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 Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Members of the Florida state board...
 Official staff Florida state board...
 Directors of county health...
 Table of Contents
 General administration
 Bureau of local health service...
 Bureau of vital statistics
 Bureau of maternal and child...
 Bureau of preventable diseases
 Bureau of laboratories
 Bureau of health facilities and...
 Bureau of sanitary engineering
 Bureau of mental health
 Bureau of narcotics
 Bureau of entomology
 Bureau of dental health
 Bureau of finance and accounts
 Articles by staff members


PALMM UFSPEC



Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00032
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: 1962
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
System ID: AM00000243:00032
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    Letter of transmittal
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Members of the Florida state board of health
        Page iv
    Official staff Florida state board of health
        Page v
    Directors of county health departments
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
    General administration
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Plate
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bureau of local health services
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Bureau of vital statistics
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Bureau of maternal and child health
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Bureau of preventable diseases
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
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        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Bureau of laboratories
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Bureau of health facilities and services
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
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        Page 159
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        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Bureau of sanitary engineering
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Bureau of mental health
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
    Bureau of narcotics
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    Bureau of dental health
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
    Bureau of finance and accounts
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
    Articles by staff members
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
Full Text


FLORIDA
STATE BOARD
OF
HEALTH


1962


I^TTB







Annual Report





State Board of Health
State of f~Larda




1962



The following reports will be published separately:
SUPPLEMENT I-FLORIDA VITAL STATISTICS, 1962
SUPPLEMENT II-FLORIDA MORBIDITY STATISTICS, 1962

WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D.
STATE HEALTH OFFICER


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA











.. -;-



The Honorable Eugene G. Peek, M.D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Ocala, Florida


Dear Dr. Peek:

I herewith submit the annual report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the year ending December 31,
1962.

Sincerely yours,
ALBERT V. HARDY, M.D., DR.P.H.
Acting State Health Officer
(October 16, 1961 through
December 31, 1962)

May 1, 1963
Jacksonville, Florida

Respectfully forwarded,
WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D., M.P.H.
State Health Officer
(Returned from leave of absence
on January 1, 1963)















His Excellency, Farris Bryant
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida


Sir:

I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the period January 1, 1962, to
December 31, 1962, inclusive.

Respectfully submitted,
EUGENE G. PEEK, M.D.
President

May 1, 1963
Ocala, Florida















Members of the
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


EUGENE G. PEEK, M.D., President
Ocala

T. M. CUMBIE, PH.G., Vice President
Quincy

ASHBEL C. WILLIAMS, M.D.
Jacksonville

F. P. MEYER, D.D.S.
St. Petersburg

W. S. HORN, D.O.
Palmetto









OFFICIAL STAFF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


December 31, 1962

DIRECTORS

State Health Officer (on leave)...................Wilson T. Sowder, M.D., M.P.H.
Acting State Health Officer............-..........Albert V. Hardy, M.D., Dr. P.H.
(Assistant State Health Officer)
Assistant State Health Officer....................Clarence M. Sharp, M.D.
(Acting Director of Bureau of
Preventable Diseases)
Assistant State Health Officer..............William L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Personnel..............................Miles T. Dean, M.A.
Division of Health Education..................Elizabeth Reed, R.N., B.S.
Librarian................................................Tomma Pastorett, B.S., M.A.
Bureau of Finance and Accounts.................Fred B. Ragland, B.S.
Assistant Director....................................Paul R. Tidwell, B.B.A.
Purchasing Agent.....................................G. Wilson Baltzell, B.S.
Bureau of Vital Statistics............................Everett H. Williams, Jr., M.S. Hyg.
Bureau of Local Health Services...............William L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H.
Assistant Director..............................Hubert U. King, M.D.
Division of Public Health Nursing.............Ruth E. Mettinger, R.N.
Division of Sanitation................................A. W. Morrison, Jr., R.S.
Division of Nutrition..............................Mary B. Deaver, M.S.
Bureau of Preventable Diseases....................ames O. Bond, M.D., M.P.H.
(Acting Coordinator of Research
and Training)
Division of Tuberculosis Control................Dwight W. Wharton, M.D.
Division of Radiological and
Occupational Health..............................Edwin G. Williams, M.D.
Division of Epidemiology (Acting)............C. M. Waters, M.D.
Division of Veterinary Public Health
(Acting) .................. ....William G. Winkler, D.V.M.
Bureau of Special Health Services.................Simon D. Doff, M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Hospitals and Nursing
Homes (Acting)................................. George W. Hoover, M.D.
Division of Chronic Diseases......................James E. Fulghum, M.D.
Bureau of Laboratories.................................Nathan J. Schneider, Ph.D.
Miami Regional Laboratory.......................Warren R. Hoffert, Ph.D.
Orlando Regional Laboratory.....................Max T. Trainer, M.S.
Pensacola Regional Laboratory..................Emory D. Lord, Jr., B.S.
Tallahassee Regional Laboratory................Robert A. Graves, M.S.
Tampa Regional Laboratory......................H. D. Venters, B.S.
West Palm Beach Regional Laboratory.......Lorraine Carson
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health............Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Bureau of Mental Health............................. Wayne Yeager, M.D., M.P.H.
Bureau of Dental Health...........................Floyd H. DeCamp, D.D.S.
Bureau of Entomology ..............................John A. Mulrennan, Sr., B.S.A.
Entomological Research Center............. Maurice W. Provost, Ph.D.
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering.....................David B. Lee, M.S. Eng.
Assistant Director.......................................Sidney A. Berkowitz, M.S. Eng.
Division of Water Supply.......................John B. Miller, M.P.H.
Division of Waste Water....................... Ralph H. Baker, Jr., M.S. San. Eng.
Division of Special Services...................... Charles E. Cook, C.E.
Division of Industrial Waste...................... Vincent D. Patton, M.S.S.E.
Bureau of Narcotics.......................Frank S. Castor, Ph.G.









DIRECTORS OF COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS

December 31, 1962

Alachua ......................................................... Edward G. Byrne, M.D., M.P.H.
Bay................................................................A. F. Ullman, M .D.
Brevard......................................................T. Paul Haney, M.D., Dr. P.H.
Broward.........................................................Paul W. Hughes, M.D., M.P.H.
Collier...........................................................Clyde L. Brothers, M.D.
Dade.............................................................T. E. Cato, M.D., M.P.H.
Duval ............................................................ Thomas E. Morgan, M.D., M.P.H.
Escambia....................................................... J. C. McSween, M.D.
Hillsborough..................................................John S. Neill, M.D., M.P.H.
Lake..............................................................J. Basil Hall, M .D., M .P.H.
Lee................................................................ Joseph W. Lawrence, M.D.
Leon..............................................................Joseph M. Bistowish, M.D., M.P.H.
Manatee.........................................................Frederick K. Allen, M.D.
Marion...........................................................P. H. Smith, M.D.
Monroe...................................................... John L. Ingham, M.D.
Okaloosa........................................................B. R. Provost, M.D.
Orange..................................W. N. Sisk, M.D., M.P.H.
Palm Beach...............................................C. L. Brumback, M.D., M.P.H.
Pinellas....................................................William C. Ballard, M.D., M.P.H.
Polk----...-................................................ James F. Cason, M.D.
St. Johns..................................................James C. Loranger, M.D.
Santa Rosa....................................................A. E. Harbeson, M.D.
Sarasota......................... ... ....R. H. Veldhouse, M.D.
Seminole...................................................Frank Leone, M.D.
Volusia...........................................................D. V. Galloway, M.D., M.P.H.
Baker-Nassau.................................................B. F. Woolsey, M.D.
Calhoun-Jackson........................................Terry Bird, M.D., M.P.H.
Flagler-Putnam..............................................James F. Sayers, M.D.
Gadsden-Liberty..........................B. D. Blackwelder, M.D., M.P.H.
Jefferson-Wakulla..........................................Karl L. Van Horn, M.D.
Madison-Taylor..............................................Charles L. Mattes, Jr., M.D.
Osceola-Indian River...................................C. C. Flood, M.D., M.P.H.
(Acting Director)
Pasco-Sumter.................................................William L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H.
Bradford-Clay-Union.................................A. Y. Covington, M.D., M.P.H.
Charlotte-DeSoto-Hardee................................E. J. McLaughlin, M.D.
Citrus-Hernando-Levy....................................Harold F. Bonifield, M.D., M.P.H.
Columbia-Hamilton-Gilchrist.................... George M. Dame, M.D.
Franklin-Gulf.............. ..................Willa Dean Lowery, M.D.
(On Educational Leave)
Glades-Hendry-Highlands ...............................William F. Hill, Jr., M.D., M.P.H.
Holmes-Walton-Washington...........................Robert V. Schultz, M.D., M.P.H.
(Acting Director)
Martin-Okeechobee-St. Lucie...................... Neill D. Miller, M.D.
Suwannee-Dixie-Lafayette......................J. Harland Paul, M.D., M.P.H.








TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
General Administration (including Activities of the Board;
Research Coordination; Scholarships; Divisions of Per-
sonnel and Health Education; and General Data
Processing) ........................................................................ 1

Bureau of Local Health Services (including Divisions of
Public Health Nursing, Sanitation and Nutrition; and
Accident Prevention Program) .......................................... 24

Bureau of Vital Statistics (including Statistical Section) ............ 64

Bureau of Maternal and Child Health ...................................... 80

Bureau of Preventable Diseases (including Divisions of
Epidemiology [Venereal Disease Control Program],
Radiological and Occupational Health, Tuberculosis
Control; and Veterinary Public Health) .......................... 91

Bureau of Laboratories ............................................................ 124

Bureau of Special Health Services (including Divisions of
Chronic Diseases and Hospitals and Nursing Homes;
and the Hospital Service for the Indigent Program) ............ 142

Bureau of Sanitary Engineering (including Divisions of
Water Supply, Waste Water, Special Services; and In-
dustrial W aste) ............................................................... 169

Bureau of Mental Health (including Florida Council on
Training and Research in Mental Health) .......................... 202

Bureau of N arcotics ................................................................ 215

Bureau of Entomology (including Entomological Research
Center) .............................................................................. 219

Bureau of Dental Health .......................................................... 233

Bureau of Finance and Accounts (including Purchasing and
Property) ........................................................................ 238

Articles by Staff Members ...................................................... 250







GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 1

WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D., M.P.H., State Health Officer
(On leave entire calendar year)
ALBERT V. HARDY, M.D., Dr.P.H., Acting State Health Officer
C. M. SHARP, M.D., Assistant State Health Officer
WILLIAM L. WRIGHT, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant State Health Officer

A statement by the Acting State Health Officer, Albert V. Hardy,
M.D., Dr.P.H.:
The year under review will be remembered by many as an ex-
ceptional one in public health in Florida. This was the full year during
which Florida's health officer of 16 years was on leave. It was the year
of the encephalitis outbreak, hopefully to be recalled as the one major
outbreak in the state of this serious disease. These and other matters
which came forcefully to administrative attention are reviewed here.
The provision of leadership on an interim basis involves prob-
lems. A static hold-the-line policy was considered not in the best in-
terest of public health. Rather the attempt was to move forward
through the broadest practicable cooperative action of senior staff.
Generous and congenial participation and assistance is acknowledged
with appreciation. Accomplishments are to be credited to staff; the
weaknesses may be charged to the interim leadership. The interesting
and stimulating experiences, rather than the problems and frustrations,
are prominent in memory.
The dominant event of the year was the encephalitis epidemic
which is considered in adequate detail elsewhere in this report. Per-
sonnel of four county health departments (CHDs) and three bureaus
were involved in study and control. These were joined by the mosquito
control districts and by the laboratory and epidemiology divisions of
the Communicable Disease Center (CDC), U. S. Public Health Serv-
ice. In-state and out-of-state consultants aided. The prompt establish-
ment of a field virological laboratory in space provided by the Tampa
Tuberculosis Hospital was a remarkable accomplishment. Staff and
equipment were made available through the cooperation of CDC. The
resources of the mosquito control districts were used in the broad and
intensive control activities. There were outstandingly effective activi-
ties but problems also are worthy of note. There were problems in
working relationships in the county with the earliest cases which
pointed to a need for a clearer definition and understanding of the
inter-related responsibilities of state and county personnel in epidemic
control. The urgent need for expert aid in the handling of the news in
a dramatic epidemic situation became evident also. This was provided
when weaknesses were obvious. It solved problems but in retrospect it
is apparent that assistance of this type may be needed from the earliest
threat of an epidemic. With vigorous efforts, and probably because of
them, the epidemic subsided quite promptly. Its occurrence together







REPORT, 1962


with the two small outbreaks in 1959 and 1961 demanded the de-
velopment of ongoing encephalitis study and control programs. A re-
quest for a National Institutes of Health research grant was given
special and prompt consideration. A five-year study program was ap-
proved and began on December 1.

The initial grant of funds in the broad fields of "Chronic Illness
and Aging" was received in late 1961; funds were substantially in-
creased in 1962. The planning and initiation of this new program de-
manded much attention in 1962. Major emphasis was given to the
development of home nursing services. Due in part to weaknesses in
communication, this program was not always acceptable to medical
societies. However, many counties, as described elsewhere, adopted the
combined home nursing program. Separate divisions of adult health
were organized to develop appropriate programs to serve the health
needs of the large populations of aged in Dade and Pinellas Counties.

In obtaining official approval of these and other programs par-
tially supported by federal grants, it became increasingly evident there
was hesitancy in accepting such funds by the Budget Director's office
and the Budget Commission. In part this appeared due to past experi-
ence that when federal funds terminated state funds were requested
to continue the programs. Hence in approval of federally supported
activities, there was the specific stipulation that this did not imply any
obligation to replace federal with state funds should the former no
longer be available. It became evident also there was a further reserva-
tion due to the practice of paying from state funds the agency's con-
tribution to social security and retirement for persons deriving salary
from federal funds. This situation led to a full exploration of what had
heretofore been a not clearly stated problem. A program to gradually
provide from federal funds for these contributions was evolved and
initiated.
Medical service to the Cubans is predominantly a Dade County
problem and program. However, budgeting for this involved adminis-
trative participation of state personnel. During the year an activity
which had been assured of support only on a month-to-month basis,
attained an appropriate annual budget. This provided for the medical
care needs but there was limited success in seeking supplementary sup-
port for the community health services required by the more than
100,000 political refugees with very limited economic resources.
The denial or withdrawal of license for hospital or nursing home
involved time-consuming and disturbing administrative problems.
Complaints of damage by air pollution were highly vocal in Polk Coun-
ty, and this complex matter was a constant source of concern.
The Board met jointly with the Merit System Council in August
and with the Air Pollution Control Commission in December. These


2 ANNUAL







GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


resulted in a better understanding of problems in which there is joint
interest and responsibility.
In mid-December word was received that the State Health Offi-
cer would return from leave on January 1, an announcement which
was received with great relief by the Acting State Health Officer, and
with great pleasure and satisfaction by him and the entire staff.

STAFF ASSISTANCE
Assistance to the State Health Officer is available from all staff
members, but attention is directed here to that provided by staff spe-
cialists reporting directly to him.
A health program analyst has served longest in this capacity. His
major responsibility is to make available those factual data required
for decision making. He is on call to aid in the study of a variety of
problems. He functions also in a liaison capacity and maintains par-
ticularly close contact with the Interim Legislative Committee on Health
and Welfare and other legislative bodies. He serves also as the Board of
Health representative on the Florida Milk Commission.
The internal auditor is available for the study of fiscal problems.
His major responsibility is to assure that fiscal matters are handled in
a business-like manner wholly acceptable to the state and federal audi-
tors. During the latter half of the year he had an assistant who devoted
major attention to the CHDs. Audits were completed on 43 CHDs in
the six months since this added assistance has been available. Defects
have been chiefly in procedure. Some quite unacceptable practices were
revealed and have been corrected.
Attention was directed also to developing a basic bookkeeping
system which is proving both acceptable and effective (see Bureau of
Local Health Services elsewhere in this Report).
The staff attorney during the year had as his major task the re-
drafting of the Sanitary Code and all official rules and regulations
which according to the newly enacted Florida administrative code must
be deposited with and published by the Secretary of State. This was a
very time consuming and exacting responsibility.
A variety of other legal problems demanded attention, but of even
more importance consultation was provided to foster the most favorable
handling of problems with potential legal implications.
Late in the year a Coordinator of Training was added. It has
been long recognized that such a position was needed.
The full-time news director prepared and distributed 125 news
items and other releases to the press, radio, television and magazines.







4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


This contributed substantially to the dissemination of information to
the public.

ACTIVITIES OF THE BOARD
Ashbel Williams, M.D., member of the Board of Health, sub-
mitted his resignation in 1962. A replacement for Dr. Williams was
not appointed by the Governor during the year.

February 13-Jacksonville
1. Approved three short term projects to be supported out of
Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Funds (Children's Bu-
reau): assistance in polio immunization program in Hills-
borough County; contract for movie on health problems of the
migrant laborers; determination of possible use of well-trained
Cuban physicians in the MCH program throughout the state.
2. Authorized Albert Hardy, M.D., to discuss the Civil Defense
Program with the Governor in order to determine how much
was expected of the State Board of Health in this program.
3. Approved public health applicants for postgraduate training
for September 1962-63.
4. Discussed proposed legislative recommendations to present to
Interim Legislative Committee on Health and Welfare.
5. Approved of a Merit System study and certain recommenda-
tions with regard to it.
6. Approved a revision of Chapter XXIV, School Sanitation, of
the Sanitary Code.
7. Appointed a Committee on Demographic Studies.
8. Elected officers-retaining the present incumbents: E. G.
Peek, M.D., President, and T. M. Cumbie, Ph.G., Vice
President.

April 8-Washington, D. C.
1. Approved a revision of Chapter VI, Privies, of the Sanitary
Code.
2. Approved a revision of Chapter VII, Section 6, of the Sani-
tary Code.
3. Approved a study of Iodination of Water to be conducted by
the University of Florida, the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering
and the Bureau of Laboratories.
4. The Board discussed "sabbatical leaves" for study and ob-
servation and adopted a plan whereby individual cases for
study leave would be considered by them and approved only
if a worthwhile plan for study and observation of public
health programs is presented.







GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


5. Approved changes in the Hospital Service for the Indigent
rules and regulations.
6. Authorized Dr. Hardy to continue working with the State
Hotel and Restaurant Commission on an agreement.
7. Authorized Dr. Hardy to set up a meeting with the Merit
System Council and the Board of Health.
8. Approved of a vacation for Dr. Hardy the latter part of Au-
gust and early September for a period of three weeks.
9. Approved the recommendations of the Ad Hoc Polio Advisory
Committee.

May 10-Miami Beach
1. Held a hearing regarding sanitary facilities in subdivisions in
Monroe County.
2. Approved revisions in regulations and standards for licensing
of hospitals.
3. Approved of Miss Elizabeth Reed accepting a Travel Fellow-
ship from the World Health Organization for the period Oc-
tober 1 to December 15, 1962, and allowed her to remain
on salary status during this period.
4. Approved of Carlton P. Maddox, Attorney for the Board,
taking appropriate legal procedures in the case of the Arling-
ton Medical Center.
5. Approved 18 applicants for medical scholarships.

June 24-Jacksonville
1. Approved certain rules, regulations and standards of the State
Board of Health to be filed in the Office of the Secretary of
State in line with new Administrative Procedures Act passed
in the last session of the Legislature.
2. Approved the establishment of two additional divisions in the
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering.
3. Approved an applicant for Osteopathic Scholarship.
4. Approved nine applicants for Dental Scholarships.
5. Approved the rules of the State Board of Beauty Culture as
revised.
6. Approved the appointment of Dr. Peek as Advisory Director
to the Board of Directors of the Florida Tuberculosis and
Health Association.
7. Discussed with Mr. Maddox the Ft. Lauderdale situation
with regard to the site of a garbage dump in that area. The
Board authorized the Broward CHD to represent the State
Board of Health in this matter and stated that Paul Hughes,
M.D., and Richard Almeida specifically are agents of the
State Board of Health for this problem.







6 ANNUAL REPORT,


August 11 -Jacksonville
1. The Board of Health and the Florida Merit System Council
held a joint meeting and discussed the problems of concern
with regard to the Merit System and the State Board of
Health.

August 11 -Jacksonville
1. Approved certain rules, regulations and standards of the State
Board of Health for filing in the Secretary of State's Office
under the Administrative Procedures Act.
2. Approved the Budget for the biennium 1963-65 for the
State Board of Health and County Health Units.
3. Approved the legislative program of the State Board of
Health.
4. Approved a State Natural Disaster Plan.
5. Approved of a plan whereby deduction of 10 per cent of
matching funds be made from CHD budgets that have a sur-
plus.
6. Approved the designation of C. M. Waters, M.D., as Acting
Director, Division of Epidemiology.
7. Designated W. G. Winkler, D.V.M., as Acting Director, Di-
vision of Veterinary Public Health.
8. Discussed the licensure of Lakeside Hospital, DeFuniak
Springs, and agreed to approve a provisional license providing
certain criteria could be met by those owning the hospital.
9. Approved in principle an agreement between the State Hotel
and Restaurant Commission and the State Board of Health.
10. Appointed William L. Wright, M.D., as Acting State Health
Officer during Dr. Hardy's absence from the continental lim-
its of the United States.

October 18-Miami Beach
1. Discussed a proposed meeting with the Air Pollution Control
Commission, citizens group and the Board of Health to be
held in either Lakeland or Tampa; the purpose of which
would be to hear the problems of all concerned regarding air
pollution in the area.
2. Approved the amount of $25,000 to be used for a study of
mental health in Florida to be conducted by arrangements
through the Governor's Office.
3. Approved revisions to the recommendations of the Ad Hoc
Polio Advisory Committee.
4. Discussed and directed that certain procedures in the Person-
nel Office be investigated by A. P. Ashby, Internal Auditor,
and a report given to the Board on this investigation.


1962







ADMINISTRATION


5. Welcomed Hans Tanzler back to his position as attorney
after a year's leave of absence for military duty.
6. Appointed Walter Weiss' replacement, Don Evans, as a mem-
ber of Advisory Committee for Hospital Service for the In-
digent.
7. Approved a resolution to the Surgeon General seeking return
of Wilson T. Sowder, M.D., to his position of State Health
Officer by January 3, 1963.
8. Authorized a year's leave of absence for James O. Bond,
M.D., director of the Bureau of Preventable Diseases, be-
ginning some time in December 1962, in order that he be
the director of the Encephalitis Project in the Tampa Bay
Laboratory; and at the end of the year this leave would be
reviewed.
9. Approved an additional request of $75,000 in state funds in
the legislative budget for the next biennium for the purpose
of constructing a virus laboratory in the proposed new Tampa
Laboratory building.
10. Authorized the securing of a clear title to land opposite the
Tampa Tuberculosis Hospital for construction of the Tampa
Laboratory building.
11. Approved the amount of $20,000 be included in the budget
for the next biennium for a building in Vero Beach.



COORDINATION OF RESEARCH
JAMES O. BOND, M.D.
Acting Coordinator of Research

The director of the Bureau of Preventable Diseases continued to
serve as Acting Coordinator of Research and Training in 1962. His
personal interest led to special emphasis on research in the communi-
cable diseases.
Early in the year there was an evaluation of a trivalent oral polio
vaccine. This was a cooperative project conducted by the Hillsborough
County Health Department (CHD), the Hillsborough County Medical
Association and the State Board of Health (SBH). The purpose of this
project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a trivalent oral polio vaccine
with the hope that it would meet the standards for licensure and be
made available for general use. A total of 190,000 persons were fed
one or more doses of vaccine in a period from February to May. This
was approximately 74 per cent of the county population under 40 years
of age. The best community responses were obtained in the low socio-


GENERAL







8 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

economic groups. The reasons for this were the subject of careful in-
vestigations by a team of social scientists. Serological responses to the
vaccine were measured on a group of 1500 children and it was found
that after feeding of two doses of the trivalent vaccine there was greater
than 90 per cent conversion against each of the three types. The effect
of the vaccine on the enterovirus prevalence in the community was
measured by taking weekly sewage specimens in selected areas in the
county and monthly collections of rectal swabs from healthy preschool
nursery children. Clinical surveillance for paralytic disease and non-
paralytic infections of the central nervous system was established in
October 1961 and continued at a high level of intensity throughout
1962. No cases of paralytic polio were detected during or after the
feeding program. The usual incidence of aseptic meningitis and other
viral infections of central nervous system were observed during this
period.
An outgrowth of this Hillsborough County program was the
establishment on an experimental basis of a continuing plan for the
immunization of all newborn infants brought into the community after
the mass vaccination program. A pilot study was initiated in this county
and later in Orange and Palm Beach Counties to evaluate procedures
for attaining effective ongoing immunization programs. This study,
which bears the title "An Evaluation of the Use of Birth Certificates as
a Means for Achieving Mass Saturation of Immunization of One-Year-
Old Infants in the Community," was supported by a one-year contract
with the Communicable Disease Center, U. S. Public Health Service
(USPHS). The basic plan in all three counties was to identify each
infant of three months by the use of birth certificates filed with the
CHD. The parents of these infants are contacted at this time to see if
immunization had been initiated and again at the age of 12-18 months
to see if they have been completed and boosters administered. In each
of the three counties the parents of the child were first contacted by
mail, then by telephone or by public health nurse visit, if no response
was received by any of the preceding steps. In Orange and Hillsborough
Counties the clerical and mailing procedures were facilitated by use of
data processing equipment from the SBH. In Palm Beach County all
administrative procedures were handled locally. The purpose of the
project is to measure the cost of carrying out the program in the three
different areas, and to determine the effectiveness in achieving immuni-
zation of all infants under age of one year. These studies will determine
whether such a program should be extended on a statewide basis.
During the latter half of the year the Coordinator gave his time
virtually exclusively to the encephalitis epidemic (See Bureau of Pre-
ventable Diseases, Epidemiology, elsewhere in this report).
Research training was an important responsibility of the Co-
ordinator. He maintained temporary direction of the research training
grant through which a limited number of promising physicians and
scientists are provided opportunity for training in community-based






Organizational Chart of t- -



GOVEI




-- -BOARD OF
Medical Scholarship Dental Scholarship Council on Training
Advisory Committee Advisory Committee and Research in

STA-
EALTH I
(on Ih
CITING
ASSISTANT HEALTH t
STATE HEALTH
OFFICER
'Research, Program

DIVISION OF
PERSONNEL




UInalariii BUREAU OF BUREAU OF BUREAU OF
VITAL MENTAL LABORATORIES BUREAU OF
Demographic STATISTICS HEALTH (Regional FINANCE
|Advisory Committee (Clinics) Laboratories) AND ACCOUNTS
Deogah t


BUREAU OF
SPECIAL
HEALTH
SERVICES


DIVISION OF
OF INDUSTRIAL
SPECIAL NWSTE
SERVICES
(Air Pollution)


DIVISION OF DIVISION OF
HOSPITALS AND CHRONIC
NURSING HOMES DISEASES
(Licensure and (Heart, Cancer,
Indigent Pgms.) Diabetes, etc.)


I


BUREAU OF
SANITARY
ENGINEERING


ASSISTANT
DIVISION OF DIVISION OF BBUREA
WASTE WATER LOCAL' HEALTH
WATER SUPPLY (c




DIVISION OF
SANITATION






0 67 County Healt


-orida State Board of Health



,NOR ]




HEALTH
RS
Hospital Licensure Advisory Committee Air Pollution
Advisory Council for Hospital Sevice Control Conmission
for the Indigent

,:E w ---- --- II II
OFFICER
ave)
STATE
FFICERASSISTANT


STATE HEALTH
OFFICER
DIVISION OF
HEALTH
EDUCATION
(Library)
mKImmm


BUREAU OF BUREAU OF





BUREAU OF
RENTOOLOGY BUREAU O BUREAU O






DISEASES
MATERNAL (Research Center, DENTAL B A O
AND osqui to Control HEALTH
HEALTH Districts)







OFFICER DIVISION OF DIVISION OF IIIn DIVISI
I OF DIVISION OF
F RADIOLOGICAL AND VETERINARY EPIDEHI
SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH TUBERCULOSIS (Includi
fe on) HEALTH (Mi'lk Sanitation) CONTROL ont



E IN DIVSISION OF
PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION
NURSING


IN OF
OLOGY
ng V.D.
rol)


h Departments


I


!


I








GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 9

research. This involves individual consultation and guidance. For
broader participation the Coordinator arranged a three-day visit to
USPHS research activities in Washington and Bethesda in which 12
staff members participated. Also there was held in Jacksonville a re-
search conference planned and sponsored by Region IV, USPHS. This
provided a ready opportunity for many staff members to become better
informed as to the availability of research grant funds for a wide variety
of differing studies.
Another important training and education activity carried out
during the year was assistance in the preparation of an issue of Health
Notes on the research programs carried on by the SBH and its various
CHDs. This was a concise summary of the many projects being carried
out by the SBH in the areas of research, demonstration and program
development.
A part-time consultant on research in mental health was
employed during the year (See Bureau of Mental Health elsewhere in
this report). A number of project applications for mental health re-
search were submitted to the Council on Training and Research in
Mental Health and received preliminary review and evaluation by this
special consultant and by the Coordinator.
The summer student training program continued to develop and
is rapidly becoming one of the most effective mechanisms for recruiting
young people into the field of public health. A total of 135 applica-
tions were received for 42 positions which were available during the
summer of 1962. The accepted students saw widely diversified pro-
grams in various bureaus, divisions and CHDs. Some carried out
creditable research projects of their own during the summer months
and submitted formal reports.
During the year the initiation of a neurological and sensory dis-
ease service program by the USPHS added a new source of study funds.
The University of Miami School of Medicine and the SBH were spe-
cifically invited to consider undertaking studies supported by these
funds. Under pressure of a very early deadline for submitting pro-
posals, a joint project was submitted for studies predominantly by the
research division of the Dade County Department of Public Health
and the University of Miami School of Medicine. Initially this calls for
fact finding. Later program development will demand consideration.
The Bureau of Special Health Services was involved in planning these
studies and it is anticipated that it will have an even greater role in
evaluating findings as to service needs.
The Community Studies Unit consists of a physician, a health
program analyst and a secretary, financed by a research grant from the
Kellogg Foundation. During 1962 principal emphasis was on the de-
velopment and testing of a system for the evaluation of public health
programs and on the compilation of a description of the school health
program as seen by participants at the county level. A number of








REPORT, 1962


studies were conducted regarding the efficacy of methods of presenta-
tion of public health programs, the factors influencing their acceptance
or rejection, and child spacing. Consultation was offered to program
directors, health officers and others in the revision of long range plans,
in the development of data collection instruments and in the improve-
ment of administrative procedures.
The need for a publication medium for reporting selected re-
search and investigative activities in public health in Florida was rec-
ognized two years ago by the establishment of a SBH monograph
series. This was intended primarily for the publication of studies which
were either too long and comprehensive for publication as short reports
in professional journals or were of a multi-disciplinary nature so that
the publication in a single journal would not adequately reach the pub-
lic health audience which would be interested in the findings. The first
three such monographs have been published and have received com-
mendable response but also indicated a need for establishment of over-
all policies and an editorial committee. Such a committee was appointed
in 1962 by the Coordinator and was formally designated by the State
Health Officer as an editorial board for the monograph series. The
fourth monograph was accepted for publication during the year and
plans were formally approved for the fifth.


SCHOLARSHIPS FOR PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

The scholarship programs created by the 1955 Legislature for the
study of medicine, dentistry and the several disciplines concerned with
mental health, were continued with only one significant change.
Stipends for residencies in psychiatry were terminated as required by
the Legislature of 1961.
Scholarships for the study of medicine were awarded upon the
recommendation of a seven-man advisory committee authorized by
statute. The seven members were: George T. Harrell, M.D., Dean of
the School of Medicine, University of Florida; John C. Finerty, Ph.D.,
Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine, University of Miami;
Richard C. Clay, M.D., Miami; James T. Cook, Jr., M.D., Marianna;
David W. Goddard, M.D., Daytona Beach; Homer L. Pearson, Jr.,
M.D., Miami; and Melvin M. Simmons, M.D., Chairman, Sarasota.
As authorized by the Legislature in 1959, one scholarship was
awarded for the study of osteopathic medicine. The recipient was rec-
ommended by the State Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners.
Scholarships for the study of dentistry were awarded by the Board
upon the recommendations of the State Board of Dental Examiners.
Scholarships in the several disciplines of mental health were


10 ANNUAL








GENERAL


ADMINISTRATION


awarded by the Board upon the recommendations of the Florida Coun-
cil on Training and Research in Mental Health.
Through the Federal Social Security Act of 1935, the State
Board of Health receives federal funds which are used to provide
stipends to its employees and those in affiliated CHDs for specialized
professional training. These stipends are awarded to career employees
who evidence potential for growth and service in specialized areas of
public health.


