CORE OBSERVATIONS


The north portion of the facility core section contains all
of the primary administrative offices.

The administration is thus at the center and main entry to
the school.

- A "main entry" is not emphasized, and the symmetry of
doorways is confusing. Greater informational clues need to
be provided the visitor. O

- After entering the building, one is facing a corridor that
extends the entire length of the facility.
t-i
- A secondary door is access to the office. Having entered
this door, one is physically within the office. There is no
reception barrier or similar vestibule to provide
orientation.

- There is no circulation system within the administrative
core. Traffic is routed through the administrative
secretary's office to the building's interior corridor
system.


Office/Reception 4101
Office Storage Room 1101E U
Principal's Office 1102
Assistant Principal Office #103
In-School Suspension Room 0104
Mail & Equipment Room I105
Bookkeeper's Office f106
Bookkeeper's Storage 1l06A
Guidance Office 1109
Curriculum Coord. Office 1108
Records Room 1108A
Clinic (110
C 3 Chapter One Room 1111/4112
Admin. Secretary Office 1107



NORTH CORE PLAN


- The reception/office and the principal's office extend out
from the building's facade providing three exterior walls.
The other administrative offices are all completely interior
spaces.


- All offices are small and appear crowded for








OBSERVATIONS NORTH CORE


particular function of each.

- The files/records room is so small that two drawers can
not be opened at the same time. The records room is
obviously hampered by the lack of work space, desk,
telephone, and other typical appurtenances. Presently the
configuration allows only storage and thus causes overlap
functions into other already limited areas.

- The administrative secretary and school computer
operations are stationed in what has become an extension of
the interior circulation. The area is utilized as a
teacher/staff gathering place, a telephone center, and a
message distribution point.

- The curriculum coordinator's office is an inner space,
very narrow, oppressive with no windows. It is capable of
seating no more than two visitors.

- The guidance office, although somewhat larger than the
curriculum coordinator's, is too small to conduct group
conferences. This office is also frequently shared with the
school resource director. The resource director's permanent
office is remotely and awkwardly located in a "found" space
in the U.A. Wing.

- A second space for guidance is certainly needed, and an
area for group conferences is essential.

- An area for the faculty to conduct private telephone
conversations is an obvious omission.

- The Health Clinic is a narrow room with a door to the
corridor. Since there is not a school nurse, the duties of
supervising the ill students is placed on the administrative
secretary in the adjacent office. This situation is made
more difficult without a connecting door or view window
between the two spaces.







SPACE LIST CENTER CORE


CENTER CORE AREA

The Center Core Area is the only portion of the facility
completely internal. It is surrounded on all four sides by
the interior corridor system. The following spaces are
housed within this area:


Media Center Reading Room
Media Director Office
Audio/visual Storage
Technical Processing
Conference Room
Teachers' Lounge
Teachers' Restroom Male
Teachers' Restroom Female
Special Education Classroom


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-84







GENERAL DESCRIPTION CENTER CORE


CENTER CORE GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Center Core is primarily occupied by the media center
and its support areas. There is a classroom for special
education on the south corner, and the teachers' lounge is
on the other.

The reading room is one large space with double doors to the
core corridors on two sides.

The reading room is typically furnished with bookshelves and
designated display areas. There are tables and chairs to
seat approximately forty and additional sofas for casual
reading.
U
The media center director has a small office on the north cn
wall centered and protruding into the reading room.

On the south side of the reading room is an alignment of
small rooms.
The larger room of the grouping houses all of the
audio/video equipment. That room opens into the corridor, as
well as the reading room, for ease of equipment movement.
The center room along the wall is dedicated to the
Instructional Television equipment and distribution board.
The room adjacent to the ITV storage room is used as a
conference room and a special classroom for the gifted
program. The space is small, with seating for eight around
a conference table, bookshelves on one wall, and a
chalkboard on the other.
There is a small storage closet adjacent to the conference
room. It opens only into the corridor and is not associated
with the media center.
The southeast corner of the core, a health classroom in the
original design, is now a special education class.
The room has standard classroom furnishings and seats
sixteen. There are access doors from two sides into the
corridor system.
On the other corner of the center core is the teachers'


L85







GENERAL DESCRIPTION CENTER CORE
^ ^ ^


lounge.
The teachers' lounge has tables and chairs for dining on one
side and a food preparation counter on the other.
The lounge is small, but sufficiently equipped for lunch
preparation. There are a microwave oven, a refrigerator,
sink, and vending machines for drinks and snacks.
The teachers' restrooms are located behind the counter area
wall with the doors at each end.
This is the only lounge, and it is designated for smoking.
The exhaust fan system is inadequate to ventilate the space.
The lounge is too small for both dining and break
furnishings. There are no sofas, easy chairs, or similar
seating arrangements for relaxation.
The interior location further reduces the comfort of the
lounge.


O
0
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U
C/D
1-I



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IQ


U


1 86 _








OBSERVATIONS CENTER CORE


CENTER CORE OBSERVATIONS


The Center Core contains the media center with its
associated support spaces, the teacher's lounge, and a
special education classroom.

- This center grouping is bordered on the long dimension by
the primary corridor system, and the secondary corridors
separate it from the administration on one end and the
cafetorium on the other.

Media Center 0

- The media center has double door entries on both sides of
the reading room. That provides easy access from both main
corridors and makes the media center central to the entire
school.

- The reading room has no center or area definition. Book C/D
check-out is not clear.

- The reading room is small for the facility and can handle
only one class group at a time.

- The audio/video storage room is too small for the
equipment on hand. Some equipment is stacked on the floor.

- The instructional television equipment room is centered
off the reading room. The space is small, but adequate.
Most of the equipment has been added since the original
construction and is randomly configured.

- There is a small conference room off of the reading room.
It is primarily used by gifted classes, visiting groups, or
itinerate teachers. It is very small and fairly oppressive
with no outside connection.

- The media center director's office is centered on the
north end and projects into the reading room. It is very
small, but is well positioned for control of the center.

Teachers' Lounge

- The teachers' lounge is located on the southwest corner of
the center core. It contains dining tables, food prep areas
and equipment, and access to faculty restrooms from within. -







OBSERVATIONS CENTER CORE


- The space is adequately sized for lunch preparation and
dining, but too small to accommodate sofas and chairs to
function as a lounge.
- The lounge has no separate area dedicated for smoking, and
the inherent conflicts have developed.
- The room is centrally located. It is completely interior
with no view to the outside.
- A more effective exhaust fan and/or a designated smoking
space should be provided.
Classroom
- There is a small room on the opposite corner of the Center
Core that is presently used as a special education
classroom. The space serves the needs well. It is, however,
incongruently located with the other activities and singled
out as an instructional space.


LCEJ







SPACE LIST SOUTH CORE


The South Core Area extends to the exterior beyond the
South and U.A. wings on. either side. The central
equipment room is on one side and the Custodial Room is on
the other. This section contains the following spaces:


Cafetorium
Chair Storage
Stage
Kitchen
Office
Pantry
Restrooms
Art Classroom
Office
Art Storage
Custodial Office
Storage


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