• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Preventable diseases
 Bureau of tuberculosis
 Malaria control
 Sanitary engineering
 Maternal and child health
 Bureau of dental health
 Local health service
 Public health nursing
 Health education
 Library
 Laboratory
 Narcotics
 Vital statistics
 Personnel administration
 Finance and accounts






Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00016
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000243
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
    Preventable diseases
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Bureau of tuberculosis
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Malaria control
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Sanitary engineering
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Maternal and child health
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Bureau of dental health
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Local health service
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Public health nursing
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Health education
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Library
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Laboratory
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Narcotics
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Vital statistics
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Personnel administration
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Finance and accounts
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
Full Text

~$
-I


STATE OF FLORIDA





FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORt."

of the

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1945




WILSON T. SOWDER, M. D.
Florida State Health Officer





FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
Jacksonville, Florida
1946


E..
'*'*
4 1
y; '


94s


-----






STATE OF FLORIDA


FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT
of the


STATE BOARD


OF HEALTH


FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1945




WILSON T. SOWDER, M. D.
Florida State Health Officer





FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
Jacksonville, Florida
1946


















His Excellency, MILLARD F. CALDWELL
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida



Sir:


I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida State Board
of Health for the period of January 1, 1945, to December 31, 1945,
inclusive.

Respectfully submitted,
HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D.
President


Jacksonville, Florida
March 31, 1946







The Honorable HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Pensacola, Florida

Dear Dr. Bryans:

The year 1945 has been an eventful one for the Florida State
Board of Health. It was marked by the retirement of Dr. Henry
Hanson on September 15. Dr. Hanson had served with the Flori-
da State Board of Health in various capacities and at different
times since 1909. He was State Health Officer for the periods
1929 to 1935 and 1942 to 1945. He was recognized as an interna-
tional authority on tropical diseases.
The end of the war brought the State Board of Health many
new problems but in a way it widened the opportunities for de-
veloping a better health program in the state. Many persons
formerly with the State Board of Health returned from the
armed forces. The recruiting of new trained personnel was
stepped up.
Changes in the administrative setup of the State Board of
Health were made. The Bureau of Epidemiology and the Bureau
of Venereal Disease Control were consolidated under a new Bu-
reau of Preventable Diseases. The Bureau of Public Health
Nursing was placed under the Bureau of Local Health Service
as a Division. The Bureau of Health Education was put under
Administration as a Division. A personnel Supervisor was ap-
pointed to keep personnel records and to recruit new personnel,
and to promote greater efficiency amongst all employees by var-
ious means. Provision was made for the appointment of a Pur-
chasing agent. Plans were made to provide new buildings for
the central office of the State Board of Health and for its branch
laboratories. Plans were made for the development of a Nutri-
tion Program. A grant of $33,400.00 was secured from the Com-
monwealth Fund for a Training Center for technical personnel
at Gainesville. Four District Offices were opened up and per-
sonnel employed to serve the needs, as far as possible, of the 3K
counties in the state not having a full-time county health unit.
By making economies in the central office more funds were
distributed for use in the various counties of the state than had
ever before been made available. This was made possible by
an increased appropriation from the State Legislature.
It is believed that the public health program in Florida faces
a new era of expansion and intensification of effort in the era-
dication of the preventable causes of disease. The people of the
state and the elected officials of the state have shown themselves






willing to support an expanded health program here. It is be-
lieved that the year 1946 will see many substantial gains in
the fight for better health in Florida.
More detailed reports of various sub-divisions of the State
Board of Health follow.

Respectfully submitted,
WILSON T. SOWDER, M. D.
State Health Officer


Jacksonville, Florida
March 15, 1946













TABLE OF CONTENTS


Communicable Diseases .... --_ .. ........------------ ..- 1

Bureau of Tuberculosis ...----------------------.- 35

Malaria Control--------------- -- 44

Sanitary Engineering .-------- ----------------- 53

Maternal and Child Health -----....------------- 63

Bureau of Dental Health .- .......------------------------------ 67

Local Health Service ...------_--.-------.-..-.--------- .71

Public Health Nursing ..-......---------- .....------------------ --- 86

Health Education .......--.----------------------89

Library ...----_.---------------.. --------- 97

Laboratory ...--__ ...---..---..------- --- --. 103

Narcotics --------------.. .. ..------- -..--------. 108

Vital Statistics ..... ..... ..... ...-----------.-......... 110

Personnel Administration -......... .-__--.-____ .........------------.112

Finance and Accounts --_ ---.__------------------ 117










PREVENTABLE DISEASES
R. F. SONDAG, M. D., Director

On October 30, 1945 a reorganization of various bureaus and
divisions within the State Board of Health was effected, and
with this reorganization, the Bureaus of Epidemiology and Ven-
ereal Disease Control were abolished. A Bureau of Preventable
Diseases was created to carry on the functions formerly done
by the Bureau of Epidemiology and Venereal Disease Control.
A Division of Venereal Disease Control was established within
the Bureau of Preventable Diseases. At a later date, if funds
become available, it is anticipated that a Division of Cancer
Control and a Division of Industrial Hygiene will be established
within the Bureau of Preventable Diseases.
At the present time, all activities of the new Bureau of Pre-
ventable Diseases are being carried on by the staff of the abol-
ished Bureau of Venereal Disease Control; however, future plans
provide for an epidemiologist, an expert physician on cancer con-
trol, and a physician well-trained in industrial hygiene.
The present annual report incorporates the epidemiological
activities for 1945 and those of the Division of Venereal Disease
Control, which follows. The activities in connection with cancer
control and industrial hygiene were in the embryonic stage dur-
ing 1945. A complete summary of these activities will be in-
corportated in the 1946 annual report.







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


Tempus fugit! In this issue a year ago, emphasis was placed
on hastening V-Day over VD. Since that time, we have seen
V-E Day and V-J day, but V-Day over VD is one battle which re-
mains to be won. During the war, important gains were made
on all fronts-medical, educational, moral and community action.
Now that hostilities have ceased, it is the feeling of many that
the consolidated lines and effective barriers built on sound public
health principles need not be extended into the postwar era. In
many areas where there has been an almost complete crackdown
on organized prostitution, there has been a tendency to ease up
.now that the war is over. There are no indications that regress
will be made on the medical and educational fronts. Medical
science continues its unrelenting warfare on the two most pre-
valent venereal diseases-syphilis and gonorrhea. Education,
too, continues right in stride with medical science by informing
young and old alike of the needless waste and misery caused by
venereal diseases. Considerable reinforcements though are
needed on the moral and community action fronts. The moral
aspect of venereal disease control is rightfully the responsibility
of the home, church, and the school. It must be emphasized again
that what is still lacking is not the quality of the effort made,
but the quantity, particularly on the moral and community action
fronts.
In 1918 a general relaxing of measures to curtail venereal dis-
eases followed the armistice and the rate of infection reached
epidemic proportions. We must not let this history repeat itself.
A similar upswing is already beginning. Now that all hostili-
ties have ceased, it is believed that the VD rate in the United
States will rise. This anticipated increase in venereal diseases
forecast the extent of the VD control problem to be faced by
civilian agencies in the immediate future. During the war, the
Army and Navy had control over eight million men and carried
out a comprehensive VD control program. During the past six
months and during the next six to eight months, over five
million of these men, all in the age groups with the highest
incidence of venereal diseases, will be discharged to civilian life.
The Army has taken steps to make sure that the number of men
discharged with infectious venereal diseases will be held to
a minimum. Civilian agencies, health departments, and private
physicians must accept the responsibility of this increased bur-
den by providing substitute VD control procedures of at least
comparable intensiveness. Failure to do so will almost surely
result in increased civilian rates.
[2]






VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 3

In each large Separation Center public health representatives
are stationed to interview all separated veterans with a positive
blood test or a-history of syphilitic infection, before or during the
the veteran's career. Before these men are separated, they are
instructed to report to a nearby Rapid Treatment Center. When
their disease is not in an infectious stage, they are instructed to
report to the nearest health department, if additional examina-
tion and follow-up work are indicated.
At the beginning of the past year, the new drug penicillin was
used rather sparingly, but as the year progressed, this drug be-
came available in increasing amounts, enabling more patients
to be treated with this new therapeutic agent. Penicillin, prior
to April 1, was only available to the Rapid Treatment Centers,
but after this date, it was distributed to all health departments,
venereal disease clinics, and private physicians for the treatment
of gonorrhea.
During the month of April, too, the four-hour treatment
scheduled for the treatment of gonorrhea was introduced to health
departments, clinics, and private physicians. The treatment of
syphilis with penicillin requires injections at three-hour intervals
for approximately ten days, patients while under treatment re-
quiring hospitalization and constant medical supervision; there-
by, precluding the use of this drug on an ambulatory basis in
health departments, clinics, and private physicians' offices. The
Bureau of VD Control, therefore, does not distribute penicillin
for the treatment of syphilis, and these patients must be referred
to the Rapid Treatment Centers for their treatments. With the
introduction of the four-hour treatment schedule for gonorrhea
and the ease with which this treatment can be carried out in the
health departments, clinics, and private physicians' offices, all
health departments were requested to treat all gonorrhea pa-
tients in their clinics.
After July 1, admissions to the Rapid Treatment Centers were
restricted to syphilis patients only. Since the earlier forms of
syphilis are mostly amenable to the intensive types of therapy,
admissions to the Rapid Treatment Centers were limited to pri-
mary, secondary, and early latent syphilis. Early congenital
syphilis and asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients were also ac-
ceptable for admission in the Rapid Treatment Centers. A glance
at the tables presented in this issue will disclose that there has
been a marked decrease in the case load of the clinics throughout
the State. This does not necessarily mean that the clinics no
longer have any work to do. On the contrary they are about as
busy now as they were when the case load was at its peak. Em-






4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


GRAPH 1.-NUMBER OF CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASE UNDER
TREATMENT IN CLINICS BY MONTH-1942-1945.






30,o 0 0





< J 20,000





10,000






1942 194.3 1944- 194-5
YEAR

phasis is now placed on referring patients to the Rapid Treat-
ment Centers, rather than treating patients by the standard fifty-
two week method. Clinics are now being used more for diagnos-
tic and follow-up activities rather than for treatment. From
statistics thus far presented, we can be assured that at least 90%
of the patients admitted to the Rapid Treament Centers for
syphilitic treatment finished the prescribed course; whereas, less
than 25 % of the patients treated on an out-patient basis by means
of the standard fifty-two week method finished the prescribed
course.
Although there was no decrease in the total number of anti-
cipated admissions at the Rapid Treatment Centers, it was de-








VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


GRAPH. 2-NUMBER OF CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASE
ADMITTED TO FLORIDA RAPID TREATMENT
CENTERS DURING 1945, BY MONTH.
JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JUIY AUG. 5PT OCT. NOV. SEC.


/I /



'I


N


. \ 1600


JAN. FES. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE. JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV DET-.


TOTAL ADMISSIONS
-SYWHILIs ADMISSIONS

--------------- GONORA AOMISSIONS


cided to close the Rapid Treatment Center at Wakulla. A few
patients were admitted during the month of January, but by
March 31 this center was entirely closed and all equipment moved


500


300


100







6 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


to other centers. With the closing of the Wakulla Center, the
Florida State Board of Health assumed the responsibility of oper-
ating the Gulf Coast Medical Center at Pensacola. After one
complete year of operating this center, arrangements were made
the latter part of December to close this center, and all patients
eligible for admission to Rapid Treatment Centers are now being
referred either to the .Center at Jacksonville or Ocala. A review
of the tables and charts accompanying this essay will reveal that
the vast majority of patients formerly treated in clinics are now
being treated in the Rapid Treatment Centers. This has reduced
the case load in the clinics so that health officers are able to
devote more time to other important health activities, and VD
clinicians can now devote more time to diagnosis, contact tracing,
and follow-up activities.
During 1945 the Legislature met and enacted into law a Pre-
marital-Prenatal Bill which became effective on October 1. Al-
though approximately three months' time was allowed to prepare
for the provisions of these laws, considerable delays were en-
countered in having the various forms printed, which, in turn,
delayed the distribution of these forms. As with many new
laws, considerable confusion was at first experienced throughout
the State in interpreting and carrying out the provisions of the
laws, but after a few weeks' operation, very few complaints were
registered, and the laws are now taken in stride. Tables show-
ing the number of persons examined under the premarital and
prenatal laws are presented in this issue.
Now that the war is over, everyone should hold firmly to the
great public health and law enforcement gains made during the
war and pledge greater confidence and determination in an all-.
out effort to emphasize the moral and community action fronts.
This must be done by everyone, if good conduct and moral stan-
dards are to be upheld. Failure to do so will interrupt the gains
made in the control of venereal diseases and almost surely place
Florida back on the unenviable list of states with VD rates. This
should never happen.









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 7


TABLE 1.-NUMBER OF CASES OF SYPHILIS AND GONORRHEA REPORTED
BY COUNTY, 1941-1945.

1941 1942 1943 1944 1945
County -- -- -
Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Con.

Alachua... ........... 378 19 965 105 784 118 348 65 307 187
Baker......... i. 118 6 76 20 45 10 31 25 30 13
Bay..................... 241 34 412 255 553 422 437 454 323 868
Bradford................. 284 19 182 97 199 86 1'93 97 134 114
Brevard................. 122 6 168 2 419 91 73 33 120 40
Broward................ 797 54 773 110 742 231 479 258 349 210
Calhoun ................ 1 0 26 2 48 5 9 1 6 1
Charlotte............... 29 3 170 8 65 33 15 17 5 15
Citrus................... 20 10 17 0 170 11 13 7 16 30
Clay Ex.................. 142 19 62 61 108 48 155 66 40 59
Camp Blanding........... 176 899 329 1,478 316 1,875 69 91 143 42
Collier................... 58 2 190 1 35 14 23 3 18 41
Columbia Ex............. 84 10 59 8 714 24 88 31 64 48
Government Hospital ...... 0 0 0 0 69 2 17 0 0 0
Dade ................... 3,228 485 4,229 522 4,459 1,349 2,588 2,016 1,724 2,444
DeSoto .................. 68 1 264 14 166 47 53 50 43 41
Dixie .................... 18 0 74 1 215 0 14 5 27 39
Duval.................. 2,973 419 3,516 2,115 6,214 3,032 3,909 1,826 2.470 2,387
Naval Air Base........... 27 93 31 428 36 503 43 529 62 706
Escambia................ 765 260 661 514 792 1,127 812 1,487 641 1,934
Flagle .................. 81 5 79 11 94 8 108 55 173 70
Franklin............... 117 2 96 30 117 158 142 675 85 184
Gadsden Ex. ....... :... 259 11 199 56 299 40 120 53 348 296
State Hospital ............ 231 0 172 0 183 1 159 0 155 2
Gilchrist.............. 99 1 42 0 4 1 1 0 4 5
Glades................ 174 5 110 7 18 8 32 6 29 3
Gulf................... 252 8 148 16 143 13 84 13 46 21
Hamilton................ 223 18 77 50 3 0 3 6 14 11
Hardee ................ 34 0 96 17 36 5 34 10 16 9
Hendry.................. 3 0 205 6 181 57 135 24 240 25
Hernando ................ 20 0 53 0 142 2 9 5 3 11
Highlands................ 211 3 344 35 299 260 183 280 107 153
Hillsborough ........... 1,827 221 2,437 803 2,920 1,430 1,417 1,815 1,205 2,176
Holmes........... 6 0 18 1 51 0 51 14 30 5
Indian River ............. 47 2 210 11 279 16 68 22 153 40
Jackson. 342 30 237 109 211 133 113 164 50 169
Jefferson................. 112 0 432 42 201 64 78 47 79 101
LaFayette ............... 4 0 7 1 14 0 4 1 2 0
,ake ................... 382 8 611 97 380 95 201 96 199 121
1,ee...................... 62 1 650 108 286 39 149 41 101 127
Leon.................... 438 50 659 1,111 450 687 359 1,128 309 1,123
Levy ................... 679 1 301 15 152 62 10 3 65 26
Liberty .................. 1 4 0 7 1 0 1 1 3
Madison................. 84 0 235 13 476 38 16 4 118 40
Manatee................. 175 3 503 35 218 187 178 84 184 241
Marion .................. 262 6 359 27 1,026 77 263 111 242 399
Martin.................. 47 0 66 2 95 8 7 0 83 19
Monroe ................ 38 24 147 80 308 171 142 220 117 228
Nassau.................. 246 9 309 59 201 126 114 102 90 36
Okaloosa................. 4 14 140 24 171 248 61 224 42 164
Okeechobee.............. 13 0 2 2 72 0 36 12 18 16
OrangeEx ............... 791 133 1,023 629 850 846 580 313 781 415
Florida T. B. Sanat........ 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0
Osceola............ .... 48 6 132 3 113 9 6 4 16 6
alm Beach.............. 1,479 41 1,245 258 1,274 335 2.324 353 2,069 814
Pasco.................... 66 0 114 2 175 4 55 3 31 5
Pinellas.................. 1,082 38 1,111 277 927 596 370 319 268 279
Polk..................... 421 2 690 34 1,135 245 526 161 552 336
Putnam ................. 45 2 401 6 320 39 82 37 193 67
Saint Johns.............. 59 0 264 10 213 36 137 33 222 71
Saint Lucie............... 229 2 127 14 339 105 165 42 160 115
Santa Rosa............... 81 4 58 27 55 18 33 88 13 38
Saiasota................. 233 14 570 83 181 46 139 53 91 78
Seminole................. 215 6 1,169 104 589 210 335 197 546 175
Sumter.................. 43 1 227 14 190 165 85 6 93 24
Suwannee................ 55 4 259 9 377 10 0 4 34 17
Taylor ...... ...... 132 18 301 75 127 58 62 110 26 17
Unon.................. 4 4 24 1 20 1 11 7 15 12
State Prison............... 0 0 0 0 238 5 89 2 144 0
Volusia.................. 129 8 944 83 660 260 310 186 350 460
Wakulla .................. 94 0 85 15 111 290 16 21 15 11
Walton.................. 43 4 164 12 46 45 58 69 55 48
Washington............. 2 0 45 0 141 22 47 55 42 57
Quarantine Hospitals. ..... 0 0 0 0 271 616 0 0 0


18.08


(Out of State Cases Excluded)


GRANT TOTAL..... 21,258 3,048 30,104 10,165 33,540116,925 19,087114,351 16,546


(Out of State Cases Excluded)


I _


0








8 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


TABLE 2.-NUMBER OF VENEREAL DISEASE CASES UNDER TREATMENT
IN CLINICS BY MONTH, 1942-1945.

MONTH YEAR
1942 1943 1944 1945
January................ 13,393 30,218 27.943 16,475

Febluary................ 14,317 29,956 28,631 16,932

M arch ................. 15.715 31,311 26,117 14,677

April .................. 16,912 31,156 25,611 12,711

M ay................... 18,186 -31,255 24,475 12,413
June.................... 19,248 31,296 21,538 11,020

July.................. 19,461 30,710 19,823 10.781
August ................. 22,600 31,412 19,864 9,708
September............... 24,633 30,472 18,287 8,365
October................ 27,743 30,008 18,303 8,805

November ............. 29,236 30,076 17,943 7,890
December.............. 29,227 32,285 16,172 **8,000

TOTAL ............ 250,671 370,105 264,707 137,777
*Includes Rapid Treatment Centers.
**Estimated.

TABLE 3.-NUMBER OF VENEREAL DISEASE CASES REPORTED IN FLORIDA,
BY DISEASE AND YEAR, 1941-1945.

Year Syphilis Gonorrhea Chancroid Granuloma Lymphopathia
Inguinale Venereum
1941 21,258 3,048 154 76 49

1942 30,104 10,165 453 135 124

1943 33,540 16,295 844 251 254

1944 19,087 14,351 535 217 248

1945 16,546 18,088 722 244 197
(Out of State Cases Excluded)

TABLE 4.-MONTHLY AVERAGE OF PATIENTS UNDER TREATMENT IN
FLORIDA, BY YEAR 1941-1945.

YEAR Monthly Average of Patients Under Treatment in Clinics
1941 12,600
1942 20,131

1943 30,655

1944 22,059

1945 11.481

TABLE 5.-SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR SYPHILIS AND MICROSCOPIC EXAMIN-
ATIONS FOR GONORRHEA-FLORIDA STATE LABORATORIES, 1941-
1945.

YEAR SYPHILIS GONORRHEA
1941 908,360 43,591
1942 1,239,399 58,936
1943 948,299 89,249
1944 839,200 017,915
1945 761,837 106,360*
*Includes 25,725 cultures.






















TABLE 6.-DISTRIBUTION OF DRUGS AS TO SOURCE AND KIND FURNISHED FOR 1943-1944-1945.


DISTRIBUTED TO DISTRIBUTED TO
DRUGS PRIVATE PHYSICIANS CLINICS, HOSPITALS OTHERS TOTAL DISTRIBUTED
1943 1944 1945 1943 1944 1945 1943 1944 1945
Mapharsen (in doses)............ 54,877 36,270 13,080 536,510 398,820 234,680 591,387 435,090 247,760
Neoarsphenamine (in doses).:.... 9,492 3,260 1.340 31,000 9,095 2,165 40,492 12,355 3,505
Sulfarsphenamine (in doses)...... 370 155 5 3,640 2,760 1,045 4,010 2,915 1,050
Tryparsamide (in doses)........ 500 940 380 9,190 10,550 4,780 9,690 11,490 5,160
Bismuth (in cc) ................. 77,260 37,470 14,040 743,430 517,720 264,790 820,690 555,190 278,830
Sulfathiarole (in grams.)......... 21,500 4,000 1,000 588,000 1,055,000 199,190 609,500 1,059,000 '200,190
Distilled Water (in cc).......... 552,200 318,600 144,300 3,083,300 3,048.90J 2,783,200 3,635,500 3.367,500 2,927,500
Penicillin (in vials)* ............. 0 0 747 0 10,920 107,862 0 10,920 108,609


*
01 0,000 Oxford units to the vial.


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z


0n









TABLE 7.-ADMISSIONS AND READMISSIONS TO FLORIDA RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS, ACCORDING TO DISEASE, STAGE
OF INFECTION, RACE AND SEX, BY CENTER BY MONTH, 1945.


