<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Members of the Florida state board...
 Official staff Florida state board...
 County health officers
 Florida state board of health
 Table of Contents
 General summary
 Report of assistant to the state...
 Bureau of finance and accounts
 Bureau of vital statistics
 Local health services
 Bureau of preventable diseases
 Bureau of tuberculosis control
 Laboratory services
 Maternal and child health
 Bureau of dental health
 Division of nutrition and diabetes...
 Bureau of sanitary engineering
 Bureau of narcotics
 Divisoin of health information


PALMM UFSPEC



Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00021
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: 1951
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
System ID: AM00000243:00021
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    Letter of transmittal
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Members of the Florida state board of health
        Page iv
    Official staff Florida state board of health
        Page v
    County health officers
        Page vi
    Florida state board of health
        Page vii
    Table of Contents
        Page viii
    General summary
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Report of assistant to the state health officer
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Bureau of finance and accounts
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Bureau of vital statistics
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Local health services
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Bureau of preventable diseases
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Bureau of tuberculosis control
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Laboratory services
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
    Maternal and child health
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
    Bureau of dental health
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
    Division of nutrition and diabetes control
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
    Bureau of sanitary engineering
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    Bureau of narcotics
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    Divisoin of health information
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
Full Text




FLORIDA
STATE BOARD


HEALTH
1951


195t
1


614 -
E65r


I- BB I







Annual Report


State Board of Health

State of ylorida


1951





The following statistical reports will be published separately:
SUPPLEMENTAL I-FLORIDA VITAL STATISTICS, 1951
SUPPLEMENTAL II-FLORIDA MORBIDITY STATISTICS, 1951


WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D.
STATE HEALTH OFFICER
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA




6 1q


The Honorable HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Pensacola, Florida

Dear Dr. Bryans:

I herewith submit the annual report of the Flor-
ida State Board of Health for the year ending
December 31, 1951.

Sincerely yours,

WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D.
State Health Officer

May 1, 1952
Jacksonville, Florida



















His Excellency, FULLER WARREN
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida

Sir:

I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the period January 1,
1951, to December 31, 1951, inclusive.

Respectfully submitted,

HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D.
President

May 1, 1952
Pensacola, Florida






















Members of the
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


HERBERT L. BRYANS, M.D., President
Pensacola

EDWARD L. FLYNN, D.D.S.
Tampa

ROBERT B. McIVER, M.D.
Jacksonville

T. M. CUMBIE, Ph.G.
Quincy

MARK F. BOYD, M.D.
Tallahassee









OFFICIAL STAFF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
December 31, 1951

State Health Officer _.--.--._....-------. .. ._Wilson T. Sowder, M.D., M.P.H.
Assistant to State Health Officer....... Knox E. Miller, M.D.

DIRECTORS
Bureau of Local Health Service _..-..... George A. Dame, M.D.
Division of Public Health Nursing.....Ruth E. Mettinger, R.N.
Field Training Center ---..-......---.....-..... Frank M. Hall, M.D., M.P.H.
Field Technical Staff......-------......--....-.Knox E. Miller, M.D., Acting
Bureau of Dental Health ....._.... ....... Floyd H. DeCamp, D.D.S.
Bureau of Preventable Diseases_ Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Venereal Disease ControlWilliam A. Walter, Sr., Asst. Sur-
geon, USPHS
Division of Industrial Hygiene---........John M. McDonald, M.D.
Division of Cancer Control---...--....--. Lorenzo L. Parks, M.D., M.P.H., Act-
ing
Florida Rapid Treatment Center-.......Frank M. Faget, M.D.
Public Health Veterinarian--...-.......... James E. Scatterday, D.V.M.
Bureau of Tuberculosis Control-.......-.. Clarence M. Sharp, M.D.
Bureau of Laboratories ......-........Albert V. Hardy, M.D., Dr. P.H.
Miami Regional Laboratory_--........-_Nathan J. Schneider
Tampa Regional Laboratory- H ........H. D. Venters
Tallahassee Regional Laboratory ..-..Robert A. Graves
Pensacola Regional Laboratory......... Addie V. Bell
Orlando Regional Laboratory......-..-....Max T. Trainer
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health_-_Frances E. M. Read, M.D.
Mental Health-.. ____--...._-...._...Frances E. M. Read, M.D., Acting
Heart Disease Control --------.............-- Frances E. M. Read, M.D., Acting
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering. ..---. David B. Lee, M.S. Engineering
Division of Entomology -----... -...John A. Mulrennan
Bureau of Vital Statistics ...._...Everett H. Williams, Jr., M.S. Hyg.
Bureau of Finance and Accounts -... Fred B. Ragland
Personnel Supervisor ---..._... _-........ Paul T. Baker
Purchasing Agent ------__...... G. Wilson Baltzell
Division of Health Information_._.._ _Elizabeth Reed, R.N.
Division of Nutrition and Diabetes
Control ---- ..__Edward R. Smith, M.D.
Bureau of Narcotics ..-..--......_.....-..... Marshall H. Doss









COUNTY HEALTH OFFICERS
(As of December 31, 1951)

Alachua --.........---------------- ---- Frank M. Hall, M.D., M.P.H.
Baker Nassau .._ ..John W. McClane, M.D.
Bay -- ..--------- -------- ...Albert F. Ullman, M.D.
Bradford Clay Union .--..----... --.. -----.... A. Y. Covington, M.D., M.P.H.
Brevard Osceola -..__....... ... -....-.... William M. Hanrahan, M.D.
Broward ____ __ Paul W. Hughes, M.D., M.P.H..
Calhoun Liberty Gadsden ....W ..Warren T. Weathington, M.D.
Charlotte DeSoto Hardee -..........Robert E. Rice, M.D.
Citrus Levy Hernando ._......J .. John S. Neill, M.D.
Columbia Hamilton Gilchrist .....----.-Joseph C. Weeks, M.D.
Dade --- ----.... ------------------------..T. E. Cato, M.D., M.P.H.
Dixie Suwannee Lafayette .........--- E. H. John, M.D.
Duval ...- --------- Thomas E. Morgan, M.D., M.P.H.
Escambia Santa Rosa -.__. --... .... John C. McSween, M.D.
Flagler Putnam _.._--..... ......Wade N. Stephens, M.D.
Franklin Gulf Wakulla ....---. Terry Bird, M.D., M.P.H.
Glades Highlands Hendry G. L. Beaumont, M.D.
Hillsborough --.. ._ Frank V. Chappell, M.D., M.P.H.
Holmes Okaloosa Walton .__ R. N. Nelson, M.D.
Indian River Okeechobee Martin -
St. Lucie -__- .. Kip G. Kelso, M.D.
Jackson Washington ---Joseph M. Batsche, M.D.
Jefferson Earl K. Langford, M.D.
Lake _.- -.... -.... -----J. Basil Hall, M.D., M.P.H.
Lee ...-------.. ----.--------- -..A. K. Cox, M.D.
Leon ------------ Joseph M. Bistowish, M.D., M.P.H.
Madison Taylor ---....-.......--. ... James L. Wardlaw, Jr., M.D., M.P.H.
Manatee Sarasota .-..............--.---........ William L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H.
Marion -_----- .------ Luther A. Brendle, M.D.
Monroe ...--........---- ------------- ----Raymond J. Dalton, M.D.
Orange ...---- ----------------....- Leland H. Dame, M.D.
Palm Beach ........---------- -........C. L. Brumback, M.D., M.P.H.
Pasco Sumter .----.....---- ... Leo L. Burger, M.D.
Pinellas ..... --------------------------...Robert E. Rothermel, M.D., M.P.H.
Polk --- .--........-- ------------------- Robert N. Price, M.D.
Seminole ....----..............-----------. ------... Frank L. Quillman, M.D.
Volusia .....--....................-- .----.---. Robert D. Higgins, M.D., M.P.H.





FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


GOVERNOR OF FLORIDA
FIVE BOARD MEMBERS

State Heabk Offir


DlisJ~a~f Covety
Pr~ Health
HLJ J










TABLE OF CONTENTS


General Summary -......--_------- __ ....---.....---....---- 1

Report of Assistant to the State Health Officer (including
Civil Defense, Hospital Construction and Licensure)__ 11

Finance and Accounts (including Personnel and Purchasing) 15

Vital Statistics ----- --------_--__ -- 41

Local Health Services (including Public Health Nursing,
Field Technical Staff and Field Training Center).----. 51

Preventable Diseases (including Venereal Disease Control,
Rapid Treatment Center, Cancer, Industrial Hygiene
and Veterinary Public Health) .--__..... _--...... ____:_ 107

Tuberculosis Control _...-...__ -_..........-_- --_ ---_..- 147

Laboratory Services .--___-_ ---_--- ........ ... .. 161

Maternal and Child Health (including Mental Health and
Heart Disease Control) __.. --.__ -.. ______--..- 174

Dental Health --.........----.----_ --_-__.-.-------- 207

Nutrition and Diabetes Control --------- -------. 212

Sanitary Engineering (including Entomology) ------ 220

Narcotics ---------------------_.-----------.----- 268

Health Information (including Library) -------------.--- 271











GENERAL SUMMARY

WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D. M.P.H.
State Health Officer

The year 1951 was from most standpoints marked by con-
tinued progress in the field of public health in Florida. The State
Board of Health it is believed maintained its good record and
diligently carried out its functions as the principal health agency
of the state. Its work was somewhat handicapped by the infla-
tionary trend in the national economy which raised the prices of
nearly everything purchasable, including personnel. The State
Legislature met in the spring of the year and did not provide ad-
ditional funds to cope with this situation and reduction in staff
and some programs was necessary. However, budget and pro-
gram planning were made easier by the fact that sufficient funds
were provided to fulfill the requirements of the appropriation
act, which was not true during the previous biennium. This
also made possible a substantial expansion of the mosquito con-
trol program which received the same appropriation as during
the past biennium but substantially more actual funds. Also
an additional $100,000 was appropriated for the use of county
health departments and $80,000 was made available for building
purposes at the central offices in Jacksonville. At the end of
the year plans for a new building were well underway, the $80,-
000 being supplemented by a grant of $175,000 from the Federal
Hospital Construction Fund through the State Improvement
Commission and by $115,000 made available by the State Budget
Commission out of fees collected by the State Board of Health
which would otherwise have gone into the general fund. The
new building will be designed to house the laboratories and per-
sonnel engaged in activities in the northeastern section of the
state, which limitation is necessary under the Federal Hospital
and Health Center Construction Act (Hill-Burton Act.)
The Legislature also, upon the advice of the State Board of
Health and the State Tuberculosis Board, revised and improved
the law relating to the compulsory isolation of recalcitrant per-
sons with tuberculosis. That body did not take any action on
a recommended bill to authorize the State Board of Health to
inspect and license nursing homes and related institutions. Also,
no action was taken on a proposed bill to provide for injunctive
action in the enforcement of laws, rules and regulations enforced
by the State Board of Health. The Legislature was opposed to
additional taxes and was consequently unable to increase the
budgets of state agencies generally so that the appropriation of








2 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


the same amount of funds for the general activities of this or-
ganization, plus certain specific increases constituted a some-
what more liberal treatment of the State Board of Health than
was accorded to many other state agencies, and was interpreted
as a vote of confidence of its policies and operations.
The administrative organization of the agency was improved.
The Field Technical Staff, formerly an independent unit directly
under the State Health Officer, was put under the Bureau of
Local Health Services. The Foodhandlers Training Program
was transferred from the Division of Health Information to the
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering. The general responsibility for
hookworm control was placed in the Division of Nutrition and
Diabetes. For the first time a county health department was
organized in Lee County after a great deal of difficulty incident
to the unprecedented opposition of the County Medical Society.
The State Board of Health took the attitude that it did not have
the right to withhold state funds when a Board of County Com-
missioners had indicated its desire to set up a county health de-
partment. Several physicians took the matter to court and ques-
tioned the right of the Board of County Commissioners to levy
taxes for the purpose under the county health unit law. The
Supreme Court upheld the right of the Board of County Com-
missioners to do this.
The personnel situation at the State Board of Health and its
affiliated county health departments continued to be good. In
fact, never in the history of the organization have so many well
trained and capable persons been employed in the field of pre-
ventive medicine and public health; and there is little doubt but
that the situation in Florida is vastly better than in practically
any other state in the Union. The improvement in the caliber
of personnel was brought about by diligent recruitment and by
taking every possible precaution to provide satisfactory working
conditions for those employed. Salaries paid were by no means
the highest in the country and the willingness of better trained
employees to remain with the agency, in spite of tempting offers
elsewhere in many cases, was an evidence of good working con-
ditions. The retirement law which was passed in 1945 has been
a great factor in this connection.
The training of personnel was continued in every possible
manner; by encouraging attendance at scientific meetings in
and out of the state, by field visits to county personnel, by short
orientation courses, by seminars, by short courses in Alachua
County and at the State University, and by the use of federal
funds for postgraduate training of professional personnel for
periods up to one year. Morale at the end of the year was at a
high level but due to our inability to grant many salary increases
there were signs that this could not last long in the face of rising
living costs without more general and liberal salary increases.







GENERAL SUMMARY 3


The population of the state continued to increase at a rapid
rate, it being estimated at 2,901,800 on July 1, 1951. More
births occurred than ever before in the history of Florida and
the highest birth rate was recorded (24.2 per 1,000), this being
equalled only in 1947. There were 27,941 deaths, giving a death
rate of 9.6 per 1,000 which was slightly greater than that for
1950. This slight increase in the past two years may be ac-
counted for by the influx of older people into the state and by
the general trend towards survival of people to greater ages.
Heart disease continued to be the leading cause of death, with
cancer, vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system,
an'd accidents following. The death rate from tuberculosis con-
tinued downward but at a slower rate (17.7 in 1951 as compared
to 18.7 in 1950). Deaths from whooping cough increased from
8 in 1950 to 25 in 1951 which is unjustifiable considering the
methods available for preventing such deaths. It is gratifying
to record that no deaths occurred from rabies and only one death
occurred from malaria, typhus fever and typhoid fever respec-
tively. No case of malaria has been found in the state which
was contracted here since 1948. The incidence of typhus fever
continued to decline from a high of 483 cases with 32 deaths in
1944 to only 20 cases with one death in 1951. The incidence,
prevalence and death rate from syphilis continued to show a
decline. Fewer admissions to the state mental hospital for the
treatment of mental complications of this disease are recorded
each year. Unfortunately, there was little change in infant and
maternal death rates in the state during the year. It is be-
lieved, however, that over a period of years substantial progress
will be made in this field through the better supervision and
instruction of midwives, and more particularly, through the
special efforts made by the medical profession and by hospitals
throughout the state. Every effort was made to stimulate these
efforts.
The work of nearly all of the units of the State Board of
Health continued to increase and their tasks were performed
efficiently and well in spite of a reduction in funds and per-
sonnel. The Bureau of Finance and Accounts, including their
personnel and purchasing sections, did a fine job. The Bureau
of Vital Statistics was faced with the necessity of filing more
records of births, deaths, marriages and divorces and of fur-
nishing more certified copies of these than in the past. Their
work was handicapped by the absence of a statistician on leave
for postgraduate work and another on military leave. The
Bureau of Local Health Services, including the Field Technical
Staff, continued their good work as did the Field Training Cen-
ter in Gainesville. During the year Dr. K. E. Miller, assistant
to the State Health Officer, served as acting director of the
Field Technical Staff in addition to his duties in the office of







4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


the State Health Officer, including civil defense. The Division
of Public Health Nursing during the year placed major em-
phasis on in-service training of public health nurses throughout
the state. The Bureau of Preventable Diseases faced many
problems during the year and handled them capably. Criticism
of the cancer program in connection with the payment of medi-
cal and hospital bills for persons not thought to be indigent
were satisfactorily answered by a survey by a qualified social
worker which showed no grounds for such criticism. A phy-
sician visiting the State Board of Health from the National
Cancer Institute praised the cancer program highly, thought
it one of the best in the country, and was instrumental in send-
ing visitors here from several states to observe its operation.
The loan of a medical officer of the U. S. Public Health Service,
Dr. William Walter, to serve as director of the Division of
Venereal Diseases made possible a substantial improvement in
that work. It is very probable that the coming year will show-
even greater improvement. Much valuable work was carried
on rather quietly by the Division of Industrial Hygiene. Their
pollen studies and inspections of X-ray shoe fitting machines
throughout the state are examples. The public health veterinar-
ian returned from a year of postgraduate study and renewed
the job that he had left temporarily. An outbreak of anthrax
in the southeastern part of the state gave him a substantial task
which he attacked vigorously in cooperation with local health
departments and the State Livestock Sanitary Board. Vigorous
efforts were continued by the Bureau of Preventable Diseases
against all the other communicable diseases not already men-
tioned. A real evaluation of progress in this field, or lack of
it, is difficult because of poor case reporting. A survey of lep-
rosy in the state showed that leprosy is a very minor problem
here. The assignment of a nurse-epidemiologist to the Bureau
from the Communicable Disease Center, U. S. Public Health
Service brought about considerable improvement in records and
investigations of typhoid fever carriers and of typhus fever,
leprosy, and other major communicable diseases. The Bureau
of Tuberculosis Control gave more attention during the year
in its statewide X-ray program to the diagnosis of diseases other
than tuberculosis. Many cases of heart disease and cancer were
found and referred to treatment sources through the medium of
this program. During the year a total of 380,727 miniature
X-rays were taken and interpreted plus 16,715 large X-rays
for diagnostic and followup purposes. The return of a staff
physician from postgraduate training allowed the resumption
of diagnostic and treatment services on a regional basis through-
out the state. Close cooperation was continued with the State
Tuberculosis Board and the Florida Tuberculosis and Health
Association. Although all these agencies were handicapped by







GENERAL SUMMARY 5


fund shortages progress in tuberculosis control continued to be
gratifying and the accomplishments were outstanding.

The work of the Laboratories continued to steadily increase
during the year but with hard work by a diligent and well trained
corps of bacteriologists, serologists, parasitologists and chemists
all laboratory examinations were made with a high degree of
accuracy and efficiency. The State Laboratories are considered
outstanding in the nation and it was due to this reputation that
three of the workers including the director, Dr. A. V. Hardy,
were asked by the Armed Forces to go to Korea to assist there
in the control of an epidemic of diarrheal diseases among pris-
oners of war. This was a signal honor not shared by any other
state health department or laboratory in the country.

The Bureau of Maternal and Child Health continued to dis-
charge its responsibility not only concerning the health of moth-
ers and children but for the mental health and heart disease
control programs. New regulations for the training and licens-
ing of midwives were adopted and a plan inaugurated whereby
county health officers would be primarily responsible for is-
suing licenses under regulations and technical procedures recom-
mended by the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health. How-
ever, the Division of Public Health Nursing continued to do
the actual registration and record keeping, and the nurse mid-
wife instructor, a public health nurse, remained in that division.
The outstanding accomplishments of the Bureau of Maternal
and Child Health were in the field of staff education and the
promotion of seminars and training for professional people
throughout the state, particularly physicians. Much attention
was also given to lay education. More interest was shown by
medical societies in the establishment of committees on maternal
mortality and much is expected of the work of these committee
in the future. In the field of child health the demonstration
center for premature babies in Dade County was outstanding.
Much attention, however, was given to epilepsy and hearing
defects and many conferences were held with school officials,
state and local, on the problem of school health. Plans were
made for the employment of a school health consultant (a phy-
sician) at the beginning of 1952. Funds for the expansion of
the mental health program were not available but by shifting
funds it was possible to assist in the establishment of a new
clinic in Duval County. A heart disease survey amongst school
children was completed in Pensacola in cooperation with the
medical officers at the U. S. Naval Air Station there. Liaison
work with the Florida Heart Association and educational work
in this field were emphasized. Public interest during the year
seemed to be considerable in the field of mental health and the
health of school children.






6 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


The Bureau of Dental Health put most of its efforts on the
stimulation of the fluoridation of public water supplies in the
state. Some success was achieved in spite of opposition by vari-
ous groups, some of which opposed fluoridation on religious
grounds, some on pseudo scientific grounds, and some because
of honest concern as to the effect of such a procedure on the
general health of the population. The Division of Nutrition and
Diabetes Control got underway with a really definite arid clear
cut program aimed at the improvement of nutrition, diabetes
control and hookworm control. Its work was probably the best in
the short history of the division and should be further expanded
in the future.
The Bureau of Sanitary Engineering continued its good work
in the field of environmental sanitation. Progress was made
in the fields of public water supply, sewage disposal and the
control of stream pollution, although due to the rapid increase
in population of the state, there was doubt at times as to whether
or not the State Board of Health was keeping up with the in-
creasing problems presented. The problem of sewage disposal
in suburban areas continued to give the most difficulty. Al-
though septic tanks are the popular choice of the builders in
such areas these are frequently unsatisfactory due to the flat
terrain and high water table. The working out of satisfactory
solutions in numerous housing developments greatly taxed the
ingenuity, patience and diplomacy of all concerned.
The mosquito control program was greatly expanded with
the receipt of additional state funds. Two new anti-mosquito
control districts were formed. Valuable research work was
done in addition to a tremendous amount of routine laboratory
work in the identification of various insects but principally mos-
quitoes. The prospect seems to be for a considerable expansion
of this program in the future because of widespread public in-
terest and demand. This was so great that the Budget Com-
mission released $80,000 from its Emergency Fund in order to
supplement this program. The Bureau of Narcotics also had a
notable year. Congressional investigations of crime stimulated
interest in the control of narcotics but Florida was fortunate
in having had a fine record of enforcement in this field for
many years. Concern was expressed particularly of the use
of marijuana in high schools and universities but no case of
addiction has been discovered in the high schools in the State of
Florida and little evidence of traffic amongst college students.
Again, however, public interest was so great that the Budget
Commission released $15,000 out of Emergency Funds to en-
hance the work of this bureau and some of these funds were
planned to be spent in investigations in the colleges and universi-
ties of the state.
The Division of Health Information continued a good pro-







GENERAL SUMMARY 7


gram of lay and professional education. Health Notes was wide-
ly read and favorable comments received from within and with-
out the state. It is believed that it is the best publication of its
kind in the country. Health education through other media
suffered through lack of funds but much was done and our pub-
lic health library continued to serve the essential need of the
state in the absence of any other library of its kind.
Although the account of work of the various bureaus and
divisions may have given the impression that little was left for
the State Health Officer to do, he nevertheless had a very busy
year. General administration, direction and coordination of
the work of the various bureaus and divisions, and the attend-
ance at numerous professional and lay meetings absorbed a great
amount of time. Also the State Health Officer acts as secretary
to the Board of Health and as the liaison officer between this
agency and the Governor, the legislature and other state agencies,
the U. S. Public Health Service, the Children's Bureau and other
state health departments. He was active in the affairs of the
Florida Public Health Association and as in past years served
as Chairman of the Program Committee. As a delegate from
this Association to the American Public Health Association he
was able to represent the State of Florida in a favorable light.
He served as a member of the Nominating Committee of the
American Public Health Association and was for the second
year appointed as a member of the Nominating Committee for
the Health Officers Section. The Association of State and Ter-
ritorial Health Officers has become increasingly important and
influential in national health affairs in recent years and he was
active in this organization. He continued to serve as an asso-
ciate editor of the Florida Medical Association's Journal. He also
took an active part in conferences on gerontology which is be-
coming of increasing interest to the state. Much public interest
has been expressed in the passage of a law for the licensing and
inspection of nursing homes by the State Board of Health and
another attempt to secure such legislation will undoubtedly be
made in the next legislature.

