<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Members of the Florida state board...
 Official staff Florida state board...
 County health officers
 Florida state board of health
 Table of Contents
 General summary
 Finance and accounts
 Vital statistics
 Local health services
 Hospital service for the indig...
 Preventable diseases
 Tuberculosis control
 Laboratories
 Maternal and child health
 Dental health
 Entomology
 Sanitary engineering
 Narcotics
 Health information


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Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00025
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: 1955
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
System ID: AM00000243:00025
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    Letter of transmittal
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Members of the Florida state board of health
        Page iv
    Official staff Florida state board of health
        Page v
    County health officers
        Page vi
    Florida state board of health
        Page vii
    Table of Contents
        Page viii
    General summary
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Finance and accounts
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Vital statistics
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Local health services
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Hospital service for the indigent
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Preventable diseases
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Tuberculosis control
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Laboratories
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Maternal and child health
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Dental health
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Entomology
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Sanitary engineering
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
    Narcotics
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
    Health information
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
Full Text



FLO
STATE


C1


RIDR
BOARD
)F
ILTH


64-
F63r


1955


IANUA REOR














State Board of Health

States a^ ?etaUd




1955




The following statistical reports will be published separately:
SUPPLEMENTAL I -FLORIDA VITAL STATISTICS, 1955
SUPPLEMENTAL II -FLORIDA MORBIDITY STATISTICS, 1955



WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D.
STATE HEALTH OFFICER
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA







*-- C? s )-'LJ












The Honorable HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Pensacola, Florida


Dear Dr. Bryans:

I herewith submit the annual report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the year ending December
31, 1955.


Sincerely yours,

WIsoN T. SOWDER, M.D.
State Health Officer

May 1, 1956
Jacksonville, Florida

















His Excellency, LEROY COLLINS
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida

Sir:

I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the period January 1, 1955,
to December 31, 1955, inclusive.


N Respectfully submitted,
HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D.
T\ President

S May 1, 1956
Pensacola, Florida









N






















Members of the
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D., President
Pensacola

CHARLES J. COLLINS, M.D.
Orlando

T. M. CUMBIE, Ph. G.
Quincy

CARL MENDOZA, M.D.
Jacksonville

F. P. MEYER, SR., D.D.S.
St. Petersburg











OFFICIAL STAFF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

December 31, 1955


DIRECTORS
State Health Officer........................................Wilson T. Sowder, M.D., M.P.H.
Bureau of Finance and Accounts................Fred B. Ragland, B.S.
Personnel Supervisor ..................................Paul T. Baker
Purchasing Agent........................................G. Wilson Baltzell

Bureau of Vital Statistics.................................Everett H. Williams, Jr., M.S. Hyg.
SBureau of Local Health Service....................George A. Dame, M.D.
Division of Public Health Nursing............Ruth E. Mettinger, R.N.
Field Advisory Staff and Field Training....Charles J. Mathes, M.D., M.P.H.
Bureau of Preventable Diseases.................Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Venereal Disease Control........John H. Ackerman, M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Industrial Hygiene.................John M. McDonald, M.D.
Division of Cancer Control.......................Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Acting
Division of Nutrition and Diabetes Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Control .---...................... Acting
Hospitalization of Indigent........................Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Acting
Public Health Veterinarian......................James E. Scatterday, D.V.M.,
M.P.H.

' Bureau of Tuberculosis Control....................Clarence M. Sharp, M.D.
Division of Heart Disease Control............Simon D. Doff, M.D., M.P.H.

Bureau of Laboratories..............................Albert V. Hardy, M.D., Dr.P.H.
Miami Regional Laboratory.......................Dwight E. Frazier
Orlando Regional Laboratory.................Max T. Trainer
Pensacola Regional Laboratory..................Emory D. Lord, Jr.
Tallahassee Regional Laboratory..............Robert A. Graves
Tampa Regional Laboratory......................H. D. Venters
West Palm Beach Regional Laboratory....Lorraine Carson

SBureau of Maternal and Child Health............Ralph W. McComas, M.D., M.P.H.

Bureau of Mental Health.......................... Ralph W. McComas, M.D., M.P.H.
Acting
Bureau of Dental Health.............................. Floyd H. DeCamp, D.D.S.

Bureau of Entomology............................... John A. Mulrennan, Sr., B.S.A.

Bureau of Sanitary Engineering....................David B. Lee, M.S., Engineering

Bureau of Narcotics............................ .........Frank S. Castor, Ph.G.

Division of Health Information....................Elizabeth Reed, R.N., B.S.










COUNTY HEALTH OFFICERS

(As of December 31, 1955)

Alachua........................................................Edwin H.Miller, M.D., Acting (1)
Baker-Nassau.................... ... .. John W. McClane, M.D.
Bay.............. ....................... ........ Albert F. Ullman, M.D.
Bradford-Clay-Union........................................A. Y. Covington, M.D., M.P.H.
Brevard-Osceola........................... James E. Speers, M.D., M.P.H.
Broward.............. .......... .. Paul H. Hughes, M.D., M.P.H.
Calhoun-Jackson.........................................Henry I. Langston, M.D., M.P.H.
Charlotte-DeSoto-Hardee.......... .................Joseph W. Lawrence, M.D.
Citrus-Hernando-Levy............ ...............Dale L. Clinton, M.D.
Collier-Lee.... ...............................................Merwin E. Buchwald, M.D., M.P.H.
Columbia-Gilchrist-Hamilton................... Joseph C. Weeks, M.D.
Dade..................... ....................... T. E. Cato, M.D., M.P.H.
Dixie-Lafayette-Suwannee ........... ............J. Dillard Workman, M.D.
Duval- ............................................. Thomas E. Morgan, M.D., M.P.H.
Escambia....................... ... ......... John C. McSween, M.D.
Flagler-Putnam........................................... Frank E. McClimans, M.D.
Franklin-Gulf-Wakulla............. .............Warren T. Weathington, M.D., M.P.H
Gadsden-Liberty.........................................Wayne Yeager, M.D., M.P.H.
Glades-Hendry-Highlands..........................Theodore W. Weeks, Jr., M.D.
Hillsborough...........................................Frank V. Chappell, M.D., M.P.H.
Holmes-Walton-Washington.............................R. N. Nelson, M.D.
Indian River-Martin-Okeechobee-
St. Lucie ........................... ...... Neill D. Miller, M.D.
Jefferson-Madison-Taylor........................ Andrew P. Haynal, M.D., M.P.H.
Lake..................................................J. Basil Hall, M .D., M .P.H.
Leon..................................... ........... Joseph M. Bistowish, M.D., M.P.H.
Manatee................................ ..----....... John S. Neill, M.D.
Marion............. ..............-.- Luther A. Brendle, M.D., M.P.H.
Monroe........................... .............................Frank J. Hill, M.D., M.P.H.
Okaloosa-Santa Rosa.......................................J. L. Turnage, M.D.
Orange............................................. .....Wade N. Stephens, M.D., M.P.H.
Palm Beach..............................----- -C. L. Brumback, M.D., M.P.H.
Pasco-Sumter ............. .......... Leo L. Burger, M.D.
Pinellas...............................................William C. Ballard, M.D.
Polk............................... ....... Chester L. Nayfield, M.D., M.P.H.
Sarasota................................................ ... William L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H.
Seminole............. ......................... Terry Bird, M.D., M.P.H.
Volusia.................................. ... Robert D. Higgins, M.D., M.P.H.
(1) Also member of In-Service Training Staff.












FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

GOVERNOR OF FLORIDA

FIVE BOARD INEBERS














TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

General Summary .................................------------................................................ 1

Finance and Accounts (including Personnel and Purchasing) ........ 8

Vital Statistics ............................ ...----......-- 25

Local Health Service (including Public Health Nursing
and Field Advisory Staff) ..................................... ................ 34

Hospital Service for the Indigent ............................---------......... 68

Preventable Diseases (including Venereal Disease Control,
Cancer Control, Industrial Hygiene, Veterinary Public
Health and Nutrition and Diabetes Control) ........................... 70

Tuberculosis Control (including Heart Disease Control) .............. 103

Laboratories ................ .................-------------------............... 117

Maternal and Child Health (including Mental Health) .................... 135

Dental Health ........................--- ......- 152

Entomology ...........................--..---. ---.... ------..------........ 156

Sanitary Engineering .......................-- .. .........-.. 162

Narcotics ...............................----- --.----------------.......... 205

Health Information (including Library) ...................................... 208








GENERAL SUMMARY
WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D., M.P.H.,
State Health Officer

The year 1955 was an eventful one for the public health program
in Florida and the responsibilities of the State Board of Health and
county health departments weie substantially increased. The alloca-
tion of federal funds to Florida remained about the same except for
a special appropriation made by Congress for the purchase and adminis-
tration of Salk Vaccine. This being the year in the biennium in which the
Legislature met, the principal changes in the public health program were
a result by actions by that body.
For the first time since the establishment of the State Board of Health
the general laws applying to the State Board of Health were thoroughly
revised by the Attorney General in consultation with the State Board
of Health and these revisions were passed by the Legislature. The laws
applying to mosquito control and the control of arthropods of public
health importance were also revised. The law on the control of narcotics
underwent minor revisions. A merit system law was passed which in
effect took the responsibility for merit system matters from the State
Board of Health and placed it in the hands of the Merit System Council
and the State Personnel Board. A Mental Health Council was established
with responsibility for advising and consulting with the State Board of
Health on mental health training and research. An appropriation of
$250,000 per annum was made for this purpose. A law was also passed
and funds were provided (to be administered by the State Board of
Health) for the awarding of scholarships to worthy and needy students
in the fields of medicine and dentistry. An appropriation of $550,000
was made for the purchase of Salk Vaccine, but this appropriation was
not used during the calendar year because of the availability of federal
funds. A law was passed establishing a statewide program for the hos-
pitalization of indigent persons. The principal responsibility in this field
was placed on the counties but the duty of coordinating the program
and of allocating state matching funds to the counties was given to the
State Board of Health.
Capital outlay funds were provided by the Legislature for an additional
building in Jacksonville, for the purchase of a lot next to the laboratory
in Tampa, and for the matching of federal and county funds in the con-
struction of combination health centers and laboratories in Orange and
Dade Counties. In addition to the above substantial increases in appro-
priations were made for county health departments, mental health, and
cancer control. However, insufficient increases were provided for the
other work of the State Board of Health. There were a total of 1,382
persons employed by the State Board of Health and county health de-
partments on December 31, 1954, and this increased to 1,478 by the end
of the calendar year.








2 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

Much difficulty was experienced during the year, both by the central
office and county health department staffs, in carrying on the health
program satisfactorily because of the rapid increase of the population
of the state steadily increasing demands for services, and the addition of
new duties. The bureaus and divisions in the State Board of Health which
have service functions in addition to consultant functions have had a
particularly difficult time. In spite of these difficulties the year 1955
was marked by a great deal of progress. Many new health centers were
built in the counties with the help of federal funds. In general, the
number of deaths and death rates from the communicable diseases,
including tuberculosis and general diseases, continued to decline. Also,
there was a gratifying decrease in maternal and infant death rates. The
State Board of Health received much criticism during the year from
small groups opposed to the flouridation of public water supplies, but
as a result of a public hearing on the subject its previous policy favoring
fluoridation and specifying the ways in which it can be and should be
done were reiterated. Great progress was made in the field of mental
health and particular emphasis was given to the development of coopera-
tive procedures with the mental hospitals. Plans were made and put into
operation for coordinating laboratory work done by the State Board of
Health and the hospitals operated by the Tuberculosis Board. Plans for
the field training of personnel were given serious study and the program
reorganized. The State Board of Health was honored by the receipt of
research grants from many agencies including: The National Foundation
for Infantile Paralysis, Armed Forces Epidemiological Board, the U. S.
Air Force, and the National Institutes of Health. Special attention was
given during the year to the problem of migratory agricultural laborers.
This was made possible by special funds awarded by the U. S. Children
Bureau. The Entomological Research Center at Vero Beach was com-
pleted and occupied during the year. Some of the problems which could
not be properly handled during the year because of lack of funds and
personnel were diabetes control, stream pollution, air pollution, civil
defense, and the training of food handlers.
It is recommended that in the future special attention be given to
securing sufficient funds and personnel to carry on the present overall
duties and responsibilities of the State Board of Health and county health
departments. Otherwise, the emphasis may be unwittingly shifted to some
of the newer public health problems at the expense of older and in some
cases more important ones.
Article by the State Health Officer:
Sowder, W. T. Where do we go from here in public health? Am. J.
Pub. Health. 45: 984-989, Aug., 1955.

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION
The 1955 Legislature established ten scholarships to be awarded an-
nually by the State Board of Health to Florida students who aspire to








GENERAL SUMMARY


study medicine. Each scholarship award may be for as much as $1,000
per year and for as many as four years, or a total of $4,000.
Upon being awarded a scholarship, the student signs an agreement
stating that, after he has graduated from medical college and completed
his internship he will practice medicine for a period of five years in one
of Florida's smaller communities or rural areas where there is need for
a physician. For each year that the student practices in the community
selected by him (from three designated by the State Board of Health)
one-fifth of his scholarship obligation will be canceled and after five
years of practice the entire scholarship will have been repaid.
For the purpose of evaluating scholarship applicants the law authorizes
the State Board of Health to consult with an advisory committee. This
committee, composed of the deans of the two medical schools in Florida
and five physicians selected by the President of the Florida Medical
Association, is presently as follows:
Melvin M. Simmons, M.D., Chairman
T. Z. Cason, M.D.
John Milton, M.D.
James T. Cook, Jr., M.D.
Homer L. Pearson, Jr., M.D.
George T. Harrell, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine, U. of F.
Homer F. Marsh, Ph.D., Dean, School of Medicine, U. of Miami
The first meeting of the Committee, held July 30, was devoted pri-
marily to study of the application form and scholarship contract to be
employed and a consideration of general policies. The second meeting
of the Committee held August 28, was devoted to the consideration of
the applications of fifteen students. Upon the recommendations made
at this meeting the State Board of Health awarded scholarships to ten
students.
(For details of State Scholarships for Dental Education, see elsewhere in
this volume, the report of the Bureau of Dental Health.)

RECIPIENTS OF SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED BY
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH- 1955
MEDICAL
Russel P. Blanton.......................Mayo Wilburn R. Jenkins...............Inverness
Edwin H. Hamilton............Ft. Myers Daniel H. Miller............Miami Beach
Rufus J. Johnston................Marianna Samuel L. Renfroe..................Starke
Robert H. Jenkins..............Monticello Oren R. Smith, Jr....................Sanford
Daniel M. Jacobs..........Daytona Beach George S. Trotter............Jacksonville
DENTAL
Thomas Henry Callahan....Jacksonville Dean W. Gordon..............Jacksonville
James W. Williams........Chattahoochee James R. Butler................Homestead
Leonard R. Sanderson, Jr., Tallahassee David L. Schofield........Miami Springs
Ralph H. Mandus....................Miami Frank D. Newgard............Jacksonville








4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

PUBLIC HEALTH
(County Health Department Staff Members)
Harold F. Bonifield, M.D Health Officer................Citrus-Levy-Hernando County
M. J. Takos, M.D.- Health Officer...............................................Dade County
Norman B. Edgerton, M.D.- Health Officer..................Brevard-Osceola County
Violet W. Walters P. H. Nurse................... ........Pinellas County
Martha Snellen P. H. Nurse.............................................Bradford County
Bessie O. Thigpen-P. H. Nurse.................. ................................Duval County
Emma J. Broker P. H. Nurse ...................... ............Broward County
Robert C. Hazelhurst Sanitarian... ......................................Pinellas County
James A. Doyle Sanitarian..... ........................ .....Martin County
Robert H. Browning, Jr.- Health Educator...................................Madison County

MENTAL HEALTH
(Psychiatric Social Work)
Mrs. Helen G. Niemeyer...........Cortez Miss Mildred E. Hall............Inverness
Jean Helen Dawson, Ft. Lauderdale Mrs. Ruth Mayos..............Jacksonville
Ronald O. Pickens........Chattahoochee Miss Florence E. Green..............Miami
Miss Eugenia F. Eve..........Jacksonville Charles A. Sproul..................rlando
Roy E. Swader................Jacksonville

ACTIVITIES OF THE BOARD
The Board re-elected Dr. Herbert L. Bryans of Pensacola as its Presi-
dent at the annual meeting in February. During the year the Board
suffered the loss of one of its members, Albert L. Ward, M.D. of Port
St. Joe by death on March 27. The Governor appointed Charles J.
Collins, M.D. of Orlando to replace Dr. Ward. Edward L. Flynn, D.D.S.
was replaced at the end of his term by F. P. Meyer, D.D.S. of St. Peters-
burg as the dentist member of the Board. Seven meetings were held
during the year at which the following important business was transacted:

January 16 Jacksonville
1. Provided for an administrative analyst to assist the State Health
Officer.

2. Approved the appointment of Charles J. Mathes, M.D. as director
of the Field Advisory Staff to be effective upon his return from
training.

3. Directed that information be gathered concerning substitutes for
silver nitrate as a preventive against ophthalmia neonatorum.

4. Discussed proposed revisions of laws relating to public health.
5. Discussed survey of public health in Florida made by the U. S.
Public Health Service at the request of the Governor.

February 8 Jacksonville
1. Revised the rules and regulations of nursing homes.

2. Revised the regulations for control of psittacosis.








GENERAL SUMMARY


3. Directed that a bill be prepared for the better control of rabies.
4. Approved certain substitutes for silver nitrate for the prevention
of ophthalmia neonatorum.
5. Discussed milk situation in Manatee County and directed that
health officers not do inspections of milk plants in counties other
than their own without the written approval of the State Health
Officer.
6. Reiterated the Board's policy that no employee accept outside
employment to supplement their salary without the Board's
approval.
April 3 St. Petersburg
1. Approved the drafting of amendments to the law on narcotics.
2. Approved a bill on rabies control.
3. Discussed proposed sanitarian's registration act and found it not
objectionable.
4. Approved amendment to hospital licensing law providing for the
licensure of all hospitals.
5. Approved a proposal for the consolidation of the laws relating to
mosquito control.
6. Discussed state auditor's report and directed that all funds col-
lected by county health units be deposited through the State Board
of Health in the State Treasury to the credit of the county health
unit except where good reasons show for other arrangements.
7. Approved the appointment of James O. Bond, M.D. as epidem-
iologist.
8. Approved in principle the planning of a Bureau of Chronic
Diseases and Tuberculosis.
9. Authorized State Health Officer to employ out-of-state consultant
to study field training in Florida.
10. Confirmed the leaves of absence of personnel serving in World
War II whether such persons received written leaves of absence
or not.
11. Approved the use of Salk vaccine for first and second grade child-
ren provided favorable report received from National Institute of
Health.
June 12 Jacksonville
1. Approved additional substitutes for silver nitrate for prevention of
ophthalmia neonatorum.








6 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

2. Approved plan submitted by C. M. Sharp, M.D., director of the
Bureau of Tuberculosis Control and Robert Davies, M.D., medical
director of the State Tuberculosis Board for the home treatment
of tuberculosis patients.

3. Approved the appointment of an advisory committee on Salk
vaccine.
4. Directed that additional assistance be given under the cancer
control program to Dade, Hillsborough and Duval Counties.

5. Revised compensation plan for employees.

6. Approved plans for awarding medical and dental scholarships,
including the appointment of a medical advisory committee.

July 17 Jacksonville
1. Appointed advisory committee on hospital services for the indigent
program.
2. Approved the appointment of John H. Ackerman, M.D., U. S.
Public Health Service, as director of the Division of Venereal
Disease Control.
3. Abolished Division of Mental Health in the Bureau of Maternal
and Child Health and created a Bureau of Mental Health with
Ralph W. McComas, M.D. as acting director and Paul W. Pen-
ningroth, Ph.D. as assistant director.
August 20 Jacksonville
1. Adopted a statement of policy on immunizations by county health
department personnel.
2. Approved the strengthening of the diabetes control program.
3. Adopted policy on property accountability and inventory control.
4. Authorized the State Health Officer to proceed with the purchase
of property adjacent to present property in Jacksonville.
5. Conducted a public hearing on the fluoridation of public water
supplies.
October 30 Jacksonville
1. Approved a statement reviewing the hearing held on August 20
and affirming its previous policy on the fluoridation of public
water supplies.
2. Reaffirmed its long standing policy favoring sewage disposal
systems in built-up areas instead of septic tanks.







GENERAL SUMMARY 7

3. Revised regulations relating to drive-in restaurants.
4. Approved a cooperative agreement regarding laboratory services
between the State Board of Health and the State Tuberculosis
Board.
5. Discussed the licensure of nursing homes and directed that estab-
lishments not meeting requirements not be licensed, and that
licenses not be renewed for such establishments already licensed.
6. Approved the assignment of Robert G. Carter, (administrative
analyst in the State Health Officer's office) to the new indigent
hospitalization program.








8 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


BUREAU OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS
FRED B. RAGLAND, B.S., Director

In carrying out the business management responsibilities of the agency
during 1955, the Bureau of Finance and Accounts assisted in the planning
of certain new programs and planning for increased emphasis of some
of the established programs. The 1955 Legislature passed various legisla-
tion assigning to the State Board of Health several new programs. In the
General Appropriations Act of 1955, additional appropriations were pro-
vided for the general program, funds for Mental Health were more than
doubled, funds for cancer control were considerably increased, funds for
the consolidated mosquito control program were approximately the same
as for the previous year and additional funds were provided for County
Health Departments. Also the Legislature through separate Acts pro-
vided funds for mental health training and research, medical scholarships,
dental scholarships, indigent hospital care and Salk polio vaccine. The
general programs will be strengthened in the fields of public health
laboratories, sanitary engineering, vital statistics, narcotics enforcement,
preventable and chronic diseases, nutrition and diabetes control, tuber-
culosis case-finding, and public health education and information.

One of the most significant steps forward is the new program for
hospitalization for the indigent which will actually be implemented
January 1, 1956. However, during 1955 considerable planning was
necessary by an advisory committee (authorized by the law) and various
staff members of the State Board of Health. A large part of the planning
had to do with the financial part of the program which provides for
state financial assistance to counties for hospital care for the acutely ill
or injured. In the years ahead, much will be heard about this program
in which the state joins with the counties in meeting this major health
problem.

The arthropod control laws were amended combining several old sec-
tions of the Statute into one chapter and providing for one state ap-
propriation for mosquito control to include both the permanent type
eliminative measures such as drainage, diking and filling, and also the
temporary relief through the spraying of chemicals.

In May 1955, the Entomological Research Center Building was com-
pleted and occupied at Vero Beach. To build and equip this Center cost
approximately $250,000 and it is significant that it is the only facility
in the country to devote extensive time and effort in determining newer
and better ways of eliminating arthropods as a public health and nuisance
problem. Also during the year, the relatively new addition to the State
Board of Health Jacksonville facilities was air-conditioned. This now








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


provides the most modern space and facilities for the central public
health laboratory and other functions such as tuberculosis control, dental
health, public health nursing, and field advisory staff.
The 1955 Appropriations Act also provided for certain capital outlay
for buildings, lands and improvements. During the year, considerable
time and effort was devoted to arranging for the purchase of additional
land in Jacksonville which will give the State Board of Health the entire
block bounded by First, Pearl, Second and Julia Streets. It is expected
that the purchase will actually be completed early in 1956. Also in the
planning stage during the year was the Dade County Health Center and
Laboratory which will be built in Miami with the combination of local,
state and Federal funds. Other capital outlay projects given some con-
sideration during the year which will receive greater attention in the next
year include the planning for an administration building in Jacksonville,
the purchase of land adjacent to the Regional Laboratory in Tampa and
the eventual construction of a health center and regional Laboratory in
Orlando.
One new responsibility worthy of note here was the transfer of the
guard service from the Bureau of Narcotics to the Bureau of Finance and
Accounts. This took place during August 1955 and this service was as-
signed as the responsibility of the Building and Grounds Section. Also
during the year a new position was added, that of Internal Auditor. The
position was actually filled late in the year and the person in this position
generally speaking will be expected to be concerned with fund collections,
property and inventory, accounting and personnel consultation in county
health departments, periodical internal audits of all fee and license ac-
counts collected by the State Board of Health as authorized by Statute.
In addition, there will be various special assignments from time to time.

FISCAL SECTION
The financial transactions of the State Board of Health for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1955 as reflected by the records of the Bureau are
presented in a condensed form in Tables 2, 3, and 4 and in Figure 1.
A detailed financial report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1955, has
been prepared and distributed to the Governor, members of the State
Board of Health, and all bureaus, divisions and county health units of
the State Board of Health.
The funds received (or appropriated) for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1955, were from the following major sources:
State Appropriations and Funds-................... $5,178,034.99 58.3%
From Local Agencies for County Health
Units ............................................................. 2,870,987.05 32.4%
From Federal Grant-in-Aid................................ 744,643.05 8.3%
From Private Contributions................................ 90,752.20 1.0%


TOTAL .............................................. $8,884,417.29


100%








10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


Objectively, the operating and capital expendures by the State Board
of Health were for:
Personal Services (Salaries and Professional
Fees) ................................ ...... $4,716,501.33 58.1%
Contractual Services (Repairs, Utilities,
Travel Expense, Cancer Program-Fees
and Hospitalization) ............................. 984,976.75 12.1%
Commodities (Office, Medical, Laboratory,
Mosquito Control, Educational) ......---.... 574,019.20 7.1%
Current Charges (Rents, Insurance, Merit
System Costs, Registrar Fees) .................... 131,759.08 1.6%
Capital Outlays (Equipment and Fixed
Assets) .........................................--.. 535,497.02 6.6%
Grants to Counties and Mosquito Control
Districts, Chapter 389.21, Fla. Statutes........$1,180,182.00 14.5%

TOTAL .................................... $8,122,935.38 100%

In addition to funds reported in the annual financial report and sum-
marized above, certain other funds and services were made available by
the Public Health Service of the U. S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare to activities of the Board but were not paid directly to the
State Board of Health. They include:

Value of Public Health Service personnel on loan to
the Board in Preventable Disease Program................. $68,937.00

Fiscal operation followed a budget plan of 112 departmental budgets.
These budgets were occasionally revised to meet changing situations.
The majority of the revisions involved county health unit budgets pri-
marily because the fiscal year of the County differs from fiscal year of
the State. At the time county health unit budgets were initially prepared,
it was not known exactly what local funds would be available in each
instance. It was, therefore, necessary to revise a number of the County
Health Unit budgets during the year after the availability of funds from
County sources was determined.








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 11


PERSONNEL OFFICE

PAUL T. BAKER

During the calendar year 1955 procurement of personnel preceded
in a very satisfactory manner. Most vacancies were filled promptly and
difficulty was experienced only in a few classifications where suitable ap-
plicants were in unusually short supply. This shortage was felt principally
in sanitary engineers, dentists and stenographers. The generous State
Retirement Plan contributed considerably to the successful recruiting
program and to retention of personnel after employment.
After making a comprehensive study, broad in scope and detailed in
nature, of the turnover rate of past years, and of existing compensation
plans of other state agencies and in private enterprise, the compensation
plan of this agency was revised upward on July 1 and now represents a
more realistic approach to adequate compensation.
Fortunately the sub-tropical climate and other advantages of this state
are attracting large numbers of new residents and our recruiting prob-
lems are considerably less difficult than is the case in many neighboring
states.
The year 1955 was marked by steady progress in the field of personnel
administration. In conformity with established policy, continued steps
were taken to strengthen the Merit System structure in the State Board
of Health. Diligent attention was given to insure that all appointments
and separations were made in accordance with the rules adopted by
the Board.
Leave records were developed and maintained and service ratings for
all employees were obtained and recorded.
Records of in-service and postgraduate training of employees were
maintained and the application of regulations governing such training
was assured. All employees at the main office were encouraged by the
Personnel Supervisor to discuss their employment problems, if any, with
him. At the times prescribed for consideration by the State Board of
Health of salary increases, full information concerning each employee
was made available to the Board in order that all employees might be
treated fairly and equitably.
The payrolls of all employees were prepared in the Personnel Office
and forwarded to the State Comptroller where salary warrants were
drawn. Upon receipt of the warrants from the Comptroller, they were
distributed promptly.
All matters pertaining to the Retirement Plan were handled with all
possible dispatch.