CENTER


MONTH


DISEASE AND STAGE OF INFECTION


.a a
0
- 04

i-ras


RACE


SEX >
I z


Ocala Rapid Treatment Center
January 38 279 18 8 6 349 194 11 4 8 4 0 4 570 143 427 344 326
February 50 235 17 31 10 343 152 12 4 9 0 0 0 520 123 397 217 303
March 52 277 62 17 35 443 146 6 4 29 0 0 0 628 161 467 283 345
April 55 404 84 13 0 556 42 8 0 47 7 8 19 672 95 577 323 349
May 78 601 111 36 0 826 24 5 0 37 8 6 16 908 78 830 517 391
June 53 413 68 25 0 559 14 10 0 41 14 4 21 645 76 569 290 355
July 67 344 66 36 46 559 20 10 15 45 5 3 9 658 74 584 327 331
August 82 408 45 23 25 583 8 6 8 36 7 3 10 651 57 604 373 278
September 51 302 33 8 33 427 17 10 8 39 12 2 14 515 51 464 275 240
October 93 251 33 25 36 438 15 6 14 30 11 1 12 515 85 430 241 274
November 86 209 27 12 40 374 15 2 65 44 9 5 15 515 77 438 255 260
December 63 54 10 4 9 140 6 8 17 21 9 2 11 203 56 147 122 81
SUB-TOTAL 768 3,777 574 238 240 5,597 653 94 139 386 86 34 131 7,000 1,066 5,934 3,467 3,533
Pensacola Rapid Treatment Center
January 53 58 13 7 3 134 253 1 0 9 9 70 79 476 224 252 171 305
February 50 45 10 7 1 113 214 11 0 6 3 48 52 396 158 238 128 268
March 63 69 26 8 0 158* 220 7 0 15 13 65 79 479 172 307 193 286
SApril 60 96 20 7 4 187 115 0 0 5 7 38 51 358 122 236 144 214
May 61 137 43 18 0 259 61 0 0 9 16 23 39 368 111 257 165 203
June 60 91 21 12 0 184 39 0 0 6 16 10 26 255 88 167 112 143
July 40 90 12 9 2 153 8 1 0 7 3 0 3 172 23 149 70 102
August 35 67 22 7 6 137 4 2 0 8 4 0 4 155 20 135 58 97
September 46 45 5 6 9 111 22 4 0 0 4 0 4 141 39 102 61 80
October 56 73 8 6 12 155 12 4 0 6 6 0 6 183 56 127 71 112
November 55 62 19 3 15 154 12 7 0 4 6 0 6 183 49 134 83 100
December 18 17 3 3 3 44 2 1 0 6 4 0 4 57** 14 43 24 33
SUB-TOTAL 597 850 202 93 551,789 962 38 0 81 91 254 3533.223 1.076 2,147 1,2801,943












TABLE 7 (Continued).-ADMISSIONS AND READMISSIONS TO FLORIDA RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS, ACCORDING TO DIS-
EASE, STAGE OF INFECTION, RACE AND SEX, BY CENTER BY MONTH, 1945.

DISEASE AND STAGE OF INFECTION RACE SEX


a 00s '0 >
'a 0 a a a a a



in 3 a' :i 41 si g js ;| .0. 5 j g 3
CENTER MONTH Cy t O3r U 0 60 X 5 9 1 R 0
Jacksonville Rapid Treatment Center
January 28 20 16 7 0 71 148 3 0 2 20 2 23 247 139 108 106 141
February 24 15 19 3 0 61 126 2 0 3 11 5 17 209 107 102 99 110
March 31 41 18 7 0 97 144 1 0 3 10 3 15 260 115 145 117 143
April 28 26 28 3 1 86 110 2 0 5 12 1 14 217 95 122 92 125
May 32 20 22 2 0 76 49 2 0 2 14 0 16 145 84 61 62 80
June 33 27 25 9 0 94 9 0 0 4 13 0 13 120 55 65 45 75
July 27 25 21 4 19 96 4 0 16 1 4 0 4 121 64 57 54 67
August 21 17 23 2 22 85 3 2 11 3 9 0 9 113 70 43 41 62
September 30 13 21 0 12 76 4 2 9 2 7 0 7 100 55 45 46 54
October 44 26 18 3 14 105 3 2 10 8 17 0 17 145 76 69 s8 65
November 40 23 15 3 12 93 3 1 14 8 8 0 8 127 62 65 77. 50
December 39 18 6 0 3 66 3 0 2 13 5 0 5 89 44 45 50 39
SUB-TOTAL 377 271 232 43 831,006 606 17 62 54 130 11 148 1,893 966 927 879 1,014
TOTAL ALL CENTERS
January 119 357 47 22 9 554 595 15 4 19 33 70 106 1,293 506 737 521 772
February 124 295 46 41 11 517 492 25 4 18 14 53 69 1,125 388 737 444 681
March 146 387 106 32 35 698* 510 14 4 47 23 68 94 1,367 448 919 593 774
April 143 526 1 23 5 829 267 10 0 57 26 47 84 1247 312 935 559 688
May 171 758 176 3 01,161 134 7 0 48 38 29 71 1,421 273 1,148 744 677
June 146 531 114 44 0 837 62 10 51 43 14 60 1,020 219 801 447 573
July 134 459 99 49 67 808 32 11 31 53 12 3 16 951 161 790 451 500
August 138 492 90 32 53 805 15 10 19 47 20 3 23 919 127 792 472 447
September 127 360 59 14 54 614 43 16 17 41 23 2 25 756 147 609 383 373
October 193 350 59 34 62 698 30 12 24 44 34 1 35 834 217 626 392 451
November 181 294 61 18 67 621 30 10 79 56 23 6 29 825 188 637 415 410
December 120 89 19 7 15 250 11 9 19 40 18 8 20 349 114 235 196 153
TOTAL 1,742 4,8981,008 374 378 8,392 2,221 149 201 521 307 304 632 12,116 3,1009,016 5,617 699.4
*Apparent error in Pensacola's report. Total figures are correct.
**P-nsacola RTC closed December 31. 1945. No Patients were admitted after December 21, 1945.









12 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


TABLE 8.-NUMBER AND RESULT OF SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR SYPHILIS PER-
FORMED IN COMPLIANCE WITH PREMARITAL AND PRENATAL
BLOOD TEST LAW, BY MONTH-FLORIDA STATE LABORATORIES.

MONTH PREMARITAL PRENATAL
Positive Negative Doubtful Total Positive Negative Doubtful Total
October.............. 131 2,168 16 2,315 75 1,341 7 1,423
November ........... 191 2,931 42 3,164 92 2,001 13 2,106
December............ 231 3,082 47 3,360 57 1,714 14 1,785
TOTAL.......... 553 8,181 105 8,839 224 5,056 34 5.31'
Percent .......... 6.25 92.56 1.19 100 4.22 95.13 .65 1o









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 13


TABLE 9.-MARRIAGES PERFORMED BY COUNTIES MY MONTHS, OCTOBER
TO DECEMBER, 1943, 1944, 1945.


COUNTIES


STATE .....................
Alachua.... :..................
B aker........................ .
B ay ..........................
Bradford .....................
Brevard ......................
Broward.......................
Calhoun .......................
Charlotte......................
Citrus........................
C lay ..........................
Collier......................
Columbia....................
Dade ........................
D eSoto........................
Dixie.........................
D uval.........................
Escambia.....................
Flagler........................
Franklin......................
G adsden .......................
O ilchrist.......................
Glades........................
G ulf..........................
H am ilton.....................
Hardee.......................
H endry ......................
Hernando....................
H ighlands. ....................
H illsboro......................
Holmes......................
Indian River........ ........ .
Jackson........... ...........
Jefferson ......................
LaFayette ...................
Lake... ......................
L ee..........................
Leon.........................
Levy........ ...............
Liberty .......................
Madison..... ................
Manatee ................ ......
M arion .......................
M artin........................
M onroe......................
N assau.......................
Okaloosa......................
Okeechobee...................
O range........................
O sceola ......................
Palm Beach....................
Pasco.........................
Pinellas.......................
P olk ..........................
Putnam.......................
St. Johns.....................
St. Lucie ........... .........
Santa Rosa ....................
Sarasota ......................
Sem inole......................
Sumter........................
Suwannee.....................
Taylor........................
U union .........................
Volusia.......................
W akulla......................
W alton .......................
W ashington...................
*1945 figures are provisional.


OCTOBER
1943 1944 1945*

4,253 3,639 1,883
56 28 36
63 71 2 2
70 56 22
42 38 16
30 37 23
226 193 98
9 12 3
13 9 6
9 10 5
26 35 13
11 15 3
25 24 19
552 469 362
13 7 2
10 4 1
487 444 219
276 230 97
16 24 8
21 20 4
42 27 6
12 13 3
18 8 1
9 14 1
13 13 1
16 11 13
6 9 2
22 17 4
53 39 16
392 311 204
19 15 2
20 29 8
33 49 6
13 6 4
7 3 1
33 37 17
44 43 16
101 79 19
10 16 2
3 4 1
24 13 7
41 24 15
50 33 16
23 11 5
49 51 18
24 23 5
45 36 12
6 12 3
184 139 94
39 32 11
166 117 85
25 21 16
159 158 85
143 123 69
36 32 9
59 50 23
35 38 11
41 32 10
48 29 16
57 59 17
12 17 9
29 15 11
15 4 4
8 15 0
65 61 59
9 6 0
10 8 2
30 18 5


NOVEMBER
1943 1944 1945*

3,986 3,691 2,412
62 34 22
53 55 1
90 67 22
21 31 23
28 35 22
203 164 121
10 6 3
8 13 2
18 4 9
29 39 13
11 21 4
29 25 16
473 481 442
13 9 8
7 7 3
476 453 294
228 216 119
17 20 12
27 19 6
26 30 16
5 9 4
8 14 9
5 15 3
8 14 2
18 19 21
4 10 3
20 16 18
38 44 21
373 339 252
14 10 4
20 25 16
51 40 6
15 22 4
3 3 3
43 34 18
55 44 21
116 83 20
18 9 6
1 2 1
11 17 8
53 44 22
51 36 22
18 19 8
52 67 38
21 23 5
38 35 6
24 8 5
173 129 133
24 32 23
154 147 88
26 31 25
143 130 104
142 127 120
20 34 18
50 34 16
37 36 13
40 26 18
44 30 27
45 43 35
21 17 7
13 10 7
15 4 4
9 11 1
62 78 53
12 11 3
11 12 7
15 19 6


DECEMBER
1943 1944 1945*

4,605 4,175 2,929
74 39 34
64 74 2
92 91 19
33 37 18
25 50 30
232 195 165
15 14 .
19 16 11
6 18 11
33 45 10
10 22 1
27 47 12
528 553 514
20 16 12
3 9 7
522 472 295
238 223 150
28 31 6
22 25 13
44 31 16
12 9 11
10 10 8
18 17 3
9 12 1
21 25 20
8 4 6
16 9 21
71 52 20
461 375 334
13 15 5
27 40 16
44 56 18
15 17 c
3 5 3
38 34 24
75 47 27
108 85 37
11 8 11
6 0 0
20 26 7
64 32 39
64 29 35
30 11 12
54 42 49
26 29 3
44 52 8
10 5 12
167 145 151
45 36 19
214 167 130
24 27 38
183 143 107
176 147 154
35 36 26
60 42 26
45 48 19
41 28 17
57 36 31
64 62 25
17 24 4
30 24 7
22 23 6
I1 21 3
59 64 69
6 7 5
13 20 8
23 21 16








TABLE 10.-BUREAU OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL-ANNUAL REPORT-1945
REPORT OF SYPHILIS ACCORDING TO STAGE OF INFECTION, PREGNANCY STATUS, RACE AND SEX, SOURCE OF REFERENCE
AND AGE GROUPS, BY COUNTIES AND FO STATE.

By Stage of Infection By Race and Sex Source ofRef. _By Age Group
Late White Colored
> a u Clinic

COUNTY or Priv. 10- 20- 30- 40- 50- Total
M F M F
0 U0 ;4 Cn 6-' Inst. M.D. ZI 9 19 29 39 40 Over

Alachua....... .. 12 36 174 48 6 20 8 3 307 3 12 17 135 141 2 397 301 6 11 3 60 127 60 26 20 307
Baker .............. 0 1 7 2 0 1 0 19 30 1 1 4 5 17 3 30 24 6 5 0 5 12 4 1 3 30
Bay.............. 13 52 138 104 2 5 9 0 323 6 42 37 104 138 2 323 282 41 1 4 64 152 66 25 11 323
Bradford............. 12 19 63 31 0 1 6 2 134 3 16 24 40 54 0 134 127 7 4 3 38 46 28 10 5 134
Brevard ............ 7 10 66 20 1 7 2 120 0 0 15 44 61 0 120 99 21 2 5 20 48 28 13 4 120
Broward ............. 22 30 206 -65 1 13 9 3 349 7 I' 25 156 135 13 349 280 69 7 4 62 149 89 27 11 349
Calhoun ............ 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 6 0 2 0 2 0 6 5 1 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 6
Charlotte............ 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 5 0 1 2 1 0 5 5 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 5
Cittus.............. 0 0 9 4 0 1 2 0 16 0 1 ( 3 6 0 16 14 2 0 0 2 7 3 3 1 16 03
Clay .............. 6 5 16 11 0 1 0 1 40 0 3 5 11 21 0 40 33 7 5 0 9 12 7 4 3 40
Collie................ 0 1 8 8 0 1 18 0 1 0 7 10 0 18 10 8 0 0 1 4 6 5 2 18
Columbia............ 4 15 27 6 0 1 1 10 64 3 2 3 28 28 3 64 54 10 2 0 19 27 8 2 6 64
Dade ................ 125 113 655 627 49 35 46 74 1,724 5 238 172 579 718 17 1,724 1,273 451 30 20 201 660 421 258 134 1,724
DeSoto.............. 2 0 14 25 0 1 1 0 43 5 2 5 14 17 5 43 18 25 2 1 5 13 13 7 2 43
Dixie ............... 2 7 9 4 0 3 2 0 27 1 4 5 4 14 0 27 26 1 0 1 3 13 8 1 1 27 CA
Duval ...............149 232 770 759 6 97 60 397 2,470 44 343 311 773 1,019 24 2,470 1,978 492 142 31 366 901 593 276 161 2,470
Escambia............ 72 96 243 163 15 24 21 7 641 11 84 83 174 293 7 641 552 89 17 13 137 267 124 59 24 641
Flaler.......... 7 4 93 39 1 9 19 1 173 0 7 4 83 70 9 173 169 4 4 16 24 38 43 18 30 173
Franklin............ 43 13 22 5 0 0 2 0 85 1 15 4 42 15 9 85 74 11 1 0 17 51 14 1 1 85
Gadsden............. 44 51 215 20 3 0 14 1 348 7 5 10 129 203 1 348 333 15 2 17 105 146 60 18 0 348
Gilchrist............. 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 3 0 4 4 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 4
Glades............ 1 1 20 6 0 1 0 0 29 0 0 2 22 5 0 29 29 0 0 0 1 18 8 1 1 29
Gulf ................ 2 10 20 9 1 0 3 1 46 2 2 5 11 28 0 46 46 0 0 3 11 22 6 4 0 46
Hamilton............ 0 3 11 0 0 0 0 14 1 0 0 8 6 0 14 12 2 1 0 4 7 2 0 0 14
Hardee .............. 0 2 0 1 0 3 1 16 0 4 7 3 2 0 16 9 7 0 1 3 4 5 2 1 16
Hendry.............. 3 1 204 8 0 20 3 1 240 1 3 1 207 29 0 240 240 0 1 2 14 147 62 11 3 240
Hernando..... 0 0 2 1 -0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3
Highlands............ 27 10 58 8 0 4 0 0 107 5 15 13 36 43 0 107 81 26 1 0 18 45 32 7 4 107
Hillsborough ........ 180 83 393 379 6 66 43 55 1,205 29 206 164 415 401 19 1,205 1,067 138 19 11 163 496 291 153 72 1,205
Holmes.............. 3 00 3 10 0 2 0 2 30 0 15 6 4 5 30 30 0 1 2 7 12 5 3 30
Indian River......... 2 6 109 14 5 7 7 3 153 1 3 4 75 69 2 153 128 25 9 5 16 51 49 16 7 153
Jackson......... 2 9 25 10 0 4 0 50 4 6 8 15 21 0 50 48 2 2 5 13 13 10 6 1 50
Jefferson............. 2 13 54 4 0 2 4 0 79 2 2 3 29 45 0 79 74 5 1 3 24 36 9 5 1 79
Lafayette ............ 1 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2
Lake............... 19 9 62 5 2 17 24 199 4 11 25 76 80 7 199 141 58 22 3 38 561 51 15 14 199








TABLE 10 (Continued).-BUREAU OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL-ANNUAL EPORT-1945
REPORT OF SYPHILIS ACCORDING TO STAGE OF INFECTION, PREGNANCY STATUS, RACE AND SEX, SOURCE OF REFERENCE
AND AGE GROUPS, BY COUNTIES AND FOR STATE.
By Stage of Infection By Race and Sex SourceofRef. By Age Group
Late White Colored
U & Clinic
COUNTY g C 0 or Priv. 0- 10- 20- 30- 40- 50- Total
r M0 F M F o a o r
Sz COUNTY M F M Z Inst. M.D. 9 19 29 39 40 Over


ee ................ 6 13 46 21 0 3 9 3 101 2 7 1 28 53 2 10 2 6 25 34 19 11 1 101
Leon............ 51 43 141 44 1 13 6 1 309 6 26 22 98 161 2 309 284 25 12 2 72 158 37 19 9 309
Levy............... 5 3 35 17 1 1 0 6 3 2 36 65 56 9 0 0 11 29 15 7 3 65 7
Liberty .............. 4 0 0 1 0 0 00 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Madison.............. .4 2 73 8 2 2 1 11 118 7 4 1 30 82 1 118 118 0 3 5 34 36 31 6 3 118





M adis ............. 4 1 7 81 2 1 21 1 18
ManateeaR ............ 1 14 97 39 0 11 184 15 8 84 66 184 157 27 2 4 20 77 45 25 11 184
arion 1............. 1 24 138 59 2 7 2 2 3 1 1 98 122 1 2 22 21 2 2 63 85 42 19 9 242










ariona .............. 2 0 8 1 4 20 9 7 0 4 35 2 6 4 3 6 3
martin .............. 5 5 42 13 8 3 4 28 6 83 81 2 1 0 35 24 13 83
Monroe .............. 12 6 57 30 1 4 3 4 117 3 18 15 32 51 1 117 116 1 1 14 57 29 12 4 117
Nassau. ............. 1 1 44 2 3 4 5 90 8 2 31 48 0 90 36 54 1 20 18 18 14 9 90
Okaloosa ............ 1 12 15 1 0 0 0 4 42 0 9 4 15 14 0 42 41 1 0 0 9 26 6 0 1 42
keechobee............ 0 0 8 8 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 7 9 0 18 18 0 0 1 4 5 2 18
rang ................ 30 59 371 176 729 34 75 781 15 47 58 310 333 33 781 586 195 20 14 102 338 198 76 33 781
Osceola. ............. 1 7 5 0 0 0 3 16 0 2 4 5 4 1 16 11 5 2 0 1 4 1 1 16 1
Palm Beach.......... 49 641,147 691 2 59 32 25 2,069 2 5 39 1,303 668 6 2,069 1,942 127 14 9 230 397 566 203 50 2,069 04
Pasco ................ 0 3 8 12 0 2 0 6 31 3 12 4 5 8 2 31 7 24 0 0 1 9 11 5 5 31
Pinellas.............. 11 21 10 105 1 11 12 7 26817 31 29 71 137 268 181 87 2 3 39 96 69 33 26 268
Polk ................ 28 48 308 131 0 13 11 13 552 7 60 49 175 229 39 552 248 304 84 8 67 188 126 53 26 552
Putnam ............. 13 83 72 2 2 11 2 193 5 39 38 52 69 3 193 109 84 2 5 44 52 51 23 16 193
St. Johns............ 2 5 136 47 2 13 17 0 222 3 8 8 126 77 3 222 212 10 0 5 43 91 51 21 111 222
St. Lucie............. 3 6 96 36 1 11 3 4 160 0 1 79 63 17 160 156 4 10 2 22 69 42 10 5 60
SantaRosa .......... 2. 3 4 2 0 0 1 1 13 1 1 6 2 4 0 13 10 3 6 5 1 0 0 13
Sarasota.............. 2 9 46 19 0 8 3 4 91 1 7 7 45 31 1 91 76 15 1 3 9 38 22 9 9 91
SeminoleSeminole .... 11 19 995 3 1 3 3 4 2 1 184 261 73 546 504 42 258 3 38 113 91 34 9 546
umter .............. 3 40 0 7 4 2 93 7 9 31 44 2 93 45 48 1 034 29 11 9 93
Suw.annee............ 4 3 17 3 2 4 1 34 5 2 10 17 0 34 32 2 2 0 4 10 11 5 2 340
Taylor............... 2 3 4 1 0 0 16 26 5 1 5 13 2 26 25 1 7 1 5 7 3 3 1 26
Union ............... 1 3 9 0 2 0 15 4 1 1 15 13 2 0 1 1 2 0 0
Volusia .............. 25 33 134 114 0 8 10 2 350 2 35 48 104 156 7 350 313 37 24 5 5 12 66 47 35 350
Wakulla ............. 2 1 5 0 2 4 15 1 1 5 8 0 15 13 2 1 0 7 4 2 0 15
Walton .............. 6 7 21 7 0 1 2 11 55 1 17 6 9 23 0 55 54 1 1 II 17 8 0 55
Washington .......... 4 9 11 11 1 1 4 42 0 6 6 13 17 0 42 39 3 0 2 11 18 5 4 2 42
State Hospital....... 0 2 16 43 2 90 2 0 155 1 8 5 52 24 66 155 155 0 9 0 1 24 33 43 45 155
State Prison.......... 0 0 0 144 0 0 0 0 144 0 21 3 107 9 4 144 144 0 141 0 0 0 2 0 1 144
Camp Blanding....... 106 4 27 0 0 6 0 0 143 0 93 0 50 0 0 143 143 0 1 0 1 108 21 1 143
Naval Air Station ..... 53 1 4 1 0 0 3 62 40 1 21 0 0 62 62 0 3 0 13 42 3 1 0 62
Out of State.......... 11 16 28 12 3 10 0 16 96 3 34 18 3 9 0 96 78 18 4 0 11 40 23 7 11 96
Florida-TOTAL.... 1 ,2541.3067,108 4,417131675 189 1,262 16,642248 1,714 1,421 6,52716.5841 396 16,642 13,947 2,695 949 2 ,462 6,578 3,825 1,707 884 16642 Cn
Includes unknown source of Reference.