ACTIVITIES OF THE BOARD

The Board met on a number of occasions during the year and
considered many difficult and intricate problems of policy and
administration. The practice of meeting with the county health
officers at their Annual Meeting which was started about two
years ago was continued. This is done in order to enable the
Board to hear direct accounts from County Health Officers
of their problems.
At the Board meeting on February 13th, the Board:







8 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


1. Modified somewhat the previous policy re fluoridation of
public water supplies and approved the promotion of such fluori-
dation by the Bureau of Dental Health and other personnel
concerned.
2. Authorized Dr. Boyd to direct a review of old records of
the Board and order their preservation or destruction as he
saw fit.
At a meeting on March 18th, the Board:
1. Approved a proposed law to be submitted to the Legisla-
ture authorizing the Board of Health to inspect and license
nursing homes and related institutions. Public hearings on pro-
posed regulations were also directed.
2. New regulations on the control of psittacosis were adopted
after hearing evidence from Dr. Parks that psittacosis was no
longer a major public health problem.
3. Discussed in detail the set up of the Cancer Program and
particularly some proposals for changes submitted by Dr. W. C.
Sumner, director of the Tumor Clinic in Duval County.
4. Discussed the adoption of the National Plumbing Code as
a part of the Sanitary Code and gave tentative approval to it.
5. Approved a proposed bill submitted by Mr. Latham, the
attorney, for an Act to provide injunctive relief in connection
with the violation of any law or regulation, the enforcement of
which is charged to the State Board of Health.
6. Approved a proposed amendment to the law requiring com-
pulsory isolation and hospitalization of recalcitrant persons with
tuberculosis.
7. Approved salary increases recommended by the State
Health Officer, and also certain changes in salary ranges and
other changes involving certain classifications of personnel.
At a meeting held on April 22 and 23, the Board:
1. Formally adopted a plumbing code based on the National
Plumbing Code.
2. Approved a leave of absence for the State Health Officer
in case he should be called to temporary duty by the U. S. Public
Health Service on a foreign assignment.
At a meeting of the Board on July 8:
1. Approved certain changes in the Merit System plan.
2. Established a policy by which personnel could receive both
sick leave pay and Workman's Compensation for illness sus-
tained on duty.
3. Approved the appointment of Dr. Edward R. Smith as
director of the Division of Nutrition and Diabetes.







GENERAL SUMMARY 9

4. Adopted a resolution concerning unsatisfactory sanitary
conditions in Maryland Manor and the Virginia Park Sanitary
Districts in Hillsborough County. The resolution warned the
officials of these districts to take corrective measures and of-
fered the assistance of the Board in making plans for this.
5. A similar resolution was adopted regarding storm sewers
and sanitary sewer installations in the Orange Bowl area in
Miami. The resolution called on the City of Miami to take
corrective measures.
6. Discussed a proposal by the Cabinet that the State Board
of Health collect blood at the State Prison at Raiford for the
Blood Bank of Dade County. It was decided that the Board
of Health could not undertake this task.
7. Discussed a proposed additional building for the State Board
of Health in Jacksonville and approved a comprehensive building
plan which was presented by Mr. David Lee, director of the
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering.
8. Discussed a plan presented by Dr. Sowder and Mr. Rag-
land, director of the Bureau of Finance and Accounts, for econ-
omies necessary to stay within the appropriation made by the
legislature. The plan presented was approved except the rec-
ommendation that physicians' fees paid in connection with the
Cancer Control Program be discussed with the Florida Cancer
Council, before being adopted.
At a meeting held on November 18, the Board:
1. Approved the appointment of Dr. William Walter, com-
missioned officer of the U. S. Public Health Service on loan to
the State Board of Health, as director of the Division of Venereal
Disease Control.
2. Approved the appointment of Dr. James Wardlaw, present-
ly health officer of Madison-Taylor Counties, as consultant in
School Health in the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health, ef-
fective January 1, 1952.
3. Discussed receipt of additional funds for Narcotic Law en-
forcement granted by the Budget Commission out of emergency
funds and approved plans for their use.
4. Approved changes in the Sanitary Code concerning sewage
disposal in unsewered areas.
5. Approved the appointment of Mr. David B. Lee as the
State Board of Health representative to the State Advisory
Council on the State Plumbing Code.
6. Discussed again sewerage problems in Miami (Orange
Bowl) and Hillsborough County (Maryland Manor and Virginia
Park). They received reports by Dr. Sowder that steps were
being taken in Miami to correct the insanitary conditions pointed







10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


out to them. He reported, however, that in Hillsborough County
an election just held to bring about the annexation of the areas
in question to the City of Tampa had resulted in the failure of
the annexation plan. The Board directed that Dr. Sowder in-
quire of governing officials of these sanitary districts as to
what their plan now was.
7. Heard a detailed report by Mr. John Mulrennan, director
of the Division of Entomology and his assistants, on proposed
plans and policy for an expanded mosquito control program.
They approved the plan which in essence consisted of an ex-
panded research program and increased state-aid to counties and
mosquito control districts. The Board went on record as op-
posing a statewide mosquito control program entirely financed
and directed by a state agency.
8. Dr. Boyd brought up the question of placing "Water Supply
Approved" signs along the roads entering the various cities of
the state. It was also brought out that the State Road Depart-
ment had refused to approve the erection of such signs. The
Board directed Dr. Sowder to inquire of other State Health De-
partments as to their practice in this connection.
9. Discussed the policy of fluoridation of public water sup-
plies. Dr. Edward Flynn stated that most literature published
on the subject related to the favorable effect on dental caries
and said he thought that the total effect of fluorines on general
health should have more study. The Board instructed the State
Health Officer to secure for the Board copies of recent articles
and surveys on this subject.
10. Adopted new rules and regulations for the control of com-
municable diseases recommended by Dr. L. L. Parks.
11. Adopted new rules and regulations on the licensing of
midwives and the practice of midwifery.
12. Approved certain changes in the Merit System Plan,
changes in salary ranges, and some salary increases.
Many other items of lesser importance were brought before
the Board and disposition made of them. Some leaves of ab-
sence were granted, and various and sundry reports were re-
ceived from bureau and division directors as well as complaints,
suggestions, and recommendations made by persons outside of
the State Board of Health. A more complete account of all the
procedures of the Board are contained in the minutes. These
minutes have been continuously kept and preserved since the
organization of the State Board of Health in 1889. During the
year a state of complete harmony continued within the Board
and between the Board and the State Health Officer and the
personnel of the organization.







REPORT TO STATE HEALTH OFFICER


REPORT OF ASSISTANT TO THE

STATE HEALTH OFFICER

K. E. MILLER, M.D.

CIVIL DEFENSE

The health and medical care aspects of Civil Defense have
progressed to the stage where the whole subject can be pre-
sented with some degree of certainty as to progress. Some of
the hitherto unmentioned background will, therefore, be re-
viewed.
The original "Blue Book", (AG 11-1), published by the Na-
tional Security Resources Board, (later to become the Federal
Civil Defense Administration, FCDA) outlined the responsibili-
ties of State Agencies in the various phases of Civil Defense.
In this document the State Health Agency was designated as
the authority to have charge of all health problems, including
medical care. In most other states this is the pattern actually
being followed. In Florida, however, health and medical care
were recognized as parallel functions, rather than one being
subject to the other. Under the guidance of this concept, the
State Medical Association was invited to assume responsibility
for all phases of medical care. There was accordingly set up
in the State Medical Association a committee on emergency medi-
cal service of which Dr. James Borland was the chairman, to
plan, organize and execute the functions of medical care in the
State Civil Defense program. In order to comply technically
with the specifications in the Blue Book, Dr. Borland was made
a Deputy State Health Officer.
Along with the foregoing arrangement a clear cut separation
of responsibilities was agreed upon. Without going into too
much detail, some of the major items are as follows:
A. For the health agencies:
1. Conduct of routihe and added normal public health
functions.
2. Responsibility for radiological training and moni-
toring.
3. Responsibility for the blood program.
4. Responsibility for identification of victims and the
disposal of the dead.
5. Stockpiling and storage of biologicals and drugs.







12 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


B. For the Florida Medical Association:
1. Conduct of normal and added medical care services.
2. Responsibility for first aid personnel and equip-
ment.
3. Responsibility for emergency hospitalization.
From this point on the health and medical care phases of the
Civil Defense program are developed separately, with, of course,
the fullest mutual cooperation and constant liaison.


1951 ACTIVITIES

It soon became apparent that the Blue Book, though excellent
as a general guide, failed in many respects to give a complete
picture of civil defense operations in Florida. For the State
Board of Health, therefore, a supplemental plan was prepared
and submitted to the State Civil Defense Director (hereafter
referred to as the Director).
With respect to radiological training, two medical officers,
two sanitary engineers, and two nurses attended special out-of-
state courses of instruction. The nurses who received this train-
ing have extended their instruction to a large number of nurses
at the local level. Also, at the University of Florida there was
arranged in March 1951, a two-day conference on Radiological
Health and Civil Defense in conjunction with the Florida En-
gineering and Industrial Experiment Station. The total attend-
ance was over 400. An excellent report of this conference was
published by the Experiment Station in November 1951. (Bul-
letin series Number 48)'
As regards radiological monitoring, three Traverlab instru-
ments were acquired for instruction and demonstration pur-
poses. Preliminary plans were also made for setting up moni-
toring courses at the several university centers.
In the procurement, processing, and storage of blood and blood
products two agencies are directly concerned-the Association
of Florida Blood Banks, and the American Red Cross. Before
any progress could be made, it was necessary to reconcile the in-
terests of these two agencies and effect a cooperative relation-
ship. To this end a special committee was appointed by the
Director. After a series of meetings of this committee with
representatives of the two agencies, a working arrangement has
been agreed upon. From the separation of responsibilities above
cited it will be seen that the blood program is underwritten by
the State Board of Health, but the actual operation of it is sublet
to the Blood Bank Committee.







REPORT TO STATE HEALTH OFFICER


In much the same manner the responsibility for identification
and disposal of the dead has been sublet to the Florida Associa-
tions of Funeral Directors, both white and colored. Each of
these has been contacted and each has agreed to participate in
the eventual operation of the program. Methods of identifica-
tion have been a moot question upon which no decision has been
made, for the reason that standard specifications have momen-
tarily been expected to be announced by FCDA. It would nat-
urally be desirable to have one standard for the nation as a whole
rather than separate methods in each state. In all probability
the ultimate decision will be some type of metal tag.
As regards disposal of the dead, progress in this field has not
advanced beyond the planning stage. The next step will be an
effort to effect specific organization at the state and local levels.
The one responsibility of the State Board of Health about
which nothing has been done is the stockpiling and storage of
biologicals and drugs. The reason is simple. These items cost
money, which the Board does not have. On the subject of fi-
nances, shortages are encountered at both State and Federal
levels. Much of our state planning is contingent upon Federal
appropriations. It is a well known fact that these fell far short
of expectations. Also, the State Director,of Civil Defense re-
quested from the last Legislature an appropriation of $325,000
and was actually awarded $25,000 for each year of the biennium.
Until such time as funds are made available to the Board from
some source, the program for stockpiling and storage can not be
implemented.

HOSPITAL CONSTRUCTION AND LICENSURE
The hospital and health center construction program is one
which does not fit into a report for any one year since the proj-
ects are rarely begun and completed in the same year. What
follows, therefore, is in the nature of a progress report.
In the report for 1950 the following hospitals were listed by
the State Improvement Commission as having been completed
with the aid of Hill-Burton funds:
Beds
1. Suwannee County Hospital, Live Oak---------.------- 37
2. Bay County Hospital, Panama City--_------_------..... 66
3. Walton County Hospital, DeFuniak Springs ---_ 23
4. Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, Leon County_-. 150
5. Southeast Florida Hospital for Tuberculosis,
Lantana --------------------- ---------------------. 500
6. American Legion Hospital for Crippled Children,
St. Petersburg ..__ __--------------_.. 61
7. Duval Medical Center (Psychiatric addition)
Jacksonville --------------___------------------ ......... 40







14 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


8. Variety Hospital for Children, Miami ------. 80
9. Florida A & M College Hospital (out-patient
department and nursing school) __ _... __ ........ 100
10. St. Lukes Hospital, Units 1 & 3 (addition) __... 28
Hospitals Begun in 1950 and Completed in 1951
Beds
1. Washington County Hospital, Chipley ...-------_ 28
2. St. Lukes Hospital, Units 2 & 4 (addition) ----- 31
Hospitals Begun Prior to 1950 and Completed in 1951
Beds
1. Baptist Hospital, Pensacola .......--------- .------.-.. 125
2. Orange Memorial Hospital, Orlando (addition) 43
3. St. Joseph's Hospital, Tampa (addition) _----- 73
Hospitals Begun in 1950 but Not Completed in 1951
Beds
1. W. T. Edwards Hospital, Tallahassee
(Tuberculosis) 350
2. Gadsden County Hospital, Quindy -------_------_ 69
3. Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami,
Service Facilities ----------------------95
4. Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami,
Psychiatric--_ __--_---- --------- 100
Hospitals and Health Centers Begun in 1951 but Not Completed in 1951
Beds
1. West Orange Memorial Hospital, Winter Garden 35
2. Indian River Memorial Hospital, Vero Beach__. 30
3. Manatee Veterans' Memorial Hospital, Bradenton 100
4. Fish Memorial Hospital, DeLand --_------------ 50
5. Santa Rosa County Hospital, Milton__...__.------. 23
6. Okaloosa County Health Center, Crestview -------
7. Wakulla County Health Center, Crawfordville --
8. Holmes County Health Center, Bonifay-__
9. Receiving Unit, State Hospital, Chattahoochee-..- 100

Listing the above hospitals and health centers in the report
of the State Board of Health may give the impression that the
Board is in some way responsible for their construction. In
Florida it is the State Improvement Commission that carries
this responsibility but the State Board of Health is charged with
the duty of inspection and licensure. Those hospitals designated
by the asterisk (*) have been and are licensed by the Board.
In order to show their licensure status, hospitals completed prior
to 1951 are included in this report. It has not been the policy,
however, to license state-owned institutions. Those hospitals
which have not yet been completed have not, of course, been
licensed.







FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


BUREAU OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS
FRED B. RAGLAND, Director

The Bureau of Finance and Accounts has the responsibility
of all fiscal, personnel, and purchasing and property control
matters.
The Bureau is a service organization, handling the business
management of the Board. Every effort. is made to handle
efficiently and expeditiously to the best interests of all Bureaus,
Divisions, and County Health Units the payment of salaries,
travel expenses, and other obligations; the personnel actions
such as recruitment, employment, termination, reclassification,
salary changes, leave records, efficiency reports and training
records; the purchasing by good business methods; and the con-
trol of property.

FISCAL SECTION

The financial transactions of the State Board of Health for
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1951, as reflected by the records
of the Bureau are presented in the condensed tables that follow.
These tables are:
Table 1 Summary of Receipts and Disbursements and
Balances for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
1951.
Table 2 Detail of Operating and Capital Expenses by
Public Health Program Activity.
Summary of Total Operating and Capital Ex-
penses by Major Functional Levels.
Appropriation and Fund Balances as of June
30, 1951.
Analysis of Balances.
Table 3 Funds Received by County Health Units from
State Board of Health and from Local Sources
for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1951.
Chart I Proposed Budget for Florida State Board of
Health Dollar for 1952.

A detailed financial report for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1951, has been prepared and distributed to the Governor, Mem-
bers of the Governor's Cabinet, members of the State Board of
Health, and all Bureaus, Divisions and County Health Units of
the State Board of Health.







16 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


The funds received (or appropriated) for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1951, were from the following major sources:


State Appropriations -_-_--- ----------$2,452,880.14
From Local Agencies for County
Health Units -_------ --- 1,841,935.27
From Federal Grants-in-Aid _- 1,202,125.69
From Private Contributions _- 31,988.35


TOTAL


44.3%
33.2%
21.9%
.6%


__ __ ______...__... ..... ...... $5,528,929.45 100.0%


Objectively, the expenditures by the State Board of Health in
summary were for:
Personnel Services (Salaries and


Professional Fees) _--- --------- $3,481,279.59
Contractual Services (Repairs, Utilities,
Travel Expense, Cancer Program,
Fees and Hospitalization) -- 882,338.85
Commodities (Office, Medical, Labora-
tory and Food Supplies) ------------_ 576,141.18
Current Charges (Rents, Insurance,
Registrar Fees) ------ ------- 101,935.94
Capital Outlays (Equipment and
Fixed Assets) --_--..------------. 149,048.85


TOTAL _---


_$5.190.744.41


67.1%

17.0%

11.1%

1.9%

2.9%

100.0%


In addition to funds reported in the annual financial report
and summarized above, certain other funds and services were
made available by the U. S. Public Health Service to activities
of the Board but were not paid directly to it. They include:


Value of Penicillin and Streptomycin fur-
nished by Public Health Service for Vene-
real Disease Program --------------___ -
Value of Public Health Service Personnel
on Loan to the State Board of Health in
Preventable Disease Programs ---
Value of Personal Services, Supplies, and
Equipment furnished by Public Health
Service (Communicable Disease Center)
for Malaria and Typhus activities under
the State Board of Health supervision__


$ 25,000.29

54,572.97



32,440.75

$112,014.01


Fiscal operation followed a budget plan of 106 departmental
budgets. These budgets were frequently revised to meet chang-
ing situations. The majority of the revisions involved County
Health Unit budgets primarily because the fiscal year of the







FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 17

County differs from the fiscal year of the State. At the time
County Health Unit budgets were initially prepared, it was not
known exactly what local funds would be available in each in-
stance. It was, therefore, necessary to revise a number of the
County Health Unit budgets during the year after the avail-
ability of funds from County sources was determined.







18 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


PERSONNEL OFFICE
PAUL T. BAKER

In conformity with the established policy, continued steps
were taken during the calendar year 1951 to strengthen the
Merit System of personnel administration in the State Board
of Health.
Careful attention was given to insure that all appointments
and terminations were made in accordance with the rules adopted
by the Board.
Leave records were developed and maintained and periodic
efficiency reports were obtained and recorded.
Records of in-service and post-graduate training of employees
were maintained and the application of regulations governing
such training was assured. All employees at the main office
were encouraged by the Personnel Supervisor to discuss their
employment problems, if any, with him. At the prescribed
times for consideration by the State Board of salary increases,
full information concerning each employee was made available
to the Board in order that employees might be treated equitably.
The payrolls for all employees were prepared in the Personnel
Office and forwarded to the State Comptroller for payment.
All matters pertaining to the retirement plan were handled
promptly.
Prompt action was taken immediately after Merit System
examinations to regularize the Merit System status of each pro-
visional employee. Employees were notified promptly upon at-
tainment of permanent Merit System status.
During the calendar year 1951 one new County Health De-
partment (Lee) was organized. At the end of the year 65 of
Florida's 67 counties were organized and operating under the
Merit System.
On December 31, 1951 there were 1305 State employees and
19 Federal employees. On December 31, 1950 there were 1277
State employees and 19 Federal employees.
During the year there were 351 employment and 323 termina-
tions among State employees.
On December 31, 1951 the Merit System status of State Board
of Health employees was as follows:








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 19

Permanent and Probational ------------1030
Provisional .......------......----__......------- 34
Temporary --------.--.. -
Emergency _--_____---- -------- 5
Exempt and Part-time..---------.---------.__ 236

TOTAL ..........- ------- --------- 1,305
During the year specifications were adopted for 6 new classi-
fications; specifications were revised for 19 classifications; 8
classifications were abolished and salary ranges for 116 classes
were revised.
Post-graduate training for one full academic year was com-
pleted successfully during 1951 by 4 Health Officers; 4 Public
Health Nurses; 2 Sanitary Engineers; 1 Veterinarian; 1 Serolo-
gist and 1 Statistician.








20 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


PURCHASING AND PROPERTY
G. WILSON BALTZELL
Purchasing Agent

During 1951, the Purchasing Agent received 1832 purchase
requests from the various departments and issued 3975 purchase
orders representing a total of $649,561.65. The number of pur-
chase orders and total amount of money represents an increase
over the previous year due mainly to an expanded mosquito
control program.
Property records accounting for items of equipment and non-
expendable property were brought up to date and all new items
acquired during 1951 have been added to the records.
One of the functions of the Purchasing and Property Section
is the processing of automobile accident and liability claims.
The State Board of Health carries insurance on the automobile
fleet for public liability, property damage and comprehensive.
The Board acts as self-insuror insofar as collision damage is
concerned. During the year the insurance companies settled
six liability and property damage claims against the State Board
of Health in the amount of $936.79 and one comprehensive claim
in the amount of $17.40.
Since the Board acts as self-insuror for collision coverage, it
might be stated that $525.85 was spent for collision repairs to
units of the fleet. However, $174.45 was reimbursed to the
State Board of Health by individuals and firms who admitted
liability.
Fire insurance on buildings and contents is carried by the
State through the office of the State Fire Insurance Commis-
sioner.

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS

All Central Office Bureaus and Divisions are located either
at the main office at 1217 Pearl Street or in leased space at the
General Administration Building in the St. Johns Shipyard,
Jacksonville, Florida. The Superintendent of Buildings and
Grounds has the responsibility for maintaining and operating
the buildings at both locations. Maintenance personnel have
carried out their duties efficiently during the year.
Plans are now under way for additional building at 1217 Pearl
Street. When the new building is completed, most of the Bu-








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 21


reaus and Divisions now occupying leased space at the St. Johns
Shipyard will be moved to the 1217 Pearl Street location. The
building and equipping of a new addition will cost approximately
$350,000.
On November 18, 1951, the U. S. Public Health Service ap-
proved Part I, Project Construction Application, listing the esti-
mated project cost of $350,000 to include $318,000 construction
contract, architect fee and supervision at the site and $32,000
equipment. Of the total project cost, the Federal share has
been approved for 50% or $175,000. The remaining 50% will
be paid part from a State General Revenue Appropriation and
part from fees collected by the State Board of Health. The
General Revenue Act of 1951 appropriated to the State Board
of Health for repairs and construction $80,000 for the biennium
July 1, 1951 through June 30, 1953. Of this $80,000, about $60,-
000 will be applied toward the building project. The remaining
$115,000 will be out of fees collected by the State Board of
Health.
On November 20, 1951, the State Budget Commission author-
ized a trust fund to plan, construct and equip a laboratory and
district health building in Jacksonville. This trust fund will
be established by depositing into it various fees collected until
a total of $115,000 has been put into the trust fund.
It is hoped that during the calendar year 1952, much progress
will have been made toward the actual completion of this build-
ing project.

DUPLICATING

This section is a valuable asset and aid to all departments of
the State Board of Health. A considerable saving is.effected
by this section being able to supply the majority of the printing
and duplicating needs at costs much less than commercial print-
ing prices.