Persons receiving scholarships in 1962 were:

MEDICAL

Scholarships Awarded in 1962:


Richard Julian Bagby............Miami
Leonard Channing Bass......Live Oak
Joseph William Haddock......Hilliard
Donald Gammon Hall....Blountstown
Gordon David
Onstad..................Miami Springs


Laurie Miles Pardee..............Irvine
Howard Todd Willson..........Orlando
Lloyd Dale Gauvin*....Walton Beach
Richard Thomas
Roby, Jr......................acksonville
Richard Allison Pollock..Jacksonville


Continuing Scholarships Awarded Prior to 1962:


Awarded 1959:
Gordon Thames Couch
Francis Thomas Greene
Everett Norwood
McCormick
Wilbur Williams, Jr.


Awarded 1960:
Sylvester Barrington
Mirion Perry Bowers
Rodney Lee Brimhall
John Agustine Moore
Cupid R. Poe
Frederick Oliver Smith
Paul Vincent Sullivan
Tommie Lynn Thomas*
Robert Whelchel Miles


*Studying osteopathic medicine


Awarded 1961:
Thomas John Calhoun
George Duncan Finlay
Buford Gibson, Jr.
Betty Lou Bottoms
Jack Denby Bergstresser*
Oliver Hunt Harper
Betty Jo Johnson
James Cranford Phillips
Thomas Joseph Philpot
Joseph Thomas Rabban
David Oliver Westmark
Prince Benjamin
Oliver, Jr.
Hubert Warren Wingate
Ronald Loyde Haney
Braxton William Price


DENTAL
Scholarships Awarded in 1962:


George Wallace Boring, Jr.....Arcadia
Robert Renne
Burch................West Palm Beach
James V. Ferdinand................Miami
Ronald Emil Molinari....Lake Worth
William Walker Motley, Jr.....Miami


Henry Cephas Nichols....Laurel Hill
Alvan Carlton Smith............Orlando
Gordan Dennis Wiebe......Tallahassee
John Paroy
Youngman................St. Petersburg
Emory Turner Cain............Pensacola








12 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

Continuing Scholarships Awarded Prior to 1962:


Awarded 1959:
George W. Alexander
Robert A. Brown
Gene Watkins Eng
Robert G. Fountain
Paul Vonbose Ladd
Daniel Gordon Noland
Thomas Melvin Scott


Awarded 1960:
Teddy Wallace Brown
Edward Martin Clayton
Harold Glenwood Gregg
Emmett Alfred Kirksey
Lorenza Laws
Charles H. Bitter
Earl Thomas Sherman
Alien R. Treadwell


Awarded 1961:
Clement W. Barfield
George B. Dorris
Guy Ronald Estes
John T. Griffin, Jr.
Charles A. Harrell
Arthur R. Higgs
Clarence L. McNair
Edward L. Peters
Ivan Beryl Roberts
David M. Strimer
William R. Warrender


MENTAL HEALTH

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY


Charles E. Buchanan........Gainesville
Donald B. Clark............Coral Gables
Benjamin F. Gillis..........Tallahassee
Mack R. Hicks................Gainesville
Stephen G. Irving............Gainesville


Patsy Ann Livingston......Jacksonville
Nathan W. Perry, Jr.......Tallahassee
Richard Toister..............Coral Gables
Eve Lyn Weeks............Coral Gables
John F. White................Tallahassee


PSYCHIATRIC NURSING


Betty Land.........................Branford
Gretchen LaGodna...................Ocala

PSYCHIATRIC
First Year
Dorothy C. Baker...................Dover
George A. Brown..............Homestead
Helen C. Ervin......................Dania
Cleo G. Griffin............St. Petersburg
Phyllis R. Keith..............Opa Locka
Lilli Ann Kresge........Ormond Beach
William H.
Mathis............Indian Lake Estates
Imogene C. Peel................Lake City
Jo Ann Suco.....................Tampa
Allie Mae Truxal........Chattahoochee
Herbert W. Uppitt.................Miami
Ruth E. W. Wilson............Pensacola


Sally Reynalds...............Clearwater
Cynthia Strazis......................Orlando

SOCIAL WORK
Second Year
Aza Lee Baxter................Tallahassee
Asa O. Flake .................Tallahassee
John E. Killiany...................... Miami
Mina Jo Powell...............Williston


PUBLIC HEALTH PERSONNEL
E. R. Broussard.............Health Officer III....................Escambia
E. Charlton Prather....... Health Officer II...............State Board of Health
Willa Dean Lowery.......Health Officer III..................Franklin-Gulf
Marilyn Ferwerda..........Public Health Nurse II..........Broward
Genevieve Larsen ..........Public Health Nurse II..........Dade
Dorothy Cantall.............Public Health Nurse II..........Broward
Irma Taylor...................Public Health Nurse II..........Hillsborough
H. Grady Callison.. .... Sanitary Engineer V................State Board of Health







GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 13

Frank L. Cross..............Sanitary Engineer II............. State Board of Health
Donald W. Rogers.........Sanitary Engineer I...............Hillsborough
A. L. Johnson..............Resident Analyst......................Dade
Leon Stanley..................Psychiatric Social Worker III.Duval
Homer Thompson..........Administrative Assistant...........Broward
Robert A. Graves...........Bioanalyst IV...........................Tallahassee Regional
Laboratory



DIVISION OF PERSONNEL
MILES T. DEAN, M.A.
Director

Under the general direction of the State Health Officer, this di-
vision is responsible for the administration of the personnel program of
the State Board of Health. This includes advising administrative of-
ficers concerning personnel practices and development; putting into
effect procedures for carrying out approved personnel policies; partici-
pating in the preparation and administration of the approved Classifi-
cation and Compensation Plan; administering the leave regulations;
maintaining adequate personnel records on all persons employed in
the agency; acting as liaison official with the Florida Merit System
involving requests for certificates and reporting on the selection of
eligibles, promotions, salary advancements, salary adjustments, demo-
tions, transfers, dismissals, lay-offs and resignations; providing and
administering a service rating system; and the preparing of necessary
reports both state and federal. Payroll operation, also a responsibility
of this division, includes the administration of leave accounting, the
employee insurance program, retirement and Social Security, as well as
the preparation of the administrative payroll and distribution of war-
rants. Preparation of the salary portion of the Legislative Requesting
and the Operational Budgets is also a responsibility of the Division of
Personnel.
During 1962 the number of new employment increased signifi-
cantly from 624 employment in 1961 to 821 in 1962. Employment
procedure was complicated additionally with the fingerprinting of all
new employees. All employees were fingerprinted in accordance with
an order from the Governor.
Considerable time was spent during the year in debate with the
Merit System concerning proposed rule changes. Certain changes were
made, most of which were of a procedure nature. These have been
somewhat helpful. A proposal was made after consultative study to
establish a tripartite approach to SBH personnel operation as a
strengthening of Merit System action.
An increase in recruitment activities was begun. Training work-








14 ANNUAL


REPORT,


shops were completed throughout the state on personnel practices and
procedures. Distribution was made of office supervisors' training pro-
gram material on an experimental basis.
Turnover continues to be a problem. There were 526 total ter-
minations during the year. Postgraduate training was completed by
13 persons and 14 were placed on postgraduate training status.



TABLE 1
NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN THE STATE BOARD
OF HEALTH AND COUNTY HEALTH UNITS
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1953-1962
Year State County Health Total
(As of Dec. 31) Office Departments Employees
1962. 692 1821 2513
1961. 626 1593 2219
1960-.. 604 1534 2138
1959 586 1396 1982
1958 558 1321 1879
1957 ..-- 528 1234 1762
1956 481 1127 1608
1955. .-........ 442 1057 1499
1954 421 980 1401
1953-.-- 439 928 1367


1962









GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


TABLE 2

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL-STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

(OTHER THAN COUNTY HEALTH UNITS)

DECEMBER 31, 1962



r I

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT | .I -
.0 fC 4 P0
E-t ~ ~ l' P4Z W M CS -^ 0


Grand Total_.....-_. ___.
Administration:
SHO ...........
Personnel-.................................
Data Processing .... ....- .....
Encephalitis (Tampa Bay
Regional) ...........
Total .....-- --- ....
Dental Health................- ...........
Entomology.......... ........
Finance and Accounts:
Fiscal .......... ........ .. ..
Purchasing and Property .....
Total...
Health Education:
Laboratories
Central (Jacksonville)__
Miami ..................
Orlando..... ... .......
Pensacola.....................................
Tallahassee-..--................................
Tampa................-- .....-... ....--
West Palm Beach...........,.....
Total ...............-
Local Health Services:
Bureau and Inservice Training......
Nursing......- ...-.....-- ........
Sanitation ..................... ...
Nutrition ............. ......--..... .
Civil Defense..........-............
Accident Prevention -............
Total................... ... ..
Maternal and Child Health:
Mental Health:
Narcotics:
Preventable Diseases:
Bureau-....................................
Radiological and Occupational
Health ........
Tuberculosis Control ....- ...-
Epidemiology and Venereal
Diseases Control .....-....
Veterinary Public Health .....
Total--------... _-.
Sanitary Engineering and Air
Pollution Control:
Special Health Services:
Bureau and Hospitals and
Nursing Homes...... ....
Chronic Diseases ......-..............
Total ............ ............. ...
Vital Statistics .......... ....-....--......


7 -_ *------- 3
...... -- ---- ...----....
... 2 1 ..........

................... ......


236
9
4
2
2
17
10
29
6
33
39
8
17
4
3
3
2
7
1
39
2
1
.5
1
9
9
7
13
1
3
10
14
1
29
10
9
1
10
9


I I I I r I I


.--.-.-...






16 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 3

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL IN COUNTY

HEALTH UNITS-DECEMBER 31, 1962





COUNTY 3
3 '
.i I] I S


GRAND TOTAL.__.. 1821 106 308 12 644 35 380 336
1. Alachua --.... 40 2 5 13 2 8 10
2. Baker-...--..... 4 ._ 1 1 __.. 1 1
3. Bay......-.- ... 17 1 2 ;- 6 1 3 4
4. Bradford-____. 6 1 1 --- 2 1 1
5. Brevard__r .. 31 1 6 11 9 4
6. Broward.... ..... 82 3 16 3 244 19 17
7. Calhoun.-- .-- 5 1 2 .. 1 1
8. Charlotte ---_ 11 1 2 -- 6 2
9. Citrus ....._ 6 1 1 1 2 .....- 1 1
10. Clay ............ 8 1 __- 4 2 1
11. Collier....... 11 1 1 ___ 3 1 3 2
12. Columbia.............. 10 1 3 .... 4 .......... 1 1
13. Dade_..... ..... 343 33 54 3 138 9 70 36
14. DeSoto ............. 6 -..... 1 2....... 1 2
15. Dixie.._.. 3 1 .... .... 1 1
16. Duval__.... 48 2 9 .. .. 12 2 10 13
17. Escambia....--.... 68 3 11 ...-- 19 4 21 10
18. Flagler...----..-- 4 .___ 2... .. 1 1
19. Franklin_..___-. 5 1 1 -- 1 2
20. Gadsden ----. 13 1 3 .- 6 2 1
21. Gilchrist___....... 2 __..---- 1-. .. 1_
22. Glades---....---- 1 ..I ___. ____. 1 .
23. Gulf --_.. .... 7 __.... 1 .. 2 ....-- 3 1
24. Hamilton _....... 6 .._... 1 ......- 3 -...... 1 1
25. Hardee-......-...-- 7 1 ..... 3 ..- 2 1
26. Hendry ...... 10 ... 1 .. 4 ..-.... 3 2
27. Hernando.......... 2 ........ ........ 1 ... 1
28. Highlands- _..._ 10 1 2 4 ........ 2 1
29. Hillsborough ..... 191 8 39 1 68 1 35 39
30. Holmes------ 5 .......-.. 12 ...... 1 1
31. Indian River_.... 12 1 2 ..5 ... .... 2 2
32. Jackson --.-..... 14 1 2 .-... 5 ........ 2 4
33. Jeferson ....... 9 1 1 .... 2 1. 1 3
34. Lafayette ._.. 4._ 1 .. 1 .... 1 1
35. Lakei__ .... .. 18 1 3 ...-... 7 ...-... 3 4
36. Lee___..... ... 14 1 3 ....... 5 ..... 2 3
37. Leon -...-.......... 41 4 5 ... 12 1 9 10
38. Levy..._ ..... 6 ...... .... 2 .. 1 2
39. Liberty.......... 3 ....... ...... .......... I ... 1 1
40. Madison .......... 7 1 1 2 .. 2 1
41. Manatee .......... 30 1 5 ..... 11 2 7 4
42. Marion.__.. 17 1 3 .... 7 ...... 2 4
43. Martin____.... 5 .___ 2 2 ..... 1
44. Monroe__.... 19 1 3 6 5 4
45. Nassau___ _..... 12 1 2 .3....... 3 3
46. Okaloosa...._... 15 1 2 ..._... 5 ........ 1 6
47. Okeechobee_...... 4 1 1 ..... 1 1
48. Orange-....... .... 75 3 12 1 1 22 1 19 17
49. Osceola-__...._...... 5 __.... 1 2 2....... 2 .
50. Palm Beach...... 88 5 14 1 29 2 16 21
51. Pasco- .4... 4 ... 1 ..... 2 ... I 1........
52. Pinellas ............. 166 9 29 2 67 4 33 22
53. Polk .___..... 90 2 14 1 33 2 17 21
54. Putnam .........-..... 14 1 "1 5 ....... 3 4
55. St. Johns .............. 12 1 3 ..... 4 ........ 3 1
56. St. Lucie......... 18 1 5 .. 3 1 3 5
57. Santa Rosa....__. 10 1 1 ...-.. 4 ........- 1 3
58. Sarasota .............. 44 1 8 14 .-...... 13 8
59. Seminole _...._......... 14 1 3 4 ...--.. 3 3
60. Sumter_.... .- 4 1 1 .... 1 1
61. Suwannee -___.... 9 1 1 3 2 2
62. Taylor---__..... 5 ..._.. 1 2 .. 1 1
63. Union___..._......3.. 3 1 I 1 _
64. Volusia 54 4 8 -...... 19 1 7 15
65. Wakulla...... 2 1 .... ..... 1
66. Walton__...._.. 7 1 1 :...'. 2 ...... .. 3
67. Washington ....... 5 1 .. 2 ........ 1 1








GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


TABLE 4
TURNOVER BY CLASSIFICATION OF THE FLORIDA STATE
BOARD OF HEALTH-STATE AND COUNTY
CALENDAR YEAR 1962

TERMINATIONS TURNOVER RATE
Physicians__.......-. 10 9.2
Sanitarians........ .. ........ 35 11.0
Sanitary Engineers-- ....... 6 14.0
Public Health Nurses... .. ............. 87 12.4
Laboratory Workers (Prof. and Tech.)........ 21 13.5
Clerical .. 156 27.9
All Others-__........................................ 116 21.1
Total_ 431 18.2

Not including persons employed on a temporary or for a specific duration. There were 95
such terminations.




TABLE 5
TERMINATION OF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
EMPLOYEES-STATE AND COUNTY
BY SALARY RECEIVED AT TIME OF TERMINATION

MONTHLY SALARY
Up to 200- 300- 400- 500- 600- 700 800 900
CLASSIFICATION Total 199 299 399 499 599 699 799 899 999 1,000
Total ..... ................... 431 54 179 118 37 13 19 4 2 5 ........
Physicians- -.................... 10 ........ ...... ........ .... 1 2 1 5 .....
Sanitarians ................ ....... 35 ..... ......... 20 13 2 ..... ... ----..
Sanitary
Engineers ......................... 6 ... ................. 3 ......... ........
Public Health
Nurses..................... 87 2 26 52 7 ... ....... ... ........
Lab. Workers
(Prof. and Tech.)...... 21 ...... 5 9 6 1 .............
Clerical ......... .. ... ..... 156 17 119 18 2 .. ........ ....-----
All Others.-................... 116 35 29 18 6 10 15 2 1 -......







18 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


DIVISION OF HEALTH EDUCATION

ELIZABETH REED, R.N., B.S.
Director

This division can report numerous activities during 1962 in line
with its assigned duties. As a service unit to bureaus and divisions
and county health departments (CHD), it provides the materials for
informing a wide diversity of persons both professional and lay about
the preventive aspects of health maintenance as well as current public
health problems in Florida. It cooperates with all voluntary and official
agencies, including schools, that are interested in any aspect of health.
It serves as a resource to the general public. The contributions of health
education and the social sciences are employed to understand and mo-
tivate individuals and communities to take responsibility for their own
health through a variety of projects.
In 1962, 1052 books were added to the State Board of Health
(SBH) Medical Library. Most of these were bound volumes of
journals. The collection now numbers 18,465. Circulation statistics:
books on regular loan, 1937; books on indefinite loan, 394; periodicals,
13,601; pamphlets, 66. Photocopies made from the library's bound
journals totaled 1694; 86 photocopies were ordered from the National
Library of Medicine; and 19 interlibrary loans were sent to other li-
braries. Reference questions in the number of 2420 were answered
and 38 bibliographies were prepared.
SBH personnel (2594) were again at the top of the list of bor-
rowers. Ranking second were CHD personnel with 47 coming in per-
son, and 1453 items mailed out on request. Two hundred seventy-four
students from local colleges, nursing schools and high schools came for
service. Eighty-two non-medical persons also requested assistance.
The library continued to serve in the capacity of an auxiliary
agency to the Jacksonville Hospitals' Educational Program (JHEP)
libraries. Interns and residents no longer have to come to the library in
person. If the item is not available in one of the JHEP libraries, then
their librarian requests it from this facility. However, 201 doctors ar-
ranged their own loans directly this past year.
A list of duplicate journals was offered to other libraries through
the Medical Library Association Exchange. A total of 162 requests were
received. To date, 1442 journals have been sent to 139 different li-
braries; 19 of these are in foreign countries.

Exhibits, posters, reproductions, illustrations, slides, signs, field
trips, etc., with over 500 recorded projects kept the exhibits section







ADMINISTRATION


busy throughout the year. Florida was given three honorable mentions
for scientific exhibits out of a total of eight awarded at the
1962 APHA meeting in Miami. One of these was designed and carried
to completion by the exhibits consultant.
Pamphlets distributed last year reached a quarter of a million
in spite of limitations imposed on quantities distributed to organiza-
tions and schools. Leading in popularity were those on communicable
diseases, nutrition and maternal and child health. There is an increas-
ing demand for pamphlets giving information on health careers in de-
tail. One interesting trend is the increasing number of employees who
browse in the pamphlet room. One lamented trend is the steady reduc-
tion of well prepared pamphlets offered free of charge by commercial
companies.

Florida Health Notes monthly mailing list grew to 17,000 by
the end of the year. Extra copies are kept on hand to answer numerous
requests that continue to come months and even years after publica-
tion. This bulletin is designed for a lay audience. Subjects covered dur-
ing the year were: intestinal parasites, community nursing service, civil
defense, eyesight, toxic pesticides, school health, encephalitis, alco-
holism, research in public health and a simplified annual report. Ap-
proximately 75,000 extra copies of the issue on encephalitis were or-
dered following the epidemic in Pinellas County. Other writing
responsibilities included assistance with the editing of SBH Mono-
graph No. 3 and the Annual Report. A public service spot campaign
was inaugurated on Florida radio stations, with a packet of 42 spots on
various subjects, of which 15 were deleted during the year with an
equal number added. Plans are being made to serve TV stations in the
same manner. A "Guide to Eating and Lodging Places" was prepared
for traveling SBH personnel. The "Florida Health Intelligencer," a
compilation of news notes about persons in health work in Florida,
appeared four times. There is a constant stream of pamphlets and bul-
letins being developed. Responsibility for all photography except
that concerned with publicity resulted in much activity in this area.
An effort was made to streamline the activities of the Audio-
Visual library since requests continued to increase, though in many
instances could not be met. The use of a tape recorder for booking and
a new daily reminder system for posting, shipping and checking on re-
turned films was employed. Aids totaling 39 were removed as obsolete
or damaged and 96 were added. Equipment placed in the library
included: a motion picture projector, new type of overhead projector,
tape recorder and an automatic slide projector. There is a constant in-
crease (11 per cent in 1962) in the use of equipment by SBH person-
nel. A new catalog was printed and distributed. Motion pictures still
lead the field with 92 per cent of all aids booked. Circulation showed
a slight decrease principally because aids requested are often not avail-
able. The total booking orders processed were 4984 in 1962 as com-
pared to 5047 in 1961.


GENERAL







REPORT, 1962


Other activities
Staff consultation time was spent with directors of bureaus and
divisions and their technical personnel and the three health educators
employed by them, the five employed by CHDs, the one with the Com-
munity Cervical Cytology Project (see Division of Chronic Diseases
elsewhere in this report), with individual mental health workers, as well
as CHDs which do not have a health educator on their staff .... Talks
to university classes, CHD staffs, civic, educational and professional or-
ganizations, consume many hours. Helping people plan meetings,
seminars, workshops (and sometimes acting as leader or moderator),
serving on interbureau committees, or as officers of voluntary health and
professional organizations, attending innumerable meetings, keep the
staff occupied.
Four regular orientation programs (and one for summer students)
were held with 220 persons attending. These seem to grow more pop-
ular each year and include invited persons from the education field,
PTAs, voluntary and official agencies, universities, as well as SBH and
CHD. .. .There was cooperation with Glades and Hendry Counties
in setting up a health education program (snake bite problems) for the
Seminole Indians. Personnel assisted with the annual Teachers
Project (see Bureau of Maternal and Child Health elsewhere in this
report) The director was given a 10-week leave of absence to ac-
cept a World Health Organization travel fellowship in Latin America so
as to better serve foreign visitors (six in 1962) for which this division
has the major responsibility. .There was continued work in many
ways with schools, faculty groups and PTAs.
This division is constantly torn between its time-honored func-
tions as a service unit and its desire to embark on community projects
that would demonstrate the desirability of more involvement of people
within their own groups in improving their health. Two such projects
were undertaken in 1962: Promotion of oral polio vaccine in Hills-
borough County and chest X-rays in Hardee County. Both of these
were aimed at low socioeconomic groups and the discovery and involve-
ment of health opinion molders. Until such time as more personnel are
assigned, there will regretfully have to be only limited assistance given
to projects of this type.
Some major problems are the constant struggle to demonstrate to
directors of CHDs the desirability of adding a health educator to their
staff An adequate budget, sufficient space and a better floor plan
for the Medical library are still unsolved. The need for a librarian's
office remains acute. Although categorical funds have made possible
the updating of books in certain subject areas, other sections are un-
balanced and contain much obsolete material Plans for the future
include reorganizing and simplifying methods of disposing of duplicate
journals; compilation of a staff manual; inauguration of a continuous
inventory and encouragement of use of available materials. Also, the
librarian plans to work toward accreditation as a Certified Medical Li-


20 ANNUAL







GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 21

brarian. Last minute requests and increased activities remained a
source of concern to the exhibits section while the problem of storage
space for the many valuable materials accumulated grows year by year.
Categorical funds which limit the subjects which can be purchased
with certain monies make the Audio-Visual library unbalanced in its
coverage. Some lacks are accidents, civil defense, arthritis and rheu-
matism, vision, etc.
Further discussion is needed concerning an additional health
educator on the staff, more assistance to CHDs with a significant
Spanish-speaking population, acceleration of health career recruitment,
stimulation of the 30 community colleges to identify public health
problems and locate teaching resources, and a year's study of one or
more representative CHDs expenditures on health education.
As a contrast to the above, it should be noted that in the long
range plan for the division first written in June of 1961, and revised
in July 1962, tangible results were noted. Needed equipment for the
Medical library and the Audio-Visual library had been purchased, radio
spot announcements had been inaugurated and money for a high
school student had been budgeted for assistance in the libraries. At the
year's end in cooperation with the Bureau of Maternal and Child
Health, a television educational program on health designed for fifth
and sixth grade children in Duval County was becoming a reality.


GENERAL DATA PROCESSING UNIT
ARNOLD KANNWISCHER, B.S.
Procedures Director

This unit performs three major functions: system and procedure
analysis, IBM data processing and inactive records storage.

SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES: This function consists of the
analysis of present methods and systems of office performance, with the
objective to simplify, improve, mechanize, or in some cases, eliminate
a system. The principal aim is to afford a saving to the agency or in-
crease the efficiency of a particular operation, especially in the areas of
records handling and storage, forms design, and mechanization of hand
operated procedures.

IBM DATA PROCESSING: The varied and expanded health
programs within the State Board of Health (SBH), as well as the rapid
growth of Florida, have led to an equally large production and accumu-
lation of paper work. This has required a continuing increase in the
mechanization of many of the manual record keeping procedures. This
unit now processes approximately 100 programs in the IBM section.
These include one or more programs for almost every bureau or division
of the SBH. With this expansion of activities it has become necessary








22 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

during the year to borrow IBM computer time from other state agencies
as well as outside industry. Six computer programs have been written
and are currently being processed on the IBM 1401 Computer at the
Florida State Department of Public Welfare. More procedures are now
being programmed for computer use during the coming year.

INACTIVE FILE RECORDS DEPARTMENT: Four years ago
it was deemed necessary to establish this department. The rapid accu-
mulation of records presented a serious and costly problem. Additional
costly filing equipment was continually requested; costly prime floor
space; and each of these active files needed clerical maintenance. In-
ventory of records is now in progress and those found to be inactive
are placed in transfer file boxes and removed to the Inactive File De-
partment. In addition much microfilming was done, further reducing
the size of the records accumulated. The year end inventory of the In-
active Records Department showed that the four years of accumulated
records now in storage, afforded this agency a savings of over 80 thou-
sand dollars. This savings plus the savings involved in records micro-
filmed and destroyed in the last three years will show a savings of over
100 thousand dollars.

SERVICES RENDERED
Personnel Division-A major conversion of records processing
continued. All payroll calculations and tabulations as well as leave ac-
counting and personnel statistics were programmed for IBM machine
handling. Narcotics-The work for this bureau consisted mainly
of one large registration procedure: the registration of 10,444 prac-
titioners of the healing arts which consists of the mailing and processing
of applications for licensing and the subsequent tabulation of related
statistics. Finance and Accounts-The work processed for this
bureau included reports on Workmen's Compensation, salary budget
projections, tabulations on expenditures, travel and county receipts and
property inventory. Mental Health-The reports submitted by the
community mental health clinics on discharged patients are processed
on a monthly basis by this unit. From these reports, calendar year as
well as fiscal year statistical data are prepared. Data on more than
9000 discharges were processed in 1962.... Local Health Services-
Numerous requests for statistical information for specific counties and
communities were tabulated during the year. A major undertaking of
this unit was the study of the feasibility of automating the daily activi-
ties reporting of the various disciplines in the county health depart-
ments. Maternal and Child Health-A monthly maternal death
listing as well as an annual listing is prepared for this bureau. ...
Dental Health, Health Education, Entomology-There are numerous
small studies and IBM machine tabulations performed for these
bureaus. Sanitary Engineering-The major undertaking for this
bureau was the consolidation of their filming and records system. Micro-
filming of the blueprints and engineering drawings continued through-








GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 23

out the year. Vital Statistics-The processing of all the vital records
included in 1962 approximately 120,000 births, deaths, mar-
riages, divorces and annulments. Information from these records were
coded and transferred into punch card format, from which are derived
the statistics compiled and published in the Annual Report, the Vital
Statistics Report, Supplement No. 1, and the Monthly Vital Statistics
Report. Preventable Diseases-This bureau received during 1962
over 90,000 communicable disease reports. These were processed by
this unit and the data developed were published in the following major
reports: Morbidity Report, Supplement No. 2.... Special Health Serv-
ices and Indigent Hospitalization Program-During the 1961-62 fiscal
year, 34,039 approved applications for indigent hospitalization were
processed. From this fiscal information many statistical tables were re-
quested, such as age of patients, length of hospitalization, average cost
per admission, etc. .Also tabulated were monthly listings of cancer
deaths, rheumatic fever deaths, reportable diseases and the semi-
annual poison control register.







24 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


BUREAU OF LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES

WILLIAM L. WRIGHT, M.D., M.P.H.
Director
HUBERT U. KING, M.D.
Assistant Director
This bureau has as its major responsibilities the supervision of
the 67 county health departments (CHD) and the coordination of
public health programs throughout the state.
The bureau is administered by a director and an assistant director
with a small clerical staff. Within the bureau are the Divisions of Pub-
lic Health Nursing, Sanitation and Nutrition. Each division has its
own director and staff. Additionally, the bureau is responsible for
clerical consultation services, the Accident Prevention Program and the
Health Mobilization Program (civil defense medical and health ser-
vices). For the greater part of the year the bureau had the services
of an additional health officer, who was used as a field consultant
throughout the state in working with directors of the CHDs.
Health programs and activities have continued to grow and ex-
pand in the CHDs with particular attention being given to new health
services for the chronically ill and aged. Almost all the counties are
presently participating to some extent in these new health services.
Recruitment of suitable, experienced and trained personnel con-
tinues to be a matter of concern in all the professional categories. A
number of positions are vacant in the CHDs due to this lack of ade-
quately trained and suitable professional applicants. The problem is
most acute in the rural areas.
Adequate financing of CHDs continues to be a problem, especi-
ally with the smaller health units. Many departments have gradually
depleted their financial reserve over the past several years and at the
same time have either reached or are very near the maximum of the
allowable millage for their operations.
On January 1, 1962, the Health Mobilization Program was trans-
ferred from the Bureau of Special Health Services to this bureau.

CLERICAL SECTION
In 1962 the duties and responsibilities of the clerical consultants
were expanded to include more phases of the work being done by the
clerical personnel in the CHDs. These consultants now assist the CHD
staffs in all matters of personnel papers, finances, payrolls, bookkeep-
ing, record keeping, filing, vital statistics, recording and the comple-
tion of medically indigent applications. Additionally, the clerical
consultants spent considerable time and effort in the central office assist-
ing in the preparation of budgets, making budget changes, recording







SERVICES 25


changes of personnel in the counties and compiling information and
data which are of value and assistance to the CHDs.
Clerical consultations and/or instructions were given to 49 CHD
staffs during the year. About two-thirds of these consultations were
made by requests coming from the counties with the remainder result-
ing from observations made in the bureau office. Such consultation
services will usually average three to four days each. Assistance was
given to eight CHDs where new clerical personnel had been employed
without previous public health experience. In these instances follow-up
visits were routinely made after a short interval so that additional in-
struction could be given.
In cooperation with the Internal Auditor of the State Board of
Health (SBH) a simple basic bookkeeping system was established in
65 counties and also for one Mental Health Guidance Center. The
other two counties, Dade and Pinellas, because of the size and com-
plexity of their financial requirements, continued to use their present
more detailed bookkeeping systems. Indications are that the simplified
bookkeeping system has been well accepted and is proving of value to
the county health officers and staffs.
The clerical consultants devoted considerable time during the year
to assisting the CHDs in setting up and completing the change-over to
the new nursing record system. As of the end of 1962 there were 13
counties using the complete new nursing record system, with an addi-
tional 38 counties having made some start towards this change-over.
The clerical consultants compiled the monthly report of activities
from similar reports submitted by the 67 counties. Much of the sta-
tistical information contained in the tables in this annual report come
from these monthly reports of activities. Each activity report submitted
by a CHD is checked for completeness and accuracy. Only two of the
67 counties, Sumter and Volusia, submitted reports for the entire year
without a single error.
Continued assistance was given by the clerical consultants to both
the state and local records committees.

HEALTH MOBILIZATION
Under executive order of the Governor, the SBH is responsible
for the organization and provision of the following emergency services:
medical care, public health, potable water supplies and mortuary serv-
ices. This responsibility involves this agency with all of the medical,
paramedical and public health personnel in the state. Also involved are
many other groups not usually considered as being medical personnel.
These responsibilities include the management of medical personnel,
supplies and facilities and the actual provision of services during a
disaster.