16 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


EPIDEMIOLOGY

For the first ten months of 1945, the epidemiological activi-
ties were directed by Dr. E. F. Hoffman, Only one senior clerk
formerly with the Bureau of Epidemiology was retained to tab-
ulate morbidity reporting.


GRAPH-3
DIPHTHERIA
MORBIDITY
INCIDENCE.
FOR.
FLORIDA
194-5
BY MONTHS


60




40


U

020
2'



I 2 3 + 5 6 7 8 9 10 I 12
1945 MONTH END.DATE 1-27 2-24 3-31 4-28 5-26 6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-27 11-24-17-29
NO.CASE5 EACH MONTH 33 17 20 17 10 4- t 16 24 27 25 37







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


Many forms previously used by the Bureau of Epidemiology
were abolished, and with the assistance of a committee on forms,
new and less complicated records were created. Most of these
forms will be put to use during the early part of 1946.
With the creation of less complicated records, it is anticipated
that morbidity reporting from private physicians and health of-


GRAPH-4
MENINGITIS
MORBIDITY
INCIDENCE
FOR.
FLORIDA
194-M -
bY MONTHS.


v
20
0

kI



1945 MONTH END.DA
No.CASES EACH MON


TI
TH


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 to II ta
1-17 2-24 3-31 4-28 S-Z6 6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-27 11-242-29
24 23 36 20 16 7 8 2 8 I 10 9,







18 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


ficers will be more productive. In the past, morbidity reporting,
epidemiological investigations, and follow-up left much to be
desired.
The Health Certificate, too, was revised by the committee on
records and the practice of filing a copy of the health card in
the State Board of Health was abolished. In the future, file


GRAPH 5
POLIOMYLLIT 50
MORBIDITY
INCIDENCE.
FOR
FLORIDA
1945 40
BY MONTHS


I 2
1945 MONTH END. DATE 1-27 2-24
NO.CASES EACH MONTH 3 +


3 4- 5 6 7 8 V 10 II 12
3-91 4-28 5-26 6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-27 11-24-29
0 7 9 5 9 9 39 25 17 16








VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


copies will be retained only in the county health department.
Line graphs and spot maps showing the rise and fall of mor-
bidity incidence for the more dangerous communicable diseases
are included in this report. There were no unusual rises in mor-
bidity incidence, other than seasonal fluctuations, except for a
local epidemic of typhoid fever in the Fort Pierce area.


160




140




120


GRAPH 6
TYPHUS TVER.
MORBIDITYIOO
INCIDENCE.
FOR
FLORIDA
1945
BY MONTHS 80




60




40



U
20
0O




z
1945 MONTH END.DA
NO.CASES EACH MOI


I 2 3 4 5
r E.-27 2-24 3-31 4-28 5-26
NTH.31 25 18 23 36


6 7 8 9 10 it I2
6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-27 11-241t-2
47 45 40 39 27 19 27







20 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


As to the future, every effort shall be made to further reduce
or eliminate those preventable diseases for which there are
specific immunizing agents. Continued efforts will be made to
provide the necessary specific immunizing agents to the
private or clinic physicians for free distribution and admin-


160




140




120


GRAPH-7.
SCARLET FEVER100
MORBIDITY
INCIDENCE
FOR
FLORIDA
1945 80
BY MONTHS



60





40




0
CO
ad



1945 MONTH ENDRDATE
NO.CASES EACH MONTH


I 2 3 4- 5 6 7 8 9 i0 II 12
1-27 2-24 3-31 4-28 5-26 6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-27 11-24.12-29
++ 47 41 32 25 16 8 9 20 21 22 46









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


istration to all susceptible age groups. With a little effort on the
part of all physicians and health officers, morbidity reporting
should be better than any time' in previous history.









so




70





60



GRAPHS.
TYPHOID FEVER.
50
MORBIDITY
INCIDENCE.
FOR
FLORIDA
194-5
40
BY MONTHS









20



U
10
0




I & 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 o1 11 12
1945 MONTH END, DATE 1-27 2-24 3-31 4-28 5-26 6-30 7-28 8-25 9-29 10-2711-24-1-29
NO.CASES EACH MONTH 6 4- 8 6 4- 22 22 12 14- 8 10









TABLE 11.--MORBIDITY OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY COUNTIES FOR THE YEAR 1945


COUNTIES




TOTAL THIS YEAR........... 0
Alachua........................ 26,241
Baker........................... 5,746
Bay ........................... 44,806
Bradford..................... 12,388
Brevard........................ 17,100
Broward........................ 43,115
Calhoun..................... ..... 7,484
Charlotte........................ 3,756
Citrus .......................... 4,792
Clay ........................... 7,638
Collier.......................... 3,745
Columbia....................... ,15,037
Dade........................... 294,445
DeSoto ............... ........... 7,986
D ixie ........................... 5,932
Duval .......................... 245,123
Escambia ........................ ... 87,335
Flagler ....................... 2,205
Franklin ........................ 7,545
Gadsden........................ 28,456
Gilchrist......................... 3,271
Glades. ............ ............ 1,739
Gulf............................. 7,072
Hamilton ....................... 8,384
Hardee. ........................ 8,420
Hendry......................... 4,633
Hernando....................... 4,814
Highlands....................... 14,397
Hillsborough. ................... 201,987
Holmes ......................... 13,303
Indian River...................... 8,065
Jackson.................... ..... 33,325
Jefferson......................... 10,041


a i .S 2

N 3

a I a I o a s
a., ,

16,546B 1808 LY ,.1


0 1,073
0 2
0 4
0 1
0 3
0 1
0 14
0 1
0 0
0 0




0 15
0 0
0 3
0 302
0 0
0 0
0 179
0 61
0 0
0 2
0 21
0 0
0 0
0 2



0 3
0 116
0 3
0 0
0 9
0 1


"16,546
307
30
323
134
120
349
6
5
16
183
18
64
1,724
43
27
2,432
641
173
85
503
4
29
46
14
16
240
3
107
1,205
30
153
50
79


187
13
868
114
40
210
1
15
30
101


2,444
41
39
3,093
1,934
70
184
298
5
3
21
11
9
25
11
153
2,176
5
40
169
101


197/ 4,576 1
1 515
11 322
2 41
0 0
I 0
0 0

7 19
0 0
2 246
21 47
0 0
0 0
19 402
17 108
0 2
1 0
6 39
0 0
0 13
2 10
0 0
0 0
0 .0
0 0
0 13
41 331
0 69
2 0
3 98
S 0 19


. -1 -1 -, -, -1


l V V, l I












TABLE 11 (Continued).-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY COUNTIES FOR THE YEAR 1945.



S- *G 0 .0
COUNTIES a & a 0




Lafayette........................ 3,080 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake ......................... 24,795 19 0 0 2 0 0 14 0 0 6 0 0 199 121 0 5 2 0 198 0 0
Lee .................... ........ 20,959 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 101 127 0 9 2 3 0 0 0
Leon .......................... 26,437 13 0 2 1 0 0 19 0 0 5 0 0 309 1,123 0 7 6 12 108 10 0
Levy................... ....... 10,456 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 65 26 1 6 0 0 40 0 0
Liberty.......................... 2,831 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0
Madison.......................... .. 13,897 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 118 40 0 2 4 1 252 0 0
Manatee........................ 24,232 8 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 184 241 0 18 9 0 101 1 0
Marion ........................ 29,769 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 7 0 0 242 399 0 10 4 2 121 1 0
Martin ......................... 6,136 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 19 0 6 1 0 0 0 0
Monroe......................... 19,889 1 0 1 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 117 228 0 8 3 2 2 0 0
Nassau. ....................... 10,859 2 8 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 12 0 0 90 361 1 0 0 54 1 1
Ok'aloosa....................... 15,980 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 42 164 0 0 0 0 92 10 0
Okeechobee........ ........... 3,112 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 18 16 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
Orange. ....................... 77,314 10 0 1 3 0 0 48 0 5 9 0 0 781 415 0 40 7 1 48 4 0
Osceola........................ 8,671 0 4 0 0 0 2 000 0 3 0 0 16 6 0 2 1 0 0 0 0
Palm Beach...................... 80,932 7 2 12 22 0 0 41 1 6 2 0 0 2,069 814 0 125 17 16 7 72 3
Pasco .... ..................... 13,044 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 0 0 31 5 0 0 0 0 7 0 0
Pinellas................ ........ 99,425 3 1 7 15 0 0 47 0 9 20 0 1 268 279 2 8 6 1 10 4 3
Polk.................. ......... 89,222 9 1 3 2 0 0 40 0 1 20 0 1 552 236 0 11 3 4 13 41 0
Putnam............ ............ 17,433 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 193 67 0 3 4 3 165 0 0
St. Johns ....................... 18,962 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 222 71 0 5 2 0 0 2 0
St. Lucie........................ 13,048 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 43 0 0 0 160 115 0 9 1 0 0 0 3
Santa Rosa...................... 14,674 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 13 38 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Sarasota.......................... 18,383 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 5 0 3 91 78 0 4 2 0 4 0 0
Seminole........................ 19,068 0 9 1 3 0 26 0 0 2 0 0 546 175 0 6 0 2 111 0 0
Sumter ........................ 9,425 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 93 2 0 1 0 0 158 0 0
Suwannee ..................... 15,281 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 34 17 0 1 1 1 0 0 0
Taylor.......................... 9,358 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 26 17 0 2 0 1 160 0 0
Union......................... 6,932 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 159 12 1 0 0 0 3 0 0
Volusia ......................... 48,680 2 4 3 4 0 0 42 0 2 15 0 2 350 460 0 10 4 4 153 1 3
Wakulla........................ 5,299 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 11 0 0 0 0 163 0 0
Walton ......................... 13,188 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 55 48 0 0 0 1 222 0 2
Washington...................... 11,185 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 42 57 1 0 0 0 88 0 0
*County Totals include reports from Military Bases.








TABLE 12.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945.*

I I I. I I z

COUNTIES



TOTAL THIS YEAR..... 50352 9 1,990 488 21 .... 93 28 4 43 176 703 1,350 9 0 336 31 27 115 477 8 44 26- 554
Alachua.................. 36,241 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Baker.....................5,746 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 007 [
Baker. 5,746 0 6 10 100 0 76
ay .................... 44,806 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Bradford ................. 12.338 0 13 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 17
Brvard..................17,100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Broward................. 43,115 0 67 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 53 0 0 11 0 0 6 15 0 0 4 0 0
Calhoun.................. 7,484 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte................. 3,75 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus ............... 4792 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clay.................... 7,638 0 7 0 13 0 1 1 0 2 64 325 115 0 0 21 0 0 37 1 0 0 0 0 0
Collier ............. 3,745 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Columbia .................15037 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Dade.................... 294,445 0 547 392 1 0 4 13 3 7 41 61 163 7 0 83 13 5 18 68 1 0 33 4 133
DeSoto............. 7,986 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie.................... 5,93 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duval. ................. 245,123 1 474 1 3 0 13 0 0 22 30 30 79 0 0 72 8 2 10 61 1 0 0 8 194
Esambia................ 87,335 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 16 6 0 0 17 2 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 0
Flagler................ 2205 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Franklin................. 7,54 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0
Gadsden................. 28,456 0 7 0 0 44 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gilchrist................. 3,271 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades ................... 1,739 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gulf .................... 7,072 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Hamilton................. 8,384 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hardee.................... 8,420 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hendry................... 4,633 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 75 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hernando................. 4,814 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands............... 14397 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hillsborough.........:....201,987 0 82 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 9 12 57 0 0 4 4 3 54 0 0 0 4 6
Holmes ................. 13,303 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
IndianRiver.............. 8,065 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jackson.................. 33,325 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0
Jefferson................. 10,041 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0











TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945.*



W >
COUNTIES *



Lafayette 3080................... 3,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake.....................24795 0 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 5 0 0 5 0 1 0 17 0 0 0 0 26
Lee.......................20.959 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leon ..................... 26,437 2 12 7 0 2 1 0 4 0 8 29 0 13 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8
Levy .................... 10,456 0 2 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liberty .................. 2,831 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madiso ................. 13,897 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
Manatee ............. ... 24232 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 36
Maron....................9,769 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
in .................. 6,136 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00
Monroe............ 889 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 7 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 2
Nassau ............ .. 1.. 0,859 5 6 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1 .0 0 0 26

Okeechobee.............. 3112 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Orange .................. 77,314 0 186 0 0 0 6 2 0 2 5 55 91 0 0 1 0 50 0 0 0 0 7 -0
Osceola................... 8,671 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3
Palm Beach .............. 80,932 0 104 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 15 25 279 0 0 12 2 17 53 0 0 0 0 0
Pasco ........ ........ 13,044 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pinellas ..................99,425 0 156 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 66 64 0 0 1 2 12 2 0 0 0 1
Polk ..................... 89,222 01 70 61 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 112 0 0 10 0 0 4 0 0 5 5 0
Putnam.................... 17,433 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11
St. Johns................. 18,962 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
St. Lucie................. 13,048 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Santa Rosa............... 14,674 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota ................ 18,383 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 7 7 0 0 0 1 2 6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Seminole.................. 19,068 0 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 5 0 0 0 0 0 101 0 0 0 0 2
Sumter .................... 9,425 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11
Suwannee ................ 15,281 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Taylor................... 9,358 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Union ................... 6,932 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3
Volusia .................. 48,680 0 58 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 3 16 0 0 5 0 0 2 70 0 0 0 62
Wakulla ................. 5,299 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 0 0
Walton..... .............. 13,188 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Washington ............... 11,185 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0









TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


Total JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
DISEASE for Week Week Week Week
Year T 1 2 3 4 T 5 6 7 8 T 9 10 11 12 13 T 14 15 16 17
6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28


Anthrax.......................
Beribel i.......................
Botulism ......................
C ancer........................
Catarrhal Fever ...............
Chickenpox (Varicella)..........
Cholera, Asiatic................
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).......
Dengue............... .......
Diarrhea, Infantile .............
Diphtheria....................
Dysentery .....................
Amebiasis...................
Bacillary....................
O ther.......................
Encephalitis (Epidemic)........
Erysipelas.....................
German Measles (Rubella).......
G landers......................
Influenza .............. .......
Jaundice, Infectious ............
Leprosy.......................
M alaria .......................
Measles (Rubeola)..............
M eningitis.....................
Mumps (Parotitis)..............
M ycosis.......................
Actinomycosis...............
Blastomycosis................
Other.......................
Pellagra .......................
Plague. ......................
Pneumonia ....................
Broncho.....................
Lobar.......................
Other.......................
Poliomyelitis...................
Psittacosis.....................


0 0
0 0
0 0.
6 14
0 2
37 150
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 1
62 14
0 0
0 2
1 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 4
0 0
2 4
1 0
0 0
0 2
3 17
2 10
25 19
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
14 109
6 9
3 12
5 88
1 I
0 0


0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
31 13 5 8
0 0 0 0
429 115 88 103
0 0 0 0
2 0 1 1
0 0 0 0
2 0 0 2
17 6 4 5
0 0 0 0
14 3 8 1
4 0 3 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
2 0 2 0
20 5 3 2
0 0 0 0
5 2 1 0
4 1 1 2
0 0 0 0
3 0 2 1
109 28 29 11
23 3 7 3
109 28 23 34
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
167 31 16 21
22 4 4 10
18 5 1 4
131 22 13 7
4 4 0 0
0 0 0 0


0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
5 3 4 7
0 0 0 0
337 110 164 107
0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 4 1 1
3 11 1 4
0 0 0 0
2 2 6 6
1 1 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 1 2 1
18 24 5 12
0 0 0 0
2 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 2 1 0
47 81 60 35
10 10 7 6
63 54 65 82
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
39 26 31 49
2 3 3 7
7 3 3 2
30 20 25 40
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0











TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


Total JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
DISEASE for Week Week Week Week
Year T 1 2 3 4 T 5 6 7 8 T 9 10 11 12 13 T 14 15 16 17
6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21
Puerperal Infection ............. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal...................... 9 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0
Rickettsial Diseases ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brill's or Typhus.............. 377 31 5 17 5 4 25 5 12 4 4 18 5 3 1 6 3 23 5 4 4 10 M
Rocky Mtn. Spot Fever....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Salmonella ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever............ 23 5 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4 2 0 2 0
Other.... ................... 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0
Scarlet Fever (Scarlatina)....... 336 44 13 14 6 11 47 14 11 7 15 41 14 7 7 7 6 37 3. 10 9 15 m
Septic Sore Throat.............. 46 6 0 2 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 1
Smallpox (Varioia).............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tetanus....................... 31 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 1 2 4 0 0 1 3
Trachoma ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pulmonary.................. 1,073 88 8 31 31 18 107 28 36 29 14 88 19 15 20 18 16 83 12 19 23 29
Other Forms ................. 13 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia...................... 8 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever ................ 124 6 0 2 2 2 4 0 1 3 0 8 1 1 .4 1 1 6 4 1 0 1 m
Indulant Fever ................ 27 4 0 1 1 2 3 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0
Vincent's Angina............... 115 19 1 14 1 3 15 4 3 4 4 17 1 7 1 5 3 10 1 2 3 4
Whooping Corgh (Pertussis)..... 477 55 4 25 17 9 56 19 3 19 15 85 29 18 27 22 7 57 5 24 13 15 m
Yellow Fever ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Helminths..................... 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ankylostomiasis (Hookworm).. 4,576 337 23 87 151 81 400 14o 65 45 144 755 51 99 248 204 153 514 126 227 88 73
Ascariasis (Roundworm)....... 225 30 14 9 3 4 16 2 3 0 11 45 .8 4 3 22 8 23 3 8 9 3
Giardiasis (Giardia Lamblia)... 153 15 1 6 1 7 9 4 2 2 1 9 1 2 2 1 3 11 2 1 4 4 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread).... 52 4 0 3 1 0 8 3 3 0 2 4 1 0 2 0 1 4 2 0 2 8
Teniasis (Tapeworm) ......... 15 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Tenia Echinococcus......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I
(Hydatid Disease).......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00
Other (Fish, Dog, Rat, Pork, 0
Beef).................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis (Trichinella Spiralis) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)...... 49 5 2 1 0 2 3 0 1 1 1 6 0 0 2 1 3 2 0 0 2 0
Diastomatosis (Flukes).......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Shistomiasis (Swimmer's Itch) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
*Venereal Diseases Excluded.









TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
DISEASE Week Week Week Week
T 18 19 20 21 T 22 23 24 25 26 T 27 28 29 30 T 31 32 33 34
5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 4 10 18 25

Anthrax.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer............................... 38 10 9 9 10 57 8 2 25 15 7 53 8 9 9 7 33 7 5 5 16
Catarrhal Fever ...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chickenpox (Vancella)................. 139 24 69 30 16 38 13 4 7 5 9 12 6 0 5 1 6 3 2 1 0
Cholera, Assatic....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).............. 2 1 0 0 1 5 0 0 3 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue ............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile .................. 10 1 1 7 1 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2 1 1
Diphtheria............................ 10 3 1 4 2 4 1 1 1 0 1 11 2 3 5 1 16 5 6 3 2
Dysentery............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Amebiasis.......................... 7 1 2 2 2 6 0 4 2 0 0 13 4 2 7 0 4 0 1 3 0
Bacillary........................... 6 0 2 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0
Other............................. 4 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis (Epidemic)................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas.................. .......... 3 0 2 0 1 4 C 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 6 4 0 0 2
German Measles (Rubella) ............ 21 7 10 3 1 5 0 0 I 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
Glanders............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Influenza ............................. 4 1 1 1 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0. 2 1 1
Jaundice, Infectious. .................. ..4 3 1- 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 6 3 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Leprosy.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Malaria.............................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 3 1 0 1 1
easles (Rubeola)....................... 46 12 12 8 14 33 7 1 12 13 10 21 8 1 0 12 13 5 5 0 3
Meningitis ........................... 18 3 7 5 3 7 4 1 1 0 1 8 0 3 2 3 2 0 0 2 0
Mumps (Parotitis) .................... 153 36 41 36 40 81 23 13 25 6 14 212 8 10 9 185 37 14 15 2 6
Mycosis.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Actinomycosis...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pellagra.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia ........................... 90 17 27 24 22 89 20 2 39 6 17 46 7 8 11 20 36 5 6 6 17
Broncho................... ....... 15 3 1 8 3 21 1 0 6 1 13 31 3 5 6 17 18 2 3 2 11
Lobar.............................. 14 5 3 2 4 11 1 0 8 0 2 7 1 2 2 2 8 2 2 1 3
Other.............................. 61 9 23 14 15 57 19 1 25 5 2 8 3 1 3 1 8 1 1 3 3
Poliomyelitis......................... 9 8 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 9 0 1 2 6 9 1 3 3 i
Psittacosis............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0












TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
DISEASE Week Week Week Week
T 18 19 20 21 T 22 23 24 25 26 T 27 28 29 30 T 31 32 33 34
5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 4 10 18 25
Puerperal Infection.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human ....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal............................. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brill's or Typhus.................... 36 4 5 18 9 47 10 6 12 10 9 45 11 12 16 6 40 9 16 5 10
Rocky Mtn. Spot Fever............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Other .............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Salmonella........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever ................. 2 0 0 0 2 5' 0 4 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0
Other................ ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fever (Scarlatina) .............. 25 3 8 8 6 16 3 2 5 2 4 8 1 2 2 3 9 2 2 2 3
Septic Sore Throat.................... 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1
Smallpox (Vartola).................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Tetanus.............................. 4 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Trachoma............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis ......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pulmonary.......................... 75 12 21 27 15 118 36 23 18 28 13 70 19 15 12 24 63 14 18 16 15 -
Other Forms ........................ 3 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0
Tularemia............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever........................ 4 2 0 1 1 22 2 1 2 0 17 22 4 3 1 14 12 2 5 1 4
Undulant Fever ...................... 0 .0 0 0 0 6 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0
Vincent's Angina...................... 8 1 3 1 3 17 6 2 2 I 6 2 1 0 1 0 5 0 1 3 1
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)............ 33 13 7 6 7 59 16 8 17 15 3 40 4 1 20 15 31 11 11 7 2
Yellow Fever ................... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Helminths............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ankylostomiasis (Hookworm)......... 339 116 31 104 88 295 39 76 102 56 22 139 27 34 51 27 197 76 54 6 61
Ascariasis (Roundworm) ............. 11 1 1 3 6 19 2 1 13 2 1 8 1 3 1 3 8 1 2 4 1
Giard.as.s (Giaidia Lambia).......... 5 0 1 0 4 15 4 5 2 3 1 10 4 2 3 1 6 0 5 1 0 0
Oxymiasis (Pin or Thread)........... 4 3 0 0 1 5 1 1 3 0 0 4 1 0 0 3 3 2 1 0 0 .
Teniasis (Tapeworm) ................ 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0
Tenia Echinococcus................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
(Hydatid Disease) ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other (Fish, Dog, Rat, Pork, Bee).. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis (Trichinella Spiralis)...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)............. 13 3 3 2 5 6 0 0 3 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Diastomatosis (Flukes)................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Shistomiasis (Swimmer's Itch)........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
*Venereal Diseases Excluded.









TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
DISEASE Week Week Week Week
T 35 36 37 38 39 T 40 41 42 43 T 44 45 46 47 T 48 49 50 51 52
7 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29

Anth ax......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Be be............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cance......................... 27 5 2 10 7 3 45 19 9 7 10 38 11 12 0 15 31- 5 26 0 10 10
Catarrhal Fever .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chickenpox (Varicella)... ...... 3 1 0 0 0 2 7 1 1 2 3 21 2 4 0 15 42 5 15 0 14 8
Choleia, Asiatic................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)......... 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
Dengue...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile............... 4 4 0 0 0 0 7 4 0 3 1 3 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0
Diphther'a...................... 24 7 5 5 6 1 27 7 7 4 9 25 8 2 0 15 37 10 18 0 6 3
Dysentery....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Amebasis.................... 5 1 1 0 1 2 6 0 2 3 1 6 3 1 0 2 5 0 2 0 1 0
Bacillary........... ...... 5 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 4 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
Other....... ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephal tis (Epidemic)........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas....................... 5 2 0 1 2 0 5 2 0 3 0 2 1 1 0 3 0 3 0 0 0
German Measles (Rubella)........ 2 0 1 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 6 2 0 0 4 0
Glanders.............. ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Influenza ........................ 13 2 0 1 6 4 16 1 8 6 1 19 7 3 0 9 41 0 21 0 12 11
Jaundice, Infectious .............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0
Leprosy.......... 0... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Malaria........ .... 3 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 2
Measles (Rubeola) ............... 4 1 1 1 1 0 8 1 0 2 5 9 2 1 0 6 32 5 16 0 6 5
Meningts ...................... 8 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 10 2 1 0 7 9 1 3 0 0 5
Mumps (Parottis)............... 34 7 4 12 6 5 19 3 3 5 8 36 6 9 0 21 76 3 29 0 15 29
Mycosis ....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Actmomycoss ................ .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis ............... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other ............... 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pellagra......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia ................... .. 42 10 5 10 7 5 42 5 13 5 19 31 10 6 0 15 64 12 30 0 14 8
Broncho.................... 20 3 1 8 4 4 25 0 8 2 15 8 I 3 0 4 13 3 10 0 14 8
Lobar......................... 8 2 0 2 3 1 12 4 '4 2 2 10 2 2 0 6 15 7 8 0 0 0
Other.............. .......... 10 5 4 0 0 0 5 1 1 1 2 13 7 1 0 5 14 2 12 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis..................... 39 4 0 11 12 12 25 5 5 9 6 17 4 6 0 7 16 4 7 0 3 2
Psittacosis. ................. .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0












TABLE 12 (Continued).-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, 1945*


SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
DISEASE Week Week Week Week
T 35 36 37 38 39 T 40 41 42 43 T 44 45 46 47 T 48 49 50 51 52
7 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29


Puerperal Infection...............
Rabies, Human..................
Anim al........................
Rickettsal Diseases .............
Brill's or Typhus..............
Rocky Mtn. Spot Fever.........
Other.........................
Salmonella ......................
Paratyphoid Fever..............
Other.........................
Scarlet Fever (Scarlatina) .........
Septic Sore Thorat ...............
Smallpox (Variola ...............
Tetanus.........................
Trachoma .......................
Tubeiculosis.....................
Pulmonary....................
Other Forms..................
Tularemia ......................
Typhoid Fever ...................
Undulant Fever................
Vincent's Angina.................
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)......
Yellow Fever ....................
Helminths ......................
Ankylostomiasis (Hookworm)....
Ascariasis (Roundworm)........
Giardiasis (Giardia Lamblia)....
Oxyuriasis (Pm or Thread)......
Tenasis (Tapeworm) ...........
Tenia Echinococ&us..........
(Hydatid Disease)............
Other (Fish, Dog, Rat, Pork
B eef) ....................
Trichinosis (Trichinella Spiralis'
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)........
Diastomatosis (Flukes)............
Shistomiasis (Swimmer's Itch). ..


0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
3 8
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 7
0 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 62
0 0
0 1
8 2
0 0
2 0
4 5
0 0
0 0
28 240
3 7
3 2
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0

0 0'
0 0
1 4
0 0
0 0


0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
27 5 3
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
2 0 0
0 0 0
21 2 7
10 2 3
0 0 0
6 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
77 13 31
, 1 0 1
0 0 0
8 0 5
0 0 0
12 1 11
16 5 I
0 0 0
0 0 0
236 29 23
1 0 1
17 1 8
7 0 3
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0

0 0 0
0 0 0
2 0 2
0 0 0
0 0 0


0 C
0 c
0 C
0 C
0 1C
0 C
0 C
0 C
0 C
0 C
0 1C
0 1
0 C
0 2
0 C
0 C
0 41
0 C
0 C
0 2
0 2
0 C
0 4
0 C
0 C
0 252
0 15
0 11
0 3
0 1
0 C
0 0

0 0
0 C
0 C
0 C
0 C


0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 14
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
7 24
0 3
0 0
0 3
0 0
0 0
19 51
0 0
0 1
2 6
1 3
0 3
5 9
0 0
0 0
139 339
6 22
8 11
2 2
1 0
0 0
0 0

0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0








32 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945

TABLE 13.-DISTRIBUTION OF INSULIN BY COUNTIES


FOR THE STATE


OF FLORIDA FOR 1945.


COUNTIES PROTAMINE ZINC PLAIN GLOBIN
10-U-40 10-U-80 10-U-20 10-U-40 10-U-80 10-U-80

Alachua................... 115 55 10 0 90 0

Baker.................... 47 0 0 0 0 0

Bay...................... 14 10 9 1 10 0

Bradford .................. 33 0 0 4 0 0

Brevard................... 0 0 0 67 0 0
Broward .................. 19 5 5 18 0 0

Calhoun.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus .................... 49 0 0 22 0 0

Clay ...................... 18 19 0 60 0 0
Collier ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Columbia ................. 63 21 2 36 2 0

Dade. .................... 339 317 15 115 0 13
DeSoto ................... 4 0 0 195 45 0

Dixie..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duval.................... 723 700 65 328 0 5
Escambia................. 60 50 11 11 0 0

Flagler.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin.................. 34 0 0 3 0 0

Gadsden................... 79 5 40 104 0 0

Gilchrist ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0

Glades.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0:
Gulf ....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Hamilton................. 14 0 0 0 0 0
Hardee ................... 14 32 0 3 8 0

Hendry................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hernando................. 2 0 0 0 0 0

Highlands ................. 7 0 1 1 0 0

Hillsborough... .......... 196 23 3 56 0 ... 22
Holmes ................... 8 0 1 24 0 0

Indian River............... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Jackson................... .25 0 0 20 0 0
Jefferson .................. 76 0 0 0 0 0
Lafayette................. 0 0 0 0 0 0









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 33



TABLE 13 (Continued).-DISTRIBUTION OF INSULIN BY COUNTIES FOR THE
STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1945.


COUNTIES PROTAMINE ZINC PLAIN GLOBIN

10-U-40 10-U-80 10-U-20 10-U-40 10-U-80 10-U-80
Lake ..................... 45 0 0 33 0 0

Lee....................... 6 0 0 4 14 0

Leon..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Levy..................... 27 0 9 0 0 18
Liberty................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Madison. ................. 32 5 36 21 0 0

Manatee .................. 2 0 0 30 0 0

Marion................... 60 30 0 0 0 0

M artin ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Monroe................... 19 0 0 8 0 0

Nassau .................. 36 3 0 27 0 0

Okaloosa.................. 0 0 0 50 0 0
Okeechobee............... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Orange................... 175 110 5 95 45 1

Osceola................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Palm Beach............... 137 9 20 0 0 0

Pasco..................... 19 0 0 20 0 4

Pinellas................... 302 0 0 49 0 0

Polk...................... 175 19 0 318 2 9

Putnam................... 21 0 0 9 0 0

St. Johns.................. 57 0 82 0 0 0

St. Lucie................. 15 10 13 13 5 0

Santa Rosa ................ 102 0 0 15 0 0
Sarasota................... 22 1 0 2 0 0

Seminole................. 18 16 58 84 16 0

Sumter................... 3 1 11 1 0 7

Suwannee ................. 10 0 0 0 0 0

Taylor..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0

Union .................... 8 4 0 0 0 0
Volusia (DeLand).......... 63 49 32 41 10 10

Wakulla.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0

Walton................... 10 30 5 50 40 0
Washington ............... 16 0 10 1 7 0 0

Volusia (Daytona)......... 13 16 10 10 10 0

TOTAL..............









34 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


TABLE 14.-THE AMOUNT


SPENT FOR INSULIN
VIAL FOR 1945.


AND AVERAGE PRICE PER


Vials Unit Total Amount
KIND OF INSULIN Purchased Price Spent

PROTAMINE ZINC
10-U-40 3925 $ .63 $2,472.75
10-U-80 1725 $1.20 $2,070.00

PLAIN
10-U-20 90 $ .32 $ 28.80
10-U-40 2300 $ .55 $1,265.00
10-U-80 350 $1.10 $ 38,50


GLOBIN
10-U-80 163 $1.34 $ 218.42


TOTAL 8553 $6.093.47









BUREAU OF TUBERCULOSIS


E. J. TEAGARDEN, M. D., Director
During the year, the State Mobile X-ray Unit operated in 8
counties over a period of 12 months and completed 8 surveys.
A total of 38,979 films were taken, of which 38,321 or 98.7% were
satisfactory. Of these, 532 or 1.4% appeared to be tuberculosis,
and 407 or 1.0% showed evidence of other pathology. Evidence
of serious cardiac or vascular pathology, or evidence of neo-
plastic involvement were important bi-products of these surveys.
Table 1 gives the result of these surveys by counties.
On December 31, 1945 Dr. E. J. Teagarden resigned, and until
a new director is installed, Dr. Clarke W. Mangun, Jr. will carry
on as acting director.
On July 14, 1945 Dr. Louis C. Pessolano, who was the medical
officer in charge of the Public Health Service Mobile Unit opera-
ting in Florida, was relieved of his duty. The films taken by
this unit were then read by Dr. C. W. Mangun, Jr., who was as-
signed for training by the Public Health Service to the State
Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Orlando. On October 1, 1945, Dr.
Mangun was assigned to the Florida State Board of Health, and
took over the responsibility of the Public Health Service Unit.
On July 1, 1945 Mr. E. M. Wilson was appointed as Junior
X-ray Technician and has assisted Mr. J. W. Morehouse in the
operation of the State Mobile X-ray Unit. On June 11, 1945 Miss
Leona Brown was appointed Typist to the Bureau of Tuber-
culosis. These additions of personnel are part of an expanding
program of the Bureau.
With the aid of $151,464.00 from the grant-in-aid program of
the Federal Government, and $16,931.52 from the Commonwealth
Fund, the following major items of equipment have been ordered
up to July 1, 1946: two mm. mobile x-ray units, tractor and trail-
er for one of these units, two stationary 70 mm. units, twelve
fluoroscopes, three 14 x 17 inch portable x-ray units, ten pneu-
mothorax machines, and ten sterilizers. Production and recon-
version difficulties have delayed the receipt of much of this
equipment, but it is hoped that two 70 mm. mobile x-ray units
will be operating in the State by mid-1946, and to have the port-
able 14 x 17 inch units helping in the follow-up work. Out-pa-
tient facilities will also be expanded by the equipment that can
be sent to the counties.
Future plans also include changes in the record system so
that patients can be more easily followed, and morbidity and
mortality statistics be obtained easier and quicker.
[351







36 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


A central developing room for large and small films is also
proposed at headquarters of the bureau in Jacksonville. The
bureau will then be able to develop all films taken by the units.
Small films from county x-ray units could also be developed.
This would result in less developing expenses and more prompt
service.
The Public Health Service Mobile X-ray Unit has been in
operation in the State for a little over a year. The survey and
follow up statistics are summarized in Table 2. The combined
operation of the State and Public Health Service Units is sum-
marized in Table 3, and is an indication of case finding activity
on a State level. A total of 81,908 people were examined, re-
presenting 3.6% of the average estimated State population for
the year.
There were 637 reported deaths from tuberculosis in the State
during the first 11 months of 1945, and from the ratio of 10 active
cases to every reported death according to the standards of the
National Tuberculosis Association, the estimate of 6,950 cases of
active tuberculosis in the State for the year is obtained. It is
hoped that when an adequate case register can be established
along with an increase in photofluorographic activities, a more
realistic figure can be obtained based on active cases rather than
estimates.
The case follow-up work is done by the county health depart-
ments assisted by the Tuberculosis Association. As many active
cases as possible were hospitalized, but due to an insufficient
number of beds many are still in need of this treatment in order
to save their lives and protect the community from the spread
of the disease.
Control of tuberculosis is a combined operation. The success
obtained for the year was due in no small part to the many
cooperating volunteer groups, and agencies such as the Tu-
berculosis and Public Health Committee of the Florida Medical
Association, county tuberculosis and health associations, and
many others. The work of the county health department and
private physicians has been of the greatest importance in pro-
viding a basis for the year's program. With their help, the
program of reducing the incidence of tuberculosis by finding
unknown and unsuspected cases of tuberculosis will make even
greater progress in 1946.




















TABLE 1.--SUMMARY OF MINIATURE FILMS TAKEN BY MOBILE X-RAY UNIT JANUARY 8 TO DECEMBER 19, 1945.


No. Films No. Films Percent Films No. Fi Ims
NAME No. Films No. Films Percent Films Interpreted Suspicious of Suspicious of iai'i; other r
Taken Satisfactory Satisfactory Negative Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Pathology
TOTALS................... 38,979 38,321 98.7 37,382 532 1.4 407

Dade County................ 12,477 12,341 99.1 12,015 186 1.5 140
Marion County.............. 290 286 98.6 285 0 0 1
Hillsborough County.......... 10,041 9,845 99.5 9,581 172 1.7 92

Duval County............... 292 282 96.6 277 5 1.8 0
Nassau County.............. 1,784 1,604 89.9 1,573 15 0.9 16
Baker County................. 940 924 98.3 911 5 0.5 8
Seminole County............. 3,341 3,293 98.6 3,197 50 1.5 46

Volusia County.............. 9,814 9,746 99.3 9,543 99 1.0 104














TABLE 2.-SUMMARY OF FILMS TAKEN BY U.S.P.H.S. X-RAY UNIT DECEMBER 2, 1944-NOVEMBER 29, 1945

35 MM. FILM FINDINGS 14 x 17 INCH FILM FINDINGS
Survey Number E- essentially Negative Reinfection Tuberculosis Other
and No. No. No. Percent Percent Other Susp. Path-
Place and Completion Date Films Unsat. Satis. Sais. T S 0 Total Neg. Calcific. Total Col. 3 IA* IB* MA* FA* Tbc. Tbc. Cardiac ology
Taken

TOTALS.................... 43,929 342 43,587 99.2412751441 370 350 20 709 1.6 62 420 170 41 16 73 43 74
1. Fla. State Prison, Raiford, 1,110 0 1,110 100.00 9 34 10 12 12 0 31 2.7 15 8 4 4 0 3 0 7
Florida 12-2-44
2. Fla. State Hospital, Chat- 3,730 113 3,617 96.9 151 273 187 49 49 C 361 9.9 28 225 86 18 4 15 3 5
tahoochee, Florida 1-13-45
3. Prisoners Assigned to Fla. 162 6 156 96.2 0 2 4 1 1 0 1 0.6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
State Hospital, Chattahoo-
chee, Florida 1-4-45
4. Employees and Families 319 5 314 98.4 2 11 6 2 2 0 7 2.2 1 4 1 1 0 2 0 0
Fla. State Hospital, Chat-
tahoochee, Florida 1-8-45
5. Tbc. contacts and Food 91 1 90 98.9 8 11 4 2 2 0 11 1.2 0 7 2 1 1 1 0 1
Handlers, State Hospital, _
Chattahoochee, Florida
1-12-45
6. St. Joe Paper Co. and Pure 431 2 429 99.5 2 18 11 9 9 0 10 2.3 0 8 2 0 0 1 0 1
Oil Company, Port St. Joe,
Florida 1-20-45
7. Community Survey, Port St. 864 15 849 98.2 1 20 18 10 9 1 7 0.8 0 7 0 0 0 0 1 0
Joe, Florida 1-31-45 _____________________















TABLE 2 (Continued).-SUMMARY OF FILMS TAKEN BY U.S.P.H.S. X-RAY UNIT DECEMBER 2, 1944-NOVEMBER 29, 1945

35 MM. FILM FINDINGS 14 x 17 INCH FILM FINDINGS
Survey Number Essentially Negative Reinfection Tuberculosis Other
and No. No. No. Percent Percent Other Susp. Path-
Place and Completion Date Films Unsat. Satis. Satis. T S O Total Neg. Calcific. Total Col. 3 1A* 1B* MA* FA* Tbc. Tbc. Cardiac ology
Taken
8. TyndallField, Panama City, 83 0 838 100.0 6 1 2 0 0 0 7 0.8 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 2
Florida 2-10-45.
9. Southern Kraft Paper Mill, 1,030 2 1,028 99.8 3 3 6 0 0 0 6 0.5 0 6 0 0 0 0 1 5
Bay City, Florida 2-15-45
11. Naval Training ','. 5,305 0 5,305 100.00 32 29 18 8 7 1 46 0.8 1 35 7 1 2 0 1 6
Pensacola, Florida 3- -
13. Town of Pensacola, Pensa- 1,890 0 1,890 100.0 10 0 1 2 1 1 3 0.1 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 1
cola, Florida 4-16-45
14. Whiting Field, Milton, 469 0 469 100.0 5 0 1
Florida 4-18-45
15. Town of Milton, Milton, 280 0 280 100.0 0 1 3 0
Florida 4-23-45
16. Fla. State Col. for Women 2,279 0 2,279 100.0 54 2 3 3 0 2 0.08 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2
Tallahassee, Florida 5-8-45
17. Fla. A MCollege (Col.) 943 0 943100.0 5 3 0 4 4 0 3 0.3 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0
Tallahassee, Florida 5-14-45
18. Elberta CrateFactory, Tal- 633 0 633 100.0 4 2 2 1 1 0 4 0.6 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 1
lahassee, Florida 5-17-45
19. Dale Mabry Air Base, Tal- 559 0 559 100.0 3 0 2 2 1 1 3 0.5 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
lahassee, Florida 5-21-45












TABLE 2 (Continued).-SUMMARY OF FILMS TAKEN BY U.S.P.H.S. X-RAY UNIT DECEMBER 2, 1944-NOVEMBER 29, 1945

35 MM. FILM FINDINGS 14 x 17 INCH FILM FINDINGS
Survey Number Essentially Negative Reinfection Tuberculosis Other
and No. No. No. Percent Percent Other Susp. Path-
Place and Completion Date Films Unsat. Satis. Satis. T S 0 Total Neg. Calcific. Total Col. 3 1A* 1B* MA* FA* The. Tbe. Cardiac ology
Taken
20. Fed. Correctional Inst., 589 0 589 100.0 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 0.3 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0
Tallahassee, Florida 5-26-45
21. City of Tallahassee, Talla- 1,753 4 1,749 99.7 11 55 11 39 35 4 19 1.0 0 8 10 1 0 3 7 6
hassee, Florida 6-13-45
22. Fla. A M College (Col.) 268 2 266 99.2 0 15 2 12 12 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Summer Session, Tallahas-
see, Florida 6-18-45
23. Fla. State Col. for Women 223 0 223 100.0 1 10 4 3 3 0 1 0.4 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6
Summer Session, Tallahas-
see, Florida 6-23-45
24. Univ. of Gainesville, Gaines- 928 0 928 100.0 3 47 22 44 44 0 7 0.7 0 3 4 0 0 2 1 5
ville, Florida 7-3-45
25. Fla. Farm Colony Mental 395 3 392 99.2 8 3 2 5 5 0 6 1.5 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 1
Institute, Gainesville, Flor-
ida, 7-6-45
26. City of Gainesville, Episco- 5,396 3 5,393 99.9 6 23 30 12 12 0 64 1.1 0 43 16 3 2 21 8 1
pal Par. House, Gainesville,
Florida 7-20-45
27. High Springs and Vicinity, 905 0 905 100.0 6 5 8 1 1 0 8 0.8 0 4 2 1 1 2 1 2
High Springs, Florida
7-25-45
28. Alachua and Vicinity, Ala- 524 0 524 100.0 2 2 3 1 1 0 4 0.7 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1
chua, Florida 7-28-45



