22 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


,TABLE 1
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1951

RECEIPTS
From State Funds:
From State Appropriations:
Salaries -- --...... ........ -.........------ -.$ 706,380.09
Expenses 5_--82,678.97
County Health Units __---- ----- 734,021.08
County Mosquito Control ...--.-..-.. 350,000.00
Purchase of Insulin and Diabetic Education ------ 60,000.00
Merit System Operation -.-- .. ...........-- -..... 13,000.00
Other:
Medical Laboratories Control 800.00
Emergency Fund Lake Apopka Fish Disposal .- 5,000.00
State Health Officer's Revolving Fund 1,000.00
TOTAL STATE FUNDS ...--..-...-.........-...-.... .- ..$2,452,880.14

From Federal Grant-in-Aid:
Public Health Service:
Rapid Treatment Center ----..---............................. $ 151,433.25
General Health 239,094.00
Venereal Disease ..........----.-.- 248,436.59
Tuberculosis Control .... 149,810.26
Mental Health 56,221.00
Cancer Control -. _.._-_.. 55,221.00
Heart Disease ____35,141.00
Water Pollution ________ 14,900.00
Children's Bureau:
Maternal and Child Health -.-...... ...-..... -- 251,868.59
TOTAL GRANT-IN-AID -..... .......... --_ $1,202,125.69

From Private Contributions:
Commonwealth Fund .-$__------ 4,089.31
Water Pollution Grand-in-Aid 24,703.50
Franklin County Marine Laboratory --- ---- 3,195.54
TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS .._---.............-- $ 31,988.35

From Local Agencies for County Health Units --.-...---- .-------- $1,841,935.27

Total Receipts ____ .._.....-. $---5,528,929.45
Balance July 1, 1950 ..__ 1,149,444.45
Total Receipts and Balances -...-.......-...-...... --.......--... 6,678,373.90








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 23


DISBURSEMENTS
Operating Expense
Personal Services:
Salaries $....----- 3,432,691.36
Professional Services and Consulting Services ...48,588.23
Contractual Services:
Travel Expenses, Including Subsistence and Lodging .. 470308.64
Telephone, Telegraph and Postage .. 72,573.01
Utilities 25,516.85
Printing, Binding, Photographing and Advertising .... 23,965.36
Freight, Express and Drayage __ 8,832.72
Cleaning, Laundry and Painting 14,637.49
Repairs to Buildings and Equipment :__ 40,680.78
Subsistence, Care and Support of Persons 204,081.25
Other Contractual Services ..... 21,742.75
Commodities:
Stationery and Office Supplies 72,567.64
Chemicals, Laboratory and Mosquito Control Supplies 231,180.56
Medical, Surgical and Dental Supplies .. ........ 123,884.14
Gas, Oil and Fuel 55,600.32
Cleaning, Laundry and Other Supplies ... ............_ 33,102.88
Educational Supplies ._.... .._......._......... 12,109.80
Food Products __.. .._ ....____ -....... .. ... 47,695.84
Current Charges:
Rental of Buildings and Equipment -........-....... ... 41,020.08
Insurance, Dues, Fees and Bonds 46,902.99
Merit System ......_.. ______ 14,012.87
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES -............-- ...--- ... $5,041,695.56

Capital Expenses
Offices, Laundry and Mechanical Equipment ..---...--...---......$ 28,690.64
Scientific, Medical and Dental Equipment --....- .. ..... 81,475.17
Automotive Equipment ------- .... 28,995.97
Books, Educational and Other Equipment ___.......... ... 7,87.07
Buildings and Surroundings ....-............_.- .. .. ........ 2,500.00
TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENSES ..-......----....... .....---- .... -- $ 149,048.85
TOTAL OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSES -..--.........-....--5,190,744.41

Non-Operating Disbursements

Contribution to State Defense Council ....... ........... $ 2,400.00
Transfers to Other State Funds 23.40
Refunds to Federal Government _____._. _............ 599.21
Refunds to Local and Private Contributors .------..--............ ... ---4,364.68
TOTAL NON-OPERATING DISBURSEMENTS ..------......-......... $ 7,387.29
TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS ------.. ...._-.------ .....-............ $5,198,131.70
BALANCES JUNE 30, 1951 ___....................... 1,480,242.20
TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCE ....-...-..-..............$6,678,373.90








24 ANNUAL REPORT, ,1951


TABLE 2

DETAIL OF OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSES
BY PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM ACTIVITY

Health Services to Mothers, Infants, Preschool and School
Children .............---------.---------------. ----------- $1,038,107.93
Statewide Venereal Disease Control, Diagnosis and Referral of
Infectious Venereal Disease Patients to the Rapid Treat-
ment Center, and Operation of RTC --------... .------------. 804,665.75
Sewage and Waste Disposal, Water Supply and Treatment, and
General Public Health Engineering and Sanitation Opera-
tion ......-------------- 611,844.63
Statewide Mosquito, Pest Control, and Structural Pest Control
Law Enforcement .... ..------ 533,902.06
Statewide Tuberculosis Control, X-ray Surveys and Follow-up
Work ....--...--. ....._............------ -------- -- ------ 498,039.24
Statewide Cancer Control Program ._.-- ------.. -- .- 243,972.63
Vital Statistics Records and Reports .---......- -- 140,141.90
Public Health Training Program .__ .. 115,088.06
Nutrition and Diabetes Control Program 94,620.16
Mental Health Program __--- ..-~... --.-.--- 85,569.78
Narcotics, Drug, Medical Practice Law Enforcement -- 66,622.16
Statewide Dental Health Program 63,145.69
Heart Disease Program ___-..._ ._.... 50,613.77
Industrial Hygiene Program ...... ... 20,053.55
Merit System Operation _.... ._. ... .... 14,012.87
General Health Program, Education and Administration _.- 810,344.23
TOTAL OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSES- $5,190,744.41


SUMMARY OF TOTAL OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENSES
BY MAJOR FUNCTIONAL LEVELS

State Level Organizational Units
State Funds -....-..-. ..... -...... $ 978,390.97
Federal Funds .... .......... 593,892.00
Private Funds -.........._._... ...... 21,355.44 $1,593,638.41
State Level Special Services
State Funds ..--. ---... -.....-............--- $ 530,957.74
Federal Funds ___ .......___..__ 326,929.57
Private Funds ..-- -----........ --.... ................. 7,932.74 $ 865,820.05
*County Health Units
State Funds ---.... ---.....-.................------ 727,074.90
Federal Funds ._--.................----- ... 272,832.30
Local Funds -.. -.....____.. 1,731,378.75 $2,731,285.95
GRAND TOTAL -____ -...-- -...... --..... .. ......... $5,190,744.41

Total County Health Units Expenditures $2,731,285.95 represents per
capital expenditure of $1.10 (294 State Funds, 114 Federal Funds, and
704 Local Funds), based on population figure of 2,485,914 served by County
Health Units. For comparison with previous years, see 1950 Annual
Report, Chart I, Page 16.








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 25

APPROPRIATION AND FUND BALANCES
As of'June 30, 1951
Fund Amount
State General Revenue Appropriation ...----._. ..._$ 825,398.21
Federal Grant-in-Aid Funds ...82,180.72
Private Contributors' Funds ____ ___. 28,287.03
Local Health Units Funds .. 544,376.24
TOTAL BALANCES ...____..... $1,480,242.20

ANALYSIS OF BALANCES
Unencumbered Funds Returnable to State Treasurer and/or
Contributors (Includes $726,713.25 Reserves from State
Appropriations withheld by the Budget Commission) --_$ 759,495.89
Encumbrances June 30, 1951 .__ ... ___ 145,006.44
Unencumbered Funds Available for Expenditures in Fiscal : -
Year 1952 ...._._ 575,739.87
$1,480,242.20

TABLE 3
FUNDS RECEIVED BY COUNTY HEALTH UNITS FROM
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND FROM LOCAL SOURCES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1951


Alachua County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds $ 24,282.50
Federal Funds .... ..... ... 5,795.00 $ 30,077,50
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ... $ 25,000.00
Board of Public Instruction 1,000,00
City of Gainesville ...._ 6,872.71
Fees and Miscellaneous .__.... .. 851.51 33,724.22
Total -. .. $ 63.801.72


Baker County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --.-..--.. --... -- ............-
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .._...... $ 2,966.61
Board of Public Instruction 2,099.97
Fees and- Miscellaneous ____... ............ 66.12
Total ... .. ------------.................---


$ 7,344.t0


5,132.70
$ 12,476.70


Bay County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .. ..-....._ ..... ..... ......$ 16,958.00
Federal Funds -__ -_____ 2,650.00 $ 19,608.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ____.. $ 22,516.20
Fees and Miscellaneous ...... 698.88 23,215.08
Total .-------......... $ 42,823.06








26 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Bradford County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...--------- -----------.---.. 10,217.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ......... 4,266.60
Board of Public Instruction 2,100.00
City of Starke _.___....-. ...... 2,075.00
Fees & Miscellaneous 174.00 8,615.60
Total ___----- $ 18,832.60
Breverd County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...-. --- ..$ 10,875.00
Federal Funds ........---------- .--- 2,400.00 $ 13,275.00
Local Funds:
.* Board of County Commissioners $ 7,500.00
... Board of Public Instruction 2,500.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ....-.--.... 605.41 10,605.41
Total _$___--- $ 23,880.41
Broward County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _.._... -.... .___ .. $ 13,416.00
Federal Funds ......--------------- 11,660.00 $ 25,076.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -. 31,485.00
Board of Public Instruction 7,500.00
Cities 960.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 1,022.02 40,967.02
Total ____ $ 66,043.02
Calhoun County Health Unit
Sate-Board of Health:
State Funds __ ....._...$ 6,692.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners --- $ 5,000.00
Fees ..---.-- 52.00 5,052.00
S Total ..... _................ .. ............ $ 11,744.00
Charlotte County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _-----..... --....--------....-....... ---- $ 4,610.00
:- Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ...$ 1,450.00
Board of Public Instruction 1,550.00
City of Punta Gorda ._._.. 610.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 30.15 3,640.15
Total ....--.... ..__.__ .. $ 8,250.15


Citrus County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ----..............-.... .. ---------...
SLocal Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 1,665.00
Board of Public Instruction 2,100.00
Fees ______..--------- 33.00


Total


$ 5,158.00


3,798.00
$ 8,956.00


-- - --------- ------- -








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


Clay County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _......-...............
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .......$ 3,556.72
Board of Public Instruction 2,400.00
City of Green Cove Springs 2,000.01
Fees 6________ _69.75


$ 9,784.00



8,026.48


Total .$ 17,810.48
Columbia County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds $ 8,938.00
Federal Funds -.... ..... 2,820.00 $ 11,758.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $_ 4,200.00
Board of Public Instruction 3,600.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 225.63 8,025.63
STotal ..$..... $ 19,783.63
Dade County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ..--..._.......... 38,866.00
Federal F'unds ......... ............... 48,924.12 $ 87,790.12
Local Iunds:
Board of County Commissioners .-............$391,050.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ._ 17,635.76 408,685.76
Total $. .. $496,475.88


DeSoto County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ..-..----...--. .$ 7,301.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ... $ 3,750.00
Board of Public Instruction 1,250.00
Fees and Miscellaneous .. 90.69 5,090.69
Total ___- ..._-. $ 12,391.69
Dixie County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .............. .......-... $ 6,070.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ..----.......--.$ 4,200.00
Board of Public Instruction __600.00 0.,
Fees and Miscellaneous _... ......._ 28.90 4,28.90
Total ....... .. ......... .... $ 10898.90
Duval County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ..... ...... ......... $ 21,183.00
Federal Funds -- -----..........- 14,820.00 $ 36,003.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .. $..... $ 43,212.99 !
Cities ............ 12,480.00
Fees and Miscellaneous .... ...... 383.74 56,076.73
Total -.. ....... __.........-............... $ 92,079.73








28 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Escombia County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ..- .. .... .................. ..........$- 19,349.00
Federal Funds -._......._-._____ --- ---_ 8,879.22 $ 28,228.22
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners --... $ 33,750.00
Board of Public Instruction .... 10,000.00
City of Pensacola ..-- ....-- ............ 19,699.92
Fees and Miscellaneous ............. 2,052.87 65,502.79
Total ...--.................................---- $ 93,731.01
Flagler County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -- -------------- $ 3,285.00
Local Funds: -
Board.of County Commissioners ..-__......$ 2,118.50
Board of Public Instruction .--------_.... ..-.- 957.20
Fees -.. ..... ------.... .----- .------- .. .. 18.75 3,094.45
Total .............. ... ........ $ 6,379.45
Franklin County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -----.. ---. -------- $ 7,723.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -..$....$--- -$ 6,859.00
John G. and Fannie F. Ruge, School Nurse
Memorial Fund ._ .... ........ 500.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __....... ........... 52.99 7,411.99
Total ___..___.......-......... ......-- .... $ 15,134.99
Gadsden County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ... ....... --.....-...-. ..--......_ $ 11,912.00
Federal Funds .--....--.....-...............---.....-- 5,280.00 $ 17,192.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ..-- ...$ 13,367.43
Board of Public Instruction --..--- ---- 3,930.00
Cities ___-- 879.50
Fees and Miscellaneous --... .........---. ..... 670.01 18,846.94
Total _. ..........___. ...... $ 36,038.94
Glchrist County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ----.--.- --.--.--- ---- $ 4,790.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .-----..-- $ 1,800.00
Board of Public Instruction ---- 1,800.00
Fees and Miscellaneous -- 16.72 3,616.72
Total -..-..-.......-...-............--- ----------- $ 8,406.72
Glades County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ---...... ---. ---------------- $ 3,095.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -... $ 2,700.00
Fees .. _.. .....------- 9.75 2,709.75
Total -........--.--......- -----.. .------ $ 5,804.75








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


Gulf County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _..._.....- -.-.-------------..... ....... $ 7,673.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ......... $ 7,718.83
Board of Public Instruction ..... .. 2,925.00
Fees and Miscellaneous .... 79.39 10,723.22
Total ---..___.._._........... $ 18,396.22

Hamilton County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ........._._.. ....._ $ 6,613.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .._ $ 2,175,00
Board of Public Instruction ......... 2,175.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ___ 92.68 4,442.68
Total --.--.--...-___--------- __ ............ $ 11,055.68

Hardee County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --- ---.-........--... -..............--. 5,811.00
Federal Funds -_. ._ 1,760.00 $ 7,571.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .. $ 6,481.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __ 77.75 6,558.75
iTotal ---.. ....------------ -...... .... $ 14,129.75

Hendry County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _---.----..... -------...........- .......... $ 5,378.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .-.......$ 4,200.00
Fees and Miscellaneous _____ 23.19 4,223.19
Total ----........ -------------...-----_.......... $ 9,601.19

Hernando County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --._---......._...$---------------- $ 4,949.00
Federal Funds _-________.776.61 $ 5,725.61
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ___ $ 1,500.00
Board of Public Instruction 2,127.00 3,627.00
Total -------.....----------_.... $ 9,352.61

Highlands County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -------------- ---.... ...........-- .... 8,720.00
Federal Funds 3,240.00 $ 11,960.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -- $ 9,000.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 153.50 9,153.50
Total ..--.._.._.. ......... .. ..._ __ $ 21,113.50








30 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Hillsborough County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -.. ............. ........ $ 43,350.00
Federal Funds ______ 27,011.68 $ 70,361.68
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners __......- $204,194.57
Board of County Commissioners-
Earmarked Mosquito Control 50,527.61
City of Tampa 600.00
Fees and Miscellaneous _.. 31,298.93 286,621.11
Total ------... .......----------------- $356,982.79

Holmes County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ____ $ 9,686.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -- 3,750.00
Board of Public Instruction 3,750.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 114.38 7,614.38
Total ....____...-______. .... $ 17,300.38

Indian River County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ____...__ ..-- $ 8,544.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -- $ 6,808.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __ 81.38 6,889.38
Total .........-... ......-.. $ 15,433.38


Jackson County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ....- 10,790.00
Federal Funds .__...... .........- 2,665.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .. ........ 7,600.00
Board of Public Instruction 3,000.00
City of Marianna ..-....-.... 600.00
Fees and Miscellaneous .- 346.77
Total __ ------------- -----

Jefferson County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State unds -____.........-..... ..-__......._..
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners __... ...$ 3,200.00
Board of Public Instruction __...... ... 3,900.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __..__.. ..._. 142.59


STotal


$ 13,455.00



11,546.77

$ 25,001.77




$ 9,406.00



7,242.59
$ 16,648.59








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 31

Lafayette County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -..................... ... ....... $ 4,875.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ._. ...$ 1,700.00
Board of Public Instruction 1,699.92
Fees and Miscellaneous ._ ..22.03 3,421.95
Total ..........................-.... ......... $ 8,296.95

Lake County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...... ._$ 20,222.00
Federal Funds -.-..... ...._.... ...._. 2,695.00 $ 22,917.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -----...........$ 23,732.35
Board of County Commissioners-
Earmarked for Mosquito Control ... 8,233.30
Cities ____2,460.00
Cities-Earmarked for Mosquito Con. .. 6,360.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 346.88
Miscellaneous
Earmarked Mosquito Control .. ...300.00 41,432.53
Total ---..--------------......-.......-........- $ 64,349.53

Lee County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --- ----- -----.....-..-.. ... .......... $ 8,903.34
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners __13,962.38
Total ._................_...._ ...__. $ 22,865.72

Leon County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ---...- ..... ......_..... 15,940.00
Federal Funds ....__.__ 16,100.00 $ 32,040.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -...... $ 37,400.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 539.90 37,939.90
Total .-----.-.....------------------------- $ 69,979.90

Levy County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -.. ...........-- ...__.._... _$.... 7,183.50
Federal Funds ---- 1,880.00 $ 9,063.50
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ._... $. 3,399.96
Board of Public Instruction 3,399.96
Fees and Miscellaneous ___-.....-- ........ 99.02 6,898.94
,Total --.....---.--.... ------....... ------------....... $ 15,962.44









32 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Liberty County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds __. -.----......-----------------
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .------ $ 2,750.00
Board of Public Instruction 2,977.50
Fees and Miscellaneous ----.------ 14.32
Total .....---------...--


$ 4,352.00


5,741.82
$ 10,093.82


Madison County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --..................-....---- -- $ 10,996.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .- $ 3,500.00
Board of Public Instruction 3,500.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ... 211.80 7,211.80
Total -.... -- $ 18,207.80

Manatee County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _.... $ 10,672.00
Federal Funds 5._____... .. 5,852.99 $ 16,524.99
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 15,500.00.
Fees and Miscellaneous _...--.....-..-......- 307.88 15,807.88
Total -....--...__. .. ....... ..-- $ 32,332.87

Marion County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -....-------.............--.......--- --- 13,849.00
Federal Funds ... ----- 4,789.34 $ 18,638.34
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .___ ---..... 23,080.00
Total $.. -. ------------ 41,718.34

Martin County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --..._ --........--------------........---- $ 3,734.00
Federal Funds ___ 1,630.00 $ 5,364.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ----.......... $ 4,510.96
Fees ---- -----------63.50 4,574.46
Total ............------------__ $ 9,938.46

Monroe County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...---- -------.. ---- -.. ---.---.------. $ 14,168.00
Federal Funds .---.. ... .... ----- .------------- 2,507.82 $ 16,675.82
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ....----....------$ 8,400.00
Board of Public Instruction _-__ 3,000.00
City of Key West _____ 4,800.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ...--..-- ... ... -- .... 904.86 17,104.86
Total --..--.....-......_._.......... -----$ 33,780.68









FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 33

Nassau County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .. .... .. $ 6,902.00
Federal Funds .. ... ......... ..... 4,320.00 $ 11,222.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 9,797.50
Board of Public Instruction 3,400.00
City of Fernandina .......... 165.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 112.03 13,474.53
Total ____-..... $ 24,696.53
Okaloosa County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds $ 9,548.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners --- $ 9,876.46
Fees and Miscellaneous ______ 267.19 10,143.65
Total $ 19,691.65
Okeechobee County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -$__...._.. 4,164.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .. $ 3,000.00
Fees 21.25 3,021.25
Total. .._______ $ 7,185.25
Orange County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .. .....$ 17,839.00
Federal Funds .. ..--- 16,144.99 $ 33,983.99
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 37,679.00
Board of Public Instruction 10,000.00
Cities ................_..... -... .- 1,590.00
Fees and Miscellaneous .5,921.75 55,190.75
Total _.. $ 89,174.74

Osceola County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds $ 10,268.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 7,500.00
Board of Public Instruction 2,000.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __ 111.71 9,611.71
Total -......---........-.... $ 19,879.71

Palm Beach County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...-- --..-..-..-.$ 17,652.00
Federal Funds 11,373.02 $ 29,025.02
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners _$ 56,000.00
Fees and Miscellaneous ..---- 606.32 56,606.32
Total $ 85,631.34









34 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951

Pasco County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .........................---......-- $ 8,698.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -- .$ 1,600.00
Board of Public Instruction ... 2,500.00
Fees and Miscellaneous _...151.58 4,251.58
Total .__...... --....._.-..............-. $ 12,949.58

Pinellas County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ---....-....-..-.. ..--.............. 29,901.00
Federal Funds -...-_.. ................ ... 28,234.71 $ 58,135.71
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -.....-- ...$156,489.94
Fees and Miscellaneous ........... 22,305.50 178,795.44
Total .... ... .....-....-.... -.....-- $236,931.15

Polk County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .. .. ____ 18,109.00
Federal Funds _.--.... .. -..-- 12,482.25 $ 30,591.25
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ... $ 54,781.36
Fees and Miscellaneous ---- 4,097.23 58,878.59
Total ... ..-......-.......- ...-. ... $ 89,469.84

Putnam County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -- ------------------- $ 12,464.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners 7,33.60
Fees and Miscellaneous ---- 220.05 7,553.65
Total -..-.. -....--... -........-- $ 20,017.65

St. Lucie County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds --..--.. ............-. $ 12,185.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 11,500.00
Fees ...-..... 183.50 11,683.50
Total -.. --............... --.... $ 23,868.50

Santa Rosa County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -...... .. ......... $ 7,131.00
Federal Funds --__ 2,100.00 $ 9,231.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners -$ 800.00
Board of Public Instruction -__-__ 5,119.92
Fees and Miscellaneous _... 134.58 6,054.50
Total ------ --... ----......-.....-..._.....-....... $ 15,285.60








FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 35

Sarasota County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ... ..~... ........_____.. $ 12,001.00
Federal Funds .............. ......... 3,820.00 $ 15,821.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ..__.......$ 15,620.00
Fees and Miscellaneous---- ... -............. 226.91 15,846.91
Total ._.._..........._....---____.. $ 31,667.91

Seminole County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _.._......----- --------------........... $ 14,949.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ----..........-.... $ 6,600.00
Board of Public Instruction 4,800.00
Fees and Miscellaneous _277.65 11,677.65
Total ----$..... -..... __._.__-.. $ 26,626.65

Sumter County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ------....... .. .........._._ $ 8,874.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ____ 1,750.00
Board of Public Instruction -------- 3,000.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 87.43 4,837.43
Total .. ......... --......-.............. $ 13,711.43

Suwannee County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds $ 8,967.74
Federal Funds .----.. .___ 4,021.84 $ 12,989.58
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ...._ .$ 11,940.00
Fees ----------................... .... 164.25 12,104.25
Total --......----------------- $ 25,093.83

Taylor County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -----..--............ ..... $ 7,939.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ......._ $ 2,500.00
Board of Public Instruction ____ 250.00
Fees and Miscellaneous -- --94.13 2,844.13
Total -_____ ----------------- $ 10,783.13

Union County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds -------------..-.. --------......- ---... $ 5,714.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners _.__... ..$ 4,000.00
Fees -----------31.25 4,031.25
Total .-....-.------------------- $ 9,745.25









36 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Volusia County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds _$ 23,343.00
Federal Funds _... 11,978.71 $ 35,321.71
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners .__ $ 76,947.02
Board of Public Instruction 6,525.00
Cities ___.._.____ 9,183.33
Fees and Miscellaneous 2,145.61 94,800.96


Total


$130,122.67


Wakulla County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds .----- ---- $ 3,838.00
Federal Funds ___ 1,580.00 $ 5,418.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners ........$ 4,850.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 30.67 4,880.67
Total ---. .....--.... ............ $ 10,298.67

Walton County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ...-............... $ 9,027.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 3,000.00
Board of Public Instruction 3,000.00
Fees and Miscellaneous __.._ 155.88 6,155.88
Total --- --..-----.---- .....-........ $ 15,182.88


Washington County Health Unit
State Board of Health:
State Funds ---$ 6,844.00
Federal Funds -- _. 2,640.00
Local Funds:
Board of County Commissioners $ 3,100.00
Board of Public Instruction _...._.. ...__ 3,100.00
City of Chipley 720.00
Fees and Miscellaneous 84.57


Total


$ 9,484.00



7,004.57
$ 16,488.57


- =






FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS


CHART I

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FLORIDA STATE
BOARD OF HEALTH DOLLAR FOR 1952


TOTAL AMOUNT INITIALLY BUDGETED $5.649,901


GENERAL ADMINISTRATION$286,760
VITAL STATISTICS 140.640
HEALTH INFORMATION 64.620
NARCOTIC ENFORCEMENT 50,980
SANITARY ENGINEERING 169,700
ENTOtMLOC6Y.d MOSQUITOCON 1L582.920
LABORATORIES 585.660


TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL 122.240
PREVENTABLE DISEASES 428,280
CHRONIC DISEASES 529.817
MATERNAL'ndCHILO HEALTH 110,400
BUREAU.LOCALHEALTH SERVICE 87.760
OTHER 102.640
COUNTY HEALTH UNITS 2,989.464











TABLE 4

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL AT MAIN OFFICE, BRANCH LABORATORIES, RAPID TREAT-
MENT CENTER AND FIELD TRAINING CENTER, DECEMBER 31, 1951

Finance Maternal Sanitary
a and Laboratories Local Health and Child Preventable Diseases Engi.
Accounts g Service Health neering

I~ 1 :0 B ^ d- *




2- u r::::r_. .U ::::::r::c1 1 1 1 1 ( 5 20
ee 22 a0 2


reni sts. ..