LOCAL


HEALTH







REPORT, 1962


About the first of March the SBH received 98 kits with which to
carry out a pilot study of a medical self-help program. These kits
were distributed to the respective counties. The ultimate objective of
this program is to train one person in each family so that they might
take care of the sick or injured in case the services of a physician were
not immediately available during a disaster. The initiation of this pro-
gram involved a personal visit to each county by the health mobiliza-
tion coordinator, the establishment of a county planning committee
and the preparation for conducting the 16 hours of instruction. A total
of 26 counties participated in this pilot demonstration which met with
varying degrees of success.
During the late summer the 34 civil defense emergency hospitals,
now prepositioned throughout the state, were inspected by the Federal
General Services Administration. Most of these hospitals were in fairly
good shape but almost all of them had some minor items which needed
correction. Two additional emergency hospitals for training purposes
are located in the state, one in Miami and the other in St. Petersburg.
The latter has been set up in a building at the county-owned airport
and is being used for training purposes. The one in Miami has not
been fully utilized. These 36 hospitals and their medical stockpiles
have a value of $833,000. The Cuban crisis late in the year provided
a sudden spur to all the state's civil defense activities and steps were
taken to organize a Task Force for Health Resources Management.
Represented on the Task Force Committee are some 26 agencies and/
or organizations.
At the close of the year emergency medical and health plans and
activities presented a very spotty picture. Some counties had developed
satisfactory local plans and were prepared to take effective steps to cope
with emergencies while some others had only begun to work on their
plans.
Health mobilization responsibilities include not only civil defense
emergencies but natural disasters as well. In September such a natural
disaster developed in the Sarasota area due to excessive rains and con-
siderable flooding. A mobile laboratory from the SBH was dispatched
immediately to assist the CHDs on the lower west coast with the prob-
lems of potable water supplies, both public and private.

ACCIDENT PREVENTION
The purpose of the accident prevention program is to give guid-
ance to the CHDs in expanding their accident prevention activities in
the fields of home, school and recreational safety. While an active
interest in traffic and industrial safety is maintained, it is felt that
these are adequately covered by other state agencies. Efforts were made
during the year to interest CHD personnel in giving additional atten-
tion to accident prevention by incorporating this consideration into their
other daily responsibilities.


26 ANNUAL







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 27

A special detailed study of accidents to residents and employees
of nursing homes in the state was completed early in the year. This
study was carried out with the cooperation of the Florida Nursing
Home Association. Not all of the nursing homes in the state were
involved in this project. Those which were involved gained a good
bit of useful information concerning their own accident hazards. This
report was circulated to all nursing homes in hopes that others would
survey their own facilities and remove such accident hazards.
In cooperation with the National Safety Council and the Sliding
Glass Door Institute, the Dade County Department of Public Health
undertook a survey of accidents involving sliding glass doors in homes.
The study was later expanded to three other counties in the state and
is presently continuing. A total of 141 accidents with 21 injuries were
investigated. It is expected that this study will result in recommenda-
tions concerning the manufacture, installation and use of these glass
doors.
Florida's 20 poison control centers were inspected and inven-
toried during the year and recommendations were made for improve-
ments where these were indicated. These inspections resulted in a
renewed interest in poison prevention and the SBH received inquiries
from a number of communities desiring to establish such centers. A
total of 3880 poisonings were reported to the SBH during the year.
Since the coverage of the state by poison control centers is not com-
plete, the number of poisonings being reported is estimated to be not
more than 50 per cent of the total which actually occurs. The public
health nurses made 3147 follow-up visits on reported poisonings. It is
during such visits that the nurses have the opportunity to give parents
and family members information concerning the prevention of poison-
ings. Tabulation of the reports indicates that 60 per cent of the total
poisonings occur in children under five years of age with the highest
frequency being in the two- and three-year-old children. Substances
most frequently reported include: aspirin, other internal medications,
cleaning and polishing agents, insecticides and kerosene.
The SBH, in cooperation with the University of Florida Medical
School and the Florida Medical Association, set up a reporting system
for all snake bites occurring within the state. At the close of the year
information had been collected on 280 snake bites which had resulted
in three fatalities. About one-half of the bites occur in children 15
years of age or younger with two-thirds of the total occurring in people
20 years of age or younger. About half of the bites occurred on the
arms and the other half on the legs.
During 1962 the personnel of the Palm Beach CHD undertook
to make a survey of accidents occurring to members of their immedi-
ate families. Some 200 individuals of 75 families were involved in the
study with 70 accidents of various kinds and degrees of severity being
reported. Slightly over half of these accidents took place in or about
the home with the kitchen and yard areas being the most frequent
sites of occurrences.







28 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS
The organizational pattern for county health units remained essen-
tially the same during 1962. The Jefferson-Wakulla Unit and Frank-
lin-Gulf Unit were officially made permanent bi-county units. With
the appointment of a health officer for the former, the Leon CHD was
relieved of responsibility for supervision of this unit. Thus there were
25 single county departments; nine bi-county units; and eight tri-
county units-for a total of 42 county health units.
Some 77 physicians were employed full-time in county health
units in 1962. During the year three local directors resigned, three
transferred to other positions, and there were five new appointments.
At the end of the year, there were four vacancies for local directors in
the state-with definite prospects for filling two of these positions.
Four public health residents received approved training during the
year. And one health officer received postgraduate training leading to
the Masters of Public Health degree.
Staffing and Financing: (See Bureau of Finance and Accounts
and Division of Personnel elsewhere in this report.) As of Decem-
ber 31, 1962, there were 1821 employees on the staffs of CHDs.
CHD budgets totaled $9,968,436 for the calendar year 1962. Of this
total $6,752,114 came from local contributions; $2,515,362 from
state and federal funds; and $700,960 came from the budgeted re-
serve.
Health Center Construction: New headquarters centers were
completed at Naples in Collier County and Ft. Myers in Lee County;
new auxiliary centers in Ft. Walton Beach in Okaloosa County, Ha-
vana in Gadsden County, Frostproof and Auburndale in Polk County
and Ft. Lauderdale in Broward County. Other quarters were secured
in the City of Okeechobee in Okeechobee County, and quarters were
remodeled at Reddick (Marion County). Construction began on new
headquarters centers in Ocala in Marion County, and Ft. Pierce in St.
Lucie County.


HIGHLIGHTS OF LOCAL PROGRAMS

The statistical report of CHD activities (Table 7) indicates the
number and types of various services rendered by local health depart-
ments. The following is a summary in abstract form of some of the
more exceptional or outstanding developments in local programs:
Baker-The combination nursing program continued during the
year demonstrates the value of a program of this type in a rural area.
Added emphasis was placed on rabies and hookworm control as well
as school sanitation and accident prevention.
Brevard-Under the new medical director a comprehensive study







LOCAL HEALTH


and evaluation of the nursing and environmental sanitation programs
were undertaken. These studies indicate that the continuing population
growth resulting from National Aeronautics and Space Administration
and other space activities require substantial expansion of services
through the addition of more adequate staff and facilities. Steps are
being taken to meet these needs. Plans were formulated for the renewal
of a mental health program in the county. Specific attention was given
to psychiatric emergencies with the result that commitment of such
patients to jails has been eliminated. In cooperation with the U. S.
Public Health Service (USPHS) and Winthrop Laboratories Research
Department, the CHD began a Measles Vaccine Field Trial. Some 897
children under seven years of age are participating in the program.
Follow-up on these children will continue during the next few years.
A mass tuberculin testing X-ray program was successfully completed
in September. The CHD cooperated in establishment of a program for
hospitalization of medically indigent maternity patients; began a com-
bination nursing service in the county on a limited basis; cooperated
with the SBH in the atypical acid-fast study, and completed plans for
a pollution survey of the Indian River.
Broward-Reported a serious outbreak of some 200 cases of in-
fectious syphilis which was brought under control through the team-
work of the CHD staff, VD investigators and private physicians. Con-
ducted studies in cooperation with local psychiatrists in an effort to
expand outpatient and home care services for psychiatric patients.
Made fluoride drops available to children under care of the dental
clinic to determine the effectiveness of this procedure in reducing the
decayed-missing-filled rate. Assisted the county commissioners in a pro-
gram in which the county plans to take over operation of water and
sewage utilities in unincorporated areas. Conducted an extensive sur-
vey of garbage disposal as a result of which the county commission
laid plans to build three incinerators and assume responsibility for
garbage disposal. Established 20 air pollution stations in a study to
provide baseline information which will be of great value as the county
becomes more industrialized. Published an extensive 25-year history
on public health in Broward County.
Charlotte-Increased school health activities. Expanded psychologi-
cal testing in the schools. The Gray Lady program was also expanded
to include all but one school. Volunteers were secured to serve as
health room attendants and were given instruction in general duties,
first aid, etc. In cooperation with school officials prepared and distrib-
uted a school health manual. Regular meetings were held with PTA
officials. Formation of PTA Health Committees was stimulated. Indi-
vidual conferences with teachers, especially those newly employed,
were held to discuss school health problems. Discussed services of
health department with lunchroom managers. Gave numerous lectures
in the schools on health subjects. Established a home nursing service
in the county. Conducted the first glaucoma screening program in the
county with over 800 individuals tested. Seventy-three suspects were


SERVICES 29







REPORT, 1962


detected. Pollution sewage of tidal water was a major program during
the year.
Collier-Moved headquarters from Everglades City to Naples as
result of the referendum moving the county seat. In November moved
into a new modern health center in east Naples adjacent to other
county government buildings.
Dade-The Cuban Refugee Medical Dispensary was moved to
larger quarters. With expanded facilities and increased staff, as many
as 16,000 patients were served during a single month. At the end of
the year the staff assisted in processing and rendering care to the Bay
of Pigs Cuban prisoners. In another new development a Division of
Adult Health and Aging was established, and will have as its goal the
coordination and expansion of activities in the control of chronic illness
and problems relating to aging. The nursing home and hospital inspec-
tion programs are also included in this division. Through increased
state and federal support intensified casefinding and treatment activi-
ties in both tuberculosis and VD control. Began a new air pollution
control program under the Engineering Division. A countywide survey
was initiated, local legislation was drafted and monitoring techniques
established. The Divisions of Research and Epidemiology were com-
bined and jointly engaged in 20 research projects during the year.
Established a psychiatric unit within the CHD to assist the Juvenile
Court. Conducted a program for the prevention of recurrent congestive
heart failure. Also began planning for a project to tape record heart
sounds of children in public schools. One of the highlights of the year
was the 90th annual meeting of the American Public Health Associa-
tion at Miami Beach in October. The Florida Public Health Association
met concurrently and awarded T. E. Cato, M.D., Director of the Dade
County Department of Public Health a Meritorious Service Award.
Escambia-One hundred and sixty-three children participated in
a study of the effectiveness of inactivated measles virus vaccine sup-
plied by Pfizer Laboratories and conducted by the CHD. During the
summer, a student training program in environmental sanitation was
inaugurated.
Gadsden-Highlight was construction of a new auxiliary health
center at Havana.
Glades-Hendry Began a unique program that of teaching
first aid to the Seminole Indians. This in cooperation with the Ross
Allen Institute, Ocala, and local Red Cross. Included were courses on
snake bite, firearms safety and general first aid.
Hardee-Continued expansion of staff and program. Physical
examinations were given to all students taking physical education, and
to football and basketball players. With assistance of the Gray Ladies
conducted audio-visual tests in the schools. Completed a tuberculin
skin testing program on all students in the first, second, third, ninth,


30 ANNUAL







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 31

tenth and eleventh grades with careful follow-up of all positive reactors
and their families. Helped expand the Gray Lady program to cover all
elementary schools. Purchased a complete dental unit and made plans
for a dental health program. Initiated a home nursing program in the
county. Conducted a study utilizing community resources in a mobile
X-ray program to demonstrate the importance of community resources
in the success of mass surveys.
Hillsborough-Approximately 388,000 doses of Sabin Trivalent
Oral Polio Vaccine (Lederle) were fed to citizens of Hillsborough
County in a mass immunization program in the spring. No polio-like
illnesses occurred after the vaccine was given. Sewage specimens and
fecal specimens from nursery school children will be taken routinely
for two years to determine the extent of natural virus which may
remain in the county. A "vaccine acceptance" sociological sampling
survey and an immunization level sampling survey were also con-
ducted-with some 1200 children tested for antibody response. In-
tensified the general immunization program by using a new immuni-
zation reminder system. Conducted a sampling survey for streptococcal
infections among school children using throat swabs. The SBH pro-
vided funds with which the CHD began a survey count of acute
rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis cases in the county.
Continued the occupational health program sponsored by USPHS
grant and begun in 1961. A project was begun to study air pollution
in three areas of the county. Information on industries in the area
was collected. A special study was done in an area adjacent to a large
asphalt plant using a non-industrial area as the control area to correlate
the incidence of respiratory symptoms with air pollution. In coopera-
tion with the USPHS carried out a cancer demonstration project in
which some 57 per cent of all female Aid to Dependent Children
(ADC) recipients were examined for uterine cancer. The community
nursing program was expanded during the year. Cooperated with the
SBH and the USPHS in radiological sampling of food and drink. Con-
ducted an intensive communitywide educational program on fluorida-
tion of public water supplies.
Holmes-Devoted much time to the formulation of civil defense
plans. Put a mosquito control program into operation at Bonifay. Com-
pleted plans for a sanitary landfill program to begin early in 1963.
Developed an outstanding school health program in one of the schools
which it is hoped will serve as a model for other schools in the county.
This program will be under direction of the school health coordinator
in cooperation with the CHD staff. Projected as a five-year study, cor-
relation of student health and scholastic achievement will be one goal
of the program.
Lake-Expanded the sanitary landfill program in the county and
in cooperation with three townships purchased 140 acres of land and
a new bulldozer for this program. It is felt that the development of
a countywide garbage disposal program has contributed materially to







32 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


the elimination of rabies in dogs by removal of "feeding areas" formerly
provided by open dumps. The CHD has concentrated efforts on the
civil defense program and has done much to stimulate private construc-
tion of fallout shelters. Some 50-plus shelters have been built with the
largest ones accommodating more than 100 people. Conducted a school
survey on smoking habits of 500 high school students. Conclusions
are that more education needs to be done with those under 15 years
of age. Parents' smoking habits are closely correlated with those of
their children-if neither parent smokes there is one chance in 11 that
the child will smoke by the senior year; if one parent smokes the
chances appear to be one in four; but if both parents smoke the chances
increase to one in three. No definite correlation could be established
as to cause and effect of smoking and poor grades. Every school in the
county received at least one lecture on the harm of "Fiddling with the
Filthy Fags."
Lee-Moved into new quarters in the Courthouse Annex. Ex-
panded tuberculosis casefinding program with the addition of an X-
ray machine. In cooperation with the Lee-Hendry County Medical
Society administered Types I and II Sabin Polio Vaccine in the com-
munity. Conducted an extensive survey of the waters of the county so
that with few exceptions all waters are now approved for shellfish and
other controlled fishing.
Madison-Inaugurated a combination nursing service during the
year. Conducted a small community screening survey for diabetes,
anemia and hypertension.
Manatee-Began a community home nursing program in coopera-
tion with the Manatee County Medical Society in March. Since that
time the program has shown rapid growth and progress. Additional
staff nurses and a director of nursing service have been added to the
staff.
Marion-A team from USPHS assisted the staff in making tests
on ADC recipients for uterine cancer. Of 467 patients tested, 69 had
abnormal findings. The nursing staff spent much time on this project
with a number of discussion meetings being held to prepare patients
for the tests. A number of home visits were required to insure proper
medical follow-up for those with abnormal tests. A dental clinic was
begun with the appointment of a dental preceptor. Over 1000 indi-
gent children have received dental inspections with 121 completed
treatments. Late in the year services of a physical therapist for one day
a week were secured. Much time was spent in laying plans for the home
nursing program expected to begin in 1963. The town of Reddick pro-
vided new health clinic quarters and Dunnellon began remodeling a
building for a clinic there. The sanitation staff was busy with sub-
division inspections with installation of two new community water
systems and extension of city lines to three new subdivisions. Belleview
and Dunnellon expanded their water systems and began work on sew-







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 33

age treatment plants. The county commission appropriated funds to
begin an arthropod control program. Additional equipment was ob-
tained to expand and improve landfill operations. Under supervision
of the CHD the county's first animal pound was constructed and began
operation. The number of cases of rabies in wildlife increased and a
study in cooperation with the USPHS and SBH was conducted. A
number of "growth study committees" were organized to study the
problems of community growth in suburban areas. Construction was
begun on the new health department headquarters in Ocala.
Monroe-A large amount of time and attention was devoted to
sewage disposal which constitutes a significant and unique problem
in the Keys due to the geology of this area. The SBH is cooperating
in conducting a survey in the Keys to determine the amount of pollu-
tion of contiguous waters. Much interest has been shown by citizens
and community leaders so that progress should be made in this program
in the near future. The Hansen's Disease (leprosy) register still shows
some 17 known cases of this disease in the county. All are under treat-
ment. The tuberculosis casefinding program has been stepped up by
substituting tuberculin skin tests for routine chest X-rays.
Nassau-A community committee with representatives from the
county medical society, local hospital trustees, welfare department,
county commission and health department was organized to study the
problem of providing adequate funds for hospitalization of the indigent
and to establish criteria for "medical indigency." As a result patients
are being more carefully screened and the limited funds available are
being used to better advantage. Land was secured and plans made for
an auxiliary health center at Yulee. A countywide X-ray program was
conducted in August. A survey of local waters for oyster gathering was
conducted.
Palm Beach-A new rehabilitation program was organized under a
plan developed by Dr. Howard Rusk. This program has as its goal the
rehabilitation of disabled persons in the county home and hospital,
those in private nursing homes, and patients seen through the bedside
nursing program. In addition to a well-trained physician, the staff
consists of a physical therapist and an occupational therapist. A reha-
bilitation center has been established at the county hospital. The pro-
gram is being used to train interns, nurses and other students. A
countywide committee representing over 25 agencies interested in re-
habilitation is being organized to coordinate services. The coordinated
administration of health, welfare and indigent medical care services
in this county continues to provide an opportunity for program devel-
opment which would not be possible without this coordination. Ex-
amples are the rehabilitation program, improvement in mental health
services and reorganization of the total indigent medical care program
in the county. A psychiatric clinic for adults was organized in 1962.
The entire mental health program is being reviewed and reorganized
to meet changing needs for services. A medical plan for the county







34 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


home and hospital was submitted to the Board of County Commission-
ers projected to the year 1980. Based on this, a construction program
and plans for a 500-bed facility have been prepared. The first phase
of construction will begin in 1963. In cooperation with local physi-
cians, a newborn immunization program was begun. Parents of new-
born infants are contacted and follow-up is made to get these infants
under medical care and immunized. The Migrant Project continued
with expansion of medical care carried out through mobile clinics taken
to the farms. The CHD in cooperation with the SBH has developed a
new record system to improve the evaluation of services. Conducted a
study of accidents among health department personnel. Participated in
evaluation of the Pfizer Trivalent Oral Polio Vaccine among 100 pre-
viously unimmunized children with studies to determine antibody levels
and rectal swabs for viral studies. Cooperated with a local hospital in
organizing an outpatient department serving patients admitted under
the Hospital Service for the Indigent program. Daily clinics are held
and patients are followed for three months after discharge from the
hospital. A public health nurse coordinates inpatient and outpatient
services, including use of home nursing and ancillary services.
Pinellas-Experienced a serious outbreak of viral encephalitis
during the Fall. An extensive mosquito control program was planned
for the Spring of 1963 for the purpose of lessening the probability of
another outbreak. In October began a Psychiatric Emergency Service
to prevent jailing of mentally disturbed patients. Cooperated with the
USPHS in establishing a study of accidents among the aged. Con-
ducted a series of nine symposia to interpret the findings of the
Gerontology Research Project. The symposia covered the health prob-
lems of the chronically ill and aged and utilized the services of state
and national speakers-focusing on solutions to problems of the aged
through community health programming. Began a study in July on the
extra-hospital needs in a retirement area. Six public health nurse inter-
viewers were trained and some 850 of an anticipated 2850 interviews
were completed. Early findings indicate that greatest needs are in
nutrition, dental care and preventive health services. A great deal of
chronic illness has been discovered-most of which is being handled
adequately by the family. A Health Careers Futurama was held in
January for 3500 students, teachers, guidance counselors and parents.
The largest water supply expansion program in the history of the
county was completed in 1962. The sanitary sewerage program con-
tinued with much success-with some 75 per cent of the population
being served by sanitary sewers.
Putnam-Assisted the county medical society and local chapter
of the National Foundation in a Sabin Polio Vaccine feeding program.
All three types were used. Public response was excellent for the first
two feedings but lagged on the third one. A unique feature was use
of voting polls as feeding stations. Plans for a new headquarters build-
ing are almost complete. Approval for a community home nursing pro-







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 35

gram was secured from the county commissioners and medical society
-which program began in April. This program is showing satisfactory
progress to date. Supervision of landfill operations was delegated to the
health department as part of its arthropod control program. Additional
equipment has been secured and by the end of the year nine landfills
were in operation.
St. Lucie-Construction was begun on the new $150,000 health
center. Completion is expected early in 1963.
Santa Rosa-Initiated a dental health program with appointment
of a dental preceptor. During 1962 some 744 school children received
dental inspections and 649 patients received dental care. Programs on
nutrition and dental care were conducted in the schools. Six classes
in medical self-help were conducted. Numerous meetings were held to
stimulate completion of a nursing home for the county. The staff gave
lectures in the high schools on preparation for marriage. A tuberculin
testing program was begun using the Sterneedle technique. Over 4700
tests were completed last school year. All positive tests were rechecked
with the Mantoux test. A report of the two-year study will be published
upon its completion. The CHD took over operation of the arthropod
control program in the county.
Sarasota-Cooperated with the county medical society in con-
ducting a Sabin Polio Program. Types I and II were given in 1962
with Type III scheduled for March 1963. Some 108,260 doses of
Type I and II vaccine were given. The Tumor Clinic was moved into
the hospital to coordinate activities with the maternity clinic. This has
greatly facilitated clinic operation. The mental health program con-
tinued to grow and provided social, economic and environmental in-
formation to the courts, state hospitals, local doctors and CHD staff.
As a specialized aspect of this program 129 alcoholic patients were
referred to the staff. Forty-one of these patients were treated at the
Florida Alcoholic Rehabilitation Center and 88 in the community.
Visiting Nurse Association-Public Health Nursing Program continued
its growth during 1962. A nurse was employed to coordinate hospital
activities with those of the health department in this field. Better
referrals and a closer working relationship with the hospital have
resulted. The CHD served as a training center to give public health
nurses training in home nursing care techniques. The CHD also con-
tinued to provide "observation" experience to nursing students from
the Manatee Junior College and Sarasota Vocational (Practical Nurses)
School. In the field of sanitation the following progress was noted:
The city of Sarasota passed a local ordinance requiring Department of
Agriculture inspection of all meat sold in the city. Local bay areas
were surveyed and approved for commercial shellfishing. A countywide
ordinance was passed requiring licensing and bonding of all county
well-diggers and provides for control and conservation of underground
water supplies. Conducted a "management institute" for restaurant
managers and owners.







36 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

Seminole-Established a new well-child clinic in cooperation
with local pediatricians. Conducted an extensive intestinal parasite
screening of colored school children. Distributed 549 Dreypacks for
detection of diabetes during Diabetes Detection Week. Nine previously
unknown cases of diabetes were discovered and confirmed by blood
sugars. Sanford began construction of new sewage treatment plant.
County entered into an arthropod control program in cooperation with
the SBH. Three sanitary landfills are being operated giving the county
a good garbage disposal program. Surveys and maps were begun look-
ing toward an extensive drainage and larvaciding program for mosquito
control in 1963-64. Considerable progress was made in control and
expansion of water and sewage facilities. A franchise agreement be-
tween the county government and utility companies has been under
study this year. As a result improvement in services provided by these
companies has resulted.
Volusia-Conducted a comprehensive foodhandlers school with
some 275 foodhandlers from schools, nursing homes, hospitals and
restaurants attending. Carried out a water pollution survey with ap-
proval of shellfish gathering in certain areas. Participated in cancer
detection program for ADC recipients. Of 592 patients examined, 24
had some type of pathology requiring follow-up which is now in prog-
ress. Conducted a survey among all retarded children in public schools
to detect phenylketonuria. Trained six public health nurses from other
counties in the home nursing care program. Supplied information
about this program to a number of university students. Home nursing
services increased significantly during the year. Two nurses were added
to the staff.
Walton-Washington-Particular attention was given to the de-
velopment of a definitive civil defense program-with assignment of
duties and responsibilities to all staff members.







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 37

DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING
RUTH METTINGER, R.N.
Director
The administrative structure of this division remains unchanged,
consisting of a director, five generalized consultants, one nurse-mid-
wife consultant and two clerical assistants. One of the consultants acts
as assistant director and guides the nursing in-service education pro-
gram. The nurse-midwife is responsible for the training and super-
vision of midwives.
The purpose of the division is to insure that a high quality of
public health nursing service is offered by each county health depart-
ment (CHD). In attempting to achieve this purpose, the consultants'
duties are: to participate in planning conferences with bureau and di-
vision directors; to interpret to local personnel the policies of the State
Board of Health and new trends in nursing programs; to offer consulta-
tion in specific and general technical aspects of public health nursing,
including interpersonal relations; to participate in the planning and
implementation of local, district and statewide in-service training pro-
grams, community health activities and workshops; and to promote
continuing education and in-service training for nurses.
All aspects of the public health nursing program received atten-
tion during 1962, but certain activities received particular emphasis.

NURSING CARE OF THE SICK AT HOME
An increase in federal funds for the improvement of programs
for the chronically ill and aged made possible an acceleration of the
plan for extending to rural areas nursing care of the sick at home. At
the beginning of 1962 there were 12 areas in which this service was
combined with other public health nursing activities; as the year ended
there were 29 areas with expanded services, an increase of almost
150 per cent. A major portion of the consultants' time was spent in
interpreting this program to CHDs and in helping to organize citizens'
advisory committees to help promote and implement the programs.

ORIENTATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES
As the expansion of the home nursing care program accelerated,
there was a need for refresher courses in bedside nursing techniques
for public health nurses, and for advanced and special courses in re-
habilitation nursing. Thirty-two public health nurses from health units
where the combined service was in operation or in the planning stage
spent two weeks in Clay, Sarasota or Volusia County for orientation
in nursing care of the sick at home.
Fifteen participated in a two-weeks' short course on home care
of the sick and aged offered by the University of Florida. Thirty-one







38 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

public health nurses were sent to Rusk Institute, Sister Kenny Insti-
tute, New York Medical Center and/or the University of Miami for
short courses in rehabilitation.
Six nurses went to the University of North Carolina for short
courses in special fields, such as supervision, chronic diseases, etc.
A national conference on home care of the sick and aged was
attended by 12 public health nurses from Florida, including one of
the nurse consultants who presented a paper.
In-service study groups continue to meet regularly as in the past.
Junior colleges were encouraged to establish programs leading to
the associate degree in nursing. Six such programs were in operation
during 1962, and four more will be initiated next year.
REVISION OF NURSING RECORDS AND FILING SYSTEMS
In cooperation with the clerical consultants, the nursing consult-
ants helped CHD personnel to install the recently approved central filing
system and revise nursing records.
WORKSHOPS AND CONFERENCES
The division continued to conduct workshops and conferences on
human relations and mental health in public health nursing, in coop-
eration with the Bureau of Mental Health.
A committee of nurses from CHDs and the Division of Public
Health Nursing prepared a "Guide for Public Health Nurses Working
With Families Who Have Emotional Problems," which was distributed
and reviewed with public health nurses throughout the state.
TRAINING, LICENSING AND SUPERVISION OF MIDWIVES
The nurse-midwife consultant made 46 visits to counties to con-
duct or assist in the planning of educational programs for midwives.
About 150 midwives attended. Two hundred and three midwives were
licensed in 1962, a decrease of 14 from the preceding year. Midwives
in rural areas are being eliminated where local physicians and hospitals
are able to care for indigent prenatals.
OTHER ACTIVITIES
Aid was given to the Division of Hospitals and Nursing Homes
in the grading of nursing homes, and consultation was offered to CHD
nurses and sanitarians regarding local nursing home problems.
One of the consultants participated on a committee with members
of the Florida League for Nursing and Florida Tuberculosis and Health
Association in the organization and activities of a committee on nurs-
ing in tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases and helped plan
future conferences on this subject.







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 39

In carrying out their assignments the consultants made a total
of 262 visits to counties during the year, emphasizing the listed activi-
ties and continuing to give attention to all phases of public health
nursing.

DIVISION OF SANITATION
A. W. MORRISON, JR., R.S.
Director
The activities of this division continue to focus on the broad
objectives of development and improvement of local environmental
health programs designed to effectively serve the needs of each com-
munity in the state. To this end, the staff consisting of: the director,
four sanitation consultants and two clerical personnel plus the half-
time services of a training consultant, directed major emphasis toward
providing high quality consultation services and other supporting as-
sistance for the county health departments (CHDs). Sanitarian train-
ing and recruitment activities were expanded and specific sanitation
program functions continued to show a steady upward rise during the
year.
Considerable time was devoted to preparation of recommended
revisions of 11 chapters of the State Sanitary Code in accordance with
provisions of the 1961 Administrative Procedure Act. These chapters
along with other revised regulations were adopted by the State Board
of Health on June 24, 1962. Extensive revision of sanitation forms
was completed by the end of the year and a number of new forms will
be available for distribution to the CHDs in early 1963.

CONSULTANT SERVICE
Consultation services were provided for all of the CHDs through-
out the year. Staff members made 349 field visits to assist county
health officers and sanitarians in all areas of environmental health.
Each county was visited at least once with most counties receiving
multiple visits for periods ranging from a few hours to several days.
Studies of the complete environmental sanitation programs were
conducted in four counties during the year. In each case, detailed
analysis of activities and accomplishments led to specific recommenda-
tions for increasing program effectiveness. A number of changes were
initiated prior to completion of the respective final survey reports and
the counties involved have continued to improve their environmental
sanitation programs by systematic implementation of recommended
methods and procedures.
Staff consultants provided a wide range of assistance to CHDs in
such diversified functions as: investigation of food-borne illnesses,
preparation of local ordinances, setting-up pollution surveys, planning







40 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

local training programs, providing sanitation services for Seminole In-
dians and formulating procedures for submission of specimens for viral
studies during an encephalitis outbreak. Consultants also conducted
essential county sanitation activities on several occasions during the
year in cases where local sanitarians were ill or positions otherwise
unmanned for extended periods.

TRAINING
Sanitarian in-service training activities were expanded to include
two basic 12-week general sanitation courses and three topical short
courses, one of which was offered at two locations. The 12-week
four weeks of internship in selected CHDs. Thirteen sanitarians,
one each from Alachua, Columbia, Dade, Duval, Escambia, Hills-
borough, Monroe, Orange, Pinellas and four from Broward, success-
fully completed this program in 1962. The topical courses were
presented as follows: a five-day course in Jacksonville on adminis-
tration of local sanitation programs which was attended by 25
sanitarians from 22 counties, a five-day course in St. Petersburg
on food processing sanitation which was attended by 24 sanitarians
from 15 counties and a two-day course held in both Winter Haven
and Tallahassee on swimming pool sanitation which was attended by
38 sanitarians from 19 counties. An analysis of topical training activi-
ties for the eight-month period extending from October 1961 through
May 1962 revealed that 136 sanitarians completed the short courses.
Although several attended two or more courses during this period, 48
counties (72 per cent) were represented at least once. Future in-
service training plans include continuation of the basic 12-week gen-
eral courses and short courses on timely topics as needed.
Division personnel conducted a three-day sanitation course for
members and inspectors of the Florida Barbers' Sanitary Commission,
a 12-lesson medical self-help course for SBH employees, a two-day
food sanitation and epidemiology course for nurses at Florida State
University and assisted other bureaus and divisions, CHDs, sanitarian
associations and other groups in planning and conducting a variety
of educational activities throughout the year.
Twelve CHDs: Alachua, Dade, Escambia, Hillsborough, Manatee,
Orange, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, St. Lucie, Sarasota, Volusia, often as-
sisted by staff consultants, reported foodhandler training activities in
1962. The combined total of 3596 foodhandlers trained represented
a modest increase of 437 over last year's figure.

RECRUITMENT
Recruitment activities were again directed toward obtaining quali-
fied personnel with sufficient science background and other necessary
aptitudes to effectively cope with the ever increasing complexity of
environmental health problems in the counties of the state. In coopera-







SERVICES 41


tion with the Florida Merit System, several major recruitment drives
were conducted in critical areas and oral board examinations were
instituted to better screen applicants for entry-level sanitarian posi-
tions. Recruitment efforts continue to become less productive, how-
ever, as salary schedules are set too low to attract a sufficient number
of badly needed young college graduates into this field. A study of the
problem by the division has led to a recommendation for changes in
minimum training requirements and salary levels.

PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
This division is responsible in whole or in part for some 16
specific sanitation programs; issues required SBH licenses or permits
for trailer parks, food processing plants, camps, bottled water plants
and rendering plants. Another program involves recommendations from
the division to U. S. Public Health Service (USPHS) for required
federal certification. Field activities associated with each of these pro-
grams are carried out by CHD sanitarians. Staff consultants provide
technical assistance to the counties in all program areas.