TABLE 2 (Continued).-SUMMARY OF FILMS TAKEN BY U.S.P.H.S. X-RAY UNIT DECEMBER 2, 1944-NOVEMBER 29, 1945

S35 MM. FILM FINDINGS 14 x 17 INCH FILM FINDINGS
Survey Number essentially Negative Reinfection Tuberculosis Other
and No. No. No. Percent Percent Other Susp. Path-
Place and Completion Date Films Unsat. Satis. Satis. T S O Total Neg. Calcific. Total Col. 3 1A* 1B* MA* FA* Tbc. Tbc. Cardiac ology
Taken

29. Newberry and vicinity, New- 579 2 577 99.6 3 0 4 0 0 0 3 0.5 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 3
berry, Florida 8-2-45

30. Archer and vicinity, Archer, 408 3 405 99.2 2 0 6 0 0 0 2 0.4 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 0
Florida 8-3-45
31. Micanopy and vicinity, Mic- 373 0 373 100.0 4 8 4 3 0 6 1.6 0 6 0 0 0 1 3 4
anopy, Florida 8-7-45 3
32. Hawthorne and vicinity, 373 0 373 100.0 5 3 6 5 5 0 4 1.0 0 2 1 0 1 2 3 0
Hawthorne, Florida 8-1-45
33. Waldo and vicinity, Waldo, 238 0 238 100.0 2 1 0 2 2 0 1 0.4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Florida 8-15-45

34. Town population of Orlando, 5,358 173 5,185 95.7 45 82 48 87 81 6 47 0.9 9 20 11 3 4 14 3 7
Florida 10-16-45

35. Ebenezer Church (Col.) Or- 1,369 3 1,366 99.7 2 21 7 17 17 0 7 0.5 2 2 2 1 0 2 0 4
lando, Florida 10-25-45

36. Orlando Army Air Base, 853 1 852 99.8 1 18 0 12 12 0 7 0.8 3 1 3 0 0 0 0 0
Orlando, Florida 11-5-45












TABLE 2 (Continued).-SUMMARY OF FILMS TAKEN BY U.S.P.H.S. X-RAY UNIT DECEMBER 2, 1944-NOVEMBER 29, 1945

35 MM. FILM FINDINGS 14 x 17 INCH FILM FINDINGS
Survey Number Essentially Negative Reinfection Tuberculosis Other
and No. No. No. Percent Percent Other Susp. Path-
Place and Completion Date Films Unsat. Satis. Satis. T S O Total Neg. Calcific. Total Col. 3 IA* 1B* MA* FA* Tbc. The. Cardiac ology
Taken
37. Town Population of Pine- 210 0 210 100.0 1 6 2 5 5 0 3 1.4 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
castle, Florida 11-8-45
38. Town of Conway, Conway, 194 1 193 99.4 1 2 0
Florida 11-8-45
39. Town population of Winter 766 0 766 100.0 4 17 0 9 6 3 9 1.1 0 2 6 1 0 1 0 0
Park (white) 11-15-45
40. Town population of Winter 308 1 307 99.6 0 6 1
Park (colored) 11-16-45.
41. Town of Apopka, Apopka, 456 2 454 99.5 2 9 3 5 3 2 7 1.5 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 1
Florida 11-20-45
42. Town of Zellwood, Zellwood, 38 0 38 100.0 0 2 0
Florida 11-20-45
43. Town population of Winter 492 0 492 100.0 0 3 0 2 1 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Garden, Florida 11-29-45
Note: It has not been possible to om nlete al sulrnre d Tl ?\ir f^^^(-~^.-^. l


T-Definite tuberculosis
S-Suspected tuberculosis
O-Other pathology
*1A-Pulmonary scar.
1 B-Minimal tuberculosis.
*MA-Moderately advanced tuberculosis.
"FA-Far advanced tuberculosis.


l s accounts or t e.


































TOTALS............................
State....................................
U. S. P. H. S.................. ..........

*These figures include tuberculosis and so


w

TABLE 3.-COMBINED 35 MM. FILM FINDINGS
_____________------------*----------- M
Number Films Percent Films Number Films Percent Films
Number Films Suspicious of Suspicious of Showing other Showing other
Satisfactory Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Pathology Pathology
81,908 1,695 2.0 848 1.0
38,321 532 1.4 407 1.0
43,587 1,163* 2.6* 441 1.0

cious of tuberculosis found on 35 mm. films by the U. S. P. H. S. X-ray Unit.





rC
0
ctI

fI








MALARIA CONTROL


JOHN A. MULRENNAN, Director

The Bureau of Malaria Control is a cooperative organization
supported by the Florida State Board of Health, the United States
Public Health Service, and the Rockefeller Foundation.
Dr. J. Harland Paul, who was assigned on a temporary basis
to the Bureau of Malaria Control by the Rockefeller Foundation
in the spring of 1944, was withdrawn on April 30, 1945.
At the present time the Bureau has only two individuals sup-
ported by the cooperative budget, namely John A. Mulrennan,
the present director, and Mrs. Nina Branch, medical technologist.
All other personnel assigned to this Bureau and performing ma-
laria control work or domestic mosquito control are paid directly
by the Malaria Control in War Areas organization of the U. S.
Public Health Service in Atlanta, Georgia.

MALARIA CONTROL PERSONNEL AND
TOTAL PERSONNEL
In January, 1945, there were 189 people employed by the
Federal Government on malaria control and domestic mosquito
control. In July this number had increased to 280, and in Decem-
ber the number had been reduced to 111 people. The great in-
crease in July was brought about by the inauguration of the DDT
house spraying program. A total of $397,516.00 was spent for
salaries during the year for all activities.

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
No routine blood or spleen surveys were performed during the
year, although investigations were made in two areas where
malaria cases had been reported. Fifteen cases were reported
from a small village in Jackson County. Following entomologi-
cal investigations, it was apparent that no malaria existed, since
there were no anophelines present to carry on transmission.
Approximately fifty cases were reported from the City of
Gainesville in July and August, 1945. The cases were reported
on a basis of blood smear examinations in a clinical laboratory.
Following investigation, it was apparent that the technician was
reading smears incorrectly. It was impossible to determine
whether some transmission had actually occurred in the City,
since no smears were kept by the laboratory. However, as the
anopheline density was found to be extremely low during this
period, it is believed that very little took place .
[441






MALARIA CONTROL


During the latter part of November and the early part of
December over 1,600 blood smears were collected from school
children in Alachua County. Approximately one thousand of
these were examined by the end of the year without a single
positive being encountered.

ENTOMOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

Around War Establishments. Anopheline inspection work
was carried on around 88 separate zones in 1945. Most of the
zones centered around war establishments, but cities within areas
subject to DDT residual house spraying which were judged too
large for house spraying were also included. There were 13,174
adult anopheline resting station inspections made to ascertain
densities of malaria mosquitoes within these zones. A total of
66,248 adult anophelines was identified in the field by trained
inspectors during the season. In determining the specific loca-
tions which needed larviciding for control of Anopheles quad-
rimaculatus and in checking on the degree of control obtained,
there were 7,713 larval stations inspected. A total of 65,433 ano-
pheline larvae was collected, and 10,420 were submitted for inde-
tification.
Light traps were operated throughout the State in order to
determine the distribution and abundance of various species of
mosquitoes, particularly those of importance in the transmission
of human and animal diseases other than malaria and those
which are pests of economic importance. A total of 918 collec-
tions was made in 25 counties. Laboratory work involved the
identification of 125,732 mosquitoes collected.
In Extended Counties. The MCWA Extended Program em-
ployed and trained twelve men as entomological inspectors
through the season (April to November). Their work was di-
visible in two phases: (1) after-spraying inspections, and (2)
vector-density surveys.
In ten counties which received DDT residual house-spray,
monthly inspections on a random-sampling basis were made of
sprayed houses and adjacent unsprayed outbuildings as controls.
Of the 1,327 sprayed houses inspected, 52 were found to contain
A. quadrimaculatus in the morning. Of these only 17 still con-
tained vectors in the afternoon of the same day, representing a
reduction of 72.8%. However, after eliminating house inspec-
tions where the surface had been treated over three months
previously (the expected duration with the dosage used), the
reduction in A. quadrimaculatus positive houses in the afternoon






46 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


over morning was 34 to 6, or a reduction of 82%. The average
number of A. quadrimaculatus in sprayed houses was 0.025, while
in adjoining outbuildings the average was 13.8, or a ratio of
1:550. This figure obtains increased significance from the fact
that only unscreened houses were inspected. In dwellings where
the application was less than three months old, only 0.7% held
A. quadrimaculatus; dwellings with treatments over three
months old averaged 4.8% with vectors. The monthly series
of vector-positive percentages derived from applications 1 to 6
months of age was, respectively: 0.6, 0.8, 0.6, 2.2, 5.6, 6.7-demon-
strating a definite loss of protection after the third month. This
inspection, therefore, demonstrated control of the vector with
DDT residual spray and in addition demonstrated that effective
duration of the 100 mg. per square foot dosage was indeed three
months.
The second phase of the Extended Program inspector's work
was an A. quadrimaculatus density and distribution survey in
29 counties in Florida's malaria belt (including the ten DDT-
sprayed counties). The aim of this work was to delineate areas
of high malaria-vector densities and thereby orient the control
program. The counties surveyed constitute a belt along the Gulf
Coast from Okaloosa County in the west to Pasco County in the
south and inland to Columbia and Lake Counties. The data ob-
tained by this survey will be valuable in future malaria control
planning in the State.
In addition to the above, a special investigation was made in
the Orange Lake area of Alachua and Marion Counties to demon-
strate the movements of A. quadrimaculatus between home in-
teriors and outbuildings and to determine host perferences in
both sets of resting places. This study was based on the selec-
tive use of DDT house-spray and on the determination of mos-
quito blood-sources by the precipitin test. Results of this study
are not yet available.
Rat Ectoparasite Identification. In connection vith typhus
control a program was inaugurated which involved control of
rat ectoparasites by dusting rat habitats with DDT. Rat ectop-
arasites were submitted to the entomological laboratory for iden-
tification in checking on the effectiveness of this control work
and also for epidemiological studies to determine the important
vectors of murine typhus. A total of 7,729 fleas, mites, and lice
was submitted for identification from seven projects.






MALARIA CONTROL


DRAINAGE AND LARVICIDAL OPERATIONS
Minor Drainage and Larviciding. This phase of activity was
carried on around military bases and also in large cities of the
counties where DDT residual spraying was performed.
In 1945, approximately 280,249 man-hours were expended in
larvicidal and drainage operations. There were 18,433 gallons of
diesel oil and 3,625 pounds of Paris green applied to 5,033 acres
of breeding surface. There were also used 445 pounds of 10%
DDT dust on 370 acres of breeding surface and 21,283 gallons
of waste oil on 179 acres.
Permanent Drainage. In the City of Leesburg 3,853 linear
feet of permanent precast concrete ditch lining were laid using
one-third of a section of a twenty-four-inch pipe for the bottom
and rectangular slabs for the sides.
At the beginning of the year a permanent concrete ditch lin-
ing program was inaugurated at the University of Florida. This
installation will not only serve to eliminate several anopheline
breeding areas in close proximity to the University Campus, but
will also be valuable as a demonstration project for the Univers-
ity as well as the State Board of Health.
The project was a cooperative one in which the University
furnished the materials and the U. S. Public Health Service
furnished the labor and engineering supervision. The project
will be terminated on January 31, 1946, at which time 3,125
linear feet of permanent lined ditches with Panama inverts and
side slabs have been installed.
A small project at Century was undertaken with the coopera-
tion of the Alger Sullivan Lumber Company. It consisted of
replacing several hundred feet of monolithic ditch lining with
precast sections. The original work, which was displaced by
hydrostatic pressure, had been performed by W.P.A. with mat,
erials supplied by the Company.
Filling. In the City of Leesburg a total of 79,279 cubic yards of
fill was deposited by a dump truck and a hydraulic dredge. The
truck was utilized in filling low areas in the City which could
not be drained, and the hydraulic dredge continued to be opera-
ted during the year toward filling a sawgrass marsh adjacent to
the City.

DDT RESIDUAL SPRAY PROGRAM
For the first time in the State a program for the residual
spraying of the interior of houses with DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-
trichloroethane) was undertaken. This campaign was designed
to destroy the adult malaria-carrying mosquito in the homes of






48 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


the smaller communities and on the scattered homesteads in the
most malarious counties. The residual spraying of the interior
and porches of unscreened homes, as well as certain public meet-
ing places usually frequented in the evening, promises to be a
valuable adjunct to the conventional engineering and larvicidal
routines which, from the economic standpoints, are feasible only
in places where the human population is reasonably dense.
The considerable expenditure in time and effort which the
new program involves has been considered justified in view of
the fact that it constitutes practically the only assurance against
a recrudescence in epidemic proportions of a disease which has
all but disappeared from the State. This is particularly true
when one observes the increasing flood of returning war vet-
erans, many of whom are proven gametocyte carriers. For the
year 1945, the army alone reported from the camps of Florida
1,210 cases of malaria which had been contracted outside of the
continental United States and nine cases which had been con-
tracted in the United States but not necessarily in Florida.
The setting-up of the so-called "extended coverage" program
took up a large part of the time of every member of the Bureau
during the first four months of the year. Various methods were
explored to help in delineating the areas which most justified
the new treatment. Allocations of DDT were strictly limited so
that there was no possibility of state-wide coverage during the
present season. Transportation difficulties and shortage of the
type of personnel necessary to insure a successful effort were
additional limiting factors.
To begin with, all available mortality and morbidity statistics
were analyzed to funrnish a general orientation by counties. With
all due regard to the relative unreliability of the original figures,
it was concluded that the following ten counties would in all
probability cover the areas where malaria was most frequently
encountered in the recent past: Dixie, Levy, Jackson, Sumter,
Jefferson, Hamilton, Madison, Citrus, Suwannee, and Taylor.
These counties all lie within the limestone belt which traverses
the State from the Gulf of Mexico near Tampa to the Alabama
border.
A second approach to this selection was made by a careful
study of the spleen and parasite surveys which had been con-
ducted by the Bureau during the past few yeads. It was found
that these figures roughly corroborated the statistical findings.
The considerable volume of entomological data collected in
the recent past by the Bureau as well as information supplied
by other sources was next classified to delineate more exactly






MALARIA CONTROL


the sections of each county where A. quadrimaculatus was
known to be breeding. The final choice of the field of operations
included certain other factors such as administrative conven-
ience. On the latter count, Hamilton County was dropped for
the present season and Leon County substituted.
Additional personnel for the "extended coverage" program
were recruited locally as far as possible; but a large number of
professional and supervisory personnel were transferred from
other states. County-wide mapping and census crews were
given training and sent out with suitable equipment throughout
the winter and spring months. At the beginning of March
enough transportation and spray equipment had been secured
to begin applications of DDT on a small scale. Citrus County,
lying at the extreme south of the projected work area, was chosen
for training the men of the spray crews. It was here, also, that
the Bureau attempted to find out what educational effort would
be required in the new program. It was immediately apparent
that the campaign "sold" itself, and that the chief function of the
men who were sent out in advance of the spray crews would be
to advise the householders of the expected time of arrival of the
crews and to instruct them in the proper preparation of the
dwelling to expedite the operation.
By June 30, formal project proposals, based on reports from
engineers, entomologists, and spray crews, had been prepared
for each county. In the case of each village or cross-roads com-
munity it was necessary to evaluate the relative economy of the
anti-adult treatment as against larvicidal methods. It was found
that very few towns were large enough to justify the initiation
of drainage programs or to employ permanent larviciding crews.
The residual spray season operated from March 1 to October
19. During this period 23,814 houses were sprayed with a total
of 31,727 applications to this number of houses. In all, 115, 639,-
378 square feet of wall surface were covered with 100 mg. of
DDT per square foot. In covering this amount, it was necessary
to use 70,605 pints of 35% DDT emulsion concentrate. It took
54,831 man-hours to accomplish this coverage with an average
of 1.78 man-hours per house and 0.79 pounds of DDT per house.
The program was a complete success in the ten counties, and
it is planned to expand the program to twenty-four counties in
the 1946 season. The DDT concentration will also be doubled.
This is expected to increase the effective residual duration
of the DDT crystals to at least four months and possibly longer.
Many interesting observations were made during the pro-
gram. Heavy infestations of bedbugs, cone-nose bugs, chicken







50 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


lice, brown dog ticks, and other household insects were found in
many homes. Evidence of bites of the cone-nose bugs was ap-
parent on some children, and it was noted that they occasionally
appeared anemic and sickly in dwellings having heavy infesta-
tions of bedbugs. After spraying walls and beds, these children
showed evidence of renewed energy and color.

AEDES AEGYPTI CONTROL
In the spring of 1945, the domestic mosquito control program
was reorganized. In the past there was a lack of sufficient
degree of continuity to achieve concrete results in any of the
cities selected for this type of work. It was, therefore, decided
to concentrate activities to as great an extent as possible into one
area so that a well-trained unit could be developed for use in
an emergency at any point in the State. Miami was chosen for
the development of this unit for two important reasons. It is
the port of entry by air for practically all traffic from Africa,
South America, and the West Indies. The City has for many
years maintained a sizable force of men to control the breeding
of domestic mosquitoes under the able supervision of Mr. Fred
H. Stutz, director of the Dade County Mosquito District.
To achieve the development of a model unit, it was necessary
to terminate activities in Jacksonville and to assign only two
individuals each to Tampa and Key West. The manpower ceil-
ing left approximately eighteen men available for the Miami area
where they were trained in all phases of domestic mosquito con-
trol. In the event of an insect-born epidemic outbreak at any place
in the State, this trained crew could be dispatched on short notice
for immediate action. Fortunately, there were no epidemics of
diseases transmitted by mosquitoes during the year, but there
were two in which houseflies were suspected of playing a part.
One was the typhoid epidemic at Fort Pierce and the other a
moderate epidemic of poliomyelitis at Miami. In both instances
the Miami crew was called upon to initiate housefly control by
residual spraying with DDT. The City of Miami, in addition to
the hand spraying of DDT, was also sprayed with DDT from the
air. The Bureau was successful in obtaining five tons of DDT'
from the office of Malaria Control in War Areas in Atlanta for
this operation.
It would be impossible to demonstrate the efficacy of these
two undertakings, but it may be stated that the housefly density
was reduced to a very low level; furthermore, few cases of ty-
phoid or "polio" were reported after a coverage had been ob-
tained with the DDT.







MALARIA CONTROL


The Miami Aedes Unit accomplished considerable control
during the year. There were 279,166 premise inspections made
in the City, 13,087 of which were found to be breeding Aedes
aegypti. There were also 20,629 special military inspections
made with 115 positive inspections recorded. In all, 35,647 man-
hours were utilized in the Miami area.
The Aedes work in Key West consisted mostly of oiling and
stocking cisterns with fish, and inspection work in those sections
of the City which had demonstrated heavy breeding in the past.
The two men assigned there performed excellent coverage. They
were able to inspect 15,631 premises of which 2,068 were recorded
as breednig areas. There were 37,639 inspections made on cis-
terns and wells with 200 found breeding. Fish were placed in
7,382 of these, and 3,013 were oiled to destroy A. aegypti. In
stocking the cisterns and wells, 88,584 Gambusia minnows were
utilized. A total of 730 gallons of diesel oil and kerosene was
applied as larvicide. The men employed 5,427 hours during the
year in performing this work.
In Tampa, two men assigned to A. aegypti control accom-
plished a creditable amount of work in close cooperation with
the County Health Unit. The County assigned one or more of
their sanitarians for a period of three or four weeks to be trained
in domestic mosquito control. In all, a total of 23 men from the
Health Unit devoted 2,640 hours to training and actual operation-
al work. This was done in order to give the sanitarians a broader
perspective of general sanitation. With the combined efforts of
the two agencies, it was possible to inspect 37,136 premises; find
breeding on 4,283; make corrections on 4,251; inspect 1,015 busi-
ness establishments; find breeding on 167; make corrections on
163; inspect 796 fish ponds; find breeding in 287; correct the breed-
ing on 283 by placing fish in 231, oil 41, and destroy 11. The men
assigned by the U. S. Public Health Service were employed 6,312
man-hours. An educational campaign, including the distribution
of 27,256 pamphlets, arrangements for eighteen public talks,
forty-eight movie trailer showings, and twenty-four newspaper
articles, was also carried out.

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES
Among the numerous minor activities of the Bureau of Ma-
laria Control during the past six months, it is worth remarking
that a most promising investigation has been made into the pos-
sibility of controlling water-hyacinth growth by the use of a
series of non-toxic, non-caustic chemical products developed for
entirely other purposes by agricultural agencies. It was found







52 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945

that sprays containing minute concentrations of 2-4, dichloro-
phenoxy-acetic acid resulted in the slow death of the plant with-
out any harmful effect on fish. It is not irritating to the skin and
is probably entirely innocuous to warm-blooded animals.
The series of chemicals now under test are related to plant
hormones by nature and seem to destroy the hyacinth by up-
setting its normal metabolic progresses. Much remains to be
studied before it can be utilized on a large scale in the field.
Tests are underway to determine whether it is best distributed
as a dust, in solution, or as an emulsion. Several field tests have
indicated that dilutions of up to 100 parts per million will kill
completely or allow recovery of at most 10% of the plants that
were not brought sufficianely into contact with the spray.









SANITARY ENGINEERING


DAVID B. LEE, Director

The activities of the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering contin-
ued under the direction of Mr. J. B. Miller during the year until
the middle of October when the director returned from military
duty and resumed office. This abbreviated report covers the
work undertaken by the Bureau during the calendar year 1945.
In reviewing the report it will be observed that various phases
of the program were restricted because of lack of personnel. It is
hoped that with the returning of technical personnel from the
armed forces and proposed addition of others needed the
bureau will be able to better meet its responsibilities as defined
by law and as imposed by the public health engineering needs
of the State.