Other ................... 2 4 2 4 4 1 5 1 3 212 7 61
Part-time ................. 19
Federated Engimployeers........ 1
PhySanitarians................ 1 11 1 321 11 1 1 14 2 14




NursTOTALes .............. 4 2 1 7 1 1 1 5 6 3 3 14 4 81 1

Gr(a) Onduate Engineergoing post-grdate training; (b) Undergoing post-graduate training.
Laboratory Personnel (Pro- 3 2 1 34 1010 73
fessional and Technical).. 32 9 3 2 3 9 58 1 1 1 1
Health Educators.......... 1 2 3 19 19 1 1 26
Nutritionists ......... ...
Medical and Psychiatric
Social Workers.......... 3
Statisticians ..............3
ai a..ea." ......i. 4 110 6 622 4 7 3 1 1 3 15 3 2 2 2 9 2 1 32 22 5 1 4 315 9 312 1042 141
Workers ................ 1212 123 5 22 8 42 4 25 25 11011 1 96
Other................4... 2 4 2 3 1 1 1 4 4 1 2 3 7 5 1 3 9 21113 7 2 61
Part-time. ............... 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 9
Federal Employees......... 2 1 1 1 8 110 1 5 6 19
TOTAL.............10 710 6 22381068206 6 621 1274 8 6 1026 5 2 31013 125 6 3 38 1 4194384179 194 5493

(a) One undergoing post-graduate training; (b) Undergoing post-graduate training.














TABLE 5
DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL IN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS, DECEMBER 31, 1951




aa0 0 a
l'I? PI l1 ilih lli.I il -1 111 I s

(a) (b) (d) (e) M() (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (1) (m)
Physicians.....................2 2 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1
Nurses ..................... 8 1 4 2 410 1 1 1 2 56 1 1 9 8 1 1 6 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 23 2 2 4 1 1
Dentists ...... ................ 1 1 1
Graduate Engineers....... 1 1 2
Sanitarians ..................... 1 3 1 2 5 1 1 1 2 32 1 5 7 1 2 11 2 1 1 15 11 1
Laboratory Personnel (Professional
and Technical)............... 1
Health Educators ...............
Nutritionists. .................
Medical and Psychiatric Social
Workers .......... .. .. 1
Statisticians .......... ....
Clerical, Administrative and Fiscal 1 1 21 1 4 1 11 1 1 27 1 16 6 1 2 1 1 1 11 1 23 12 2 1
Maintenance and Custodial
Workers.................... 3 1 2 5 3 1 7
Other. ......................... 1 1 5 2 1 14 1
Part-time.... .............. 3 1 1 1 1 12 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 1 1 1
Federal Employees .............
TOTAL...................1.. 83 13 5 821 3 2 4 5 7 142 3313 28.21 2 12 2 2 541 5212 6 1011 6 16"10 42


(a) One undergoing post-graduate training.
(b) Serves also Osceola County.
)Serves also Hernando and Levy Counties.
) Serves also Bradford ad Union Counties.
(e) Serves also Gilchrist and Hamilton Counties.


One undergoing post-graduate training.
Serves also Santa Rosa County.
Serves also Gulf and Wakulla Counties.
Serves also-Calhoun and Liberty Counties.


Serves also Charlotte and DeSoto Counties.
Serves also Glades and Hendry Counties.
Serves also Okaloosa and Walton Counties.
Serves also Washington County.













TABLE 5-Continued

DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL IN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS, DECEMBER 31, 1951




A z -8, I X, N 4 N w, n | w, w|1,|


(n) (o) (p) (q) (r) (.) (t)
Physicians_............................ 1 1 2 1 1 1( 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 48
Nurses.................................. 1721 1 4 3 1 2 33 112 2131166 2 1 1 3 1141 227
Dentists .................... 1 5
Graduate Engineers ....................... 1 1 7
Sanitarians ........................... 1 2 1 1 2 11 12 31 113 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 7 11157
Laboratory Personnel (Professional and 1 4
Technical) .................. .... .. 2 1 4
Health Educators ............ ......... 1
Nutritionists. ...............................
Medical and Psychiatric Social Workers.... 1
Statisticians............................
Clerical,AdministrativeandFiscal............ 2 1 5 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 5 114 6 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1163
Maintenance and Custodial Workers ........... 2 2 41 8 42
Other ........ .......... ............ .... 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 45
Part-time:: ... ................. .. .... 1 1 1 8 6 3 4 1 1 3 1 1 1 77
Federal Employees..........................
TOTAL................................ 12 519 5 2 7 910 3 9 8 7 233 432 36325 6 9 6 8 5 8 4 237 2 3 5 831


(n) One also serves Taylor County.
One on Military Leave of Absence.
(o) Serves also Sarasota County.


(p) Serves also Baker County.
(q) Serves also Flagler County.
(r) Serves also Indian River. Okeechobee and


Martin Counties.
(s) Serves also Pasco County.
(t) Serves also Dixie and Lafayette Counties.







VITAL STATISTICS 41


BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
EVERETT H. WILLIAMS, Jr., M.S., Hyg.
Director

This report contains a brief summary of preliminary totals
for statistical data for the year 1951 and also covers the activi-
ties of the Bureau of Vital Statistics. Final and more detailed
statistical data regarding births, stillbirths, deaths, marriages,
and divorces will be published separately as a supplement to this
annual report under the title, "Florida Vital Statistics, 1951".
Another supplement containing more detailed data concerning
reported cases of disease will be published under the title, "Flor-
ida Morbidity Statistics, 1951."


POPULATION

Final population figures from the 1950 Federal Census have
now been released for this State and each of its counties. Since
these figures are now available, the current population estimates
should be more reliable. Unfortunately, census data for coun-
ties by color are not yet available.
The population of Florida as of April 1, 1950 was 2,771,305
according to the Federal census. This figure represents a gain
of 837,999 or 46.1 percent over the 1,897,414 inhabitants of the
State enumerated in the 1940 census. The growth of Florida's
total, white, and colored population from the Federal census of
1830 to the one of 1950 are shown on Figure I. This graph
shows that, the total population has had a fairly steady rate of
increase which averages about 40 percent each ten years. The
white population increase has been slightly higher while the
rate of increase of the colored population has been gradually
getting smaller. For the decade 1940-1950 the white population
increased 56.7 percent as compared to an increase of 17.4 percent
for the colored population. This difference in rate of increase
is bringing about a gradual change in the proportion of white
and colored persons in the population. In 1950, white persons
comprised 78.2 percent of this State's population as compared to
72.8 percent in 1940. Based on past experience we can expect
the proportion of white persons to continue to increase.
The population estimate for the State of Florida as of July 1,
1951 is 2,901,800 and is divided as follows: (1) 2,283,880 white,
and (2) 617,920 colored.








42 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951
FIGURE 1
GROWTH OF POPULATION, FLORIDA, BY RACE FROM 1830 THROUGH 1950

S.000.000
1,000.000 Tot



1.000.000

500,000


200,000

100,000


50.000


20,000

10,000 A .
1830 40 50 60 70 80 90 1900 to 20 30 40 .50
CENSUS YEARS
BIRTHS
There were 70,212 resident births for Florida during 1951
and the rate was 24.2 per thousand population. This is the
highest number of births on record in this State, and the rate
is the same as that for 1947 which established a record. The
white birth rate was 22.0 and the colored rate was 32.1 per
thousand population. Table 6 shows the number of resident
births and birth rates for this State for the period 1931-1951.
Preliminary totals of births by color for all counties and for
cities over 10,000 population are shown in Table 7. The pro-
portion of births attended by physicians continue to increase.
While data for 1951 are not yet available, tabulations for 1950
showed 85 percent of all births attended by physicians as com-
pared to 73 percent in 1941. Physicians attended 98 percent
of all white births and 53 percent of the colored births. 92 per-
cent of the white births occurred in a hospital as compared to
39 percent of the colored births.
DEATHS
In 1951, there were 27,941 deaths among residents of this
state and the death rate was 9.6 per thousand population. The
white death rate was 9.0 and was 24 percent lower than the







VITAL STATISTICS 43


colored rate of 11.8 per thousand population. The trend of resi-
dent death rates in Florida for the years 1931-1951 are shown
in Table 6. Deaths for the year 1951 by color for every
county and each city over 10,000 population are shown in
Table 8.
Heart disease continued to be the leading cause of death and
accounted for 33 percent of all deaths. Other leading causes of
death were cancer, vascular lesions affecting central nervous
system, and accidents. Deaths by color and a comparison of
death rates for 1950 and 1951 are shown for the abridged list
of fifty causes in Table 9.
It is gratifying to note the continued decrease in the tubercu-
losis death rate. The rate for 1951 was 17.7 as compared to 18.7
per 100,000 population in 1950. Florida's progress in this field
has been outstanding. There were 88 maternal deaths and 2,308
deaths among children under one year of age. The death rates
for these two causes showed little change from the previous year.
The number of deaths due to motor vehicle accidents was
slightly less than for 1950 but this improvement was more than
offset by the increase in deaths due to other types of accidents.
Accidental deaths are the fourth leading cause and constitute a
serious problem in this State.
Whooping Cough deaths increased from 8 in 1950 to 25 in
1951. In view of the fact that an effective immunization is
available for this disease, it is felt that most of these deaths
could have been prevented.
Table 10 shows the number of deaths for certain important
diseases for each county and also contains the 1951 population
estimates.

MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES
This is the second year for which much new data concerning
marriages will be tabulated. Prior to 1950 only county and
month of occurrence was tabulated. In 1950, by correlating in-
formation from the marriage application with that on the mar-
riage license, it was possible to make tabulations concerning the
age, race, previous marital status, and residence status of both
bride and groom. These data were published in the Vital Sta-
tistics Supplement to the 1950 annual report. Similar tabula-
tions will appear in the Vital Statistics Supplements for this and
future annual reports. Unfortunately data concerning age and
race are not currently available on divorce records. It is hoped
that this information can be made available in the near future
so that desirable tabulations can be made.
There were 26,794 marriages performed in Florida during
1951. This is a 3 percent decrease from the proceeding year.
The rate of persons married was 18.5 per thousand population.







44 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


The marriage rate for white persons was 18.3 as compared to
the negro rate of 19.1 per thousand population.
In 1951, there-were 18,431 divorces granted in this State.
This represents a rate of 12.7 persons divorced per 1,000 popu-
lation. There were also 187 annulments granted during the
year. The ratio of marriages to divorces was 1.45 as compared
to 1.52 in 1950 and 1.25 in 1949. A tabulation of marriages by
color, divorces, and annulments for each county is given in
Table 11.

ACTIVITIES
The work load of this bureau increased considerably during
the year 1951. In addition to the filing of a larger volume of
records, there was a large increase in requests for certified
copies of records. In 1951 there were 84,296 requests for cer-
tifications as compared to 72,873 for the previous year. Each
year more and more organizations require certified copies of
birth records to prove age and citizenship.
A total of 1262 adoption decrees were received from clerks
of Circuit Courts and 1419 adoptive birth certificates were filed.
There were also 3130 delayed birth certificates registered. 1539
of these delayed birth certificates were filed with the various
County Judges and forwarded by them to this office.
It is gratifying to note the improvement in completeness of
birth registration in this state during the past decade. A na-
tional test made by the U. S. Bureau of the Census following
the 1950 population survey showed that during that year 97.5
percent of all births in Florida were registered. This figure
is about the same as the national average of 97.8 percent. Fol-
lowing the 1940 census, a similar test showed that during that
year only 89.9 percent of births were being registered in this
state. Fifteen of the state's 67 counties made 100 percent on
birth registration during 1950. Those counties were Brevard,
Charlotte, Citrus, DeSoto, Flagler, Gulf, Hardee, Hendry, Her-
nando, Liberty, Okeechobee, Osceola, St. Johns, Suwannee, and
Wakulla. Counties where records fell below 90 percent com-
pleteness are Union, Clay, Collier, Dixie, Gilchrist, Glades, Mar-
ion, Taylor and Washington.
Table 12 shows the percentage of birth registration com-
pleteness in 1940 and 1950 by race for each county in Florida
and for some of the larger cities. The state law requires that
all births be registered by the responsible attendant at birth
within 10 days after the birth occurs. Failure to achieve 100
percent completeness of registration indicates that a few phy-
sicians and midwives have failed to comply with the state law.
While much progress has been made, we cannot be satisfied
until each baby born in Florida is registered according to law.










VITAL STATISTICS 45
TABLE 6
RESIDENT BIRTHS AND DEATHS WITH RATES PER
1,000 POPULATION, FLORIDA, 1931-1951


YEAR

1951*
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945:
1944
1943
1942
1941
1940
1939
1938
1937
1936
1935
1934
1933
1932
1931


POPULATION

2,901,800
2,797,100
2,692,500
2,587,800
2,483,200
2,378,500
2,273,900
2,196,195
2,125.935
2,055,675
1,985,415
1,915,155
1,853,660
1,795,322
1,736,984
1,678,646
1,620,308
1,585,596
1,554,000
1,530,356
1,502,736


BIRTHS

70,212
64,370
61,642
59,685
60,201
54.347
48,839
49,186
46,763
40,675
37,351
33,696
32,437
31,101
29,529
28,116
28,058
26,722
25,647
27.242
26,789


BIRTH RATE

24.2
23.0
22.9
23.1
24.2
22.8
21.5-
22.4
22.0
19.8
18.8
17.6
17.5
17.3
17.0
16.7
17.3
16.9
16.5
17.8
17.8


DEATHS

27,941
26,525
26,317
24,505
24,150
22,750
22,594
23,251
23,213
21,144
21,438
21,458
20,209
19,949
19,825
20,050
19,059
19,518
18,112
17,721
17,291


*1951 data based on preliminary totals.
TABLE 7
PRELIMINARY TOTALS OF BIRTHS BY COLOR FOR COUNTIES
AND CITIES OVER 10,000 POPULATION, FLORIDA, 1951


County or City Total White


Florida..........
Alachua............
Gainesville ........
Baker...............
Bay..... .........
Panama City....
Bradford ...........
Brevard ............
Broward...........
Fort Lauderdale....
Calhoun............
Charlotte ...........
Citrus..............
, Clay................
Collier ............
Columbia............
Dade...............
Miami............
Miami Beach......
DeSoto.............
Dixie...............
Duval ..............
Jacksonville .......
Escambia............
Pensacola ........
Flagler ............
Franklin...........
Gadsden.............
Gilchrist ............
Glades..............
G ulf ................
Hamilton ............
Hardee... ...........
Hendry.............
Hernando..........
Highlands..........
Hillsborough........
Tampa .........
Holmes............
Indian River.........
Jackson ...........
Jefferson...........
Lafayette...........
Lake...............
Lee.......... ......
Fort Myers..........


70,212
1,466
794
185
1,286
918
312
754
2.517
979
205
74
124
510
134
510
11,537
5,555
518
177
84
8,752
7,136
3,540
2,040
99
143
1,024
83
42
206
261
214
137
186
347
6,212
4,592
324
324
889
285
82
897
533
340


50,332
931
571
127
1,022
684
226
517
1,526
628
167
60
79
422
100
335
9,018
4,193
518
120
66
6.267
4,886
2,665
1,365
31
99
291
76
23
146
109
193
90
130
245
5,084
3,681
316
204
563
69
69
607
381
215


Colored


19,880
535
223
58
264
234
86
237
991
351
38
14
45
88
34
175
2,519
1,362
57
18
2,485
2,250
875
675
68
44
733
7
19
60
152
21
47
56
102
1,128
911
8
120
326
216
13
290
152
125


County or City

Leon ...............
Tallahassee ........
Levy...............
Liberty.............
M adison ............
M anatee ...........
Bradenton.........
M arion .............
Ocala.............
Martin .............
M onroe .............
Key West........
Nassau..............
Okaloosa............
Okeechobee..........
Orange ..............
Orlando... ....
Osceola.............
Palm Beach.........
Lake Worth.......
West Palm Beach..
Pasco...............
Pinellas .............
Clearwater .......
St. Petersburg ....
Polk ................
Lakeland .........
Putnam .............
St. Johns ..........
St. Augustine......
St. Lucie. .......
Santa Rosa..........
Sarasota.............
Sarasota...........
Seminole............
Sanford...........
Sumter .............
Suwannee ..........
Taylor..............
Union..............
Volusia .............
Daytona Beach...
W akulla............
Walton..............
Washington ..........


DEATH RATE

9.6
9.5
9.4
9.5
9.7
9.6
9.9
10.6
10.9
10.3
10.8
11.2
10.9
11.1
11.4
11.9
11.8
12.3
11.7
11.6
11.5


Total

1,315
847
297
81
438
784
327
982
363
178
999
955
354
1,054
84
2,851
1,526
223
2,448
203
.994
443
2,958
370
1,676
3,176
706
665
652
462
573
601
628
477
740
371
274
461
230
116
1,527
691
112
373
240


White

702
522
161
62
153
485
213
624
219
93
894
850
260
987
69
2,164
1,163
172
1,497
191
690
351
2,334
276
1,238
2,360
652
385
401
296
314
437
483
332
325
176
179
314
157
71
1.076
431
70
307
181


Colored

613
326
136
19
285
299
114
458
144
85
105
105
104
67
16
687
363
51
951
12
304
92
624
94
438
816
154
280
251
166
259
64
145
145
415
195
95
147
73
45
451
260
42
66
59


--


I olre










46 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951











TABLE 8

PRELIMINARY TOTALS OF DEATHS BY COLOR FOR COUNTIES
AND CITIES OVER 10,000 POPULATION, FLORIDA, 1951


County or City I Total White


________________________________________ I- 1 -


Florida...........
Alachua.............
Gainesville........
Baker...............
Bay...............
Panama City.......
Bradford...........
Brevard. ............
Broward ...........
Fort Lauderdale....
Calhoun............
Charlotte............
Citrus.......... .....
Clay..............
Collier. ..............
Columbia ...........
Dade...............
M iami............
Miami Beach......
DeSoto ............
Dixie...............
D uval...............
Jacksonville.......
Escambia............
Pensacola ........
Flagler....... .......
Franklin ............
Gadsden............
Gilchrist ............
Glades .............
Gulf ................
Hamilton...........
Hardee...............
Hendry............
Hernando..........
Highlands...........
Hillsborough.........
Tampa............
Holmes.............
Indian River.........
Jackson ............
Jefferson............
Lafayette............
Lake................
Lee................
Fort Myers .......


27,941
463
188
46
302
200
119
302
810
383
64
46
64
140
53
182
4,593
2,586
396
80
38
2,854
2,320
900
491
30
59
294
24
19
61
113
92
63
65
161
2.598
1,723
97
112
316
126
35
386
278
180


20,652
244
112
34
230
145
82
225
560
288
48
37
52
1051
32
99
3.943
2,195
395
61
30
1,771
1,339
599
273
17
30
95
18
12
36
62
81
39
48
126
2,022
1,285
88
81
181
32
31
297
208
125


Colored


7,289
219
76
12
72
55
37
77
250
95
16
9
12
35
21
83
650
391
1
19
8
1,083
981
301
218
13
29
199
6
7
25
51
11
24
17
35
576
438
9
31
135
94
4
89
70
55


County or City Total


Leon................
Tallahassee........
Levy...............
Liberty............
Madison...........
Manatee ............
Bradenton.........
Marion..............
Ocala ............
M artin .......... ..
Monroe.............
Key West.........
Nassau.............
Okaloosa............
Okeechobee..........
Orange..............
Orlando ...........
Osceola.............
Palm Beach.........
Lake Worth.......
West Palm Beach..
Pasco...............
Pinellas .............
Clearwater ........
St. Petersburg .....
Polk................
Lakeland..........
Putnam .............
St. Johns............
St. Augustine......
St. Lucie............
Santa Rosa..........
Sarasota............
Sarasota...........
Seminole ...........
Sanford. ..........
Sumter..............
Suwannee...........
Taylor .............
Union..............
Volusia .............
Daytona Beach....
Wakulla............
Walton...............
Washington..........


400
219
99
29
171
427
237
448
158
95
258
231
132
169
49
1,270
755
193
1,236
184
525
230
2,382
209
1,555
1.154
353
271
282
214
215
148
375
271
307
153
84
185
106
43
905
376
51
148
94


White


172
124
49
21
75
331
193
228
85
62
208
181
75
146
37
1,054
631
171
892
182
387
195
2,172
171
1,415
894
288
158
162
132
118
124
321
229
147
58
51
113
67
28
698
280
27
127
73


Colored


228
95
50
8
96
96
44
220
73
33
50
50
57
23
12
216
124
22
344
2
138
35
210
38
140
260
65
113
120
82
97
24
54
42
160
95
33
72
39
15
207
96
24
21
21


' '









VITAL STATISTICS 47


TABLE 9

PRELIMINARY TOTALS FOR DEATHS BY IMPORTANT CAUSES,
BY COLOR, FLORIDA, 1951, AND A COMPARISON OF
DEATH RATES FOR THE YEARS 1950 AND 1951
DEATH RATES
DEATHS (PER 100,000
(Numbers in parentheses refer POPULATION)
CAUSE OF DEATH to the International List of --1-- ----
causes of death) Total White Colored 1951 1950
All Causes.................. .......... .... .... 27,941 20,652 7,289 9.6* 9.5*
Tuberculosis of respiratory system (001-008)............ 483 264 219 16.6 17.8
Tuberculosis, other forms (010-019).................... 30 12 18 1.0 0.9
Syphilis and its sequelae (020-029) .................... 176 71 105 6.1 6.4
Typhoid fever (040).................. ........ ...... 1 0 1 *** ***
Dysentery, all forms (045-048) ................... .... 23 10 13 0.8 0.9
Scarlet fever and streptococcal sore throat (050-051) ..... 8 7 1 0.3 0.1
Diphtheria (055) ................ ............ ... ..... 5 4 1 0.2 0.3
Whooping cough (056) .......................... .. 25 6 19 0.9 0.3
Meningococcal infections (057)........................ 23 21 2 0.8 0.6
Acute poliomyelitis (080)............................. 16 14 2 0.6 0.9
Acute infectious encephalitis (082)..................... 16 11 5 0.6 0.3
Smallpox (084) ....... ; ...................... ....... 0 0 0
Measles (085).......................... ...................... 5 3 2 0.2 0.1
Rabies (094) ................. .. 0 0 0
Typhus and other rickettsial diseases (100-108).......... 1 1 0 *** 0.1
M alaria (110-117) ................................... 1 0 1 0.1
All other diseases classified as infective and parasitic
(030 to 138) with exception of above causes ........ 110 55 55 3.8 3.2
Malignant neoplasms, including neoplasms of lymphatic
and haematopoietic tissues (140-205) .............. 3,756 3,162 594 129.4 130.9
Benign and unspecified neoplasms (210-239)............ 139 98 41 4.8 3.6
Diabetes mellitus (260).................. ......... 382 285 97 13.2 13.2
Anemias (290-293) ................... .............. 99 76 23 3.4 3.0
Vascular lesions affecting central nervous system (330-334) 3,309 2,334 975 114.0 108.0
Nomeningococcal meningitis (340) .................... 54 27 27 1.9 2.2
Rheumatic fever (400-402).............. .......... 17 9 8 0.6 0.9
Chronic rheumatic heart disease (410-416).............. 304 243 61 10.5 11.7
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease (420-422).. 6,687 5,714 973 230.4 222.6
Other diseases of heart (430-434)...................... 753 537 216 25.9 25.7
Hypertension with heart disease (440-443) .............. 1,416 872 544 48.8 49.9
Hypertension without mention of heart (444-447)........ 275 181 94 9.5 9.2
Influenza (480-483).................. .... ......... 205 92 113 7.1 5.6
Pneumonia (490-493)............................... 753 430 323 25.9 20.5
Bronchitis (500-502) ................................ 48 37 11 1.7 1.8
Ulcer of stomach and duodenum (540-541).............. 149 115 34 5.1 5.2
Appendicitis (550-553) .................... ...... 59 28 31 2.0 2.0
Intestinal obstruction and hernia (560-561-570).......... 212 147 65 7.3 7.6
Gastritis, duodenitis, enteritis and colitis, except
diarrhea of the newborn (543-571-572).............. 186 92 94 6.4 5.1
Cirrhosis of liver (581) ............................... 280 231 49 9.6 8.9
Nephritis and nephrosis (590-594) ..................... 556 331 225 19.2 21.2
Hyperplasia of prostate (610) ......................... 130 106 24 4.5 4.5
Complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the
puerperium (640-652, 670-689).................... 88 37 51 3.0 3.0
Congenital malformations (750-759).................... 332 265 67 11.4 10.2
Birt injuries, postnatal asphyxia and atelectas 183 1.7 1.7
(760-762) ....................................... 571 388 183 19.7 16.7
Infection of the newborn (763-768)..................... 72 33 39 2.5 1.8
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy, and immaturity
unqualified (769-776) ............................. 742 461 281 25.6 28.8
Senility without mention of psychosis, ill-defined and
unknown causes (780-795) ........... ..... ... 760 411 349 26.2 33.1
All other diseases (Residual) ........................ 2,017 1,501 516 69.5 67.3
Motor vehicle accidents (810-835)..................... 837 647 100 28.8 30.4
All other accidents (800-802, 840-962)................ 1,172 868 304 40.4 37.6
Suicide and self-inflicted injury (963, 970-979)........... 339 322 17 11.7 11.3
Homicide and operations of war (964, 965, 980-999)...... 319 93 226 11.0 13.0
Infant mortality (Deaths under one year of age)........ 2,308 1,349 959 32.9** 32.3**

Rate per 1,000 population.
** Rate per 1,000 live births.
***Rate less than 0.05.