12 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

Prompt action was taken after each scheduled Merit System examina-
tion to regularize the Merit System status of each provisional employee.
Employees were notified without delay upon attainment of permanent
status.
Salary increases were given to most of the personnel during the year.
These increases were predicated on the basis of merit. Working condi-
tions were generally satisfactory and employee moral continued to be high.
At the end of the year sixty-six (66) of the State's sixty-seven (67)
counties had organized County Health Departments which were operat-
ing under the Merit System.
On December 31, 1955 there were 1,478 State employees (including
those in county health departments), and 14 Federal employees on loan
to this agency. On December 31, 1954 there were 1,382 state employees
and 13 Federal employees.
During the year there were 461 employment and 365 separations in-
cluding part time personnel. The principal reasons for separations in-
clude marriage, pregnancy, transfer of husbands from area, completion
of projects for which employed and acceptance of more profitable em-
ployment elsewhere.
A tabulation of new employment, separations and turnover rates
according to classification is shown in the table below:
TABLE 1
NEW EMPLOYMENT, SEPARATIONS, AND
TURNOVER RATES, BY CLASSIFICATION
New Turnover
Classification Employments Separations Rate*
Total ......................................... 461 365 25.52%
Health Officers ........................ 13 8 12.90%
Sanitary Engineers .................... 5 6 24.00%
Sanitarians ...................------ 47 34 17.44%
PH Nurses ............................... 97 70 16.67%
Clerical ............................-......... 121 103 30.00%
Others ..........................------ 178 144 32.29%
*Turnover rate-separations divided by average number of employees.
On December 31, 1955 the Merit System status of State Board of
Health personnel was as follows:
Permanent and Probational .................. 1178
Provisional ......................------------.... 41
Temporary ............................................--- 3
Emergency ...........................--.----------.. 3
Exempt and Part-time .......................... 253

TOTAL .................................. 1478








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


During the year specifications were adopted for 6 new classifications;
no specifications were revised; 1 classification was abolished and salary
ranges for 117 classifications were revised.
Postgraduate training on a stipend basis for one full academic year
was successfully completed during 1955 by 2 health officers; 3 public
health nurses and 1 sanitarian.
Tables 7 and 8 show the terminations and turnover rates for full-time
employees by salary brackets.
Generally speaking the greatest turnover is to be found in the lower
salary brackets of the various groupings which would indicate that
consideration might well be given to a re-evaluation of the compensation
plan. A considerable percentage of loss is represented by female employees
for reasons mentioned earlier and for which little remedial action can
be taken.

PURCHASING AND PROPERTY

G. WILSON BALTZELL, Purchasing Agent

During 1955 the Purchasing Agent received 2460 requistions for
equipment and supplies from various departments and 3556 purchase
orders were issued totalling $723,680.71.

There were 356 more requistions received in 1955 than in 1954, but
312 less purchase orders were issued. This reduction in number of
purchase orders was due to several causes, one being that bills for auto-
mobile repairs were processed to the Fiscal Section without purchase
orders, as these represented services rendered rather than commodities
purchased. Jacket files were set up for each fleet unit so that at any time
it could be determined what repairs had been made and if costs ex-
ceeded normal upkeep. Also, monthly purchase order numbers were
assigned to certain vendors at the beginning of each month for purchases
of small miscellaneous items, thereby reducing the number of purchase
orders issued to respective vendors during the course of the month.

An unusually heavy load was added to the purchasing department
while equipping the new Entomological Research Center at Vero Beach.
Lengthy requisitions were received, requiring much newspaper advertising
and widely spread invitations to bid. Purchase orders totalling large sums
of money were issued, covering many items on each particular order,
resulting in fewer purchase orders but greater amounts in dollars and
cents.
Immediately after the 1955 Legislature had appropriated $550,000.00
for the purchase and distribution of polio vaccine, bids were invited from
manufacturers. No purchase was made, however, since the Federal Polio








14 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

Assistance Act of 1955 was passed in August 1955 and vaccine to Florida
was furnished by the Public Health Service. The state appropriation
remains intact, but may have to be used at some later date.
Fire insurance on buildings and contents is carried in the State Fire
Insurance Fund supervised by the State Fire Insurance Commissioner,
but the State Board of Health carries automobile insurance on its fleet
of passenger cars, trucks, trailers, etc. This includes Public Liability,
Property Damage, Fire, Theft, and Comprehensive. During the year
our insurance company was called upon to pay only two liability claims
amounting to $28.01 an all time low record. One fire loss on a truck
was settled for $671.62; one theft claim for $22.36, and one comprehen-
sive (broken oval windshield on a trailer) for $61.00.
The State Board of Health acts as self-insurer for collision coverage,
and in 1955 damages to our cars which we assumed, amounted to
$811.68. This was more than last year, but still much less than it would
cost to carry collision coverage. Damages to our cars caused by others
amounted to $1,042.80, but these were all settled by individuals causing
the damage or by their insurance companies.

Property records are being currently maintained up to date. The system
of memorandum receipts installed in 1954 has contributed adequately to
accomplish this result. Annual inventories are forwarded to the State
Fire Insurance Commissioner as required. A property control system
was authorized by the Board and put in effect and a Survey Board
set up, so that now obsolete and non-serviceable property can be disposed
of under definite procedure.
During the year a 1950 Ford sedan was seized under violation of the
Uniform Narcotic Drug Law, and according to provisions of the law, sold
at public auction for $305.00, it being determined that it would be
too costly to repair the vehicle to make it serviceable as a part of our
fleet.

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS
The Superintendent has the responsibility of maintaining and operating
all buildings and the upkeep of the grounds. Maintenance personnel have
carried out their duties efficiently particularly in light of the growth of
the agency and the increased number of work orders referred to the
department. The maintenance section has continued to supervise the
upkeep of automobiles and trucks in the Jacksonville area. During the
year, the Bureau of Entomology was moved from the Administration
Building of the St. Johns Shipyard to the Oetjen Building, 1023 Liberty
Street, which location is more convenient to the State Board of Health
headquarters.
It has been mentioned previously that the guard service was transferred
to the Buildings and Grounds Section. A five member janitor service








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


is now on duty each night, Mondays through Fridays, to clean, dust
and generally maintain office and hall space. This night janitor crew
is supervised by the guard on duty.

DUPLICATING
The Duplicating Department, located in the basement of the Julia
Street building, continues to serve the various departments economically
and expeditiously. This department is capable of turning out a large
volume of work effecting considerable savings to the agency. The de-
partment now operates at a maximum load with the personnel and
equipment assigned to it.
TABLE 2
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1955
RECEIPTS
FROM STATE FUNDS
From State Appropriations:
Salaries ................................................................................... $ 718,554.00
Expenses ............................................................................................ 612,730.59
Emergency Fund State Board of Health -
Cancer Administration ........................................................ 75,000.00
Emergency Fund Grant to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.. 25,000.00
Purchase of Salk Polio Vaccine .............................................. 550,000.00
State Mental Health .................................................................. 75,000.00
Licensing of Nursing Homes ............................................ 25,000.00
County Mosquito Control .......................................................... 350,028.50
Mosquito Control Under Chapter 389.21,
Florida Statutes 1953 ........................................ 250,000.00
State Matching Mosquito Control, Chapter 389.21,
Florida Statutes 1953 ........................................................ 1,250,000.00
County Health Units ................................................................ 1,100,000.00
Franklin County Marine Laboratory ...................................... 9,800.00
Other:
Medical Laboratory Control .................................................. 780.00
State Board of Health Trust Fund .......................................... 80,985.90
Bedding Inspection Administration ........................................ 54,911.00
Advisory Hospital Council ..................................... 245.00
TOTAL STATE FUNDS ................................................$5,178,034.99


FROM FEDERAL GRANT-IN-AID
Public Health Service:
General Health .................................................... $
Venereal Disease .............................................. ...............
Tuberculosis Control .............................................................
Heart Disease .................................... .................
Cancer Control .....................................................................
Mental Health ....................................... ...........................
Prevention and Control Center ........................................
Children's Bureau:
Maternal and Child Health ...............................................


217,752.00
65,276.71
80,545.00
25,723.80
47,163.00
45,217.00
2.80
262,962.74


TOTAL FEDERAL GRANT-IN-AID ............................$ 744,643.05









16 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

FROM PRIVATE CONTRIBUTIONS
Grants and Donations ............................................................$ 90,752.20
TOTAL PRIVATE CONTRIBUTIONS ....................$ 90,752.20
FROM LOCAL AGENCIES FOR COUNTY HEALTH UNITS $ 2,870,987.05
Total Receipts .................................................... ......... $ 8,884,417.29
Balances July 1, 1954 ............................................................ 1,657,439.98

Total Receipts and Balances .............................................. $10,541,857.27

DISBURSEMENTS
OPERATING EXPENSE
Personal Services:
Salaries ...................................................... ............ ................ $ 4,640,473.57
Professional Fees and Consultant Services .......................... 76,027.76
Contractual Services:
Travel Expenses, including subsistence and Lodging ............ 519,557.08
Communication and Transportation of Things ...................... 118,173.33
Utilities ........................................ 31,852.28
Repairs and Maintenance ...................................................... 34,837.31
General Printing and Reproduction Services ...................... 25,541.35
Subsistence, Care and Support of Persons ......................... 214,754.91
Other Contractual Services .................................................. 40,260.49
Commodities:
Bedding, Clothing, Linens and Other Textile Products ....... 1,068.39
Building and Construction Materials and Supplies .............. 6,633.36
Coal, Fuel Oil and Other Heating Supplies ........... ..... 11,167.02
Educational, Medical, Scientific and Agricultural
Materials and Supplies .................................................... 396,451.97
Maintenance Materials and Supplies (Janitorial, etc.) ........ 29,567.18
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ............................................... 41,879.11
Office Materials and Supplies ................................................ 80,773.37
Other Materials and Supplies .................................................. 6,478.80
Current Charges:
Insurance and Surety Bonds .................................................... 28,964.85
Rental of Buildings and Equipment ................................... 47,269.59
Other Current Charges and Obligations ...................... 38,165.74
M erit System .............................................................................. 17,358.90
Total Operating Expenses ........................................ $ 6,407,256.36
CAPITAL EXPENSE
Books ........................................... ............ 2,390.50
Buildings and Fixed Equipment ............................................ 346,142.10
Educational, Medical, Scientific and
Agricultural Equipment ................................... ... 81,445.64
Motor Vehicles-- Passenger ................................................. 27,044.54
Motor Vehicles-- Other ....................................................... 29,190.41
Office Furniture and Equipment ................. ................. 45,388.95
Other Capital Outlay .......................................................... 3,894.88
Total Capital Expenses .................................. ..........$ 535,497.02

TOTAL OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSES ........$ 6,942,753.38
Grants to Counties and Mosquito Control Districts,
Chapter 389.21, Florida Statutes 1953 .................................$ 1,180,182.00

Total Program Expenses ................................................................ $ 8,122,935.38









FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


NON-OPERATING DISBURSEMENTS
To close out Rapid Treatment Center to Venereal
Disease Fund ...................................... ............ ... $
Emergency Fund State Board of Health Grant
to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital ..............................
Refund of Registration fees -Comptroller's
3% Fee Deduction ........................................................
To close out State Health Officer Revolving Fund ............
Bedding Inspection Administration -Refund for


2,977.06
25,000.00

30.45
2,000.00


stamps returned ....................................................... 59.00
To close out Hillsborough County Revolving Fund ............ 2,000.00
Refund of local Contributions ............................. .. 111,550.00

Total Non-Operating Disbursements..............................$ 143,616.51
TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS ........................................................8,266,551.89
Balances June 30, 1955 ................................................................... 2,275,305.38

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES ......................$10,541,857.27

TABLE 3
SCHEDULE OF EXPENSES
BY PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM ACTIVITY
Health Services to mothers, infants, preschool and school children ..$ 1,412,980.00
Statewide Venereal Disease Control Diagnosis and referral of in-
fectious Venereal Disease Patients to the Prevention and Con-
trol Center and Operation of Centers ..................................... 654,850.00
Mosquito and Pest Control Programs, including pest control law
enforcement ..................................................... 2,261,016.39
Statewide Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Sanitation ...... 792,289.91
Statewide Tuberculosis Control, X-Ray Survey and Follow-up
work ............................................................................................... 645,220.00
Statewide Cancer Control Program .................................................. 221,440.81
Mental Health Program ....................................... ......................... 232,270.00
Statewide Narcotics, Drug, Medical Practice Law Enforcement .... 87,222.12
Heart Disease Program .................................................................... 95,870.00
Industrial Hygiene Program ................................. .... 20,174.49
Building Construction, and Equipping Same .................................. 365,659.36
Other Health Programs and Administration .................................... 1,333,942.30

Total Expenses ...........................................................................$ 8,122,935.38
SCHEDULE OF EXPENSES BY FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY
General Administration and Miscellaneous Training ......................$ 404,692.78
Vital Statistics .................................................................................... 177,918.04
Health Information ............................................................................. 56,676.85
Narcotic Enforcement .......................................................... 65,874.82
Sanitary Engineering ....................................................... ...... 203,929.91
Entomology and Mosquito Control ...................................... 1,669,993.94
Laboratories ................................................. 426,945.94
Tuberculosis Control ........................................ ........................... 108,402.33
Preventable Diseases (excluding Tuberculosis) .............................. 163,376.83
Chronic Diseases ................................................................................ 316,508.90
Maternal and Child Health ............................................................... 119,588.24
Local Health Service ............................................... 120,967.47
Building Construction, and Equipping Same ................................. 365,659.36
County Health Units ............... ................ .................. 3,922,399.97

Total Expenses .................... .............. .............................$ 8,122,935.38








18 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

SUMMARY OF TOTAL EXPENSES BY MAJOR FUNCTIONAL LEVELS
State Level Organization Units
State Funds .................................................$ 1,454,807.67
Federal Funds ............................................ 427,029.06
Private Funds ............................................ 56,860.22
$ 1,938,696.95
State Level- Special Services
State Funds ................................................$ 2,119,777.91
Federal Funds ............................................ 122,441.87
Private Funds ............................................ 19,618.68
$ 2,261,838.46
*County Health Units
State Funds .............................................$ 1,122,872.52
Federal Funds ............................................ 196,359.10
Local Funds .............................................. 2,603,168.35
$ 3,922,399.97

GRAND TOTAL .......................................................................$ 8,122,935.38

* Total County Health Units expenditures $3,922,399.97 represents per capital
expenditures of $1.15 (39c State and Federal Funds and 76c Local Funds) based
on population served by County Health Units of 3,416,697 (1955 Est. Census).
For comparison with previous years, see 1954 Annual Report, Table 3, Page 16;
1953 Annual Report, Table 3, Page 15; 1952 Annual Report, Table 2, Page 16;
1951 Annual Report, Table 2, Page 24.








TABLE 4
FUNDS RECEIVED BY COUNTY HEALTH UNITS FROM STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND FROM LOCAL SOURCES FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1955


STATE BOARD OF HEALTH LOCAL FUNDS
Total
COUNTY Funds State Board of Board of Fees &
Mental County Corn- Public Mie-
Total State Health Federal Total missioners Instruction Cities cellaneous


ALACHUA ..............
BAKER..................
BAY .....................
BRADFORD.............
BREVARD ...............
BROWARD...............
CALHOUN.............
CHARLOTTE ............
CITRUS.................
CLAY. ................. .
COLLIER ................
COLUMBIA..............
COUNTY HEALTH UNIT-
STATE AT LARGE.....
DADE ...................
DESOTO.................
DIXIE...................
DUVAL..................
ESCAMBIA..............
FLAGLER...............
FRANKLIN ..............
GADSDEN ...............
GILCHRIST .............
GLADES.................
GULF. ................. .
HAMILTON .............
HARDEE................
HENDRY................
HERNANDO............
HIGLANDS ...............
HILLSBOROUGH .........
HOLMES ................
INDIAN RIVER..........
JACKSON ................
JEFFERSON .............
LAFAYETTE ............
LAKE....................
LEE ...................


$ 82,006.08
13,471.45
64,447.59
23,235.38
30,095.67
142,050.15
14,797.50
9,225.06
13,471.51
23,622.15
17,013.60
25,114.22
49,331.00
748,405.46
14,177.33
8,977.90
123,867.46
222,368.52
11,988.49
16,001.11
41,594.59
8,824.60
8,507.92
20,835.22
14,995.85
18,590.65
11,657.58
11,448.00
24,480.27
500,045.72
18,258.75
20,024.42
40,065.03
16,837.23
8,556.63
70,906.10
43,376.22


$ 33,142.34
7,209.00
30,585.31
11,796.00
15,663.00
39,521.00
7,947.00
4,923.00
6,845.00
12,274.00
8,146.00
14,359.00
49,331.00
130,193.07
7,797.00
4,478.00
50,614.00
45,126.00
4,039.00
6,628.00
21,365.00
4,589.00
3,507.00
9,254.00
8,689.00
9,861.00
6,162.00
6,290.00
13,441.00
78,095.99
10,526.00
10,300.00
19,860.00
8,714.00
3,922.00
27,365.00
21,295.00


$ 27,526.00
7,209.00
25,408.00
11,796.00
15,663.00
24,471.00
7,947.00
4,923.00
6,845.00
12,274.00
8,146.00
14,359.00
49,331.00
81,360.00
7,797.00
4,478.00
29,374.00
32,776.00
4,039.00
6,628.00
20,165.00
4,589.00
3,507.00
9,254.00
8,689.00
9,861.00
6,162.00
6,290.00
13,441.00
29,300.00
10,526.00
10,300.00
19,860.00
8,714.00
3,922.00
27,365.00
21,295.00


$ 3,927.30


$ 5,616.34
1,250.01


4,820.001 10,230.00


2,900.00
6,150.00


48,833.01

18,340.00
6,200.0(

1,200.0C


6.205.001 42,590.9S


$ 48,863.74
6,262.45
33,862.28
11.439.38
14,432.67
102,529.15
6,850.50
4,302.06
6,626.51
11,348.15
8,867.60
10,755.22

618,212.39
6,380.33
4,499.90
73,253.46
177,242.52
7,949.49
9,373.11
20,229.59
4,235.60
5,000.92
11,581.22
6,306.85
8,729.65
5,495.58
5,158.00
11,039.27
421,949.73
7,732.75
9,724.42
20,205.03
8,123.23
4,634.63
43,541.10
22,081.22


$ 33,850.04
6,232.45
33,270.53
6,156.21
11,705.67
77,642.09
6,800.00
1,750.00
3,994.76
8,770.40
8,600.00
6,889.38

576,978.24
4,830.33
3,865.77
59,250.22
116,825.75
5,289.00
8,824.11
13,999.92
2,224.60
4,996.17
8,481.75
2,841.68
8,449.90
5,449.33
2,530.00
10,880.02
336,465.77
3,840.00
8,620.42
16,322.19
4,800.00
2,585.38
41.163.88
21,209.82


$ 7,500.00

2,800.00
2,250.00
12,680.00
2,060.00
2,600.00

3,600.00


1,450.00
600.00
6,300.00
2,478.80
3,930.00
2,000.00
3,000.00
8,091.67
200.00
2,530.00
258.00
3,840.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
3,200.00
2,040.00


$ 6,600.00

2,400.00
720.00
450.00
2,400.00





11,460.00
49,154.94
500.00
1,200.00


300.00






600.00


1,980.00o


.1


$ 913.70
30.00 Z
591.75
83.17
477.00
11,487.06 z
50.50
42.06 C
31.75
177.75 M
267.60
265.84

41,284.15
100.00
34.13
2,543.24
4,961.88
181.69
49.00
1,099.67
11.00
4.75
99.47 0
73.50
79.75 C
46.25
98.00 Z
159.25
85,225.96
52.75
104.00
282.84
123.23
9.25
397.22
871.40 ,0












TABLE 4 (continued)

FUNDS RECEIVED BY COUNTY HEALTH UNITS FROM STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND FROM LOCAL SOURCES FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1955


STATE BOARD OF HEALTH LOCAL FUNDS
Total
COUNTY Funds State Board of Board of Fees &
Mental County Corn- Public Mis-
Total State Health Federal Total missioners Instruction Cities cellaneous

LEON.................... $ 93,115.54 $ 39,624.65 $ 29,486.00 $ 10,138.65 $ 53,490.89 $ 45,952.14 $ 1,500.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 1,038.75
LEVY ................... 20,576.77 11,585.00 11,585.00 8,991.77 4,849.89 4,059.38 82.50
LIBERTY ................ 10,603.95 3,627.00 3,627.00 6,976.95 2,927.07 3,825.00 224.88
MADISON................ 19,157.95 11,154.00 11,154.00 8,003.95 4,400.00 3,500.00 103.95
MANATEE ............... 47,633.91 20,258.00 20,258.00 27,375.91 25,724.12 1,651.79
MARION ................. 62,938.81 25,047.00 25,047.00 37,891.81 27,888.06 4,000.00 5,600.00 403.75
MARTIN ................ 15,796.13 7,358.00 7,358.00 8,438.13 7,757.38 500.00 180.75
MONROE ................ 47,285.10 20,518.00 20,518.00 26,767.10 15,239.86 4,500.00 5,179.13 1,848.11
NASSAU ................. 32,782.89 13,964.00 13,964.00 18,818.39 14,497.16 4,000.00 180.00 141.23
OKALOOSA .............. 33,513.50 17,655.00 17,655.00 15,858.50 11,200.00 4,200.00 458.50
OKEECHOBEE ........... 7,233.21 4,438.00 4,438.00 2,795.21 2,765.46 29.75
ORANGE................. 156,539.28 45,360.60 31,971.00 $ 10,736.50 2,653.10 111,178.68 90,970.68 10,000.00 1,600.00 8,608.00
OSCEOLA................ 19,666.50 10,484.00 10,484.00 9,182.50 6,000.00 2,400.00 782.50
PALM BEACH........... 205,398.23 50,638.71 33,250.00 17,388.71 154,759.52 81,042.64 16,915.00 39,211.01 17,590.87
PASCO................... 21,207.32 12,372.00 12,372.00 8,835.32 4,000.00 4,000.00 835.32
PINELLAS............... 340,778.07 66,697.00 33,232.00 12,790.00 20,675.00 274,081.07 226,966.96 47,114.11
POLK .................... 130,407.74 43,901.73 29,919.00 6,489.50 7,493.23 86,506.01 75,848.00 701.24 9,956.77
PUTNAM................ 31,174.25 14,732.00 14,732.00 16,442.25 16,205.25 237.00
ST.LUCIE................ 27,405.38 14,168.00 14,168.00 18,237.38 12,466.19 771.19
SANTA ROSA. ........... 21,882.50 12,249.00 12,249.00 9,633.50 4,125.00 5,420.00 88.50
SARASOTA............... 57,536.42 26,847.00 25,707.00 1,140.00 30,689.42 29,183.42 1,506.00
SEMINOLE .............. 29,559.00 16,226.00 16,226.00 13,333.00 7,700.00 5,400.00 233.00
SUMTER ................ 16,612.44 9,324.00 9,324.00 7,288.44 3,500.00 3,500.00 288.44
SUWANEE............... 23,449.23 13,862.00 13,862.00 9,587.23 9,429.26 157.97
TAYLOR ................ 14,332.87 8,482.00 8,482.00 5,850.87 5,750.00 100.87
UNION ................... 13,104.75 7,581.00 7,581.00 5,523.75 5.500.00 23.75
VOLUSIA ................ 140,164.13 45,009.53 36,633.00 5,766.53 2,610.00 95,154.60 80,000.00 9,800.00 5,354.60
WAKULLA............... 10,715.75 5,594.00 5,594.00 5,121.75 5,000.00 121.75
WALTON................. 22,816.00 12,462.00 12,462.00 10,354.00 4,800.00 4,200.00 1,200.00 154.00
WASHINGTON .......... 21,071.45 11,072.00 11,072.00 9,999.45 5,789.42 3,400.00 720.00 90.03
TOTALS.................. $4,227,130.98 $1,356,143.93 $1,100,000.00 $ 59,784.83 $ 196,359.10 $2,870,987.05 $2,313,863.74 $ 168,229.09 $ 136,455.08 $ 252,439.14


d




L-i


I'd
O





0

U1
wl







FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FLORIDA STATE
BOARD OF HEALTH DOLLAR FOR 1956


GCENEL LAD#INISTWITION ?,400,1 3I-.4.7 I0
VITAL STATISTICS --I BB,060- Za IC
WEALTH INFORMATION ----53.64o--G69f
I".J\1COTI1CS ---69, 4OO-.8-63
SANITARv ENGINEERING~- -209p760-24714
Ei-rOMM OLOGY *I,?73q,3Afo-.O04 lie
L C~ 1301 O Z T0 1?V dyrq?,S880- .3QC
PREVENTABLE DISEASES( cdiM -. 29, Cox- 2.Ssvt
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL 10,060-I-1194
CNiONIC DISEASES *3o,/6;2-'9.2i6C
MATERNAVHLCILD WEALTH -I 10.416 -/. 3sae
_rm$=k f-4 1f -4 C If two b OXO8
LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE -I # 6,%201- -I 3 70
COUNTY I4EALTH UNITS 96- 4f18,.avf-5i.S6
184947144 ONE MAR






TABLE 5

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL-STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
(OTHER THAN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS)
DECEMBER 31, 1955



J3 Q
In, 0 P

Bureau or Division > I






Administration-SHO ....................... ...... 2 3 3 1 9
Dental Health ...................... ................. 2 1 1 4
SFiscal 11 11
S Fiscal ................................. 11 1
Finance Personnel............................. 7 7
and Purchasing and Property.................. 8 17 4 29
Accounts Total .................................. 26 17 4 47
Health Information...... ... .... ............. 2 4 1 2 2 11
Jacksonville...................... 1 33 7 24 3 1 69
Miami ......................... 13 8 3 1 20
Orlando ...................... 3 1 3 7
Laboratories Pensacola ....................... 2 1 3 6
Tallahassee ........ .......... 3 3 2 8
Tampa........ ................ 9 2 5 1 1 18
West Palm Beach................ 3 1 4
Total ................... ...... 1 66 15 38 8 4 132
Bureau........................ 2 2 4
PH Nursing ..................... 4 2 6
Local Health Service Field Advisory Staff
and Inservice Training........... 2 3 4 4 13
Total.......................... 4 7 4 8 23
Maternal and Child Halth............................ 1 1 1 1 2 6
M mental Health................... ..... ....... .... ... 1 3 2 6
N arcotics................ .......... .................. 3 7 10
Bureau............................... 2 2 3 7
Cancer Control ....................... 4 4
Industrial Hygiene................... 1 2 1 4
Preventable Venereal Disease Control ................ 4 4 12 20
Diseases Veterinary Public Health ................ 1 2 3
Nutrition and Diabetes Control .......... 1 4 1 6
Hospitalization of Indigent.............. 2 2
Total ................................. 3 4 1 4 4 15 1 14 46
Sanitary Engineering.................................... 16 3 3 11 4 37
Entomology.......................................... 2 2 16 6 3 18 47
SBureau ............................... 1 9 7 17
Tb Control Heart Disease Control ................. 2 1
Total......... .................... .... 1 11 7 1 20
Vital Statistics ........................................ 1 3 45 1 3 53
Grand Total.................................. 12 9 2 18 13 86 9 4 3 152 60 59 10 14 451


I


-v-







FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 23

TABLE 6
DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL IN COUNTY HEALTH
DEPARTMENTS-DECEMBER 31, 1955





COUNTIES g V l
Q 0
.2 S .wo

z l I s a t


Alachua............ 8 2 3 1 1 5 20
Baker.............. 1 1 1 3
Bay................ 1 4 3 2 2 1 13
Bradford.......... 3t 1 1 1 6
Brevard............ 1* 3 2 1 2 3 12
Broward............ 1 16t 1 8 9 1 2 1 39
Calhoun............ 1 1 1 3
Charlotte .......... 1 1 1 3
Citrus............. 2*t 1 1 1 5
Clay............... I* 1 1 1 1 5
Collier............. 2 1 1 4
Columbia........... 1* 2 1 1 1 6
Dade.............. 7t 76 2 38 1 31 5 4 14 178
De Soto............ 1 1 1 1 4
Dixie .............. 1 1 2
Duval.............. 1 11i 5 6 2 7 3 35
Escambia.......... 2 10 6 7 1 3 7 36
Flagler ............. 1 1 1 3
Franklin............ 1* 1 1 1 1 5
Gadsden............ 1* 5 2 2 1 11
Gilchrist............ 1 1 2
Glades............. 1 1
Gulf............... 1 1 1 1 4
Hamilton........... 1 1 1 1 4
Hardee............. 1* 2 1 1 5
Hendry ............ 1 1 1 3
Hernando........... 1 1 2
Highlands.......... 1* 2 2 1 1 7
Hillsborough........ 6 40 1 16 26 15 23 10 137
Holmes............ 2 1 1 1 5
Indian River........ 3 1 1 5
Jackson ............ 1* 4 2 2 1 10
Jefferson........... 1* 1 1 1 1 5
Lafayette........... 1 1 1 3
Lake............... 1 6 3 3 1 14
Lee............... 1* 4 3 2 1 11
Leon.............. 1 7 3 1 7 1 1 1 22
Levy............... 2 1 1 1 5
Liberty............. 1 1 2
Madison........... 2 2t 2 6
Manatee .......... 1 4 2 1 3 3 14
Marion ............ 1 4 2 2 1 2 12
Martin..... ..... 2 2 1 5
Monroe ........... 1 4 3 2 3 2 15
Nassau............. 1* 3 1 1 1 7
Okaloosa........... 1* 4 2 2 1 10
Okeechobee......... 1 1 2
Orange............ 1 13 1 5 1 8 4 10 43
Osceola............. 2 1 1 4
Palm Beach......... 1 17 1 1 8 11 2 4 5 50
Pasco.............. 1* 2 1 1 5
Pinellas ........... 4 29f 1 1 171 1 2 18 5 3 3 84
Polk.............. 1 11 1 8 1 8 2 4 36
Putnam............ 2* 3 1 1 7
Santa Rosa......... 2 1 1 2 6
Sarasota........... 1 6 3 3 13
Seminole............ 1 2 1 1 1 6
St. Lucie .......... 1* 2 2 2 1 2 10
Sumter............. 1 1 1 1 4
Suwannee.......... 1* 2 1 1 1 6
Taylor............. 1 1 1 1 4
Union............. 1 1 1 3
Volusia............ 1 12 7 1 2 2 7 4 36
Wakulla............ 1 1 2
Walton............. 1* 2 1 1 1 6
Washington......... 2 1 1 1 5
Total. ....... 53 364 3 7 189 3 7 203 40 73 99 1041

*Serves two or more counties-See Roster of County Health Officers.
+One on Academic Leave.