INDUSTRIAL WASTE
Wastes from citrus processing plants continued to be of
primary concern. Two plants were constructed during the year
for handling this type of waste. These plants consist primarily
of evaporators for turning out by-products which have been de-
veloped. Other plants of this kind are being planned.
Situations involving wastes from the phosphate mining indus-
try were investigated on the Peace River watershed and the
Alafia River watershed. It will be necessary to continue these
investigations to reach an equitable solution of the problems
involved.
An important conference with the National Council for Steam
Improvement (of the pulp and paper and paperboard industries)
was held. It is expected that a definite policy in cooperation
with that organization will be developed for abating pollution
resulting from paper and paperboard mill operation in the State.
Initiation of studies of the effects of waste from a proposed
mill under construction in Putman County was made. This pro-
ject will be continued into 1946.

SEWAGE DISPOSAL FOR FHA DEVELOPMENTS
As in the past several years the working agreement between
the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering and the Federal Housing
Administration continued. This, briefly, consists of making in-
[ 53]







TABLE 1.-PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS APPROVED OR CONSULTING ENGINEERS' REPORTS RECEIVED COVERING WATER
nR SEWERAGE IMPROVEMENTS


Location Water Sewerage Remarks


Miami...............
Fort Walton.........
Pensacola............
Fort Pierce..........
Mayport (Forest
Acres S/D)........
Melbourne...........
Lake City ...........
Pensacola............
Tampa..............
Pinellas County......
Sarasota.............

D ania ...............
Belle Glade..........
Opa Locka ..........
Chattahoochee.......
St. Petersburg........
Live Oak...........
Hollywood ...........
Gainesville..........
Ft. Myers.......
Panama City......
Sanford.............
Chipley.............
M iami...............
M iami...............
Miami Beach ........
Pensacola............
Miami Beach.........
Miami Beach.........
Indiantown ..........
DeLand .............
Lake Worth..........
Tallahassee ..........
Delray..............
Warrington.........
St. Augustine........
High Springs.........
Banana River........
Pensacola............
Port St. Joe..........
Gainesville...........
Delray Beach........
Fernandina .........
Jacksonville Beach....
J acksonville .........


Plans & Specifications.....
Plans & Specifications.....
........................
Plans & Specifications.....

Plans* ..................



Plans & Specifications.....

Engineers' Report; Plans
& Specifications.......
Engineers' Report......
Plans & Specifications.....
Plans & Specifications.....


Engineers' Report......



.... .... .... .... ...


Plans. .................
Plans..................


Plans & Specification.....
Plans & Specifications....
Plans & Specifications.....
Plans & Specifications.....
Plans & Specifications.....
Engineers' Reporti.....
Engineers' Report........


Plans & Specifications.....
...................:....



. . .. .


Engineers' Report; Plans & Specifications
Plans & Specifications....................
Engineers' Report .................. ...
Engineers' Report......................


Engineers' Report; Plans & Specifications.
Engineers' Report ......................
Plans & Specifications .................
Plans & Specifications .................


Plans & Specifications..................
Engineers' Report ......................
Engineers' Report.....................
Engineers' Report......................
Plans & Specifications ..................
Plans & Specifications ..................
Plans & Specifications........... ....
Engineers' Report...................
Engineers' Report ..................
Plans & Specifications.................
Plans & Specifications.................
Plans & Specifications .................
Plans & Specifications...................
Plans & Specifications ..................
Plans & Specifications ..................

Plans & Specifications .................
Engineers' Report ...................



Engineers' Report .....................

Plans & Specifications ..................
Engineers' Report ............... ......

Plans & Specifications...................
Engineers' Report......................
Engineers' Report.......................
Engineers' Report............. .......
Engineers' Report.. ...................


~-------I I


rr


I


Sewage disposal facilities; extension of water system.
Water and sewer facilities.
Naval Air Station disposal facilities.
Improvements to water supply; sanitary sewerage.

*Also flow analysis for water improvements.
Sewerage extensions.
Sanitary sewerage system.
Florida Sausage Company sanitary sewerage.
Virginia Park Subdivision.
Water extension; elevated storage tank.

Water supply; treatment plant.
Waterworks improvements.
Water treatment plant.
Water treatment plant.
Sewage disposal plant.
Sewage treatment problems.
Geological data; sanitary sewers and storm drainage.
Sewerage and drainage.
Florida Farm Colony sanitary sewerage and Imhoff tank.
Extension of sanitary sewerage.
Millville: outfall sewea and chlorination facilities.
Sanitary sewerage facilities.
Sanitary sewerage facilities.
Biltmore Hotel service extensions.
Addition to sewerage.
Isle of Normandy trunk line.
Moreno Court Subdivision: sewers and plant.
Indian Creek sewer relief line.
Nautilus Extension: sanitary sewers.
Addition to wate. plant.
Sewage treatment plant; extension of water system.
Sewerage improvements; power and water improvements.
Improvements to water system.
Improvements to water system.
New well and transmission main.
Improvements to water and sewerage systems.
Waterworks improvements.
Naval Air Station sewerage improvements.
Treatment plant modifications.
Water treatment facilities.
Construction of sanitary sewers.
Sanitary sewerage facilities.
Sanitary sewerage facilities.
Sanitary sewerage facilities.
Electro-Motive Division of General Motors: sanitary sewerage.


,


I

























TABLE 2.-STREAM POLLUTION SURVEYS AND STREAM STUDIES


Name of Stream Remarks
1. St. Johns River and Tributaries ....................... Initiated April 1945; carried on weekly throughout year.
2. Halifax River (oyster beds) ........................... Continued at monthly intervals since September.
3. Rice Creek and Tributaries (Palatka) ................ Begun in December.
4. Peace River ....................................... Cursory physical observation.
5. Alafia River ................. .................. Preliminary chemical determinations and
physical observations commenced.


~I-



'4


0




04






56 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


spections of individual septic tank installations through local
health service, where same exists, and execution of report there-
on (FHA Form 2218) and seeing that the sewage disposal facili-
ties meet State Sanitary Code requirements.

Another important feature of the program dealing with hous-
ing developments of the Federal Housing Administration has
been established which makes for a more effective scope of this
activity. Reference is made to the arrangement with the Fed-
eral Housing Administration authorities for the investigation of
housing developments or subdivision sites to determine soil
characteristics and water table elevations as these conditions re-
late to disposal of septic tank effluent. This particular part of
the work has been considerably improved during the year and
the Federal Housing Administration now requires from this
department a report (FHA Form 2084c) on each subdivision.

Below is a summary of accomplishments in these phases of
the program:

Form No. of Case
No. Description Inspections

FHA 2218 Inspection & Certification Reports
(Sewage Disposal) completed ---_-- -- .-----....._ 1793

FHA 2218 Inspection & Certification Reports
(Sewage Disposal) pending.--- ..........----__.......... 278

FHA 2084c Percolation Report (Soil Characteristics
& Water Table) ..-_-........................ --_..... 16

CIVILIAN PUBLIC SERVICE SANITATION PROJECTS
The Civilian Public Service Sanitation Program, under tech-
nical supervision of Bureau of Sanitary Engineering, has been
varied and most productive. This work has not only been the
backbone of the sanitation program in Polk, Orange, and Wakulla-
Franklin Counties but it has also contributed to the general san-
itation program throughout the State by supplying forms, tem-
plates and other assistance to many counties, as well as func-
tioning as a training center for sanitation personnel where sani-
tation personnel might observe efficiently organized and operated
projects.







SANITARY ENGINEERING


Accomplishments of CPS Sanitation Projects Operating in
Polk, Orange, Wakulla-Franklin Counties
Privies-Built, installed or delivered to adjoining counties-2017
Privy Forms-Built ..----. ----------- ------ ----------- 17
Urinals-Built ....----------- --------- ----_-- --------- 2
Urinal Forms-Built__--- ...----.--------------- ----- 4
Metal Baskets-Fabricated-for sterilizing units_-------- 85
Cooling Boxes for Milk-Built ...-.._----.. -------.--6. 6
Burr Cottages (man-days)--....--...------------- ------ 55
Sanitary Surveys (man-days) .- ---------------------- ----- 162
Typhus Control (man-days) --.--. ---- ----- ----.. 83
Painting and Repairing county public institutions
(man-days) ....----------- ------- ------ --------------- 595

COMMON CARRIER WATER SUPPLY AND
WATERING POINT SANITATION
A listing of common carriers requesting interstate water sup-
ply source and watering point sanitation certification is received
each year from the U. S. Public Health Service. With this major
listing a program of inspection is organized and a representative
of this bureau visits each of the cities in the State operating a
water supply utilized by the common carriers.

COMMON CARRIER WATER SUPPLY AND WATERING POINT INSPECTIONS
AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CERTIFICATION TO U. S. PUBLIC
HEALTH SERVICE

No. Certifi-
Inspections cations No. Re-
Requested Number Recom- Inspections Number
USPHS by USPHS Inspected mended to to be Made Deleted
Form No. USPHS
8921-E Water Supply
Examination 43 46 45 1 1
8921-0 Watering Point
Sanitation 111 113 96 5 12

SANITARY MILK CONTROL

The milk program progressed slowly during 1945. Data on file
indicate that there is current field inspection information on ap-
proximately 45 per cent of the 800 dairy farms and milk pasteuri-
zation plants in the State. Of the 279 samples of pasteurized milk
examined in the State laboratory and reported to the Bureau of
Sanitary Engineering about 40 per cent had bacterial counts
within the Grade A limit. Eighty-eight per cent of the 262 milk
samples reported were found to be properly pasteurized.







58 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


A summary of the activities completed in the milk program is
listed below:
Dairy farm inspections__ _- ----- -___ ---- 181
Producer-Distributor inspections ----111
Pasteurization plant inspections ----------107
State institution inspections -__- 11
Interstate carrier permits approved ------- 14

WATER IMPOUNDMENTS AND MOSQUITO CONTROL
Because of programs now being sponsored by the Soil Con-
servation Service, and the Florida Forest and Park Service the
number of water impoundments constructed by individuals is
increasing rapidly. During the past year ten permits for im-
poundments were issued, and inspections incidental thereto were
made. Most of these were for small ponds to be used primarily
for irrigation purposes and as fish ponds. This work has been
done in cooperation with th Bureau of Malaria Control, and with
others concerned. Investigations pertinent to proposed impound-
ments to be constructed by U. S. Engineer Department were also
made.

LIST OF DRAWINGS DEVELOPED IN THE BUREAU
DRAFTING ROOM
1. Shop Drawings for Water Sampler for St. Johns River Pol-
lution Survey.
2. Shop Drawings for DDT Dust Distributing Can.
3. Plan of Typical Comfort Station for Small Communities.
4. Shop Drawings for Chlorinator Base and Carrying Case.
5. Plan of Typical Large Abattoir for Hog and Cattle Slaugh-
tering.
6. Detail of Screen Chamber and Grease Trap for Abattoir
Waste Disposal.
7. Plan of Mixing Tank and Mechanical Attachments for Laun-
dry Waste Disposal.
8. Numerous Plans showing Layouts for Industrial Waste Dis-
posal.
9. Standard Septic Tank Design with Details of Metal Forms.
10. Numerous Septic Tank, Distribution Box, and Drain Field
Plans.
11. Detail showing Experimental Well.
12. Location map of the State showing all Water Treatment
Plants by Type.
13. Numerous City, County, and State Maps and Charts.

















TABLE 3.-ESTABLISHMENTS AND PRACTICES PERMITTED BY BUREAU OF SANITARY ENGINEElIANU.

Under Under
Description Permit Permit Remarks
1944 1945

Tourist and trailer camps........ 697 736 Permits granted on permanent basis; revokable for cause.
Food Canneries................. 130 133 Permits granted on permanent basis; revokable for cause.
Bottled Water Plants ........... 23 25 Permits granted annually.
Swimming Pools ............... 78 83 Permanent permits; revokable. Temporary permits granted pools without chlorination with understand-
ing chlorinators will be installed when available.

Seafood: Each establishment was inspected on an average of 6 times during seasons.
Oysters-shellstock ...... 9 9 11 new plants were constructed.
Oysters-shucking...... 31 49 14 plants made major repairs. All 22 condemned areas should be re-surveyed. For this purpose three
laboratory field assistants are needed.
Crabmeat.............. 27 30 Condemned areas should be re-posted with warning signs.
Scallops................ 5 14
Drainage Wells ................. 164 185 Every effort is being made to eliminate disposal of contaminated water through drainage wells. Drain
age wells are being permitted only in cases where quality of ground water will not be impaired.

Migratory Labor Camps......... .54 118 Co-operation of the department was continued with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Office of Labor


Water W ells ...................


after the War Food Administration ceased to function in connection with labor camp sanitation program
It is felt that continuation of the working agreement for sanitary control of housing for migratory and
imported labor has been beneficial.
Effectiveness of this feature of the program is deficient in that during the war years it has not been possi-
ble to carry out necessary educational work with the well drilling industry. It is anticipated that more
direct legislation will be needed to bolster up sanitary control needed.







60 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


14. Detail of Metal Form for Concrete Riser (Sanitary Privy).
15. Detail of Nozzle Housing Arrangement for Railway Instal-
lation.
16. Detail of Gravity Feed Arrangement for Hypochlorite Solu-
tions.
17. Numerous Black-Line Prints for this and other bureaus of
State Board of Health.

RODENT AND TYPHUS CONTROL
Although the State Board of Health has allotted no funds as
yet to conduct this activity, fortunately at least for the time
being, the Public Health Service has made available an officer
experienced in this work who is assigned to Bureau of Sanitary
Engineering to assist in development and supervision of rodent
and typhus control projects in the State. This is the first year
in which the full-time services of a man have been available
for the duty of rodent and typhus consultant.
Accomplishments are briefly itemized as follows:

1. The available morbidity and mortality statistics. on the
disease were tabulated and analyzed. (See Table 4.)
These statistics emphasize extent of the problem.
2. Existing control projects were reviewed and reorganized
where need indicated.
3. Major activity in latter part of year consisted of establish-
ing experimental DDT dusting projects for control of rat
fleas. This was initiated in October through cooperation
of Public Health Service. As with other rodent and typhus
work, these projects were set up and conducted as part of
program of local health department concerned. Rats have
been trapped and combed to determine flea index. Rat-
blood specimens were collected and examined to determine
per cent rats positive for typhus. Flea index has averaged
about 12 per rat. Number of rat-blood specimens reported
positive for typhus has been reaching the high figure of
8 out of 10 in seevral instances, again emphasizing extent
of the control problem.
4. Keeping at the forefront the mainstay of permanent long-
range rat and typhus control work, i.e: Separation of
human life from rat life and suppression of the latter;
this, through ratproofing of buildings and poisoning, trap-
ping, fumigation and improved storage and disposal of -
garbage and removal of incidental rat harborages.






SANITARY ENGINEERING


Organized programs conducted as activities of local health
departments have been in operation at Miami, Tampa, Tarpon
Springs, Dunedin, Bartow, Jacksonville, Tallahassee and Pensa-
cola during the year. A good start has been made, and it is
hoped to eventually develop an adequate program more nearly
consistent with the need for control shown by the statistics on
this disease in the State.


500.
















200-
40

100 30

J,20

,R~Pi1
...... ? .. __ .,'[ot,# @ o


1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Curves Indicating Increasing Prevalence of Endemic Typhus in Florida.









S[ 62]





ENDEMIC TYPHUS FEVER.-CASES & DEATHS REPORTED-STATE OF
FLORIDA BY YEARS-10-YEAR PERIOD-1935-1944, INC.


Year Cases DEATHS
Reported
White Colored Total
1935 27 5 0 5
1936 55 9 0 9
1937 131 11 1 12
1938 75 8 2 10
1939 152 6 1 7
1940 111 9 6 15
1941 196 12 1 13
1942 313 16 7 23
1943 314 16 6 22
1944 484 27 7 34
Total...... 1,858 119 31 150








MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH


LUCILLE J. MARSH, M. D., Director

When no mother or child dies in Florida of a preventable death
and when every child is given the opportunity to grow up free
from preventable physical defects, the objectives of the Bureau
of Maternal and Child Health will have been achieved. Improve-
ment comes slowly because the factors involved in the problems
are intangible as well as tangible.
The figures for maternal mortality show a little improvement.
The leading cause of maternal deaths in Florida as taken from
the 'death certificates is toxemia. Infection and hemorrhage are
the next in line. Toxemias before and after delivery account for
71.4% of the maternal deaths in Florida as against 67.5% of the
deaths in the U. S. average. There is a growing body of evidence
that a nutritional factor is important in the prevention of eclamp-
sia. It begins to appear that an adequate amount of protein in
the prenatal diet may be one of the important preventive meas-
ures. In the work with the prenatal clinics and the midwives
nutrition is being emphasized.
The infant mortality rates are still too high especially among
the colored. Of 2,167 infant deaths, 1,356 died within the first
month of life. Of these 31.4% died with prematurity as the only
cause given. (See chart on page ... ) One staff nurse was sent
to Columbia University for a course in the care of the premature.
As the proper care of the newborn is an important factor in sav-
ing life, the program initiated last year by a series of talks on
the care of the newborn by one of the physicians is being carried
on. A survey of the incubators available in Florida has been
made and attempts will be made to see that incubators of suitable
kind will be within easy reach of every area in Florida.
Of great importance in the educational program are the MCH
clinics now being conducted in 24 county health units. The at-
tendance on prenatal and postpartum clinics has continued to
increase slowly in spite of difficulties in transportation. Atten-
dance at infant hygiene clinics has increased appreciably. Em-
phasis is being placed on education in the early care and im-
munization of the infants to protect them during the years of
greatest susceptibility.
Since nutrition is one of the great problems in Florida, a
special program was planned to bring the problem to public
attention and to guide the activities of community groups con-
cerned with improving nutrition and health. In January Dr.
Walter Wilkins, Surgeon, USPHS, conducted a series of 6 white
and 2 Negro demonstration nutrition clinics in 5 areas of the






64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


state, under the auspices of the State Board of Health and with
the assistance of MCH medical and nutrition staff members.
Similar clinics in other sections of the state were arranged and
conducted by MCH staff members.
Special emphasis was put on better nutrition during child-
hood and the prenatal-postpartum period. Interest was stimu-
lated and guidance given in the former area through some 15
talks to lay groups, a similar number for school children, and
consultation with teachers on nutrition education in element-
ary school. Eleven college classes in health education were met,
where the problems of childhood nutrition were discussed. Con-
sultation service was given 3 children's homes.
In the area of pre and postpartum nutrition, the principal
channels of education were public health nurses, midwives, and
welfare case workers. A series of 8 nutrition institutes were held
for public health nurses; special attention was given to nutrition
in the regular in-service training of midwives and in the midwife
training program at Tallahassee; and a bulletin was prepared
for welfare case workers and public health nurses on the im-
portance of nutrition in pregnancy.
Staff education, stimulation, and guidance were given the
organized county health units, and active nutrition programs
were being carried on by at least 11 county units at the close
of the year. One issue of Health Notes was devoted to nutrition
and was given national recognition.
The experimental unit for training midwives who cannot
qualify for training as nurse midwives has at last gotten under
way. Since the emphasis in the work is upon quality and atten-
tion to detail in the training, the number of trainees is very
limited. It is too soon to evaluate the influence of the course.
The Director of the Bureau worked very closely with the
State Welfare Board in working out Standards for Maternity
Homes which were adopted by the State Welfare Board for use
in counties over 267,000. The Migratory Labor Camps request-
ed consultation in the preparation of standards for the care of
infants under two years.
Dr. Scott Turk and Dr. Harriet Farley, clinicians in the infant
hygiene clinics, Dr. R. J. Dalton, one of the local county health
unit directors, and the director of the bureau attended the
Southern Pediatric Seminar at Saluda, N. C.
Doctors E. C. Hamblin, Herbert C. Miller and Oren Moore
were provided for the Postgraduate Medical Assembly in Jack-
sonville in June.
The Emergency Maternity and Infant Care program carried







MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH


on entirely with Federal funds, which provides hospitalization
and obstetrical care for the wives of service men, and hospitali-
zation and medical care for their infants, has taken a great deal
of the time of the department to administer. However, during
1945 the addition of professional personnel employed by EMIC
funds enabled other members of the department to cover more
of the regular work of MCH. This year 7,692 cases were com-
pleted; that is, all care authorized was paid. Of this number 7,206
were maternity cases, 486 were infant cases. The average cost
of a maternity case, including those cases in which only prenatal
care was paid, was $75.80. The average cost of an infant case
was $73.46. Of the maternity cases 6,383 were delivered in hos-
pitals and 294 were home deliveries.
A medical social consultant was added to the staff by EMIC
funds. She has served in a liaison capacity to bring welfare and
social agencies explanation of the Emergency Maternity and
Infant Care program as well as general policies of the maternal
and child health bureau. Difficult social problems of EMIC ap-
plicants have been evaluated with nurses and social workers in an
effort to work out the best possible solution. She has attempted to
increase understanding of what services are available through
each agency. Conferences were held with representatives of the
Child Welfare Division and members of the State Welfare Board,
Crippled Children's Commission, State Council for the Blind,
Florida Vocational Rehabilitation Service, Veterans' Advisory
Council of the Community Chest, Navy Relief Societies, Coun-
cal of Social Agencies, and Army Personal Affairs Divisions.
Each hospital taking patients under the EMIC program must
have an annual inspection of the plant and must prepare a cost
statement upon which the reimbursable cost payment is made.
The addition of a hospital accountant, paid from EMIC funds, to
the staff has been of great assistance to the hospitals in preparing
their statements. There are 74 participating hospitals. During
the period from March through December, 31 hospital reim-
bursable cost statements were approved and hospital agreements
completed on the basis of the cost statements. Twenty-one of
these statements were completed as a result of direct contacts
with the hospitals. Forty-one hospitals were visited in this
period.