48 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951

TABLE 10
PRELIMINARY TOTALS FOR RESIDENT DEATHS FROM
SELECTED CAUSES BY COUNTIES, FLORIDA, 1951



O .IE- S
COUNTIES I 0 'E | g*

a I Iu III

In N a U= -o


Florida,.....
Alachua... ......
Baker.............
Bay..............
Bradford. :.........
Brevard ..........
Broward...........
Calhoun...........
Charlotte .........
Citrus.............
Clay.............
Collier ............
Columbia.........
Dade.............
DeSoto. .........
Dixie .. ..
Duval... : ......
Escambia..........
Flagler. .. .......
Franklin ........
Gadsden...........
Gilehrist.........
Glades ...........
Gulf..............
Hamilton..........
Hardee...........
Hendry..........
Hernando.......
Highlands ........
Hillsborough.......
Holmes...........
Indian River.......
Jackson...........
Jefferson .........
Lafayette..........
Lake..............
Lee...............
Leon..............
Levy.............
Liberty ...........
M adison..........
Manatee..........
Marion...........
M martin ...........
Monroe..........
Nassau............
Okaloosa..........
Okeechobee........
Orange............
Osceola...........
Palm Beach.......
Pasco.............
Pinellas ..........
Polk..............
Putnam...........
St. Johns .........
St. Lucie..........
Santa Rosa........
Sarasota..........
Seminole.........
Sumter ...........
Suwannee.........
Taylor ...........
Umon............
Volusia ...........
Wakulla ..........
Walton ...........
Washington........


2,901,80(
58,83(
6,32(
42,73C
11,64C
24,72C
92,270
7,920
4,300
6,250
15,410
6,890
18,460
540,400
9,850
3,900
312,040
114,680
3,560
5,800
37,680
3,590
2,200
7,630
9,050
10,480
6,250
6,900
14,110
260,650
14,010
12,570
34,690
10,410
3,440
38,440
23,420
53,600
10,790
3,180
14,210
36,670
38,960
8,280
32,720
13,360
30,370
3,550
122,060
11,630
118,090
22.280
166,520
127,030
25,080
25,850
22,010
18,930
31,240
27,500
11,550
17,010
10,410
7,120
78,170
5,300
14,940
11,900


2,308
49
4
49
13
27
82
9
4
4
22
5
15
304
2
8
254
122
4
4
53
2
2
8
9
10
14
3
15
200
12
7
36
21
2
37
16
40
8
2
24
29
42
4
33
12
25
4
90
5
85
15
76
97
31
22
40
17
23
42
10
24
7

49
3
13
8


513 176 25 958
5 2 20


3,756
51
3
34
9
36
110
5
11
9
14
7
21
741
16
6
346
98
9
30
2
4
7
11
14
6
9
16
361
8
16
42
8
4
57
32
48
11
2
21
61
33
13
37
9
15
8
171
22
170
34
381
166
37
33
27
15
45
27
8
17
12
2
141
7
20
10


13,300 837
225 14
20 5
119 8
62 3
137 17
379 32
28 1
17 2
30 4
S59 3
22 2
87 2
2.193 136
33 3
10 3
1,275 87
380 26
19 2
26 2
123 12

7 1
24 3
44 4
45 4
23 5
38 2
78 8
1.167 83
43 5
45 1
141 3
60 3



46 8
17 1
87 1
233 6
215 16
56 6
75 10
62 8
65 14
28
651 38
117 3
613 43
115 8
1,319 36
556 40
131 9
132 5
81 10
63 6
185 14
151 3
40 4
87 4
64 5
22 2
455 13
22 1
68 6
43 3


1,172
22
1
18
4
14
30
5
1
3
11
6
10
157
7
6
144
42
2
2
14
1
71
10
1
8
2
4
98
8
6
9
6
1
18
16
19
1
7
9
18
2
22
7
20
4
45
4
65
11
66
41
15
9
6
13
15
12
4
12

2
35

9
6


-I I I I










VITAL STATISTICS 49

TABLE 11
PRELIMINARY TOTALS FOR MARRIAGES BY COLOR,
DIVORCES, AND ANNULMENTS FOR FLORIDA
AND EACH COUNTY, 1951

MARRIAGES
COUNTIES ----DIVORCES ANNULMENTS

TOTAL WHITE COLORED

Florida........... 26,794 20,903 5,891 18,431 187
Alachua........... 372 231 141 244
Baker............. 39 25 14 213 2
Bay.............. 448 341 107 92
Bradford.......... 91 65 26 546 12
Brevard............ 272 216 56 505 3
Broward.......... 1,433 1,075 358 448 2
Calhoun........... 47 40 7 57
Charlotte.......... 65 58 7 23
Citrus.............. 77 54 23 72
Clay.............. 107 84 23 166
Collier............ 101 83 18 22
Columbia......... 138 92 46 81 1
Dade............. 5,562 4,824 738 4,712 63
DeSoto............ 93 74 19 18 ....
Dixie ............. 21 14 7 15
Duval............ 2,158 1,592 566 983 11
Escambia.......... 636 487 149 726 15
Flagler............. 113 68 45 108 1
Franklin. ......... 72 58 14 26
Gadsden........... 204 73 131 61
Gilchrist........... 53 44 9 3 .
Glades ............ 24 17 7 3 .
Gulf.............. 67 40 27 22
Hamilton.......... 54 32 22 35
Hardee............ 125 112 13 338
Hendry........... 86 58 28 29
Hernando......... 106 85 21 34
Highlands ....... 149 106 43 130
Hi sborough....... 2.659 2,247 412 1,276 12
Holmes ......... 53 48 5 61
Indian River....... 154 113 41 34 .
Jackson........... 200 129 71 102 1
Jefferson........... 79 26 53 24
Lafayette.......... 23 15 8 3
Lake............. 315 228 87 184
Lee............... 243 197 46 107
Leon.............. 349 214 135 256 ..
Levy*............. 90 44 46 19
Liberty*......... 23 19 4 11
Madison.......... 73 41 32 61
Manatee.......... 386 283 103 73
Marion ........... 372 218 154 199 3
Martin............ 82 59 23 27
Monroe............ 455 408 47 345 2
Nassau............ 48 34 14 17
Okaloosa........... 197 181 16 100
Okeechobee........ 50 35 15 14
Orange............ 1,260 988 272 275
Oseea........ 172 133 39 17 ....
Palm Beach....... 1,157 788 369 600
Pasco............. 260 222 38 93 1
Pinellas............ 1,527 1,330 197 691 4
Polk.............. 1,285 997 288 1,032 10
Putnam............ 206 123 83 106 2
St. Johns.......... 201 155 46 1,110 16
St. Lucie........... 216 123 93 117 2
Santa Rosa*....... 71 57 14 29
Sarasota............ 366 309 57 161 2
Seminole.......... 300 176 124 177 1
Sumter............. 127 92 35 74 2
Suwannee......... 114 83 31 73
Taylor............ 95 60 35 19
Union... ......... 43 22 21 9
Volusia............. 635 508 127 1,092 11
Wakulla*.......... 38 33 5 4 1
Walton*............ 70 53 17 43
Washington........ 87 64 23 84
No December divorce reports received from Clerks of Circuit Court of Levy,
Liberty, Santa Rosa, Wakullo, and Walton Counties.










50 ANNUAL REPORT; 1951

TABLE 12

BIRTH REGISTRATION COMPLETENESS IN 1950 and 1940
BY RACE: FLORIDA, EACH COUNTY AND CERTAIN CITIES
(By Place of Birth, Figures for 1950, Preliminary; for 1940 Final)


IALL RACES WHITE NON WI
AREA 1950 1940 1950 1910 1950


Florida..................
Alachui...... ........
Baker ...............
Bayf....................
Bradford.............. .
Brevard... ............
Broward..................
Calhoun..................
Charlotte .................
Citrus ...................
Clay.. ...................
Collier.................
Columbia.................
D ade.....................
M iami...............
Miami Beach..........
DeSoto .. .. ........
Dixie ...............
Duval .... ..............
Jacksonville .............
Escambia.................
Pensacola ..............
Flagler....................
Franklin ..................
Gadsden ................
Gilchrist ..................
Glades...................
G ulf ......................
Hamilton .................
Hardee ..................
Hendry ..................
Hernando.................
Highlands.................
Hillsborough ............
Tampa ..............
Holmes .................
Indian River..............
Jackson...................
Jefferson .................
Lafayette ................
Lake ....................
Lee .......................
Leon ................. ..
Levy ....................
Liberty ..................
Madison. ................
M anatee ................
Marion ...............
M martin ................
Monroe ...............
Nassau ...............
Okaloosa .................
Okeechobee ...........
Orange ................
Orlando .................
Osceola ..................
Palm Beach ...............
West Palm Beach........
Pasco..................
Pinellas ..................
St. Petersburg ..........
Polk......................
Putnam...................
St. Johns..................
St. Lucie........... ...
Santa Rosa................
Sarasota ............
Seminole ................
Sumter..... ............
Suwannee.................
Taylor..................
Union................
Volusia .................
W akulla..................
Walton ................
Washinton ..........


97.5
97.0
96.7
97.8
96.6
100.0
98.2
97.6
100.0
100.0
88.9
85.7
97.7
99.2
98.9
99.5
100.0
82.4
98.2
98.3
97.3
98.0
100.0
97.2
97.4
75.0
75.0
100.0
95.6
100.0
100.0
100.0
95.8
98.8
99.0
95.7
93.0
94.3
97.4
95.0
99.0
96.3
95.2
S95.7
100.0
92.5
97.6
87.1
97.3
99.4
08.7
94.2
100.0
97.2
97.9
100.0
95.7
99.0
92.4
99.4
99.7
97.3
95.3
100.0
96.0
97.8
98.1
99.3
97.9
100.0
84.4
63.2
98.3
100.0
96.7
88.1


89.9
91.0
69.0
93.2
87.5
97.2
90.6
83.6
83.3
85.0
84.0
90.9
76.0
95.7
96.3
96.6
97.6
70.0
95.7
96.8
85.9
86.8
100.0
93.5
84.5
66.7
92.9.
74.5
81.8
92.1
73.1
92.9
94.5
94.0
96.8
77.7
94.2
75.0
69.9
73.9
97.4
98.3
79.1
85.7
100.0
59.3
86.8
94.2
94.6
85.9
79.1
85.9
56.3
96.2
99.1
100.0
95.4
97.8
91.1
95.5
95.6
92.6
93.3
96.8
86.4
88.0
94.2
91.9
87.1
80.1
88.2
80.0
97.3
72.2
74.3
75.5


98.8
98.6
100.0
97.4
100.0
100.0
98.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.4
99.3
99.5
100.0
78.6
98.9
99.0
98.0
98.7
100.0
96.2
.98.6
75.0
100.0
S100.0
91.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.5
99.5
100.0
95.7
100.0
97.1
100.0
91.7
99.3
98.1
98.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.5
100.0
99.3
100.0
96.6
100.0
98.8
99.0
100.0
98.8
99.6
95.1
100.0
100.0
98.7
96.8
100.0
98.6
100.0
100.0
98.4
100.0
100.0
88.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
96.0
82.8


91.3
92.6
67.6
93.2
95.0
95.2
87.7
85.3
90.0
84.6
73.3
88.2
79.4
97.1
98.2
96.6
97.1
57.1
97.0
98.0
86.1
87.1
100.0
95.2
84.1
66.7
100.0
70.0
81.8
91.7
73.7
96.8
97.8
94.6
97.3
77.6
100.0
79.4
69.6
72.7
98.5
98.9
83.9
87.1
100.0
63.5
90.9
97.2
94.7
82.1
71.8
86.8
60.6
96.9
99.4
100.0
97.4
99.3
92.1
97.5
96.9
95.2
92.5
96.6
85.4
87.0
96.3
91.7
85.7
79.3
94.3
90.0
98.6
56.3
72.2
73.5


94.1
93.6
93.3
100.0
89.5
100.0
97.1
92.3
100.0
100.0
78.6
66.7
90.0
98.1
97.3
100.0
100.0
96.6
96.5
95.5
96.3
100.0
100.0
96.8
50.0
100.0
97.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
95.2
93.5
100.0
81.8
88.7
96.7
100.0
98.5
89.3
89.3
93.1
S100.0
86.5
93.7
75.9
94.1
100.0
97.2
64.3
100.0
92.3
92.4
100.0
90.6
97.0
83.3
97.2
98.7
93.4
93.8
100.0
92.7
90.9
91.3
100.0
94.7
100.0
78.9
53.3
93.5
100.0
100.0
100.0


I


,


IITE
1940
86.4
88.8
75.0
93.3
68.8
100.0
93.9
60.0
50.0
85.7
100.0
100.0
71.9
91.0
89.9
100.0
84.2
92.7
93.8
85.1
85.3
100.0
90.0
84.7
66.7
66.7
86.7
81.8
100.0
71.4
81.8
77.8
91.1
95.2
80.0
85.7
67.3
70.0
100.0
94.9
96.0
74.5
82.8
100.0
56.1
77.8
89.4
94.4
100.0
89.3
80.0
93.8
97.6
100.0
91.4
92.1
87.5
87:7
90.7
83.6
94.6
97.2
87.9
100.0
86,7
92.2
90.0
81.6
66.7
50.0
94.6
85.0
86.7
82.6 ,







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE
GEORGE A. DAME, M.D.
Director

On July 1, 1951, the Field Technical Staff and the In-service
Field Training Center became a part of the Bureau of Local
Health Service. This bureau now functions through its four
component facilities: County Health Units, Public Health Nurs-
ing, Field Technical Staff and Field Training Center. The an-
nual reports of the latter three are found elsewhere in this
volume.
Final plans were completed and the Lee County Health De-
partment was organized and accredited on October 15, 1951.
Doctor A. K. Cox, formerly of the Jackson-Washington Unit,
was appointed director. Other personnel have been selected,
surveys have been made, programs planned and normal activi-
ties are now well underway. The department is well housed
in suitable and adequate quarters.
There remain only two counties, Saint Johns and Collier, with-
out accredited county health departments. There is a lively
interest in public health and preventive medicine in each of these
counties and it is quite likely that at least one of them will join
their sixty-five (65) sister counties in organized full-time health
programs some time in the year 1952. The Florida State Board
of Health stands ready to cooperate with funds and all other
necessary assistance to these counties when they are ready to
set up their health facilities.
The 1951 session of the Florida Legislature increased its ap-
propriation of funds for county health units from $750,000 to
$850,000 per annum. This $100,000 increase was badly needed,
and barely covered increased costs of operations in the county
health departments, and did very little toward the increase of
personnel arnd finances to expand programs for the service of
the greatly increased population. It is sincerely hoped by all
citizens who are interested in the health of the people of the
State that the next Legislature will find itself able to greatly
increase its appropriation to the county health departments.
Of the fifty-one health officers who are engaged in public
health work in the county health departments, or are being
trained for that service, there are thirty-six directors, eleven
assistant health officers and four who are presently in training
in schools of public health.







52 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


Of the total number of health officers, six are Diplomates of
the American Board of Preventive Medicine and Public Health;
thirty-seven are licensed to practice medicine in this State; four-
teen are not yet licensed. However, five took the recent medi-
cal examinations but have not yet been informed of the results.
Seventeen of our health officers have the degree of Master
of Public Health or a similar degree. All of them, of course,
have the degree of Medical Doctor. Of the seventeen who have
degrees in public health, the following shows the number from
each of the schools of public health: Johns-Hopkins, seven; Har-
vard, four; North Carolina, three; California, two; and Michi-
gan, one. Of the four who are now in training the distribution
is as follows: Johns-Hopkins, three, and Tulane, one.
The number of health officers born in each of the areas listed
here are as follows: Tennessee, eight; Georgia, five; Pennsyl-
vania, four; Alabama, three; Florida, three; Illinois, three;
New York, three; Kentucky, two; Ohio, two; South Carolina,
two; West Virginia, two; Wisconsin, two; Colorado, one; In-
diana, one; Michigan, one; Mississippi, one; Missouri, one; Ne-
braska, one; North Carolina, one; Oklahoma, one; Utah, one;
Virginia, one; Egypt, one; and Puerto Rico, one.
During the year seven directors of county health departments
were terminated and eight new ones were employed. The ter-
minations were for the following reasons:
To accept further training to return to private practice, two.
To return to private practice, one.
For non-performance of duties, one.
To accept health officer position in another state, one.
To enter United States Navy, one.
Recalled to United States Public Health Service, one.
On June 18, 1951, Diplomates of the American Board of Pre-
ventive Medicine and Public Health, resident in Florida, met in
Jacksonville and organized The Florida Academy of Preventive
Medicine and Public Health. There were twelve charter mem-
bers, since which time two other members have been accepted.
Florida was the second state to organize an academy; North
Carolina being the first. The purposes of the Academy are to
study, improve the practice of, and to advance the cause of pre-
ventive medicine and public health. The membership of the
Academy includes six directors of local health departments.
All preliminary plans for the establishment of Residency Areas
in Florida having been successfully completed, Alachua, Dade,
Hillsborough and Pinellas County Health Departments were rec-







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 53


ommended for approval by the Executive Board of the American
Public Health Association, and the American Board of Pre-
ventive Medicine and Public Health. The Council on Medical
Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association
approved these areas in September, 1951. These areas are ana-
logous to hospitals approved for the training of other medical
specialists. There. are three health officers presently in resi-
dency. The areas are adequate for ten residents and will soon
probably be used to full capacity.
While all county health departments are operating all of the
usual programs of preventive medicine and public health, and
generally speaking are conducting them in a satisfactory man-
ner, there are some programs in some of the counties that are
of such unusual interest from the viewpoint of merit or novelty,
they should be given special mention in this report. Many of
the county health departments not mentioned are doing balanced
programs of consistent merit. Although the health officer in
some instances may be named mostly for identification purposes,
frequently the excellency of a program or activity is due to the
type of personnel the health officer has had the ability or luck
to secure for his staff. Let it be said that teamwork also is
largely the answer.
Several county health departments have conducted programs
of sanitation that are worthy of special mention. Probably the
most satisfactory of these programs is that of Indian River
County. Taking all factors into consideration Mr. Edwin Had-
den, Jr., of that county, should be especially commended. A
close second is Mr. Byron Hudson of Madison. In the larger
county health departments there should be mentioned Mr. Allen
Henry of Pinellas, Mr. Henry Crowell of Hillsborough, Mr. Bur-
ney Cowden of Polk, Mr. Robert Quick of Dade, Mr. Norman
Tuckett of Broward and Mr. Robert Eddy of Palm Beach. The
qualities and qualifications of engineers and sanitarians em-
ployed by county health departments are steadily improving.
The legal term for a clerical person engaged in public health
work in a county health department is "clerk". This person
may be either a clerk or stenographer or may be especially
trained as a secretary. Here we refer to the person who keeps
records, makes reports and does related work. This person is
a very important employee of a county health department and
much depends on her personality and qualifications. Upon check-
ing carefully the reports received from the county health de-
partments, both as to accuracy and promptness, the palm goes
to Mrs. Elizabeth Maddox of Sumter. Others who should re-
ceive commendation are Mrs. Mary Lastinger of Franklin, Miss
CaroLee Owens of Lake, and Mrs. Frances Anderson of Hills-
borough. There has been great improvement in the qualities
and qualifications of clerks throughout the state.







54 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


In his health unit composed of the health departments of Co-
lumbia, Gilchrist and Hamilton, Dr. Joseph Weeks has con-
ducted, for the past five years, a highly successful program for
the eradication of tinea capitis. He has now made his report.
Surveys have found 129 cases: 40 cases in 1947, 39 cases in
1948, 25 cases in 1949, 14 cases in 1950, and 11 cases in 1951.
It will be seen, therefore, that the number of cases have de-
creased each year so that the number for 1951 was only about
25% of the number found in 1947. It is natural to assume that
the aggressive measures employed by Dr. Weeks in combat-
ing the disease are yielding the desired results toward its ulti-
mate elimination. At the same time our experience is such as
to emphasize the importance of alertness on the part of other
health departments for the detection of this condition.
Recently it has been demonstrated that many children in
Florida are suffering from a vitamin C deficiency: This in the
greatest citrus producing area in the world. Dr. Robert Rice,
health officer in the Unit composed of the health departments
of Hardee, DeSoto and Charlotte, is doing something about it.
Already in Hardee County every school has a refrigerated orange
juice dispensing unit. These are being rapidly installed in the
schools of DeSoto and Charlotte. The frozen concentrate juice
is now available to about five thousand school children. A five
ounce container is dispensed at five cents. The whole plan has
been carefully worked out by Dr. Rice, the Sargents' Concen-
trate people, the Florida Citrus Commission, and local authori-
ties. This program will no doubt be rapidly extended to other
areas as its usefulness and feasibility are demonstrated.
Several county health departments have been running neck
and neck on the conducting of very satisfactory programs of
tuberculosis control. The consensus is that Dr. Paul Hughes
and his staff in Broward County have won by a nose. Dr.
Joseph Bistowish and staff of Leon, Dr. Frank Hall and staff
of Alachua, Dr. William Wright and staff of Sarasota, and
Dr. John McSween and staff of Escambia "placed". We could
add that several others won "show".
In the latter part of August, 1951 a dental program was es-
tablished in the Jackson County Health Department under the
direction of Dr. A. K. Cox, then health officer. This program
is being continued under Dr. Joseph .Batsche, the new health
officer since Dr. Cox took over the direction of the health de-
partment in Lee County. 'Mr. Sam Smith of Marianna was
the originator and promoter of this program. The County Com-
missioners levied a millage sufficient to finance the new pro-
gram. Great progress has been made. Other health officers
and county health departments have operated consistently fine
programs and credit should be given to Dr. Frank Chappell







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


in Hillsborough, Dr. Leland Dame in Orange, Dr. Elam Cato
in Dade, and Dr. Rothermel in Pinellas. Other county health
departments have had difficulty in maintaining programs on
account of not being able to maintain continuous service of
dentists.
As a means for developing public health consciousness in
Citrus County Dr. John Neill, the county health officer, with
the help of his staff, conducted a poster contest among the school
children. Small cash prizes were awarded and quite a favor-
able stimulus was created; much of this enthusiasm being car-
ried over into the homes. This, of course, is only one of the
methods being used by Dr. Neill in his three county health
departments in Citrus, Levy and Hernando, for a better under-
standing of the needs for preventive medicine and public health.
Some of the highlights in milk control are briefly mentioned.
The program is being continually improved. Dr. John McSween
and his staff of Escambia County have now done an outstand-
ing job in brucellosis control. Dr. Kip Kelso and staff in his
four county Unit, composed of St. Lucie, Indian River, Martin
and Okeechobee, have practically covered all of his territory with
the adoption of a model milk ordinance by all of the municipali-
ties in this area. Dr. Frank Chappell and staff of Hillsborough,
which lead the way, and now Dr. Robert Rothermel and staff
of Pinellas, have a 100% mastitis program in each of the coun-
ties. These items are submitted as examples: There are so
many counties doing fine milk control programs that it is not
feasible to mention each of them.
A noteworthy activity in Walton County in the year 1951,
under the direction of Dr. Robert Nelson and his staff, was a
rat control program. A continuous educational program hav-
ing been carried on for months, there was a great demand on
the part of citizens and officials that a program be set up for
the extermination or reduction of the very extensive rat popu-
lation. The city furnished warfarin, labor and transportation
for the program in DeFuniak Springs, and a similar program
was set up for the remaining area of the county and carried
out by the veterans organization and county officials. Both of
these programs were directed by the county health department.
As a general practice all new and remodeled buildings were rat-
proofed, and poison was regularly put out to kill rats. It is the
consensus of citizens that the rat population was reduced about
60%.
Dr. Robert Higgins and his staff completed the schedule cov-
ering the survey and evaluation for Volusia County. In a letter
to Dr. Higgins from Dr. Roscoe Kandle, Field Director of the
American Public Health Association the following comments
were made: "You, your staff and Volusia County have indeed