TRAILER PARKS
Florida's 2137 permitted trailer parks (excluding 622 tourist
courts formerly reported in this program) provided 89,882 trailer
coach spaces at the close of 1962. This represents a net increase of
115 parks and 4069 additional spaces for the year. The division
processed 331 permit transactions involving new parks, expansions,
changes of ownership and park closures in 1962. County sanitarians
made 7582 visits to trailer parks in the interest of environmental
health during the year.

FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS
The number and variety of food processing plants continues to
show a significant rise each year. Operating permits were issued to 570
plants in 38 counties in 1962. This represents an increase of 133
plants (30 per cent) over last year's figure. County sanitarians made
4170 visits to insure that food processing plants were operated under
sanitary conditions throughout the year.

CAMPS
A total of 300 camps consisting of 260 migrant labor camps
with space available for 34,770 occupants and 40 recreational camps
providing facilities for 4706 persons were licensed in 1962. This
represents an increase of 65 camps (28 per cent) over the 1961
figure. County sanitarians continued to exercise close surveillance over
all camps during periods of occupancy in order to maintain high-level
environmental conditions. This activity necessitated 5366 fields visits
in 1962.


LOCAL


HEALTH







42 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

BOTTLED WATER PLANTS
The number of bottled water plants remained static with 29
plants in 17 counties and four out-of-state shippers being permitted
in 1962. One new plant was constructed (replacing an older one)
and improvements were effected in other plants. Routine observations
and continuous sampling of bottled waters for laboratory analysis were
maintained to insure a high quality product. County sanitarians made
318 visits to accomplish this purpose.

RENDERING PLANTS
This minor activity covers only 14 plants, including a single
new one, which were permitted in 1962. County sanitarians exercise
careful control over these operations in order to minimize odor, waste
and other nuisance problems.

COMMON CARRIER FACILITIES
The division cooperates with USPHS in the Interstate Carrier
Certification Program which covers water and food placed aboard
common carriers and the handling of liquid and solid wastes from
such carriers. Complete evaluations of these facilities are made at least
twice each year by the CHDs and reports are submitted to the division.
These reports serve as a basis for semi-annual recommendations to
USPHS. The 112 facilities recommended for approved status in 1962
included: 27 airline catering and watering points, 10 airline servicing
areas, seven railroad commissaries and catering points, 20 railroad
watering points and 48 vessel watering points.

FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS
All counties continued major food sanitation activity directed
toward the prevention of food-borne diseases with increasing emphasis
being given to proper handling, preparation and storage of potentially
hazardous foods. The counties recorded a total of 30,391 food estab-
lishments of all types (an increase of 3334 over the previous year)
and sanitarians made 156,113 visits to these establishments in 1962.











LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 43


TABLE 6

'PERMITTED ESTABLISHMENTS AND FACILITIES-1962


Food Bottled
County Trailer Processing Water Rendering
Parks Plants Camps Plants Plants


Alachua- 34
Bakery _.. 3
Bay---,-- 58
Bra ... .. 5...
Bradford.
Brevard ........... ... 89
Broward.- 119
Calhoun ......... 1
Charlotte.__..... 16
Citrus__ ............... ..
Clay ......... 12
Coler ........... 22
Columbia.-.. ............ ...... 3
Dade ___.......... 95
DeSoto ....... ........... ..... ..
Dixi e--..-..--- 5
DuvaL--. - 47
Escambia -------- 9494
Flagler -.. .... .. 3
Franklin ....... ... 4
Gadsden .. ..............-... 7
Gilchrisths.. L.... _


Glades. ........ 1.. .. .
Gulf_ ..._..............
Hamilton-__.... ___..
Hardeed--- .
Hendry__..........
Herando___._-.....
Highlands..-------............_-
Hillsborough...................
Holmes ..............
Indian River............
ackson-- .........
efferson.-----
fayette ........
Lake_-_...... _
Lee-- .. ...........
Leon__ .-.-...-.....
Levy .....--....-......... ..
Liberty_......
Madison.............--..
Manatee_..........
Marion_ ---...-----
Martin----- .
Monroe_...........
Nassau-.- ........-
Okaloosa-...--..-...._....
Okeechobee......-............-
Orange-----.............
Osceola---..............
Palm Beach_-...-. .
Pasco-- __
Pinellas_
Polk_ ......
Putnam --.._a..
St. Johns-...--........
St. Lucie ..._......... --.........
Santa Rosa_.._.... ..
Sarasota_ .............
Seminole_---l.. .
Sumter---..... _.. .
Suwannee_ ..--_--__
Taylor-.__........
Union_..__..____..
Volusia-_-..........-..
Wakulla.............
Walton.__.______.-
Washington_ .
Out-of-State.___.__


5
5
3
1
5
2
8
173
17
6
1
29
68
. 32
7
1
76
32
28
60
8
43
15
117
12
104
48
269
96
16
10
22
19
77
4
7
3
6


19


3
25
3

..............--- --- .
1
1
88
5
9
31
1

1





55

4
-- ----------












2
10
3
2

29
2
4

1

2
19
4
75
42
1
3
9
45
10


4---- I-~i~


1


1

5


2

1







2

1
_- --

-- -- -

---





--- -

--- -


2






1

53
1


1
4



5

2
5
2
20

2

7

2


10
1

1


7
51
12
6
21
4
3
2


2
1


9 3

1 -_____ ____
----- 4 ..- ---
4


Totals. 2137* 570 300 33 14

*622 tourist courts without trailer coach spaces deleted from list *


1



1





4

1










1
1



1



2
1



1
1
3
1
4


I1
- --- -



- -

- -





- -











3- -- .
4. --- -

-- -


I ____________







44 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

OTHER PROGRAMS
The CHDs functioned in a variety of additional environmental
health activities involving: housing, school health, water, liquid and
solid waste disposal, nuisance control, swimming pools, rabies control,
hospitals and nursing homes, child-care centers, recreational areas and
other facilities. It is evident that such activity will increase as Florida's
population continues to spiral upward.


DIVISION OF NUTRITION
MARY BRICE DEAVER, M.S.
Director
It is the primary responsibility of this division to work toward
the continued improvement of the nutritional status of the people of
Florida. Since good nutrition is basic to good health and to the control
and prevention of many diseases, it is important to include a sound
nutrition program in the overall health program of each county.
During the year there were several staff changes: one regional
nutritionist resigned in the late spring and was replaced in September;
one county health department (CHD) nutritionist resigned and that
position has not been filled as yet; one CHD created a new position
for a nutrition consultant; a special demonstration project was estab-
lished to explore the value of a "shared nutritionist" for several rural
counties but it has been impossible to fill the position; one CHD nutri-
tionist returned to her position from a year's educational leave to obtain
a master's in public health.
The pattern of work established previously was continued and
expanded so that many counties in each region are now receiving
regularly scheduled nutrition services. The program areas may be
divided as follows: health department services; community activities;
work with other organizations and agencies; services to institutions;
training and research responsibilities. Increased work in the area of
research which it had been hoped could start this year had to be
postponed because of lack of qualified personnel.
In services to county health departments, priority was placed on
in-service education. During the year 113 group conferences and 260
individual conferences were held. The nutritionists had major respon-
sibility for these and participated in 95 additional meetings with CHD
personnel.
Because of increased interest in home care programs and in the
use of nutrition in a curative as well as preventive role, numerous
requests have been received this year for the latest nutrition informa-
tion in relation to rehabilitation, cardiac conditions, weight control,
metabolic disturbances, diabetes and other chronic illnesses. There







SERVICES 45


have been many classes and meetings held on these topics with a total
attendance of over 1500.
In maternal and child health, there has been considerable interest
in developing materials which may be used at a very low educational
level. Some simple, very short demonstrations have been used quite
effectively with small groups, along with a single illustrated sheet for
the patient to take home. Work has been done cooperatively with the
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health in following up phenylketonuria
(PKU) patients. This involves instruction for parents of the children
with PKU as well as working with professional personnel. In cooper-
ation with the Crippled Children's Commission, diet referrals from
the regional clinics are followed by the nutrition consultant in the
area. Sixty-three group conferences as well as numerous individual
ones were held in other services to prenatals and children.
During the first year of the revised migrant project in Palm
Beach County, the nutrition consultant has placed priority on plan-
ning and preparing for the nutrition component of the project. Special
attention has been focused on the growth patterns of the migrant chil-
dren in relation to diet. Follow-up has been done on the previous work
with families and schools in the Belle Glade area as well as extending
the nutrition services available to other migrant groups.
In providing services to the community, many talks, demonstra-
tions and classes have been held for community organizations and
clubs. A variety of topics have been covered including food budgeting,
weight control, food additives, food fads, foods for civil defense and
family food planning. Groups requesting such meetings were civic
clubs, home demonstration groups, PTA groups and other local organi-
zations.
In regard to services to other organizations and agencies, much
work has been done cooperatively with such agencies as agricultural
extension, school food service and the schools themselves working to-
ward the improvement of teenage nutrition. Participation by some
counties in the National Youth Power Conference projects has spurred
considerable interest among the high school students and has led to
increased cooperative planning among the county agencies concerned.
In several counties such efforts have led to the formation of county
nutrition councils or committees and offer an excellent beginning for
cooperative efforts on other nutrition problems. In other counties em-
phasis has been placed on practical nutrition teaching in the elemen-
tary grades in an effort to improve food habits of the children. Since
many CHDs devote a high percentage of time to school health, service
to schools continues to be one of the most frequent requests for nutri-
tion consultation. During the year, 103 group conferences and 142 in-
dividual conferences were held with school personnel. Sixteen dietary
surveys in schools were completed, the information being used largely
for program planning in nutrition education. Nutrition consultants also
took an active part in county land regional school lunch workshops.


LOCAL


HEALTH







REPORT, 1962


The Florida Heart Association and many local affiliates have re-
quested and received assistance in planning and conducting classes
for heart patients and their families. Individual diet counseling has
also been given at the request of the CHDs and private physicians. Two
nutritionists were speakers at the state meetings of the Florida Heart
Association.
Work was completed on cost recommendations for low-income
diets and for therapeutic diets in cooperation with state welfare per-
sonnel. An annual state price index for food was also revised as a
reference for state and county personnel in computing diet costs.
Assistance has been provided in several counties in cooperation
with county and state welfare personnel in regard to the expanded
family surplus commodity program. Demonstrations in the use of the
commodity foods, menu plans, recipes and some direct family con-
sultation have resulted in better acceptance and use of the foods. As
yet, there are only a limited number of counties in the state participat-
ing in this program.
Considerable time was spent in cooperation with other agencies
in program planning and assisting with the local arrangements for the
Home Economics Section of the Southern Agricultural Workers' Asso-
ciation which met in Florida in 1962. The nutrition staff has actively
participated in many national meetings in Florida this year. These
included the American Dietetic Association, the American Home Eco-
nomics Association, the Institute of Food Technologists and the Ameri-
can Public Health Association.
In service to institutions, the dietary consultation program for
nursing homes has progressed considerably. Several different methods
of dietary consultation were used in working with nursing home per-
sonnel. Visits were made by the dietary consultant to 40 nursing homes
for periods varying from one-half to several days. A nutrition workshop
was conducted in one county for six half-day sessions. A pilot food cost
study was conducted to provide pertinent information on food purchas-
ing as related to menu planning, size of home, proportion of personnel
to patients and physical facilities. A "Diet Guide and Menu Planner"
was prepared and distributed to many homes to assist in preplanning
of menus to provide an adequate diet. Consultation was also given to
several small hospitals and to the state institutions for the mentally
retarded. Work has been started on a revision of the "Food Service
Manual for Nursing Homes" which was first prepared by the Division
of Nutrition in 1958.
In the area of training, field experience was provided to two
graduate nutrition students from the University of California School
of Public Health and one graduate student from the University of
Michigan School of Public Health. A short period of field observation
was also provided for a student from Thailand at the request of the
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.


46 ANNUAL







SERVICES 47


Classes haire been taught and consultation provided to schools of
nursing, to practical nursing programs, to health education students
and to undergraduates in food and nutrition courses.
Considerable attention has been focused on methods and pro-
cedures of program evaluation this year. A trial evaluation procedure
involving a new method of reporting information in regard to services
performed has been worked out and will be tested during the coming
year.
Recruitment has been a major problem and little success has been
achieved in filling existing vacancies or new positions. It is felt that
definite action in regard to salary ranges and job specifications is
necessary to alleviate this situation. Because of such difficul-
ties, it has been necessary to curtail some activities and postpone plans
in regard to a rural nutrition demonstration program.
In planning for the future, it is becoming more apparent that
efforts must be increased to provide basic nutrition information in the
student training of future doctors, nurses and other allied professional
personnel. More attention will be paid to the older population group.
However, the preventive aspects of nutrition will be emphasized as
well, beginning with the early years of life and with special attention
to the teen years.


LOCAL


HEALTH







48 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

TABLE 7

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL

IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED

a a a *

COUNTY No S



_1 2-3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Total 1962-.. 5409 11082 39219 90704 147646 91942 230474 312104 77444 51 53321


Alachua__
Bakery .
Bay._----
Bradford...--
Brevard...
Broward-...
Calhoun-
Charlotte-...
Citrus-
Claye y
Collier......
Columbia---.
Dade----
DeSoto._---
Dixie.__ __
Duval..---
Escambia-
Flagler--
Franklin...
Gadsden......
Gilchrist---
Glades-
Gulf ---
Hamilton..-
Hardee--....
Hendryg
Hernando-
Highlands-
Hillsborough.
Holmes -
Indian River-
Lackson..--.....
efferson_...
ayette--
Lake__.__..
Leon
Levy --
Liberty....
Madison....
Manatee-.--
Marion---
Martin-__
Monroe--
Nassau
Okaloosa-
Okeechobee-.
Orange-
Osceola---
Palm Beach.
Pasco
Pinellas-a
Polk..---
Putnam----.
St. Johns-
St. Lucie-
Santa Rosa-.
Sarasota-
Seminole...
Sumter--.....
Suwannee.-.
Taylor..--
Union-
Volusia......
Wakulla..-
Walton.---
Washington-.


45'
20
29
18
107
224
9
951
1
23
48
0
59
13
26
15
10
3
37
37
33
28
0
0
4
27
11
3
1222
13
11
80
2
4
20
0
200
9
11
3
174
37
3
40
44
202
3
267
4
239
7
417
213
99
25
1
1
67
48
47
2
8
9
80
11
5
0


61
22
54
21
235
372
9
2335
1
33
277
0
1015
29
47
23
22
3
46
37
41
34
0
0
9
56
18
6
1872
27
23
101
3
4
53
0
241
14
12
5
211
111
3
57
53
224
4
575
15
838
24
681
429
107
31
4
2
97
132
86
5
11
30
164
20
7'
0


1926
997
167
112
559
375
165
239
43
95
501
1384
349
238
163
263
1354
395
199
5756
422
44
619
1002
217
167
144
111
1708
984
209
399
323
84
155
317
416
438
354
495
235
1006
434
9
756
294
39
534
174
458
967
275
1213
707
267
10
517
88
3748
1122
533
320
158
216
194
442
615


2004
436
"1645
216
1386
3182
306
333
136
238
290
619
23245
292
102
1294
6854
149
520
1816
311
81
546
118
182
447
154
130
5551
503
409
1319
861
136
223
1643
3127
410
258
872
349
2002
601
973
1206
1425
80
3343
205
4034
347
2159
3696
1044
1406
98
752
357
1180
726
242
241
107
475
70
495
747


2605
580
1581
627
3038
6420
393
802
443
369
2107
5499
19070
484
476
4123
14333
339
381
2980
303
400
909
413
528
935
443
547
9444
943
789
1833
652
78
765
1952
1598
1124
346
1147
585
2773
944
1448
1449
3130
221
8068
841
9296
869
4953
7203
1348
2792
260
1381
1096
1474
655
721
956
227
690
213
920
1334


2114
337
1574
310
1657
3631
258
315
189
248
738
4274
16705
308
301
3030
10790
148
381
975
208
74
687
278
298
295
120
319
5855
457
379
1071
517
54
402
840
1217
279
145
401
264
1482
335
505
737
2146
97
3238
576
4116
754
3903
4093
365
447
227
1067
676
1158
485
447
503
131
600
210
589
612


3956
120
3898
747
3286
7120
720
857
494
535
2184
6069
50720
553
577
5754
32412
442
1193
5058
733
420
1261
486
661
941
783
579
10254
1143
1133
3836
1156
150
775
3375
2509
1215
828
1781
979
3901
1083
1625
2460
4323
255
9344
841
10510
890
5530
8887
1660
2853
492
1807
1205
2271
666
1367
1196
272
723
610
1084
1842


5376
1526
4690
1396
3698
8401
1505
588
1016
828
1796
5003
42942
1150
824
8954
32749
688
1485
7811
685
497
1373
653
919
905
1242
811
5830
1626
1101
5183
1693
145
1010
5018
3911
2086
790
1933
48947
4420
674
1984
4682
4651
347
13636
1528
12978
3154
8257
12869
1112
4813
339
2141
1293
3650
921
1781
2174
380
1808
396
1403
1929


982
859
7699
42
500
224
1298
122
160
6
264
3318
829
38
481
637
14055
14
424
3142
424
381
937
214
80
561
2
37
492
626
670
1716
1255
52
.12
1695
1822
755
439
578
96
3215
944
860
3475
2893
110
7134
497
1232
25
260
685
19
1112
51
1299
38
2071
377
724
344
312
59
479
540
751


0
99
0
172
0
0
0
0
0
346
0
0
0
0
0
0
5628
0
0
0
0
62
0
181
0
85
0
0
33474
0
0
0
423
0
0
0
0
0
0
126
3005
0
0
0
315
0
0
1890
0
0
0
38
7231
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
156
0
0
0
0
90








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 49

TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


S .9
COUNTY i



1 2 3 4 5 6
TOTAL 1962 43201 14398 6943 13275 35547 80515
Alachua_- ...... ... 102 46 63 8 29 155
Baker- ........5... 5 2 2 1 12 14
Bay- a. ........ 170 99 61 80 278 208
Bradford-- -------51 30 30 23 .27 79
Brevard----------- ---. 49 7 37 6 68 76
Broward- 889 573 623 1002 1797 1920
Calhoun-- 18 13 9 7 4 25
Charlotte......---. 4 0 1 0 0 9
Citrus --. .... ..... 22 4 11 11 34 22
Clay....----------.----- 26 7 8 7 24 45
Collier ............ .128 65 75 143 254 173
Columbia-...---- -----..---. .._ .... 162 101 101 60 125 141
Dade------. --------- ... 14931 3248 1642 3539 13517 38137
DeSoto .. ------- -4 0 4 0 0 8
Dixie--.... ---. 12 6 17 3 10 15
DuvaL ---_- 11979 1661 577 1880 4862 14939
Escambia-_ ___ 2720' 2648 183 947 2120 2989
Flagler ...... .. 9 6 11 5 8 34
Franklin__. .. ..4 2 4 0 0 8
Gadsden ............ .99 99 90 37 90 137
Gilchrist..-----.. 2 2 2 3 2 5
Glades ..... 11 7 7 6 6 13
Gulf ...... 8 1 "1 3 8 22
Hamilton ......8 7 0 0 4 9
Hardee-_- 9 1 2 6 9 8
Hendry ------ --74 11 20 25 71 79
Hernando ...-...... 9 7 6 10 16 13
Highlands --- ---..... 52 42 73 104 165 93
HiUsborough--- ---.---.-...- 3477 1284 626 1170 3250 8439
Holmes .---1--- -- 10 1 7 8 1 20
Indian Biver-.. 124 95 102 101 20 142
Jackson -- ...- ..................... 24 22 19 6 9 30
Jefferson -- .............. ... 31 24 10 7 7 46
Lafayette ........... ... 4 3 1 1 3 8
Lake.............. ... 17 10 3 3 16 15
Lee.---------.-.- -. 65 41 54 27 82 66
Leon953 782 12 60 14 1330
Levy 48 18 22 40 23 91
Liberty. ----- -2 2 2 1 0 4
Madison .............27 26 27 9 8 29
Manatee ............ ... .--... .. 259 138 154 120 260 325
Marion ..-...---- ....--------- 1026 359 223 460 1263 1769
Martin-....-.... ....------.. .....--... 91 42 75 90 147 34
Monroe -... -----.. -..........-- ...-....... 124 98 91 82 236 281
Nassau ................................ 23 14 7 1 11 57
Okaloosa ..... .... .. ... 42 4 38 39 35 3 47
Okeechobee--- ...........- 6 1 4 7 22 15
Orange ----------------- ------ 1066 572 292 944 2034 2034
Osceola.---------. .. 29 28 20 57 26 134
Palm Beach -..------ 1098 683 405 747 2137 1665
Pasco ------------------------ 19 16 17 10 4 22
Pinellas----------- ..---------- ..1472 521 238 481 1197 1864
Polk.--- ...---. .------- ---------507 255 115 261 421 658
Putnam ...........-..-- .........------ 115 65 98 43 34 151
St. Johns ...............-............ 213 96 111 82 10 375
St. Lucie-....--.............-.. ........ 69 69 99 94 267 96
Santa Rosa-----.------------.......- 10 5 7 4 4 19
Sarasota-------------.. 135 46 54 174 207 257
Seminole---------------... .... ... 171 104 127 59 147 311
Sumter..----.---------...... --------. 40 40 40 20 16 59
Suwannee ....-----.---------- .... 28 22 12 5 11 32
Taylor ..........-------------- ...... 41 30 29 15 19 44
Union -------------.--------3 1 1 1 0 12
Volusia.......--- .......----- -... 236 120 118 110 83 615
Wakulla ...-...... ...... ........... 8 5 5 11 1 9
Walton ..-- .---.. -- -..23 18 10 11 14 26
Washington_. ------ 8 4 7 2 0 8







50 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL

ADMISSIONS TO SERVICE PERSON D


COUNTY 3


-.4u -- J l
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
TOTAL 1962 2270 718 6236 19809 482053 40804 73573 37183 49403 1850
Alachua .......... 14 10 42 106 9430 377 472 480 175 13
Iaker----- --- 3 0 3 20 944 38 67 43 23 2
ay........ 16 4 95 185 0 482 104 128 314 14
Bradford -. 3 2 29 44 2442 88 48 207 60 3
Brevard .- 24 14 105 588 2 2852 5136 1140 1282 27
Bro ward- 130 39 372 916 47808 190 5268 3649 1361 74
Calhou7 6 20 13 0 58 29 17 124 3
Charlotte -- 7 1 22 90 2768 1202 368 280 207 7
Citru .. 2 2 6 15 0 10 9 23 23 3
Clay ---.. 6 26 12 43 3331 61 65 135 41 2
Colier 12 7 41 113 5532 154 1145 220 227 9
Columbia .--..... 6 5 13 30 683 77 56 84 38 3
Dade ..----- 376 85 967 6826 75155 7648 3533 4498 18796 460
DeSoto .. 2 0 16 28 4545 413 2 147 126 0
Dixie 2 3 4 24 0 23 29 77 45 2
DuaL -.. 135 83 547 401 4773 2469 526 778 1970 238
Escambia -.----. 161 20 314 696 11359 1038 674 3732 337 76
Flagler -----.. 2 0 6 39 1020 81 404 40 201 2
Frankin--... 2 1 13 46 1684 70 33 41 114 6
Gadsden ._-_ 19 1 46 177 9610 85 155 622 172 17
Gilchrist. ----------- 4 3 1 30 366 24 77 57 43 1
Glades- .. 1 0 3 14 860 244 21 19 17 1
Gulf .---- ..._ 8 1 19 91 2456 461 73 111 140 8
Hamilton .............. 3 3 7 24 1065 39 27 19 76 6
ardee....... .. 8 12 10 37 0 485 1913 89 81 3
Hendry.-----.---.- 5 0 13 41 2158 161 247 115 96 1
Hernando-____. 4 0 15 4 0 25 13 40 29 4
Highlands- .- 9 11 24 102 5219 255 222 191 174 8
Hisborough.-.- .- 415 77 881 3940 77431 1569 7765 3977 5196 192
Holmes ----- 4 0 11 138 3 93 400 110 236 2
Indian River 8 2 8 19 0 148 199 106 71 6
ackson --.-. 23 4 41 214 0 351 649 468 423 10
efferson-____.__ 5 0 7 14 0 0 33 45 19 2
afayette .._ 2 1 6 0 0 5 0 14 10 1
Lake .------------ 24 6 137 245 13044 423 58 922 189 29
Lee.... ... 29 10 50 52 17286 379 4136 206 237 16
Leon_ ----- 46 10 112 360 12392 329 2636 1280 956 22
Levy_ 7 5 28 39 639 41 35 102 33 9
Liberty -..... 5 3 1 28 663 14 35 42 34 4
Madison --- _-._. 8 0 42 95 353 43 133 52 218 10
Manatee ---_ -_- 23 4 91 146 9726 65 130 525 431 14
Marion .-------. 25 2 54 93 0 591 1312 386 63 19
Martin- ....... 14 6 41 93 3752 186 1878 164 121 10
Monroe ................ 11 18 35 85 3595 579 1193 415 310 8
Nassau ........... 1 6 19 49 4279 103 0 163 99 2
Okaloosa ..--- -.-. 3 4 30 47 0 2480 1131 235 150 3
Okeechobee__ 4 1 15 13 1188 36 16 33 43 1
Orange__... 104 36 178 388 15743 1050 436 1317 1906 62
Osceola------- 11 1 27 18 2517 100 59 52 242 4
Palm Beach___ 158 79 240 326 26960 1247 1512 2045 870 150
Pasco... .. 13 6 32 129 1547 156 86 162 306 7
Pinellas- ...... 95 4 423 600 30346 1993 1719 1804 4849 79
Polk.-- --.---- 88 37 488 1036 28971 1247 15755 2587 3155 52
Putnam-__. .-. 20 3 20 74 2289 1013 2768 136 109 19
St. Johns-...-_ 5 6 22 20 0 203 1566 66 56 5
St. Lucie-.--__--- 21 2 55 59 0 201 88 384 296 21
Santa Rosa.----_. 8 1 22 17 0 350 2430 76 91 6
Sarasota -__.. 22 6 63 100 6320 335 134 639 477 12
Seminole..___ 22 6 29 146 0 414 1521 370 680 23
Sumter_ ..._ 10 0 7 50 0 131 559 123 132 8
Suwannee.---- 6 2 33 47 914 117 160 46 139 3
Taylor-. ... 6 1 11 17 3292 15 75 48 21 10
Union- 0 1 5 0 61 28 3 3 32 0
Volusia_._____ ... 34 19 166 241 23929 5495 582 933 628 28
Wakulla--------- 8 1 1 23 920 14 10 49 28 4
Walton 8 2 20 63 683 92 1619 96 136 1
Washington_ .. 3 7 20 42 0 58 36 20 119 3











LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


D. MATERNITY SERVICE E. CHILD HEALTH
---SERVICES
S 8 Admissions To Well
S8 a b a Child Medical Service

cr u It I I in 4 a




1-2 3 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1A,2A IB,2B 1C,2C
TOTAL 1962 14957 44970 23015 47043 60665 1049 1050 23 465 14558 13376 6852


Alachua-....
Baker ..........
Bay .....
Bradford ......
Brevard.__.
Broward---
Calhoun.....
Charlotte..---
Citrus-_-.--.
Clay ....
Columbia-....-
Dade ..........
DeSoto-----
Dixie...---.-
Duva..----
Escambia......
Flagler.......
Franklin...
Gadsde_.....
Gilchrist---.
Glades......-
Gulf.....-......
Hamilton-...
Hardee.-.....
Hendry...----.
Hernando_.
Highlands.....
Hillsborough-
Holmes ........
Indian River..
ackson......
efferson-........
afayette......-
Lake .........-..
Lee ............
Leon__ .........
Levy_----
Liberty--........
Madison.....
Manate........
Marion.-........
Martin........
Monroe ......
Nassau-..........
Okaloosa.....
Okeechobee....
Orange........
Osceola_..._....
Palm Beach-
Pasco_.._...-.
Pinellas......
Polk. --.--
Putnam---.
St. Johns...
St. Lucie-_.
Santa Rosa-
Sarasota-..__
Seminole---.
Sumter ---.
Suwannee-_..
Taylor---=
Union_---
Volusia_--...
Wakulla___.
Walton---
Washington-


265
25
142
70
248
343
3
0
3
88
122
198
2998
0
25
44
794
72
9
761
20
27
18
25
34
36
9
21
2432
1
0
125
40
10
118
219
228
79
14
63
83
0
0
65
4
35
2
991
132
572
2
862
1209
238
52
211
0
106
165
15
33
51
54
297
22
6
21


558
34
142
163
825
389
4
0
.3
246
383
193
9497
0
42
147
2101
237
22
1374
34
78
40
40
128
98
17
31
8547
1
0
163
87
12
273
252
738
200
17
204
377
0
0
106
4
38
2
3124
316
1976
2
4034
3574
687
109
755
0
435
469
16
61
91
150
1238
59
6
21


629
74
183
78
390
588
27
8
3
135
156
236
5229
0
46
219
1082
91
24
1106
19
30
38
189
35
83
10
11
3071
67
47
331
78
16
219
419
435
36
18
163
217
62
0
112
29
114
2
1134
137
916
71
935
1575
296
89
252
2
179
360
117
47
59
83
472
26
17
93


1812
115
448
287
1177
1522
4
15
9
399
134
491
13833
0
62
336
2202
79
38
1013
50
43
126
529
29
254
9
8
5047
7
86
367
145
44
311
542
1323
31
9
389
566
166
0
236
40
97
1
878
122
3008
117
1697
3627
259
131
206
5
540
450
148
43
64
59
1120
37
37
64


1493
42
213
32
1663
1102
87
0
2
281
755
453
9160
0
115
289
2828
243
59
1806
27
62
99
272
158
308
18
13
10817
77
84
876
123
50
320
973
858
20
27
291
641
5
0
215
11
117
5
3239
312
2741
81
5279
6546
726
206
990
3
516
675
135
133
176
151
1482
17
25
142


21
3
18
50
26
16
0
2
0
18
10
95
7008
0
2
104
89
7
5
178
3
0
16
0
2
32
0
4
3044
7
0
27
37
0
1
1
141
0
20
9
103
0
0
18
18
1
0
188
48
130
0
1240
41
13
17
5
4
0
11
1
4
5
29
495
8
0
1


58
4
5
3
16
15
1
3
0
110
16
74
2316
0
1
167
35
11
0
75
6
0
4
0
0
14
0
6
2089
0
0
13
14
0
0
1
78
1
9
10
194
0
0
8
17
0
0
194
0
97
0
496
190
77
20
2
32
0
20
0
5
13
32
296
2
0
2


I I F I I


"""'












52 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

E. CHILD HEALTH SERVICES (Continued)

VISITS MEDICAL ADMISSIONS TO FIELD NURSING OFFICE NURSING
CONFERENCES NURSING SERVICE VISITS VISITS


COUNTy I ,


S 4t .9 4 4 9
3A 3B 3C 5A 5B 5C 6A 6B 6C 7A 7B 7C

TOTAL 1962 29292 24927 9603 27363 33711 63459 55064 61936 64450 37432 36525 138070


Alachua ..-.-
Baker .....
Bay
Bradford .....
Brevard ...---
Browardn....-..
Calhoun- ..
Charlotte...
Citrus ....
Clay .. ..
Collier -------
Columbia --.
Dade------..
DeSoto -....
Dixie .....
Duval .......
Escambia _..
Flagler .. .
Franklin .....
Gadsden...-..
Gilchrist_ ---
Glades -......
Gulf... ....
Hamilton ........
Hardee -...-
Hendry
Hernando .......-
Highlands..
Hillsborough.-
Holmes ........
Indian River..
ackson ......
efferson....
afayette....
Lake.... .
Lee ........
Leon ......
Levy........
Liberty ......
Madison_ .
Manatee-....
Marion ......
Martin ......
Monroe .- .
Nassau ........
Okaloosa.....
Okeechobee.---
Orange......
Osceola ......
Palm Beach_..
Pascon....
Pinellas---
Polk____
Putnam ----.
St. Johns--
St. Lucie-_
Santa Rosa-
Sarasota-
Seminole---
Sumter--
Suwannee-
Taylor--
Union--
Volusia_...........
Wakulla-......
Walton--_
Washington..-


158
2
389
53
133
820
0
0
0
38
84
116
11895
0
4
919
2146
55
4
368
7
20
16
0
9
56
0
12
4665
3
0
101
91
0
28
120
106
22
9
19
144
0
0
23
11
15
0
695
149
1881
0
1821
740
133
27
46
1
0
75
6
9
27
143
857
16
0
5


34
3
45
52
29
64
0
2
0
22
16
95
11213
0
2
217
344
16
6
199
4
0
17
0
2
61
0
6
8456
7
0
39
44
0
1
5
197
0
20
10
134
0
0
23
21
1
0
428
103
252
0
1618
69
13
20
16
4
0
11
1
5
5
74
892
8
0
1