66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


91 54 33 56 '37 '5
4


I.".--
,'. \.~

U /


/


neqro

WhiTe

Tota


Rate of Deaths from Premature Birth per 1,000 Live Births, Florida
1934-1944


'^` '- --


195-4 '55 Ob .5-1 I-JK 1110 "11 -.&2 '4 x -W 11








BUREAU OF DENTAL HEALTH


D. H. TURNER, D.D.S., Director

The activities of the Bureau of Dental Health for the year
ending December 31, 1945, varied only slightly from those of the
previous year. It was impossible to expand the Bureau's services
to any great extent because of its limited personnel-a director,
one field dentist, and one secretary. The program called for
promotion of dental health on a state-wide basis and provided
dental health education for everyone in the state and correctional
service for indigent maternal and preschool cases and elemen-
tary school children.
Education. Upon request, dental health literature was for-
warded to everyone desiring it; likewise, lectures, talks and
movies were presented, when time permitted, to school and civic
groups. Only educational material approved or originated by
the American Dental Association or by the State Board of
Health, was used. While dental health education was available
to everyone, it was especially provided for and distributed to
maternal and preschool patients, all school children, teachers,
and parents.
The most effective factor in the plan was the demonstration
phase-the educational-correctional clinics. To conduct the
clinics, the bureau maintained and operated two dentomobiles.
One was in use the entire year (except for repair periods); the
other, from late October. Wherever running water and elec-
tricity (110 volts, a. c.) are accessible, these fully-equipped den-
tal offices on wheels can be quickly set up and the clinics put
into immediate operation. The field dentist and/or the director
operate the clinics. They are usually conducted in county health
unit localties in cooperation with the health departments; always
with the approval of local dentists, if any, and where the dental
indigents could not otherwise obtain dental care of any kind. As
such communities are too numerous for complete dental atten-
tion to be given to all the patients, only the most necessary work
to relieve dental discomfort and prevent immediate or further
dental trouble is done. The eligibility of a patient to the clinics
must be determined by a welfare worker or a public health nurse
The following summary is a record of the dentomobile clinics
for 1945:


[67]







68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


Maternal Preschool School Total
Patients, new 15 5 2014 2034
Patiets, repeat 6 1085 1091
Inspections 15 5 2014 2034
Prophylaxis 14 3 1909 1926
Corrections:
Fillings, amalgam 12 4 2197 2213
Fillings, cement 11 3 894 908
Fillings, silicate 10 71 81
Extractions 16 1 611 628
Treatments 33 11 4143 4187
X-ray ...
Miscellaneous -- 218 218
Total corrections 82 19 8134 8235

Health Education:
Chair instruction 2965
No. pieces literature given 5989
Talks and/or lectures give:
Classroom 47 Attendance 3090
Civic groups 4 Attendance 1650
Movies shown 2 Attendance 2276
No. of showings 10

Ten counties received dentomobile visits of from three to
eight weeks each. Nine of these maintain organized county
health departments; one is a part of the Central Florida Health
District.
In one of the localities where the clinic was held, in cooper-
ation with the State Board of Health's nutrition consultant and
representatives of the United States Public Health Service, den-
tal examinations were made for indications of subclinical nutri-
tional states. The dental findings showed that the carious teeth
were no greater in number for this class of patient than in the
majority of other classes; however, those children who were nu-
tritionally deficient did have more tartar on their teeth and their
gums were inflamed and anemic.
Each year, to assist in caring for dental indigents,. the Chil-
dren's Bureau has allotted funds to organized county health de-
partments for paying dental fees in connection with dental cor-
rective care for maternal and preschool patients. Because of
the shortage of dentists, this method for the past several years
has been used less and less, and in 1945 only six health depart-
ents availed themselves of their allotted funds. And of these six,
only one continued its program into the second half of the year.
At its best, this was never a satisfactory means of providing
dental care; however, considering the difficulties encountered
during the period being considered, the results, while not large,
are good and indicate the need of extensive local health pro-






BUREAU OF DENTAL HEALTH


grams in each county. The county-by-county tabulation that fol-
lows is the 1945 account of county health unit Maternal and
Child Health Dental Corrective Clinics:


o
Counties o a .
0 .- 5
a 0 0


Dentists Participating ..--------- 3 2 4 4 1 1
Maternal ...----------------- 20 80 2 123
Pre-school ....---- -.----- 14 128 .-
School ...- --------- 24 44 218 81
Total .- -- 58 208 44 220 123 81
Treatments ....-.----- ---- 92 71 1 90 70
Extractions ....-..---.....------ -- 23 110 55 81 35 13
Fillings
Ama. .........................-- ..- 80 14 34 47 287 113
Cem. -----. 39 2 5 10 46 14
Sil. ------------ 5 7 14 8
Prohhplaxis ..--.....---.....-- 19 5 3 9 26

Dade, Hillsborough, and Pinellas County Health Departments
each maintained and operated dental clinics in connection with
their general health programs. Although there were several
weeks in which these clinics, for good and sufficient reasons,
were not in operation, together they treated between six and
seven thousand patients and performed nearly 20,000 dental
operations.
Experience has shown that locally maintained and operated
dental programs are the best way to provide dental care to a
locality's dental indigents. Accordingly, much effort has been
expended in that direction. Alachua County Health Department
has now acquired and equipped a dentomobile. Just as soon
as a dentist can be obtained, a county-wide, year-round dental
program will be launched there.
Miscellaneous. Because it was not possible to obtain Florida-
licensed dentists to operate the dental clinic at the Bay Area
Health Center, Valparaiso, it was closed and all the property
there which belonged to the State Board of Health was brought
in to headquarters.
Dr. Ramon Cordova, Dean of Guadalajara Dental College,
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, was a goodwill visitor to Florida in
January. He was the guest of the Florida State Dental Society
.and the State Board of Health. As a representative of both these
organizations, the director of this Bureau was designated as Dr.






70 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945

Cordova's guide. Mexico was planning an extensive enlarge-
ment of its public health program and Dr. Cordova was here to
study Florida's health plan-especially as it pertains to public
health dentistry-with the idea of incorporating its best phases
in Mexico's new program.
Conclusion. Tentative plans are being made to extend the
state's dental health program so that it will embrace the entire
state on a year-round basis. To do this it will be necessary to
obtain at least four more dentomobiles and secure the services
of five additional public health dentists.







LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


GEORGE A. DAME, M. D., Director

The present personnel of the Bureau of Local Health Service
consists of a director, a records consultant, two sanitation con-
sultants, a chief clerk and a senior clerk. The senior clerk in
addition to her several bureau duties, also operates the teletype
machine for all other offices of the State Health Depart-
ment.
The personnel of the Division of Public Health Nursing and
the activities of that division will be reported separately. This
division which formerly functioned as a separate bureau was
added to the Bureau of Local Health Service as a division on
November 1, 1945.
A report of the activities of the Bureau of Local Health
Service, exclusive of the Division of Public Health Nursing, in-
cludes necessarily all activities of the local agencies now operat-
ing under the bureau on a local level. The state is now entirely
covered by one or another of the three types of local agencies;
county health units, attached counties, or health districts.
A "county health unit" is the legal term denoting an admin-
istrative unit, composed of one, two or three county health de-
partments, under the direction of one health officer. Each organ-
ized county has its own county health department and its own
budget. It is sometimes necessary, on account of smallness of
population and smallness of budget, for two or three weak health
departments to share one health officer.
There are at present twenty six organized county health units
comprised of thirty seven county health departments, or 55.2%
of the sixty seven counties of the state. These organized coun-
ties have a population of 1,819,472 or 80.8% of the state's total
population of 2,249,649.
An "attached county" is an unorganized county attached to
an adjacent county health department for supervision, and that
its citizens and officials may be gradually shown the desirability
of organizing and supporting its own county health department.
There are presently six attached counties. They are each at-
tached to counties with which each will eventually constitute a
part of an administrative unit according to the over-all future
plan which calls for the administration of all local health work
in thirty-five full-time, fully staffed, local health units.
The six attached counties have a combined population of
29,309, or 1.3% of the total population of the state.
[71]






72 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


A "health district" is a grouping together of several unorgan-
ized counties under the direction of a health officer with a staff
of nursing, sanitation and clerical personnel appointed by the
State Health Officer and whose salaries and expenses are paid
from funds appropriated for that purpose by the Legislature.
The four health districts are composed of twenty-four coun-
ties with a combined population of 400,868, or 17.8% of the total
state population.
The budgets of the health districts and of the county health
units are set up for the following personnel: 65 health officers
and technicians, 212 public health nurses, 125 sanitary officers
and engineers, 109 clerks and stenographers and 69 others; a
total of 580. Copies of the district and county budgets are on
pages _.
At the close of the year there were employed in the county
health units and districts the following personnel:'41 health offi-
cers and clinicians, 99 sanitation officers, 166 nurses, and 198
clerical and others, a total of 504 persons.
There has been a most difficult problem of securing and re-
taining sufficient personnel for the full operation of the local
health units and districts. Fortunately no unit or district has
closed. The problem has not become less difficult since the clos-
ing of World War II hostilities. A compilation of local health
activities is attached.
On October 1, 1945, Mr. Fred A. Safay was assigned to this
bureau as a sanitation consultant. He has had a long and valuable
experience in public health work. He had recently returned
from the Eureopean area where he served as a Brigadier Gen-
eral.
On January 1, 1946, Mr. Byron G. Barfield who had served
most efficiently since July 1, 1943, tendered his resignation as a
sanitation consultant to become effective December 31. He is
to be a member of the teaching staff of the In-Service Field
Training at Gainesville.
Mr. Robert G. Carter now in the Bureau of Engineering will
be assigned to the Bureau of Local Health Service early in 1946.
Very intelligent and effective service from Mr. Carter, whose
high reputation is well known, is anticipated.
In the latter part of the year an Advisory Records' Commit-
tee of County Health Officers was appointed for the purpose of
revising all forms used in the county health units. A policy
was adopted of using only such records and reports as are neces-
sary and usable.. Many forms were abandoned, and those re-
tained were brought up to date and simplified.






LOCAL HEALTH SERVICE


This committee worked diligently and carefully and did a
fine job. The committee was composed of the following officers:
Frank Hall, Paul J. Coughlin, Lawrence Zell, Leland Dame and
Frank Chappell.
For the first time a formula was devised and used in the dis-
tribution of State and federal funds to the county health units.
This formula served very well and, though some two or three
counties expressed dissatisfaction, the over-all situation was
much better than when practically all counties were dissatisfied
under the old "Greco-Roman system of catch-as-catch-can and no
holds barred." The present formula was adopted by the State
Board of Health as a temporary expedient to serve a then urgent
purpose. It is necessary that certain changes be made to fit
current conditions and other revisions will be made from year
to year as necessity arises.


S TATE


OF


FL OR. IDA


POPULATION

LEG EN 0

F rLILL-T II
COLUNT':



ATTACH4




PFi-ALTI-P


;PIA;



2,249,649 (1945)



E ORGANI tt. ED,
W -IEALTH UNITS



ED COLLNTIES ke




DIZtTRICTS
PAHC


~,-d I'


3TATE OF


A -:











TABLE 1.-COUNTY HEALTH UNIT BUDGETS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1945, TO JUNE 30, 1946


Item DESCRIPTION Annual
No. Rate


31 Alachua ...........................
32 B aker............................
33 B ay ..............................
34 Bradford..................... ....
35 Broward ..........................
36 Clay..................... ........
37 D ade.............................
38 D uval ............................
39 Escam bia .........................
40 Franklin ..........................
41 Gadsden..........................
42 Glades...........................
43 Gulf...............................
44 Highlands.........................
45 Hillsborough......................
46 Holm es...........................
47 Jackson..........................
48 Jefferson ..........................
49 Lake.............................
50 Leon .............................
51 Levy .............................
52 M adison..........................
53 Monroe ..........................
54 Nassau ..........................
55 Okaloosa .........................
56 Orange ............................
57 Pinellas...........................
58 Polk ..............................
59 Santa Rosa.................... ...
60 Seminole..................... ...
61 Sumter ..........................
62 Taylor............................
63 V olusia ...........................
64 W akulla ..........................
65 W alton ...........................


Total
Budgeted


40,220
12,214
34,255
12,243
35,434
11,529
259,050
40,335
50,835
11,768
28,435
4,844
11,200
17,196
202,007
15,940
19,124
15,491
31,082
48,765
15,546
18,590
3C,186
20,837
12,563
45,627
51,599
50,531
12,835
22,980
11,815
14,317
59,341
7,217
14.560


State


8,157
2,922
7,900
3,783
8,294
5,019
19,474
12.558
10,820
4,054
8,790
1,156
2,116
4,796
15,466
3,107
5,544
5,287
7,318
8,894
4,266
5,090
9,066
4,711
4,023
5,307
10,499
7,533
5,034
5,270
3,375
3,937
10,111
2,517
3,800


SOURCE OF FUNDS

U. S. P. H. S. Other Agencies
County Children's
Title VI V. D. T. B. Bureau Name Amount

20,933 2,040 4,340 1,930 2,820
5,852 1,920 1,520
19,015 1,350 3,860 2.100
4,300 2.520 1,640
18,325 2,600 3,200 3,015
4.840 1,470 200


215,000
18,987
31,315
5,574
14,365
2,638
5,350
9,200
164,041
6,513
6,300
7,284
14,924
25,825
7,055
7,000
14,100
10,326
5,000
30,000
32,800
30,243
4,581
9,380
4,000
6,000
36,930
3,200
6,000


1,560
2,820
2,040

2,280
1,050
1,920
1,200
3,000
2,040
2,400
900
2,400
2,040
3,375
2,010
2,280

1,920
1,560
2,040
3,000
1,920
2,880
1,800
2,160
2,040
900
2,040


14,440

300
2,140
2,400

280
2.,000
11,760
2,240
2,160
2,020
3,800
6,460
350
2,320
2,300
2,320
1,420
3,400
3,020
4,040
100
730
2,440
2,020
5,250
350
2.520


1,800
2,320
1,920









2,626


2,400

1,920
2,040
2,340
1,200
2,260

1,350


6,776
3,650
4,440

600

1,534

7,740
2,040
2,720

2,640
2,920
500
2,140
2,440
1,080
200
3,440
1,200
3,375

2,460
200
200
3,660
250
200


I
























TABLE 1 (Continued).-COUNTY HEALTH UNIT BUDGETS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1945, TO JUNE 30, 1946
SOURCE OF FUNDS

DESCRIPTION Annual Total U. S. P. H. S. Other Agencies
Rate Budgeted State
RaeIChildren's


W ashington .......................
Suwannee.... ...................
County Budget Totals..........

TUBERCULOSIS PROGRAMS
Dade County...................... 8,820
Hillsborough County .............. 11,160
Pinellas County.................... 5,370

Grand Total..................


- -- I /- ----
13,784 4,094
18,500 11,000

1,322,795 245,088

7,080
8,880
4,080

1,342.835 245.088


county


5,720
7,500

820,446


Title VI V. D. T. B.

1,800 2,170

69,305 99,510 24,106


820.446 69.305 99.510


7,080
8,880
4,080

44.146


Bureau




64,340





64,310


Name


r
0


Amount C

>



M

>
ti



Cn
H

C
c,


t

-i


Item
No.



66
82



79
80
81








TABLE 2.-HEALTH DISTRICTS BUDGETS FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1945, TO JUNE 30, 1946

SI I SOURCE OF FUNDS


DESCRIPTION


NORTHERN DISTRICT
District Health Officer..............
Senior Sanitary Officer .............
Public Health Nurse Consultant.....
Senior Stenographer ................

CENTRAL DISTRICT
District Health Officer .............
Sanitary Engineer..................
Sanitarian ........................
Public Health Nurse Consultant.....
Senior Stenographer...............

SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT
District Health Officer. ............
Sanitary Engineer.................
Sanitarian .........................
Public Health Nurse Consultant.....
Senior Stenographer. ..............

SOUTHEASTERN DISTRICT
District Health Officer .............
Sanitary Engineer .................
Sanitarian.........................
Public Health Nurse Consultant.....
Senior Stenographer ..............;.


Annual Total
Rate Budgeted


5,220
2,400
2,640
1,560


5,460
3,780
2,460
2,820
1,560


5,460
3,780
2,460
2,280
1,560

5,460
3,780
2,640
2.640
1.560


TRAVEL
Health Officers and Staff............

OTHER EXPENSES
Supplies...........................
Equipm ent ........................
R ent .............................
Contingent........................
Revised to include Janitor-Northern District
Revised to include Janitor-Southwes tern Dis

Totals .................... ...


3,915
1,800
1,980
1,170


4,095
2,835
1,815
2,115
1,170


4,095
2,835
1,815
1,710
1,170


4,095
2,835
1,980
1,980
1,170

13,030


605
3,510
1,630
585

trict


3,915
1,800
1,980
1,170

4,095
2,835
1,845
2,115
1,170


4,095
2,835
1,845
1,710
1,170


4,095
2,835
1,980
1,980
1,170

13,030


605
3,510
1,630
585


CoInty


S 4 640001


U. S. P. H. S.
Children's
e VI V. D. T. B. Bureau
-


Other Agencies

Name Amount










C



I-
>

f








to
93
H

ca


i------I------- i--------I----


---


S 64.000


64.000










TABLE 3.-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.





ACTIVITIES a
I| i,
a a aW O ti
Cd he 1 Ii -l


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL
Admission to service ..................Al
Consultations with physicians ........A2
Field visits........................ A3-9
Smallpox immunizations ..............A15
Diphtheria immunizations............A16-18
Typhoid fever immunizations ..........A19

VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
Admissions to medical service..........B I
Clinic visits ......................... B3
Field visits .......................... B4

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
Individuals admitted to medical service. Cl
Individuals admitted to nursing service. C2
Clinic visits ......................... C5
Nursing visits........................C7-8

MATERNITY SERVICE
Cases admitted to medical service...... D 1-8
Cases admitted to nursing service ......D2-7-10
Visits by anterpartum cases to medical
conferences.................... D3
Nursing visits........................D5-6-11-12

INFANT HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service. El
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E2
Visits to medical conferences ...........E3
Nursing visits......... ...............E5-6

PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service.E8
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E9
Visits to medical conferences ...........E10
Nursing visits .......................E12-13
Inspections by dentists or dental
hygienists .. .. ...... '. .. .: .E14


26
0
64
3,107
2,223
6,755

470
7,218
872

6
196
7
706

262
324

339
955


70
218
103
691


131
325
167
978

C


17 13
10 2
38 19
415 1,362
230 387
359 1,083

61 1,362
835 12,542
82 3,267

3 101
42 166
4 2,411
100 772


63 97
128 270

114 114
319 991

30 42
88 252
54 100
232 748

120 128
178 458
226 166
367 1,I25
2 0


13

24
68
292
497

320
3,765
312

9
24
14
51

96
113

176
253

111
115
340
302

135
-151
*320
292
S0


75 15
71 16
233 22
178 193
412 549
253 1,125

619 231
7,253 2.337
1,443 31C

175 11
221 17
177 If
612 5R


206 7T
302 12(

405 11
1,054 43,

153 291
252 151
406 46.
774 32-


167 8
166 5'
381 12:
474 13i

0


921
122
1,803
4,453
2,930
496

5,424
88,072
17,985

2,065
759
2,915
2,066

1,551
3,568

3,333
7,185


1,034
2,422
2,868
6,768

1.140
1,264
2,236
4,886
S 94


92
6
289
532
890
1,934


300
143
318
1,439
2,851
9,282


0 2,695
0 12,111
221 4,17E


19
492
13
1,338

110
1,013

160
2,803


195 8 0
19,411 571 49
699 8 0
1,154 1,329 88

338 243 0
815 205 122
1,028 243 0
1,886 754 182

5 16 20


12
168
57
608
442
808

1,421
6,624
1,447


188
196
207
424

413
697

740
2,172

199
583
309
1,530

314
1,045
544
2,169
0


1,490
560
2,880
12,419
11,322
23,075

12,700
141,808
30,364


2,595
2,280
5,776
6,443

2,945 P
6,76t 1

5,610
16,943

2,138
24,138 -
5,352
13,988


2,803
4,848
5,433
13,370
-137
-:1








TABLE 3 (Continued).-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.


ACTIVITIES


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL
Admission to service ................. Al
Consultations with physicians..........A2
Field visits ..........................A3-9
Smallpox immunizations ..............A15
Diphtheria immunizations .............A16-18
Typhoid fever immunizations..........A19

VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
Admissions to medical service..........B
Clinic visits ......................... B3
Field visits. ......................... Bt

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
Individuals admitted to medical service. C
Individuals admitted to nursing service. C2
Clinic visits......................... C5
Nursing visits........................C7-8

MATERNITY SERVICE
Cases admitted to medical service......D1-8
Cases admitted to nursing service...... D2-7-10
Visits by anterpartum cases to medical
conferences ....................D3
Nursing visits........................D5-6-11-12

INFANT HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service. El
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E2
Vists to medical conferences........... E3
Nursing visits ........................E5-6

PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service. E8
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E9
Visits to medical conferences ...........E10
Nursing visits........................E12-13
Inspections by dentists or dental
hygienists.....................E14


55 137 211
979 1,300 2,904
154 132 156


3
2
13
320
357
943

118
2,010
38


103
95
261
687
1,244
12

270
5,269
313


22
4
42
110
999
2,415

397
7,091
863


62
28
144
1,116
753
2,599

1,124
12,626
2,328


160
196
496
3,191
4,481
1,845

2,668
38,621
6,707


1,078
1,561
3,269
2,737

560
2,379

1,190
5,718

536
1,768
962
4,709

1,090
1,735
1,634
4,608

59


2 70
197 100
4 63
405 249


28
30
51
269
252
2,204

196
4,880
514

85
64
120
129

221
452

272
1,607

69
329
122
1,247

17
592
26
1,550
0


1,490
S560
2,880
12,419
11,322
23,075

12,700
141,808
30,364

2,595
2,280
5,776
6,443

2,945
6,764

5,610
16,943

2,138
24,138
5,352
13,988

2,803
4,848
5,433
13,370
137


7
7
10
433
152
1,745

346
4,341
148

49
38
84
46

149
102

562
365

41
105
48
150

97
42
144
68

0


7 54
78 168
20 4C
162 282


89
354

162
793

70
163
181
273

23
65
86
110

0


58
213

74
468

16
196
27
494

103
494
103
811

0


330
357

397
1,048

55
216
63
432

20
167
20
258

0


1,883
935 f
3,916
18,925 m
19,925
35,921 M

18,394 0
224,065
41,801

3,946
4,577
9,376
10,594

4,368
10,788

8,276
27 373

3,321
27,153
7,736
22,130

4,248
8,121
7,608
21,121
201


. .











TABLE 3 (Continued).-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.