24 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 7

TERMINATIONS AND TURNOVER RATES BY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND COUNTY HEALTH UNITS,
CALENDAR YEARS 1953 AND 1954 (FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES ONLY)

SALARY

CLASSIFICATION Total Un-
Total Un-
der 150- 200- 250- 300- 400- 500- 600- 700- 800
150 199 249 299 399 499 599 699 799 4

TERMINATIONS-1953-1954

Total-All Employes........ 621 80 237 170 93 38 13 11 19 7 3
Physicians......... ........ 30 4 16 7 3
Sanitary Engineers......... 8 5 2 1
Sanitanans................ 43 15 19 6 1 2
Public Health Nurses....... 137 87 40 8 2
Prof. Laboratory Workers.. 22 10 2 6 3 1
Clerical, Admin. & Fiscal... 196 150 41 2 2 1
All Others................. 185 30 77 25 26 14 7 4 2
TURNOVER RATE-(ANNUAL PERCENTAGE)

Total-All Employees......... 24.8 24.4 50.2 24.6 15.9 11.0 12.3 22.9 31.7 18.9 8.3
Physicians .... ...... 25.4 100.0 35.6 20.0 9.1
Sanitary Engineers......... 16.0 27.8 15.4 7.1
Sanitarians................ 12.1 27.8 11.6 5.2 4.5
Public Health Nurses....... 20.9 32.1 15.0 7.8 15.4
Prof. Laboratory Workers... 16.1 45.5 6.720.7 8.8 5.9
Clerical, Admin. & Fiscal.... 29.8 47.8 16.5 3.6 11.8 16.7
All Others......... 35.0 24.6 57.0 29.1 8.2 23.3 22.6 22.2 33.3

TABLE 8

TERMINATIONS AND TURNOVER RATES BY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND COUNTY HEALTH UNITS,
CALENDAR YEAR 1955 (FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES ONLY)

SALARY

CLASSIFICATION Total Un-
der 150- 200- 250- 300- 400- 500- 600- 700- 800
150 199 249 299 399 499 599 699 799 +

TERMINATIONS-1955

Total-All Employees....... 323 15 93 92 70 31 9 7 2 1 3
Physicians................. 5 1 1 3
Sanitary Engineers.......... 6 2 2 2
Sanitarians................. 34 1 4 19 9 1
Public Health Nurses....... 70 20 38 12
Prof. Laboratory Workers... 8 2 2 4
Clerical, Admin. & Fiscal.... 101 46 48 5 1 1
All Others................. 99 15 46 18 6 4 5 4 1

TURNOVER RATE (ANNUAL PERCENTAGE)

Total-All Employees.......... 24.3 34.5 48.9 35.5 19.1 10.7 12.5 21.2 8.3 4.2 10.9
Physicians................. 8.3 9.1 4.7 12.0
Sanitary Engineers....... 24.0 50.0 26.7 23.5
Sanitanans........ ........ 17.5 100.0 100.0 28.6 8.7 5.1
Public Health Nurses...... 19.3 36.4 19.4 12.0
Prof. Laboratory Workers... 11.0 12.5 10.5 18.2
Clerical, Admin. & Fiscal.... 29.2 38.7 33.3 9.7 22.2 40.0
All Others................. 36.7 34.5 67.6 45.0 17.9 9.9 21.3 33.3 15.4








VITAL STATISTICS 25


BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS

EVERETT H. WILLIAMS, JR., M.S., Hyg., Director

A summary of the activities of the Bureau of Vital Statistics and a
brief analysis of statistical data based on preliminary tabulations are
given in this text. An analysis of vital statistics and morbidity data for
1955 in greater detail is presented in Supplements 1 and 2 of this
report under the titles "Florida Vital Statistics, 1955", and "Florida Mor-
bidity Statistics, 1955".

POPULATION
Preliminary estimates placed the population of the state at 3,643,562
as of July 1, 1956. Of this figure 2,918,458 were white and 725,104 were
nonwhite.

Population estimates made by this bureau, the Bureau of the Census
and the various universities throughout the state have shown varying
amounts of disagreement. The need for a census every five years has
been noted by several official agencies concerned with population data.
Four counties, Broward, Dade, Leon and Palm Beach, felt a sufficient
need for this information to have special counts made by the Bureau
of the Census at county expense.

BIRTHS
Births to Florida residents reached 89,192, an increase of over 4,000
from the 1954 figure. The birth rate for the state was 24.4 per 1,000
population, slightly below the estimated national rate of 24.7. White
births totaled 64,086 with a rate of 21.9 per 1,000 population. There were
25,106 nonwhite births and a nonwhite rate of 34.6 per 1,000 population.

The 1955 birth figure again represents a record high for the state and
reflects the continued growth of population and relatively high birth
rates of the post World War II period. The upward trend of births is
indicated by the figures in Table 10. Births by race by county are
shown in Table 12.

DEATHS
The 33,088 resident deaths which occurred in 1955 represent an in-
crease of 5.3 per cent over the previous year. However, the 1955 death
rate of 9.1 was only slightly higher than the 1954 rate of 9.0 per 1,000
population. A similar slight increase in the death rate was noted na-
tionally, the rate for the United States rising from 9.1 to 9.3. Death rates
in Florida in recent years have been slightly below those of the nation.








26 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


There were 25,562 white deaths with a rate of 8.7 per 1,000 and
7,526 nonwhite deaths with a rate of 10.4.

Increases were noted in the crude death rates for the major chronic
diseases. The rate for diseases of the heart was 314.2 per 100,000 popu-
lation compared with 304.8 in 1954. The cancer death rate increased from
139.4 to 141.5 per 100,000. A slight increase in the rate for vascular
lesions affecting the central nervous system was also noted. The 1954
rate was 107.3 per 100,000 and the 1955 rate 107.4.

The death rate for the major infective diseases of tuberculosis and
syphilis continued to decline. The syphilis death rate in 1955 was 2.8
per 100,000 compared with 3.6 in the previous year, and the tuber-
culosis death rate declined from 8.1 per 100,000 in 1954 to 7.8 per
100,000 in 1955.

The trend of resident death rates since 1931 is shown in Table 10.

MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE
Marriages increased by over 1,500, reaching a total of 29,869 compared
with 28,316 in 1954. The crude marriage rate was 8.2 per 1,000 popu-
lation. There were 23,689 white marriages with a rate of 8.1 compared
with 6,180 nonwhite marriages and a nonwhite rate of 8.5.

Divorces and annulments totaled 19,956 compared with 19,417 in
1954. The divorce and annulment rate in 1955 was 5.4 per 100,000
population. Divorce and annulment rates are not available by race.

ACTIVITIES
The work load of the bureau continues to increase. The number of
paid requests for photostat copies and other types of certification increas-
ed 8 per cent. Fees collected increased 8 per cent and the number of cur-
rent certificates filed increased 5 per cent. There was a 17 per cent
increase in the number of new birth certificates processed for children
who were adopted.

The crowded condition of the vault was relieved somewhat when a
small room adjacent to the vault was made available. Although this
room is not fire-proof, it is considered fire-resistant and all indexes
were moved in. This additional space is estimated to be sufficient for
one of two more years.

An additional duty was given to the bureau by the 1955 Legislature.
The new legislation provides for a monthly list of adult deaths to be
sent to each incorporated municipality for the purpose of eliminating
name from the register of qualified voters.








VITAL STATISTICS 27

Late in the year the bureau started a register of all persons injected
with the new Salk poliomyelitis vaccine. The name and statistical data
are key-punched on IBM cards and in addition to a register of names,
the system will provide statistical data on persons immunized and be the
basis for a follow-up study of the results. This project made it necessary
to order additional IBM equipment. Some of the equipment arrived
in December and the complete tabulating unit should be installed by
March 1, 1956. Plans are being made to transfer several other pro-
jects to this tabulating unit as soon as possible.

A consolidated "Vital Statistics Scoreboard" is shown as Table 15.
Counties are listed in order of rank showing their relative efficiency in
birth and death registration. It is gratifying to note the improvement
which has taken place in some counties. On the other hand, it is dis-
couraging that the state average has shown little change. It is hoped
that the local health departments will take remedial action in those
counties which are at the bottom of the list and have shown little or no
improvement. Proper registration of births and deaths in each county is
the responsibility of the county health officer.

Articles by staff members:
Williams, E. H., Matched data on births and neonatal deaths, Pub.
Health Rep., 70:923-925, Sept., 1955.









28 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

TABLE 9

ACTIVITIES OF THE BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS

DURING THE YEARS 1954 AND 1955


Activity
Current certificates filed .................................
Delayed birth certificates filed ...................
Amended certificates filed for adoptions ........
Amended certificates filed for legitimations
and corrections of parentage ..................
Requests for certifications
Fee paid ............................................
Free ...................................................
Photostats made ..........................................
Birth registration cards made .....................
Fees collected and transmitted to


1954
164,001
3,123
2,090

479

76,300
17,799
84,551
25,030


State Treasurer ......................................$113,328.60


1955
172,609
3,552
2,451

616


Per cent
change
+ 5.2
+13.7
+17.3

+28.6


82,600 + 8.3
14,953 -16.0
92,044 + 8.9
26,812 + 7.1

$122,272.24 + 7.9


TABLE 10

RESIDENT BIRTHS AND DEATHS WITH RATES PER 1,000
POPULATION, FLORIDA, 1931-1955

YEAR POPULATION BIRTHS BIRTH RATE DEATHS RATE DEATH
1955* 3,643,562 89,192 24.4 33,088 9.1
1954 3,481,528 85,011 24.4 31,433 9.0
1953 3,111,100 80,087 25.7 30,529 9.8
1952 3,006,400 74,219 29.7 29,136 9.7
1951 2,901,800 70,431 24.3 27,857 9.6
1950 2,797,100 64,370 23.0 26,525 9.5
1949 2,692,500 61,642 22.9 25,317 9.4
1948 2,587,800 59,685 23.1 24,505 9.5
1947 2,483,200 60,201 24.2 24,150 9.7
1946 2,378,500 54,347 22.8 22,750 9.6
1945 2,273,900 48,839 21.5 22,594 9.9
1944 2,196,195 49,186 22.4 23,251 10.6
1943 2,125,935 46,783 22.0 23,213 10.9
1942 2,055,675 40,675 19.8 21,144 10.3
1941 1,985,415 37,351 18.8 21,438 10.8
1940 1,915,155 33,696 17.6 21,458 11.2
1939 1,853,660 32,437 17.5 20,209 10.9
1938 1,795,322 31,101 17.3 19,949 11.1
1937 1,736,984 29,529 17.0 19,825 11.4
1936 1,678,646 28,116 16.7 20,050 11.9
1935 1,620,308 28,058 17.3 19,059 11.8
1934 1,585,596 26,722 16.9 19,518 12.3
1933 1,554,000 25,647 16.5 18,112 11.7
1932 1,530,356 27,242 17.8 17,721 11.6
1931 1,502,736 26,789 17.8 17,291 11.5

*1955 data based upon preliminary totals.




TABLE 11

DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY CAUSE, BY RACE, FLORIDA, 1955 (PRELIMINARY)



CAUSE OF DEATH Deaths Rate Per 100,000 Population
CAUSE OF DEATH
(Numbers in parentheses refer to the International List of Causes of Death) Tl White Colored Total I White Colored
ALL CAUSES ..Total White Colored Total White Colored
ALL CAUSES ................... ...................... .33,088 25,562 7,626 9.1* 8.8* 10.4*


Tuberculosis of respiratory system (001-008) .................. ...........................
Tuberculosis, other forms (010-019)..................... ...............................
Syphilis and its sequelae (020-029)............... ............................ ....
Typhoid Fever (040) .................. ............ .. ............ ..............
Dysentery, all forms (045-048) ................. ................... ..........
D iphtheria (055) ........................................................ ................
Meningoocccal infections (057) ........................................................
Acute Poliomyelitis (080)..... .. ............. ......... ..........................
Acute Infectious Encephalitis (082).................. ..................................
M easles (085).................................................... .......................
Typhus and other rickettsial diseases (100-108)....... .......................................
All other diseases classified as infective and parasitic (030 to 138 with exception of above causes)...
Maglignant Neoplasms, including neoplasms of Lymphatic and Haematopoietic tissues (140-205)...
Diabetes Mellitus (260) ............ ......... .......................................
Anem ias (290-293)..............................................................
Diseases of the cardiovascular-renal system ................................................
Cerebral vascular disease (330-334) ....... .............. .. ....................
D diseases of the heart..........................................................
Chronic rheumatic heart disease (410-416) ............................................
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease (420-422)................... ........
Hypertension with heart disease (440-443)....... .................................
Other diseases of the heart (430-434)........ ......................................
Hypertension without heart disease (444-447)...........................................
Other circulatory diseases (450-468) .................................................
Nephritis and nephrosis (590-594) .....................................................
Rheumatic fever (400-402)................................... ...........................
Influenza (480-483) ................................................................
Pneum onia (490-493) .....................................................................
Ulcer of stomach and duodenum (540-541).................................................
Intestinal obstruction and hernia (560, 561, 570) ............................................
Gastritis, duodenitis, enteritis and colitis, except diarrhea of the newborn (543, 571, 572)..........
Cirrhosis of liver (581) .....................................................
Complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (640-652, 660, 670-689) ............
Congenital malformations (750-759).............. .... ..................................
Birth injuries, postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis (760-762) .................................
Infection of the newborn (763-768)..........................................................
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy, and immaturity unqualified (769-776)...................
Senility without mention of psychosis, ill-defined and unknown causes (780-795)..................
Motor vehicle accidents (810-835)............. ..................................
All other accidents (800-802, 840-962) ...............................................
Suicide and self-inflicted injury (963, 970-979) .............................................
Homicide and operations of war (964, 965, 980-999) ..........................................
All other diseases (residual)......... .......................... ..................


260
24
102
1
16
7
21
10
16
2
1
168
5,155
465
89
16,944
3,912
11,447
324
9,063
1,342
718
248
901
436
23
77
749
180
230
213
345
50
423
646
102
763
855
952
1,271
442
381
2,105


163
12
51
0
9
3
14
9
10
1
0
85
4,379
356
55
13,750
2,896
9,676
276
7,988
834
578
160
759
259
15
26
450
150
172
83
301
23
334
421
39
433
466
712
909
419
119
1,593


7.1
0.7
2.8
***
0.4
0.2
0.6
0.3
0.4
0.1
***
4.6
141.5
12.8
2.4
465.0
107.4
314.2
8.9
248.7
36.8
19.7
6.8
24.7
12.0
0.6
2.1
20.6
4.9
6.3
5.8
9.5
0.6**
11.6
17.7
2.8
20.9
23.5
26.1
34.9
12.1
10.5
57.8


5.6
0.4
1.7
0
0.3
0.1
0.5
0.3
0.3
***
0
2.9
150.0
12.2
1.9
471.1
99.2
331.5
9.5
273.7
28.6
19.8
5.5
26.0
8.9
0.5
0.9
15.4
5.1
5.9
2.8
10.3
0.4**
11.4
14.4
1.3
14.8
16.0
24.4
31.1
14.4
4.1
54.6


13.4
1.7
7.0
0.1
1.0
0.6
1.0
0.1
0.8
0.1
0.1
11.4
107.0
15.0
4.7
440.5 4
140.1
244.2
6.6
148.3
70.1 =4
19.3
12.1
19.6
24.4
1.1
7.0
41.2
4.1 -
8.0
17.9
6.1
1.1**
12.3
31.0
8.7 0
45.5
53.6 C/
33.1
49.9
3.2
36.1
70.6 tO
46.2**


Infant mortality (deaths under one year of age) .............................................. 2,594 1,434 1,160 29.1* 22.4**

*Rate per 1,000 population.
**Rate per 1,000 live births.
***Rate less than 0.05.


I -I


I


I


I


I


I











30 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 12

ESTIMATED POPULATION AND PRELIMINARY TOTALS OF BIRTHS,
DEATHS, AND INFANT DEATHS BY COLOR, FLORIDA, 1955

Estimated BIRTHS DEATHS INFANT DEATHS
COUNTIES Population
1955 Total White Colored Total White Colored Total White Colored
STATE........ 3,643,562 89,192 64,086 25,106 33,088 25,562 7,526 2,594 1,434 1,160
Alachua ........ 62,441 1,608 996 612 486 277 209 55 23 32
Baker.......... 6,262 192 126 66 68 42 26 10 5 5
Bay........... 54,711 1,836 1,468 368 351 269 82 53 35 18
Bradford....... 11,444 335 240 95 103 72 31 10 4 .6
Brevard........ 42,400 1,270 1,019 251 337 276 61 31 22 9
Broward....... 159,052 4,159 2,595 1,564 1,356 1,029 327 137 58 79
Calhoun........ 7,599 206 167 89 65 51 14 4 1 3
Charlotte....... 5,347 72 60 12 60 51 9 2 2 0
Citrus......... 6,127 147 96 51 91 73 18 4 3 1
Clay........... 19,710 619 529 90 124 95 29 9 5 4
Collier......... 10,800 236 175 61 86 59 27 16 12 4
Columbia ...... 20,400 496 299 197 159 83 76 12 4 8
Dade.......... 691,244 15,421 11,770 3,651 5,940 5,118 822 374 228 146
DeSoto ........ 9,288 194 140 54 100 78 22 10 9 1
Dixie.......... 3,996 101 76 25 36 31 5 3 3 0
Duval......... 396,502 10,677 7,685 2,992 3,037 2,005 1,032 263 160 103
Escambia...... 157,385 4,812 3,617 1,195 1,004 656 348 145 77 68
Flagler......... 4,133 133 56 77 43 25 18 7 0 7
Franklin....... 5,386 133 84 49 51 31 20 3 2 1
Gadsden....... 39,493 1,079 279 800 323 103 220 58 8 50
Gilchrist....... 2,960 68 50 18 26 17 9 3 3 0
Glades......... 2,719 48 19 29 27 13 14 3 2 1
Gulf........... 9,444 301 214 87 65 45 20 8 3 5
Hamilton....... 9,151 245 114 131 74 37 37 7 3 4
Hardee......... 11,731 227 193 34 104 94 10 5 4 1
Hendry........ 6,724 193 117 76 67 44 23 11 5 6
Hernando...... 7,977 201 123 78 68 54 14 5 3 2
Highlands...... 15,459 452 267 185 197 153 44 18 8 10
Hillsborough.... 323,023 7,664 6,191 1,473 2,855 2,385 520 210 140 70
Holmes........ 12,750 240 231 9 125 118 7 5 4 1
Indian River.... 15,156 436 264 172 153 116 37 14 4 10
Jackson........ 35,659 888 550 338 335 203 132 25 9 16
Jefferson...... 9,964 295 88 207 122 43 79 11 3 8
Lafayette..... 3,278 58 48 10 27 21 6 2 1 1
Lake........... 45,05 1,008 692 316 536 427 109 42 27 15
Lee............ 31,142 700 485 215 360 277 83 39 21 18
Leon........... 59,995 1,558 877 681 426 203 223 47 19 28
Levy.......... 10,412 258 129 129 103 59 44 9 1 8
Liberty...... 2,512 88 72 16 14 6 8 0 0 0
Madison....... 14,421 393 143 250 158 68 90 17 0 17
Manatee....... 44,123 892 580 312 501 414 87 33 8 25
Marion........ 45,010 1,113 596 517 455 281 174 37 16 21
Martin......... 9,729 218 117 101 104 69 35 7 3 4
Monroe........ 49,380 1,800 1,156 144 293 238 55 39 34 5
Nassau......... 15,131 897 264 133 117 70 47 8 2 6
Okaloosa....... 40,422 1,332 1,238 94 207 179 28 39 36 3
Okeechobee..... 4,188 118 91 27 43 30 13 5 3 2
Orange......... 176,402 4,490 3,483 1,007 1,630 1,373 257 120 86 34
Osceola........ 13,158 24 194 49 221 201 20 8 6 3
PalmBeach..... 157,086 3,568 2,303 1,265 1,523 1,115 408 106 45 61
Pasco.......... 24,852 527 427 100 309 277 32 29 18 11
Pinellas....... 217,066 3,867 2,983 884 3,172 2,962 210 87 59 28
Polk........... 156,167 4,001 2,954 1,047 1,259 959 300 124 73 51
Putnam........ 27,287 769 447 322 300 164 136 25 11 14
St. Johns....... 29,378 624 390 234 291 190 101 14 7 7
St.Lucie....... 26,482 765 378 387 245 157 88 35 6 29
Santa Rosa..... 22,050 668 598 70 149 133 16 27 25 2
Sarasota ....... 37,402 792 606 186 477 419 58 16 10 6
Seminole........ 33,847 871 485 436 296 167 129 37 8 29
Sumter........ 11,153 277 169 108 98 75 23 11 4 7
Suwannee...... 16,407 370 236 134 189 88 51 14 5 9
Taylor......... 13,618 341 254 87 108 74 34 14 10 4
Union.......... 8,247 110 69 41 50 33 17 4 3 1
Volusia........ 90,524 1,764 1,238 526 1,135 898 237 52 24 28
Wakulla........ 4,988 126 75 51 47 26 21 2 1 1
Walton ........ 15,116 349 276 73 130 111 19 8 8 0
Washington .... 11,597 258 185 68 127 102 25 6 3 3









VITAL STATISTICS 31


TABLE 13
PRELIMINARY TOTALS OF RESIDENT DEATHS FROM
SELECTED CAUSES, FLORIDA, 1955

S- Cardio-Vascular-Renal Dis.











Bay ........ 3 2 0 1 0 46 6 2 6 37 96 11 3 8 22
j- ,j s s
0 a s Q 3 So 0 0 S







Bradford.... 0 1 0 0 0 11 2 0 3 8 44 3 3 3 4
STATEvard..... 0284 102 16 10 5,1 46 9 826 ,910 12 52 11,447 1,149 436 96 1,271
Browardhua.... 1 4 3 0 0 67 4 2 14 67 146 21 9 16 21
Baker.lhoun.... 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 1 8 24 1 1 4 8
Bay......... 3 2 0 1 0 46 6 2 6 37 96 11 3 8 22
Bradford.... 0 1 0 0 0 11 2 0 3 8 44 3 0 8 4
Brevard..... 0 0 1 0 0 59 5 0 12 52 110 7 4 6 17
Broward.... 1 12 3 1 1 195 185 42 154 466 38 18 41 52
Calhoun.... 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 0 1 8 21 5 2 0 7
Charlotte... 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 4 7 19 2 0 3 3
Citrus...... 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 1 15 37 7 1 2 3
Clay........ 0 0 0 1 0 12 3 2 9 15 46 4 4 6 4
Collier...... 0 1 0 0 0 15 0 0 3 5 20 4 3 5 6
Columbia... 1 1 0 0 0 22 1 1 12 22 45 2 1 5 5
Dade....... 8 51 16 1 3 1,097 104 15 119 577 2,161 224 55 141 194
DeSoto..... 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 4 16 42 0 1 1 3
Dixie....... 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 3 6 9 4 0 0 1
Duval...... 9 52 16 3 0 451 52 8 83 344 963 93 46 110 126
Escambia... 3 15 1 0 1 140 10 1 32 99 256 27 11 45 47
Flagler...... 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 3 14 3 1 3 2
Franklin.... 0 0 1 0 0 5 2 0 2 6 20 1 1 2 2
Gadsden.... 1 2 1 0 1 38 3 5 14 35 80 16 7 15 20
Gilchrist.... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 7 8 0 0 1 1
Glades...... 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 2 1 4 1 0 5 2
Gulf........ 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0 2 9 19 2 0 7 7
Hamilton... 0 1 0 0 0 12 1 0 3 10 16 5 0 1 2
Hardee..... 1 0 0 0 0 14 3 0 5 14 25 4 4 7 7
Hendry..... 0 1 0 0 0 8 3 0 1 7 21 4 1 1 0
Hernando... 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 2 1 10 18 6 2 4 2
Highlands... 1 3 0 0 0 26 3 0 5 29 64 7 7 5 9
Hillsborough. 3 29 7 0 1 468 41 5 48 319 931 78 40 81 79
Holmes..... 0 0 0 0 0 11 2 1 3 19 44 5 4 9 3
Indian River. 0 2 0 0 0 26 1 1 4 12 64 5 1 4 5
Jackson..... 2 4 1 0 0 43 3 1 7 56 98 14 7 13 10
Jefferson.... 0 3 0 0 0 10 5 1 4 28 87 3 6 1 5
Lafayette... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 3 9 0 1 3 1
Lake....... 1 2 2 1 0 97 6 5 14 56 195 16 6 13 21
Lee......... 1 3 0 1 0 50 7 0 17 39 115 10 2 12 13
Leon....... 0 3 1 0 0 63 1 0 14 58 117 17 9 9 26
Levy....... 1 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 16 84 6 1 3 4
Liberty..... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 3 8 0 0 0 2
Madison.... 0 1 3 0 0 19 0 1 2 15 54 4 5 3 8
Manatee.... 0 5 1 0 0 68 8 2 12 59 201 26 11 10 12
Marion..... 1 4 1 1 0 61 5 1 13 53 159 12 10 15 21
Martin...... 0 0 0 0 14 2 0 0 16 84 4 1 5 7
Monroe..... 0 2 1 0 0 46 3 0 8 28 82 7 5 11 15
Nassau...... O 1 1 0 0 8 1 1 2 18 46 6 0 3 8
Okaloosa.... 0 1 0 0 0 22 3 0 10 23 53 2 2 15 12
Okeechobee.. 0 0 1 0 0 8 2 0 0 4 10 0 0 6 2
Orange...... 2 16 4 0 1 244 27 3 31 214 582 57 9 42 55
Osceola ..... 0 3 0 0 0 19 1 2 6 37 88 13 1 5 7
Palm Beach. 2 11 7 2 0 224 20 4 38 213 549 84 14 55 60
Pasco....... 0 3 0 1 0 45 5 0 7 40 109 11 5 13 11
Pinellas..... 1 10 11 0 0 570 45 7 49 458 1,292 127 27 41 94
Polk........ 3 8 5 1 0 183 9 1 35 135 449 53 16 39 59
Putnam..... 1 8 2 0 0 31 5 1 14 24 104 6 22 8 21
St.Johns.... 0 3 1 1 0 51 5 0 7 39 100 14 8 10 11
St.Lucie.... 1 8 1 0 0 47 1 2 10 24 78 3 3 5 7
Santa Rosa.. 0 1 0 0 0 9 1 1 7 23 59 3 3 3 3
Sarasota.... 0 1 3 0 0 90 2 0 10 49 203 14 3 10 13
Seminole.... 0 3 1 0 0 48 6 2 12 27 95 14 7 6 16
Sumter...... 0 0 0 0 13 2 0 5 11 26 6 3 9 6
Suwannee... 0 1 1 0 0 19 1 1 2 21 49 7 1 2 8
Taylor...... 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 3 13 26 3 3 5 6
Union....... 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 24 0 0 1 4
Volusia...... 0 8 3 0 1 171 16 2 27 139 451 47 17 24 43
Wakulla.... 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 1 9 7 5 0 0 5
Walton..... 1 1 1 0 0 13 2 0 6 15 43 7 1 7 6
Washington. 1 0 1 1 1 16 2 0 2 23 33 8 2 5 5

*Includes all vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system.