56 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


made substantial gains in public health since 1947. The in-
crease in the staff of the health department; the establishment
of the Visiting Nurses Association and its close coordination
with the other public health nursing service; the record of
community-wide participation in the public health program; the
formal and in-service training of the health department and
Visiting Nurses Association staff; the improvement in the gen-
eral quality of the tuberculosis program; the review procedure
of maternal deaths; the concentration of maternal nursing serv-
ices on mothers delivered at home; the substantial improvement
in the infant mortality rate; the better water supplies of the
city and of the rural schools." These evaluations are of con-
siderable benefit to health officers and their county health de-
partments: They bring out strengths and weaknesses and show
progress or lack of progress and indicate to the health officer
where he should place emphasis in his programs.
Comment should be made on the fine work done by Dr. Frank
Quillman, director of the Seminole County Health Unit, and
his staff, in pioneering the first multiphasic screening survey
in Florida. This multiphasic survey consisted of 70 mm chest
X-rays, and blood tests for syphilis, anemia, and diabetes. Ap-
proximately 25% of the county population of 11,330 in the coun-
ty were examined. The positive findings were: 78 X-rays
showed possible disease.; 290 had positive test for syphilis; 42
had high blood sugar suspicious of diabetes; 430 had hemoglobin
levels of less than 11.5 G. per cent. Dr. Quillman personally
interviewed each individual with positive findings, explained
the findings, and directed them for proper attention.
SUnder the direction of Dr. Ellsworth John of the Suwannee
County Health Department, a consolidated nutritional study of
the first three grades in Live Oak City School has been under-
taken. This survey has included dietary records (showing
marked inadequacy of basic foods), hookworm and anemia sur-
veys (showing high incidence of both). Each child's growth
and developmental pattern has been plotted on the Wetzel Grid.
Community participation and interest has been encouraged
through appropriate publicity channels. Congratulations to Dr.
John and his fine staff for a new and valuable program!
From a letter written by a competent authority to the health
officer of Monroe County, and referring to Mr. Eddie Fernandez
and Mr. Manuel Varela of the county mosquito control program,
the following excerpt is quoted: "In my estimation they have
accomplished . the most outstanding work in the field
of mosquito control that has been accomplished in the State of
Florida, or, in fact, the Nation. The eradication of the yellow
fever mosquito (aedes aegypti) from Key West ranks with ....
the eradication of yellow fever mosquitoes in some of the South






LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


American countries by the Rockefeller Foundation". It is very
gratifying to report such excellent work, and to give credit
where credit is due.
Dr. Warren Weathington, recently elected director of the
Gadsden County Health Department reports on the fine work
being done by the Havana Health Council. This council has
been a very active organization for sixteen years and so Dr.
Weathington does not claim any credit. The membership con-
sists of interested citizens from the churches, schools and civic
organizations. A representative of the health department is
invited to attend each meeting of the council. .The highlight of
the council's meetings is usually a talk on some interesting sub-
ject relating to health. Each fifth Sunday evening during the
year the churches alternate in meeting together. At this meet-
ing the public health nurse gives a report of the health activities
for the quarter. The collection received at these meetings is
used by the health council for: Correcting defective vision of
school children; dental corrections; free lunches for underprivi-
leged children; hookworm surveys and follow-up treatment;
assistance for mobile X-ray surveys; aiding in diabetic and. pre-
school clinics, and equipping a sick room loan closet. The most
recent project undertaken by the council was a blood typing
program. Equipment for the program was purchased and after
due publicity clinics were held from one until four o'clock every
afternoon for three days. One result of the council's work is
that they have a nice health center which is well located in the
center of the small town. Clinics are held once a week and are
well attended by the citizens of the town and surrounding
country.
A statistical report of some of the activities of county health
departments is submitted as a matter of interest and record.
The value of this table for comparison is limited by the fact
that many splendid activities are not codable.







58 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


TABLE 13

SOME MAJOR ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL HEALTH UNITS
DURING 1951


a 2 B

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S 0

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1; Admissions to Service........ 10 7 31 56 25 78 6 0
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians........... 0 4 100 7 10 197 0 1
3. Field and Office Visits........... 18 7 88 77 38 149 6 0
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4: Smallpox;......... ..... 1,364 104 1.113 185 300 727 344 47
5. Diphtheria, (5-7).............. 1,755 333 961 682 426 1,062 114 88
8, Typhoid Fever............. 6,172 820 2,606 125 10 2,563 1.078 169
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11).......... 659 322 659 393 301 979 102 73
12. Tetanus ............ ....... 2,244 295 2,539 677 378 1,093 108 122
:13. Rabies ................ ......... 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
.INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service..... ..... 3 687 267 188 48 860 131 11
15,, Field and Office Visits.... .. 378 698 278 209 64 1,128 131 11
**16. Treatments Given............... 372 699 268 200 43 832 131 11
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service... 571 23 273 101 44 366 26 3
2 Visits to Medical Conferences... 1588 40 734 172 64 1,425 53 4
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations................. 168 64 1,447 92 320 2.999 73 18




.0 o
3 .E .
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 g .

A ;COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
'.- Admissions to Service........... 1 18 11 965 6 2 76
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians....................... 1 23 660 1 11 15
3. Field and Office Visits.......... 9 31 210 1,901 21 6 155
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox....................... 18 92 293 8,244 67 118 1,261
5. Diphtheria, (5-7) ............... 61 338 1,987 7,056 229 247 2,542
8. Typhoid Fever................ 902 672 3,010 385 16 676 6,025
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11). ........ 56 334 1,803 6,929 206 247 1,851
12. Tetanus....................... 87 336 3,174 7,203 247 406 3,755
13. Rabies......................... 0 0 4 17 0 0 4
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service........ 100 192 1,055 64 55 426 250
16. Field and Office Visits........... 103 199 1,149 64 73 695 286
16. Treatments Given .............. 260 241 1,066 64 118 426 245
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 40 61 95 6,885 18 26 2,659
2. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 45 94 17535,327 22 39 5,256
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations................. 44 121 10215,392 49 27 3,098










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 59




MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



.a a

ANNUAL REPORT 1951

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 118 2 7 30 0 12 7
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians................ 16 11 1 6 0 10
3. Field and Office Visits.......... 400 2 9 32 13 32
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox..................... 1,97 29 201 306 55 62 224
5. Diphtheria, (5-7) ............. 2,255 218 100 389 227 122 201
8. Typhoid Fever. ............... 14286 253 683 4,631 203 135 1,093
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11)......... 1275 120 92 311 61 32 186
12. Tetanus..................... 1,762 270 398 1,106 409 132 589
13. Rabies........ ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service.......... 356 28 71 398 391 12 217
15. Field and Office Visits............ 448 38 71 398 398 12 235
16. Treatments Given.............. 445 24 71 398 385 12 -217
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 1,137 33 52 281 3 23 53
2. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 3,574 40 111 483 2 57 220
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations........... .... 1,190 34 34 727 13 26 67


.0
a a 0 0


ANNUAL REPORT 1951 0 0 U

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 14 11 9 4 9 279 4
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians............... 3 19 11 2 25 23 2
3. Field and Office Visits.......... 2 21 10 4 17 530 4
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox....................... 1,497 172 57 214 40 4,034 400
5. Diphtheria, (5-7)............... 366 204 301 112 181 4,689 785
8. Typhoid Fever.................. 1,49 24 208 366 25 282 929
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11)......... 209 191 260 102 93 2,726 260
12. Tetanus.......: ................ 1166 214 308 341 181 4,700 1,034
13. Rabies......................... 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service........... 491 268 17 238 76 439 567
15. Field and Office Visits........... 1,313 342 17 297 76 634 567
16. Treatments Given...........;... 491 191 16 224 99 577 1.436
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service' .. 62 9 27 13 109 1,295 20
2. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 105 11 33 20 138 4,020 26
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations ................. 25 32 57 23 71 7,540 16









60 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT,1951

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admission to Service. ........... 20 16 77 2 241 2 16
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians ............... 7 8 4 8 189 2 4
3. Field and Office Visits.......... 20 22 92 4 582 2 40
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox................. 217 1204 229 172 20 83 1,174
5. Diphtheria, (5-7).... ........... 564 1,123 161 174 57 2 1.255
8. Typhoid Fever............... 791 7,980 1,897 936 54 3 7,130
9. Whooping Cough. (9-11)......... 562 813 143 173 40 0 809
12.. Tetanus ................ ..... 89 1,037 1,239 466 54 2 6,201
13.: Rabies........................ 3 0 0 0 0 1
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service. 4......... 407 1,116 61 89 280 0 54
15. Field and Office Visits........ 413 1,140 84 104 583 0 56
16. Treatments Given.... .......... 482 1.586 88 102 208 0 126
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service... 15 442 35 11 61 7 1,119
2. Visits to Medical Conferences... 15 610 57 20 633 7 1,441
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations................. 95 413 141 8 254 8 1,833



t a

ANNUAL REPORT 1951

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1.' Admission to Service............ 15 1 16 41 6 0 53
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians .............. 1 0 32 20 34 0 6
3.f Field and Office Visits........... 15 4 35 92 7 0 78
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox ...................... 133 10 824 491 935 339 235
5. Diphtheria, (5-7)........ ...... 176 93 666 1,352 252 711 528
8. Typhoid Fever............... 1,963 722 1,571 1,770 6,641 822 1,288
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11)... .... 184 90 118 1,198 241 151 402
12. Tetanus........ ............. 181 129 751 2,004 298 1,100 680
13. Rabies........ .............. 0 9 0 0 0 0 0
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14.. Admissions to Service ........... 172 114 323 566 155 144 0
15. Field and Office Visits........... 174 114 323 573 181 145 0
16. Treatments Given............... 17 228 323 677 181 145 0
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 31 4 157 318 517 46 88
2. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 31 9 179 590 740 125 128
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations................ 91 9 80 414 1,337 135 152









LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 61


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




ANNUAL REPORT 1951 20 0


A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service............ 85 3 36 643 17 92 160
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians............... 107 0 3 200 5 20 25
3. Field and Office Visits......... 167 3 44 815 26 158 03
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox....................... 839 173 61 2,283 181 417 188
5. Diphtheria, (5-7)............... 1,837 408 161 3,056 254 846 39
8. Typhoid Fever ................ 2,280 630 453 7,518 204 1,200 96
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11)......... 1,657 321 30 1,631 228 493 546
12. Tetanus...... .............. 1,650 448 220 2,317 436 1,422 555
13. Rabies .................. ....... 0 4 0 0 0 0
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service............ 697 1,470 167 124 104 56 802
15. Field and Office Visits........... 778 1,470 171 241 139 69 831
16. Treatments Given............. 749 1,470 162 165 129 56 1,617
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 56 83 53 594 23 590 60
2. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 636 88 98 1,475 29 633 106
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations;................ 317 191 121 2,801 96 2,251 112





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 I

A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 177 71 15 15 45 14 47
2. Consultations and Conferences
with Physicians............. ... 37 56 33 10 29 21 10
3. Field and Office Visits........... 372 139 16 27 141 70 101
IMMUNIZATIONS COMPLETED
4. Smallpox ..................... 1,090 820 203 416 190 440 355
5. Diphtheria, (5-7) ............... 2,596 1,128 829 648 638 601 253
8. Typhoid Fever. ................. 936 195 636 1,888 2,681 1,977 63
9. Whooping Cough, (9-11) ........ 2,280 829 408 204 407 459 275
12. Tetanus....................... 2,581 1,131 878 895 955 1,701 317
13. Rabies......................... 6 1 0 0 0 1 0
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service........... 312 253 304 115 231 90 85
15. Field and Office Visits............ 492 316 485 115 231 102 177
16. Treatments Given .............. 262 :264 304 102 231 79 67
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 497 765 254 105 38 125 196
2. Visits to Medical Conferences... 3,523 1,024 398 205 85 449 203
3. Field Visits and Epidemiological
Investigations ................ 3,281 1,103 229 101 62 256 658








62 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


d 0

ANNUAL .REPORT 1951 | 'a

A. COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service.... 115 4 6 47 28 0 0 4 3,928
2. Consultations and Con-
ferences with Physicians. 3 7 2 36 9 0 0 0 2,340
3. Field and Office Visits... 115 14 21 68 92 0 0 4 7,704
IMMUNIZATIONS
COMPLETED
4. Smallpox............... 141 468 91 18 976 78 258 388 39;687
5. Diphtheria, (5-7).......... 650 905 171 215 1,212 185 591 663 53,531
8. Typhoid Fever......... 1,796 2,936 415 724 282 1,072 22 1,041 113,009
9. Whooping Cough, (9.11). 511 731 128 88 919 156 226 656 38,945
12. Tetanus............... 519 2,14 294 214 1292 249 635 -92 72,463
13. Rabies................. 14 1 0 0 0 0 6 3 90
INTESTINAL PARASITE
CONTROL
14. Admissions to Service... 270 472 123 172 108 1161,635 381 19.827
15. Field and Office Visits... 270 541 123 178 149 116 1,635 381 23,212
16. Treatments Given....... 270 490 123 148 119 116 1,635 381 22.811
B. VENEREAL DISEASE
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical
Service................ 177 170 27 45 249 57 21 39 21.383
2. Visits to Medical
Conferences ........... 261 233 307 107 291 83 33 45 68,775
3. Field Visits and Epidemi.
logical Investigations .. 70 237 117 39 630 53 43 64 51,671




a a 1 I
ANNUAL REPORT 1951

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.).............. 1,772 7 320 50 30 ~569 2 0
5. Admissions to Hospitals..... .. 34 4 68 24 66 143 21 1
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases ................ 14 4 10 9 5 122 0 4
(B) Contacts and Suspects.... 5 14 7 38 24 100 4 6
(C) Arrested Cases.......... 6 1 1 6 5 37 1 1
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases................... 33 4 34 9 26 119 3 9 .
(B) Contacts and Suspects.... 292 10 162 22 5 603 26 30
(C) Arrested Cases........... 20 5 29 0 18 77 1 3
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films.......... 20,617 0 0 0 0 0 0 1112
(B) Large 14" x 17" Films.... 406 26 618 135 100 1,994 55 17
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills ....... 142 1 0 0 0 0 .0 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 104 12 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 250 23 24 74 47 317 5 19
7. Tuberculin Test................ 187 29 235 36 53 533 3 11
8. Field Nursing Visits............. 623 41 635 98 263 1.354 51 109
I I








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


: 0 5 -I


ANNUAL REPORT 1951 s S
L) 0 U Q
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.).............. 16 21 82 9,093 0 41 2,867
5. Admissions to Hospitals. ........ 17 21 21 32 21 5 371
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases.................... 8 4 2 543 8 2 10
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 0 22 0 3,749 9 2 2
(C) Arrested Cases............ 1 0 47 2 3 0
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A Cases.................... 13 7 6 868 9 122
B Contacts and Suspects...... 18 8 73 247 10 16 285
C) Arrested Cases............. 1 9 11 35 2 4 68
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films........... 0 014882 3021 027,337
(B) Large 14" x 17" Films..... 59 42 72 4.235 73 45 127
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills...... 0 0 3,163 0 0 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 0 0 579 0 0 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 11 39 2315,597 5 8 14
7. Tuberculin Test................ 85 24 23 993 6 3 211
8. Field Nursing Visits.............. 74 144 166 3.274 56 33 1.154



w V
ANNUAL REPORT 1951

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.) ............... 3243 19 15 235 1 13 39
5. Admissions to Hospitals......... 94 11 11 106 1 9 18
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases.................... 136 0 8 6 0 1 13
(B Contacts and Suspects...... 1,907 0 0 10 0 1 0
(C) Arrested Cases........... 180 0 0 0 0 0 0
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases................ 101 4 5 27 3 4 12
(B Contacts and Suspects.... 389 26 14 .132 7 9 62
(C) Arrested Cases............. 21 0 2 3 4 0 6
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
,(A) Miniature Films...........15,090 0 0 0 0 655 0
(B)Large 14" x 17" Films...... 2,025 11 82 79 10 23 28
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills....... 953 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............. 142 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 2,264 4 4 17 0 7 1
7. Tuberculin Test................ 703 29 70 50 15 4 25
8. Field Nursing Visits.............. 1,627 53 20 417 47 17 252








64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 g H
a9 w
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea. etc.)...... ........ 79 3 10 6 62 2048 8
5. Admissions to Hospitals........ 18 3 10 9 26 329 6
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases..... ............ 3 1 6 2 8 147 9
(B) Contacts and Suspects..... 2 9 2 2 98 1,615 10
(C) Arrested Cases............ 1 0 0 0 7 335 0
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases.................... 3 8 5 10 17 276 11
(B) Contacts and Suspects.. .... 4 63 8 20 60 2,013 119
(C) Arrested Cases............. 2 6 0 3 7 262 0
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films.......... 0 2,373 1,274 883 2,66049,142 0
(B) Large 14" x 17" Films...... 51 81 47 55 116 795 16
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills..... 0 0 0 0 0 270 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 0 0 0 0 1 79 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 20 2 8 4 126 3,838 25
7. Tuberculin Test.............. 10 14 9 20 63 701 47
8. Field Nursing Visits............. 13 141 33 71 140 3,332 246




a a. g .
ANNUAL REPORT 1951
0
B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea. etc.)............. 6 604 57 4 0 10 1,715
5. Admissions to Hospitals......... 8 35 20 2 56 .0 171
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases............... .... 5 3 1 0 23
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 0 2 2 1 3 13 8
(C) Arrested Cases............ 0 1 1 0 4 0 0
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases.................. 30 45 10 3 43 0 63
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 150 105 13 20 201 2 326
(C) Arrested Cases............. 4 10 7 0 29 0 12
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 8,685
(B) Large 14" x 17" Films.... 177 267 19 59 258 0 849
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills....... 16 0 0 0 1 0 256
5. Pneumothorax Refills............. 46 0 0 0 0 0 148
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 0 1 21 23 9 13 40
7. Tuberculin Test.............. 52 178 4 33 87 7 176
8. Field Nursing Visits............. 262 279 74 133 661 0 596










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 65


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 5

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.)............. 13 0 121 208 374 76 389
5. Admissions to Hospitals......... 19 5 44 30 68 4 1
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases..................... 0 0 12 11 11 3 6
(B) Contacts and Suspects..... 3 0 48 9 10 0 9
() Arrested Cases......... .... 0 0 9 3 3 0 3
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases..................... 8 1 10 64 74 8 41
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 129 12 44 169 118 49 155
(C) Arrested Cases............. 10 0 8 13 4 15 3
3. umber of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films........... 1,722 0 0 0 9,896 0 0
(B) Large 14"x 17" Films...... 79 5 66 450 441 114 198
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills....... 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 0 16 0 0 0 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences... 7 0 78 30 24 3 18
7. Tuberculin Test................ 109 7 23 182 245 85 89
8. Field Nursing Visits............. 277 28 89 721 405 197 611




0 5
a o C) C o
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cond't.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.)............... 151 102 37 256 17 493 38
5. Admissions to Hospitals......... 23 15 12 129 9 224 35
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases............. ....... 0 4 0 15 2 20 13
(B) Contacts and Suspects..... 5 0 0 13 2 45 26
(C) Arrested Cases............ 1 0 0 2 0 6 9
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases..................... 18 8 2 184 7 119 14
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 106 44 32 549 54 79 83
(C) Arrested Cases............. 14 5 3 90 7 83 15
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films........... 0 0 014,559 0 8,201 3,312
(B) Large 14" x 17" Films...... 194 83 46 609 78 617 101
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills ....... 0 0 0 853 0 218 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 0 0 0 54 0 5 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences .... 12 6 7 911 7 362 66
7. Tuberculin Test................ 20 10 1 207 18 203 29
8. Field Nursing Visits........... .. 507 113 76 1,570 99 1,265 14











66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


d


ANNUAL REPORT 1951 .

B. VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
(Cont'd.)
4. Treatments given (Syphilis,
Gonorrhea, etc.)............... 901 494 246 96 35 153 166
5. Admissions to Hospitals.......... 98 118 54 10 4 7 93
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical Service
(A) Cases..................... 115 58 4 0 1 12 0
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 541 55 58 0 0 3 20
(C) Arrested Cases............ 480 25 3 0 0 1 10
2. Admissions to Nursing Service
(A) Cases.......... ..... 95 145 7 1 7 34 13
(B) Contacts and Suspects...... 336 389 77 134 40 192 51
(C) Arrested Cases............. 171 69 5 41 4 34 5
3. Number of Persons X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films........... 45,85 33,337 0 0 1,902 0 5808
B) Large 14" x 17" Films..... 4,357 1,085 198 111 6 389 124
4. Pneumoperitoneum Refills....... 681 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Pneumothorax Refills............ 220 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 1,604 228 86 0 8 15 48
7. Tuberculin Test................ 616 490 123 69 7 49 4
8. Field Nursing Visits ............ 1,121 1,253 121 377 111 471 119


5*o
N I a .S 1 s ^
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 3 0

B. VENEREAL DISEASE
CONTROL (Cont'd)
4. Treatments given (Syph-
ilis, Gonorrhea etc).... 156 176 1 31 150 68 30 80 28,105
5. Admissions to Hospitals.. 18 7 24 10 106 15 6 14 3,039
C. TUBERCULOSIS
CONTROL
1. Admissions to Medical
Service
(A) Cases............. 2 6 10 1 24 0 21 1 1,470
(B) Contacts and
Suspects.............. 7 5 24 6 19 0 39 11 8,625
(C) Arrested Cases..... 3 0 3 0 14 0 0 2 1,650
2. Admissions to Nursing
Service
IA) Cases............. 5 4 10 2 133 7 19 12 3,017
) Contacts and
uspects.............. 70 40 150 17 318 25 76 43 9,298
(C) Arrested Cases..... 3 6 3 4 61 4 0 6 1,347
3. Number of Persons
X-rayed
(A) Miniature Films.... 1,969 0 0 0 0 0 0 0274,296
(B) Large 14" x 17"
Films. ............... 131 61 39 25 1,568 38 94 42 25,401
4. Pneumoperitoneum
Refills ... ..... 0 0 0 0 363 0 0 0 6,917
5. Pneumothorax Refills.... 0 0 0 1 61 0 0 0 1.468
6. Visits to Medical Con-
ferences .............. 16 19 45 17 82 0 166 14 26,762
7. Tuberculin Test......... 54 44 365 8 487 16 48 176 8,571
8. Field Nursing Visits..... 107 127 381 87 1,248 58 222 79 28,343








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 67

MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


ANNUAL REPORT 1951

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits.............
10. Cases Hospitalized ............
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service...............
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician .................. ..
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service................
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences.......
5. Number of Clinic Sessions Con-
ducted. ..................... .
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.' .................
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante.
partum Cases.',........ ....
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery... ....... ....
9. Cases given Service at Delivery by
Certified-Nurse Midwife........
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations.................
11. Admissions to Postpartum Nurs-
ing Service ................ .
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum eases .................
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum cases ................
14. Admissions for Midwife Super-
vision.....................
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings .................. ...