679
71
188
147
385
1001
11
473
13
126
112
258
6426
3
57
850
1187
72
45
872
21
14
57
90
35
71
8
11
4186
11
58
270
218
84
295
335
436
30
9
152
425
116
29
167
37
118
3
929
96
1231
83
1175
1624
229
81
150
7
147
257
136
92
50
135
558
26
27
68


600
249
97
419
669
583
19
175
35
234
60
587
8857
12
72
235
460
154
68
1745
65
13
56
34
33
94
41
8
.6297
45
19
234
471
76
541
363
1291
25
18
113
797
85
123
467
81
104
2
1114
78
445
146
1846
1311
134
36
231
47
113
72
75
230
30
125
690
42
27
93


1218
260
281
406
1012
1294
77
1780
46
715
146
235
9831
250
82
812
964
165
48
706
166
24
64
20
80
167
69
84
6713
297
491
151
228
112
592
306
1828
68
49
483
*2199
603
. 179
586
299
360
84
1675
98
3464
62
9975
5309
184
122
28
1195
642
199
50
163
28
105
2157
212
1137
24


1849
157
623
418
1076
2506
7
614
19
413
111
443
15564
1
95
829
2637
84
81
1211
66
16
86
274
48
162
10
12
4430
7
230
321
391
157
426
488
1558
27
13
381
.453
314
31
277
54
104
3
1013
95
5303
156
2800
3658
275
149
238
12
464
431
145
142
91
110
780
33
39
53


1567
541
320
1263
2107
1682
28
84
56
482
80
711
21220
0
130
245
1308
132
114
2684
154
25
142
283
34
221
68
14
4417
27
73
383
539
203
799
443
4716
24
19
214
272
226
95
850
79
265
10
957
106
2259
319
3502
2325
182
44
635
64
305
184
85
362
34
171
887
40
42
84


1408
550
576
728
2863
3015
97
883
121
682
212
314
10741
234
134
518
1316
66
97
630
257
32
119
296
74
306

86
82
5508
113
249
251
195
190
695
363
3396
66
49
320
759
759
226
752
273
764
92
1627
105
6242
96
7359
3149
136
138
35
366
1141
616
60
200
56
168
1161
94
231
13


526
23
418
11
220
695
11
395
2
63
201
135
10950
3
46
1682
1510
80
15
431
44
17
66
72
9
92
3
6
7159
18
26
286
221
68
171
170
249
16
2
51
707
5
15
185
11
103
0
1210
212
2166
69
2314
2266
159
42
55
15
1
239
106
95
55
159
983
9
25
63


1097
36
302
224
616
236
55
2895
2
727
50
115
67406
64
17
602
2659
174
35
446
363
16
54
74
32
155
1
50
6687
480
515
152
127
128
334
74
1493
19
6
421
2400
261
53
862
526
212
37
1745
259
6736
28
21869
6311
157
98
37
1312
323
672
111
107
47
146
3077
127
1598
20












LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 53


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

F. SCHOOL HEALTH
Pupils Examined By Physician Screening By Other Health Dept. Personnel
Parent Present Parent Not Present Visual Audiometer





COUNTY "



IA 1B IC 2A 2B 2C 3A 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 7
TOTAL 1962 29416 3439 2536 37003 3023 755 391290 32252 11667 187438 5779 1335 105044


Alachua........
Baker-.--
Bakery.......
Bradford....
Brevard..-..
Broward_..-.
Calhoun..
Charlotte......
Citrus ...........
Clay
Collier.....--...
Columbia.....
Dade..._._.._
DeSoto .....
Dixie_.......
Duval..
Escambia._
Flagler.........
Franklin.......
Gadsden.......
Gilchrist.....
.Glades---....
Gulf ..........-
Hamilton-_._
Hardee ........
Hendry........
Hemando......
Highlands..
Hillsborough..
Holmes-.......
Indian River..
ackson.....
efferson-.-
afayette........
Lake......_
Lee__.....
Lcon_.__..
Levy....___
Liberty.......
Madison--_
Manatee......
Marion_...._..
Martin-.--...
Monroe....--..
Nassau...........
Okaloosa.....-
Okeechobee-..
Orange .......
Osceola--...
Palm Beach..
Pasco. ..- -
Pinellas....--
Polk ........
Putnamn-..-...
St. Johns-.....
St. Luie-.....
Santa Rosa...
Sarasota-_...
Seminole-.__
Sumter ...
Suwannee--e
Taylor .....
Union....
Volusia. ..
Wakulla.......
Walton-...-
Washington-


85
46
60
262
1
290
0
31
59
166
39
129
2367
89
95
4
13
94
4
256
58
194
10
221
47
218
215
226
2555
621
0
56
288
12
844
0
384
138
64
23
107
0
96
74
111
616
56
194
139
389
0
15652
325
56
22
0
414
4
390
235
49
16
87
355
89
172
4


6155
624
10314
288
1
10990
159
2027
49
1661
2341
59
65855
2772
112
9198
15632
706
386
2517
53
76
1592
2
635
3386
62
26
55649
558
2305
268
2804
1
4549
1663
7171
961
87
238
1378
1691
2045
7025
178
2937
528
23924
2857
23861
0
58404
17778
752
64
469
557
9513
8195
1498
913
2
75
11135
585
753
241


600
72
1021
8
1
2075
84
164
15
86
328
12
5930
355
0
1104
1670
169
29
166
16
29
131
0
51
198
8
10
3802
125
100
131
245
0
432
204
702
27
3
48
254
152
188
454
26
298
57
1458
700
2686
0
2464
1054
60
23
36
28
261
642
90
64
0
9
980
23
85
9


2748
17
697
0
0
8
29
688
20
1
1050
14
39475
2411
72
10
4171
2
390
673
33
0
271
663
652
399
0
2
25768
13
2012
262
149
0
266
25
3812
837
194
0
1302
560
96
5885
7
281
63
10128
14
9506
0
46115
3908
0
1
0
100
5952
4817
5
317
250
0
'9179
663
440
15


1704
214
2626
89
923
6336
263
608
257
631
1059
31
26968
482
96
1543
3139
33
40
1203
242
142
302
244
463
566
4
104
10392
211
294
563
139
31
722
406
1649
21
27
160
746
971
147
1734
464
438
55
3538
302
6863
0
12436
7481
228
178
0
420
1812
1430
130
278
29
46
120
75
139
57


__












54 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

G. DENTAL HEALTH (Dentist Only)

NUMBER REQUIRING
DENTAL INSPECTIONS TREATMENT




COUNTY 1
-4 O 4d E 1


1A 1B IC ID 2A 2B 2C 2D 3 4 5 6 7
TOTAL 1962 119 100259 100 84 39 56674 140 180 7598 24673 65892 19463 1006


Alachua--.
Baker--.--
Bay____
Bradford-L._
Brevard__-
Broward__
Calhoun_
Charlotte-
Citrus__
Clay
Collier__-.
Columbia__
Dade------
DeSoto---
Dixie__
Duval
Escambia--..
Flagler __.
Franklin.
Gadsden__-
Gilchrist--
Glades..--
Gulf-_ ...--.
Hamilton---
Hardee ..
Hendry---
Hernando-__
Highlands-_.
HiMlsborough-
Holmes-.-.
Indian River.-

fayette.-_
Lake__-
Lee__....-
Leon-
Levy
Liberty-
Madison_.--
Manatee...
Marion--_
Martin____-.
Monroe-.-..
Nassau__-.
Okaloosa___
Okeechobee-
Orange---
Osceola ..--.
Palm Beach-
Pasco----
Pinellas-.._
Polk...___
Putnam..-_
t: t
St. Johns__
St. Lucie__
Santa Rosa_
Sarasota_
Seminole_._
Sumter..
Suwannee...
Taylor____
Union ..
Volusia.....
Wakulla_.
Walton._-
Washington...


12944
432
0
0
0
603
0
0
0
24
0
0
0
81
0
700
208
911
0
0
0
70
0
0
0
662
0
5070
13497
0
0
0
165
0
3771
0
0
0
0
0
1553
1020
0
174
0
0
0
36039
0
4115
S0
9212
6238
1022
0
0
0
1034
113
0
0
0
0
601
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
78
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


1147
0
0
0
0
522
0
0
0
0
0
0
8410
0
0
1351
725
310
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
48
0
194
1917
0
0
0
95
0
737
0
0
0
0
0
89
764
0
117
0
0
0
1262
0
3816
0
602
433
737
0
0
673
77
42
0
0
0
0
605
0
0
0


4627
43
0
0
0
3363
0
0
0
0
0
0
27380
0
0
2419
772
594
0
0
0
29
0
0
0
108
0
547
5391
0
0
0
161
0
4130
0
0
0
0
0
139
1035
0
83
0
0
0
1785
0
4903
0
2617
1141
973
0
0
980
70
13
0
0
0
0
2589
0
0
0


149
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
0
0
221
0
176
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
42
9
0
0
0
0
0
156
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
0
0
0
38
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
198
0
0
0












LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 55


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


H. CHRONIC DISEASES

Cancer Service Diabetes Service Heart Disease Control



COUNTY .
r >




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
TOTAL 1962 5520 13611 14284 9250 3072 12561 15224 498 3627 5342 22915 9902


Alachua...-..
Baker_...---...-
Bay_.--...
Bradford .
Brevard............
Broward ....
Calhoun ..-..-
Charlotte.----..
Citrus -.-...-...
Clay ................
Collier..............
Columbia.......
Dade-....---....
DeSoto............
Dixie--......--.....
Duval............
Escambia-.....
Flagler-............
Franklin.......
Gadsden............
Gilchrist..........-
Glades ............
Gulf-..............
Hamilton.........
Hardee..-.........
Hendry.............
Hernando..........
Highlands.........
Hillsborough...
Holmes-............
Indian River....
ackson............
efferson-...........
afayette .........
Lake................
Lee ........... --
Leon..............-...
Levy_........-
Liberty-...-- ...
Madison-..........
Manatee-...........
Marion...............
Martin .......-...
Monroe.............
Nassau...............
Okaloosa............
Okeechobee.......
Orange..............
Osceola----...........
Palm Beach...
Pasco .....-.........-
Pinellas.............-
Polk--..................
Putnam..-...........
St. Johns-.....
St. Lucie--......
Santa Rosa..
Sarasota-.........---
Seminole...........
Sumter.--............
Suwannee..........
Taylor................
Union.. ...
Volusia..............
Wakulla ............
Walton.............
Washington.....


289
12
9
53
68
206
22
30
2
47
70
19
220
25
14
14
534
3
29
51
11
4
32
8
25
6
6
31
778
36
16
50
12
3
52
20
107
5
11
28
48
76
25
89
14
35
14
229
20
378
23
560
681
11
12
16
39
66
7
25
22
35
6
67
14
29
21


195
13
5
11
179
465
5
38
1
28
128
18
75
35
11
7
1502
3
48
28
13
5
57
12
17
14
0
23
3615
43
22
22
1
2
39
170
3
10
28
14
2
13
75
6
12
8
2709
31
893
96
1499
1766
10
11
4
35
0
1
35
40
73
12
0
2
18
26


127
0
0
0
29
224
0
0
0
0
151
0
5989
0
0
1992
74
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
33
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
17
0
0
0
0
2
0
221
26
16
0
303
6
0
0
0
0
10
0
19
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


360
3
87
24
142
151
12
165
27
133
120
18
83
16
15
21
1349
21
18
46
13
23
59
23
2
96
2
45
1865
11
187
53
43
8
112
8
220
15
5
23
338
71
20
99
32
24
10
62
13
354
198
164
640
7
121
1
49
124
16
13
87
35
4
4372
15
62
8


0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
498
55
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
48
77
4
0
2860
1
0
0
6
0
0
37
6
0
0
1
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0


96
55
37
44
220
45
6
45
14
75
49
7
179
0
44
26
469
33
29
220
97
15
62
59
22
40
4
14
870
26
16
69
21
19
46
13
124
82
228
33
100
26
2
76
18
29
6
93
18
156
34
533
193
20
7
18
51
77
33
11
58
23
14
132
19
35
7


495
34
220
348
494
110
3
177
3
568
90
9
2594
0
139
46
1836
150
8
1002
117
13
78
78
63
98
2
26
2408
42
48
60
44
18
89
14
813
54
589
22
368
112
0
167
34
63
10
274
17
599
74
4159
302
21
15
157
114
991
47
12
99
.70
0
2097
29
70
12


159
124
15
72
263
12
5
12
73
66
91
6
17
0
114
5
771
62
105
761
579
27
272
179
15
121
2
6
1034
92,
10
279
7
13
39
29
87
255
997
38
128
9
6
45
9
32
13
49
92
172
38
1403
304
38
2
2
87
0
64
20
227
25
52
98
34
122
11








56 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

H. CHRONIC DISEASE J. MENTAL HEALTH.
(Continued)

Other Chronic Diseases Admissions To Service Field Visits Office Visits


COUNTY g I I




13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
TOTAL 1962 9383 28057 9425 6383 4775 3999 12882 18407 23236 27038 10652


Alachua-----
Baker_....
Bay __
Bradfordc-
Brevard ___
Broward --
Calhoun .-
Charlotte--
Citrus__--
Clay
Collier......
Columbia.._
Dade..-----.
DeSoto--....
Dixie ....-
DuvaL.__.
Escambia.--.
Flagler ......
Franklin .-.
Gadsden-_.
Gilchrist ..-
Glades--_ ..
Gulf---..--
Hamilton...
Hardee__...
Hendry --...
Hernando.....
Highlands ..
Hillsborough-
Holmes ..
Indian River-
Jackson--_
Jefferson..-
ayette___
Lake_._
Lee___-.
Leon_......_
Levy --
Liberty---
Madison.._....
Manatee .....
Marion .
Martin...--_....
Monroe- ...
Nassau__ ..-
Okaloosa ...
Okeechobee_
Orange- -.
Osceola- ....
Palm Beach._
Pasco ......__
Pinellas ._.
Polk -
Putnam--- .
St. Johns_-
St. Lucie__
Santa Rosa_
Sarasota-- ...
Seminole__ .....
Sumter--..-
Suwannee-.--.
Taylor___
Union. -
Volusia---__
Wakulla__.
Walton __
Washington-


103
11
221
91
286
223
32
97
3
194
80
43
51
102
102
27
508
2
31
147
100
8
21
173
38
12
16
49
805
72
62
139
12
11
109
95
64
20
14
58
27
102
18
200
34
65
36
343
22
319
108
2738
402
17
1
31
17
166
23
56
73
30
11
216
28
59
9


- -. I-- -I


412
2
821
222
967
660
61
176
2
623
350
59
330
134
170
29
3774
19
4
492
189
7
107
16
98
29
28
99
1860
47
196
89
13
46
184
106
623
34
20
137
114
318
33
441
76
187
51
468
21
1716
181
6202
977
77
1
85
20
853
57
72
214
143
0
2383
31
62
39


128
15
207
206
364
23
43
53
16
175
95
43
17
130
512
10
31
0
29
122
474
6
80
628
10
17
0
25
229
90
25
166
5
0
69
232
21
19
2
.43
8
13
6
93
30
37
18
52
23
198
147
3546
359
9
0
69
21
5
32
71
186
21
16
30
7
50
18


469
2
3
3
71
224
26
74
18
107
261
0
1598
43
6
10
9
3
23
21
1
30
27
0
38
44
15
9
829
24
29
53
4
1
25
44
275
6
2
1
25
40
56
38
22
89
37
671
6
60
7
45
378.
44
4
166
13
35
60
10
16
1
2
100
22
8
0


157
13
74
24
100
19
34
3
34
24
28
36
410
5
5
156
184
4
35
53
2
0
13
5
5
5
21
9
637
11
19
44
19
0
30
77
120
32
3
14
143
314
9
38
10
22
5
173
0
630
27
298
288
22
20
30
36
43
21
16
14
10
3
99
* 10
27
3


179
5
10
9
66
238
12
9
9
36
103
6
314
4
3
36
188
0
8
21
1
0
2
1
13
15
0
60
278
7
32
25
3
4
11
58
414
2
0
6
71
122
19
71
26
14
3
68
12
252
9
332
150
27
S
126
18
351
33
0
22
2
2
59
14
3
0


1068
11
338
69
381
102
44
82
55
218
119
49
1335
11
39
265
856
10
74
128
4
3
86
4
15
29
16
69
895
16
148
182
13
12
60
112
272
55
4
53
295
279
13
143
108
155
1
434
25
952
73
1187
600
89
34
9
70
626
87
13
61
8
6
223
43
40
6


3990
13
133
37
644
57
122
149
123
243
190
11
2013
38
24
270
830
2
175
151
1
27
163
3
26
68
73
154
831
17
163
458
19
1
64
189
217
91
5
38
517
293
36
293
155
297
0
390
20
1020
79
1085
792
109
19
43
91
464
342
45
42
6
9
295
113
26
2


1268
28
20
17
84
2443
25
25
34
61
869
33
5200
48
5
28
34
20
17
80
4
25
13
8
92
55
4
35
1906
47
88
63
16
0
25
102
2731
8
1
24
110
94
69
68
20
75
34
738
26
1565
19
139
1444
92
41
1040
54
953
77
54
47
31
6
779
22
48
5


1806
7
26
9
-377
1585
49
134
105
162
849
1
5211
51
9
24
24
3
17
55
2
18
8
3
56
83
30
87
3141
28
50
85
9
0
41
432
1042
49
1
32
181
386
251
48
39
111
128
1991
19
952
37
807
1822
49
24
1235
50
2101
420
61
26
6
0
543
21
26
3


430
1
3
0
5
2585
172
42
149
30
459
0
858
46
8
2
1
0
185
60
2
8
203
1
30
37
66
27
499
5
146
462
73
0
0
147
135
21
0
2
127
281
22
18
74
216
10
63
19
337
0
239
400
38
"12
227
9
573
92
0
0
0
0
840
155
0
0








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 57


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


K. MISCELLANEOUS M. NUSNG








1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2
TOTAL 1962 9460 20876 14112 173060 215078 2295 1438 2824 401 4679
Alachua-..........-........ 419 443 390 319 3622 5 9 139 2 31
Baker-.. .-... 62 170 199 28 88 0 7 0 0 0
Bayke......36 95 7 0 2262 60 6 41 2 12
Bradford ............ 75 180 112 44 234 109 17 0 1 4
Brevard----............ 450 686 262 20 3092 78 58 0 10 36
Broward....- ..... 221 503 29 734 21476 30 1 114 19 255
Calhoun .... .. 99 16 191 25 204 11 9 0 0 0
Charlotte.... ....... .... 47 403 356 0 886 8 4 1 1 1
Citrus.........----.... 23 33 87 54 566 5 4 0 0 0
Clay .............. 138 259 61 36 384 90 16 1 1 1
Coer-... .... 123 289 138 67 900 9 8 3 0 0
Columbia------- 243 295 300 60 313 13 19 0 0 0
Dade .....--------............ 59 247 412 164224 21635 42 23 -475 46 741
DeSoto .................- 19 55 5 4 453 21 0 0 0 0
Dixie...... ........ 58 43 58 7 301 69 10 2 0 0
Duval-.... -...- 34 30 33 4 5685 2 0 636 40 563
Escambia............ 187 647 243 1193 11523 13 143 189 8 61
Flagler ...... ........ .... 65 244 327 124 196 34 3 0 0 0
Franklin.............. 47 43 22 16 794 7 0 0 0 0
Gadsden .................. 133 455 423 33 852 671 2 0 .0 0
Gilchrist.....----... 263 232 855 36 103 1 0 1 0 0
Glades...................... 116 158 348 33 62 1 0 0 0 0
Gulf ............................. 37 40 66 3 326 215 20 2 0 0
Hamilton....: ........-.... 126 2 177 70 349 1 5 0 3 4
Hardee ............. .... 23 33 13 0 430 11 8 0 1 7
Hendry....................... 138 291 .539 12 457 27 0 0 0 0
Hernando............ ....... 6 12 3 242 511 0 1 0 3 13
Highlands-.................... 31 22 19 72 555 10 8 0 4 14
Hillsborough.................. 644 3282 129 664 42227 4 7 319 37 947
Holmes ........................ 3 35 6 32 44 327 4 27 0 2 23
Indian River .............. 27 141 20 54 944 2 0 1 3 23
ackson-.......... ........... 87 69 65 42 695 63 48 0 0 0
efferson........................ 47 111 23 34 253 15 0 0 1 2
afayette ...........-....... 39 154 65 1 17 13 0 0 0 0
Lake ......................... 30 43 12 15 947 17 0 0 6 14
Lee..........-- ......... 82 71 107 199 3584 3 1 23 4 18
Leon... ......... 283 600 282 100 3118 10 1 0 2 8
Levy ..................... 28 26 146 163 627 3 -31 3 2 10
Liberty..................... 64 177 198 59 110 1 0 0 0 0
Madison .................. 39 67 40 11 166 16 32 0 0 0
Manatee---... ............ 165 612 393 210 3639 4 3 61 10 79
Marion ..........-- 3 18 3 99 2248 198 13 11 2 28
Martin .................... 11 42 20 0 0 12 3 0 1 3
Monroe .................. 300 353 224 50 1369 24 38 0 2 7
Nassau................. 119 151 69 19 621 48 11 4 0 0
Okaloosa................... 151 1001 1070 167 1829 25 0 0 1 2
Okeechobee........---... 4 8 1 0 198 0 3 0 1 8
Orange----..-.............. 130 224 63 602 3808 18 42 221 25 210
Osceola---............ .. 8 18 16 69 774 1 9 0 8 47
Palm Beach..---....... 304 1082 366 338 14533 39 46 350 18 78
Pasco----.......--. 86 117 53 12 2133 5 4 0 10 110
Pinellas---..---.. 916 1848 704 406 30575 1 550 65 41 382
Polk ................... 1117 699 1637 29 7430 85 44 63 25 198
Putnam.... ....... 395 318 727 262 1035 2 3 0 6 21
St. ohns------ ... 54 25 46 7 1066 0 1 1 7 17
St Lucie ----.. 0 0 0 0 1006 6 17 0 4 25
Santa Rosa.............. 112 52 284 238 493 1 34 2 0 0
Sarasota....... ... --..... 159 966 2 0 2382 4 20 84 10 97
Seminole.-----............... 25 59 20 0 632 31 2 0 8 91
Sumter...--- ..----- 46 47 56 3 432 0 9 0 1 8
Suwannee ......... 139 263 925 33 422 0 3 0 1 14
Taylor--------- 115 63 149 44 458 7 14 0 0 0
Union--.....---..... 120 32 176 55 111 14 0 2 0 0
Volusia -......-- 186 2143 213 1443 5682 51 0 10 21 451
Wakulla..........----.. 19 15 6 6 302 12 0 0 0 0
-Walton--.----. .. 82 10 85 81 379 5 26 0 0 0
Washington............. 11 37 10 41 247 8 15 0 1 15











58 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962



TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


P. SANITATION
WATER SEWAGE
Private New Specifica-
Public Water Private Water Bottled Water Public Sewerage Sewerage tion Septic
Systems Plants Plants Systems Systems Tanks Installed
COUNTY 2 3 4 5 6






TOTAL 1962 6896 17697 7720 13223 56 318 1219 8274 543 2742 25650 38352


Alachua..----
Baker .---
Bay _..... .
Bradford .....
Brevard .......-
Broward.... ...
Calhoun..-.....
Charlotte..._.
Citrus--... --
Clay ...
Collier ......
Columbia ...-
Dade- ...- ......
DeSoto__.......
Dixie__.....
Duval -..... ...
Escambia........
Flagler ..........
Franklin..........
Gadsden_......
Gilchrist__..-_
Glades.............
Gulf.................
Hamilton_.......
Hardee-..-....-
Hendry............-
Hernando .......
Highlands-.......
Hillsborough..-..
Holmes...........
Indian River...
ackson ......
Jefferson ...-...
Lafayette .....
Lakes.. .=
Leon__........_
Levya ........
Liberty--__.....
Madison .......
Manatee-- ..
Marion .......
Martin.-- .....
Monroe--.. ..
Nassau__ ..
Okaloosa.......

Osceola ....---....
Palm Beach_--
Pasco__.....
Pinellas----
Polk...---..
Putnam ----
St. Johns___-
St. Lucie_.....
Santa Rosa- ...
Sarasota--...
Seminole__
Sumter---__
Suwannee___
Taylor._-..
Union_-__
Volusia_. .
Wakulla.---..
Walton ...
Washington---


373
60
349
10
334
738
52
50
74
146
241
26
1301
117
63
4057
589
0
95
94
0
45
86
21
72
104
20
44
527
3
3
68
33
13
35
50
177
57
352
46
632
111
231
14
4
193
85
1838
56
678
18
1179
549
42
12
46
31
466
219
188
3
112
0
318
55
34
58


192
8
171
0
120
319
2
34
107
5
34
3
628
37
9
390
531
2
5
38
1
1
47
51
61
1
19
70
780
6
2
5
28
1
53
6
25
30
5
21
868
160
93
10
6
31
20
4
1
699
12
83
270
22
19
68
11
1323
78
16
3
70
0
35
14
1
I


358
9
282
0
265
550
3
628
122
22
111
5
1252
44
11
493
592
3
53
46
1
19
91
20
134
12
21
82
1361
11
2
10
34
1
94
6
33
44
8
38
975
240
152
29
17
104
35
112
7
838
26
188
395
28
60
151
34
2642
96
37
4
95
0
65
20
1
1


37
2
31
1
58
51
0
6
8
6
8
3
49
1
5
98
40
2
6
3
1

5
0
1
1
9
5
42
1
7
4
2
0
1
17
1
1
4
Io
1
50
3
7
11
1
8
2
351
1
9
12
115
46
1
9
4
10
21
23
1
1
1
1
6
3
1
2


106
8
162
11
454
783
0
16
27
23
91
14
454
6
11
553
569
2
73
21
1
4
9
0
17
48
10
13
773
2
24
40
7
0
S2
158
4
2
5
8
194
4
124
36
4
95
34
1001
32
172
18
1168
247
2
89
26
42
261
178
4
2
6
2
13
5
2
2


365
33
264
106
3076
2405
51
203
10
49
103
178
1
4
1
459
1284
46
2
80
19
9
49
19
62
81
6
473
1199
25
44
33
2
7
703
475
279
75
4
15
647
293
445
109
64
227
116
1600
104
2943
101
1747
1465
194
34
285
68
1165
461
41
18
44
110
1039
2
27
22


487
97
553
109
4076
3225
103
229
22
106
276
474
1
4
1
677
1472
75
9
132
134
14
67
52
140
113
8
596
1461
57
67
143
4
7
1057
480
417
111

39
1223
426
694
262
185
328
166
2150
137
3580
194
2596
2246
298
103
669
127
3088
475
70
30
48
185
1882
4
47
39


- -











LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 59


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

P. SANITATION (Continued)
SEWAGE MISCELLANEOUS
Percola-
New Specifica- Garbage Subdi- tion and Public
tion Privies Disposal vision Soil Log Pollution Bathing Areas Swimming
COUNTY Installed Systems Analysis Test Survey Surveyed Pools
7 8 9 10 11 12 13



-I S Si 1 Z J Si 'r Si I- Si l

TOTAL 1962 222 487 448 4386: 438 14426 288 2962 209 1000 2383 16732
Alachua_... 0 0 2 48 64 833 15 20 8 9 15 127
Baker....... 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4
Bay ....... 0. 0 0 7 7 11 272 2 10 0 0 40 390
Bradford 0 0 6 63 0 18 0 0 3 3 3 13
Brevard.. 2 2 8 114 9 1849 5 35 11 25 21 125
Broward_... 0 0 15 25 22 26 32 163 5 5 554 2974
Calhoun .. 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Charlotte .... 0 0 1 13 0 10 4 150 2 4 4 52
Citru ....... 0 0 5 15 0 2 2 5 2 2 2 6
Clay.............. 1 1 4 54 0 147 1 1 1 1 5 13
Cor....... 17 51 2 27 0 33 2 29 0 0 21 214
Columbia.... 3 4 1 234 3 39 1 1 1 1 4 10
Dade 0 0 1 1 1 2 64 127 27 265 691 5929
DeSoto....- 0 0 5 9 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie____ 0 0 1 6 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duval_.. 2 4 41 482 13 1881 1 21 1 6 4 11
Escambia... 8 85 5 1222 8 80 12 106 6 60 30 112
Flagler .. 0 0 0 0 2 69 5 6 2 3 1 5
Franklin--...... 3 3 5 85 0 7 0 0 0 0 2 13
Gadsden ..... 90 126 8 138 1 0 1 21 2 10 4 37
Gilchrist........ 2 4 1 26 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades. ...... 1 1 1 14 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gulf...... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 .0
Hamilton......... 19 23 1- 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 3
Hardee...... 0 0 2 16 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 2
Hendry -.. 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 23
Hernando 0 0 2 7 0 25 3 9 0 0 2 2
Highlands .... 0 0 4' 10 9 0 2 3 0 0 19 28
Hi2sborough .. 2 27 75 248 27 209 5 981 3 56 60 771
Holes...... 0 0 1 2 0 36 0 0 0 0 0 0
Indian River-... 2 2 1. 6 3 56 1 1 3 3 15 119
Jackson. ....... 0 4 1 1 1 116 2 10 2 7 1 15
efferson....... 2 2 1 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0
afayette........ 1 1 1 8 0 29 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake....-... 0 0 0 0 31 159 3 4 0 0 4 6
Lee... 2 3 4 17 0 1 3 25 0 0 12 31
Leon 1 2 6 13 0 18 12 12 10 206 20 121
Levy-__ 0 0 5 23 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liberty_ 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison__ 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 6
Manatee ..... 4 8 2 4 12 163 3 41 9 30 19 161
Marion .._ 7 9 89 223 16 369 0 0 1 3 15 67
Martin............ 1 1 4 19 0 363 6 48 1 1 12 52
Monroe ........... 0 8 66 2 0 20 526 8 39 38 78
Nassau..... 2 9 7 23 0 7 1 1 1 5 9 54
Okaloosa ........ 1 1 1 28 2 267 3 8 1 1 2 10
Okeechobee..... 0 0 1 2 0 62 0 0 0 0 1 4
Orange ....... 1 4 4 352 45. 2214 4 123 2 34 69 518
Osceola.... 0 0 1 51 6 21 1 1 1 1 1 4
Palm Beach.... 0 0 5 41 11 32 3 37 3 4 203 2053
Pasco ._ ... 1 1 4' 4 1 38 1 5 0 0 3 14
Pinellas ..-. 16 21 12 266 5 2850 7 140 7 72 220 1255
Polk.-... 1 5 10 50 22 637 23 78 37 72 48 172
Putnam .------ 0 0 12 89 2 56 0 0 3 4 5 18
St. ohs....... 9 41 17 33 11 43 3 14 1 3 24 72
St. lucie_ 0 0 0 5 27 1 194 2 22 1 11 11 81
Santa Rosa..- 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 6 6 1 1
Sarasota_...._. 7 17 4 12 74 527 10 100 8 12 28 166
Seminole.... 0 0 8 57 12 377 4 21 24 27 7 19
Sumter...... 2 4 2 2 0 40 1 6 1 4 2 25
Suwannee.... 4 4 0 0 0 33 0 0 0 0 4 18
Taylor .... 1 1 5 30 0 2 4 11 0 0 13 26
Union- -. 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Volusia- 5 9 16 41 5 90 7 31 4 4 99 693
Wakulla... 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 5 5
Walton --- 0 0 3 4 1 56 1 1 1 1 0 0
Washington.. 0 0 1 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3










60 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

P. SANITATION (Continued)
MISCELLANEOUS
Tourist
Schools Mobile Camps Courts or Child Care Complaints
Home Parks Motels Centers Investigated
COUNTY 14 15 16 17 18 19