32 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 14

MARRIAGES BY COLOR, DIVORCES, AND ANNULMENTS FOR

FLORIDA AND EACH COUNTY, 1955


MARRIAGES
COUNTIES tal White C d Divorces Annulments
Total White Colored

STATE .................... 29,904 23,695 6,209 19,786 213
Alachua.................... 369 228 141 279 0
Baker .................... 23 16 7 584 3
Bay....................... 423 354 69 147 0
Bradford................... 87 61 26 446 5
Brevard................... 365 268 97 527 7
Broward................... 1,735 1,328 407 734 5
Calhoun ................... 23 18 5 48 0
Charlotte .................. 87 77 10 18 0
Citrus .................... 97 73 24 70 0
Clay ................ 108 78 30 88 1
Collier ..................... 127 113 14 19 0
Columbia ................. 119 68 51 69 0
Dade ..................... 6,780 5,881 899 4,760 48
DeSoto .................... 103 76 27 18 0
Dixie...................... 39 29 10 32 0
Duval .................... 2,140 1,617 523 865 9
Eseambia .................. 786 641 145 810 21
Flagler ................... 82 47 3 274 0
Franklin ................... 437 370 67 15 0
Gadsden................... 176 69 107 74 1
Gilchrist................... 34 26 8 16 2
Glades ..................... 24 15 9 4 0
Gulf ...................... 63 47 16 19 1
Hamilton.................. 41 22 19 28 4
Hardee.................... 114 94 20 379 18
Hendry ................... 82 69 13 19 0
Hernando................. 112 92 20 29 0
Highlands .................. 132 93 39 174 2
Hillsborough ............... 2,434 2,043 391 1,386 12
Holmes.................... 56 50 6 42 0
Indian River ............... 143 93 50 43 0
Jackson ................... 208 141 67 73 0
Jefferson .................. 74 28 46 10 0
Lafayette.................. 19 17 2 3 0
Lake ...................... 354 260 94 418 3
Lee ...................... 327 263 64 135 0
Leon .................... 399 225 174 294 1
Levy..................... 75 41 34 20 0
Liberty .................... 14 12 2 36 0
Madison................... 58 43 15 34 0
Manatee................... 383 311 72 40 0
Marion .................... 356 212 144 182 2
Martin..................... 104 80 24 18 0
Monroe ................... 455 405 50 315 3
Nassau ................... 40 34 6 21 0
Okaloosa.................. 248 226 22 118 2
Okeechobee ............... 53 44 9 14 0
Orange. ................... 1,434 1,128 306 405 2
Osceola.................... 185 132 53 19 0
Palm Beach ................ 1,523 1,067 456 705 2
Pasco ...................... 297 246 51 109 1
Pinellas.................... 1,749 1,537 212 741 7
Polk ...................... 1,447 1,174 273 1,231 21
Putnam.................... 224 123 101 902 11
St.Johns.................. 196 150 46 648 11
St. Lucie. ................... 273 166 107 151 1
Santa Rosa ................ 116 103 13 55 0
Sarasota ................... 442 362 80 152 1
Seminole ................... 306 175 131 172 2
Sumter.................... 92 83 9 94 2
Suwannee.................. 110 69 41 51 0
Taylor..................... 78 58 20 21 0
Union ..................... 42 29 13 86 0
Volusia.................... 676 544 132 429 2
Wakulla .................. 28 15 13 0 0
Walton ................... 89 72 17 53 0
Washington ................ 89 64 25 21 0







VITAL STATISTICS 33


TABLE 15

VITAL STATISTICS SCOREBOARD
BASED ON PROMPTNESS AND COMPLETENESS OF CERTIFICATES

FILED IN 1955

Percent of Percent of
Certificates Complete Percent of Total Score Change
COUNTY Rank Filed on Time Certificates Monthly (Maximum from 1954
Reports = 500) Total Score
Submitted
Births Deaths Births Deaths on Time
Wakulla ............. 1 100 95 100 100 100 495 +17
Hernando............. 2 97 100 98 100 100 495 + 6
Sarasota. ............. 99 99 99 98 100 495 + 5
Okeechobee............ 4 97 100 100 97 100 494 + 8
Dade ................. 5 94 99 99 99 100 491 1
Escambia ............. 6 96 97 99 99 100 491 + 7
Manatee............. 7 95 99 98 99 100 491 2
Volusia............... 8 95 96 99 99 100 489 + 9
Hillsborough........... 9 93 97 99 99 100 488 + 4
Baker ................ 10 95 95 97 100 100 487 0
Charlotte.............. 11 97 98 97 95 100 487 + 7
Franklin .............. 12 97 98 96 95 100 486 4
Polk.................. 13 92 96 99 98 100 485 +11
Marion ............... 14 89 97 99 99 100 484 + 6
Martin................ 15 97 99 100 95 92 483 3
Madison.............. 16 90 98 97 98 100 483 +10
Brevard............... 17 94 90 99 98 100 481 + 4
St. Lucie.............. 18 95 88 99 98 100 480 + 9
Collier................ 19 90 88 100 100 100 478 +69
Santa Rosa........... 20 95 94 98 99 92 478 4
DeSoto............... 21 98 99 98 99 83 477 9
Palm Beach........... 22 84 94 99 99 100 476 7
Bay .................. 23 88 93 98 97 100 476 +11
Broward .............. 24 86 92 98 99 100 475 +31
Orange................ 25 94 92 99 97 92 474 +30
Citrus ................ 26 74 100 100 98 100 472 +11
Sumter................ 27 81 91 99 100 100 471 +36
Highlands ............ 28 83 91 99 98 100 471 +19
Duval................ 29 79 97 97 98 100 471 + 9
STATE.......... 86 92 99 99 93 469 + 2
Walton ............... 30 89 89 99 100 92 469 + 3
St. Johns.............. 31 94 95 99 98 83 469 +13
Hardee ............... 32 80 90 100 98 100 468 +19
Jefferson .............. 33 72 99 99 98 100 468 +48
Seminole ............. 34 99 96 99 98 75 467 +39
Osceola .............. 35 85 93 98 99 92 467 + 6
Monroe............... 36 87 81 99 99 100 466 1
Washington ........... 37 83 87 99 97 100 466 +12
Levy ................ 38 87 86 98 95 100 466 +5
Clay ................. 39 78 99 99 98 92 466 -11
Gulf .................. 40 81 87 97 97 100 462 +30
Suwannee............. 41 98 96 98 95 75 462 -28
Lee ................... 42 67 98 98 96 100 459 + 6
Dixie.................. 43 69 100 97 100 92 458 +21
Lake ................ 44 84 78 97 98 100 457 4
Holmes............... 45 94 76 95 92 100 457 -18
Gilchrist ............. 46 74 90 93 95 100 452 +17
Putnam............... 47 89 76 98 95 92 450 8
Calhoun .............. 48 78 78 95 98 100 449 + 2
Gadsden............... 49 82 79 99 97 92 449 +12
Bradford.............. 50 94 94 96 96 67 447 -32
Taylor................ 51 59 95 94 97 100 445 +25
Leon ................. 52 81 85 98 98 83 445 -19
Nassau............... 53 91 81 99 98 75 444 +24
Pasco................. 54 68 93 94 97 92 444 -12
Lafayette ............ 55 65 100 96 89 92 442 + 9
Okaloosa.............. 56 86 82 99 99 75 441 -21
Jackson................ 57 71 65 97 98 100 431 5
Pinellas ............... 58 56 74 99 99 100 428 -65
Liberty ............... 59 87 62 78 100 100 427 +39
Hamilton ................ 60 55 79 96 97 100 427 +21
Union ................ 61 65 83 93 93 92 426 -12
Glades................ 62 40 92 100 100 92 424 + 4
Hendry ............... 63 54 78 99 100 92 423 +19
Flagler................ 64 97 84 99 97 42 419 -25
Alachua............... 65 73 83 99 98 58 411 + 2
Indian River.......... 66 62 77 94 98 58 389 4
Columbia ............. 67 32 52 99 99 58 340 -56








34 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


BUREAU OF LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE

GEORGE A. DAME, M.D., Director

This bureau, including its constituent divisions of Public Health
Nursing, Field Advisory Staff, Field Training Center, and County Health
Units, believes that the more than eleven hundred persons now employed
in county health departments are generally better trained, more effi-
cient, more cooperative, more stable in tenure, and better paid than
at any time in the history of the State Board of Health.

The county health department budgets now total approximately four
and a half million dollars. County appropriations alone now amount
to nearly three million dollars. These figures not only reflect the rapidly
increasing population and wealth of the state, but the increasing con-
fidence of the citizens of the state and counties in the ability and effi-
ciency and work of county health departments, and the high esteem in
which they hold the programs now being operated.

County health departments are being operated economically. In some
counties equipment and furniture are old and inadequate. In other
counties the pay rolls have been spread too thin. In many of the counties
the local appropriations while being annually increased are usually a year
behind actual needs. State appropriations for county health units are
increasing in each biennium in an effort to keep up with high popu-
lation increases but are behind actual needs.

Dr. C. J. Mathes was appointed in July, 1955 as director of the Field
Advisory Staff and of In-Service Field Training.

Dr. Harold Bonifield, director of the unit composed of Citrus, Levy
and Hernando Counties; Dr. Bruce Edgerton, director of the unit com-
posed of Putnam and Flagler Counties are both working on their degrees
of Master of Public Health. Doctor Dale Clinton is serving as locum
tenens for Doctor Bonifield, and Doctor Frank McClimans for Doctor
Edgerton.

It is with a sense of great loss to public health in Florida that it is
necessary to record the passing of Dr. Frank M. Hall, Director of the
Alachua County Health Department on December 23, 1955. Doctor
Hall was an outstanding public health administrator and was nationally
prominent. He was born at Gainesboro, Tennessee on September 12,
1902. He received his medical degree from the University of Tennessee
College of Medicine, and his degree of Master of Public Health from
Johns Hopkins University. He was a diplomat of the American Board
of Preventive Medicine. He was a Past-President of the Florida Public








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


Health Association, and at the time of his death was President of the
Southern Branch of the American Public Health Association, and Secre-
tary of the American Association of Public Health Physicians.

At the very successful meeting of the Local Health Officers Con-
ference with the State Board of Health held in Jacksonville on February
7, 8 and 9, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year:
Dr. Paul W. Hughes, General Chairman; Dr. Aubrey Y. Covington,
General Vice-Chairman; and Dr. J. Basil Hall, General Secretary.
The following Chairmen of Committees were appointed: Dr. Frank
V. Chappell, State-Local Relations; Dr. Frank J. Hill, Preventable
Diseases; Dr. J. C. McSween, Maternal and Child Health; Dr. Joseph
M. Bistowish, Training and Records; Dr. C. L. Brumback, Environmental
Sanitation; Dr. Chester L. Nayfield, Public Health Nursing; Dr. T. E.
Cato, Chronic Diseases; and Dr. R. D. Higgins, Mental Hygiene.

As usual this report will carry some of the more interesting activities
of some of the county health departments. These items cover such
subjects as new health center buildings, water systems, sewage collection
and disposal systems, mosquito control projects, dental programs and
others. Space limitations do not permit inclusion of all outstanding items
reported from the counties.

Palm Beach County: Dr. Brumback
"The most outstanding public health accomplishment of the past
year is the development of plans for treatment of sewage from West Palm
Beach, Palm Beach, and Lake Park.

The health hazard resulting from the polluted condition of Lake
Worth was determined in 1941 when the State Board of Health con-
ducted its first pollution survey of the lake. Subsequent surveys made
by the State Board of Health in 1947 and the Palm Beach County
Health Department in 1949-1950 reflected deteriorating conditions in the
lake and increased hazards to the surrounding population.

The health department used these results to promote interest in
adequate sewage collection and treatment facilities for the cities adjacent
to the Lake. Public interest stimulated by these surveys has resulted in
a big step toward the restoration of Lake Worth to its original state of
purity and elimination of the health hazard.

Determined to provide adequate facilities, the city of West Palm
Beach has just issued and sold fourteen and one half million dollars worth
of revenue certificates, part of which funds will be used to finance con-
struction of sewage collection and treatment facilities. It is estimated
that construction of the system will begin in early Spring and that it will
be completed two years from the beginning date. Palm Beach has sold








36 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


bonds for a collection system and an outfall into the Gulfstream, with
construction to begin in the Spring. Construction of a system to serve
Lake Park and the area to the north is underway by a private utility firm.
The remaining communities are all expressing interest in taking their
places with these progressive cities in providing adequate facilities.

This accomplishment can be attributed to years of health education,
spear-headed by state and local health departments."

Broward County: Dr. Hughes
"On February 20, 1955, the main health center for Broward County
was completed. The value of this health center is $123,000.00.

A bill was passed in the legislature for Broward County enabling a
building fund to be set up for future expansion. Within three years
it is contemplated that two health centers will be constructed in North
Broward County and west of Fort Lauderdale. The mobile X-ray unit
will be replaced at that time also. The Broward County Health Depart-
ment strongly supported zoning bills and a program for building and
plumbing inspection in the county areas. A Broward County bill was
passed in the legislature enabling county-wide zoning and building and
plumbing inspection. A county-wide dog licensing act strongly supported
by the health department was also passed. This means that all dogs
must be licensed in all parts of Broward County and there will be one
county agency for same. Annual vaccination is required for a license.

There are now six water and sewage systems in the un-incorporated
areas serving approximately 1,360 homes. The sanitation department was
very active in promoting these systems."

Marion County: Dr. Brendle
"An intensive enforcement program has been instituted toward bring-
ing about improved sanitary conditions in bars and 'beer joints'. Partic-
ular emphasis was given toilet facilities, glass sanitization and general
conditions at these places. Due to the excellent cooperation received
from the State Beverage Department, we have seen marked improvement.
A joint inspection has been made of all licensed alcoholic beverage dis-
pensing establishments and necessary corrections made.

We feel that a considerable amount of progress has been made in the
general field of sanitation, with particular emphasis on the following:
pipe line milkers have been installed in two dairies; homogenizing equip-
ment has been installed in two dairies; two cold wall tanks have also
been installed with plans and preparations for more to come. Six new
schools have been built or are under construction, with cafeteria additions
to two more. Two motels have been built. A total of eleven new court
pools have been built, with one more under construction. A colored








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


municipal pool is also under construction. There has been a boom in
FHA and VA construction with good results in water and sewage disposal
for all new and old subdivisions.
Certain progress has been made on plans for the inauguration of an
arthropod control program in the next year."

Manatee County: Dr. Neill
"One of the most gratifying things that could happen to a public
health department happened to us when we learned last spring that the
proposed building was to receive a legacy of $5,000 from a philanthropic
person of the community who evidently, though unbeknown to us, was
very much interested in our work.

The 1955 Legislature passed a Rabies Control Bill especially for
Manatee County. We like to feel we had something to do with the
passage of this act. We are particularly proud of this legislation because
there is no history of rabies in Manatee County, therefore, we feel it is
certainly in the realm of preventive medicine.
Shortly after the middle of the year we were further pleased to learn
that the County Commissioners had increased our appropriation so that
we could add a clinic aide, health educator, and sanitarian to our staff.
Also, while preparing the budget, the County Commission appropriated
funds to establish the first county-operated sanitary land fill to replace
a very disagreeable county dump. The Sanitary Land Fill Program
will come under the Anti-Mosquito Control District. In addition to the
county dump, the City of Palmetto has applied to come under this same
program thereby eliminating their present surface dump.
In August the health department moved from its quarters in the
Courthouse to the new Manatee County Health Center with the afore-
mentioned increase in staff. This new building should improve our pro-
gram considerably. It also makes possible the revival of a former service
- a dental clinic for indigent children. The equipment for this clinic
was furnished by the Kiwanis Club of Bradenton and it will be staffed
by dentists of Manatee County.
Before the end of 1955 the City of Bradenton will have a sewage
disposal plant in operation. This is the only municipal sewage disposal
system in Manatee County. We have recently had a private sewage
disposal unit established by the owners of a trailer park in Manatee
County. It is hoped that both of these sewage disposal units will serve as
examples for other municipalities and individuals to provide for human
excreta disposal."
Pinellas County: Dr. Ballard
"The most outstanding accomplishments in sanitation in 1955 were
water supplies and sewage disposal. The water system for St. Petersburg








38 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


is completed and sewerage systems of North Redington Beach and Largo
have been completed. We now have under construction the water supply
system of Pinellas County and sewage disposal plants for St. Petersburg,
Safety Harbor and Kenneth City sub-division. Sewerage projects are
in the active planning stages for Long Key, Treasure Island and Gulf-
port.
When the county water project is completed, Pinellas County will
very probably have better coverage by public water supplies than any
other county in the state. 1956 will probably be the first year in the history
of Pinellas County that the number of new sewerage connections will
exceed the number of new septic tanks installed.
Our municipalities are doing outstanding jobs in correcting their
sewage disposal problems and our major efforts are now being directed
toward getting the fringe area sanitation problems corrected. The county
health department, the State Board of Health and the County Board
of Health have recommended to the County Commissioners that action
be taken to establish a county sewerage system. County Commissioners
retained a consulting engineering firm to study this project.
In cooperation with Florida State University School of Hotel &
/Restaurant Management we initiated a new concept in food handler
training a training program solely for restaurant managers. Emphasis
is being placed on achieving better organization, training and supervision
of employees by management.
Participation of the community in the nursing program was outstand-
ing with literally hundreds of lay and professional persons helping plan
and carry out the program. A few of the services were vision testing,
hearing testing, assisting in clinics, serving on planning committees, mak-
ing possible the correction of physical defects in the indigent and forming
transportation committees.
During February 1955 representatives of the County Health Depart-
ment, Budget Board, Commissioners, Board of Health and State Board
of Health met and approved that we operate on a state fiscal year, thus
eliminating the old combination of county and state budget preparations.
A fluoridation program, promoted by the Pinellas County Health
Department Dental Division, was approved by St. Petersburg City Council
and introduced into the city water supply on August 9, 1955. This
project supplies water to 140,800 persons. This makes the 1,106th com-
munity in the United States participating in fluoridation, with a total
population of 21,000,000."
Wakulla County: Dr. Weathington
"The Wakulla County Health Department has completed one full
year of its intensified midwife program. Based on individual midwife in-
struction, with strict supervision, and weekly clinics for prenatal pa-
tients at Sopchoppy, Crawfordville and Wakulla, the program has for
its goal the delivery of all complicated cases in the hospital by. an








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 39

obstetrician. Only routine deliveries are certified to the midwife for
home delivery. No mothers have been lost and only two babies, neither
of which could be attributed to poor practice by a midwife. The fol-
lowing is the form, around which the entire program is based:

APPOINTMENT SLIP AND PERMIT FOR DELIVERY
BY MIDWIFE
This is to certify that................................................ has been approved for
delivery by any licensed midwife of Wakulla County, Florida. This
permit expires...................................which is the date for this patient
to return to Clinic.

Wakulla County Health Department
The midwives are instructed to accept for delivery only those women
who have such a slip issued by the Wakulla County Health Department
which is not out of date. Patients attending other reputable clinics, or
physicians, are given permits without examination."
Orange County: Dr. Stephens
"A soundproof trailer with facilities for audiometric screening of 20
children at a time was placed in operation in October 1955. This unit
was purchased by the North Orlando Kiwanis Club and presented to
the County Health Department. It is believed to be the only such unit in
the United States that was locally purchased and is locally operated in
this cooperative manner. The unit is moved from school to school giving
screening tests and individual rechecks. During the period October 7,
through November 30, 1955, 2,836 children were screened, 383 required
individual testing, and of these 149 were referred to specialists because
of hearing loss. Only 13 of those referred are known to be under
treatment at the present time, but the follow-up continues, and it is
hoped that all will eventually be seen by a specialist.
Indigent children secure their corrections through the County Wel-
fare Clinic; others are referred to private physicians. An occasional
border-line case is financed by the Orlando Kiwanis Club. Up to
November 30, 1955 only one such case has been referred to the Club.
Reactions of school principals and teachers have been highly favorable
because the use of the trailer upsets school routine far less than doing
the same work in a school room or auditorium. Results are also more
uniform and reliable. Parents whose children have been found to have
defects have on several occasions called the health department to ex-
press their gratitude for this program."
Polk County: Dr. Nayfield
"An Enabling Act authorizing the county to levy an annual tax not
exceeding one mill on all taxable property was enacted by the last State
Legislature. The Public Health Committee of the League of Women








40 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

Voters of Winter Haven worked diligently in promoting this legislation.
The Board of County Commissioners of Polk County realized the needs
of the Health Department and generously levied the full mill tax.
This has resulted in needed salary increases and additional personnel.
A Dental Health Program is being planned and the services of a health
educator were secured. Necessary new equipment is also being pur-
chased for all of the district offices. The millage was doubled."
Sarasota County: Dr. Wright
"The County Commissioners are planning on building a new health
department office here in Sarasota and have put into the budget $20,-
000.00 for this year for this purpose. They plan to put in $30,000.00
during the next fiscal year 1956-57, and will have then sufficient money
to meet their portion of the cost. Some discussions have already been
held with the consulting architect and with the Hospital Board with a
view to putting the new health department on the grounds of the County
Memorial Hospital. It is felt that this would be a choice location since
it would put us adjacent to the hospital and across the street from the
Physician's Building where about half of the local doctors have their
offices.
With the recent opening of the new County Memorial Hospital we
have instituted a new pre-natal service and are now holding our pre-
natal clinics at weekly intervals in the Tumor Clinic located in the new
hospital. All of the doctors on the hospital obstetrical service are now
on the roster of the new clinic and will serve in rotation during the
next year. Each doctor serves two weeks and then goes to the bottom
of the list. The health department nurses and clerks are also working
in this new clinic, which is for medically indigent pregnant women.
We have a plan worked up with the hospital whereby such women can
attend the pre-natal clinics and then be admitted to the hospital and
have a hospital delivery done by a licensed physician for the small sum
of $55.00. The doctor gets $25.00 of this money and the hospital gets
$30.00. By instituting this new service we have been able to get along
without any midwives in Sarasota County. We also have about 97 to 98
per cent of deliveries done in hospitals."
Escambia County: Dr. McSween
"Escambia County was proud to have two sanitarians recognized
internationally, nationally and by the state for outstanding accomplish-
ments. B. G. Tennant received the Sanitarian's Award of the Interna-
tional Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians. The award was
conferred for distinguished service to his county in the field of public
health; for his contribution to the advancement of the sanitarian; for
his meritorious achievements in the field of food sanitation; and for his
ability to personalize the ideals of the sanitarian.
E. E. McGovern was selected by the Florida Association of Sanitarians
as 'The Outstanding Sanitarian of the Year'. He and Mr. Tennant








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


have worked together to improve many phases of sanitation; jointly pro-
viding better garbage collection, better regulations affecting food sani-
tation and better arthropod control. Close cooperation with military
personnel has been maintained in all sanitation regulations."
Brevard County: Dr. Speers
"A substantial increase in appropriation from the Brevard County
Commission made possible the inauguration of a dental health program
in October, 1955. A dental hygienist, Mrs. Ena Bishop, began work at
that time. The first step in the program was a complete DMF survey
of elementary school children. At the end of the calendar year this
survey was approximately 45 per cent complete, a total of 2,406 children
having been examined.
Meanwhile, an army surplus truck has been purchased and is being
converted into a mobile dental unit. Much of this work is being done
by local high school students as part of their Industrial Arts Program.
This unit will be used in a program of dental prophylaxis and education
in the areas of greatest need as indicated by the results of the survey.
An advisory committee of local dentists has been formed and has
played an active part in the planning and supervision of the program
thus far. It is expected that the program will eventually include some
curative dental work for indigent children, to be provided by these
local dentists on a volunteer basis."
Taylor County: Dr. Haynal
"A striking illustration of the great help an active community health
council can give in the development of local health programs is found
in the work of the recently organized Taylor County Health Council.
Soon after its organization in February, 1955, this council adopted as
its first project a sanitary landfill garbage disposal program for the City
of Perry. The County Health Department had been agitating for sev-
eral years trying to get the city to clean up its dump and adopt the
sanitary landfill program. City officials consistently agreed that this
was a good idea but did not go any further than this until the health
council began to publicize the problem and promote the sanitary landfill
solution. Seeing that a group of disinterested citizens were concerned
over the problem, the city speedily took action, appropriated the neces-
sary funds and as a result Perry will soon enjoy sanitary garbage dis-
posal for the first time in history.
Hearing of the shoestring budget the County Health Department has
been operating on during the past few years, the Health Council decided
something should be done now to enable health department personnel
to expand their services in this growing community. The council ap-
pointed a committee to study health department financing and make
recommendations to the Boards of County Commissioners and Public
Instruction. The committee recommended to these bodies increases in








42 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


local contributions amounting to twice what was requested by the
health officer. While we did not get all that was recommended, local
contributions to the operation of the health unit were increased by a
greater percentage than ever before in the history of the unit, thanks
largely to the interest of the community Health Council."
Charlotte County: Dr. Lawrence
"Charlotte County had one outstanding development during the year
of 1955. We were able to convince the County Commissioners, the
County School Board and the City Council of Punta Gorda of the need
for a full time sanitarian. Beginning December 1, 1955 we now have
Mr. Willard G. Thomas as a full time sanitarian.
A sanitary land fill is also being started. Our arthropod budget is
now being studied by the Bureau of Entomology and we hope the
sanitary landfill will soon be operating.
A future nurses club has been organized by our nurse and is very
active. The program of this club for the present school year is ex-
ceptionally well planned and has been commended by the State Medical
Auxilliary."
Suwannee County: Dr. Workman
"Starting in June 1955, Arthropod Control was begun in the county
as a part of the Health Department program. This program covers
sanitary landfill and fogging in the City of Live Oak. This was made
possible by a contribution of $5,000 by the City of Live Oak to the Su-
wannee County Commissioners. October 1st another grant of $5,000
was made by the City of Live Oak to carry the program on until Sept-
ember 30, 1956.
In Dixie County replacement of midwives being needed, a program of
training was instituted with the help of the Midwife Consultant of the
State Board of Health. This program is progressing nicely and should
license a midwife in the near future."
Walton County: Dr. Nelson
"Through joint action of the Board of County Commissioners and
the Town Council a $65,000 health center for DeFuniak Springs has
been assured. The Commissioners had bugeted $17,500 for 35 per cent of
a $50,000 health center to be built under the Hill-Burton Act, with the
Federal Government furnishing 65 per cent of the money. In December
1955, when the Commissioners gave their $17,500, it developed that
Federal aid would be given in the amount of 65 per cent of $65,000, and
the Council furnished the additional amount necessary. The Council
also furnished a site on Ninth Street, measuring 188.5 feet by 337.5 feet,
and all preliminary papers were to be signed in December 1955. Sherlock,
Smith and Adams of Tallahassee have been employed as architects for
the building, and actual construction is expected to start in the near
future. The health center will include a doctor's office, a sanitarian's








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


office, two nurse's offices and an X-ray room, assembly room, laboratory,
two clinic rooms, examination room, reception room and records office,
a waiting room with a center division and five other rooms."
Sumter County: Dr. Burger
"The City of Wildwood is working out plans for adequate water and
sewer systems to cost approximately $485,000. New ordinances are be-
ing planned to carry out these projects. The ordinances were drawn
up by Black and Associates of Gainesville."
Levy County: Dr. Clinton
"Mr. Basil May, Sanitarian in this county has been very successful in
his sanitation programs. A report is quoted:
In the early 1940's a septic tank was constructed for the City of
Williston and the effluent from the same was disposed of in an open
lime rock pit. As the town grew this became inadequate and in fact
became a definite health menace. Through recommendations from the
Florida State Board of Health, a program was instituted in 1954 to
build a disposal plant and extend the existing sewer system. After
several attempts which failed, it became certain that the whole project
depended upon public education and enlightenment toward the need.
Soon thereafter the County Health Department started a program to
inform the citizens of Williston as to the immediate need of the project.
Public meettinges were held and arguments were heard both for and
against and the arguments were finally resolved by a special election
held October 25, 1955 by which the proponents of the project secured a
comfortable majority of the votes. The City Council then immediately
went into action and hired engineers and fiscal agents to survey the
project, and on November 14, 1955 the Council passed a resolution
authorizing the issuance of public utility revenue certificates in the
amount of $275,000.00 in order to construct a complete new disposal
plant and to extend the existing sewerage system for the entire city. This
resolution passed without opposition, being signed by every member of
the Council, and the Mayor. At present, the ground work is almost
accomplished. The firm of Smith and Gillespie, engineers, have the
plans and specifications in the last stages of development and the valida-
tion petition for the certificates will come up for final hearing on
January 16, 1956, after which they will be immediately sold by the
firm of Leedy, Wheeler and Alleman of Orlando, bids advertised and
contracts let. The whole project should be completed and in operation
by the Fall of 1956 marking a great step forward in the development
of this central Florida community."
Nassau County: Dr. McClane
"We are now occupying a beautiful new building well designed and
laid out; substantial construction which would be a credit to any com-
munity; total cost $52,943.50; approximately 3,000 square feet floor
space; beautifully and adequately equipped.








44 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


We have no intention of letting down on the Civil Defense or disaster
programs. A complete new mobile trailer unit capable of being any
place at any given time is now a fact. This unit has one 3000 Watt AC
generator with 20 gallon gas tank and one 28 volt DC generator for
charging of 6, 12 and 24 volt batteries, together with 2-way radio,
sufficient medical supplies, etc., to take care of reasonable casualties.
The Callahan Clinic is set up as a secondary headquarters in the
event we have to work for the mainland. The clinics are well equipped
- have gas for sterilization and portable electric generators for lights.
Fernandina Beach is expected to have in operation in May of 1956,
extensive sewer lines and disposal plants. It is anticipated that sewerage
and disposal plants will be ready in Callahan in about two years. Hil-
liard now has completed new water systems ready to serve the entire
village.
In Baker County bids will soon be let for a county hospital, but just
how soon the facilities will be available is undetermined at this time.
It is anticipated when this county hospital is completed, considerable of
our morbidity work can be dispensed with and more time put into
preventive medicine.
Installed in our headquarters building is a 3000 watt generator,
which in event of emergency, will supply the health department with
sufficient current to operate and also to keep the Sheriffs radio and
receiver in operation."
Jackson County: Dr. Langston
"On January 19, 1955 the County Commissioners of Jackson County
let the contract for construction of the Jackson County Health Depart-
ment building. Parker-Brown Construction Company of Dothan, Ala-
bama was the low bidder and received the contract for constructing the
building of 5,100 square feet of floor space at a cost of $74,411. Con-
struction of the building was somewhat delayed due to difficulty in
securing the necessary building materials. The building at the present
time is approximately 95 per cent complete. The completion date is
expected to be February 1, 1956. We are in the process of selecting the
necessary equipment for which $8,800 has been allocated. The County
Commissioners have asked for quotations from several business and
medical supply houses. Should no difficulties be encountered in securing
the equipment, the building should be ready for occupancy by March 1,
1956. The total expected cost of the project is $87,500.
In Calhoun County, Federal funds in the amount of $44,850 have
been allocated and $24,150 of local funds have been earmarked for the
construction of the Calhoun County Health Department Building. At
the present time we are awaiting the completion of the plans and speci-
fications by Sherlock, Smith and Adams of Tallahassee and Montgomery
to be submitted to state and federal representatives. The total cost of
the building and equipment is expected to be approximately $69,000."







TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955





1 '0 1 .
B. 2E
< o c c a5
8m


A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.)
2. Field and Office Visits (May-Dec.)
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
3. Smallpox ....... ...................
4. Diphtheria ........................
5. Typhoid Fever ....................
6. Whooping Cough ...................
7. Poliomyelitis ...................
8. Tetanus ......................
9. Rabies (a) Humans ................
(b) Animals. ................
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(a) Cases-Active .................
(b) Cases-Inactive ................
(c) Contacts and Suspects...........
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(a) Cases-Active..................
(b) Cases-Inactive ................
(c) Contacts and Suspects...........
3. Number of Persons X-rayed:
(a) Minature Films ................
(b) Large 14" x 17" Films...........
4. Tuberculin Test...................
5. Field Nursing Visits ................
6. Office Nursing Visits................
7. Cases Hospitalized .................
8. Visits to Med. Cont. (May-Dec.)......
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum Med. Serv.
2. Adm. to Antepartum Nursing Service.
3. Visits by Antepartum Cases to Med.
Conf.........................


38 41 161 0
83 6 221 0 S


10 248 73
17 608 224


586
2,097
3,105
1,949
702
3,015
2
0


8
0
O
1
10
7
54
0
56
29
130
33
10
0

170
179
170


810
1,164

3,186
5,317
10,002
2,665
5.102
6,178
0
0


38
121
247
116
155
697
10,077
1,570
98
2,173
176
61
373

459
574
789








TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955


Cs r

.~~5 s .g & I I
(D -I -5 iJ A


A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.) 1 2 0 0 1 0 8 1 2 24 15 450 7 23 3 1 0
2. Field and Office Visits (May-Dec.) 1 2 0 0 2 0 9 1 2 49 31 505 12 26 3 1 0
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
3. Smallpox................ ......... 151 183 2,183 13 32 409 12 120 50 180 114 5,025 136 251 452 666 117
4. Diphtheria ........................ 209 332 1,604 285 69 533 348 278 191 98 762 5,859 676 451 1,767 668 205
5. Typhoid Fever .................... 10 417 4,150 119 4 814 465 18 9 44 80 373 172 372 2,519 72 227
6. Whooping Cough................. 162 323 1,602 290 67 493 321 269 186 79 756 4,062 576 450 1,092 439 172
7. Poliomyelitis ..................... 264 283 2,965 81 109 1,085 53 502 276 219 657 8,234 537 417 1,346 640 125
8. Tetanus ......................... 283 530 ,411 420 77 57 818 284 199 134 1,192 6,242 720 524 3,577 1,206 253
9. Rabies (a) Humans................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 0 0 0 0 0
(b) Animals.................. 22 310 717 0 70 150 0 77 197 0 176 0 0 253 0 201 0
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(a) Cases-Active ................. 0 7 7 0 1 0 4 5 7 2 2 125 1 0 0 2 1
(b) Cases-Inactive ............... 0 7 0 4 0 1 2 0 5 14 461 0 0 0 2 0
(c) Contacts and Suspects........... 6 1 6 0 3 0 4 2 6 13 168 1,584 10 0 0 1 0
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(a) Cases-Active ................. 0 7 24 1 0 15 4 8 1 4 4 264 5 8 26 1 2
(b) Cases-Inactive ................27 2 4 4 2 8 1 7 20 364 27 31 50 10 3
(c) Contacts and Suspects........... 12 19 167 19 3 31 1 41 3 26 42 1,606 88 54 92 23 5
3. Number of Persons X-rayed:
(a) Minature Films ................ 0 0 0 0 756 0 0 2,602 0 0 4,405 39,217 2,408 0 0 0 598
(b) Large 14" x 17" Films........ 10 59 268 23 17 130 51 55 51 35 181 1,147 232 154 289 268 20
4. Tuberculin Test.................... 4 15 169 8316 4 7 16 4 10 5 595 22 2 122 739 2
5. Field Nursing Visits................. 5 16 572 55 9 156 13 117 2 129 142 3,207 270 165 241 44 19
6. Office Nursing Visits ................ 30 36 99 0 7 19 6 39 10 48 58 30 114 152 58 29 1
7. Cases Hospitalized ................. 0 6 22 1 2 2 0 7 4 2 88 1 3 23 3 0
8. Visits to Med. Conf. (May-Dec.)..... 0 29 0 7 0 3 0 16 4 152 2,110 12 0 0 3 8
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum Med. Serv.. 71 14 406 11 9 11 31 35 52 24 45 1,632 41 0 218 61 24
2. Adm. to Antepartum Nursing Service.. 63 12 484 31 0 15 77 42 0 14 18 1,817 48 85 323 73 33
3. Visits by Antepartum Cases to Med.
Conf ...................... ..........30 823 15 28 18 4 129 1241 28 92 6,280 71 O 259 172 55


z
:
Z
Z







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hd
0
w
-3


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ul
Ul






TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955









A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL O
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.) 11 46 97 8 0 7 128 3 1 48 54 5 1 118 1 82 2
2. Field and Office Visits (May-Dee.) 28 52 118 8 0 11 252 5 2 77 86 6 3 231 1 257 11
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
3. Smallpox.......................... 58 550 1,501 247 35 831 525 1,631 381 301 928 754 72 4,968 336 4,793 545
4. Diphtheria ........................ 296 744 1,286 280 205 907 655 510 328 33 2,077 2,055 102 6,012 527 4,706 857
5. Typhoid Fever .................... 24 1,133 2,366 531 440 1,318 69 3,594 639 710 2,074 1,447 444 3,720 90 669 620
6. Whooping Cough .................... 282 220 1,286 278 196 692 638 473 328 254 2,055 2,017 98 3,569 489 3,649 686
7. Poliomyelitis....................... 969 1,057 6,107 283 239 1,287 1,071 1,084 313 2,150 2,112 1,336 94 5,104 452 7,803 647
8. Tetanus .......................... 320 966 2,721 705 290 1,186 929 546 384 482 2,037 2,642 103 7,402 538 7,796 970 r
9. Rabies (a) Humans........... .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 0 0 0 0 15
(b) Animals ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 268 131 0 312 0 0 0 815
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(a) Cases-Active ................. 0 9 21 1 0 3 3 1 0 8 1 15 0 0 4 54 12
(b) Cases-Inactive ................ 0 2 17 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 90 5
(c) Contacts and Suspects........... 0 3 141 1 5 3 1 0 4 15 18 4 0 0 2 77 51
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(a) Cases-Active ................. 30 18 41 13 0 4 34 41 8 9 9 17 1 124 14 119 21 C2
(b) Cases-Inactive...................... 60 37 33 11 0 14 47 71 6 17 38 16 0 44 16 88 23
(c) Contacts and Suspects........... 154 101 177 69 31 69 114 173 30 27 71 268 0 683 65 497 202
3. Number of Persons X-rayed:
(a) Minature Films ................ 11,565 7,435 9,752 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,306 0 0 0 51,911 0 9,629 5,028
(b) Large 14" x 17" Films........... 402 145 979 77 20 88 324 813 113 98 124 949 50 1,084 117 1,367 158
4. Tuberculin Test.................... 43 34 288 43 8 193 85 43 149 87 20 410 1 308 61 623 81
5. Field Nursing Visits.................. 454 147 310 178 24 103 501 620 115 194 381 418 75 1,754 154 1,495 398
6. Office Nursing Visits................. 59 188 32 13 14 91 166 54 16 74 166 318 57 309 81 476 190
7. Cases Hospitalized ................. 21 7 25 3 0 5 8 17 6 5 7 10 1 80 6 88 9
8. Visits to Med. Conf. (May-Dec.)...... 0 31 180 3 0 1 9 5 0 25 29 13 0 0 2 230 16
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum Med. Serv. 61 119 359 48 13 54 82 4 0 66 22 57 0 544 72 387 26
2. Adm. to Antepartum Nursing Service. 151 175 161 61 10 72 54 166 11 76 63 83 5 140 82 273 46
3. Visits by Antepartum Cases to Med.
Conf ............................. 192 248 1,236 122 30 166 289 9 0 181 40 89 0 1,741 173 979 45










TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955



ar
( a
a S
-u a 8P


0, 0 CO cc U I-' M) o o


A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.)
2. Field and Office Visits (May-Dec.)
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
3. Smallpox....................... ....
4. Diphtheria......... ............
5. Typhoid Fever ......................
6. Whooping Cough......................
7. Poliomyelitis ........................
8. Tetanus .............................
9. Rabies (a) Humans. ....................
(b) Animals......................
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(a) Cases-Active ....................
(b) Cases-Inactive..................
(c) Contacts and Suspects ...............
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(a) Cases-Active ......................
(b) Cases-Inactive .....................
(c) Contacts and Suspects................
3. Number of Persons X-rayed:
(a) Minature Films .....................
(b) Large 14" x 17" Films ...............
4. Tuberculin Test .......................
5. Field Nursing Visits .....................
6. Office Nursing Visits ....................
7. Cases Hospitalized .....................
8. Visits to Med. Conf. (May-Dec.)...........
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum Med. Serv.....
2. Adm. to Antepartum Nursing Service......
3. Visits by Antepartum Cases to Med.
Conf...................................


1.4051 1.392


46 90
75 183
112 244


19 311 0
35 62 0


42 104
56 174
126 458


3,130
5,099

66,023
82,477
64,450
67,969
120,653
104,748
118
11,475


1,218
1,726
7,698
2,609
3,048
8,989
326,565
32,471
15,900
29,124
7,966
1,474
15,990

12,213
12,648
36,384


1 6
0 3
1 45
2 9
12 22
37 73
0 3,044
43 71
17 30
37 118
71 100
4 6
2 71

64 58
51 58
197 122


' ~







TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955




Ta




D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont.)
4. Number of Clinic Sessions Conducted. 210 47 62 23 121 111 15 11 10 24 15 162 477 0 34 26 134 0
5. Field Nursing Visits Antepartum..... 293 60 83 176 228 442 21 5 38 156 36 256 3,698 0 92 457 686
6. Office Nursing Visits Antepartum..... 1,566 33 666 96 459 1,944 34 20 10 229 142 486 9,991 0 250 188 1,743 (
9. Postpartum Medical Examinations.... 190 9 59 1 50 113 0 1 1 13 1 232 1,161 0 27 48 202
10. Adms. Postpartum Nursing Service.. 364 60 131 95 167 275 2 11 29 79 29 300 3,094 0 47 183 402
11. Field Nursing Visits Postpartum...... 662 92 173 204 262 357 3 22 41 121 27 571 6,812 0 51 281 794
12. Office Nursing Visits Postpartum..... 127 32 76 1 56 132 0 5 3 9 1 70 1,025 0 34 9 265 -
13. Visits for Midwife Supervision.......... 19 39 14 16 66 184 0 6 14 30 6 45 18 0 48 11 59
14. Attendance at Maternity Classes..... 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100
15. No. Midwife Meetings (May-Dec.).... 3 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 7 0 0 0 5
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service........ 307 134 115 128 92 391 23 7 5 92 13 207 3,734 0 61 440 555
2. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 626 118 184 200 295 950 43 31 49 144 68 345 4,242 1 150 826 912 -
3. Visits to Medical Conferences........ 436 261 192 279 113 1,195 23 8 153 13 214 9,217 0 92 1,324 1,110 -=
4. Field Nursing Visits.................. 1,078 232 324 542 567 3,459 34 84 105 298 49 542 9,082 1 363 1,109 1,587
5. Office Nursing Visits ................ 449 7 196 249 222 1,621 38 39 1 176 107 107 6,598 0 128 968 1,802 X
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service........ 339 251 37 167 45 50 124 24 87 299 10 146 3,643 95 64 784 31
7. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 1,007 463 162 670 606 101 116 105 114 471 87 842 3,757 96 269 1,676 525
8. Visits to Medical Conferences........ 405 593 61 374 46 57 124 7 87 307 11 146 6,507 95 88 1,956 35
9. Field Nursing Visits................. 1,540 899 349 1,875 971 599 36 205 285 409 86 916 6,982 83 646 2,628 895
10. Office Nursing Visits................. 270 9 72 305 259 126 116 182 1 330 85 159 4,504 27 119 1,659 198
12. Number of Infant-Preschool Clinic
Sessions Conducted.................. 269 49 40 38 79 82 136 9 6 40 16 141 36 6 39 90 93
13. Dental Inspections.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 0 12 0 0 0 1 35 0 14
F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected.................... 21,805 1,237 2,227 404 1,161 4,813 0 187 156 245 374 347113,821 354 302 5,807 7,723
2. Pupils Examined.................... 1,796 839 797 269 746 3,141 149 384 455 183 375 372 25,043 923 601 104 149
4. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 838 206 472 171 324 3,734 308 133 38 448 80 74 7,842 17 294 610 1,130
5. Field Nursing Visits................ 1,841 185 777 428 190 1,438 407 187 54 235 63 110 5,304 56 373 910 1,184
6. Office Nursing Visits ................ 577 288 924 16 426 6,650 315 544 13 514 7 58 23,665 5 220 403 1,240
7. Number of Corrections Secured...... 2,993 8 41 201 19 238 20 16 29 26 2 222 14,281 111 26 71 249
8. Dental Inspections................. 2,459 0 0 0 2,229 4,892 0 338 0 0 2 0 0 896 414 0 349









TABLE 16
ul
SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955 o




6 1 I




D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont.)
4. Number of Clinic Sessions Conducted. 47 20 147 12 21 11 35 42 71 24 43 264 38 1 67 26 25
5. Field Nursing Visits Antepartum .... 52 0 149 74 0 11 43 47 0 6 7 1,727 41 38 343 37 42
6. Office Nursing Visits Antepartum..... 173 26 1,119 32 0 27 215 139 0 22 18 7,244 56 155 761 186 35
9. Postpartum Medical Examinations.... 8 1 114 0 0 2 1 12 2 9 0 869 32 0 61 18 0
10. Adms. Postpartum Nursing Service... 8 11 489 38 0 9 49 55 0 17 15 1,621 36 101 349 77 19
11. Field Nursing Visits Postpartum.... 47 15 609 85 0 40 73 93 0 29 29 2,990 66 211 581 106 45
12. Office Nursing Visits Postpartum... 25 1 158 2 0 6 11 11 0 13 0 911 16 36 162 10 1
13. Visits for Midwife Supervision........ 31 4 161 0 0 24 18 6 0 3 29 28 16 16 223 14 10
14. Attendance at Maternity Classes .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 145 0 0 0 0 0O
15. No. Midwife Meetings (May-Dec.).... 7 0 10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service........ 40 18 215 17 5 83 70 18 28 30 64 2,186 100 0 37 48 19
2. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 53 62 626 74 3 42 67 55 1 38 3 3,119 50 144 372 130 72
3. Visits to Medical Conferences........ 56 21 323 32 6 90 105 25 31 35 94 4,739 152 0 37 87 25
4. Field Nursing Visits................. 61 132 896 244 9 157 100 100 1 70 55 3,524 88 321 682 212 334
5. Office Nursing Visits................ 91 13 464 15 0 37 22 25 1 43 16 5,590 24 153 117 149 99
PRESCHOOL UL
6. Admissions to Medical Service........ 31 17 120 51 41 7 154 83 14 36 174 3,257 58 0 52 2 17
7. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 109 46 1,192 183 0 57 154 177 0 141 153 4,606 117 124 443 115 60
8. Visits to Medical Conferences....... 35 24 194 96 41 8 290 83 17 42 214 6,060 66 0 53 2 19
9. Field Nursing Visits................. 115 83 1,665 675 0 142 210 144 0 209 77 2,770 209 307 459 126 332
10. Office Nursing Visits................. 118 16 384 2 0 72 21 97 0 49 119 7,738 23 98 110 72 50
12. Number of Infant-Preschool Clinic
Sessions Conducted ................ 47 13 105 40 8 23 70 36 34 35 48 436 38 0 44 36 25
13. DentalInspections ................. 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected ................... 596 230 6,705 144 164 3,344 465 1,349 147 536 705 11,343 156 3,070 762 137 5
2. Pupils Examined................... 94 249 1,372 892 188 137 809 1,118 463 428 1,121 12,145 731 333 107 20 450
4. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 492 86 285 22 16 114 9 397 35 174 89 4,802 200 274 329 124 81
5. Field Nursing Visits ................ 127 62 648 84 10 2,061 16 259 16 182 85 3,914 186 498 263 92 73
6. Office Nursing Visits................ 1,496 110 2,217 0 19 1,235 16 560 34 861 57 4,350 189 223 364 146 252
7. Number of Corrections Secured...... 4 85 1 19 118 0 52 107 43 13 718 1 69 28 6 3
8. Dental Inspections ................ 0 0 170 0 299 0 3 581 225 0 498 2,807 0 0 0 0 0






TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955



0 r

a a a a 3 1 i a


D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont.)
4. Number of Clinic Sessions Conducted. 49 116 59 59 26 69 57 13 0 61 20 18 0 184 60 179 25
5. Field Nursing Visits Antepartum..... 251 70 271 12 8 30 94 18 17 56 163 92 1 263 123 455 29
6. Office Nursing Visits Antepartum.... 65 520 31 117 44 191 306 16 1 196 48 131 5 90 243 845 64
9. Postpartum Medical Examinations.... 46 71 92 9 14 11 33 0 0 27 2 21 0 187 26 113 0
10. Adms. Postpartum Nursing Service... 191 246 396 64 24 165 83 234 4 57 34 53 6 262 66 411 35
11. Field Nursing Visits Postpartum...... 94 279 757 91 32 327 161 512 8 91 65 77 8 445 183 824 52
12. Office Nursing Visits Postpartum..... 14 51 15 7 5 26 43 6 0 38 5 27 2 89 57 112 6
13. Visits for Midwife Supervision........ 17 8 22 16 5 25 22 38 10 34 108 25 0 16 13 33 3
14. Attendance at Maternity Classes..... 0 0 0 0 07 47 0 0 0 0 113 0 4 0 103 0
15. No. Midwife Meetings (May-Dec.)... 0 0 10 1 0 11 14 3 1 1 1 0 0 6 0 9 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service........ 60 58 197 8 10 20 64 14 0 63 108 40 0 403 61 250 6
2. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 288 305 477 78 30 173 144 369 107 131 116 156 10 461 140 589 84
3. Visits to Medical Conferences........ 69 67 236 10 10 24 76 17 0 188 211 43 0 883 74 534 7
4. Field Nursing Visits ................. 639 457 958 105 67 315 230 926 125 124 254 311 29 712 350 1,884 100
5. Office Nursing Visits ................ 46 107 61 20 21 51 108 16 99 243 94 178 8 93 203 497 70
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service........ 4 35 215 8 12 5 40 25 5 68 343 323 0 1,585 39 56 178
7. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 492 298 729 158 80 70 161 409 529 166 363 384 26 816 289 260 308
8. Visits to Medical Conferences........ 6 35 247 8 12 11 64 39 5 261 1,454 323 0 2,439 39 70 178
9. Field Nursing Visits ................ 734 427 1,015 175 151 197 215 1,112 509 126 643 300 81 1,473 731 428 266
10. Office Nursing Visits ................ 57 120 25 24 13 30 152 10 23 389 618 377 12 137 272 318 308
12. Number of Infant-Preschool Clinic
Sessions Conducted................. 30 110 75 13 0 11 34 11 29 111 73 17 0 205 52 145 4
13. Dental Inspections.................. 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 2 0 0 424 0 42 0
F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected.................... 2,573 335 2,370 1,248 85 148 1,22 2,861 7 6,506 9,584 2,350 503 14,569 1,085 11,511 8,622
2. Pupils Examined.................... 484 969 651 908 273 26 418 1,009 315 1,026 877 1,074 134 674 248 224 441
4. Admissions to Nursing Service........ 754 373 588 122 174 30 834 545 118 1,029 611 1,1 1 1,445 87 2,218 1,307
5. Field Nursing Visits..................... 968 244 696 168 302 151 919 1,253 88 349 685 404 179 2,595 176 2,665 268
6. Office Nursing Visits ................ 457 531 435 60 376 290 697 84 93 4,096 1,742 1,041 52 4,354 569 6203 1,711
7. Number of Corrections Secured....... 31 5 128 41 103 1 24 41 28 103 18 249 0 274 12 1,053 27
8. Dental Inspections................... 0 0 3,728 0 79 0 264 0 0 535 0 270 0 15,086 0 1,406 668









TABLE 16
U'
SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955

4 4n
@1 ii S ,






D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont.)
4. Number of Clinic Sessions Conducted...... 170 137 87 46 28 16 23 38 37 21 46 57 93 32 29 4,231 -
5. Field Nursing Visits Antepartum.......... 453 614 9 159 7 260 214 76 32 14 107 247 61 18 34 13,986
6. Office Nursing Visits Antepartum. ........ 1,537 1,759 348 644 50 129 168 118 265 123 130 450 35 184 145 37,063
9. Postpartum Medical Examinations........ 200 160 33 17 2 18 24 0 0 8 22 60 25 23 18 4,499
10. Adms. Postpartum Nursing Service........ 276 491 133 113 5 51 291 124 72 30 48 196 50 52 60 12,485
11. Field Nursing Visits Postpartum.......... 548 909 20 283 5 131 484 181 153 40 82 404 119 63 83 23,491
12. Office Nursing Visits Postpartum ......... 215 121 55 24 3 40 49 57 18 11 26 63 9 29 29 4,576
13. Visits for Midwife Supervision ............ 46 13 29 8 7 0 76 23 5 26 0 21 32 24 20 1,883
14. Attendance at Maternity Classes.......... 22 24 0 0 0 172 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 783 0
15. No. Midwife Meetings (May-Dec.) ......... 0 2 12 0 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 1 2 1 0 130
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service............ 644 553 73 0 12 40 16 19 77 60 84 112 30 54 54 12,472
2. Admissions to Nursing Service............ 854 1,016 220 264 18 80 316 196 170 119 135 334 95 81 73 21,758
3. Visits to Medical Conferences ............ 1,236 1,247 113 0 13 49 16 23 98 93 135 298 39 87 73 26,462
4. Field Nursing Visits ................... 1,840 1,809 301 67 18 232 564 340 431 97 161 654 227 84 87 41,48
5. Office Nursing Visits..................1,946 1,113 178 13 14 24 56 175 90 162 145 298 10 120 50 26,000
PRESCHOOL LI
6. Admissions to Medical Service........... 1,282 43 99 4 43 56 0 18 55 33 71 281 24 33 18 15,311
7. Admissions to Nursing Service............ 1,675 467 211 356 51 78 483 295 560 112 250 586 320 86 111 29,923
8. Visits to Medical Conferences............. 1,944 66 128 4 64 64 0 22 63 58 148 697 41 47 18 26,698
9. Field Nursing Visits .................... 1,732 1,184 299 995 63 242 1,064 362 1,036 73 542 903 590 37 163 44,795
10. Office Nursing Visits .................... 2,417 247 119 80 21 23 34 178 39 181 151 743 35 89 40 25,172
12. Number of Infant-Preschool Clinic
Sessions Conducted ..................... 176 89 94 13 33 9 11 45 44 26 46 142 45 27 22 4,269
13. DentalInspections......................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 875
F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected...................... 25,711 116 4,992 1 58 12,218 4,117 1,313 250 167 123 15,831 630 989 97 323,014
2. Pupils Examined....................... 4,813 550 1,231 12 761 509 399 327 2,084 12 199 547 100 1,259 516 80,053
4. Admissions to Nursing Service............. 4,956 74 214 25 952 594 745 301 186 139 156 2,066 38 1,376 41 47,518
5. Field Nursing Visits ................... 4,032 82 325 85 288 1,198 2,007 283 315 133 153 1,382 14 621 114 45,760
6. Office Nursing Visits....................3,475 60 282 40 875 854 601 396 65 285 230 2,261 62 1,867 172 82,509
7. Number of Corrections Secured............ 9,968 1 25 0 166 173 97 29 7 11 19 105 0 64 5 32,990
8. Dental Inspections....................... 18,767 0 0 0 0 103 2,095 0 0 1,655 1 1,707 0 1 0 62,527






TABLE 16
SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955



a a a
M s U 3 d i Lx L "

S S i3 B c ( S S 0 (

H. MORBIDITY
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.).... 61 9 1 91 21 339 38 21 34 74 27 35 63 0 39 9 689
2. Field Visits (May-Dec.)............. 30 4 3 68 8 230 0 13 54 29 10 47 244 0 80 10 3,525 0
3. Office Visits (May-Dec.) ............. 370 11 0 191 37 725 40 34 28 65 38 35 92 0 12 0 391
J. CANCER SERVICE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service............... 59 4 39 31 14 42 8 13 6 25 14 29 7 8 3 3 193
2. Field Visits ........................ 3 3 63 95 15 107 14 46 34 28 23 39 43 27 4 9 1,108
3. Office Visits........................ 110 6 43 18 13 156 5 29 1 24 13 29 0 4 8 0 309
K. DIABETES (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service ............... 2 7 6 34 17 8 8 5 9 8 15 7 6 25 5 0 49
2. Field Visits ......................... 2 0 10 2 82 106 0 12 21 11 9 13 14 1 5 0 347 trJ
3. Office Visits ........................ 27 0 60 38 80 30 21 17 8 16 6 0 38 24 0 2
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service................ 27 56 55 26 30 36 23 10 26 12 18 8 2 8 8 14 59 -
2. Field Visits......................... 40 8 130 144 55 135 31 25 34 19 38 15 4 16 27 23 244 i-
Office Visits ....................... 119 50 8 4 63 23 16 5 5 15 18 8 0 12 5 1 7
M. HEART DISEASE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service................ 0 0 4 0 1 11 0 0 2 0 0 1 81 0 1 0 120
2. Field Visits ....................... 0 0 4 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 2 855 0 0 0 905
3. Office Visits ........................ 0 0 0 0 1 25 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 8 0 418 fl
P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies Installed:
(a) Private and Semi-Public......... 24 5 2 0 2 841 6 1 1 0 0 39 7 1 0 45 414
(b) New Public Water Connections... 15 2 11 04 24 29 0 0 0 0 0 11 4 0 1,309 661 -
2. New Specification Privies Installed.... 60 6 1 1 0 31 10 14 2 0 0 15 1 6 5 6 74
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary Condition 56 35 4 4 0 30 0 0 0 0 0 25 0 0 0 7 13
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil Log
Tests............................. 1,447 2 525 23 364 436 0 7 34 263 107 45 11 0 29 1,981 381
5. New Specification Septic Tanks
Installed ......................... 479 27 399 36 1,344 6,544 29 73 25 34 140 884 112 42 3 1,616 2,897
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sanitary
Condition......................... 28 17 3 6 2 16 9 2 0 8 22 94 269 0 2 100 24
7. New Public Sewer Connections ....... 14 6 8 28 0 499 0 12 0 0 17 93 10 0 4 83 8
Field Visits (8-19)..................... 2,451 1,958 2,206 258 2,946 12,490 357 347 655 663 1,036 2,104 46,091 556 230 9,428 16,646









TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955





II I I I
Sa l i l l l0
T


H. MORBIDITY
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.)....
2. Field Visits (May-Dec.) ...........
3. Office Visits (May-Dec.)...........
J. CANCER SERVICE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service ..............
2. Field Visits .........................
3. Office Visits......................
K. DIABETES (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service ..............
2. Field Visits................. ......
3. Office Visits.......................
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service..............
2. Field Visits ........................
3. Office Visits.......................
M. HEART DISEASE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service..............
2. Field Visits........................
3. Office Visits.......................
P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies Installed:
(a) Private and Semi-Public ........
(b) New Public Water Connections...
2. New Specification Privies Installed....
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary Condition
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil Log
Tests.........................
5. New Specification Septic Tanks
Installed .........................
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sanitary
Condition ........... ..
7. New Public Sewer Connections......
Field Visits (8-19) ......................


22 76 42 90
46 6 1,018 38
74 220 136 227


3 10 34 11 1 9 11
6 12 320 17 2 87 2
5 19 46 17 0 31 17

3 12 25 4 4 7 1
1 12 13 8 1 95 0
6 68 79 3 15 34 1

9 40 86 11 2 26 3
42 23 308 18 1 102 26
4 99 7 0 9 3 0


2 5
4 28
4 1


1 15
0 15
1 3


118 166 59 12 284 104
279 0 163 20 20 56
288 442 51 44 386 108


5 17
13 70
7 10

4 26
3 13
16 152


2 6 130
0 26 23
2 5 130


z
z
2i

C2


88
20
49

3 W
8
11
0
3
2
21

2
65
9

4 U1
5
0






TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955





j -a

&1 | |4 z e Is
v i Z Z'^ '^ '^ t ^ ^ A 6


H. MORBIDITY
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.)....
2. Field Visits (May-Dec.) .............
3. Office Visits (May-Dec.).............
J. CANCER SERVICE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service.............
2. Field Visits.......................
3. Office Visits .......................
K. DIABETES (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service. ..............
2. Field Visits ........................
3. Office Visits .......................
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service. ..............
2. Field Visits.......................
3. Office Visits .......................
M. HEART DISEASE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service ...............
2. Field Visits ......................
3. Office Visits....................
P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies Installed:
(a) Private and Semi-Public .........
(b) New Public Water Connections...
2. New Specification Privies Installed....
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary Condition
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil Log
Tests ............................
5. New Specification Septic Tanks
Installed. .........................
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sanitary
Condition.......................
7. New Public Sewer Connections......
Field Visits (8-19) ......................