I I I I I --- .1 .1 1


24 35 79 I
231 6 621 0


445
3
492
1,004
231
671
1,726
1
0
255
619
1,030
224
23
23


97 2,291
10 51


.0
0 a
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 3 o -

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits........... 18 75 36 2 10 56 74
10. Cases Hospitalized ............. 2 2 1 432 3 8
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service..................... 33 46 155 2,595 0 52 55
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician ..................... 6 3 0 33 0 3 24
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service....... ........ 30 59 187 2,307 0 66 205
4. Visits to Antepartum cases to
Medical Conferences.......... 2 97 449 9,972 0 110 171
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted .. .. ...... 25 136 436 0 28 25
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.................. 52 41 202 3,155 0 68 333
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases ................ 27 84 479 1,290 0 156 254
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery. ................... 0 0 0 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife..... 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations................. 12 22 36 1,034 0 0 7
11. Admissions to Postpartum Nurs-
ing Sevice................... 35 39 249 2,674 0 25 166
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum cases .................. 92 48 530 6,419 0 27 324
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum cases ................. 6 24 15 532 0 4 30
14. Admissions for Midwife Super-
vision ........ .. .... 8 7 10 18 0 2 1
15. Attendance of Midwives at
SMeetings ..................... 18 1 63 268 0 2 0


41
6


6
0
11
10
11
7
11
0
0
0
8
18
0
2
0









68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951

MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



a "
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 a

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits............ 217 29 6 22 13 5 44
10. Cases Hospitalized............. 66 1 9 33 1 0 18
D. MATERNITY SERVICE.
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service............ 01 31 9 363 6 1 13
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician..................... 37 1 1 3 0 7
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service .............. 595 33 16 454 28 22 12
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences........... 593 60 10 981 7 80 16
5. Number of Clinic Sessions Con-
ducted....................... 116 48 18 148 5 28 10
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.................. 360 1 1 371 84 21 31
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases................. 2.038 89 28 1.263 5 55 25
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery ................... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife.... 0 0 0 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations ................. 166 14 1 97 1 1 0
11. Admissions to Postpartum Nurs-
ing Service........... ... 497 5 2 522 34 22 19
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases.................. 665 6 2 891 86 36 36
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases.................. 107 15 1 110 0 0 3
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision................... 20 3 5 20 0 2 3
15. Attendance of Midwives at
SMeetings....................... .71 3 5 174 0 6 0





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 7 S a

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits............ 5 72 14 18 46 52 96
10. Cases Hospitalized.............. 10 4 0 2 0 80 13
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service............... 28 2 46 11 19 1,419 37
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician. .................... 0 5 3 0 3 26 2
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service ............... 43 9 11 14 34 1,776 65
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences........... 36 3 142 15 28 4,867 47
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted .................... 22 1 37 22 12 232 37
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.............. 29 10 16 3 34 1,500 88
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases ................. 101 5 0 25 15 6,811 74
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife ... 0 0 0 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations ................. 2 0 0 1 0 671 28
11. Admissions to Postpartum Nurs-
ing Service................... 38 23 21 8 19 1,675 68
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases ................. 76 35 26 17 29 2,067 146
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases.................. 0 0 2 7 2 851 18
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision.................. 8 3 2 1 7 11 1 7
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings......................... 4 58 O 4 30








LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 69

MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


.5

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 -S g

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits........... 187 27 15 27 42 2 37
10. Cases Hospitalized............... 5 20 4 1 18 50
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service...................... 223 45 28 87 2 297
2. Cases Referred to Private
S Physician .................. 1 25 1 1 4 0 12
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service ............... 43 435 105 40 188 0 232
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences........... 0 306 82 59 206 3 670
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted .................. 0 40 32 25 53 3 60
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.................. 67 313 104 38 484 0 251
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases ................ 42 942 148 82 42 0 103
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery.......... ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife..... 0 0 3 0 0 0 1
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations ................. 0 155 5 4 56 0 123
11. Admissions to Postpartum
Nursing Service................ 56 401 137 36 247 0 375
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases ................ 103 514 234 75 668 0 767
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases.................. 11 128 7 15 7 0 3
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision ................... 7 7 11 1 5 2 1
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings...................... 17 54 72 2 0 0 94





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 0 .

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits............ 89 5 99 55 2 32 7
10. Cases Hospitalized ...... ...... 3 1 8 20 28 6 11
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service ............... 53 21 129 79 0 0 58
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician ................... 3 .0 11 16 0 16
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service............... 90 29 107 118 20 16 91
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences........... 100 25 438 186 0 0 76
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted................... 62 7 101 23 0 0 30
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases................ 92 50 0 101 10 27 105
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases ................. 85 56 384 158 22 28 236
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery...................... 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations .................. 4 2 55 73 0 0 4
11. Admissions to Postpartum
Nursing Service ............... 113 24 205 98 6 27 90
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases................. 191 61 198 152 12 79 187
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases ................. 0 3 48 35 1 2 7
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision.................... 9 3 9 6 17 1 7
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings ...................... 13 0 54 51 141 0 12








707 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951

MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


0 53
Vo to 5
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 a 3 W

C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits............. 193 7 20 902 17 121 155
10. Cases Hospitalized.............. 15 5 2 50 1 72 10
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service................ 15 38 4 498 36 302 18
2. Cases Referred to Private
-Physician..................... 22 1 1 2 7 19 10
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service................ 108 26 32 170 50 188 23
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
'Medical Conferences........... 38 81 6 1,381 48 712 27
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted.................... 31 62 8 192 46 115 26
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante.
partum Cases ................. 299 22 41 311 46 345 10
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.... ....... 59 53 23 28 112 191 30
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery ...................... 0 0 1 2 1 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife.... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations .................. 1 16 0 193 9 75 2
11. Admissions to Postpartum
Nursing Service........ ....... 86 32 16 400 48 357 11
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases ............ ... 186 43 38 553 118 732 11
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases ................. 14 13 4 17 10 38 2
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision ................ 9 5 1 9 2
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings.................. 45 1 0 40 0 27 12




3 s naptu
ANNUAL REPORT 1951
Psi U2i5i 2 Ci)
C. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
(Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits........... 1.640 532 141 160 37 99 2
10. Cases Hospitalized.............. 37 65 15 13 12 10 2
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service....................... 409 158 89 67 26 19 143
2. Cases Referred to Private
Physician .......... .......... 53 27 2 13 7 2 102
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service.............. 477 248 127 134 44 21 111
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases to
Medical Conferences.......... 1,524 244 181 92 63 39 437
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted......................... 127 46 51 12 46 11 48
6. Field Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases................. 676 194 19 62 16 40 240
7. Office Nursing Visits to Ante-
partum Cases.................. 1,746 507 279 298 92 38 134
8. Cases given Nursing Service at
Delivery...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
9. Cases given Service at Delivery
by Certified-Nurse Midwife.... 15 1 0 0 0 0 0
10. Cases given Postpartum Medical
Examinations........................ 204 16 21 6 5 4 63
11. Admissions to Postpartum
Nursing Service ............... 257 110 10 72 26 31 22
12. Field Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases............. ... 504 161 9 60 28 56 445
13. Office Nursing Visits to Post-
partum Cases................. 210 55 28 37 4 4 17
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision................... 11 17 5 5 3 6
15. Attendance of Midwives at
Meetings.............. .......... 23 0 129 0 10 0 0










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 71


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)


Is




C. TUBERCULOSIS CON-
TROL 'Cont'd)
9. Office Nursing Visits...... 73 32 302 12 190 21 50 26 8.876
10. Cases Hospitalized....... 12 4 8 0 34 3 10 1,85
D. MATERNITY SERVICE
1. Admissions to Antepartum
Medical Service....... .... 61 122 23 47 8 53 22 7810,181
2. Cases Referred to Private .
Physician .... ..... 1 15 7 1 6 4 8 5 703
3. Admissions to Antepartum
Nursing Service ........ 66 123 25 62 131 60 30 105 11318
4. Visits to Antepartum Cases
to Medical Conferences... 88 335 31 93 294 101 37 9028,664
5. Number of Clinic Sessions
Conducted.. ........... 85 22 14 31 55 28 42 47 3,638
6. Field Nursing Visits to
Antepartum Cases....... 38 102 0 180 291 108 35 49 12,757
7. Office Nursing Visits to
Antepartum Cases....... 93 297 48 1 87 42 38 244 2266
8. Cases given Nursing Ser-
vice at Delivery.......... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 18
9. Cases given Service at
Delivery by Certified.
Nurse Midwife.......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24
10. Cases given Postpartum
Medical Examinations... 13 10 4 11 39 9 30 55 3.812
11. Admissions to Postpartum
Nursing Service........ 85 114 10 37 223 92 51 13511,747
12. Field Nursing Visits to
Postpartum Cases....... 93 201 2 39 369 174 121 23421.185
13. Office Nursing Visits to
Postpartum Cases....... 30 5 8 17 3 9 94 3,08
14. Admissions for Midwife
Supervision... ... .. 6 12 8 1 11 14 4 481
15. Attendance of Midwives
at Meetings ............. 11 54 37 0 6 25 8 15 1747



S 2 0 c
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 N N

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision.... 79 8 70 21 94 72 14 30
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized.............. 15 0 1 0 2 5 -0 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 338 55 28 149 120 330 11 3
2. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 694 146 145 190 238 665 15 22
3. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 479 74 40 298 228 813 12 20
4. Field Nursing Visits............. 1,305 308 254 611 515 844 11 31
5. Office Nursing Visits............ 520 57 107 28 83 1,224 16 11
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 433 159 34 310 191 965 110 11
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1,411 448 202 645 549 1,097 82 55
8. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 530 252 58 406 303 1,093 110 37
9. Field Nursing Visits............. 2,165 1,050 352 1,747 850 203 11 87
10. Office Nursing Visits ............ 492 154 76 3 157 1,881 104 20
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes................. 0 0 0 1 31 0 0
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted....... 176 40 24 24 122 128 1 27
13. Cases Hospitalied............. 3 4 0 0 1 5 0 0










72 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



a

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 & & 2 :2 .
Qu u a Q p a _
D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision... 25 36 9 78 0 28 11
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 0 44 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized .............. 1 0 0 61 0 1 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 16 48 103 2,653 2 28 456
2. Admissions to Nursing Service... 37 75 338 3,294 1 51 808
3. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 20 73 151 7,101 2 51 1,337
: 4. Field Nursing Visits............. 122 85 717 8,664 1 86 1,173
5. Office Nursing Visits ............ 2 62 181 1,669 0 49 1.600
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 8 124 252 2,243 70 70 1,111
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.. .. 41 178 1,133 1,626 14 87 1,832
S8. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 11 178 310 4,303 70 76 2,465
9. Field Nursing Visits............. 89 74 1,423 2,626 3 111 2,285
10. Office Nursing Visits............ 13 183 0 723 12 24 2,316
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes ................. 0 7 0 0 4 0 920
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted....... 53 18 148 250 7 13 165
13. Cases Hospitalized.............. 0 1 0 25 0 0 11





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision... 86 8 6 77 0 36 17
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 58 0 0 0 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized .............. 1 0 0 4 0 0 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 374 28 10 228 20 28 2
2. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 887 29 4 718 62 22 63
3. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 648 54 10 344 28 35 2
S4. Field Nursing Visits............. 897 8 2 1,370 236 37 180
5. Office Nursing Visits............ 1,517 49 4 426 4 3 44
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 706 26 37 245 62 3 3
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1.394 18 16 790 189 7 122
8. Visits to Medical Conferences..... 706 40 41 316 74 4 3
9. Field Nursing Visits............. 1,249 5 5 1,541 545 9 311
10. Office Nursing Visits............ 619 23 18 361 0 0 22
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes ................. 120 0 0 0 91 0 23
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted...... 91 33 23 91 36 11 5
13. Cases Hoopitalized.............. 00 0 0 9 0 0 0











LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 g 1 -

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision.... 8 7 27 3 39 19 30
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 0 0 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized............ 0 0 0 0 587 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 60 3 7 6 62 1,734 36
2. Admissions to Nursing Service:... 50 54 17 16 65 2,439 101
3. Visits to Medical Conferences. ...3 0210 8 123 4,149 60
4. Field Nursing Visits............ 115 73 21 33 106 2,783 215
5. Office Nlrsing Visits............ 2 12 0 15 41 3,601 34
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 157 74 13 13 213 2,823 150
7. Admissions to Nursing Service... 147 226 8 34 37 2,820 189
8. Visits to Medical Conferences .... 286 77 13 19 224 6,075 162
9. Field Nursing Visits............. 312 272 8 84 64 2,072 304
10. Office Nursing Visits............ 1 140 0 59 12 5,224 58
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes. ................. 7 1 11 2 0 0 0
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted....... 93 96 8 27 19 348 48
13. Cases Hospitalized .............. 0 1 0 1 0 8 0





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 : 4 "0
n a s as -v -s .
_____ ____ *____________^ ^ -a -] -1 >-1i4


D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision....
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes..
18. Cases Hospitalized .............
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service....
2. Admissions to Nursing Service....
3. Visits to Medical Conferences....
4. Field Nursing Visits.............
5. Office Nursing Visits............
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service....
7. Admissions to Nursing Service....
8. Visits to'Medical Conferences....
9. Field Nursing Visits............
10. Office Nursing Visits............
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes ................
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted.......
13. Cases Hospitalized ..............


24
7
0


0
113
0
253
108

0
156
0
216
165
230
0
0


179
8
3


152
416
168
550
182

148
131
151
141
52
1
23
1


22 21
220 90
28 33
468 195
33 74

7 69
131 155
9 72
228 .323
24 140
0 0
12 24
.. 0 0


142
663
147
1,034
37
1
39
0


2 48
0 31
0 2


"'










74 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision.... 23 4 77 66 19 6 22
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 0 0 180 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized ............. 0 0 0 2 1 0 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 7 15 169 106 0 0 85
2. Admissions to Nursing Service... 163 47 327 130 65 93 182
3. Visits to Medical Conferences... 8 15 243 163 0 0 100
4. Field Nursing Visits............. 345 130 188 210 32 240 390
5. Office Nursing Visits............ 4 20 316 41 76 7 125
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 2 12 194 277 1 237 142
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 137 42 249 278 96 201 23
8. Visits to Medical Conferences..... 2 26 538 1,187 14 237 166
9. Field Nursing Visits.............. 228 105 2 171 106 484 652
10. Office Nursing Visits............ 6 26 710 189 183 23 86
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes ... ...... 3 0 2 192 60 0 2
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted...... 9 5 115 60 2 31 41
13. Cases Hospitalized....... ..0 1 0 1 0 0



C s & -3 -
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 3 j
z o o 0 o (

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision.... 158 14 0 34 2 56 13
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 5 0 0 0 0
18. Cases Hospitalized.............. 1 0 5 5 0 10 6
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 31 69 5 476 41 165 31
2. Admissions to Nursing Service... 188 53 53 703 150 438 60
3. Visits to Medical Conferences... 56 77 6 957 78 294 41
4. Field Nursing Visits............. 442 62 96 837 251 934 29
5. Office Nursing Visits............ 92 29 10 147 148 263 81
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 119 62 2 1,5 152 83 215
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 545 85 35 1,367 451 120 114
8. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 446 68 10 2.577 161 141 242
9. Field Nursing Visits............. 1,149 123 161 1,562 687 198 19
10. Office Nursing Visits.......... 429 27 9 255 567 263 223
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes................. 6 2 0 0 0 437
12. Number of Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted....... 39 73 9 232 74 51 84
13. Cases Hospitalized. ............ 2 0 0 1 4 1









LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 75


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



o 0

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S 2 g g

D. MATERNITY SERVICE (Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife Supervision.... 0 46 21 18 18 5 115
17. Attendance at Maternity Classes.. 0 0 0 0 23 0
18. Cases Hospitalized............. 6 0 0 1 0 0 0
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical Service.... 486 103 64 54 18 14 42
2. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 860 374 62 105 56 74 340
3. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 1,368 147 80 59 20 19 43
4. Field Nursing Visits............. 1,820 527 23 140 65 138 714
5. Office Nursing Visits............ 1,997 688 71 138 11 10 50
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical Service.... 833 49 77 24 100 77 30
7. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1,525 362 75 102 162 84 531
8. Visits to Medical Conferences.... 1,580 74 92 27 110 83 30
9. Field Nursing Visits. ............... 2002 770 27 151 97 134 1,378
10. Office Nursing Visits............ 2372 659 69 66 92 8 56
11. Attendance at Infant and Pre-
school Classes................. 74 0 35 2 0 74 0
12. Number bf Infant-Preschool
Clinic Sessions Conducted....... 109 14 60 10 43 9 43
13. Cases Hospitalized.............. 11 9 0 2 0 0 0




S Ias
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 -n _d

D. MATERNITY SERVICE
(Cont'd)
16. Visits for Midwife
Supervision............. 34 12 32 9 43 25 45 18 2.268
17. Attendance at Maternity
Classes........ ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 379
18. Cases Hospitalized........ 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 726
E. INFANT AND PRESCHOOL
HYGIENE-INFANT
1. Admissions to Medical
Service................. 22 119 60 53 337 51 52 4310,072
2. Admissions to Nursing
Service................. 147 258 62 67 408 144 105 12818,751
3. Visits to Medical
Conferences............. 31 136 91 81 759 73 70 5021,818
4. Field Nursing Visits...... 125 483 53 172 738 298 203 18934,195
5. Office Nursing Visits...... 182 79 198 2 179 38 41 15217,151
PRESCHOOL
6. Admissions to Medical
Service.. ............. 99 264 21 83 871 125 59 163 17,050
7. Admissions to Nursing
Service................ 198 548 21 98 687 509 133 19726,430
8. Visits to Medical
Conferences............ 112 287 54 100 1,915 244 71 17029,489
9. Field Nursing Visits...... 170 685 24 210 1,317 919 245 30736,818
10. Office Nursing Visits...... 157 110 355 16 501 152 24 23521,040
11. Attendance at Infant and
Preschool Classes........ 0 3 0 0 0 0 85 0 2,427
12. Number of Infant Pre-
school Clinic Sessions
Conducted.............. 96 15 11 30 235 48 441 57 4,042
13. Cases Hospitalized........ O0 1 0 0 7 0 1 1 121









76 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





Isa .I0 I
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 t,

. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected................ 2,380 1,841 2,577 1,722 9,317 2,898 236 676
2. Pupils Examined................ 2,375 1,465 192 198 695 2,387 85 335
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1,219 360 208 43 177 775 130 93
5. Field Nursing Visits............ 529 394 438 90 294 613 157 198
6. Office Nursing Visits............ 1,514 107 211 46 370 2.073 56 187
7. Number of Corrections Secured.. 6 25 1 107 22 198 15 3
8. Cases Hospitalized.............. 1 1 0 0 1 9 0 1
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............. 3,050 138 980 369 299 2,928 131 177
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 2,678 32 32 253 14 127 2 1
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 241 42 111 10 44 315 29 168
5. Cases Hospitalized............... 0 0 5 0 1 5 0 0
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 176 10 38 24 10 103 18 17
2. Field Visits ..................... 37 8 125 48 30 120 30 52
3. Office Visits.................... 270 17 60 21 8 356 28 37
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments ony................ 10 2 43 3 0 13 46 16
5. Cases Hospitalized. .............. 53 1 14 9 3 29 9 4


A

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 : g 4a a :

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected............... 782 1,076 62102,515 30 134 2,494
2. Pupils Examined............... 870 130 2,690 18,220 1,205 244 199
4. Admissions to Nursing Service... 66 97 32 7,961 25 38 236
5. Field Nursing Visits............ 75 59 32 3,060 44 48 490
6. Office Nursing Visits........... 14 101 0 19,609 1 37 243
7. Number of Corrections Secured.. 2 111 0 7,357 5 0 15
8. Cases Hospitalized....... ..... 2 0 10 1 0 5
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............ 91 401 1,105 7,346 219 338 6.125
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits.. 174 49 91 0 3 103 0
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits.. 100 52 746 262 8 73 118
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 4 23 15 1 22 18 586
2. Field Visits.................. ...... 44 5 5 96 19 418
3. Office Visits .................. 3 23 47 0 5 22 387
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only............... 1 2 0 5 0 4,513
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 1 5 3 0 2 2 221










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 77





MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 .

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected ................ 3,502 233 853 2,033 2 205 885
2. Pupils Examined... ............ 762 259 170 732 917 90 45
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.. 642 421 185 59 10 12 256
5. Field Nursing Visits............. 495 6 52 377 14 13 270
6. Office Nursing Visits............ 667 846 140 69 0 146 1,468
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 9 0 0 51 0 2 44
8. Cases Hospitalized.............. 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4).............. 4,251 153 446 531 294 89 297
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits.. 29 16 205 36 0 5 32
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 287 11 300 350 685 20 288
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 4 0 0 4 1 0 0
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 237 1 34 31 8 4 29
2. Field Visits .................... 196 1 19 93 12 1 116
3. Office Visits............... 143 1 72 6 8 7 43
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only................ 66 0 19 1 0 8 26
5. Cases Hospitalized .............. 09 0 17 12 0 1 20



a S 0

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 -

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected............... 213 177 328 430 1,09819,508 439
2. Pupils Examined............... 1,200 2,190 319 361 976 6,957 826
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 0 325 19 5 127 2,414 300
5. Field Nursing Visits............. 0 385 18 14 116 2,187 255
6. Office Nursing Visits ............ 0 119 318 3 692,648 176
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 0 13 45 9 3 8,212 5
8. Cases Hospitalized ............. 0 2 0 8 4 4 0
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............. 530 380 418 113 55328,823 535
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 558 1 64 7 55 35 12
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 816 44 63 13 111 679 12
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 0 4 0 0 4 11 0
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service............ 19 31 8 2 17 388 55
2. Field Visits .................... 3 54 6 1 4 17 53
3. Office Visits .................... 38 4 15 3 1 ,157 91
4. Cases Receivin Ambulatory
treatments only .............. 7 37 3 1 2 183 17
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 6 7 3 0 3 159 9










78 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 4 .5

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected................ 582 1,708 4 64 5,588 0 2,344
2. Pupils Examined................ 770 405 164 386 0 117 245
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1,018 192 15 7 415 1 258
5. Field Nursing Visits............ 1,052 125 23 14 475 0 499
6. Office Nursing Visits....... 642 192 4 39 145 1 10
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 411 9 0 1 40 0 10
8. Cases Hospitalized............ 32 2 0 0 0 0 2
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............. 62 888 256 90 30 54 2,420
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 4 62 3 112 0 1 4
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 260 153 127 255 0 13
5. Cases Hospitalized ............. 8 3 0 0 0 0
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 11 29 21 19 10 1 60
2. Field Visits.......................... 67 2 39 9 19 44
3. Office Visits .................. 7 23 13 38 3 1 45
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only................ 20 51 0 0 0 0 15
5. Cases Hospitalized .............. 8 44 1 3 1 0 20





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 i B a I

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected................ 385 226 324 926 438 492 6,088
2. Pupils Examined ................ 770 56 181 470 86 508 627
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 78 96 29 362 337 17 79
6. Field Nursing Visits............. 93 185 143 352 334 30 487
6. Office Nursing Visits............ 2 8 92 382 690 0 247
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 26 10 0 22 0 40 0
8. Cases Hospitalized.............. 0 0 0 5 2 33 0
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............. 395 91 455 1,335 1,006 104 1,679
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 50 12 2 13 0 0 306
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 194 461 9 40 3 26 804
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 0 0 37 0 1 62
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 16 3 26 35 3 19 21
2. Field Visits..................... 27 4 11 50 5 27 70
3. Office Visits. ................... 108 2 40 4 0 14 41
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only.............. 0 44 14 0 9 6
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 2 0 251 18 0 6 1











LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 79


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



8 0
0" .0 4 d
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S 3

F. SCHOOL
1. PupilsInspected................ 5,776 1,490 8211,937 382 3,447 187
2. Pupils Examined................ 75 777 441 2,227 213 141 1.505
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 197 356 78 1,515 214 785 617
5. Field Nursing Visits.... .... 476 30 239 2,318 89 686 203
6. Office Nursing Visits............ 1,175 197 7 1,714 688 1,748 841
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 13 12 14 132 ,0 49 11
8. Cases Hospitalised............... 3 0 3 3 0 20 4
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1-4)............ 492 604 218 1,064 418 437 957
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 31 180 11 232 4 293 124
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 322 269 180 185 85 1,062 238
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 25 1 16 2 0 16 11
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 40 20 9 97 7 266 31
2. Field Visits ..................... 142 7 43 14 11 206 3
3. Office Visits.................... 17 35 2 148 9 525 48
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only................ 18 15 2 44 0 55 14
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 17 6 3 69 4 84 16





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 0 a

F. SCHOOL
1. PupilsInspected................ 4,644 131 645 414 45911,90013646
2. Pupils Examined................ 2296 393 381 963 342 692 1,870
4. Admissions to Nursing Service.... 1,512 28 145 72 54 454 696
5. Field Nursing Visits........... 3,867 27 84 108 232 657 2,236
6. Office Nursing Visits............ 4.725 102 308 2 438 203 261
7. Number of Corrections Secured... 446 1 1 5 9 29 0
8. Cases Hospitalized.............. 56 2 1 191 0 17 0
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MEDICAL
EXAMINATIONS (1.4)............. 13198 41 475 4 236 23 0
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical Visits... 2,325 65 173 15 183 56 0
4. Field and Office Nursing Visits... 282 1,187 118 131 389 28 10
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 25 12 0 0 1 2 0
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service........... 174 178 28 20 56 18 13
2. Field Visits .................... 88 6 14 40 51 23 28
3. Office Visits.................... 286 415 22 10 44 2 3
4. Cases Receiving Ambulatory
treatments only ............... 46 83 5 4 12 2 0
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 45 55 3 3 15 3 11










80 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 .