TOTAL 1962 1611 4536 1634 7583 560 5366 557 1533 1553 5190 32635 68889
Alachua .-.. 9 53 31 79 26 74 98 119 12 86 .303 728
Baker__. .. 5 34 4 4 0 0 1 1 0 0 28 50
Bay -.... 30 31 53 109 1 1 21 51 0 0 122 173
Bradford... 7 8 2 4 7 14 3 4 1 1 29 56
Brevard ------ 17 54 85 443 2 10 5 14 15 56 973 1616
Broward.-----. 128 239 102 338 20 173 6 23 173 719 2429 4443
Calhoun__- 5 53 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 12
Charlotte-__ 3 37 1 53 1 7 2 30 0 0 13 148
Citrus ---- 4 11 5 7 0 0 7 10 0 0 31 36
Clay 12 80 12 120 7 60 7 47 1 7 23 40
Collier ... 4 5 9 22 50 239 5 11 3 4 73 163
Columbia------ 14 21 2 4 2 8 2 2 1 3 27 80
Dade --- 260 426 139 385 68 3178 0 0 210 332 7791 18712
DeSoto.- -----. 7 56 1 2 0 0 9 9 0 0 42 45
Dixe 1- 16 0 0 1 2 2 2 0 0 10 25
Duval ..- 91 122 27 90 5 9 34 109 240 344 1545 3942
Escambia__ __ 92 95 78 199 0 0 11 29 30 87 3219 5386
Flagler_____ 1 2 1 1 5 24 0 0 0 0 8 14
Franklin .. 4 27 7 28 4 10 0 0 0 0 25 97
Gadsden----. 15 105 4 18 3 19 9 49 1 1 52 83
Gilchrist-__. 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 1 1 1 4
Glades----.--. 4 10 1 6 9 21 0 0 1 2 13 20
Gulf-.... ..- 7 51 7 13 0 0 9 17 0 0 24 56
Hamilton------ 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 44
Hardee---......-- 2 17 4 10 10 32 2 2 0 0 14 55
Hendry--...----- 5 17 3 30 9 58 5 36 2 2 19 74
Hernando .... 2 2 4 5 3 5 1 1 0 0 50 72
Highlands-..-- 6 10 40 90 27 40 22 35 0 0 75 111
Hillsborough---. 24 422 116 868 13 234 3 26 184 1964 1933 5750
Holmes- 9 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 15
Indian River- 1 34 9 27 3 11 2 7 1 2 118 249
Jackson___ 3 24 3 37 1 2 1 3 0 0 12 42
Jefferson __ 8 19 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 24 45
Lafayette___ I1 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 7 7
Lake ..--.. 21 32 11 17 8 25 7 11 1 1 78 118
Lee ..... 30 88 27 41 1 3 1 3 2 2 102 198
Leon ... 29 43 35 94 23 55 42 46 42 119 268 527
Levy.. .. 9 26 4 5 5 8 9 9 0 0 25 26
Liberty-- .... 6 22 0 0 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison-... 8 10 0 0 2 3 2 2 0 0 15 20
Manatee ... 3 4 51 101 11 46 12 22 23 44 376 578
Marion ..-. 44 109 28 86 14 47 44 121 13 40 387 838
Martin. ...- 1 13 14 67 1 2 4 10 0 0 91 246
Monroe. ---..-. 12 37 58 132 6 9 8 18 6 11 158 261
Nassau.-----..... 9 44 5 17 1 6 3 14 0 0 54 98
Okaloosa ----.---- 9 61 2 12 1 10 5 12 4 9 125 155
Okeechobee...... 4 8 16 83 0 0 0 0 1 2 17 26
Orange- -..--.. 168 564 88 452 4 55 42 347 218 416 1546 4046
Osceola---....- 5 41 9 63 1 2 13 24 0 0 58 83
Palm Beach.-.... 101 211 51 142 98 309 3 16 157 548 2328 3793
Pasco .....- 2 2 28 60 11 87 6 12 0 0 54 95
Pinellas .. 147 530 234 2531 8 165 3 4 96 132 5332 10550
Polk--.. 78 146 38 181 32 172 7 38 14 24 862 1466
Putnam ____. 1 1 2 3 10 19 10 12 1 1 81 138
St. Johns_____ 20 86 10 16 12 12 4 6 9 10 42 84
St. Lucie ........ 8 8 28 177 6 35 0 0 11 11 134 253
Santa Rosa__.. 5 16 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 69
Sarasota .---. 22 55 63 122 2 10 13 23 34 125 633 1179
Seminole.... 18 81 4 15 7 16 3 4 21 32 248 447
Sumter --- 8 28 4 9 2 4 8 32 0 0 24 34
Suwannee.------ 11 11 4 13 4 4 10 26 2 13 13 29
Taylor--------..-.. 5 28 7 10 0 0 15 57 0 0 20 28
Union .-..-... 2 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3
Volusia ........-... 18 30 52 127 9 20 5 6 17 29 396 1023
Wakulla.-....-.. 6 12 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 17 36
Walton.---_. 14 16 3 3 2 5 3 3 4 9 13 22
Washington __.. 6 23 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 20 27












LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES 61



TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


P. SANITATION (Continued)

MISCELLANEOUS (Continued) PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
Nui-
sances Rabies- Eating and Food Pro- Shellfish and
Cor- Plumbing Animal Bites Drinking cessing Abattoirs Crustacea
COUNTY reacted Establishments Plants
20 21 22 23 24 25 26






TOTAL 1962 23394 2179 6482 17902 54438 20817 105685 1066 4170 130 781 194 1535


Alachua .......
Baker.............
Bay --............
Bradford.........
Brevard -...-.
Broward.........
Calhoun......
Charlotte........
Citrus----..---
. Clay.........
Collier-..
Columbia-.....
Dade---....-
DeSoto.---...
Dixie..-.--.
Duval.--.....
Escambia ....
Flagler.........
Franklin __..
Gadsden......
Gilchrist......-
Glades..........
Gulf...........
Hamilton......
Hardee- ......
Hendry.......-
Hernando..-
Highlands..
Hillsborough..
Holmes----..
Indian River-
ackson-..------
efferson-....-
fayette-.....
Lake ...-..-..
Lee-_---__
Leon..-.... -
Levy ....-
Liberty-......
Madison.. -..
Manatee---
Marion........--
Martin ........
Monroe-......
Nassau.--.-----.
Okaloosa --. -
Okeechobee....
Orange -.....--
Osceola-.........
Palm Beach..
Pasco ...---.....
Pinellas......
Polk---- .
Putnam ...-.-
St. Johns.....
St. Lucie ...
Santa Rosa-..
Sarasota-.....
Seminole___
Sumter _......
Suwannee ...
Taylor_.......
Union ........
Volusia_........
Wakulla.......
Walton............
Washington..


438
10
32
38
850
1662
10
36
18
35
51
15
3941
11
8
1333
2867
15
31
170
5
7
18
14
13
47
37
28
2210
14
45
5
10
4
38
72
383
19
0
6
304
417
55
171
20
66
3
1108
16
884
43
3940
453
31
51
140
62
739
110
9
8
10
4
179
3
6
16


6
1
0
1
2
168
0
1
4
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
1
6
0
0
4
0
1
0
2
4
1
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0


972
78
132
116
1226
3552
2
56
10
178
109
245
15998
42
6
1128
3080
31
33
43
8
16
38
30
55
40
2
104
14026
23
100
49
34
1
55
129
843
82
4
33
280
371
43
258
47
254
51
2679
81
321
64
1522
2178
47
44
319
134
1582
306
102
15
93
12
832
16
37
41


344
12
230
42
428
1640
34
14
41
82
94
120
4818
42
29
685
685
64
47
93
6
52
59
37
27
49
17
184
1963
55
113
118
35
10
197
308
292
74
16
37
295
237
112
180
56
100
60
460
56
1109
240
1848
687
117
99
181
81
393
166
52
78
63
7
718
77
97
56


1177
77
849
355
1986
4164
271
257
65
621
233
594
25085
182
98
1585
3621
203
159
526
121
135
445
97
82
231
26
306
20332
295
670
672
68
33
455
803
1882
84
94
90
620
786
569
423
446
366
387
2409
216
2907
705
12032
4771
280
378
1560
153
1353
615
134
661
158
15
4137
102
217
256


81
0
3
0
32
135
0
21
1
3
15
6
730
13
0
42
133
0
27
8
0
0
11
0
13
0
6
1
505
0
15
9
2
0
8
52
15
4
0
0
216
36
26
4
1
4
4
248
11
79
28
836
269
4
12
64
0
162
77
41
0
0
0
149
3
5
0


2
0
160
0
51
2
0
84
6
0
0
"0
7
0
38
196
113
1
7
33
0
0
26
0
0
0
0
0
93
0
22
0
0
0
0
75
6
67
0
0
8
0
2
5
-29
0
0
4
0
4
2
177
2
2
76
2
10
96
0
0
0
13
0
13
89
9
3


I I I I I I I








62 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962

P. SANITATION (Continued)
PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK (Continued)
Dairy
Cows Farms
Other Food Food- Milk and Milk Cows Tuber- under
Grocery and Establish- Handlers Products Bangs culin Mastitis
COUNTY Meat Markets ments Trained Dairy Farms Plants Tested Tested Control
Program
27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34



1 1I I I I | | |
S S Z < > > Z Z

TOTAL 1962 6325 33089 2043 10853 3596 791 10404 822 7807 19491 93262 374
Alachua------ 137 412 4 9 4 21 66 3 13 0 0 5
Baker-----... --- 15 40 16 31 0 4 26 0 0 0 0 0
Bay ------- 63 159 4 32 0 3 33 2 18 0 283 0
Bradford----- 33 255 2 3 0 3 35 3 35 0 44 0
Brevard- .----- 54 404 11 .26 0 5 32 7 65 0 0 0
Broward..------. 376 1100 20 47 0 3 25 11 89 122 156 0
Calhoun-- .._. -- 11 16 0 0 0 11 212 0 0 0 717 0
Charlotte---..---- 8 67 1 5 0 0 0 1 12 0 0 0
Citrus------ 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clay----.. 36 454 0 0 0 7 82 2 18 0 0
Collier -- 17 33 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia .-- 59 169 0 0 0 1 3 2 23 0 0 0
Dade 1498 6868 924 5328 1693 97 943 352 3144 0 1335 0
DeSoto ..... 22 104 10 16 0 2 49 0 0 0 0 0
Diie--- 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duval----- 364 868 52 92 0 1 9 1 8 0 0 0
Escambia-- 263 1191 49 184 387 70 985 10 55 0 3831 0
Flagler--- 8 26 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin 5 5 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0
Gadsden-- 32 41 I 1 0 3 79 1 14 20 289 0
Gilchrist-__ 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades.------ 14 32 0 0 0 5 92 0 0 0 0 0
Gulf-. 61 403 7 21 0 1 15 0 0 0 78 0
Harmilton_ 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hardee------ 2 3 1 1 0 3 40 0 0 0 187 0
Hendry.. 10 52 0 0 0 7 51 0 0 0 0 0
Hermando.___ 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands .. ..- 30 55 1 2 0 8 40 6 10 0 3386 0
Hillsborough_-. 857 8946 464 3757 51 88 2293 15 1053 1306 15819 88
Holmes ----- 23 149 0 0 0 16 223 0 0 0 761 0
Indian River____ 6 93 0 0 0 5 48 1 29 0 1 0
0ackson-- .. O 0 0 0 0 24 358 3 27 144 0 0
efferson.-- 26 42 0 0 0 9 96 2 13 134 126 0
afayette--- 4 5 1 1 0 20 385 0 0 0 1503 3
Lake-- 8 10 0 0 0 4 7 0 0 0 0 0
Lee---63 109 28 31 0 8 65 1 55 0 0 0
Leon--- 174 826 25 28 0 13 170 7 163 0 2099 0
Levy ------ 14 14 1 1 0 1 1 12 0 9 0
Liberty --... .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison 0 0 0 0 0 7 31 3 6 0 490 0
Manatee- .. 61 118 4 5 0 26 347 6 13 0 7277 0
Marion--------- 59 128 8 18 3 13 327 5 46 0 1160 0
Martin-------- 36 163 3 4 0 9 100 5 21 0 3683 0
Monroe--- --- 22 48 1 6 0 0 0 6 11 0 0 0
Nassau.....---- 23 69 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Okaloosa -.. 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 1 1 25 73 0
Okeechobee -. 29 181 0 0 0 24 309 2 22 0 18000 5
Orange ---. 23 501 253 521 278 25 215 37 391 0 0 0
Osceola---- 9 10 0 0 0 8 96 0 0 0 0 0
Palm Beach 243 639 37 67 0 23 167 31 884 17629 15287 199
Pasco- 3 4 1 1 1 21 232 1 2 0 4677 0
Pinellas------- 614 3357 34 312 109 12 216 234 1137 82 3568 12
Polk_ --. 317 2264 33 214 99 46 602 2 28 0 4524 47
Putnam-n 37 79 0 0 0 7 31 0 0 0 0 0
St. Johns-.-- 5 12 1 '3 0 10 21 2 13 0 0 0
St. Lucie. ---- 65 629 3 3 26 7 46 4 14 0 1767 0
Santa Rosa__.. 0 0 1 1 0 10 116 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota--- .. 99 204 16 42 25 5 68 3 21 1 98 4
Seminole---- -. 59 228 1 2 0 8 79 1 1 0 224 0
Sumter------ 15 57 1 5 0 9 110 0 0 0 162 0
Suwannee- ..- 0 0 0 0 0 6 71 1 5 22 148 0
Taylor-----. 10 17 I 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Union----..... 10 15 0 0 0 0 2 8 0 0 0 0 0
Volusia---- .. 214 1142 17 24 920 41 414 42 337 0 0 0
Wakulla. 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Walton--- 32 65 4 5 0 11 45 5 8 6 660 11
Washington_ .... 28 187 I 1 0 10 264 0 0 0 840 0












VITAL STATISTICS 63



TABLE 7 (Continued)

MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS, 1962


P. SANITATION (Continued) V. HEALTH EDUCATION X. LAB.

Private Public .
Premises Premises
35 36

COUNTY 0 .

Sa I Il

S0 1 2 3 1 4 5 6 7 8 1 "22

TOTAL 1962 30730 92689 12714 37879 10096 8771 7626 34083 2939 311 1954 681 66996
1040 2 10 11


Alachua._ ...-
Baker ...
Bay........
Bradford_......
Brevard ......
Broward- -....-..
Calhoun .
Charlotte .......
Citrus_






HendrClay.......
Colier...-..
Columbia ...
Dade-- -...... ...
DeSoto ---....... -
Dixie .. .
DuvaL..._..
Escambia---..
Flagler....
Franklin_ ....

Glades .-....
Gul.f- ..
HamiltoL-_..--
Hardee........
Hendry------
Hernando........
Highlands- ...
Hillsborough__
olmes.........
Indian Iliver-
Jackson ....
iefferson --...
Lafayette.....
Lake........
Leeon__-......
Levy....--.
Liberty.-----.--
Madison-.......
Manatee-...
Marion- .....
Martin-.---.-
Monroe_-.
Nassau-.--..-..
Okaloosa -......
Okeechobee-.
Orange-.......-
Osceola-. --
Palm Beach...
Pasco----
Pinellas ............
Polk- ...........
Putnam__.
St. Johns......
St. Lucie-.....-
Santa Rosa--
Sarasota-........
Seminole ...
Sumter--...-
Suwannee-......
Taylor__
Union____-
Volusia__.--
Wakulla..-.
Walton.-..
Washington-.


90
87
259
3
20
1448
4
18
102
14
6
27
7646
65
18
6380
3315
2
42
450
17
48
127
2
81
83
65
73
1114
7
86
9
28
23
628
45
52
119
3
5
247
648
610
161
44
39
33
240
43
490
52
2474
446
4
7
483
39
924
400
136
40
191
203
140
11
11
3


456
110
419
3
94
2426
12
87
157
139
19
263
14864
122
25
11572
4836
169
131
559
23
800
188
50
161
841
144
132
15898
12
670
58
68
31
779
95
281
244
3
5
312
1010
791
247
182
106
46
1137
87
817
147
24824
707
18
62
648
96
1882
1116
335
73
315
453
268
42
19
3


104
6
16
0
26
237
3
5
6
18
27
64
8003
95
7
256
457
2
24
21
3
5
41
1
20
32
1
26
297
3
26
5
5
14
.187
113
58
50
6
6
41
189
36
62
14
49
32
209
38
276
3
502
57
1
20
135
38
449
68
12
8
30
11
136
8
10
4


1040
19
27
0
293
758
18
235
6
103
73
286
16628
252
17
1174
1207
.9
96
57
3
48
103
1
85
261
1
134
2812
5
159
38
16
17
263
231
143
156
8
8
74
375
178
122
88
518
162
1821
385
620
20
4121
138
17
187
370
71
829
369
24
10
45
19
481
15
21
9


226
24
84
111
162
228
34
117
38
84
158
102
1310
17
11
211
323
7
34
86
26
50
38
35
95
88
16
57
916
27
221
112
22
30
51
273
201
16
4
67
273
217
30
135
46
31
8
339
49
910
15
927
444
56
46
54
159
248
59
22
21
35
10
191
5
52
2


180
23
61
56
111
308
29
210
40
120
125
30
1346
15
16
132
222
1
27
101
27
21
48
74
34
59
4
22
909
33
173
101
19
13
31
112
103
40
4
26
121
122
69
117
104
50
27
386
59
471
S9
574
382
30
31
106
169
329
153
39
56
25
5
296
19
11
5


779
18
296
51
4349
3299
29
1580
67
503
117
1163
1029
143
198
77
289
6
66
785
759
26
363
50
233
85
46
100
823
55
149
143
63
20
588
56
499
35
4
134
230
156
113
723
250
17
158
2543
11
3034
43
1463
672
14
248
59
780
3312
641
134
42
87
2
203
47
25
1


1133
9865
1315
10521
36362
1612
4401
1254
1901
5207
3657
82136
1728
1657
18488
36878
1222
2432
6095
1541
755
1960
2168
12374
2316
919
3131
125939
4584
4053
6722
2342
470
3574
7001
23644
2164
1740
2168
11835
7326
1510
4328
2546
4962
1098
27948
2567
30654
3648
59031
27399
4233
3252
3356
3910
5619
2934
2225
2262
1538
1009
7895
2284
2933
1912


I I I





.







64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
EVERETT H. WILLIAMS, JR., M.S., Hyg.
Director
This bureau is responsible for the collection and preservation of
the following records: birth, stillbirth, death, marriage, annulment of
marriage, divorce, adoption and legal change of name. It is responsible
for the issuance of certified copies of most of these vital records and
for processing of various types of amendments to the records. The
records have legal value in that they are accepted by courts as legal
proof of the facts stated thereon. In addition to their legal value, these
records have statistical value for public health agencies and others in-
terested in demographic studies.

COLLECTION
Collection of records is one of the primary functions of the vital
statistics system. The value of these records for both legal and statistical
purposes is completely dependent upon the effectiveness of the collec-
tion system. The county health officers are registrars for their areas
and are responsible for the collection of birth, stillbirth and death cer-
tificates. Particular emphasis has been placed upon promptness of filing
birth and death records. Last year, 98.9 per cent of all births and 97.7
per cent of all deaths were registered at this bureau by the fifth of the
following month. In each case this represents an improvement of one-
tenth of one per cent over the preceding year. A total of 21 counties
submitted 98 per cent or more of their birth records and 26 counties
submitted 98 per cent of their death records within the prescribed
time limit. Unfortunately, there are still a sizable number of counties
which need considerable improvement in the timeliness of filing birth
and death records. One measure of the relative efficiency between
counties with regard to birth and death registration is the "Vital Sta-
tistics Scoreboard," which is published annually (Table 15). The top
10 units are to be congratulated on their superior performance. They
are: Jacksonville-Duval, Dade, Citrus, Hillsborough, Martin, Volusia,
Hernando, Seminole, Orange and Polk.
Last year, a total of 231,997 current certificates were registered
with the bureau, an increase of 1.5 per cent over the preceding year.

CERTIFICATIONS
The issuance of certified photocopies and other certifications is
one of the large volume jobs performed by the bureau. Last year,
122,149 requests for certifications were received and processed. This
figure represents an increase of 1.9 per cent over the previous year.
Birth and death certificates are confidential records and certified copies
are not issued to persons who cannot demonstrate the proper interest
in the record. For those persons who are not entitled to receive certi-







VITAL STATISTICS


fled photocopies of birth records, a birth registration card can be issued
showing the name, date of birth and place of birth. Last year, a total
of 23,665 birth registration cards were issued. Table 8 shows com-
parative data for other types of certifications issued during the past two
years.

AMENDMENTS
One of the most complex and troublesome functions of the bureau
is the amendment of records. Many requests are received to have rec-
ords corrected. In each case, the applicant must submit evidence to
substantiate his request and bureau personnel must determine whether
sufficient proof has been submitted to justify the correction. Every
effort is made to correct minor errors as easily as possible while making
sure that sufficient evidence is obtained for major corrections to main-
tain the legal validity of the record. A set of administrative regulations
governing requirements for correction of records was passed by the
State Board of Health (SBH) during the year.


DELAYED REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS
A "Delayed Birth Certificate" is one which is filed after the per-
son's first birthday. An application for filing a delayed birth certificate
must be accompanied by documents which verify the date of birth,
place of birth and parentage. Requirements for documentary evidence
must be sufficient to minimize the filing of fraudulent records and to
make the record of sufficient value that it will be acceptable to other
agencies and offices using these records as proof of birth. During
1962, administrative regulations governing evidentiary requirements
for filing a delayed birth certificate were enacted by the SBH. Bureau
personnel must explain these requirements for evidence in writing and
orally, and must determine when sufficient proof has been submitted.
Last year, a total of 3254 delayed birth certificates were filed. This is
a decrease of 7.5 per cent under the total for the preceding year.


ADOPTIONS
In 1962 there were 4225 adoption decrees received from the
courts for children who were born in Florida. This represents an 8.3
per cent increase over 1961. When an adoption decree is received for
a person born in Florida a new birth certificate is substituted for the
original certificate. The new certificate shows the new parents' names
and does not disclose the fact of adoption. The original certificate is
sealed and is only available upon receipt of a court order or upon
receipt of a request from the registrant if he or she is of legal age.
Adoption decrees received for persons born in other states are for-
warded to the vital statistics office of the state of birth for similar







66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


processing. A total of 1210 adoption reports were forwarded by this
office to other states during the year 1962. This is an increase of 15.8
per cent over the preceding year.

COMMITTEE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC STUDIES
A State Committee for Demographic Studies sponsored by the
SBH was organized in January. This was later officially approved as
an Advisory Committee to the SBH.
Two meetings were held during the year. The following func-
tions were approved: a clearing house for information on studies, re-
ports and activities of members and their organizations in the broad
area of Florida demography to include vital statistics, population char-
acteristics, population estimates and projections, and the following
areas as they relate to the preceding subjects: health, employment,
labor force, economic development, public welfare, medical care, eau-
cation, gerontology, urban and rural growth; a source of encourage-
ment for research studies and the publication of reports on demo,
graphic topics; a forum for exchange of views by the members of the
committee; a source of technical advice to public agencies on matters
within the committee's competence; and an agency for cooperation
with the Bureau of the Census (and other federal agencies) in the
development of improved statistics for Florida's population.
Two subcommittees were appointed during the year by the chair-
man. First, a Subcommittee on Census Tracts to act as liaison between
the Census Bureau and several untracted metropolitan areas in the
state. The first areas to be considered were West Palm Beach, Ft. Lau-
derdale-Hollywood and Pensacola. The second subcommittee appointed
was the Subcommittee on Population Estimates and Projections. This
committee was to study methodology for current population estimates
and population projections.
As of the end of the year, members of the Demographic Com-
mittee were as follows: John N. Webb, Ph.D., College of Business
Administration, University of Florida, Chairman; T. Stanton Dietrich,
Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Florida State University (FSU), Vice
Chairman; Everett H. Williams, Jr., SBH, Secretary; Robert B. Beas-
ley, Management Director, Florida Industrial Commission; James O.
Bond, M.D., SBH; Oliver Boorde, Statistician, SBH; John O. Boynton,
Research Director, Florida Development Commission; Ralph A. Brad-
ley, Ph.D., Head of Department of Statistics, FSU; Richard G. Cornell,
Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Statistics, FSU; Howard
Croom, Assistant Director for Administration, State Department of
Public Welfare; John K. Folger, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School, FSU;
Charles M. Grigg, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Social Research, FSU;
Albert V. Hardy, M.D., Assistant State Health Officer, SBH; Robert G.
Hoffmann, Ph.D., University of Florida Medical School; George B.







VITAL STATISTICS


Hurff, Ph.D., Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University
of Florida; Miss Iris Kiem, Biostatistician, University of Miami School
of Medicine; George Macesich, Ph.D., Director, Council on Economic
Development; Edward A. Mueller, Assistant Engineer for Traffic and
Planning, State Road Department; Travis J. Northcutt, Ph.D., Social
Scientist, SBH; Carter Osterbind, Ph.D., Director, Bureau of Economic
and Business Research, University of Florida; James A. Paisley,
Chief, Research Division, Metropolitan Dade County; Earl R. Rich,
Ph.D., Department of Zoology, University of Miami; T. Lynn Smith,
Ph.D., Head, Department of Sociology, University of Florida; Miss
Dena Snodgrass, Research Analyst, State Chamber of Commerce; Mit-
chell Wade, Ph.D., specialist in Research and Statistics, State Depart-
ment of Education; Irving L. Webber, Ph.D., Research Social Scien-
tist, Pinellas County Health Department.


STATISTICAL SECTION
OLIVER H. BOORDE, B.S., B.A.
Director
This section of the Bureau of Vital Statistics is responsible for
summarizing and analyzing data obtained from vital records and from
special studies. It also provides statistical support and consultation to
all bureaus and divisions of the State Board of Health.
During the year, the statistical section publishes a monthly
vital statistics bulletin which reveals the latest available data on
births, deaths, marriages and divorces. Accompanying this bulletin
is a monthly article concerning various subjects of public health inter-
est. It is widely distributed to county health departments, hospitals,
libraries, schools and to persons expressing a desire to receive this
type of information.
At the end of each year, the section publishes Supplement No. 1
to the State Board of Health Annual Report-a complete summary and
analysis of vital statistics for the year. Supplement No. 2 to the Annual
Report (Florida Morbidity Statistics) is published in cooperation with
the Bureau of Preventable Diseases. This report reviews the number
of cases of reportable diseases and analyzes any apparent trends.
During 1962, assistance was requested of the statistical section
for a wide range of studies and surveys. Assistance primarily consisted
of sample design and statistical interpretation of resulting data. Con-
sultation was also provided to insure that study procedures were adapt-
able to IBM processing.
Among the major projects completed in 1962 was a sociological
and immunization survey accomplished in connection with the Hills-
borough County oral vaccine field trial. In this survey the section was







68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

responsible for the sample design, sample selection, technical aspect
of data collection and statistical interpretation of the data. Objectives
were to determine the most effective means of persuading persons to
take the vaccine and to determine the pre- and post-vaccination im-
munization level of the area.
A special survey was also conducted in the Bradenton-Sarasota
area as to the result of the encephalitis outbreak in the area. The sec-
tion's responsibilities were the same as in the Hillsborough County
survey. The objectives in this study were to obtain data on living con-
ditions of persons selected in the survey. There was also a serological
aspect to this survey, wherein a blood sample was taken, when possible,
and an encephalitis titer was determined.
During 1962, tabulations were completed and analyses begun on
a detailed study of neonatal mortality in the state.
The following report presents a brief summary of preliminary
vital statistics for 1962. A more detailed analysis of these statistics
can be found in Supplement No. 1 of this report, entitled Florida
Vital Statistics, 1962. Preliminary 1962 birth and death figures have
been used in this report because of a time lag in receipt of records
from the counties and the extensive process required to summarize the
data in final form. Final 1962 data covering marriages, divorces and
annulments are contained in Table 14, and Tables 11A and 12A pre-
sent final 1961 natality and mortality figures.
Population
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of
Florida, provisionally estimated the 1962 midyear population of Flor-
ida at 5,349,900. This represents a gain of 3.7 per cent over their
1961 estimate of 5,158,100. On the basis of these figures, the state
is adding an average of almost 16,000 persons to its population each
month.
Births
Preliminary figures indicate a total of 115,520 births in 1962.
This is a one per cent drop since 1961 and it resulted in a further
decline of the birth rate per 1000 population from 22.6 in 1961 to
21.1 in 1962. The resident birth rate in Florida rose from 17.6 in
1940 to a peak of 25.0 per 1000 population in 1956. However, since
1956, the rate has gradually declined to its present level (21.6). The
number of white births totaled 84,721 in 1962. This is a 1.3 per cent
decrease from the preceding year and yielded a rate per 1000 white
population of 19.3 in 1962 as compared with the 20.3 rate for 1961.
The 30,799 nonwhite births in 1962 are approximately the same as
the 1961 figure (30,803). However, the rate fell from 33.4 births
per 1000 nonwhite population to 32.2 in 1962. The nonwhite birth
rate remains about 50 per cent higher than the white birth rate. One







VITAL STATISTICS


of the principal reasons for the declining birth rate, especially among
the white, is that a large portion of Florida's in-migration has been by
persons beyond the child-bearing ages.

Deaths
The preliminary mortality data for 1962 indicate a rise of 7.7
per cent in resident deaths (48,690 to 52,443) yielding a rate of 9.8
per 1000 population as compared with the 1961 rate of 9.4. Deaths
among white residents rose from 39,703 and a rate per 1000 popula-
tion of 9.4 in 1961 to 43,110 and a rate of 9.8 in 1962. Nonwhite
deaths rose from 8987 and a rate of 9.7 in 1961 to 9333 deaths in
1962 with a rate of 9.8. Once again, increases in the state's aged
population was probably the main cause of the higher rates.
The 10 leading causes of death with rates per 100,000 popula-
tion for 1962, and with the comparative position of these causes in
1952 are represented in Table 10. The first six of these causes have
remained in the same position throughout the period. It is interesting
to note that the top three of these diseases-heart disease, cancer and
cerebral vascular disease-are diseases associated with aging and all
three experienced a rise in rates during the 1952-1962 period. This
rise in death rates is probably due to the increasing average age of
Florida citizens. Although the next two causes-all accidents and dis-
eases of early infancy-retained their positions throughout this period,
both experienced a drop in death rates. Influenza and pneumonia's
position also remained static, although it shows a slight increase in
rate during the period.
Three of the remaining leading causes of death (general arteri-
osclerosis, other circulatory diseases and diabetes mellitus) are also of
a chronic nature and are more prevalent among the aged. Since 1952,
general arteriosclerosis has moved from eighth place to seventh, and
the death rate per 100,000 population rose slightly (15.4 to 16.4).
Deaths from other circulatory diseases rose dramatically during this
10-year period as this cause went from a ranking of sixteenth place in
1952 to eighth in 1962 with a rate twice that of 1952 (7.7 to 15.4).
Diabetes mellitus experienced a slight drop in death rate (14.0 to
13.9) during the 1952-1962 period, but retained its ranking of the
ninth leading cause of death. Ranking tenth in 1962 were suicide
deaths, with a rate of 13.1 per 100,000 population compared with 11.6
and a rank of twelfth in 1952. Although suicide is not generally thought
of as a cause of death directly associated with aging, the death rate
increases markedly among older people. Tuberculosis and chronic ne-
phritis, ranking seventh and tenth in 1952, dropped to rankings of
nineteenth and fifteenth, respectively, in 1962.








70 ANNUAL REPORT,


Marriages, Divorces and Annulments
There were 41,540 marriages in Florida in 1962, giving an
increase of 54.3 per cent over 1952 when 26,924 marriages were
recorded. However, the rate per 1000 population has dropped from
8.9 in 1952 to 7.8 in 1962 (12.4 per cent).
Divorces and annulments totaled 22,180 in 1962; an increase
of 8.4 per cent over the 20,468 granted in 1952. The rate per 1000
population has dropped from 6.7 in 1952 to 4.1 in 1962 (38.8 per
cent).

Infant Mortality
There were 3259 infant deaths in 1962. The rate per 10,000
live births has declined from 34.0 in 1952 to 28.2 (17.1 per cent)
in 1962. The white rate declined from 25.8 to 22.2 between 1952
and 1962, and the nonwhite rate fell from 55.3 in 1952 to 44.8 in
1962.


TABLE 8
ACTIVITIES OF THE BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
DURING THE YEARS 1961 AND 1962.