14 20 49
19 45 16
4 27 199


12 18
8 12
67 108

20 189
4 460
33 504


91 43 41
15 11 199
258 115 641


16 16
11 130
73 54


0 3
0 13
0 0


9 22
21 1E
4 23


85 8
80 23
384 80

23 1
41 6
40 0


7 34
23 1i
24 154

8 111
69 181
3 31

0 11
0 1


15 43
59 140
22 12

0 6
0 12
0 2


t--

72 o
61

52
41 t-l
33






45
40

6



i0 <
1



0
3
nW
29
75
14 U1
0 Ul
754









TABLE 16
SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955




-, r r
) 0 0 5 <- 0 to
I I 0 5 I1 -
0 PO 0


H. MORBIDITY
1. Admissions to Service (May-Dec.).........
2. Field Visits (May-Dec.).................
3. Office Visits (May-Dec.)................
J. CANCER SERVICE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service.................
2. Field Visits ..........................
3. Office Visits............................
K. DIABETES (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service.................
2. Field Visits.... ..................... .
3. Office Visits ........................
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service ...................
2. Field Visits. .........................
3. Office Visits................. ........
M. HEART DISEASE (May-Dec.)
1. Admissions to Service...................
2. Field Visits. ...... .................... .
3. Office Visits .........................
P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies Installed:
(a) Private and Semi-Public..............
(b) New Public Water Connections........
2. New Specification Privies Installed.........
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary Condition....
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil Log
Tests. ...............................
5. New Specification Septic Tanks
Installed. ...................... .....
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sanitary
Condition ...................
7. New Public Sewer Connections..........
Field Visits (8-19).................. .......


424 184 88 1 63
2,202 203 57 1 29
614 381 171 0 112


242 256 1C
324 164 54
804 310


45 50
109 190
114 60

12 6
17 33
0 3


466 7
25 1


15 16
13 87
24 6


27 57 19
115 31 92
4 142 10


14 22 54
60 46 191
84 42 1


2 39 11 100
36 2 20 0
1 112 126 12


6
3
4

6
27
14

22
37
1

1
0
1


1
0
2
0
2
11
1
0
341


11 20
21 13
16 37


14
33
60

16
42
22

6
12
3


0
12
10
4
10
144
17
4
675


z
z


5,511
11,921
9,425

1,913
4,108
2,683 '
0
1,800
2,460
3,839

2,122
5,072 --
1,985 .
UI
346 Ul
2,654
511


2,286
6,830
653
641
18,953
35,940
1,398
5,013
243,205








TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955







O
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
1. Food-handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision........... 210 87 244 71 55 588 30 22 24 119 4 19 5,293 33 23 893 423
2. Field Visits to Food-handling
Establishments..................... 1,390 549 938 693 202 1,592 315 131 119 749 128 91 33,529 70 14 2,153 2,123
3. Number of Food Handler's Certificates
Awarded Persons ................... 3 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,487 0 0 0 0
4. Dairy Farms Registered for Supervision 25 2 9 4 1 1 12 8 4 7 1 11 70 4 0 0 68
5. Field Visits to Dairy Farms.......... 287 32 126 45 1 5 230 15 11 74 1 83 1,708 31 0 0 657
6. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ........... 17 0 4 2 0 3 0 3 1 3 1 12 94 3 0 0 5
7. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants ................... 95 0 31 28 0 12 0 3 7 26 1 85 3,275 12 0 0 193
8. Cows Tuberculin Tested............. 1,284 0 324 0 0 133 400 164 0 0 0 0 8,899 196 0 0 3,416 -
9 Cows Bangs Tested ................. 340 0 429 0 0 0 338 0 0 0 0 0 41 0 0 0 8,353
10. Dairy Farms under Mastitis Control
Program .......................... 92 0 13 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0
V. HEALTH INFORMATION
1. Lectures, Talks and Motion Picture
Showings......................................... 32 10 76 36 4 116 69 54 19 56 13 9 728 49 289 29 200
3.Radio and Television Programs....... 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 28 1 0 0 22
4. News Articles Published ............. 8 0 8 83 68 262 2 27 2 117 11 0 77 19 27 2 40
5. Exhibits ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
3 LABORATORY-Specimens Examined
1-23 Examined ....................... 17,462 993 8,326 1,655 5,042 21,874 1,255 1,418 925 1,751 1,700 8,230 64,895 2,113 1,546 18,387 35,188
S. MISCELLANEOUS
1. Health Cards Issued ................ 1,272 118 1,028 363 772 5,062 83 188 302 336 296 251 6,895 870 110 ,676 6,766
2. Field Nursing Visits to Nursing Homes. 14 0 0 0 4 34 0 8 0 0 0 0 121 0 14 38












TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955


t .




R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
1. Food-handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision........... 49 48 123 8 19 117 35 47 39 23 217 2,618 61 53 141 23 4
2. Field Visits to Food-handling
Establishments ..................... 83 289 485 197 189 878 156 188 306 106 500 19,825 464 246 645 217 45
3. Number of Food Handler's Certificates
Awarded Persons................... 0 0 35 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12
4. Dairy Farms Registered for Supervision 1 1 11 1 8 2 1 4 4 0 3 119 23 6 35 9 28
5. Field Visits to Dairy Farms......... 1 1 136 16 144 26 14 97 109 0 12 2,537 274 56 398 226 449
6. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ........... 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 3 18 1 1 2 1 0
7. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
ProductsPlants.................... 0 0 44 16 20 0 0 2 0 1 6 927 1 10 32 12 0
8. Cows Tuberculin Tested............. O 26 663 0 734 75 107 327 440 0 0 16,324 421 0 966 607 522
9. Cows Bangs Tested.................. 0 26 2,460 0 186 103 107 1 0 0 0 2,726 606 0 0 1,414 426
10. Dairy Farms under Mastitis Control
Program.......................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 119 21 0 0 0 0
V. HEALTH INFORMATION
1. Lectures, Talks and Motion Picture
Showings.......................... 8 19 134 4 6 190 14 13 11 78 66 600 42 4 68 130 25
3. Radio and Television Programs..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 0 1 4 0 0
4. News Articles Published ............. 0 13 57 0 5 26 2 1 7 17 5 95 37 1 11 21 4
5. Exhibits .......................... 7 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 16 1 0 0 0 0 1
X LABORATORY-Specimens Examined
1-23 Examined ...................... 1,435 1,237 5,261 721 488 2,803 4,227 2,489 1,072 680 3,007 99,714 3,320 2,962 6,125 1,434 1,096
S. MISCELLANEOUS
1. Health Cards Issued ............... 96 288 750 69 50 163 237 250 314 340 506 18,122 129 418 490 121 29
2. Field Nursing Visits to Nursing Homes. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 27 0 0 0 0


z
z









0





L
-1
tw











VI








TABLE 16
SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955









R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK 0
1. Food-handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision .......... 153 235 387 26 10 17 134 249 59 135 47 139 17 492 41 614 123
2. Field Visits to Food-handling
Establishments.................. 448 783 1,321 111 50 293 537 592 263 820 225 464 48 2,322 352 2,024 838
3. Number of Food Handler's Certificates
Awarded Persons................... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 6 8 0 0 0 0 65 0 76 0
4. Dairy Farms Registered for Supervision 13 6 22 2 0 15 32 19 3 0 0 7 1 0 8 55 6
5. Field Visits to Dairy Farms........ 88 44 198 16 0 604 580 198 39 0 0 31 7 0 33 376 102
6. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision .......... 9 1 5 5 0 1 8 10 2 9 0 2 1 0 6 16 0
7. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants ................... 100 19 241 12 0 105 71 51 2 57 0 5 6 0 6 1,277 0
8. Cows Tuberculin Tested............. 0 330 940 0 0 525 1,766 1,339 468 0 0 3 45 0 0 9,222 499
9. Cows Bangs Tested................ 0 0 6,337 67 0 658 0 348 468 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 35
10. Dairy Farms under Mastitis Control
Program .......................... 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 2 0 0 7 0 0 0 18 8
V. HEALTH INFORMATION 03
1. Lectures, Talks and Motion Picture
Showings ........................ 26 40 42 63 22 86 222 27 25 263 33 66 29 723 18 308 65
3. Radio and Television Programs....... O 6 2 0 0 6 1 8 1 227 0 3 0 505 0 1 13
4. News Articles Published.............. 1 26 110 3 7 30 49 11 4 457 34 12 10 141 0 6 20
5. Exhibits........................... 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 34 0 0 12 0 0 0
X LABORATORY-Specimens Examined
1-23 Examined ......................... 3,013 6,050 25,808 2,580 1,213 1,856 6,564 4,662 1,403 8,094 3,548 3,540 945 11,353 2,156 19,949 2,908
S. MISCELLANEOUS
1. Health Cards Issued ................ 493 1,227 3,586 360 81 237 1,506 924 126 443 574 531 138 1,036 289 2,413 1,428
2. Field Nursing Visits to Nursing Homes. 13 3 6 0 0 16 8 0 1 0 0 1 28 3 1 1












TABLE 16

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS DURING 1955




SII d U -
a P a 2 0 2



R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
1. Food-handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision................... 2,149 807 112 126 47 172 80 97 57 86 28 1,087 28 89 72 19,673
2. Field Visits to Food-handling
Establishments........................ 8,675 3, 166 242 185 969 73 37 479 290 76 6,32 165 806 457 103,671
3. Number of Food Handler's Certificates
Awarded Persons....................... 0 245 0 0 0 0 55 0 0 42 0 0 0 0 0 4,053
4. Dairy Farms Registered for Supervisin ..... 40 4 6 6 29 9 9 7 14 3 8 27 1 17 21 918
5. Field Visits to Dairy Farms .............. 742 860 7 62 237 128 35 94 172 45 43 681 10 166 248 13,178
6. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ................ 48 2 4 6 0 3 2 0 0 2 0 13 0 2 0 337
7. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
ProductsPlants......................... 623 47 20 40 0 64 3 0 0 33 0 353 0 27 2 8,003
8. Cows Tuberculin Tested................. 6,741 4,254 639 8 0 660 0 356 212 75 0 2 63 772 565 65,512
9. Cows Bangs Tested..................... 4,255 4,180 1,001 120 1,384 124 0 350 255 175 0 4 136 772 545 83,772
10. Dairy Farms under Mastitis Control
Program ............................... 2 53 0 1 21 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 17 16 448
V. HEALTH INFORMATION
1. Lectures, Talks and Motion Picture
Showings.............................. 556 141 80 4 53 772 41 9 49 56 2 173 1 71 5 7,352
3. Radio and Television Programs ............ 68 2 7 0 3 16 0 0 34 5 0 4 0 18 0 1,052
4. News Articles Published................. 245 12 18 2 19 109 9 17 8 27 20 26 28 70 21 2,547
5. Exhibits............................... 13 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 1 1 110
Al LABORATORY-Specimens Examined
1-23 Examined ............................ 82,993 11,794 8,760 1,874 1.828 2,922 5,834 1,930 2,574 1,453 859 5,675 1,198 2,628 2,047 510,842
S. MISCELLANEOUS
1. Health Cards Issued ..................... 9,427 59 401 192 269 617 0 410 161 244 67 122 154 271 190 78,236
2. Field Nursing Visits to Nursing Homes...... 171 30 4 4 0 18 11 2 1 0 0 58 0 4 0 664








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 61

DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING

RUTH E. METTINGER, R.N., Director

The Division of Public Health Nursing has supported and worked
with all the bureaus and divisions of the State Board of Health and all
county health units for the purpose of promoting public health in
general and continued increase in quality and performance of nursing
service. Emphasis has been on progressive training and study, both formal
and informal.


IN-SERVICE EDUCATION
Institutes: In order to render the best possible services to the com-
munities, refresher courses have been held in various subjects:

Nine institutes on heart disease control were held in January. Miss
Jane Wilcox, Chief Nurse Consultant, Heart Disease Control Center,
National Institute of Health, was one of the principal discussants. Pre-
paration for these institutes was made jointly with the Division of
Heart Disease Control, State Heart Association, Florida State Nurses'
Association and the Division of Public Health Nursing. Over 900 nurses
participated.

The Florida Council for the Blind planned in conjunction with the
Nursing Division a one-day conference January 25. Mr. George Em-
manuele of the Council and Mrs. Bernadine Blatt, public health nurse
consultant for the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, were
discussants. All public health nurses in the area (Jacksonville) were
invited to attend.

To better acquaint the nurses with certain phases of the Crippled
Children's Commission, a workshop was held May 26-27. Nurse con-
sultants from the state office as well as public health nurses in the north-
eastern area attended. Miss Carolyn Blair, Nurse Consultant, Crippled
Children's Commission, conducted the workshop.

The annual Obstetrics Seminar in Daytona (sponsored by the Bureau
of Maternal and Child Health) continues to draw nurses from the field
of public health and hospitals. There has been a definite increase in
nurse attendance each year: 1951, 7; 1952, 31; 1953, 77; 1954, 96 and
1955, 102.

So that the nurses would be better informed as to their role in the
venereal disease control program, a series of eight institutes were held in
September and October. Planning for the program was done by the
Division of Venereal Disease Control, Division of Public Health Nursing








62 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

and the United States Public Health Service. Miss Alice Clark, Chie'
Nurse Consultant, Venereal Disease Control, U. S. Public Health Service,
was the nursing leader. The entire staff of each county health unit
was invited to attend and participate.

Exchange visits: The tuberculosis hospital exchange visits were con-
tinued in 1955 with a few changes. One-day visits are now scheduled
for public health nurses, who previously had a 48-hour visit. The facul-
ties of the tuberculosis hospitals have continued to visit the county health
units for two days.

A similar program has been started in the Florida State Hospital (for
the mentally ill), Chattahoochee. This was initiated by the Division of
Public Health Nursing. The original planning was done by the director
of the school of nursing at the State Hospital and the director of
this Division. A committee representing the county health units,
Bureau of Mental Health, State Hospital and this Division for-
mulated definite plans for the orientation. The first group to visit the
hospital for 48 hours was composed of two health officers, a psychiatrist
from the Bureau of Mental Health, and five public health nurses, includ-
ing consultants from this Division. It is agreed that the exchange visit
to the State Hospital will mean much to the community, hospital and
patient, bringing about a much better understanding of the problems of
both the health department and hospital. Therefore, plans have been
made for a group of eight or ten county personnel to visit the hospital
every other month.

In-service groups: A number of requests have been made by nurses
for help in methods or techniques in working with people. This, of
course, requires a faculty who are experts in the area of human relations.
One study group was selected to do a pilot project this year which we
hope will serve as a pattern for developing similar programs throughout
the state, if the groups wish to have them. This group is in a university
center and the faculty of the university has been very generous in
helping with class plans and in providing instructors.

In-service training: Seven nurses went to Gainesville for the orienta-
tion program in public health nursing; three will complete their third
month in Jacksonville, January, 1956.

Advance education (Scholarships): Due to the demand for more
and better prepared nurses, the Florida State Nurses' Association ap-
pointed a committee to study the need for scholarships. The director
of this Division was asked to represent public health nursing. As a result
of much planning, the Florida State Nurses' Association sponsored a
bill during the 1955 Legislature which passed. It carried an appropriation
of $200,000 for basic and advanced education in nursing. These monies
are administered by the State Department of Education. Seven public








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


health nurses took the competitive examinations and hope to enter a
school offering the approved course in public health nursing in February,
1956.

Civil defense: Nurses have been encouraged to develop an awareness
of the necessity for civil defense preparedness. This has been done through
classes in the nursing aspects of atomic warfare. Two classes were held
for professional nurses and one class for practical nurses. Professional
nurses were requested to hold classes in disaster nursing care in their local
areas.

CONSULTANT FIELD SERVICE
Nursing functions and activities in public health have been expanded
both in number and kind. The consultants have assisted the public
health nurses in planning and implementing their programs, so that the
patient and the county health department would receive their greatest
benefits; and to work and understand allied organizations placing
emphasis on the interpretation of this relationship to all phases of
public health nursing services.

An acute problem is the need for more supervisory help for the nurses
in counties where there is no supervisor, and the inability to follow-
through in promoting teaching techniques.

One local supervisor retired and another accepted a foreign assign-
ment. These positions were filled by well qualified nurses from out of
state. These changes necessitated visits from a consultant to orient the
new nurses in the public health nursing program in Florida.

School nursing: Much interest has been manifested throughout the
state in ways to improve the school health program. Consultants have
assisted with planning workshops, which included the staff from two or
three county units. Representatives from the county boards of education
also participated in these meetings.

Midwifery: Activities pertaining to the midwife program have been
carried out state-wide. A total of 336 midwives were licensed in 1955.
Through one-day conferences and field visits, 225 of the total active mid-
wives were reached.

Two-week periods were spent in Alachua and Gadsden Counties on
delivery service. Assistance was given during one delivery in each of
the two counties.
Health councils: Two of the nursing consultants were invited to par-
ticipate in two of the Gulf Coast Council's meetings. Assistance was
given with the organization of a health council in a rural area. This
council has been the means of helping to promote sanitation projects.








64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATIONS
The development of combination services has been emphasized. Sara-
sota County has started a combination service in Venice, which is the
first in the state; the board of directors contributes to the salary of the
nurse through the health department. The nurse carries out the total
program including home nursing.

The Visiting Nurse Association's Board in Hillsborough County is
considering the combination service in one district; this service to be
on a trial basis.

Nurses in three of the visiting nurses' associations are paid jointly by
the board of directors and the health departments.

Other health units have been contacted and the organization of similar
services explained to the medical director and interested citizens.

The objective of a combined service is to prevent the duplication of
work.

FIELD EXPERIENCE
Plans formulated for field experience for the students of Florida State
University and Florida A & M University in 1954 were carried out in
1955. An evaluation of the field work was made following the two
months' experience. Supervisors, advisory nurses and the professor of
public health nursing from the university were asked to attend the evalua-
tion meeting.

Plans for 1956 had to be changed due to the requirements of the
National Accrediting Service of the National League for Nursing. There-
fore, two conferences were held to work out the policies of the NLN.

Six students from the University of North Carolina received field
experience in Florida in 1955.

Two public health nurses from Chile received an orientation at
Gainesville. They also spent some time at the premature center at the
Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami.








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 65

FIELD ADVISORY STAFF
C. J. MATHES, M.D., M.P.H., Director

For the first part of 1955 the Field Advisory Staff consisted of two
sanitation consultants, one nursing home field inspector, one record
consultant, and two nurse consultants. One of the sanitation consultants,
one of the nurse consultants and the field inspector were engaged in the
nursing home program.
For administrative purposes it was thought advisable during 1955
to consider the nursing home supervision and licensing program as an
integral part of the Field Advisory Staff's general activity. The fun-
damental basic needs had been met in nursing home administration in
most areas and the local health departments were administering the
program at the local level.
The director of the Field Advisory Staff assumed his duties at mid-
year when it was deemed advisable to reorganize the staff and its opera-
tional areas. As a result the sanitation consultants were increased to
three. The nursing home field worker was assigned to the position of
a record consultant and the two nurses continued in a general con-
sultation capacity. It was planned that the sanitation and record con-
sultants at regular intervals rotate their work areas. The consultants
work out of the central office. Therefore, nursing home consultation is
the responsibility of the nurse and the sanitarian in that particular area.
Experience to date indicates that the nursing home consultation program
has benefited from this arrangement.
With the responsibility of the nursing home program as only a part
of the general consultation service, more time can be spent in other aspects
of our work. With the alteration of the monthly activity report it was
thought that basic indoctrination in the use of the new form was indicated.
Four Record Institutes were planned. Jacksonville, Panama City, West
Palm Beach and Winter Haven served as centers for the public health
workers of these areas. An average of thirty persons attended each
Institute.
The Field Advisory Staff prepared two programs at the annual meet-
ing of the Florida Public Health Association: a fire prevention demon-
stration and a program for the clerical and administrative personnel.
A panel on In-Service Training was presented at the Gulf Coast
Conference in November.
Participation in Dade County Health Department's sanitarian training
program was a mutually beneficial experience for some members of the
staff.
The director was invited to do an evaluation of a county health de-
partment's program where much interest was created in devising an
evaluation device that is practical and more realistic than those in use
heretofore.








66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TRAINING
The Training Program for the Florida State Board of Health was re-
viewed and altered during 1955.
Doctor John J. Wright from the School of Public Health, University
of North Carolina, visited the state in mid-year at the request of
the State Health Officer who requested Doctor Wright to observe the
status of the Training Program and to make recommendations con-
cerning it.
Doctor Wright reviewed the experience of the Training Center at
Gainesville from July 1, 1946, through July 31, 1955. During this period
a total of sixty-two health officers, one hundred three nurses, one hundred
ninety sanitarians and thirty-two clerks were trained.

When Federal and state training funds were drastically reduced three
years ago, the State Board of Health was no longer able to continue its
provision of stipends for trainees and was forced to reduce its financial
participation in the Center. This resulted in loss of training staff at the
Center and the shifting of financial responsibility for providing training
from the state to the county health departments. This, coupled with the
serious and prolonged illness of the director of the Center, resulted in
reduced effectiveness of the program as well as a serious reduction of
personnel sent to the Center for training.

Five county health departments have accepted student nurses from
the School of Nursing at Florida State University for two months' field
experience in public health nursing. Upon graduation from the four
year curriculum these girls are eligible for first-level positions in public
health nursing and further graduate training. Several diploma schools
of nursing use local health departments for much more limited type of
field experience. These training activities on the local level are an ex-
cellent recruitment device. As a part of his report Doctor Wright re-
commended that the responsibility for training be centered in the Field
Advisory Staff and that formal and field in-service training programs be
under its supervision. This recommendation has been carried out.

A committee was designated for consideration of In-Service Training.
Each of Doctor John Wright's recommendations were discussed and
planning was begun. It was agreed that field experience for the nurse
trainees remain for the present at Gainesville while all other aspects of
the program be carried out in Jacksonville at the central office.

A program for the nurses was planned and beginning in November
three trainees began their three months' experience.

Plans were being made at year's end for the Training Program for
sanitarians. It was hoped that early in 1956 the first group of sanitarians
would begin their training at Jacksonville.







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


TABLE 17

SUMMARY OF TRAINING 1955


Health Officer
Nurses

Sanitarians
Clerks


1-2 3 1 6 2 3
weeks weeks month weeks months months Total
1 1 2
2 1 3 3 9


(1 from Chile)


7 7


TABLE 18

ACTIVITIES OF THE FIELD ADVISORY STAFF

TYPE VISITS PERSONS SERVED
CONSULTANT Counties Number Old New Health
Visited Visits Routine Request Employee Employee Officer Group Other
Sanitation ...... 62 159 112 47 123 28 80 13 83
Record.......... 55 80 51 29 64 12 28 2 3
Total...... 117 239 163 76 187 40 108 15 86



TABLE 19

SUMMARY OF NURSING HOMES BY COUNTY SHOWING
NUMBER OF HOMES, NUMBER OF BEDS, AND PATIENTS
BY RACE AND SEX, AS OF DECEMBER 18, 1955

COUNTIES Total Homes Reported Beds Reported Patients
Homes White Colored
White Colored White Colored Male Female Male Female
State Total.. 292 211 13 5,416 304 1,568 2,650 135 122
Alachua.... 2 1 1 26 6 14 11 4
Bay......... 2 2 ... 28 ... 11 11
Brevard..... 3 3 ... 45 ... 6 17
Broward..... 11 11 ... 256 ... 58 123
Charlotte.... 1 1 ... 11 ... 2 5
Citrus....... 1
Columbia.... 1 1 ... 9 ... 2 3
*Dade........ 44 35 3 1,520 90 541 698 65 38
DeSoto..... 1 1 ... 8 ... ... 8
Duval....... 32 20 3 435 80 121 235 24 42
Escambia.... 7 5 ... 52 ... 7 35
Hardee...... 1
Hernando.... 1 1 ... 2 ... 1 1
*Hillsborough. 22 15 2 736 40 221 309 12 10
Indian River. 3 3 ... 39 ... 14 22
Lake........ 10 7 ... 42 ... 7 32
Lee......... 4 3 ... 44 ... 18 14
Leon....... 3 2 ... 29 ... 2 27
Levy........ 1 1 ... 7 ... 4 3
Manatee..... 5 2 ... 60 ... 18 40
Marion...... 2 1 1 12 7 3 5 2 4
Martin...... 1 1 ... 3 ... ... 1
Orange...... 13 8 ... 196 ... 34 93
Osceola...... 7 5 ... 49 ... 14 20
Palm Beach.. 18 13 1 271 22 67 110 8 8
Pasco...... 7 6 ... 106 ... 20 38
*Pinellas...... 32 25 ... 705 18 191 419 14 4
Polk......... 10 8 ... 144 ... 28 89
Putnam..... 4 3 ... 41 ... 9 25
St.Johns.... 4 3 1 58 10 14 33 ... 6
St.Lucie.... 4 1 ... 16 ... 11 4
Sarasota.. 6 4 ... 89 ... 27 40
*Seminole..... 8 6 1 110 31 25 31 16 15
Sumter...... 1
Suwannee.... 1 1 ... 20 ... 6 10
Volusia...... 19 11 ... 257 ... 68 122
Washington.. 1 1 ... 10 ... 4 1 ..

*With County Homes








68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


HOSPITAL SERVICE FOR THE INDIGENT
L. k. PARKS, M.D., M.P.H., Acting Director
ROBERT CARTER, B.S.,
Administrative Analyst
The problem of providing essential hospital service for the indigent
is one that-has been under consideration for some time. Acting upon
a recommendation of the House of Delegates of the Florida Medical
Association, Governor Leroy Collins appointed a Citizens' Advisory Com-
mittee to study this problem and recommend a solution. The members
of this committee were George T. Harrell, M.D., Charles C. Hillman,
M.D., Rep. J. B. Hopkins, Ralph W. Jack, M.D., Edward Jelks, M.D.,
Earl L. Koos, Ph.D., Mr. T. Fletcher Little, Robert B. McIver, M.D.,
John M. Mclachlan, Ph.D., Senator Verle A. Pope, Wilson T. Sowder,
M.D., Robert T. Spicer, M.D., Mr. S. Tanner Stafford, H. Phillip
Hampton, M.D., Chairman.
The committee's study and resulting report was very thorough. It
presented a summary of facilities and services now available for the care
of the indigent in each county of the state, and included a specific
recommendation for the creation of a state-wide program for providing
essential hospital care for the indigent.
The committee's report was reviewed by the Legislative Committee
and approved by the House of Delegates of the Florida Medical As-
sociation meeting in April 1955.
A Bill incorporating the recommendations of the committee was
drawn and presented to the 1955 session of the Legislature. The Bill
called for the creation of a program to be administered by the State
Board of Health in conjunction with each county of the state and pro-
vided that the cost of hospital care for the indigent be met by a joint
state-county matching formula which limited the state's contribution to
not more than 50 per cent of the total cost and required each county to
provide not less than 50 cents per capital annually for its estimated popu-
lation. The Bill was enacted by the Legislature but the recommended
appropriation of $3,000,000 for state matching funds was reduced to
$500,000 and the date for effecting the program postponed until Jan-
uary 1, 1956.
During the last eight months of 1955, necessary preparations were
made to begin the operation of the program on January 1, 1956. An
advisory committee to the State Board of Health for the operation of
the program was appointed in accordance with the provisions of the
law. The members of the committee are as follows:
H. Phillip Hampton, M.D., Chairman--Tampa
Pat N. Groner, Hospital Administrator Pensacola
Frank Kelly, Attorney Miami
Edward Jelks, M.D. Jacksonville
Richard Simpson, Businessman Monticello








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 69

The committee's first meeting held in Jacksonville July 17, was devoted
entirely to a study of the law and a consideration of major policy and
administrative matters. The committee's second meeting, held in St.
Petersburg December 7, was devoted primarily to a consideration of
rules and regulations for the administration of the program as required
by law. Tentative rules and regulations were recommended by the
Committee to the State Board of Health and will be considered at its
next annual session.

As authorized by the law, several conferences have been held with
representatives of the State Welfare Department for the purpose of
exploring the possibilities of developing a program through which that
department may meet the cost of providing necessary hospital care to the
indigent on its rolls. As yet there have been no specific conclusions
concerning this proposal








70 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


BUREAU OF PREVENTABLE DISEASES
L. L. PARKS, M.D., M.P.H., Director
JAMES O. BOND, M.D., M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist
The following divisions make up the Bureau of Preventable Diseases:
Cancer, Industrial Hygiene, Venereal Disease, Veterinary Public Health
(including Milk Sanitation), Nutrition and Diabetes, and Communi-
cable Diseases.
During the first half of the year, activities in the field of epidemiology
were carried out by the regular staff and the director of the bureau.
In July, 1955, the services of a full time epidemiologist, Dr. James
O. Bond, were added.
The major portion of the efforts of the staff, concerned with com-
municable disease control this year, were directed against poliomyelitis.
Fortunately, a natural decline in the incidence of the disease occurred
for the general population and for all age groups, relieving the staff
of the large task of collecting reports and distributing gamma globulin,
which took so much time in 1954. The rate per 100,000 fell from 51.0
in 1954 to 12.8 in 1955, or a reduction of 75 per cent. Total cases fell
from 1777 to 466.
The advent of the Salk vaccine against poliomyelitis in April 1955
presented many new problems as well as the opportunity to carry out
the first really major preventive program against poliomyelitis. Table
20 shows the amount of Salk vaccine received in Florida during 1955
from various sources, and its estimated use. During the spring, vaccine
supplied by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis was dis-
tributed to all counties for inoculation of first and second grade school
children. An estimated 146,562 children received a first inoculation,
and 105,511 received a second inoculation by September 1, 1955. This
response rate of 72 per cent for second injections was better than the
national average, and reflected the non-emotional reaction in Florida
to the news of the Cutter incident with contaminated batches of vaccine.
The Federal Poliomyelitis Assistance Act of 1955, providing free
vaccine to the state, presented new duties and opportunities to the
bureau in the administration of this program. After preparation and
approval of the plan for administration of the vaccine supplied by the
Federal Government, the State Board of Health received 90 per cent of
all vaccine allocated to Florida. The estimated distribution by injection
number of the 205,176 cc. received and distributed to the counties by
the State Board of Health is shown in Table 20 along with the estimated
distribution of the 56,959 cc. going through regular commercial chan-
nels.
From the total 577,135 cc. of Salk vaccine received in Florida in
1955, an estimated 270,648 children received one injection or more.