F. SCHOOL
1. Pupils Inspected.... 1,348 0 1 18212,025 391 68 242 247,212
2. Pupils Examined..... .. 976 729 779 79 1,457 265 1,179 218 70,777
4. Admissions to Nursing
Service............... 130 66 27 42 1,628 60 89 58 28,492
5. Field Nursing Visits..... 158 92 266 141 1,022 69 120 111 28,135
6. Office Nursing Visits..... 176 11 794 0 1.894 142 69 90 49,277
7. Number of Corrections
Secured............... 22 12 51 11 303 21 17 1 17,989
8. Cases Hospitalized....... 0 0 1 0 5 0 1 2 437
G. ADULT HYGIENE-MED-
ICAL EXAMINATIONS
(1-4) ....................... 575 189 99 109 1,089 321 554 546 91,624
H. MORBIDITY
3. Field and Office Medical
Visits................. 225 10 4 112 0 589 23 67 9,905
4. Field and Office Nurs-
ing Visits.............. 98 8 5 498 1 787 0 22 14.303
5. Cases Hospitalized ...... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 266
J. CANCER CONTROL
1. Admissions to Service.... 25 23 9 10 149 30 54 51 3,511
2. Field Visits............ 17 8 9 19 209 35 8 30 3,094
3. Office Visits............ 34 56 10 15 109 35 89 66 5,241
4. Cases Receiving Ambula-
tory treatments only.... 10 5 7 4 13 25 14 18 5,579
5. Cases Hospitalized...... 7 19 5 0 25 7 25 12 1.255





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 J 4 I 0

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service ........... 4 12 40 0 32 32 13
2. Field Visits.................... 9 0 32 0 122 63 3 11
3. Office Visits ................... 3 67 186 0 70 128 28 33
4. Instruction Class Enrollment..... 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 12
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 209 38 82 43 53 155 23 30
2. Field Visits ............... ..... 423 47 198 151 97 228 71 68
3. Office Visits. ................... 26 6 20 4 15 83 14 7
4. Clinic Visits ................... 398 2 207 80 6 44 59 27
5. Cases Hospitalized............. 10 1 11 8 2 5 3 3
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 0 102 0 1 0 0 168
2. Preschool Inspections............ 0 3 0 0 0 0 0
3. School Inspections.............. 0 0 200 0 1 0 0 205
4. Inspections (Other)............. 0 3 0 0 0 0 0
5. Individuals Completed ........... 0 60 0 0 0 0 29
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed .. 0 8 0 0 0 0 0









LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 81


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




a
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 5

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service. ......... 23 28 17 4 9 5
2. Field Visits.....;................ 11 21 0 76 19 17 14
3. Office Visits................... 11 48 76 0 43 2
4. Instruction Class Enrollment..... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service............ 21 25 12 0 18 28
2. Field Visits.................... 39 96 17 28 44 68 14
3. Office Visits.................. 6 14 0 0 2 15 1
4. Clinic Visits................. 0 74 2 0 1 12 0
5. Cases Hospitalied.............. 1 0 0 0 2 0
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service............ 0 0 678 64 0 444
2. Preschool Inspections.. ........ 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
3. School Inspections.......... 55 0 010,885 16 0 2,924
4. Inspections (Other) ............. 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Individuals Completed........... 0 0 0 190 49 0 317
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0





ANNUAL REPORT 195T1 a g

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service........... 57 5 16 30 8 4 16
2. Field Visits .................... 4 0 4 59 2 8 52
3. Office Visits. ................. 20 7 1 52 15 4 63
4. Instruction Class Enrollment 3 0 0 0 0 0 1
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 168 6 84 61 25 5 22
2. Field Visits.................... 314 10 67 238 68 2 77
3. Office Visits ..................... 42 10 2 0 5 3
4. Clinic Visits.................... 17 8 01 105 76 1 31
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 4 0 7 14 0 0 5
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 0 0 7 139 0 0 0
2. Preschool Inspections ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. School Inspections .............. 0 0 7 139 .0 0 0
4. Inspections (Other) .............. 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Individuals Completed .......... 0 0 7 117 0 0 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 412









82 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951








MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)

A



ANNUAL REPORT 1951 a

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service............ 1 26 9 6 7 184 39
2. Field Visits .. ..... .... O 12 3 7 13 71 62
3. Office Visits ................... 1 105 41 25 2 634 338
4. Instruction Class Enrollment..... 0 17 0 0 1 111 310
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service............ 8 69 2 6 20 400 65
2. Field Visits.................... 11 115 0 9 19 584 69
3. Office Visits .................... 2 25 2 1 8 17 49
4. Clinic Visits .................... 19 151 0 0 6 271 63
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 1 20 1 0 0 105 a
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 0 0 0 0 72 6,507 0
2. Preschool Inspections........... 0 0 0 0 0 74 0
3. School Inspections ............. 0 0 0 0 72 5.497 0
4. Inspections (Other)............. 0 0 0 0 0 732 0
5. Individuals Completed ........... 0 0 55 47 8,287 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed. 0 0 0 30 0 1,491 0




a e 8 .
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 .i w

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service........... 14 10 15 7 23 6 17
2. Field Visits.................... 58 10 19 8 48 0 37
3. Office Visits..... ............... 42 53 53 26 2 6 14
4. Instruction Class Enrollment. .... 0 0 0 0 0 0
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 6 152 34 25 36 0 62
2. Field Visits......... ... ....... 235 68 153 175 81 0 94
3. Office Visits. ................... 9 20 16 20 13 0 0
4. Clinic Visits......................... .. 133 332 45 46 0 0 0
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 4 3 4 3 1 0 0
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 131 214 0 0 0 0 0
2. Preschool Inspections ........... 74 5 0 0 0 0 0
3. School Inspections............ 68 217 0 0 0 0 0
4. Inspections (Other)............ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Individuals Completed.... ....... 56 7 0 0 0 0 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed 114 0 0 0 0 0









LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 83


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 'S 1 '

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service........... 13 6 13 21 19 .11 20
2. Field Visits...................... 3 3 1 38 34 26 57
3. Office Visits .................... 17 5 39 10 5 12 501
4. Instruction Class Enrollment... 0 0 0 0 0 16 1
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 32 10 52 86 83 18 41
2. Field Visits.................... 121 11 40 164 216 31 154
3. Office Visits.................... 2 0 88 17 10 6 84
4. Clinic Visits. ............... .. 14 0 99 127 0 28 1
5. Cases Hospitalized .............. 7 0 8 10 0 0 3
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2. Preschool Inspections ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. School Inspections.............. 0 0 426 0 34 0
4. Inspections (Other)............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Individuals Completed........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


o. .0
a o ia a
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 o 0 s
z 0 0 0 0 (5
K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service......... 36 27 6 61 6 10 11
2. Field Visits..................... 48 15 22 24 64 51 1
3. Office Visits ................... 68 77 14 437 5 6 52
4. Instruction Class Enrollment..... 0 0 2 0 0 0 1
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 26 77 40 67 17 10 86
2. Field Visits .................... 84 69 196 96 27 34 86
3. Office Visits.. ................. 10 16 2 13 8 2 16
4. Clinic Visits.................... 3 56 12 0 0 0 164
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 5 13 0 0 0 1 19
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 0 0 0 1,508 7 171 0
2. Preschool Inspections............ 0 0 0 180 1 22 0
3. School Inspections............... 0 0 0 9,998 2 55 0
4. Inspections (Other) ............. 0 0 0 86 2 39 0
5. Individuals Completed .......... 0 0 0 1,999 2 148 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0









84 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951







MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




a = a. .

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 I s

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service........... 55 71 29 4 24 5 3
2. Field Visits ................... 53 40 0 27 19 17 5
3. Office Visits.................... 197 .104 29 28 91 1 2
4. Instruction Class Enrollment..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service........... 34 21 63 33 109 34 34
2. Field Visits .................... 109 20 43 151 151 98 138
3. Office Visits ................... 13 7 15 6 25 35 7
4. Clinic Visits.................... 13 3 51 23 236 119 40
5. Cases Hospitalized.............. 4 2 4 16 24 18 8
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service........... 576 0 0 0 0 0 4
2. Preschool Inspections........... 30 0 0 0 0 5 0
3. School Inspections.............. 18270 239 0 0 27 0
4. Inspections (Other) ............. 70 0 84 0 0 2 0
6. Individuals Completed........... 387 0 814 0 0 0 0
6. Fluoride Treatments Completed. 01 814 0 0 0 0





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 B '.

K. DIABETES
1. Admissions to Service..... 15 31 0 3 59 10 21 15 1,335
2. Field Visits.............. 2 8 0 31 106 26 .26 21 1,693
3. Office Visits ............. 28 318 0 6 171 39 80 24 4,805
4. Instruction Class
Enrollment............. 0 22 0 0 0 4 12 0 521
L. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
1. Admissions to Service..... 26 103 25 39 139 35 41 25 3,453
2. Field Visits.............. 30 201 249 143 358 164 50 52 7,264
3. Office Visits............. 35 8 17 3 46 4 12 14 979
4. Clinic Visits............. 15 85 67 33 155 3 62 81 3,767
5. Cases Hospitalized........ 0 4 0 4 6 0 3 6 393
M. DENTAL HYGIENE
1. Admissions to Service... 64 180 0 0 1,329 0 0 012,366
2. Preschool Inspections..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 447
3. School Inspections........ 64 180 0 0 1,262 0 0 051,183
4. Inspections (Other) ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,019
5. Individuals Completed.... 11 0 0 0 331 0 0 012,913
6. Fluoride Treatments
Completed ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.869










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 85


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




-u 50
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 a ,

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 1 17 28 4 7 0 0 62
(B) New Public Water
Connections ................. 0 7 450 4 5 1.692 8 1
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tains installed.......... 0 250 2 0 0 0 0
2. New Specification Privies
Installed.................... 40 5 96 3 1 210 18 4
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition. ..... .......... 58 0 13 3 0 103 2 0
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests. .................. 29 0 70 4 27 67 6 0
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed................... 269 21 359 47 368 3,305 49 67
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sanitary
Condition .................. 11 0 1 12 5 1,225 4 1
7. New Public Styrer Connections... 14 11 452 4 6 46 7 0
FIELD VISITS (8-17).............. 5,224 604 4,861 474 1,815 9,374 397 333
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision.... 227 62 239 41 112 623 25 27
2. Field Visits to .Food-Handling
Establishments ............. 1,810 481 1,705 408 527 2,260 307 139
3. Food Handler'saCourses
Conducted. ................ ... 0 5 3 0 1 2 0


...

ANNUAL REPORT | 1951 :

P. SANITATION
1.' Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 1 1 137 235 38 44
(B) New Public Water
Connections ................. 3 1 0 263 0 0 535
(C) Approved Drinking Fountains
Installed... ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2. New Specification Privies
Installed........... ........... 6 1 125 0 18 12 34
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition...'.. ......... 2 0 63 3 4 3 5
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests ..................... 0 1 6 36 0 0 2.108
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed.................... 32 68 399 720 42 30 2,157
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition................. 4 2 34 246 3 15 79
7. New Public Sewer Connections... 3 4 14 25 0 1 1
FIELD VISITS (8.17).............. 683 909 2,076 39,133 400 27410,288
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1.. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 20 94 109 5,054 37 20 562
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments................ 196 598 74435,480 185 210 2,275
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted..:.................. 0 2 0 570 0 0 2










86 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 '

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 136 4 1 48 8 0 0
(B) New Public Water
Connections. ............... 551 3 0 194 1 0 29
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tains Installed ............... 0 0 2 0 0 0
2. New Specification Privies
Installed ...................... 34 4 6 125 23 0 6
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition ................... 11 0 5 188 25 0 8
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests..................... 280 3 16 0 0 0 0
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed...................... 725 22 15 62 .44 16 23
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition ................ 22 9 2 48 2 4
7. New Public Sewer Connections.. 22 0 0 145 0 0 14
FIELD VISITS (8-17)............. 10,620 306 970 1,613 1,088 88 547
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 352 26 35 55 9 16 118
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments................. 2,010 115 253 231 352 81 1,028
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted .................... 10 0 0 0 0 0





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 0 S S 3 3

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 0 0 7 0 413 3
(B) New Public Water
Connections ...... ........ 3 0 0 14 0 1,585 2
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tains Installed ............... 0 0 0 1 0 8
2. New Specification Privies
Installed ..................... 7 13 0 6 4 141 10
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition ..................... 0 0 2 3 414 16
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests...................... 0 0 0 188 8
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed.............. 29 17 16 13 87 1,934 13
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition ................. 4 3 0 0 12 91 0
7. New Public Sewer Connections... 4 0 0 1 4 985 10
FIELD VISITS (8-17) .............. 834 683 166 421 1,09629,008 352
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 43 92 42 6 191 2,815 88
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments ................ 767 48 231 127 62212.472 308
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted..................... 0 0 0 0 4 0









LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 87


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




5 a
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 : -c J

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 3 1 17 0 15 0 3
(B) New Public Water
Connections ................ 13 0 25 6 195 0 0
(C) Approved'Drinking Foun-
tain Installed ............... 6 0 4 0 0 0 0
2. New Specification Privies
Installed..................... 0 0 20 2 8 0 7
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition. ................... 1 2 70 3 13 0 3
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests .................... 8 21 8 0 0 0 140
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed..................... 218 29 20 8 450 4 321
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition................. 9 0 5 0 15 6 6
7. New Public Sewer Connections... 11 2 26 0 3 0 190
FIELD VISITS (8-17) ............. 2.249 343 350 167 5,706 108 9.938
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision ...... 145 25 20 14 140 43 128
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishment ................ 610 206 98 130 654 49 1,526
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted .................... 6, 0 1 01 01 0 3



i a a a I

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 1 0 214 2 0 0
(B) New Public Water
Connections................... 0 27 646 199 0 1
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tainsInstalled ............... 0 2 0 2 1 0 3
2. New Specification Privies
Installed.................... 0 2 19 0 2 0 0
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition ............... ...... 5 0 39 10 5 0 6
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests .................... 1 1 18 4 0 7
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed................... 50 15 22 626 177 29 45
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition ................ 21 2 11 7 14 1 0
7. New Public Sewer Connections. 2 0 12 -374 58 0 0
FIELD VISITS (8-17)............. 1,180 165 908 2,768 3,413 654 511
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 4 14 53 212 98 104 11
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments .............. 343 108 314 767 1,006 274 1127
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted .................... 2 0 0 0 0 5









88 ANNUAL REPORT,. 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



0 t o)

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 i S
z 0 0 0 0 L .

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public.... 2 1 0 33 55 71 3
(B) New Public Water
Cnnetonnections.............. 15 77 36 318 8 422 0
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tains Installed............... 0 0 11 0 1 0
2. New Specification Privies
Installed.................... 0 8 0 27 0 10 3
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition. .................... 3 2 0 12 0 3 1
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests ..................... 15 94 0 60 1 83.
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed...................... 81 403 16 1,393 63 1.480 31
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition ................ 1 1 0 34 4 .31 10
7. New Public Sewer Connections. 1 3 1 76 138 6 4
FIELD VISITS (8-17).....:........ 1,021 1,644 412 7,289 1,100 2.927 415
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 41 117 21 274 82 146 132
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments................ 303 311 116 1,966 1,027 1,085 581
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted .................... 1 1 0 1 0 6



0. .9

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 I
P O pow Cl com d 1 n

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-Public... 4 127 12 0 1 166 24
(B) New Public Water
Connections........... ...... 0 08 5 2 32 0 40
(C) Approved Drinking Foun-
tains Installed.............. 3 1 0 0 0 0 3
2. New Specification Privies
Installed.......... ... 5 22 7 0 0 5 23
3. Privies Restored to Sanitary
Condition ................... 7 2 4 2 0 3
4. Percolation Water Table or Soil
Log Tests.................... 368 112 74 3 0 3 143
5. New Specification Septic Tank
Installed.......... .. ...... 2,369 1,072 86 267 7 626 178
6. Septic Tanks Restored to Sani-
tary Condition ................ 145 51 2 41 0 20 18
7. New Public Sewer Connections.. 9 72 3 1 : 7 9
FIELD VISITS (8-17)............... 11,023 5,580 963 2,277 171 2,591 1,769
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK
1. Food-Handling Establishments
Registered for Supervision...... 1,536 601 101 49 89 90 116
2. Field Visits to Food-Handling
Establishments............... 8,824 1,415 432 195 561 454 662
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted .................... 29 0 3 .0 0 0 0










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 89


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)




0 o = n .- u
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 B 3 s j o

P. SANITATION
1. Approved Water Supplies
Installed
(A) Private and Semi-
Public ........... .. 0 1 0 4 12 1 5 8 2,019
(B) New Public Water
Connections......... 0 0 22 1 8 0 36 0 8,026
(C) Approved Drinking
Fountains Installed... 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 329
2. New Specification Privies
Installed............... 0 7 43 27 1 4 60 81 1,761
3. Privies Restored to Sani-
tary Condition.......... 0 3 36 3 0 3 74 1 1,263
4. Percolation Water Table
or Soil Log Tests....... 0 2 16 0 64 9 10 0 4,122
5. New Specification Septic
Tank Installed......... 12 40 40 23 193 8 177 27 21,555
6. Septic Tanks Restored to
Sanitary Condition..... 4 5 1 16 6 6 2 2,346
7. New Public Sewer Con-
nections. .............. 5 7 17 3 84 0 32 1 3 435
FIELD VISITS (817)....... 228 797 1,829 1,458 2,395 440 1,283 364201;073
R. PROTECTION OF FOOD
AND MILK
1. Food-Handling Establish-
ments Registered for
Supervision........... 79 4 49 45 977 30 52 71 17,048
2. Field Visits to Food-
Handling Establishments 492 715 305 164 6,050 154 160 502100.095
3. Food Handler's Courses
Conducted.............. 0 0 1 0 0 00 0 658



C -v

ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S 5I a

R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK (Cont'd)
4. Number of Certificates Awarded
Persons....................... .0 0 346 78 0 35 82 0
5. Number of Ceritficates Awarded
Establishments................ 0 0 57 9 0 0 9 0
6. Dairy Farms Registered for
Supervision................... 19 3 54 3 8 1 11 6
7. Field Visits to Dairy Farms...... 301 3 274 48 132 37 136 45
8. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision...... 10 2 23 1 4 18 0 1
9. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants ................ 120 2 294 27 28 222 0 23
10. Cows Tuberculin Tested........ 0 398 12 0 536 329 0
11. Cows Bangs Tested............. 0 789 12 0 0 324 0
S. MOSQUITO CONTROL
1. Surveys and Field Visits......... 17 9 164 2 0 0 5 11
2. Building Mosquito Proofed....... 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0
3. Drainage-Linear Feet Completed 0 014,620 650 0 0 0 0
5. Mosquito Breeding Places
Eliminated................... 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0
6. Breeding Places Controlled-
Acres.............. ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0
8. Structures Sprayed with D.D.T...I 19 18 0 0 0 0 3 0










90 ANNUAL REPORT, 1951


MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)



Ja
0
ANNUAL REPORT 1951 S $

R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK (Cont'd)
4. Number of Certificates Awarded
Persons.... ..... ..0...... 0 8,792 0 0 513
5. Number of Certificates Awarded
Establishments. ............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Dairy Farms Registered for
Supervision................... 1 4 4 98 6 1 0
7. Field Visits to Dairy Farms...... 26 37 130 1,963 128 23 0
8. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ...... 0 4 7 73 1 1 2
S. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants..... .......... 0 16 117 3,120 68 20 2
10. Cows Tuberculin Tested......... 0 0 012,416 0 0 0
11. Cows Bangs Tested............. 107 0 778 36 0 83 0
S. MOSQUITO CONTROL
1. Surveys and Field Visits. ........ 8 0 0 0 13 0 0
2. Buildings Mosquito Proofed...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.870
3. Drainage-Linear Feet Completed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Mosquito Breeding Places
Eliminated .................. .. 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
6. Breeding Places Controlled-
Acres....... 1 0 0 0 20 0 0
8. Structures Sprayed with D.D.T... 647 0 0 0 0 0 0





ANNUAL REPORT 1951 8 S

R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK (Cont'd)
-4. Number of Certificates Awarded
Persons..... ............. 63 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Number of Certificaies Awarded
Establishments................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Dairy Farms Registered for
Supervision.................... 107 0 0 10 1 1
7. Field Visits to Dairy Farms... 1029 0 0 13 17 219 57
8. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ...... 10 0 0 2 1 3 0
9. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants................ 336 0 0 7 18 21 0
S10. Cows Tuberculin Tested......... 2,799 0 0 1,010 0 1.009 0
11. Cows Bangs Tested........... 4,049 0 0 1,134 0 80 44
S. MOSQUITO CONTROL
1. Surveys and Field Visits......... 57 0 85 34 0 0 0
S2. Buildings Mosquito Proofed...... 0 0 7 81 0 0 0
3. Drainage-Linear Feet Completed 0 011,664 0 .00 3,040
5. Mosquito Breeding Places
Eliminated. .................. 0 8 0 0 0 0
6. Breeding Places Controlled-
Acres .................. .... 0 0 5 0 0
8. Structures Sprayed with D.D.T... 2 0 10 53 0 0 .14










LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE 91





MAJOR ACTIVITIES (Continued)

0"


ANNUAL REPORT 1951 4 0

R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK (Cont'd)
4. Number of Certificates Awarded
Persons....................... 0 0 0 0 0 357 0
5. Number of Certificates Awarded
Establishments................ 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
6. Dairy Farms Registered for
Supervision .............. 1 8 9 2 3 124 25
7. Field Visits to Dairy Farms.... 6 87 149 40 32 1,519 258
8. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision...... 1 3 0 2 1 30 7
9. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants................ 6 43 0 14 12 1,087 18
10. Cows Tuberculin Tested......... 0 0 593 0 1 11,977 40
11. Cows Bangs Tested.. ............ 28 .0 135 0 0 1,775 59
S. MOSQUITO CONTROL
1. Surveys'and Field Visits.......... 0 0 0 7 0 235 5
2. Buildings Mosquito Proofed ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Drainage-Linear Feet Completed 0 0 0 0 014.712 0
5. Mosquito Breeding Places
Eliminated .................... 0 0 0 1 0 2 2
6. Breeding Places Controlled-
Acres...... .............. 0 0 0 0 0 9,66 0
8. Structures Sprayed with D.D.T... 0 0 0 12 0 0


*


ANNUAL REPORT 1951 "

R. PROTECTION OF FOOD AND
MILK (Cont'd)
4. Number of Certificates Awarded
Persons. ..... ........ 70 0 21 0 0 0 32
5. Number of Certificates Awarded
Establishments................ 7 0 0 0 0 0 0
6. Dairy Farms Registered for
Supervision.................... 8 47 7 10 12 4 28
7. Field Visits to Dairy Farms...... 105 641 100 79 113 4 314
8. Milk and Milk Products Plants
Registered for Supervision ...... 2 2 1 0 8 18 6
9. Field Visits to Milk and Milk
Products Plants................ 2 28 3 0 51 18 260
10. Cows Tuberculin Tested ......... 30 267 524 0 0 0 1,754
11. Cows Bangs Tested............. 398 0 753 263 0 0 3,000
S. MOSQUITO CONTROL
1. Surveys and Field Visits.....:... 1 0 2 0 5,000 0 1,082
2. Buildings Mosquito Proofed..:... 0 0 17 0 657 0 1
3. Drainage-Linear Feet Completed 0 0 100 0 3,365 0 10.170
5. Mosquito Breeding Places
Eliminated ................ .. 0 3 0 12 0 2
6. Breeding Places Controlled-
Acres............. .......... 0 0 0 0 78,955 0 2,488
8. Structures Sprayed with D.D.T... 1 2 57 6 2,688 0 72