Activity 1961 1962 Per Cent
Change
Current certificates fled 228,457 231,997 + 1.5
Delayed birth certificates filed_.......... .. ... 3,519 3,254 7.5
Amended certificates filed for adoptions ..... 3,900 4,225 + 8.3
Adoption reports forwarded to other states .... 1,045 1,210 +15.8
Legitimations processed-..... ... 466 526 +12.9
Legal changes of name received .......... 935 976 + 4.4
Requests for certifications:
Total.. .... .. 119,822 122,149 + 1.9
Fee paid ....... 96,000 98,800 + 2.9
Free .- .-. 23,822 23,349 2.0
Photostats made --------- ... 127,843 134,254 + 5.0
Birth registration cards made ... ...... 22,924 23,665 + 3.2
Fees collected and transmitted to State Treasurer.. $151,990.78 $157,194.42 + 3.4


1962









VITAL STATISTICS 71








TABLE 9
RESIDENT 'BIRTHS AND DEATHS WITH RATES
'PER 1000 POPULATION, :FLORIDA,
1940, 1950, AND. 1952-1962

Midyear
Year Population Births Birth Deaths Death
Estimate Rate Rate
1962 ..... ....... 5,349,900 115,520 21.6 52,443 9.8.
1961 ....5,158,100 116,886 22.7 49,110 9.5
1960 ..-...5,012,100 115,610 23.1 47,937 9.6
1959-............... 4,742,900 112,733 23.8 44,179 9.3
1958.......... .... .... 4,498,100 108,014 24.0 43,353 9.6
1957................ ..... 4,186,200 103,806 24.8 39,937 9.5
1956.......... 3,893,400 97,320 25.0 36,705 9.4
1955- .. ..... 3,662,000 89,112 24.3 33,295 9.1
1954 .......... 3,431,100 84,831 24.7 31,503 9.2
1953 ..- .... 3,223,000 80,087 24.8 30,529 9.5
1952 .. ............. 3,033,100 74,219 24.5 29,136 .9.6
1950 ....... .. ... 2,797,100 64,370 23.0 26,525 9.5
1940 .......- .. ....... .......... 1,915,155 33,696 17.6 21,458 11.2

*Provisional estimate.










-..
TABLE 10

TEN LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH WITH RATES PER 100,000 POPULATION, FLORIDA, 1952 AND 1962


NUMBER OF DEATHS RATE*"

CAUSE OF DEATH 1962** 1952 1962 1952 c

Non- Now- Non- Non- '
Total White white Total White white Total White white Total White white

Total Deaths 52,443 43,110 9,333 29,136 21,615 7,521 9.8 9.8* 9.8* 9.6* 9.0' 11.9'

1 Diseases of the heart (400-443)- 18,900 16,599 2,301 9,577 7,787 1,790 353.3 377.8 240.6 315.7 324.3 283.3 1
2 Malignant neoplasms (140-205) 8,765 7,692 1,073 4,195 3,523 672 163.8 175.1 112.2 138.3 146.7 106.4 2
3 Cerebral vascular disease (330-334)- 6,197 5,032 1,165 3,301 2,383 918 115.8 114.5 121.8 108.8 99.2 145.3 3 O
4 All accidents (800-962) 3,129 2,351 778 2,015 1,454 561 58.5 53.5 81.3 66.4 60.6 88.8 4
5 Diseases of early infancy (760-776)- 1,947 1,192 755 1,510 886 624 36.4 27.1 78.9 49.8 36.9 98.8 5 I
,6 Influenza'and pneumonia (480-493)- 1,679 1,176 503 901 452 449 31.4 26.8 52.6 29.7 18.8 71.1 6
7 General arteriosclerosis (450)- 880 775 105 469 396 73 16.4 17.6 11.0 15.4 16.5 11.6 8
8 Other circulatory disease (451-468)- 822 706 116 233 179 54 15.4 16.1 12.1 7.7 7.5 8.5 16
9 Diabetes mellitus (260) 745 591 154 424 328 96 13.9 13..5 16.1 14.0 13.7 15.2 9 0\
10 Suicide (963, 970-979) 700 670 30 353 331 22 13.1 15.3 3.1 11.6 13.8 3.5 12

19 Tuberculosis-all forms (001-019).. 215 136 79 501 250 251 4.0 3.1 8.3 16.5 10.4 39.7 7
15 Chronic nephritis (592-594) 326 219 107 423 246 177 6.1 5.0 11.2 13.9 10.2 28.0 10

*Rate per 1000 population.
*Based on midyear population estimates.
*""Provisional data.






TABLE 11
RESIDENT DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY CAUSE, BY RACE, FLORIDA, 1962 (PRELIMINARY)

CAUSE OF DEATH DEATHS Bate per 100,000 Population
(Numbers in parentheses refer to the International List of Causes of Death) Total White Nonwhite Total White Nonwhite
ALL CAUSES 52,443 43,110 9,333 9.8* 9.8* 9.8*
Tuberculosis of respiratory system (001-008) 202 130 72 3.8 3.0 7.5
Tuberculosis, other forms (010-019) --13 6 7 0.2 0.1 0.7
Syphilis and its sequelae (020-029) ...106 57 49 2.0 1.3 5.1
Typhoid fever (040) 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Dysentery, all forms (045-048) 10 5 5 0.2 0.1 0.5
Diphtheria (055) .-1 0 1 0.0 0.1
Meningococcal infections (057) 219 16 3 0.4 0.4 0.3
Acute poliomyelitis (080) 1 0 1 0.0 0.1
Acute infectious encephalitis (082) 41 37 4 0.8 0.8 0.4
Measles (085) 10 5 5 0.2 0.1 0.5
Typhus and other rickettsial diseases (100-108) _- 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0
All other diseases classified as infective and parasitic
(030 to 138 with exception of above causes) -- 189 124 65 3.5 2.8 6.8
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and
haematopoietic tissues (140-205) 8,765 7,692 1,073 163.8 175.1 112.2
Diabetes mellitus (260) 745 591 154 13.9 13.5 16.1
Anemias (290-293) 117 81 36 2.2 1.8 3.8
Major cardiovascular-renal disease -27,525 23,608 3,917 514.5 537.4 409.5
Cerebral vascular disease (330-334) 6,197 5,032 1,165 115.8 114.5 121.8
Diseases of the heart 18,900 16,599 2,301 353.3 377.8 240.6
Rheumatic fever (400-402) -- 15I 10 5 0.3 0.2 0.5
Chronic rheumatic heart disease (410-416) 461 414 47 8.6 9.4 4.9
Arteriosclerotic heart disease, coronary disease (420) 14,708 13,456 1,252 274.9 306.3 130.9
Nonrheumatic chronic endocarditis and myocardial degeneration (421, 422) 1,170 943 221 21.9 21.6 23.1
Hypertension with heart disease (440-443) 1,552 974 578 29.0 22.2 60.4
Other diseases of heart (430-434) 9..94 796 198 18.6 18.1 20.7
Hypertension without heart disease (444-447) 400 277 123 7.5 6.3 12.9
General arteriosclerosis (450) --. 880 775 105 16.4 17.6 11.0
Other circulatory disease (451-468) 822 706 116 15.4 16.1 12.1
Chronic and unspecified nephritis (592-594) 326 219 107 6.1 5.0 11.2
Influenza (480-483) 89 56 33 1.7 1.3 3.5
Pneumonia (490-493) -1,590 1,120 470 29.7 25.5 49.1
Ulcer of stomach and duodenum (540-541) ...325 286 39 6.1 6.5 4.1
Intestinal obstruction and hernia (560, 561, 570) -_.. ah o272 225 47 5.1 5.1 4.9
Gastritis, duodenitis, enteritis and colitis, except diarrhea of
the newborn (543, 571, 572) -. 302 163 139 5.6 3.7 14.5
Cirrhosis of liver (581) -618 557 61 11.6 12.7 6.4
Acute nephritis and nephrosis (590, 591) .- 62 34 28 1.2 0.8 2.9
Complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
(640-652, 660, 670-689) d the puerp m 49 21 28 4.2* 2.5* 9.2*
Congenital malformations (750-759) ___598 460 138 11.2 10.5 14.4
Birth injuries, postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis (706-762) 834 555 279 15.6 12.6 29.2
Infection of the newborn (763.768) ...... .... .. 164 64 100 3.1 1.5 10.5
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy, and immaturity unqualified (769-776) 949 573 376 17.7 13.0 39.3
Symptoms, senility, and il-defined causes (780-795) __757 436 321 14.1 9.9 33.6
All other diseases (residual) .. 3,786 3,021 765 70.8 68.8 80.0
Motor vehicle accidents (810-835) 1,351 1,078 273 25.3 24.5 28.5
All other accidents (800-802, 840-962) ____ 1,778 1,27 50 33.2 29.0 52.8
Suicide and self-inflicted injury (963. 970-979) 700 670 30 13.1 15.3 3.1
Homicide and operations of war (964, 965, 980-999) 475 166. 309 8.9 3.8 32.3
Infant mortality (deaths under one year of age) _3,259 1,880 1,379 28.2"* 22.1**. 45.18 *

*Bate per 1000 population. **Rate per 10,000 live births, ***Rate per 1000 live births. -Less than 0.05 pet 100,000 population.








TABLE 11A
RESIDENT DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY CAUSE, BY RACE, FLORIDA, 1961 (FINAL FIGURES)

CAUSE OF DEATH DEATHS Rate per 100,000 Population
*(Numbers in parentheses refer to the International List of Causes of Death) Total White Nonwhite Total White Nonwhite
ALL CAUSES 48,690 39,703 8,987 9.4- 9.4- 9.7-
Tuberculosis of respiratory system (001-008) 200 132 68 39 3.1 7.4
Tuberculosis, other forms (010-019) 17 9 8 0.3 0.2 0.9
Syphilis and its sequelae (020-029) 97 35 62 19 0.8 6.7
Typhoid fever (040) __ 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Dystery, all form (045-048) 6 4 2 0.1 0.1 0.2
Scarlet fever and trep sore throat (050, 051) .... 5 5 0 0.1 0.1 0.0
Diphtheria (055) -1 0 1 0.0 0.1
UWooping cough (056) -- 4 2 2 0.1 0.2
Meningococcal infections (057) 17 11 6 0.3 0.3 0.7



(030 to 138 with exception of above causes) __ 170 114 56 3.3 2.7 6.1
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic and
haematopoietic tissues (140-205) -- 8,233 7,175 1,058 159.6 169.4 114.7
Benign and unspecified neoplasms (210-239) 123 93 30 2.4 2.2 3.3
Diabetes mellits (260) 753 576 177 14.6 13.6 19.2
Anemias (290-293) e 103 67 36 2.0 1.6 3.9
lMajor cardiovascular-renal disease ...-25,500 21,747 3,753 494.4 513.4 407.0
Cerebral vascular disease (330-334) -..... -5,660 4,559 1,101 109.7 107.6 119.4
Diseases of the heart 17,586 15,410 2,176 340.9 363.8 236.0
Rheumatic fever (400-402) 9 4 5 0.2 0.1 0.5
Chronic rheumatic heart disease (410-416) .___ 461 421 40 8.9 9,9 4.3
Arteriosclerotic heart disease, coronary disease (420) .... 13,647 12,403 1,244 264.6 292.8 134.9
Nonrheumatic chronic endocarditis and myocardial degeneration (421, 422) 1,136 938 198 22.0 22.1 21.5
Hypertension with heart disease (440-443) -- 1,493 966 527 28.9 22.8 57.1
Other diseases of heart (430-434) .....840 678 162 16.3 16.0 17.6
Hypertension without heart disease (444-447) ..371 227 144 7.2 5.4 15.6
General arterioscleross (450) -- 8,2. 843 738 105 16.3 17.4 11.4
Other circulatory disease (451-468) 720 608 112 14.0 14.4 12.1
Chronic and unspecified nephritis (592-594) __ 320 205 115 6.2 4.8 12.5
Influenza (480-483) 50 24 26 1.0 0.6 2.8
Pneumonia (490-493) 1 1,192 817 375 23.1 19.3 40.7
Bronchitis (500-502) .101 86 15 2.0 2.0 1.6
Ulcer of stomach and duodenum (540-541) 315 271 44 6.1 6.4 4.8
Appendictiis (550-553) ......... __es (451 38 13 1.0 0.9 1.4
Intestinal obstruction and hernia (560, 561, 570) 257 202 55 5.0 4.8 6.0
Gastritis, duodenitis, enteritis and colitis, except diarrhea of
the newborn (543, 571, 572) h 337 175 162 6.5 4.1 17.6
Cirrhosis of liver (581) 1591 531 60 11.5 12.5 6.5
Acute nephriti an nenhrosis (590, -51) 48 22 26 0.9 0.5 2.8
Hyperplasia of prostate (610) 50 ... ... 133 103 30 2.6 2.4 3.3
Complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
(640-652, 660, 670-689) .1.... .. 58 19 39 5.0'*1 2.2 12.7
Congenital malformations (750-759) __.5 612 465 147 11.9 11.0 15.9
Birth injuries, postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis (760-762) 54-1. 1 906 578 328 17.6 13.6 35.6
Infection of the newborn (763-768) 162 66 96 3.1 1.6 10.4
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy, and immaturity unqualified (769-776) 988 663 325 19.2 15.7 35.2
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined causes (780-795). 777 457 320 15.1 10.8 34.7
All other diseases (residual) 2,867 2,288 579 55.6 54.0 62.8
Motor vehicle accidents (810835) 1,241 979 262 24.1 23.1 28.4
All other accidents (800-802, 840-962) 1,598 ,139 459 31.0 26.9 49.8
Suicide and sef-inflcted injury 963, 970-979) --664 630 34 12.9 14.9 3.7
Homicide and operations of war (964,965, 980-999) 477 152 325 9.2 3.6 35.2
Infant mortality (deaths under one year of age) 03,390 1,994 1,396 29.1"'* 23.21 45.3"*


**Rate per 10,000 live births. **Rate per 1000 live births. -Less than 0.05 per 100,000 population.


*Rate per 1000 population











VITAL STATISTICS 75


TABLE 12

ESTIMATED POPULATION AND RESIDENT
BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND INFANT DEATHS,
BY RACE, BY COUNTY, FLORIDA, 1962

(Preliminary)


Population BIRTHS DEATHS INFANT DEATHS
COUNTY 1962 -
Prov. Est. Non- Non- Non-
Total White white Total White white Total White white
STATE....... 5,349,900 115,520 84,921 30,599 52,443 43,110 9,333 3,259 1,880 1,379


Alachua........
Baker..--...
Bay..........
Bradford---
Brevard...--
Broward.....
Calhoun..--
Charlotte...
Citrus- -
Clas--
co&=r........
Coler __._
Columbia--.-
Dade-___
DeSoto___.
Dixie.__..
Duval.--...
Escambia...
Flagler---
FrankUln...-
Gadsden.__
Gilchrist-...
Glades. ....
Gulf---..__
Hamilton_..-..
Hardee......
Hendry-_
Hernando.-__
Highlands.--
Hillsborough-
Holmes....
Indian River-
Jackson--._
efferson---_ _
ayette-
Lake-.----
Lee--__
Leo----..
Levy
Liberty-
Madison__-
Manatee_---
Marion-.....
Martin ~._
Monroe----
Nassau ........-
Okaloosa-....
Okeechobee....
Orange-
Osceola---.
Palm Beach_-
Pasco-,
Pinellas___
Polk
Putnam---
St. Johns_-_
St. Lucie_-_
Santa Rosa_..
Sarasota-...
Seminole.........
Sumter^..--
Suwannee.__
Taylor---
Union-
Volusia---
Wakulla---_
Walton_-.-
Washington.


82,800
7,700
66,600
12,900
134,700
377,000
7,500
16,700
10,300
19,000
19,300
21,200
1,024,100
12,700
4,600
482,600
183,100
4,100
7,100
43,100
2,700
2,600
9,400
7,700
12,900
9,600
12,000
23,600
413,000
11,100
28,400
34,900
9,200
3,200
61,700
65,300
76,200
11,300
3,100
14,900
75,200
56,600
19,400
53,900
18,300
63,600
7,700
285,400
19,500
252,900
38,600
401,300
206,300
33,000
30,500
43,500
32,700
84,500
62,800
12,400
16,200
13,600
6,400
133,100
5,500
15,600
11,500


2,205
179
1,870
284
3,858
7,433
178
237
175
477
460
527
19,686
269
130
12,599
5,039
98
159
1,134
53
47
259
209
297
264
289
574
9,281
193
643
716
249
57
1,176
1,308
1,905
257
69
377
1,176
1,280
397
1,379
437
2,047
214
6,682
340
5,287
617
5,660
4,479
793
674
976
1,057
1,363
1,537
276
367
349
103
2,200
106
287
217


1,487
121
1,540
200
3,252
5,132
138
211
131
393
364
327
14,567
190
111
9,181
3,717
44
122
272
43
27
187
105
258
146
186
385
7,421
180
449
442
71
43
812
992
1,211
134
54
158
835
705
274
1,242
305
1,839
166
5,323
264
3,516
521
4,539
3,305
480
438
499
963
1,102
1,119
146
237
247
65
1,544
63
239
141


718
58
330
84
606
2,301
40
26
44
84
96
200
5,119
79
19
3,418
1,322
54
37
862
10
20
72
104
39
118
103
189
1,860
13
194
274
178
14
364
316
694
123
15
219
341
575
123
137
132
208
48
1,359
76
1,771
96
1,121
1,174
313
236
477
94
261
418
130
130
102
38
656
43
48
76


600
55
452
123
830
3,546
83
233
126
151
154
234
9,334
121
51
3,953
1,203
70
96
358
37
24
64
87
126
80
123
304
4,109
122
326
323
110
38
763
657
519
111
18
140
1,051
584
232
364
143
288
57
2,438
329
2,669
495
6,249
1,907
330
333
427
214
1,100
510
152
158
119
55
2,045
44
151
145


330
42
371
93
708
3,022
70
221
109
125
114
152
8,186
97
41
2,692
853
42
74
115
33
15
45
47
117
52
109
232
3,435
118
260
225
37
34
653
540
284
80
15
68
928
354
173
310
96
260
41
2,080
294
2,112
467
5,923
1,537
219
235
294
176
1,017
347
119
112
73
43
1,776
26
134
108


270
13
81
30
122
524
13
12
17
26
40
82
1,148
24
10
1,261
350
28
22
243
4
9
19
40
9
28
14
72
674
4
66
98
73
4
110
117
235
31
3
72
123
230
59
54
47
28
16
358
35
557
S28
326
370
111
98
133
38
83
163
33
46
46
12
269
18
17
37


68
7
55
9
91
214
6
4
8
15
14
19
478
8
3
360
143
8
4
71
4
3
4
8
4.
7
8
21
277
8
23
18
11
3
44
38
46
7
1
14
35
34
16
28
11
48
6
194
16
149
13
135
132
23
23
36
23
40
41
13
8
7
5
68
3
10
8











76 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 12A

ESTIMATED POPULATION, RESIDENT BIRTH AND DEATH RATES
PER 1000 POPULATION AND RESIDENT INFANT DEATH RATES
PER 1000 LIVE BIRTHS, BY RACE AND COUNTY, 1961
(FINAL FIGURES)


Midyear BIRTH RATE DEATH RATE INFANT DEATH RATE
COUNTY Population
COUNTY Estimate Non- Non- Non-
1961 Total White white Total White white Total White white

STATE 5,158,100 22.6 20.3 33.4 9.4 9.4 9.7 29.1 23.2 45.8


Alachuat-..-..
Baker ._
Bay--........
Bradford..-
Brevard .........
Broward .__
Calhoun.__..
Charlotte ..---
Citrus .-_....
Cla y__
Collier. -
Columbia .
Dade __
DeSotot_ __
Dixie.__
Duval____
Escambia.....
Flagler .....
Franklin .......
Gadsdent .--
Gilchrist........
Glades.............
Gulf
Hamilton ....
Hardee._ .....
Hendry....__
Hernando.--.
Highlands.......
Hillsborough...
Holmes .........-
Indian River--
Jackson .....
Jefferson..-.....-
Lafayette-..-
Lake....----
Lee-..... .._._
Leont-..--.---
Levy__
Liberty__ ..
Madison-__
Manatee__.._
Marion_..._
Martin--__
Monroe --_
Nassau ._.
Okalossa ..-
Okeechobee--
Orange_ ....
Osceola-...-
Palm Beach_..
Pasco ....._
Pinellas-....
Polk...- ..
Putnam....
St. Johns..--.
St. Lucie _.....
Santa Rosa_.
Sarasota .....
Seminole.-
Sumter -..
Suwannee ._
Taylor -
Uniont_-
Volusia
Wakulla -.
Walton--....
Washington..-


79,700
7,200
66,000
12,800
119,600
367,500
7,000
16,400
11,000
21,400
18,700
19,600
968,700
13,800
4,700
460,900
180,400
4,600
7,000
41,300
2,700
3,000
11,000
7,900
12,500
9,100
12,400
22,600
402,100
10,700
26,100
35,400
9,600
3,100
57,500
63,000
74,400
11,200
3,100
15,600
74,500
53,200
19,100
47,300
18,000
67,600
8,100
275,400
19,500
236,300
37,400
392,000
201,500
32,300
30,900
43,900
28,900
82,300
61,100
11,500
14,900
12,900
6,200
129,900
5,800
14,700
11,600


32.6
29.2
30.1
24.5
29.2
21.0
21.7
14.3
17.3
23.6
22.8
26.1
20.2
25.0
24.0
27.9
29.2
23.5
24.3
32.9
23.3
19.3
26.1
28.4
23.8
27.7
26.2
23.9
23.4
14.6
24.5
20.4
26.6
15.2
20.1
20.8
30.0
21.0
27.7
22.4
17.1
23.2
21.3
27.5
26.0
30.4
26.4
25.2
18.0
21.3
18.3
14.7
22.8
27.1
21.9
21.7
35.6
16.2
25.2
22.0
23.2
26.9
27.0
18.5
19.5
20.6
19.9


31.1
27.0
29.4
23.2
28.0
17.3
21.4
14.2
14.6
22.8
21.7
23.5
17.6
23.5
22.5
26.5
27.4
11.8
23.1
20.5
19.2
20.0
22.7
22.7
21.8
24.1
22.4
19.5
22.1
13.9
20.7
17.6
16.7
10.4
17.3
18.3
28.9
14.1
26.2
17.2
14.3
20.1
15.7
27.8
24.6
29.6
25.4
23.8
16.3
18.3
17.7
12.9
21.1
23.4
19.2
17.9
35.6
14.3
23.9
18.1
19.5
25.2
22.6
16.1
18.3
19.1
16.1


36.2
36.9
34.2
29.0
39.2
39.2
23.6
16.0
29.5
28.3
28.2
32.0
35.3
29.7
32.9
32.8
36.3
41.7
28.7
40.3
56.7
18.3
36.9
35.4
42.5
37.2
40.4
40.2
32.0
32.5
38.4
26.5
33.3
47.5
31.3
34.2
32.2
36.8
36.0
28.1
32.6
28.8
42.8
25.5
30.2
41.1
31.5
33.3
32.4
31.3
22.6
33.9
30.5
35.4
28.9
29.7
35.7
34.0
28.9
33.0
32.7
32.2
44.4
30.4
22.4
30.5
35.2


7.5
8.2
6.2
10.0
5.6
8.7
10.8
13.7
11.1
7.6
7.7
10.1
.9.2
8.9
9.2
7.5
6.3
6.4
13.3
9.2
10.4
10.0
5.6
10.2
9.3
6.2
11.4
10.8
9.3
10.8
10.5
8.2
10.3
11.1
12.8
9.0
7.0
10.4
11.2
10.5
12.7
10.0
10.3
6.9
7.9
4.2
7.4
7.9
15.6
10.3
13.6
14.8
8.5
9.3
11.3
10.6
5.6
11.0
7.0
10.2
10.5
9.0
13.7
14.4
7.1
9.8
11.0


12.4
13.1
7.2
11.3
7.5
8.0
11.8
12.0
9.0
12.3
9.4
12.9
7.6
11.3
11.4
10.7
9.2
13.3
10.7
11.0
26.7
4.2
11.2
10.9
8.3
15.2
10.4
13.3
12.2
27.5
8.2
8.5
9.5
12.5
12.1
12.2
11.9
12.6
14.0
8.5
9.4
12.4
10.5
9.2
12.0
7.7
16.9
9.0
13.3
9.0
9.0
8.3
8.7
15.2
12.0
9.4
16.2
10.9
10.3
13.3
16.1
13.1
10.0
10.1
12.4
11.0
11.7


*Based on less than 100 live births, which limits the significance of the rate.
tRates based on population excluding large institutional segments.


23.5
38.1
23.1
31.8
28.9
30.0
39.5
38.5
21.1
25.8
35.1
45.0
24.4
33.0
35.4
26.2
24.8
46.3
23.5
60.9
31.7*
17.2*
34.8
31.3
23.6
55.6
33.8
51.9
32.2
32.1
21.9
36.1
39.2
42.6*
43.4
31.3
32.4
51.1
23.3*
48.7
38.6
28.4
46.8
26.9
42.7
27.8
28.0
25.5
31.3
37.7
36.5
27.2
28.3
33.1
25.1
55.6
23.3
24.7
24.7
39.5
34.8
11.5
0
25.8
17.7
23.1
30.3


13.3
39.7
20.0
26.4
26.6
21.1
39.7
36.7
22.9
28.6
35.9
43.5
21.3
28.0
11.1*
20.7
18.9
30.3*
23.6
33.6
0*
27.8*
20.9
40.0
20.3
31.4
27.3
37.5
26.2
28.0
18.9
32.6
15.4*
35.7*
31.1
27.8
20.2
45.5
29.4*
42.6
34.3
21.5
29.3
24.6
45.2
25.3
28.9
22.1
31.8
27.2
32.3
24.2
22.8
13.4
16.2
37.7
18.9
19.7
14.5
19.5
19.0
16.4
0*
24.8
13.3*
16.5
26.7


45.1
33.9*
38.3
46.0*
41.9
49.7
38.5*
62.5*
16.9*
11.8*
32.3*
47.6
33.2
44.9*
130.4*
40.7
41.6
53.3*
23.3*
69.2
117.6*
0*
62.5*
24.2
39.2*
96.8*
47.6
77.7
57.7
76.9*
27.9
41.2
47.4
52.6*
71.4
41.3
53.6
56.0
0*
52.9
'48.9
37.3
71.9
48.0
36.8
51.8
24.4*
39.3
29.4*
58.5
63.2*
38.9
44.9
62.1
40.7
77.8
80.0*
44.1
50.5
70.7*
59.7
0
0*
28.4
26.3*
49.2*
37.0










VITAL STATISTICS 77


TABLE 13

PRELIMINARY TOTALS OF RESIDENT DEATHS FROM
CERTAIN CAUSES BY COUNTIES, FLORIDA, 1962


Cardio-Vascular-Renal
Diseases
4

COUNTIES | | *
,0 .4 S w Q


STATE.................. 49 215 106 10 1 8,765 745 117 1,679 6,197 18,900 326 2,102 1,351 1,778
Alachua........---------- 0 1 1 0 0 98 2 1 18 85 165 5 30 18 19
Baker .........----------- 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 6 8 14 0 4 0 2
Bay ......-..........------ 0 3 2 0 0 60 8 3 14 45 132 0 19 13 24
Bradford .............. 1 1 0 0 0 20 1 0 6 16 31 3 3 5 6
Brevard ------------....... 0 2 0 0 0 114 16 0 21 78 279 4 29 38 35
Broward ....---....... 4 7 7 0 0 638 60 13 122 324 1,322 27 154 70 119
Calhoun .-.......... 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 2 10 39 0 2 1 3
Charlotte ..---...-------- 0 0 0 0 0 42 4 0 2 23 115 0 9 2 5
Citrus --- ..... 0 0 0 0 0 25 0 0 3 18 53 0 5 2 4
Clay.................-------------- 0 0 0 0 0 26 4 1 6 24 42 0 10 1 9
Collier..--..------ 0 0 0 1 0 22 2 0 6 14 47 1 7 6 5
Columbia..--.. 0 6 1 0 0 28 2 0 6 34 76 1 5 13 9
Dade......-............. 11 59 20 3 0 1,727 156 18 268 859 3,436 55 338 225 246
DeSoto............. 0 0 1 0 0 22 2 0 2 17 34 2 7 3 2
Dixie ............---........ 0 1 0 0 0 11 1 0 4 7 9 1 3" 4 1
Duval -------------........ 3 24 19 1 0 637 55 9 125 471 1,260 18 166 107 166
Escambia.............. 1 9 1 0 0 168 7 1 46 123 412 4 40 60 60
Flagler .............. 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 4 9 20 0 4 3 6
Franklin......--------- 0 0 0 0 0 20 1 0 2 17 40 1 4 2 5.
Gadsden -...-....---------1 0 1 0 0 36 4 1 18 32 97 2 11 13 33
Gilchrist......--------..... 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 3 17 1 2 0 2
Glades ................ 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 8 0 0 0 2
Gulf ........----------__...... 0 1 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 8 27 0 1 1 8
Hamilton............... 0 1 0 0 0 7 2 0 3 9 44 0 2 2 1
Hardee.-..-........------ 0 1 2 0 0 23 1 0 4 22 34 0 4 7 6
Hendry ................ 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 3 3 24 0 6 8 3
Hernando............. 0 0 0 0 0 27 2 0 2 16 36 0 9 6 1
Highlands............. 0 1 1 0 0 56 6 2 7 38 104 4 8 11 6
Hillsborough......... 6 16 10 1 0 667 63 18 144 508 1,498 26 147 95 130
Holmes................. 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 4 14 54 3 5 3 2
Indian River ......... 0 0 1 0 0 53 2 0 13 35 127 2 8 13 12
Jackson .................. 0 0 1 0 0 41 5 0 10 47 120 5 22 8 6
efferson ............. 1 0 0 0 1 14 1 0 5 15 36 2 8 0 6
Lafayette ............. 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 13 1 1 1 4
Lake ....-................. 0 1 1 0 0 126 11 2 22 82 276 6 48 23 27
Lee ...-------------..........---........0 1 0 0 0 101 11 0 18 71 212 5 25 18 25
Leon .......-............ 0 5 1 0 0 70 5 5 23 62 164 5 16 10 21
Levy .---- .... 0 0 0 0 11 1 0 11 18 30 0 5 3 6
Liberty ............... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 5 0 1 1 1
Madison---------..... 1 0 2 0 0 19 0 1 6 9 57 0 2 3 8
Manatee.....-...... 0 4 2 0 0 158 20 1 48 157 417 6 37 16 38
Marion ........... 2 2 1 0 0 88 4 0 10 97 203 5 18 17 27
Martin ............. 0 0 2 0 0 32 4 0 5 31 80 2 8 8 5
Monroe .......------ 1 0 0 0 0 57 5 0 11 42 111 4 14 21 16
Nassau .... ..... 0 0 0 0 0 30 2 1 3 15 36 2 3 8 8
Okaloosa...------......----..... 0 2 0 0 0 30 4 0 14 27 94 5 7 10 15
Okeechobee.......... 0 1 0 O 0 6 1 0 6 3 16 1 1 3 8
Orange................ 2 8 3 1 0 385 33 3 102 322 896 18 80 74 79
Osceola----..---- 0 0 2 0 0 56 1 0 11 46 106 2 12 5 15
Palm Beach.--.. 4 10 0 0 0 502 46 6 84 356 885 8 90 80 96
Pasco .................... 1 1 1 0 0 80 7 0 10 62 210 1 24 18 17
Pinellas ............... 0 13 6 1 0 1,144 63 12 158 925 2,541 25 323 89 107
Polk ...--.............. 4 8 2 0 0 313 34 4 58 233 630 19 85 72 67
Putnam ........... 1 3 2 2 0 32 6 2 16 31 129 14 6 10 19
St. Johns ...._...... 0 0 1 0 0 56 4 1 11 38 107 4 19 4 16
St. Lucie ....... 0 4 2 0 0 74 7 0 13 41 137 3 12 14 13
Santa Rosa........... 0 1 0 0 0 23 2 0 8 25 71 2 4 9 36
Sarasota .............. 1 3 1 0 0 201 14 1 31 143 420 3 57 24 38
Seminole............-------.. 1 2 2 0 0 88 8 1 20 54 169 0 20 12 23
Sumter .......... 0 0 0 0 0 20 3 0 4 18 44 3 2 7 10
Suwannee........... 0 1 1 0 0 16 2 1 8 27 51 2 5 1 12
Taylor .................... 1 0 2 0 0 20 0 1 7 17 45 0 4 4 3
Union................ 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 24 0 2 1 2
Volusia ........... 2 9 4 0 0 336 36 7 64 232 834 12 89 39 60
Wakulla................ 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 2 10 10 0 2 0 2
Walton............ 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 8 27 64 0 1 3 7
Washington-.......... 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 1 5 26 61 1 7 3 3

*Includes all vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system.