PREVENTABLE DISEASES


165,337 of these received two injections and 2347 of these received
three inoculations. Since there are an estimated 1,098,319 children ages
0-15 in Florida, approximately one-fourth of them received one or more
Salk vaccine injections in 1955.

In conjunction with the National Poliomyelitis Surveillance Center
at the Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta, the bureau carried
out a surveillance program to determine both the safety and effective-
ness of the vaccine distributed. Reports of poliomyelitis occurring in
vaccinated children were obtained and transmitted to Communicable
Disease Center. Table 21 gives the pertinent data on these cases. It will
be noted that only four cases were reported as paralytic, and of the
remaining twenty-five non-paralytic cases, six were considered as not
being poliomyelitis after review of the laboratory and clinical evidence.
The results of the laboratory studies on these cases are shown in Table
21. There was no evidence that would incriminate any lots of the
vaccine as containing live virus, and in fact, there was no reaction what-
soever reported after vaccination.

Twenty-two of these cases in vaccinated children occurred over the
period June 1 to October 31, during which time there were relatively
few inoculations made and an estimate of the total numbers of vaccinat-
ed and unvaccinated children could be made. Accepting the original
diagnosis of poliomyelitis and their paralytic status, a comparison of
the attack rates in the vaccinated and unvaccinated children is shown
in Table 22. Since the diagnosis of non-paralytic poliomyelitis is rather
difficult (as shown by the evaluation of the cases in vaccinated children)
the comparisons least subject to bias are for the rates of paralytic polio-
myelitis. It is seen that the vaccinated children had a rate of 1.3 per
100,000 and the unvaccinated 4.9. If it is assumed that the rate in
the vaccinated group would have been that of the unvaccinated groups
had they not been immunized, the reduction of 73 per cent in the
incidence rate may be attributed to the vaccine. Sources of bias in such
a comparison lie in the population estimates, the accuracy of reporting
and diagnosis, and the fact the unvaccinated children were not true
controls. However, similar comparison in other states showed consistent
reductions of the same magnitude, and it is concluded that they truly
reflect the protective effect of the vaccine.

Despite the dramatic interest in poliomyelitis this year, the other fami-
liar childhood diseases presented problems which were kept under close
observation. Whooping cough showed a marked rise in reported in-
cidence with 1080 cases reported compared to 339 in 1954. The case
fatality rate remained essentially unchanged from previous years (13
deaths, 1.2 percent), indicating this was not due to increased reporting.
Eight of these deaths were investigated and the following information
obtained: seven were confirmed as due to pertussis; six under one
year of age and five were six months or under. All but one were negroes.
None of these infants had received any immunization against whooping








72 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

cough. This information was used to alert physicians and health de-
partments of the need for more complete and earlier immunizations of
colored infants. The marked rise in incidence this year was felt to be
due to the cyclical rise noted every three to four years in the past.
This indicates a build up of susceptibles is going on in the infants and
children and represents the need for continual emphasis on immuniza-
tions.

Although total diphtheria incidence was essentially unchanged from
the last five years (99 cases, 1955) the fact that it is not falling is of
some concern. Two areas in the state experienced unusual increases
in incidence and were given careful observation. It was found that most
of the cases were occurring in the low income groups and in one area
90 percent of the cases did not have adequate immunization. Only six
of twenty-nine cases studied were typical diptheria with toxic effects
evident. The remainder were either very mild or had only positive throat
cultures after contact investigation. It was noted that three distinct
diphtheria types were cultured from different geographic areas, in-
dicating no apparent epidemiological link between the areas. Again, it
was concluded that immunization levels in the lower income groups are
probably lower than is realized.

Other communicable diseases presented no especial problems. Ty-
phoid fever remained at the level of one case per 100,000 population
where it has been for the past five years. The names of 88 typhoid
carriers are currently on file in the Bureau. Tetanus remains as the
major cause of death from communicable disease (53 cases, 29 deaths)
other than tuberculosis and venereal disease. There were no significant
outbreaks of unusual diseases this year.

The unusual disease of 1954, termed Tallahassee Strain Poliomyelitis,
was restudied by the Bureau in July 1955. The epidemiologic records
collected during the outbreak in the fall of 1954 were analyzed and a
special re-evaluation of twenty random sample cases made. The original
observation of the selective risk of white, married, adult females, and
the absence of risk in negroes, children, aged, and college students was
statistically confirmed. It was concluded that a very small proportion of
the cases were due to suggestibility and anxiety, a small number due to
true poliomyelitis, and the remainder (estimated 75 percent of the
reported cases) due to an unknown communicable disease bearing certain
resemblances to similar outbreaks reported from Iceland and England.

Intestinal parasites remain one of the most frequently reported com-
municable diseases, although they are of minor importance as causes of
morbidity and mortality. A special study of the risk of obtaining ascaris
infection from sewage sludge, used as lawn fertilizer was carried out in
Tampa in cooperation with the Hillsborough County Health Department.
Three hundred twenty-two households were visited of which one hund-
red fifty-four had used sludge as fertilizer on their lawns and one









PREVENTABLE DISEASES


hundred sixty-eight were control homes one block away. From these
homes sixty-nine children in the sludge group and seventy-nine in the
control group submitted specimens of stool for intestinal parasite ex-
amination. Only one was positive for ascaris, and this was from the
sludge group. Although viable ascaris eggs are found in the dried sludge
used for fertilizer, it was concluded they did not present a significant
risk of infection to the children.

In addition to the above special studies and routine duties, a consider-
able amount of time was spent in revising the State Board of Health
Rules and Regulations for Control of Communicable Diseases. Many
talks or lectures to student nurses, medical students and others were made
on communicable diseases and epidemiology. It is anticipated that in
the future, the services of the epidemiologist will not be limited to
communicable diseases, but applied also to the chronic diseases which
are our major public health problems.










TABLE 20
ESTIMATED USE OF SALK VACCINE RECEIVED IN FLORIDA--1955

Estimated cc's Vaccine Used Vaccine Unu
as of 12/81
Source 1st Injection 2nd Injection 3rd Injection Returned or Expired Total
NFIP.............. 146,562 105,511 62,927 315,000
Federal............. 105,113 50,679 1,988 47,396 205,176
Commercial......... 18,973 9,147 359 28,480 56,959
Total........... 270,648 165,337 2,347 138,803 577,135












TABLE 21

POLIOMYELITIS REPORTED IN VACCINATED CHILDREN

FLORIDA-1955

Initial Diag. Interval between Laboratory Studies
Date Inoc. and Onset Virus Isolation Serology
County Initials Age Sex Race of Less Type Polio Type Final Diag.
Onset Non- than 15-80 Over No
Par. Par. 15 days 30 None I II III Rie I II III
days days

Escambia...... CWL 6 M W 4/29 ...... x .... ............ .......... .... ot Polio
Polk.......... JT 7 F W 5/20 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ........................ ...... ..... ..... on-Para.
PalmBeach... RH 8 M W /30 ...... ........ ...... ....... x .................. on-Para.
Palm Beach... DH 7 M W 5/30 ...... ...... ...... x x ...... .......... ........................ x Non-Para.
Dade .. ...... JW 7 M W 6/1 ...... ...... ...... x .. .......................... NotPolio
Dade......... RR 7 M W 6/6 ....... ...... ...... ....on-Para.
Pinelas ....... SMe 6 F W 6/6 ...... ..... ...... .................. ................ ..... ot Polio
Holmes....... LP 7 F W 6/11 ...... x ............ ..... .......... ... ...... .................. on-Para.
Highlands..... LC 7 F W 6/12 ..... ... .. x ... .. x ....... .... ..... x ...... ...... ...... ......NotPolio
Hillsborough... TT 6 M W 6/14 ...... ...... ...... x ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... x NotPolio
Marion........ JJ 9 F W 6/16 ...... ...... ...... .......................................... ......... on-Para.
Dade ......... DMC 8 F W 6/14...... x ...... .............................. .......... ..... .... .....Bulbar
Pinellas....... EF 6 F C 6/18 ...... x x ...... ...... ...... ...... x ...... ...... ...... on-Para.
St. John....... MMc 7 F W 6/21 ..... ................ ..... ........ .Paralytic
Polk......... HC 5% M W 7/2 ............. .. x ...... ...... ...........NotPoo
Duval......... BB 6 M W 7/18 ...... x ..... ...... .... ..... ...... .... ..Non-Para.
Pinellas....... JM 8 M W 7/19 ...... x ...... ...... x .. ................................Non-Para.
Palm Beach... GC 10 M W 7/31 ...... x ...... ... .. ... on-Para.
Martin........ DRP 7 M W 8/1... ...... ..... ..... ........ ................. ... ...... Non-Para.
Bay........... SW 7 F W 8/1....... x ......... a. x ................... ... ......Non-Para.
Dade......... KB 7 M W 8/2 ...... ..... ...... ....:::::: :::::: :::::. ::::: ...... ......... on-Para.
Orange........ RH 7 M C 8/11 x ........ ...... ...... x......... aralytic
Palm Beach... GH 6 M W 9/18 ...... ............ x ......... ...... .. Nonar.
Dade......... DD 6 M W 10/28 ...... ...... ...... ........................ ..... ...... ........Non-Para.
Escambia...... JK 8 M W 10/6 ...... ............ ...................... x ........................otPolio
Palm Beach... NM 7 F W 12/15...... ...... ...... ........................................... ......Non-Para.
Dade......... BS 11 M W 12/15 ...... x ...... ............ ..................................... ......... Non-Para.
Dade......... JB 11 F W 12/23 x ...... ..... x ................................... ..... .... .....Paralytic
Duval......... KB ...... ...... ...... 10/14 ........... .... x ........................ .......... ........... ......Paralytic









PREVENTABLE DISEASES


TABLE 22
REPORTED CASES POLIOMYELITIS, FLORIDA AGES 5-9, BY
VACCINATION HISTORY AND PARALYTIC STATUS
JUNE I-OCTOBER 31, 1955


Rate per 100,000 Population


*Includes 21 unspecified
**Children receiving one or more injections

TABLE 23
TYPHOID FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, PERTUSSIS AND TETANUS
REPORTED CASES, DEATHS AND IMMUNIZATIONS WITH RATES,
FLORIDA 1950 1955, BY SINGLE YEARS


Immunizations
Rate per Rate per Reported Percent of
Year Cases 100,000 Deaths 100000 by Health Population
Population Population Officer Immunized


TYPHOID

1950 43 1.5 1 .04 116,145 4.1
1951 81 1 1 1 .03 113,009 3.8
1952 46 1.5 2 .06 107,880 3.5
1953 66 1.8 1 .08 85,568 2.7
1954 81 .9 0 .0 68,668 2.0
1955 56 1.5 1 .02 64,450 1.8

DIPTHERIA


1950 97 .4 8 .28 68,255 2.1
1951 66 2.8 6 .21 58,531 1.8
1952 82 2.7 7 .2 65,775 2.2
1953 114 8.6 12 .88 76,838 2.5
1954 114 3.5 10 .81 76,469 2.8
1955 99 2.7 7 .19 82,477 2.8


PERTUSSIS

1960 471 10.8 8 .28 88,598 1.2
1951 920 17.4 27 .93 38,745 1.3
1952 291 9.7 6 .13 47.391 1.6
1953 '09 6.7 4 .12 62,435 2.0
1954 839 10.4 1 .03 61,511 1.9
1955 1.08P 29.6 18 .35 67,969 1.9

TETANUS

1950 43 1.5 35 1.25 66,937 2.3
1951 34 1.2 24 .82 72,463 2.5
1952 46 1.5 27 .89 86,867 2.9
1953 44 1.4 82 1.02 95,028 8.1
1954 59 1.8 89 1.12 94,236 2.9
1955 53 1.5 29 .79 104,748 2.9








76 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 24

TOTALS OF REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, BY COUNTIES,

FLORIDA, 1955, AND STATE TOTALS FOR 1953 AND 1954


u


.0p
.0


S


10 5,717 328 1,900 96 114 177 53 9 305 11,459 109 1
9 5,640 344 2,144 106 114 102 48 13 126 11,841 71 2
12 5,852 888 3,241 158 99 144 68 19 190 12,146 69 2

.... 71 2 8 ...... ...... 65 1 ...... 35 1,346 2 ..
4 ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... .... ......... .. .. 1... .. ....
57 ...... 31 ............ 15 7 .... 13 135 ............
17 ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ........ 3 1 .....
.... 70 ..... 99 .................. 1 ..... 6 40 ............
220 33 117 ..... 2 ..... 1 1 3 243 5 ..
S 10 .... 2 .......... 1 1 4 .................


County




State 1953...
State 1954...
State 1955...

Alachua.....
Baker.......
Bay.........
Bradford....
Brevard ....
Broward.....
Cahoun.....
Charlotte ...
Citrus.......
Clay........
Collier ......
Columbia....
Dade.......
DeSoto......
Dixie ......
Duval......
Escambia....
Flagler.....
Franklin....
Gadsden.....
Gilchrist.....
Glades....
Gulf........
Hamiton...
Hardee.....
Hendry ....
Hernando...
Highlands...
Hillsborough.
Holmes.....
IndianRiver.
Jackson...
Jefferson. ..
Lafayette....
Lake......
Lee.........
Leon.......
Levy .......
Liberty .....
Madison....
Manatee...
Marion......
Martin.....
Monroe....
Nassau ....
Okaloosa....
Okeechobee..
Orange .....
Osceola....
Palm Beach.
Pasco.......
Pinellas ....
Polk .......
Putnam....
St. Johns....
St. Lucle...
Santa Rosa..
Sarasota....
Seminole. ...
Sumter......
Suwannee...
Taylor......
Union.......
Volusia.....
Wakulla.....
Walton......
Washington .


1 ...... 1 1 ..::::: .. ::
1 2 5 ................
...... ...... ...... ... .. ........ .







PREVENTABLE DISEASES


TABLE 24 (continued)

TOTALS OF REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, BY COUNTIES,

FLORIDA, 1955, AND STATE TOTALS FOR 1953 AND 1954





o r o a
County I a~0 0 j a I





State 1953... 301 4,206 1,406 1 96 19 1,316 102 1,112 7 959 733 58
State 1954... 303 4,772 279 1 55 11 10,766 96 1,516 17 747 1,777 84
State 1955... 262 3,551 157 1 1 1,49 8 1,933 16 731 466 77


Alachua........... 867
Baker....... ........
Bay......... 15 298
Bradford........ ....
Brevard..... 5 17
Broward..... 7 13
Calhoun..... ..... 126
Charlotte.... ... 37
Citrus..... .........
Clay....... ..... 1
Cdllier...... 6 24
Columbia.... ..... ......
Dade...... 93 11
DeSoto...... ..... 42
Dixie....... ...
Duval....... 11 115
Escambia.... 32 2
Flagler........... 11
Franklin......... 47
Gadsden.... ..... 59
Gilchrist..... .... .....
Glades...... ..... 15
Gulf............. 34
Hamilton......... 1
Hardee...... 1 128
Hendry..... 1 38
Hernando... ..... 1
Highlands... 1 43
Hillsborough. 19 78
Holmes..... ..... 3
Indian River. ..... 31
Jackson..... 6 326
Jefferson.... ..... 39
Lafayette.... .... 1
Lake........ 3 139
Lee......... 18 62
Leon........ 1 231
Levy.... ...........
Liberty...... .... 125
Madison..... 119
Manatee.... 1 169
Marion...... ..... 3
Martin...... 8 5
Monroe..... .........
Nassau...... .........
Okaloosa....... .... 104
Okeechobee.. ........
Orange...... 16 50
Osceola...... .... 45
Palm Beach. 1 22
Pasco....... 2 18
Pinellas..... 3 84
Polk........ 6 18
Putnam ..... 1 17
St. Johns.... ........
St. Lucie.... 1
Santa Rosa.. 2 62
Sarasota.... .... .....
Seminole.... ..... 6
Sumter...... ..... 7
Suwannee. 1 1
Taylor...... ..... 73
Union....... .... 10
Volusia..... 2 84
Wakulla..... ..... 24
Walton...... ..... 58
Washington ..... 38


20


27
7

. .......







1






5
9
6
6

9








2


2

4
.....i.
















1
1
1.


... i..











4






















1


1


2


18i

25
21



12
1
837

54
40
1
2
4
29

4

5
48
9
4
8
8
61
14
135
10
51
7
1
1
88
1

i44
2
123
96
14
99

3


14
20
3
2
17

12 i


..... i

.... i
18i
7












1
1










1
2
2




2

2
1







1
1
1








2


ii....
14

20
21
18i

13

2

103
2
1







220

14


73
56
48


5
8
38
46


82
112
250
2
60
28
2
3

17
2

81
14
4
2


" i

2
......I

6
1









2












i


2

4
2
2


4
383


70





........i

1
4
134

2
1
8
2
12
i
1
2

2
1

1
1

2
2
1
5 "

1


2
1
2

27





163

21










1



18



3
2
4
8
2


8




26
23
27


1





......
8
8


5
1
1

1

1


1


2
2





1
1




2
1
2
4




2
1

8
1



1
1
2
8
3
2


1
1




.. .....
..............................


...... I ...... I


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~'~ ~ ~ ''~ ' ''







78 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

TABLE 24 (continued)
TOTALS OF REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, BY COUNTIES,
FLORIDA, 1955, AND STATE TOTALS FOR 1953 AND 1954



g |e t 54







State1954....... 196 2 63 632 6,894 59 0 2,461 3 31 5 839
County P a ~

EH E .0


State 1953.........103 0 91 692 6,722 44 1 2,424 7 41 10 209
State 1954.........196 2 63 632 6,894 59 0 2,461 8 31 5 339
State 1955....... 167 1 223 726 5,541 53 1 2,253 5 56 11 1,080
Alachua............... ...... ...... 1 69 1 .... ...... ........ 2
Baker........... ...... ...... 1 1 8 ...... .......... 1 .. .........
Bay... 2 1 ...... ....... 4..... 2 16 2 1........... .... 1
Bradford............................. 10 ...... ... 11 .....................
Brevard......... 11...... 6 9 54...... .... 29 ........... ...... 11
Broward......... ...... ....... 2 18 484 1 ..... 91 ..... 2...... 82
Calhoun......... .... .................. 4 1 ...... 4 ...... 1 ..... .....
Charlotte........ ............ 8 ...... 10 ...... ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 7
Citrus........... ... ... ...... ...... ... ...... ...... ... ....
Clay............ 1 ...... ...... 8 18 ............ 12 .......................
Collier........... ...... 1 4 88 ............ 10 .................. 18
Columbian............ .................. 40 1 ...... 12 .. ...........
Dade........... 6 ..... 16 78 1,175 11 ..... 432 ...... 7 ...... 336
DeSoto.......... ...... ........ ...... 28 1 ...... 5 ...... ..... ...... 3
Dixie............: .. .. ..... .. 2 ..... ..... .... .
Duval........... 29 ...... 22 208 924 4 ...... 247 1 9 2 50
Escambia........ ...... 1 36 414 7 ...... 86 1 3 ...... 110
Flagler.............................. 6 ............ 2 .. .......... .. .......
Franklin........ ............. .... 1 11 ............ 6 ..... 1 ..... 2
Gadsden...................... ..... ...... 107 ......... 33 ............ 1 ......
Gilchrist .........8........ ... ... .. 1 ......................
Glades........... ..... ............. 4 ..... .......... .........................
Gulf........... ............. ....... ...... 6 ............ 2 ................ .....
Hamilton........ ..... ........ ......... 11 ...... ...... 6 ............ ..... 2
Hardee.......... ...... ...... ...... 3 ..... ..... 2 ...... ..... ....... 1
Hendry.......... .. .... 1..... ...... 1...... ...... 2 ............ ....... 6
Hernando........ ..... ..............8 .... .. 2 ........... ............
Highlands...... 1...... 1 7 39 ...... ..... 12 ...... ...... ...... 20
Hillsborough................ 16 115 279 4 ...... 220 1 3 ...... 136
Holmes......... ....... ...... ........ 1............. 11...... ... .. ......
Indian River..... ...... ...... 1..... 14............ 8 ...
Jackson........... ..... ........ ... .... .. 24 ...... ...... 26 2 1 1 2
Jefferson........ ..... ...... ...... d 13 ...... ...... 3 ............ ....... 8
Lafayette........ ...... ...... ............. 1 ..... .................
Lake........... .... ...... 1 1 43 1 .. 42.................. 12
Lee ............ .... ...... 131 6 43 ...... ...... 15 ............ ........ 2
Leon........... 68 ..... 2 12 87 1 ..... 21 ...... ...... 1 5
Levy........... ......... .. 1...... 1............ ........... ......
Liberty........ ... ...... .. .... ..... ... ..................
Madison......... ..... 2..0.. ............. 9 ...... 2 2 5
Manatee................ 1 5 41 2 1 23 .................... 9
Marion......... 8 ...... ...... 1 36 ...... ...... 16 ............ ...... ....
Marion.......... 16
M artin. ......... ...... .... ...... 2 21 1 ...... 11 ...... ...... ....... 2
M onroe.......... .... 1 3 42 1 ...... 12 ...... 1 ...... 25
Nassau......... ..... .. ..... ...... 10 ...... ...... 8 ...... 1...... 1
Okaloosa......... ................. 2 17 ...... ...... 16 ...... ...... ...... 27
Okeechobee........ ............ .... ...... 4 ............. 1..... 1 ...... 1
Orange.......... ...... ...... 2 47 187 1 ...... 159 ...... 1 ...... 44
Osceola........... 1 ...... 1 3 14 ...... ...... 14 .......................
Palm Beach....................... .. 15 237 4 ...... 120 ...... 3 ..... 66
Pasco............ ......... 2 1 11 ...... .... 16 ..... 2 1 4
Pinellas.......... 26 ...... 4 26 194 1 ...... 119 ...... 8 ...... 24
Polk............. ...... ..... 3 16 269 2 ...... 94 ...... 6 ...... 22
Putnam......... ....... ............ 12 34 3 ...... 2 ................ .....
St. Johns........ ...... ............ ...... 15 ...........110 ...... ........... .....
St Lucie......... ...... ........ .. ....... 51...... ...... 9 ...... 1 ...... 15
Santa Rosa....... ...... ..... ...... 8 9 ...... ...... 11 ...... .... ...... 1
Sarasota......... ...... ...... ...... 22 36 1 ...... 22 ......
Seminole......... 2 ...... ..... 34 114 2 ...... 19 ....... .. 1 2
Sumter.......... .... .... .............. 13 ...... ..... 8 ........ ...... 2
Suwannee...... .......... ....... .. 4 11...... .... .. 11...... 1 ...... 4
Taylor.................................. 10 ...... ...... 6 ...... ...... ...... 10
Union.. ....... ............ ..... ...... 4 ...... ...... 21.................. ....
Volusia.......... 5..... 2 103 1..... 52..... 1..... 2
Wakulla......... ........ 4............ .
W alton ............ .... .. ............ 10 ........ 9 .. ..
Washington...... ....................... ...
*Includes Paratyphoid Fever
**Includes Streptococcal Infection







PREVENTABLE DISEASES


DIVISION OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL

JOHN H. ACKERMAN, M.D., M.P.H., Director

In 1955, we had several changes in the personnel of the Division:
Philip M. Fox, M.D., former Director of the Jacksonville Venereal
Disease Clinic left to take up a residency in Radiology at the Veterans
Administration Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Michael J. Takos,
M.D., Director of the Dade County Venereal Disease Clinic, Miami,
left to secure his M.P.H. degree at Harvard University. John H. Acker-
man, M.D., was appointed Director of the Division; Donald B. Flitman,
M.D., was assigned as Director of the Jacksonville Venereal Disease
Clinic; James A. Donaldson, M.D., was assigned as Director of Polk
County Venereal Disease Control; and H. Donald Hill, M.D., was
assigned as Director of the Dade County Venereal Disease Clinic.

Several needed new interviewer-investigators were added to the staff
and assigned to areas of high incidence that formerly had not been
covered due to lack of personnel.

The U. S. Public Health Service held a regional Venereal Disease
Control Seminar for Regions III, IV, and VII (16 southern states, the
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) at Miami
Beach on April 20-21. This seminar was both interesting and instruc-
tive with a free exchange of ideas for improving case-finding, diagnosis,
and treatment of the venereal diseases. Attendance was exceedingly good
with representatives from the armed forces, private physicians, and
health workers from the three regions, for a total registration of over
three hundred.

During September, October and November a series of V.D. Control
Institutes for nurses was conducted in eight strategically located centers
throughout the state. These institutes were held for the purpose of
stressing the participation of the nurse in the V. D. control program.
A well rounded agenda was arranged by the Nursing Bureau, with the
V. D. Nurse Consultant from Region IV; Director of Division of Public
Health Nursing, Florida State Board of Health; Director of Venereal
Disease Control Division, Florida State Board of Health; and others.
Many lively discussions took place and it was the general opinion that
these institutes proved to be informative and stimulating and will result
in a further strengthening of our control program.

Selective blood testing was carried out by survey teams in Escambia,
Polk, and Seminole Counties resulting in 17,674 persons being tested
with 1,572 positive tests or a positivity rate of 8.9 per cent. In con-
junction with the blood testing for syphilis the survey teams also drew
blood specimens on persons thirty years of age and over to test for
elevated blood sugar as a diabetes case-finding program.







80 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


We have always enjoyed and benefited from the fine co-operative ef-
forts of our private physicians in the field of Venereal Disease Control.
The activity during the past year is an outstanding example of what
can, and has been accomplished through the combined efforts of private
physicians and public health workers.

In 1955, a total of 5,541 cases of syphilis were reported compared with
a total of 6,894 cases in 1954; a reduction of 19.6 per cent in total
cases. Even more encouraging is the fact that there was a reduction of
12 per cent in primary and secondary syphilis cases and a reduction of
25.6 per cent in early latent syphilis cases. In 1955 there were 394
primary and secondary cases reported against 448 in 1954; early latent
syphilis cases reported were 1,329 compared with 1,786 in 1954.

Follow-up of contacts of infectious cases reported by private physicians
increased from 70 in 1954 to 111 in 1955 or an increase of 58.6 per
cent. The TPI (Treponema Pallidum Immobilization) test was used
in 115 diagnostic problem cases in 1955 compared with only 17 in
1954.

Gonorrhea cases reported showed a slight increase during the past
year with 12,146 cases reported compared with 11,841 cases in 1954.

The so-called minor venereal diseases (chancroid, granuloma inguinale,
and lymphopathia venereum) remain at about the same level as in
1954.

Although great strides have been made in the control of the venereal
diseases we still have a long way to go. With a syphilis rate of 152.1
per hundred thousand population, a gonorrhea rate of 333.4 per hundred
thousand population, and blood test survey positivity rates of 9 per
cent, we must not only continue; we must intensify our casefinding
program if we are to achieve control over these diseases.

Table number 25 gives the number of syphilis cases reported by
stage of infection and race, and results of diagnostic observations for
venereal diseases by year from 1948 through 1955.

Table number 26 gives the number of venereal disease cases reported
by disease and stage of infection for 1951-1955.

Table number 27 gives the number of syphilis cases reported by
county for 1955.