78 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


TABLE 14

MARRIAGES BY RACE, DIVORCES AND ANNULMENTS
BY COUNTY, FLORIDA, 1962

MARRIAGES ANNUL.
COUNTY ,DIVORCES MENTS
Total White Nonwhite MN
STATE- ....-- 41,504 34,499 7,005 21,997 181
Alachua .. 540 391 149 187 0
Baker- 86 64 22 61 0
Bay 492 404 88 273 1
Bradford_-___ 116 104 12 61 1
Brevard--- 963 821 142 673 5
Broward_... 2,961 2,438 523 1,392 10
Calhoun--------..... 41 38 3 50 0
Charlotte- ... 113 104 9 74 0
Citrus ...-- 105 89 16 61 0
Clay .. 106 94 12 77 0
Co ler ..... -189 167 22 82 0
Columbia ......... 189 123 66 86 0
Dade....----. 8,953 7,730 1,223 4,765 64
DeSoto....-..-..- .... 136 119 17 49 1
Dixie...---- 54 45 9 30 0
Duval--- .----.- 2,991 2,363 628 2,057 10
Escambia...-......... 1,448 1,145 303 959 19
Flagler. 52 36 16 95 1
Franklin ........ 59 50 9 27 0
Gadsden----.. .... 152 78 74 77 0
Gilchrist ._ .... 48 38 10 7 0
Glades -- 36 25 11 24 0
Gulf..-. .---- 89 67 22 38 0
Hamilton .58 38 20 32 0
Hardee _178 151 27 273 2
Hendry __ 127 100 27 68 0
Hernando.___- __ 144 124 20 55 0
Highlands. ---208 158 50 85 2
Hillsboroughh 3,462 2,992 470 1,842 9
Holmes-..--. 119 112 7 64 0
Indian River-- 234 175 59 80 1
Jackson ... ..168 136 32 48 0
Jefferson 56 28 28 30 0
Lafayette 15 15 0 0 0
Lake.- 482 381 101 833 4
Lee- -- 492 409 83 234 1
Leon 480 333 147 240 3
Levy --91 68 23 33 0
Liberty-. 6 5 1 8 0
Madisnn 76 56 20 31 0
Manatee--- 579 473 106 172 0
Marion 478 312 166 122 0
Martin- 192 153 39 88 0
Monroe 443 399 44 293 3
Nassau--- 84 68 16 43 0
Okaloosa- 323 305 18 297 2
Okeechobee 87 73 14 44 0
Orange 2,140 1,806 334 523 4
Osceola..- 230 190 40 77 0
Palm Beach-- h1,946 1,535 411 853 5
Pasco. 400 365 35 112 3
Pinellas_ 2,909 2,617 292 1,337 13
Polk _1,792 1,483 309 773 4
Putnam.... 215 148 67 330 1
St. Johns 218 171 47 217 3
St. Lucie- 355 236 119 191 1
Santa Rosa-.. 205 187 18 106 1
Sarasota __700 643 57 265 1
Seminole-- ........... 366 268 98 226 0
Sumter 130 104 26 111 2
Suwannee.--...... 119 87 32 39 0
Taylor 112 82 30 38 0
Union ... 49 41 8 17 0
Volusia __915 770 145 486 4
WakullUa 36 29 7 0 0
Walton.... 87 74 13 44 0
Washington ... 79 66 13 32 0








VITAL STATISTICS 79

TABLE 15

VITAL STATISTICS SCOREBOARD
BASED ON PROMPTNESS AND COMPLETENESS OF
CERTIFICATES, FLORIDA, 1962


Per Cent of Per Cent of Per Cent 8:
Certificates Complete of ,
COUNTY Filed on Time Certificates Monthly -' 5
______Reports 'n" g
Births Deaths Births Deaths on Timeed 40
STATE-_... ............ 94.9 97.7 99.7 99.5 94.3 486.1 + 1.6


Jax.-Duval .-......... -- 1 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 499.9 + 0.3
Dade...................... 2 98.5 100.0 99.9 99.9 100.0 498.3 + 0.5
Citrus................ 3 99.4 100.0 98.7 100.0 100.0 498.1 + 1.8
Hillsborough........ 4 98.4 99.6 100.0 99.8 100.0 497.8 + 0.5
Martin ........ 5 98.6 100.0 99.7 99.1 100.0 497.4 + 4.7
Volusia.................... 6 99.3 98.8 99.7 99.5 100.0 497.3 + 9.0
Hernando...... 7 99.7 100.0 100.0 97.2 100.0 496.9 + 9.2
Seminole ..---..... 8 99.7 99.5 98.9 98.5 100.0 496.6 + 2.7
Orange............. 8 97.7 99.2 99.9 99.8 100.0 496.6 0.7
Polk..................... 10 98.4 97.9 99.5 99.0 100.0 494.8 +15.3
Escambia............ 11 97.6 97.1 99.9 99.8 100.0 494.4 0.1
Pinellas....---------. 12 96.4 97.7 99.9 99.9 100.0 493.9 1.0
Clay......................... 13 98.2 97.4 98.8 98.0 100.0 492.4 + 2.6
Palm Beach............ 14 92.4 99.2 99.7 99.6 100.0 490.9 + 2.3
Broward............... 15 99.1 100.0 99.8 99.7 91.7 490.3 8.1
Sarasota ........-........ 16 99.4 99.8 99.9 99.3 91.7 490.1 + 8.9
Alachua ............ 17 91.4 98.7 99.8 99.9 100.0 489.8 4.6
Bay......................... 18 95.8 94.5 99.9 97.8 100.0 488.0 +10.9
Jefferson ... 19 98.3 100.0 99.2 98.7 91.7 487.9 7.3
Bradford_--...... 20 99.0 98.4 99.3 99.2 91.7 487.6 +16.4
Suwannee ... .... 21 91.5 97.1 99.7 98.6 100.0 486.9 0
Washington..........- 21 96.9 91.7 100.0 98.3 100.0 486.9 1.5
Baker ............ 23 98.2 99.1 98.8 98.2 91.7 486.0 5.2
Indian River.......... 24 99.0 97.3 98.2 99.7 91.7 485.9 + 9.9
Hardee ------...... 25 98.4 99.0 98.4 98.1 91.7 485.6 +20.7
Lee......... 25 86.5 99.7 99.6 99.8 100.0 485.6 1.7
Putnam............. 27 92.3 95.0 98.9 99.0 100.0 485.2 +14.3
St. Lucie__ ._... 28 92.5 93.5 99.6 99.5 100.0 485.1 + 7.2
Brevard__...._.... 29 96.2 98.9 99.3 98.0 91.7 484.1 +10.1
Gulf .. .... 30 93.3 94.6 99.3 96.4 100.0 483.6 + 3.1
Levy-..........-..-...._. -31 98.1 85.9 99.4 100.0 100.0 483.4 2.4
Walton.......___ 32 92.3 91.7 100.0 99.3 100.0 483.3 + 9.8
Taylor ............ 33 86.9 96.3 99.7 100.0 100.0 482.9 + 9.6
Highlands............... 34 87.9 96.2 99.2 98.6 100.0 481.9 -34.1
Franklin.................. 35 99.4 92.3 100.0 97.4 91.7 480.8 + 8.8
Lake..............-----....... 36 89.5 91.4 99.5 99.0 100.0 479.4 + 8.8
St. Johns .........._... 36 92.4 90.9 98.8 97.3 100.0 479.4 4.6
Manatee.................. 38 84.6 96.8 99.4 98.3 100.0 479.1 + 2.5
Okeechobee..--...._ 39 91.7 89.9 100.0 97.1 100.0 478.7 +38.4
Hamilton ........ 40 93.0 84.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 477.9 +17.1
Charlotte.............. 41 92.4 96.5 96.5 100.0 91.7 477.1 6.7
Hendry.__.............. 42 83.2 98.7 100.0 94.9 100.0 476.8 + 1.5
Flagler ....... 43 94.4 94.1 100.0 100.0 83.3 471.8 + 6.0
DeSoto...................44 98.5 100.0 99.4 98.6 75.0 471.5 -10.2
Collier........... ...... 45 89.3 100.0 100.0 98.8 83.3 471.4 +37.0
Wakulla.................. 46 87.5 92.0 100.0 100.0 91.7 471.2 2.9
Gilchrist......------. 47 85.7 81.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 467.0 +35.1
Holmes............-...... 48 94.1 85.8 94.9 100.0 91.7 466.5 2.0
Osceola.---..---. .... 49 67.2 99.0 99.2 98.0 100.0 463.4 + 8.7
Gadsden........... 50 74.3 90.5 99.2 99.1 100.0 463.1 + 3.7
Madison.....---.... 51 98.5 98.2 98.1 100.0 66.7 461.5 -32.3
Santa Rosa-_ ......... 52 90.8 92.2 99.6 94.4 83.3 460.3 +16.2
Monroe....---------. 53 82.2 89.2 98.8 97.8 91.7 459.7 + 4.9
Calhoun- ......... 54 74.5 85.5 99.3 98.7 100.0 458.0 + 0.8
Marion......... 55 71.2 94.6 98.9 99.2 91.7 455.6 + 8.2
Union ....----- 56 70.2 95.5 98.2 100.0 83.3 447.2 2.5
Sumter................... 57 68.2 76.4 99.2 100.0 100.0 443.8 8.6
Liberty................... 58 66.7 100.0 100.0 100.0 75.0 441.7 +48.7
Jackson.............. 59 70.4 78.3 99.8 99.6 91.7 439.8 6.4
Dixie ---........ 60 81.3 64.0 100.0 100.0 91.7 437.0 -21.5
Columbia ........ 61 63.5 83.0 99.1 98.8 91.7 436.1 +11.0
Nassau........- 62 59.3 85.7 99.3 98.0 91.7 434.0 + 2.4
Okaloosa----------.. 63 72.2 72.1 99.0 98.7 91.7 433.7 -39.2
Leon.................. 64 75.4 77.5 99.1 97.8 83.3 433.1 -13.7
Pasco...........- ....... 65 65.4 95.8 99.6 99.4 58.3 418.5 -47.9
Lafayette............ 66 50.0 81.8 92.3 100.0 91.7 415.8 -58.3
Glades................... 67 0.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.7 391.7 -83.3







REPORT, 1962


BUREAU OF MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

L. L. PARKS, M.D., M.P.H.
Director

The work of this bureau is aimed at promoting better care for
mothers and children through the county health departments (CHDs).
This is done by making certain consultative services available to the
counties and by making available funds from the Children's Bureau.
These are used primarily to strengthen the nursing staffs of the CHDs.
Funds and consultative services are also available to the special projects
that are operated through grants from the Children's Bureau. These
presently are the Migrant Project, the Developmental Evaluation Clinic
and the Premature Demonstration Program, and are described later
in this report.
The bureau has continued to make some supplies available to the
CHDs, such as Lofenalac for the early phenylketonuria (PKU) cases
if the patient is indigent. Planned parenthood supplies have been made
available to maternity clinics when requested by the county health
director, and 33 counties made at least one such request during the
year. Medical textbooks on obstetrics, pediatrics, mental retardation,
nutrition and school health program were made available to each
director to build his CHD library. Most of them took advantage of
the offer by requesting one or more books. To strengthen the Audio-
Visual Library of the State Board of Health (SBH), selected new films
on subjects pertaining to the health of mothers and children were pur-
chased from funds available to this bureau.
There are many official and non-official agencies in the state
which are concerned with the health of mothers and children, and
members of the staff of the bureau were frequently called upon to take
part in meetings or conferences with such organizations as the Florida
Children's Commission, Florida Congress of Parents and Teachers
(and local PTA groups), Florida Committee on Rural Health, State
Department of Public Welfare, Florida Medical Association (and local
medical societies), Florida Council for the Blind, Florida Cooperating
Council for Children and Youth, State Department of Education, State
Tuberculosis and Health Association, various nurses organizations,
Sunland Training Centers, Florida Education Association and many
others.

MATERNAL HEALTH
The provisional maternal mortality rate of 4.2 per 10,000 live
births for 1962 shows a slight decline from the 5.0 rate recorded in
1961. There were 49 maternal deaths during the year, compared with
58 the previous year.


80 ANNUAL







MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 81

Final maternal mortality data revealed substantial improvement
for both races. In 1951 the white maternal mortality rate was 7.1
whereas it was 2.2 in 1961; the nonwhite maternal mortality rate was
25.5 in 1951 compared with 12.7 in 1961.
There were 203 midwives licensed to practice during the year
as compared with 217 for 1961, and there continues to be a decrease
each year.
In 1951 the percentage of deliveries in hospitals for white births
was 93.2; whereas, it was 99.0 per cent in 1961. The percentage of
nonwhite hospital deliveries was 43.5 in 1951 as compared with 81.2
per cent in 1961. Physicians delivered 98.0 per cent of white babies
in 1951 and 99.2 per cent in 1961, while physicians delivered 57.1
per cent of nonwhite babies in 1951 and 82.9 per cent in 1961.
Midwives delivered 1.6 per cent of white babies in 1951 and 0.6 per
cent in 1961. Midwives accounted for 41.8 per cent of nonwhite
babies in 1951 and 16.1 per cent in 1961. This shows the gradual
trend away from midwife deliveries and toward physician-hospital
births. During the period from 1951 to 1962 the number of licensed
midwives has dropped from 425 to 203.
The number of illegitimate births is increasing. In 1951, 8.15
per cent of births were illegitimate, and in 1961, 9.52 per cent illegit-
imate births. The proportion of white illegitimate births increased
from 1.8 per cent in 1951 to 3.0 in 1961; while the nonwhite per-
centage rose from 24.1 to 27.6 in the same period, which means the
nonwhite rate is about one in four.
The CHD maternity clinics are open to all expectant mothers
who do not have their own physician. Fifty-eight counties operate
such clinics. More and more counties are providing planned parent-
hood services through these clinics, and the interest in this service is
growing.

INFANT AND PRESCHOOL HEALTH
In 1962 preliminary figures show there were 115,520 births, or
a rate of 21.6 per 1000 population. For the same period there were
3259 infant deaths reported and the rate was 28.2 deaths per 1000
live births. Immaturity continues to be reported as the leading cause
of infant death. The CHDs promote care of the immature and more
emphasis is being placed upon preparing the home for their care prior
to discharge from the hospital. This is in keeping with the philosophy
of the teaching at the Premature Demonstration Center in Miami. Well
baby clinics continue to be conducted in the majority of counties.
The total infant mortality rate was 33.1 per 1000 births in 1951
and it dropped to 29.1 in 1961; the white rate fell from 27.0 to 23.2
and the nonwhite rate declined from 48.4 to 45.3 during the 1951-
1961 period.







82 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

The total number of immunizations reported by the CHDs show
there were 90,704 immunizations for smallpox, 147,646 for diph-
theria, 230,474 for tetanus, 91,942 for Whooping cough and 312,104
for polio during the year. There was an increase in the number of
immunizations given this year for all of the above diseases.
HEALTH SERVICES FOR MIGRATORY AGRICULTURAL WORKERS
The estimated peak population of migrants in Florida is 51,655.
Palm Beach County is reported to have 10,400, Dade 8550 and Brow-
ard 5300. The number of migrants in other counties varies downward
to a minimum of 110. The migrants remain in Florida from about
November to May. These estimates are probably conservative because
other estimates have been made that Palm Bach County alone has
15,000 to 20,000 at the peak of the season.
The health problems of the migrants vary from community to
community depending upon many factors such as housing and local
medical facilities. These problems do not differ materially from those
of many other communities where there are medically indigent persons,
except that in the area where there are migrants, there are many more
medically indigent persons for whom to provide health services.
The Children's Bureau has continued to provide funds to support
this project. The purpose of this grant is to extend health services to
the agricultural migrants in Florida through the CHDs in counties
where most of the migrants are located. Migrants coming into the
state place a heavier load upon many communities, and outside assist-
ance is needed. Local funds have not been sufficient to provide the
necessary CHD personnel. The Children's Bureau special grant helped
to provide 17 workers, some of whom are on a part-time basis, for
work in four different counties. Efforts have been made to use the
team approach to cover all the public health services needed by the
migrants.
At the present health services are being extended from the Belle
Glade area to other areas of Palm Beach County by means of mobile
and night clinics. This service makes it possible for the migrants to
work during the day and bring the mothers and children in for services
after working hours. Additional personnel have also been made avail-
able to Dade, Lee and Collier Counties.
Health services to migrants include the usual services such as
nursing supervision, medical and dental services, information on nutri-
tion and social welfare services, and to a limited extent general health
education, although the latter are not as fully developed as they should
be at this time. In the opinion of the bureau medical care for the
migrants is being provided as well as it can be in many areas among
the low-income group, although there is the usual problem of persuad-
ing patients to come in early for diagnosis and treatment. There has
been excellent cooperation on the part of local physicians. The CHDs
license labor camps under state laws which means frequent inspections
by sanitarians.








MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 83

Health problems are only a part of the many problems of the
migrant. It has been found that all agencies concerned such as schools,
welfare agencies, voluntary agencies and others are rendering what
services they can with their respective staffs. Experience has been that
most of the farmers are working with the official agencies concerned
with migrants. Efforts have been made to bring together farmers, crew
leaders and persons in charge of securing migrant labor but this has
not been very successful. However, much progress is being made in
providing better health services to the migrants.
The Florida Committee on Rural Health, which is made up of
representatives of the Farm Bureau Federation, Cooperative Extension
Services, Medical Association, SBH and the Veterinary Medical Asso-
ciation, is very much concerned with the problems of the migrant.
During its semi-annual meeting in December a tour was taken of
Collier County to obtain firsthand knowledge of the problems of the
migrants. It happened that the tour came on the day following the
worst freeze Florida has had during this century and the members of
the committee now better understand the migrants' problems. Collier
County has a local migrant committee which is very active. Some of
the members have been on this committee for a number of years. Dade
County is in the process of forming such a committee. There is an
increased interest in migrants because of the recent bill passed by
Congress which may make additional funds available to improve their
health.


TABLE 16

1962 POSTGRADUATE OBSTETRIC-PEDIATRIC SEMINAR
REGISTRATION BY STATES
STATE Doctors Nurses Other Total
Alabama. ........... 12 2 0 14
Georgia _. 32 1 0 33
South Carolina-.... ......25 0 0 25
MississippiP. 9 0 0 9
Other states 3 1 1 5
Florida _____120 59 2 181
TOTALS_5. ___ 201 63 3 267







84 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


POSTGRADUATE OBSTETRIC-PEDIATRIC SEMINAR
This seminar has been held annually since 1951. It is held with
the cooperation of the Bureaus of Maternal and Child Health of the
State Health Departments of Florida, Georgia, Alabama, South Caro-
lina and Mississippi; the Maternal Health Committee of the Florida
Medical Association, the Florida Academy of General Practice and the
Children's Bureau. Plans have been made to return to Daytona Beach
for the 1963 meeting.

PREMATURE PROGRAM
Physicians, nurses, hospitals and CHDs working with some of
Florida's smallest citizens-premature infants-have completed a year
filled with activity designed to give these babies a better chance in life.
They have been working together and with this bureau to improve care
given premature babies in hospitals and in their homes. Approximately
nine per cent of the babies born in Florida during the year, were born
before term. Because they were immature, special care through the first
months of life was essential to their survival. Premature infant care is
highly specialized and expensive, since special equipment operated by
specially trained personnel is imperative.
The training of physicians and nurses in this field had major
attention during the year. Three five-day seminars were held for nurses
at the Premature Demonstration Center, Jackson Memorial Hospital,
Miami, and 93 nurses were enrolled in these classes. In addition seven
carefully selected nurses were given three additional weeks of intensive
training in premature infant nurseries at the Demonstration Center.
They were chosen from large hospitals where a high percentage of the
state's tiny infants were born or to which they were transferred at
birth. The trainees then returned to their hospitals to teach other
nurses and employees new techniques and procedures.
The training program is jointly sponsored by this bureau, Jackson
Memorial Hospital and the University of Miami School of Medicine,
with cooperation from local medical groups and hospitals, and with
funds made available by the Children's Bureau. Students from several
schools of nursing in addition to those from Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital, medical students, interns and residents also receive training in
premature infant care. One group of physicians from a nearby air base
spent a week learning how to care for the tiny infants at the Center.
Numerous other visitors from this and other countries have taken ad-
vantage of the training offered. One medical student from the Uni-
versity of Miami, who was interested in the care of the premature,
was given further training and experience in this field during the
summer months. He gave some valuable assistance in the study and
follow-up of the premature. A pediatrician and a well-qualified nurse







MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 85

have been available to hospitals for consultation on their problems or
procedures. A series of 10 lectures, given as in-service training for
nursery personnel at one large hospital, was judged valuable. A nurse-
physician team received a scholarship to attend the Institute on Pre-
mature Care at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Both are
now participating in the Florida training program.
To meet the need of small hospitals unable to release nurses for
the five-day seminar at the Demonstration Center, regional one-day
Demonstration Clinics are arranged, and during the year one was held
in the Orlando-Winter Park area. More than 100 members of the nurs-
ing profession came from the immediate and adjacent areas to attend.
An evening session for physicians drew an audience of approximately
30 pediatricians and general practitioners.
New technical textbooks have been provided for the libraries of
CHDs so staff members may be kept abreast of the most modern
methods of infant care. Publications likewise have had wide distribu-
tion through appropriate channels. Manuals of procedure prepared at
the Demonstration Center have been supplied to hospitals for use by
medical and nursing personnel in premature and newborn nurseries.

SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAM
Joint responsibility for the health of the school age child is legally
assigned to the State Board of Health and the State Department of
Education (School Law 232-20). This responsibility is then relegated
to the local CHDs and boards of public instruction for implementation
(School Law 232-31). The activities of this bureau in the field of
promoting physical examination on children in selected grades are now
further strengthened by the new accreditation requirements for Level I,
which are as follows: "First Grade Health Examination-All pupils
during the first grade shall be required to present the results of a
physical examination for recording on the cumulative health record
form MCH 304." Primary responsibility for this requirement lies with
the parent. Yet this regulation indicates the need of the CHD to co-
operate with the local board of public instruction and the local medical
society to satisfy the demand.
Recommendations for physical examination at age 11-13, junior
high level, and age 15-18, senior high level, will be satisfied by the
new standards for accreditation. "Grades 7-9 Health Examination-
All pupils at some time during grades 7-9 shall be required to present
the results of a physical examination for recording on the cumulative
health record MCH 304. This may be done at the sixth grade level."
"Grades 10-12 Health Examination-All pupils some time during
grades 10-12 shall be required to present the results of a physical
examination for recording on the cumulative health form MCH 304."
The activities in the area of school health records are now sig-
nificant because this is now a part of the required physical examina-







86 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


tions. In an effort to facilitate the recording of future subsequent physi-
cal examinations, this bureau is in the process of developing a single
sheet physical health record which can be easily inserted into the
child's cumulative folder. This effort is in part responsible for the
project by the State Department of Education to record all of this data
on IBM cards to facilitate processing and reporting.
Screening procedures for hearing, vision and dental defects are
fairly continuous over the state. Measuring of height and weight is a
common practice in Florida's public schools. There is need for some
uniformity in the screening practices but the greatest need is in the
referral and follow-up procedure. The problem is educating the parent
to do something about the defect that is detected in the child. In this
respect PTAs whenever possible are advised to urge the parents to seek
medical assistance for their child. The PTA groups have scheduled
health workshops in an effort to encourage parents to understand and
meet the responsibilities of health of their children.
The School Health Coordinators plan is another effort on the part
of the public schools to encourage a better health program in the
schools. The coordinator should in consultation with the principal
establish a school health committee and policies for retaining key
people and rotating others. The coordinator should be acquainted with
existing health policies of the school and the county education and
public health departments. The school health coordinator presently
has a full teaching load and is many times unfamiliar with the new
assignment. The bureau has been engaged in the process of giving
information to these individuals to enable them to do a more effective
job. The information given to this important member of the health
team is accepted eagerly and enthusiastically.
This plan with definite guidance fills the void that is so apparent
in the teaching of health. The elementary schools generally do a com-
mendable job in health instruction, yet this plan can encourage more
ingenuity in methods used by the teacher in presenting the subject with
current and more attractive materials which will be in line with the
needs and interests of the children in the community. The definite lack
of health instruction in secondary schools can receive a great impetus
if this plan is successful at this level. This bureau has exerted some
effort to give this group of secondary level health coordinators some
assistance to motivate them to improve their respective school's health
program. Some progress is noted, but success is slow and much more
is needed in this area before significant progress will be made. The
team approach in this problem will insure the success of this program.
Public health nurses, insofar as personnel and other service pro-
grams permit, visit the schools regularly and routinely. Other services
they perform in the school, beyond regular nursing duties, are serving
as resource people to the teachers in all matters related to health. The







MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 87

nurse aids the health coordinator in resolving specific health problems
related to each school. Where there is a need felt for more services
than the public health nurses can provide, the Gray Lady Program
functions effectively, especially in the care of the sick child at school.
More areas are receiving encouragement to make use of this worth-
while program.
The Florida School Bulletin, issued December 1962, shows that
the school enrollment for 1961-62 was 1,131,502, which was a 5.18
per cent increase over the previous year. This is for grades from 1
through 12 and does not include kindergarten. There were 22,453
elementary school teachers and 19,274 teachers in the secondary
schools, or a total of 41,727 teachers in the public schools of Florida.

TEACHERS PROJECT
The Teachers Project in Health Education conducted its seventh
annual session with 57 teachers enrolled from 27 counties. This was
the greatest participation by CHDs since the Project was initiated in
1955. In addition to CHDs, the Health Department of the City of
Jacksonville volunteered to accept and provide field experiences for
teachers working in Jacksonville schools.
The institutions providing the academic aspect of the project in-
cluded Bethune-Cookman College, Florida State University and the
University of Florida. The University of Miami did not participate in
the 1962 project due to the sabbatical leave of the director of the
course. The course directors expressed a feeling that the teachers en-
rolled displayed sincerity, interest in discovering new resources for their
school health programs and deep concern for the health of their stu-
dents. The distribution of teachers to the three schools was as follows:
Bethune-Cookman College, 11; Florida State University, 16; Univer-
sity of Florida, 30.
The project was originally designed to familiarize teachers with
health and welfare resources available to them in their school health
programs. This objective remains paramount in the minds of all per-
sonnel involved. From a survey of schedules of activities prepared by
CHDs for teachers, it would appear that a great many facilities and
opportunities were presented the enrollees. Teachers were recruited
from the counties in which they will teach in the next school year.
Many teachers expressed amazement at the number and variety of the
programs from which they could draw to improve the health and well
being of the school child and his family. Teachers visited regional
facilities of activities serving their county, such as tuberculosis hos-
pitals, child guidance clinics, Sunland Training Centers, clinics oper-
ated by the Crippled Children's Commission and others.
Several teachers remarked that more helpful information had
been obtained from this course than from any they had previously







88 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962


taken. Favorable comments were made as to the pertinence of the
material presented and its adaptability to their needs. They also re-
ported pleasure at learning more of the activities of the CHDs and
how its various programs might be utilized. CHD personnel stated that
having the teachers in the health department was good for them as it
tended to make them sharpen their "tools." They also felt that they
had learned more of the problems of the teachers and ways in which
they might work more effectively in the school health program.
The Teachers Project is a four-weeks course for which teachers
earn three hours of credit to be applied in a variety of ways. Teachers
spent four days on the campus of the university of their choice, two
in the orientation and two in the evaluation phase of the project. Fol-
lowing orientation to all that would follow, the teachers returned to
their respective counties for 14 days spent in field experiences. Con-
census of all of those participating in the Teachers Project in Health
Education in 1962 was that it was a success. It is planned to continue
the project in 1963.

MENTAL RETARDATION
This bureau is concerned with the entire field of mental retarda-
tion and is active in certain aspects of the problem. Ongoing activities
include orientation talks and programs at the several Sunland Training
Centers. These are two-day programs held regularly in cooperation
with the personnel of the Sunland Training Centers and the SBH in
addition to representatives of the local communities interested in the
problem. The coordinator of the program is a public health nurse
whose headquarters are at the Sunland Training Center in Gainesville.
Her duties are to arrange for speakers, programs, workshops, to act as
consultant and liaison with the voluntary agencies and mental retarda-
tion associations in the state.
The main purpose of the program is to make professional persons
aware of the facilities, what they offer and how they operate, what
the limitations and strengths are and how the patients and inmates
live, work and learn. With this knowledge, these people can return to
the communities and inform their own people of the mental retarda-
tion institutions of the state from firsthand experience. Seven commu-
nity programs were held with an attendance of 821 persons; 12 Orien-
tation Programs at Sunland Training Centers-attendance 263.
Another activity is the early detection, diagnosis and treatment
of mental retardation. This is usually accomplished through the well
child conference and child guidance clinics held throughout the state
as an integral part of the maternal and child health program. Children
are brought to the clinics for routine screening procedures, immuniza-
tions and physical examinations. This gives an opportunity for the







MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 89

child to be seen early and any defects or abnormality that are present
has a chance to be noted and proper referral made. If an indigent case
is found and the parents are unable to provide the necessary diet
supplement for a PKU patient, this bureau has been making some
supplies available to these cases.
A statewide registry is kept in the bureau of all known cases
of PKU and through arrangements with the Bureau of Laboratories,
confirmatory serum tests for diagnosis are made available to the clinics
and physicians of the state. If a PKU case is found, other members
of the family are urged to be tested and it is stressed to the parents
the importance of having any future children born into the family
tested in the first few weeks of life.
The biggest gap in the knowledge and work is the complete lack
of knowledge of the causes of mental retardation and how to prevent it.

DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION CLINIC
This special project in mental retardation is located in Miami
and during 1962 completed a total of 276 comprehensive evaluations.
Seventy-seven were new patients admitted to service and 199 were
re-evaluations of children seen in the previous year. By the end of the
year the clinic had 262 active cases.
The clinic staff is composed of a part-time pediatrician who
serves as director and a clinical psychologist, two psychiatric social
workers, a public health nurse, speech specialist, Fellow in Pediatrics,
secretary and clerk-typist. During the past year the requests for service
have increased as has the caseload. Since most of these children are
in the preschool age group, the needs of the patients and their families
change from year to year. In addition, the children coming to the clinic
are a very heterogeneous group representing a wide variety of problems
and etiological causes. Because the clinic is seeing such a variety of
problems, the diagnostic and counseling services which are offered by
the clinic have to be extensive. It is estimated that approximately 50
per cent of the children seen at the clinic have multiple handicaps.
Recommendations of the clinic to the parents have to be coordinated
with existing community agencies. At times it is frustrating to find
that optimal treatment facilities do not exist to carry out recommenda-
tions of the cases evaluated.
One of the original objectives of the clinic, the determination of
what services are necessary and available for the proper training and
guidance of the mentally retarded child and his family, continues to be
worked on by all staff members in a variety of ways.
The public health nurse has continued to make home visits on
all new patients admitted to the clinic for service. In addition to
aiding some of the parents in a home training and supervision pro-







90 ANNUAL REPORT, 1962

gram, conferences are held with the general nursing staff of the Dade
County Department of Public Health who are carrying clinic patients
as part of their caseload. Fifty-four patients are being supervised in a
home training program by the clinic s public health nurse.
The Children's Bureau has continued to make funds available
for a Fellowship in Pediatrics at this clinic. Two medical students and
two psychology students were employed during the summer of 1962
and rendered some valuable service in addition to getting training in
this field. The clinic has been used as a training field for the pediatric
residents at the University of Miami School of Medicine as in the past.







BUREAU OF PREVENTABLE DISEASES 91
CLARENCE M. SHARP, M.D.
Acting Director

During 1962 there was a major epidemic of St. Louis encephalitis
in the Tampa Bay area resulting in a sizable research grant from the
U. S. Public Health Service (USPHS) to study arthropod-borne
encephalitis in this area. The Tampa Bay Regional Encephalitis Lab-
oratory was established on the grounds of the Southwest Florida Tu-
berculosis Hospital in Tampa.
The USPHS has made a grant to this laboratory for five years.
This disease outbreak had a tremendous effect upon the economic life
of the St. Petersburg area. Florida is confronted with what may be the
state's greatest public health problem in recent years. The Tampa Bay
Regional Encephalitis Laboratory and its field study unit is attempting
during the dormant season of the disease to find the weak link in the
chain of host-vector-man and try to break it. Florida is in for a critical
period, so far as its tourist economy is concerned, should there be addi-
tional outbreaks of the disease. This outbreak is discussed at some
length under the Division of Epidemiology.
During the last six months of the year almost the full-time efforts
of the State Board of Health's epidemiologist and the staff of the Di-
vision of Veterinary Public Health have been spent on this problem.
Poliomyelitis reached an all time low during the last year. There
have been a significant number of both cases and virulent carriers
of diphtheria, particularly among the nonwhite residents of Jackson-
ville. There has been a significant increase in cases of infectious hepa-
titis for the past five years.
Florida is still having a few cases of typhoid fever reported, but
no major threat presented itself during 1962.
During 1962 no major outbreak of influenza was noted, although
the Asian influenza virus has been reported.
Venereal diseases, particularly infectious syphilis, continue to in-
crease and during 1962 the greatest number of infectious cases (1632)
occurred during any year since 1949. Fortunately the USPHS is
stepping up funds for an increased program in casefinding and control
during the next year.
The State Board of Health was indeed saddened at the untimely
death of James Scatterday, D.V.M., director of the Division of Veter-
inary Public Health.
There has been a slight increase in tuberculosis cases reported
primarily as the result of the Cuban refugee problem in Dade County.