PREVENTABLE DISEASES


TABLE 25
SYPHILIS CASES REPORTED BY STAGE OF INFECTION AND RACE,
AND RESULTS OF DIAGNOSTIC OBSERVATIONS FOR VENEREAL
DISEASES, FLORIDA 1948 1955

SYPHILIS CASES REPORTED
V. D. DIAGNOSTIC
OBSERVATIONS
BY STAGE BY RACE









1954 6,894 448 1786 4,366 294 1,469 5,300 125 171,206 17,112 10.0
o< aa a 03 0


1955 5,541 894 1,829 8,616 202 1,414 8,988 194 82,587 15,541 18.8
1954 6,894 448 1,786 4,366 294 1,469 6,300 125 171,206 17,112 10.0
1953 6,722 585 2,245 3,648 244 1,706 4,894 122 163,181 15,628 9.6
1952 10,824 785 3,870 5,730 439 2,347 8,284 193 132,360 13,967 10.2
1951 9,445 1,111 8,188 4,711 435 2,335 6,914 196 163,054 18,070 11.1
1950 10,784 1,510 3,997 4,833 444 2,750 8,034 159,666 28,992 18.2
1949 12,405 2,874 4,817 4,731 483 2,857 9,548 156,894 38,126 24.4
1948 15,395 4,847 5,178 4,844 615 3,344 12,140 137,998 35,556 25.8
*Included in White




















TABLE 26

REPORTED CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASE, 1951-1955

Granuloma Lympho-
Year Syphilis Gonorrhea Chancroid Inguinale pathia OPH. Total
Venereum NEO. V. D.
1955............ 5,541 12,146 388 69 51 16 18,211
1954............ 6,894 11,841 44 71 55 17 19,222
1953............ 6,722 11,459 828 109 96 7 18,721
1952........... 10,824 11,809 462 233 120 20 23,468
1951............ 9,445 12,70 317 417 40 14 22,942






82 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

TABLE 27

TOTAL NUMBER OF SYPHILIS CASES REPORTED BY STAGE OF
INFECTION, PREGNANCY STATUS, RACE AND SEX, SOURCE OF
REPORT, BY COUNTIES, FLORIDA, 1955

SOURCE OF
STAGE OF INFECTION RACE AND SEX REPORT

WHITE COLORED




0df 3 ... 1
COUNTY o 0


STATEv............. 541 233 1 1,329 3,616 202 185 718 696 1,8752,058 194 2218 2911 412
Alachua............. 69 44 2 1 15 25 1 3 11 5 27 26 3 183 26 10
Bakerl ......... .... ..... .......... ... 2 ...... .....
Bayro.......... ...2 1 8 9 16 8 1 7 10 14 ... 12 2
Bradford............ 1 .....1 ..... 4..... 1 6 3
Brevard............. 53 4 1 10 8 1 4 7 1 0 17 1 12 51 1
Broward .......... 484 28 2 53 11 14 45 40 168 218 1 83 27 3
Calhoun............ 5 57... 27 251 789 51 24 201 183 378 367 46 50 66 4...
Charlotte............ 1.......... 4 6 .....1 3 2 1 4 .... 13 1
Citrus.............. ...3 ..... .......... 1 2 ........ 1 ..... 1 2 .....
Collier ............. 9 18 1 2 10 10 17 1 12 25 1
Columbia .......... 40 1 2 3 4 2 4 2 19 14 1 6 27 7
Dadge. ............ 1,175 57 27 224 201 183 378 367 46 510 616 49
DeSotoFr ............ 1 ..... 1 ..... 4 2 7 4 1. 13 5

ixiadsden ... 26 ..... 1 8 17 ... 6 2 2 10 11 1 5 17 4
Dilchrist .............. 3 ............ ...1 2............. 1 2 1.... 2 .... 12
DuvaI..............924 22 18 287 580 17 19 106 103 317 351 47 228 651 45
Esambia............. 4 6 57 314 33 12 17 29 184 181 3 332 71 11
Flagler.............. ... .. ..... 1 .... 2 2 1 23 1 1
Franklin.............11 2 1 1 7........... 4...... 3 4...... 9 2.
Gadsden ............ 26.... 1 8 17 6 2 2 10 11 1 5 17 4
Gilchrist.............3................ 3................ 1 2........... 2 1
Glades.............. 4 ............... 4 .................... 2 2..... 4 .. ...
Gulf................ 6.......... 4 2.......... I1.... 2 2 1 2
Hamilton ........... 11 1 1 3 6 ......... 1 1 4 5 ..... 5 5 1
Hardee............. 3 .......... 2 1 .. 1 ..... 1 1 ..... 1 1 1
Hendry............. 1 .............. 1 ...................... 1 .............. 1 .....
Hernando............8 1.. 5 2 1 2 i 2 3 ..... 1 7 ...
Highlands ........... 39 1 3 10 3 2 2 6 6 7 20. 14 25 ...
Hillsborough........ 279 9 5 69 185 11 17 48 46 101 81 3 139 102 38
Holmes............. 1...........1 ....... 1................... 1.
Indian River ........ 14 3 1 2 1 3 2 8 2 11 1
Jackson............. 24 ... 2 9 12 1 .... 5 2 6 10 1 11 8 5
Jefferson............ 13 ......... 4 6 .... 2 ..... 5 6 .. 8 2
Lafayette ........... 1............. 1 ...................... 1 .............. ...
Lake............... 43 3 1 11 27 1 2 4 2 17 20 10 31 2
Lee................. 43 4 1 10 27 1 1 9 9 11 11 3 22 21 .....
Leon............... 80 2 1 14 4 9 2 7 7 36 27 8 56 10 14
Levy............... 1 ............... ......... 1...
Liberty............. 3............... ............ 1 2.
Madison : ..20 ......... 20 ..3 1 2 9 7 1 7 11 2
Manatee .......... 41... ... 13 27 1 1 8 7 10 15 1 11 80 ..
Marion ............ 36 1 .. 9 21 5 1 4 4 16 12 .... 20 12 4
Martin............. 21 1 ... 10 8 2 2 2 1 6 12... 8 1 ....
Monroe ............ 42 7 8 7 25 .... 2 8 11 11 12 .. 8 30 4
Nassau .......... 10 2 2 ..... 1 4 5 .... 5 3 2
Okaloosa........... 17 6 2 2 .... 2 4 2 6 5 ... 6 7
Okeechobee........... 4.......... 3 1.... 2 .... 3 ..... 1......... 4 ....
Orange ............ 187 10 10 5 105 6 6 26 30 54 63 14 46 122 19
Osceola ......... 14 1..... 3 10 .... 1 2 3 4 5 ..... 4 10 ...
Palm Beach......... 237 10 8 72 14 4 13 44 35 64 91 3 75 161 1
Pasco .............. 11... 11... ..... 3 4 1 3 ..... 7 4 ...
Pinellas ............ 194 11 3 131 3 5 83 32 45 55 29 4 142 3
Polk .............. 26 7 38 201 1 6 28 19 110 103 1 77 2
Putnam ............ 34 2 5 23 3 1 ... 15 14 ..... 28
St.Johns........... 1 2 1 5 6 1 2 2 2 4 6 1..... 10
St. Lucie........... 51 4..... 25 26 ...
Santa Rosa.......... 9 ..... ... 1 7 1 2 2 2 2 ..... 7 2 ...
Sarasota ........... 36 ..... 7 27 ..... .2 4 5 4 21 2 8 28 ...
Seminole ............ 114 6 4 25 79 .. 8 3 7 47 55 2 43 69 2
Sumter ............. 13 ... ... 6 6 1 1 1 1 6 5 ..... 11 1 1
Suwannee........... ..... 1 1 3 4 2 .... 11 ....
Taylor ............. 10.......... 1 8 1 1 2 4 3 4 1
Union............ ... ........ .... 1 3 ..... 2 1 1
Volusia............. 103 5 8 27 61 2 3 16 14 28 41 4 31 58 14
Wakulla ............ 4.......... 1 .. ... 1 1 2 1... 3.... 1
Walton ............. 10 1..... 4 5..... 1 1 2 2 5.... 7 3..-
Washington ........ 1.......... 4........... .... 4..... 2 2 1
State Hospital....... 91........... 3 88......... 13 1 30 1....... 9
Fed. Prison (Leon Co.) 7 .......... ... 7 ..... ..... 1 .... 1 4 1 1 ..... 6







PREVENTABLE DISEASES


CANCER CONTROL

L. L. PARKS, M.D., M.P.H., Director

Education and service are the two principal objectives of the Cancer
Control program. Cancer continues to be the second leading cause of
death. The actual number of cases is not known because the number
reported is very small. There were 5,852 cases reported, an increase
of more than 200 over last year, but the majority of these were obtained
from death certificates. Some cases were reported through the state aid
program, and a very small percentage by private physicians.

The educational part of the program consists primarily of assistance
to the American Cancer Society, Florida Division, through the distri-
bution of literature, providing films and talks on cancer.

The principal emphasis has been placed upon service to the patient
by providing diagnostic service through the tumor clinics and hospitali-
zation of those patients that need this care. There are nineteen tumor
clinics in operation. One new clinic was added during the year in
Panama City. The tumor clinics are located as follows: Pensacola,
Tallahassee, Panama City, two in Jacksonville, Gainesville, Ocala,
Tampa, St. Petersburg, Daytona Beach, Orlando, Lakeland, Sarasota,
Bradenton, West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, two in Miami Beach,
and one in Miami.

Patients coming under this program are first seen by a physician who
initiates an application for state aid. The patient signs a statement that
he is indigent, and after this is verified by the local health officer or
local welfare agency the application is forwarded to the state health
department and reviewed. If approved the patient is referred to the
tumor clinic nearest his home. Efforts are made in each of these steps
to see that only indigent patients are accepted. It is interesting to note
that of the applications reaching the state office in 1955 only 17 were
rejected. Seven of these were too far advanced for assistance, three were
considered able to pay their own expenses, five were non-malignant,
and two were out-of-state residents.

Facilities for the tumor clinics are provided by the hospitals. The
physicians that take care of patients in the tumor clinics give their time,
and the hospital is paid only a very small fee for diagnostic tests done
in the out-patient department. If a patient is hospitalized under this
program, the hospital is paid a per diem allowance based upon its
cost statement. This cannot exceed a maximum of $17.00 per day un-
less there are some unusual circumstances. The tumor clinic secretary,
as a rule, is paid from funds provided by the state, and a nurse is pro-
vided in some of the larger clinics. In a few of the smaller clinics a
part-time secretary is paid by the Cancer Society. As a rule, the Cancer







84 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

Society assists in the operation of tumor clinics by providing funds for
office and clinic supplies. Budgets for the tumor clinics are worked
out between the State Cancer Society and the State Board of Health
so that there will not be an overlapping of responsibilities and services.
The Florida Cancer Council which consists of two physicians from
the Cancer Committee of the State Medical Association, two from the
American Cancer Society, Florida Division, one representing the Ameri-
can College of Surgeons, and two from the State Board of Health had
two meetings during the year. This Council has continued to act as an
advisory body on the over-all cancer problems in the state. Its purpose
is to coordinate all of the services of the official and voluntary agencies.

In the operation of tumor clinics, the standards recommended by the
American College of Surgeons have been adhered to by the State Board
of Health. To get the approval of the American College of Surgeons
on and after January 1, 1956, each clinic must set up a cancer registry,
which will contain an abstract of the clinical record of all patients seen
in the tumor clinic and at the hospital where tumor clinics are in opera-
tion. We believe the registry will be very helpful in evaluating the types
of treatment that are given in each of the hospitals and will be useful in
following up and determining the results of treatment given the patients.
Efforts have been made during the year to get the tumor registries into
operation, and the Cancer Society has agreed to provide the necessary
record forms. The record which was adopted will be used in each of the
tumor clinics. In the past, the majority of the tumor clinics have had
the approval of the American College of Surgeons, and efforts have
been made to have all the tumor clinics meet their standards.

Following the recommendations of the Florida Cancer Council in-
creased effort has been made (in co-operation with the Florida Society
of Pathologists) to encourage the use of cytological procedures in the early
diagnosis of cancer. It is believed that this means of diagnosis should
be given more attention, but detailed plans have not yet been made.
Arrangements have been made to have an exhibit on cancer (provided
by the U. S. Public Health Service) emphasizing the field of cytology
at the next Florida Medical Association meeting.
The hospitals of the state have been advised to make routine chest
X-rays of hospital admissions for the purpose of detecting early lung
cancer cases as well as other pathology.
Material was prepared and sent to the physicians of the state urging
a five-point cancer detection examination. Special emphasis was placed
upon the detection of cancer of the skin, oral cavity, breast, female
genitalia, and rectum. The response on the part of the physicians to
this program was most satisfactory.
Plans for conducting the Cross-Road Seminars during the year did
not materialize; however, in the past years these conferences, at which








PREVENTABLE DISEASES 85

an authority on cancer met with the local physicians, were thought
to have been very helpful. The three-day cancer seminar for physicians
was not scheduled for this year, but plans are being made to hold one
in Jacksonville during the coming year.

The number of patients receiving aid increased from 1399 cases in
1954 to 1903 during 1955, as shown in Table 32. There were more
funds available for the program during the year; however, the main
reason for the increase in number of patients was due to the assistance
rendered patients in Dade and Duval Counties. Prior to this year only
a few residents of Dade and Duval counties were given assistance under
this program because of the limited state funds and because these
counties had excellent facilities for taking care of their indigent cases.

It will be noted in Table 28 that the proportion of patients that were
found to have cancer when applying at the tumor clinic has dropped
from 79.5 per cent in 1947 to 45.7 per cent in 1955. This is encouraging
in that it shows that patients are applying earlier for treatment when
cancer is suspected.

It is noted in Table 29 that skin cancer is the principal site in the
white male cases, the female genital organs is the main site in the white
female as well as the colored female, and the digestive system is the
principal site in the colored male.

Table 30 shows that although the majority of patients lost to follow-up
are lost during the first year, this number has diminished, and currently
the per cent of patients lost during the first year is less than one-third
what it was in 1947. Table 31 shows the per cent of patients surviving
at the end of five years, according to the site at which the cancer occurs.

In cooperation with the Bureau of Tuberculosis, efforts have been
made to follow-up patients showing masses or tumors on chest films
made in tuberculosis surveys. A total of 298 inquiries were mailed to the
county health departments to determine if the patients were given further
studies. Of this number, 189 replies were received-63 per cent of the
total number studied. Of the replies received a diagnosis could not be
obtained on 62 -or 33 per cent of them. Of those diagnosed, 100
were reported to be negative for tumor, eight were reported as having
a benign tumor, and nineteen were reported as being malignant, ten
per cent of the total number of replies received.
Efforts will continue to be directed toward urging individuals with
suspected lesions or symptoms of cancer to report to their physicians
for diagnosis, to provide diagnostic service and hospital care for the
indigent, and to work with the physician in the field of cytology.










86 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 28

DISTRIBUTION BY DIAGNOSTIC STATUS, RACE AND SEX OF PERSONS
APPROVED FOR STATE AID UNDER THE FLORIDA CANCER PROGRAM
DURING THE YEARS 1947*-1955

DIAGNOSTIC STATUS

NUMBER OF PERSONS PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION

RACE, SEX
o *
AND YEAR o
0.

s I e b I


Total persons........ 12,722 6,878 41 4,649 1,154 100. 54.1 0.8 86.5 9.1
1947*................... 205 163 ...... 37 5 100. 79. ...... 18.0 2.4
1948 ................... 1,52 823 3 409 117 100. 60.9 0.2 80.3 8.7
1949 ................... 1,059 645 2 331 81 100. 60.9 0.2 81.3 7.6
1950................... 1,688 930 5 611 142 100. 55.1 0.3 36.2 8.4
1951................... 1,688 933 5 576 124 100. 57.0 0.8 35.2 7.6
1952................... 1,677 873 8 623 173 100. 62.1 0 87.1 10.3
1963................... 1,643 842 18 633 155 100. 51.2 0.8 38.5 9.4
1954.................. 1,594 817 2 694 81 100. 51.3 0.1 43.5 5.1
1955 ................... 1,866 852 8 735 276 100. 45.7 0.2 39.4 14.8
White Male.............. 4,007 2,506 17 1,12 861 100. 62.5 0.4 28.0 9.0
White Female............ 5,483 2,798 2,232 42 100. 51.0 0.4 40.7 7.9
Colored Male........... 1,026 486 1 406 183 100. 47.4 0.1 89.6 18.0
Colored Female. ......... 2,206 1,088 2 888 228 100. 49.3 0.1 40.3 10.3
*1947 total includes 7 persons approved for State Aid in November and December. 1946.





TABLE 29

DISTRIBUTION ACCORDING TO SITE, RACE AND SEX OF CANCER CASES
ADMITTED TO THE FLORIDA STATE AID CANCER PROGRAM
DURING THE YEARS 1947* -1955

NUMBER OF PERSONS PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION
SITE
Total WM WF CM CF Total WM WF CM CF
Total............... 6,878 2,506 2,798 486 1,08 100. 100. 100. 100. 100.
Buccal Cavity........... 463 281 89 55 38 6.7 11.2 3.2 11.3 3.5
Digestive System......... 647 241 177 154 75 9.4 9.6 6.3 31.7 6.9
Respiratory System....... 877 243 54 65 1 5.5 9.7 1.9 13.3 1.4
Breast.................. 693 4 427 5 25 10.1 0.2 15.3 1.0 28.6
Female Genital.......... 1,66..... 985 ..... 581 22.8 ..8... 35.2 ...... 5.4
Male Genital ............ 178 88 ...... 90 ...... 2.6 3. ..... 18....
Urinary... ....... 180 92 41 27 20 2.6 3.7 1.5 5.6 1.8
Skin................... 2,55 1,398 889 81 37 34.2 55.8 31.8 6.4 8.4
Other Sites............... 289 107 99 9 44 4.2 4. 3.5 8.0 4.0
Lymph. and Haem. Tissues 130 52 37 20 21 1.9 2.1 1.3 4.1 1.9
*Includes 6 persons approved for State Aid in November and December, 1946.










PREVENTABLE DISEASES


TABLE 30

NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CANCER CASES UNTRACED AFTER


EACH YEAR


OF FOLLOW-UP ACCORDING TO CALENDAR
YEAR OF ENTRY TO PROGRAM


CUMULATIVE CASES UNTRACED AFTER EACH
Cases YEAR OF FOLLOW-UP
Entering
Calendar Year Program
During Number Percentage
Calendar
Year 1st 2nd 8rd 4th 5th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 6th
year year year year year year year year year year
1947* ........ 148 7 8 8 8 8 4.7 6.4 .4 5.4 5.4
1948 ....... 735 26 86 46 55 57 3.5 4.9 6.3 7.5 7.8
1949......... 590 15 28 43 61 60 2.5 4.7 7.3 8.6 10.2
1950......... 824 20 32 8 43 ...... 2.4 3.9 4.6 5.2 ......
1951......... 812 25 40 56 ............ .1 4.9 6.9 ...........
1952......... 7 4 14 80 ...... ...... ...... 1.9 4.1 .................
1953. ....... 660 10 ................. .1...... .. ......... ......
Based on follow-up experience of 4503 cancer cases receiving monetary assistance during the
year of admission under the Florida State Aid Cancer Program, 1947*-1953.
*Includes 5 cases approved for State Aid in November and December, 1946.


















TABLE 31


PER CENT OF CANCER PATIENTS SURVIVING
YEAR OF FOLLOW-UP, BY SITE


AFTER EACH


PER CENT SURVIVING AT
SITE
1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years
Total.......................... 74.6 62.6 55.0 50.0 46.4
Buccal Cavity ....................... 70.3 55.5 48.1 41.8 39.1
Digestive System ..................... 37.3 25.2 19.1 15.3 13.9
Respiratory System ................... 36.5 25.3 18.9 14.9 13.9
Breast............................ 76.6 61.9 50.1 41.9 86.5
Female Genital...................... 78.6 67.8 49.1 45.1 42.7
Skin................................. 94.5 87.9 81.6 76.2 71.4
Other Sites (Residual)................. 59.6 67.9 46.7 42.4 87.4
Based on follow-up experience of 4503 cancer cases receiving monetary assistance during the year
of admission under the Florida State Aid Cancer Program, November 1946 through December
1953. (Excludes those refusing treatment.)









88 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955


TABLE 32

NEW PERSONS APPROVED FOR STATE AID, NUMBER OF PERSONS
RECEIVING FINANCIAL AID, AND EXPENDITURES, BY COUNTY,
FLORIDA CANCER PROGRAM 1954 AND 1955

New Persons Persons Re- Total Expenditures
County Approved ceiving Aid

1954 1955 1954 1955 1954 1955

State Total................. 1,594 1,866 1,399 1,903 $135,673.30 $209,049.67
Alachua................... 220 27 22 32 2,871.49 2,905.39
Baker ................. 10 14 8 9 682.00 559.25
Bay...................... 28 32 20 38i 2,028.00 3,313.25
Bradford.................. 25 18 25 17 2,158.89 2,722.85
Brevard.................. 12 15 11 1 1,665.45 2,075.06
Broward .............. 33 37 24 34 1,923.65 3,438.08
Calhoun.................. 32 21 23 21 1,108.42 2,621.97
Charlotte...... ........ 5 13 3 9 174.22 1,100.38
Citrus..a6.. 4 4 1,353.21 358.75
Citrus .................... 3 6 4 18 1,353.21 358.75
Clay................... 19 18 14 1 2,33.70 1,219.15
Collier....... ......... 19 20 12 19 1,272.35 4,579.25
Columbia.................. 26 31 18 19 1,842.72 2,355.44
Dade..................... 50 122 42 24 2,837.50 28,424.60
DeSoto.................... 26 16 12 8 1,217.13 902.75
Dixie .................... 8 10 5 8 410.50 124.50
Duval.................... 16 27 12 3 2,190.60 6,100.74
Escambia.................. 103 120 66 104 5,447.95 10,493.76
Flagler................... 7 7 3 4 22.25 313.50
Franklin.................. 19 14 9 14 282.50 1,631.79
Gadsden........... .... 33 5 29 24 2,361.59 597.75
Gilchrist .................. 8 8 4 249.20 288.66
Glades. ................... 5 2 4 1 88.50 85.00
Gulf ................... 10 12 14 18 2,004.19 2,026.77
Hamilton................. 16 13 13 12 1,758.50 1,642.21
Hardee ................... 12 13 13 8 468.50 660.25
Hendry ................. 11 8 3 5 159.00 120.00
Hernando................ 4 12 4 6 355.33 582.75
Highlands ................ 18 24 16 18 1,072.35 3,432.64
Hillsborough............... 97 161 108 190 10,656.71 19,527.35
Holmes .................. 27 33 20 33 1,451.25 2,069.00
Indian River.......... ..... 13 10 11 11 397.57 1,391.25
Jackson ................ 48 58 39 43 3,262.90 4,624.81
Jefferson.................. 11 10 13 12 1,470.72 483.64
Lafayette ................ 6 8 6 4 682.60 797.00
Lake ................... 22 21 11 18 1,212.50 2,170.26
Lee ................... 27 28 18 12 2,119.76 2,196.33
Leon............... .. .. 49 39 51 42 3,208.02 2,482.84
Levy....... .... ......... 6 11 7 9 507.95 913.17
Liberty................. 11 8 5 273.50 568.57
Madison .................. 21 20 18 23 1,416.03 2,135.70
Manatee ................. 33 39 22 33 3,073.95 5,418.15
Marion ................... 12 11 19 13 1,940.36 936.95
Martin................... 11 9 7 5 808.25 1,009.75
Monroe .................. 9 54 32 46 3,371.00 8,054.75
Nassau.................. 23 25 15 23 367.47 2,096.07
Okaloosa ................. 34 44 15 32 677.40 2,208.45
Okeechobee ............... 5 8 4 1 163.25 186.00
Orange ........ ... 28 66 35 58 5,348.35 6,737.80
Osceola .................. 9 18 3 11 251.50 830.92
Palm Beach ............... 46 46 65 54 6,180.00 4,069.75
Paseo .................... 29 31 32 27 3,058.15 3,020.34
Pinellas ................... 55 57 55 62 7,305.85 9,770.55
Polk ..................... 30 51 48 68 4,860.70 7,183.88
Putnam .................. 47 40 46 51 4,686.22 4,082.38
St. Johns ................. 16 14 14 18 3,108.64 2,254.55
St. Lucie................... 24 15 16 16 1,703.16 1,502.50
Santa Rosa............... 26 29 20 32 1,896.50 1,893.73
Sarasota................... 24 14 27 18 2,822.54 1.342.50
Seminole .................. 24 32 21 24 3,519.86 3,852.79
Sumter................... 12 23 8 16 771.57 2,084.41
Suwannee ................. 34 26 31 27 3,330.28 1,674.50
Taylor................... 24 20 17 20 1,247.89 1,388.05
Union .................... 10 8 5 8 113.21 225.50
Volusia ................... 35 33 50 45 3,848.67 6,947.27
Wakulla.................... 18 7 11 5 598.03 698.83
Walton.................... 19 19 13 14 668.00 2,096.50
Washington............... 16 27 29 31 2,369.50 2,433.89
*Other ................. .... ... .......... 1,062.50


*Rental (monthly) of radium for use of Bay and Duval Tumor Clinics.








PREVENTABLE DISEASES 89

DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE

JOHN M. McDONALD, M.D.
Director

LABORATORY
With emphasis being placed on atmospheric pollution, a major por-
tion of both the laboratory and field work has been in connection with
this problem. Considerable time and effort was devoted to securing
and assembling the necessary equipment for air sampling and chemical
analysis, as well as to research into analytical procedures.
Through the courtesy of the Polk County Health Department, a
compact portable field generator was made available which enabled
this Division to operate equipment at any advantageous site. It was
thus possible to obtain large volume air samples rather than the small
volume samples collected by the midget impinger.
The determination of urinary lead for employees of the lead storage
battery manufacturing companies and other lead product plants was
continued and most of the companies contacted at least once during
the past year. Division personnel collected 223 samples. Private physi-
cians and hospitals contributed 15 blood and 53 urine samples for
biological lead analysis. Urine analyses for lead included 29 specimens
from a painting crew at Green Cove Springs Naval Station, and several
atmospheric samples from the Jacksonville Naval Air Station. In re-
turn, the industrial hygienist from the latter station assisted in personnel
training.
During a fire in a fertilizer warehouse, some packages of 15 percent
parathion were broken by water used in controlling the fire. In order
to determine if the water supply used by this plant had been con-
taminated, the local health department requested the analysis of two
water samples. Results were negative. Several different soap and de-
tergent compounds which were suspected of being responsible for cases
of dermatitis among restaurant workers, and three rust removing com-
pounds of unknown composition were received for identification of
possible toxic chemicals. Dust counts were made in the wood-working
shop of a furniture manufacturing company.

AIR POLLUTION
The study of air pollution in Polk County mentioned in the 1954
annual report has been continued except for a period of about three
months during which most of the plants were closed because of a strike.
Air sampling was expanded to include airborne fluorides as well as sul-
fur dioxide. Some samples of vegetation such as grass and Spanish
moss were obtained in an effort to define the area of pollution. The
Division of Veterinary Public Health made available the services of a








90 ANNUAL REPORT, 1955

veterinarian for the examination of cattle in the affected area. Some
of the cattle were followed to the slaughter house in order to get speci-
mens of bone from them.

At its 1955 session, the Florida Legislature appointed a committee
to study air pollution in Polk and Hillsborough counties. This committee
has already held three hearings. The subjects discussed were the effect
of the pollution on human beings and the damage done to citrus and
gladioli. The first two meetings were attended by two members of this
Division and the last one by one member.

Complaints about the irritating gas arising from the treatment of phos-
phate rock with sulfuric acid were received from residents of a small
town in West Florida. One brief investigation has already been made
of this condition, but because of lack of personnel the full study has
had to be postponed.

Among the minor air pollution problems, there are several that are of
interest. One of the smaller cities on the east coast received assistance
in dealing with the discharge of smoke from a gas making plant. In
another case a local physician requested information on the dust issuing
from a plant processing perlite. Still another concerned odors arising
from the dredging of the bottom of a portion of Lake Worth.

EDUCATION
The chemist gave several talks on radioactivity to senior students in
local high schools. The director presented various papers on air pollu-
tion to a number of professional groups, and attended several meetings
which were devoted to air pollution.

STUDIES
The study of exposure to solvents in the dry cleaning industry which
was initiated last year was continued and expanded during the present
year. By the end of the year, nearly half of all the dry cleaning industries
in the state had been visited and tests had been made in the working
environment. No serious hazards were encountered but in a large number
of cases it was found that gaskets and valves were defective.
In cooperation with the Jacksonville City Health Department, in-
vestigations were made of the following problems: a soot-fall in North-
east Jacksonville, an objectionable odor arising out of the operations
of a large machine shop, and odors in a dress shop where the air con-
ditioning unit was improperly operated.
At the request of two county health departments, studies were made
of the operation of the chest X-ray machines in those units. Suggestions
and recommendations were made to secure safe operation of the ap-
paratus.








PREVENTABLE DISEASES 91

A long conference was held with the safety supervisor of a power
corporation with respect to setting up periodic examinations for em-
ployees. Assistance was given to the Department of Education in revising
their physical examination form for school bus drivers. The management
of two local plants consulted us on noise measurements and reduction.

PERSONNEL
At the end of April, W. E. MacDonald, Jr., who had been an in-
dustrial hygiene chemist for several years, resigned to accept a position
with the University of Miami. The new chemist is R. L. Hebblethwaite,
who has had a background of analytical chemistry in industrial opera-
tions. This change in personnel inevitably involved some change in the
volume of laboratory work. Mr. Hebblethwaite attended a two-week's
training course for chemists and engineers at the Occupational Health
Field Headquarters of the Public Health Service in Cincinnati. He also
attended a course in Civil Defense given by the Food and Drug Adminis-
tration.

The Occupational Health Field Headquarters of the Public Health
Service loaned an experienced industrial hygiene chemist to the Division
for a period of about ten weeks. He contributed a great deal to the
program of the air pollution study, both in sampling and analytical work.
He assisted in the training of personnel in industrial hygiene techniques.
In spite of his valuable assistance, the laboratory still had a backlog of
samples at the end of the year.

COOPERATION WITH THE FLORIDA
INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION
Cooperation was given to the Florida Industrial Commission in the
revision of their Regulations for Control and Prevention of Occupational
Diseases. This revision was necessary because more than eight years have
elapsed since the regulations were written. In the meantime, many
changes have been worked out in maximum allowable concentrations,
and many new chemicals have been introduced into industrial processes.
At the request of the Commission, studies were made in a plant pro-
ducing ant buttons; in a machine shop where carbon tetrachloride was
being used; and in checking a new process for wood preservation. At
the suggestion of the Commission, arrangements were made with the
Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami to set up blood cholinesterase de-
terminations to assist in the laboratory diagnosis of parathion poisoning.

POLLEN COUNTS
During most of the year, the Tampa Chamber of Commerce operated
two pollen collecting stations in Tampa. The slides were counted in this
office. The counts were considerably lower than those obtained during
the 1950-51 study. A study was begun on the molds in the air in Jack-