0 I 02IE
ACTIVITIES 0
0 |3 W I&
S Z 0 0 4 0 CO 0 1. >' 11414


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL
Admission to service.................. Al
Consultations with physicians......... A2
Field visits ..........................A3-9
Smallpox immunizations ............... A15
Diphtheria immunizations ............. A16-18
Typhoid fever immunizations ..........A19

VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
Admissions to medical service..........B
Clinic visits ....................... ...B3
Field visits.......................... B4

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
Individuals admitted to medical service. Cl
Individuals admitted to nursing service. C2
Clinic visits ................... .... C5
Nursing visits ......................C7-8

MATERNITY SERVICE
Cases admitted to medical service......D1-8
Cases admitted to nursing service...... D2-7-I10
Visits by anterpartum cases to medical
conferences.................... D3
Nursing visits ....................... D5-6-11-12

INFANT HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service.El
Individuals admitted to nursing service.E2
Visits to medical conferences......... .. E3
Nursing visits........................ E5-6

PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service. E8
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E9
Visits to medical conferences ..........E10
Nursing visits .......................E12-13
Inspections by dentists or dental
hvygienists .................... E14


9 41
5 71
36 110
443 2,464
922 491
1,301 1,673

345 155
2,900 2,262
459 261

172 26
158 78
236 42
1,110 199

99 59
164 182
227 115
475 373

107 57
273 123
194 118
578 267

107 186
256 210
193 476
1,034 411

64 1


17
2
27
181
314
1,588

48
807
35

0
17
0
30

0
18

0
43


439
63
695
1,714
1,877
6,562

1,079
12,807
2,466

192
433
68
1,871

355
418

772
1,018


45
12
88
1,073
1,162
269

643
9,271
988

154
327
177
723

321'
543

1,232
1,202


0 396 481
51 466 746
0 902 1,335
154 1,067 2,714

0 541 745
7 642 1,176
0 1,280 1,477
10 1,534 2,183

0 19 37


0
0
0
3,383
742
106

176
1,286
831

0
409
0
1,711


2
0
3

0
2
0
2

0


23
6
37
269
802
2,435


99
608
121

16
55
16
97

0
50

15
108

1
23
1
83

0
15
0
44

C


77
107
149
292
672
1,355

414
6,258
588


187 0 35
85 45 71
113 0 16
698 129 96


318
578

242
2,082

185
438
295
1,668

200
834
266
3,740

1


18 865
332 5,471
264 986


448
448
103
1,195

129
668

309
1,482


16 125
145 482
19 344
454 1,140

8 172
497 625
13 257
703 1,410

0 0


1,883
935
3,916
18,925
19,925
35,921

18,394
224,065
41,801

3,946
4,577
9,376
10,594

4,368
10,788

8,276
27373

3,321
27,153
7,736
22,130

4,248
8,121
7,608
21,121
204


2,700
1,207
5,343
30,196
28,306
52,980

22,308 O
266,242
48,869

5,176
6,703
10,147
18,453 B

5,682 "
13,606

11,264
34,835

4,693
29,918
10,948
30,276

6,211
12,407
11,574
32,221

326


I


,


:


r






TABLE 3 (Continued).-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.




.. E Si is TOTAL ANNUAL
ACTIVITIES 7= 5 I |is 1945
*5 S S5 6ag gaa g~~ Ss
? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ z C uu w o n S'i


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL
Admission to service ..................Al
Consultations with physicians..........A2
Field visits. ..........................A3-9
Smallpox immunizations .............. A15
Diphtheria immunizations ............ A16-18
Typhoid fever immunizations..........A19

VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL
Admissions to medical service.......... B
Clinic visits ......................... B3
Field visits .......................... B4

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
Individuals admitted to medical service. C1
Individuals admitted to nursing service. C2
Clinic visits ......................... C5
Nursing visits........................C7-8
MATERNITY SERVICE
Cases admitted to medical service ..... D 1-8
Cases admitted to nursing service......D2-7-10
Visits by anterpartum cases to medical
conferences .................... D3
Nursing visits........................D5-6-11-12

INFANT HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service.El
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E2
Visits to medical conferences...........E3
Nursing visits........................E5-6

PRESCHOOL HYGIENE
Individuals admitted to medical service.E8
Individuals admitted to nursing service. E9
Visits to medical conferences...........E10
Nursing visits........................E12-13
Inspections by dentists or dental
hygienists..................... .E14


~~~~~I~~~1 -- I---- --l--j--- ---


2,700
1,207
5,343
30,196
28,306
52,980

22,308
266,242
48,869

5,176
6,703
10,147
18,453

5,682
13,606
11,264
34,835

4,693
29,918
10,948
30,276

6,211
12,407
11,574
32,221
326


2,750
1,249
5,431
30,475
29,579
56,926

22,568
270,758
49,250

5,185
6,780
10,161
18,674

5,746
13,800

11,364
35,265

4,747
30,094
11,059
30,840

6,305
12,746
26,543
33,019

326













TABLE 3 (Continued).-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.


ACTIVITIES
0 I


SCHOOL HYGIENE
Inspections by physicians or nurses........ F1
Examination by physicians..............F2
Individuals admitted to nursing service.....F4
Nursing visits .................. ....... F5-6
Inspections by dentist or dental hygienists..F7
ADULT HYGIENE
Medical examinations................... G1-5
MORBIDITY SERVICE
Medical visits.......................... H3-4
Nursing visits...........................H5-6
Admissions to hospitals...................H7
GENERAL SANITATION
Approved individual water supplies
installed ................ ...... JI
Approved excreta disposal systems
installed...................... J2-3
Field visits...............................J4-11
PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
Food-handling establishments
registered for supervision............ K
Field visits to food handling estabs.........K2
Dairy farms registered for supervision...... K3
Field visits to dairy farms................ K4
Milk plants registered for supervision...... K5
Field visits to milk plants ...............K6
LABORATORY
Specimens examined ..................... -1-21


261
1,723
416
1,029
0

453

9
98
0


19
81
2,232


123
874
23
192
9
39


1,843
396
127
171
214

169


4,256
310
62
968
0


Fl


852
506
49
229
0


2,666
1,922
2,639
5,292
0


829 2721 181


71 0 93 2C
108 186 78 1
14 0 C


7
59
1,055


54
429
4
64
0
1


I 5.4581 4.786


1
205
2,452


306
603
15
112
11
18


0
18
608


50
443
4
47
2
14


8.3811 2.898


19
207
2,239


455
2,748
11
144
9
36

5.168


U


2,046
1,020
81
193
0

97


169,409
3,470
3,722
30,858
2,246

147


93 0
215 232
9 C


98

2,151
45,623


45 3,011
372 26,829
4 6S
117 1,881
5 3S
17 1,864


5,170
276
129
1,624
0


a


e:





3,790
0
376
781
228


210
1
339
345
314


1,297 8461 118 129


3
277
2


23
646
4,495


263
.838
0
0
0
0


39 0 32
126 251 115
0 0 30


52
554
2,269


249
2,031
79
456
7
181


153
158
702


84
533
1
1
0
0


2.2501134.7461 4.0051 22.8781 1.254


0




671
146
105
310
0


111
103
119
235
C

14

C
26
2




26


191,285
9.873
8 164
42,035 r
3,002

4,852

360
1,730
57


462
4,639
64,518


4,697 M
36,069
230
3,138
85
2,187

198,196


70
433
2,172


48
313
8
108
1
15

6.222


'~'~'~'~'~'~~~`~~~ '~'~~









TABLE 3 (Continued).-STATE OF FLORIDA-ANNUAL REPORT.





ACTIVITIES 8
0 a 5


SCHOOL HYGIENE
Inspections by physicians or nurses........ 1 1,661 0 278 12,657 455 747 231 3,579 23 1,180 1 191,285 212,097
Examination by physicians.............. 2 2 0 315 5,885 0 52 235 5 32 1,110 12 9,873 18,518 M
Individuals admitted to nursing service..... 4 8 0 23 1,372 46 88 34 413 86 11 483 8,164 10,728
Nursing visits........................... F5-6 625 0 134 3,417 71 136 71 555 176 18 820 42,035 48,058
Inspections by dentist or dental hygienists..F7 0 0 238 4,463 0 0 271 435 0 0 0 3,002 8,409 0
ADULT HYGIENE
Medical examinations ....................G-5 0 31 199 16,427 53 273 188 710 2,681 69 272 4,852 25,755 1.
MORBIDITY SERVICE
Medical visits...........................H3-4 0 0 0 87 1 1,051 454 47 69 344 870 360 3,283
Nursing visits........................... H5-6 119 0 0 689 69 1,059 50 358 57 319 591 1,730 5,041 W
Admissions to hospitals .................. H7 0 0 0 321 0 4 0 0 8 0 0 57 390
GENERAL SANITATION
Approved individual water supplies
installed .......................... J 42 0 0 1,113 14 10 28 11 76 2 50 462 1,808
Approved excreta disposal systems
installed.........................J2-3 82 0 50 1,891 118 178 151 128 262 33 45 4,639 7,577
Field visits ............................. J4-11 2,153 0 396 44,955 202 2,347 655 2,286 2,849 265 898 64,518 121,524
PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
Food-handling establishments
registered for supervision............ K 92 0 68 1,452 21 60 28 165 293 48 61 4,697 6,985
Field visits to food handling estabs.........K2 689 0 1,104 10,197 183 326 54 1,413 2,967 304 449 36,069 53,755
Dairy farms registered for supervision......K3 5 1 8 96 3 5 0 9 24 0 9 230 390
Field visits to dairy farms................ K4 18 1 68 1,608 18 34 0 109 184 4 84 3,138 5,266
Milk plants registered for supervision..... K5 2 0 29 0 2 0 7 6 0 0 85 131
Field visits to milk plants .................K6 2 0 1 691 0 19 0 46 59 0 19 2,187 3,024
LABORATORY
Specimensexamined..................... L-21 1,061 233 1,493 66,652 1,529 5,155 3,449 6,239 13,217 2,203 4,639 198,196304,066














TABLE 4.-SOME STATISTICS SHOWING GROWTH OF LOCAL HEALTH


ACTIVITIES


SCHOOL HYGIENE
Inspections by physicians or nurses........F
Examination by physicians ...............F2
Individuals admitted to nursing service..... F4
Nursing visits .......................F5-6
Inspections by dentist or dental hygienists..F7

ADULT HYGIENE
Medical examinations ................... 1-5

MORBIDITY SERVICE
Medical visits...........................H3-4
Nursing visits..........................H5-6
Admissions to hospitals. ................. .H7

GENERAL SANITATION
Approved individual water supplies
installed......................... J1
Approved excreta disposal systems
installed......................... J2-3
Field visits........... ........ ...... .....J4-11

PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
Food-handling establishments
registered for supervision........... K
Field visits to food handling estabs......... K2
Dairy farms registered for supervision...... K3
Field visits to dairy farms................. K4
Milk plants registered for supervision...... K5
Field visits to milk plants........... .......K6

LABORATORY
Specimens examined.....................Ll-21


1,635
292
95
1,494
1,095

892

67
58
0


22

121
1,118


100
346
2
11
4
9

4,146


I I .-~ -.- - .- -


4,778
375
258
699
15

639

176
80
5


32

31
1,003


42
368
1
20
1
7

2,496


0
0
0
8


2,339
0
32
45
0

7

0
113
3


V
55
6


1---- I-1-1 -


5.39E
646
265
3,722
24


1,552
2,387
800
1,760
366


491 1,644


325 1
1,026 151
349 4


4 70

55 796
608 3,486


75
671
C
1
C


1,834


240
1,256
1
13

4

5,699


15

198
1,341


199
658
3
8
1
4

7.941


C
17
C1
C
C

C

C
C



18

832
2,234


373
832
17
259
14
99


a

t0


5,798
201
1,194
3,792
38

522


0 16
9 2
0 152


5 71

123 186
707 1,485


3,41;
835
71
15(


20C

148
75
C


14

35
527


108
169
2
6
0
0


471
713
36
138
0

117


12,075
1,937
510
1,329
1,903

757


147 77
107 139
0 0


122

174
1,418


34
379
4
71
0
8


451

322
3,361


647
6,213
36
423
0
182


212,097
18,518
10,728
48,058
8,409

25,755

3,283
5,041
390


1,808

7,577
121524


6,985
53,755
390
5,266
131
3,024


1.9561 1.4101 3.2111 2.4161 3871 l1R1 6~lw4 Aef


250,017
25,921
14,035
61,322
11944 O

31,054

4,240
6,801
903


2,632

10,450
138,912
VI

8,956
65,421
461 1
6,145 M
166
3,384

347,348


' '


1,4101- 3-11 2 -11 35 11 816130 06(-ww ,-









HEALTH SERVICE IN COUNTY HEALTH UNITS FOR THE WAR



>
Sn ANNUAL TOTAL
ACTIVITIES o4 | 1945



SCHOOL HYGIENE
Inspections by physicians or nurses ....... I 859 705 669 0 0 0 0 250,017 252,250
Examination by physicians ............... F2 11 12 566 0 0 0 0 25,921 26,510
Individuals admitted to nursing service.....F4 17 17 135 0 0 0 0 14,035 14,204
Nursing visits......................... F5-6 119 23 492 0 0 0 0 61,322 61,956
Inspections by dentist or dental hygienists..F7 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 11,944 11,950
ADULT HYGIENE
Medical examinations ....................G1-5 137 19 123 0 0 0 0 31,054 31,333
MORBIDITY SERVICE
Medical visits ... ........................3-4 17 0 631 0 0 0 0 4,240 4,888 M
Nursing visits........................... H5-6 443 34 1,229 0 0 0 0 6,801 8,507 (O
Admissions to hospitals ...................H7 3 20 6 0 3 0 0 903 935 f
GENERAL SANITATION
Approved individual water supplies
installed..........................JI 3 62 47 0 0 1 0 2,632 2,745
Approved excreta disposal systems
installed ..........................J2-3 207 64 128 0 0 10 0 10,450 10,859
installed..........................J2-3 207 64 128 0 0 10 0 10,450 10,859
Field visits...........................J4-11 729 831 695 0 0 80 0 138,912 141,247
PROTECTION OF FOOD AND MILK
Food-handling establishments
registered for supervision............K1 58 26 66 12 0 33 0 8,956 9,151
Field visits to food handling estabs.........K2 141 116 440 12 0 37 0 65,421 66,167
Dairy farms registered for supervision......K3 1 4 23 0 0 0 0 461 489
Field visits to dairy farms................. K4 5 39 92 0 0 0 0 6,145 6,281
Milk plants registered for supervision...... KS 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 166 169
Field visits to milk plants .................K6 0 4 165 0 0 0 0 3,384 3,553
LABORATORY
Specimens examined..................... LI-21 1,700 1,225 2,329 30 15 0 0 347,348 352,647























YEARS. NO STATISTICS FOR THE HEALTH DISTRICTS ARE GIVEN AS THEY WERE ONLY RECENTLY ORGANIZED.


Number of Total Estimated Total No.
Year Organized County Per State Per Federal Per Total Per Population Number of of Coded
Counties Contribution Capita Contribution Capita Contribution Capita Budgets Capita Served Personnel Activities
1941 32 $215,128 29 $128,062 18 $185,621 26 $528,811 73 722,506 299 1,009,140
1942 34 319,218 38 201,805 23 238,441 28 759,464 89 845,554 274 1,663,348
1943 34 440,546 39 195,630 17 290,250 26 926,426 82 1,129,906 486 1,991,525
1944 36 692,467 51 209,341 16 265,750 20 1,167,558 87 1,334,810 643 1,867,460
1945 37 820,446 51 245,088 15t 277,301 17t 1,342,835 83 1,612,472 559 1,737,481*
*~aviel uai opeiu er r n o cooe ecroco nOtiso ciiis


0
0


vlany items cooaDie in previous years are not now coaaole, nence, reatcuon in ngltes on activities.
tThe State's contribution although increased, shows a per capital reduction due to a more rapid increase in number of persons served by local units.
Tbhe same applies to per capital Federal contributions.








PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING


RUTH E. METTINGER, R. N., Director

The Division of Public Health Nursing has made an effort to
coordinate the nursing service throughout the State by advising
and emphasizing the carrying out of a generalized nursing pro-
gram. Where infirmaries were established with the cooperation
of the Federal Public Housing Authority and the U. S. Public
Health Service the infirmary nurses were requested to cover an
area from home visiting, thus relieving the local health depart-
ment nurses. This, of course, was under the direction of the
local health officer and supervising nurse.
Prior to V-J day the scarcity of nurses was not felt so acutely,
inasmuch as the Division of Public Health Nursing had utilized
the services of nurses wishing to be near their husbands stationed
in the various Florida camps. In many instances these nurses
had had both experience and training in the field of public
health. With the subsequent separation of the men from the
service, these nurses returned to their former homes, leaving
many vacancies. Attempt has been made to fill them with those
being released from the military service. Upon investigation it
was learned that a large majority of these nurses are taking
advantage of the GI Bill of Rights in order to further their edu-
cations; others are being diverted to positions such as those of-
fered by the Veterans' Administration for which the compensa-
tion is greater than in public health positions.
On December 31, 1945, when the annual count of nurses was
made for the U. S. Public Health Service, there was a total of
288 nurses actually employed in the State (including those work-
ing in unorganized counties, with insurance companies and in-
dustries). This is an increase of 15 over the count made Decem-
ber 31, 1944. As of December 31, 1945, there were approximately
16 vacancies. Of the total number of nurses employed in the
county health departments, forty percent (40%o) had completed
their full courses at one of the universities offering the approved
course in public health nursing.
The Division of Public Health Nursing has assisted in de-
veloping the nursing programs in unorganized counties; has as-
sisted in securing nurses for the Rapid Treatment Centers and for
the U. S. Public Health Service Infirmeries which are under the
supervision of the State Board of Health; and also has given
advisory assistance to the American War Community Service
through the National Organization for Public Health Nursing
regarding the establishment of visiting nurse associations.
[86






PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING


Even though the scarcity of nurses has been acute, it has
been the aim and desire of this Division to maintain the same
standards for public health nursing. Unfortunately, State funds
were not available for scholarships, but nurses were advised to
take advantage of Bolton Act funds for this purpose. Five white
nurses and one colored nurse took advantage of this opportunity
and completed their full courses in public health nursing. For
specialized training the State Board of Health sent three nurses
for short courses in tuberculosis nursing and two nurses for
long courses in this particular phase of work.
Realizing the great need for field experience for nurses as-
signed to counties without supervision, a Training Center was
established in Gainesville under the direction of the Alachua
County Health Department. To this Center was assigned nurses
for special training for a period of two months, during which
time they were given lectures and field experience. Vander-
bilt University has taken advantage of the services of this Center
and during 1945 sent four of their students to Gainesville for
field training, giving them college credits. Two of these students
entered the armed forces and two remained in Florida with the
county health units.
This Division assisted the Bureau of Maternal and Child
Health in the establishment of a midwifery orientation program
in Tallahassee under the direction of the Leon County Health
Department. The State Midwife Consultant and the State Mid-
wife Teacher were signed to this unit to assist in the teaching
of the student midwives. The women were carefully selected for
this course by the county health units and investigated by the
State Consultants.
During 1945 the Director of the Division of Public Health
Nursing planned and conducted two staff conferences for the
supervising nurses of the county health units.
The reorganization of the State Board of Health handicapped
the Division of Public Health Nursing somewhat, as three of the
consultants were assigned to the newly-organized health districts.
Another consultant entered the Army Nurse Corps and one join-
ed the ranks of the U. S. Public Health Service. For several
months this left only two consultants in the State Office to cover
the organized county health units throughout the State. One of
these had been assigned to the Division by the U. S. Public
Health Service. In December another State Consultant was as-
signed to the Division by the U. S. Public Health Service.
At a meeting of State Directors of Public Health Nursing in
Atlanta called by the Public Health Nursing Consultant of the






88 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


District No. 4 office, representatives from seven states were in
attendance. The training of public health nurses was one of
the several subjects discussed and the directors were urged to
continue their service. Another subject was the employment of
nurses aides and war emergency nurses to offset partially the
shortage of nurses. The importance of a close working rela-
tionship of the nursing division with other divisions of the state
health department was emphasized.
The representatives from the District Office and the Chil-
dren's Bureau urged the development of bedside nursing serv-
ices. A discussion on this subject was led by the Director of
this Division, who reported for her state the development of
three new services of this nature, financed by the Community
Chests in their respective communities.
The Director was re-appointed Chairman of the State Nursing
Council for War Service, under which the U. S. Cadet Nurse
Corps and Procurement and Assignment Service operated, and
served until October when the State Nursing Council for War
Service voted upon the dissolution of this committee.
In January and February of 1945, one of the State Consultants
carried through two trainee-on-the-job institutes on the "Inte-
gration of Public Health into the School of Nursing."








HEALTH EDUCATION, 1945


ELSIE D. WITHEY, Director
RUTH STUART ALLEN, Acting Director

(The Director of Health Education, Mrs. Elsie D. Withey, resigned
her position on September 1, 1945, and Mrs. Ruth Stuart Allen, the
Publicity Consultant, was appointed acting director for the remainder
of the year. Mrs. Withey's report which follows covers the period
January-August, 1945.)
A major accomplishment of the Bureau of Health Education
in 1945 was its participation in the proposed Florida School-Com-
munity Health Education Projects to be financed by the W. K.
Kellogg Foundation. The director and others, including Dr. E.
Benton Salt, of the University of Florida and State Department
of Education, initiated steps for this project late in 1944 and com-
pleted them after Dr. Salt met with representatives of the Kel-
logg Foundation the first of the year.
The committee appointed to compile Florida's application to
the Kellogg Foundation planned that a directing committee
would be set up by the State Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion to include several representatives of the State Department,
approximately five bureau directors from the State Board of
Health, a representative of the Florida Medical Association, the
Florida Tuberculosis and Health Association, the University of
Florida, the Florida State College for Women, and others. Rep-
resentatives from every professional, officially voluntary or-
ganization in the state concerned with health were to serve on
a larger advisory committee.
From six to eight areas in the state, preferably community
areas rather than counties, were to be selected, wherein one school
and the community area served by the school would become a
"project" school-community group. Most important phase of the
project was to be the local planning committee, composed of
project school representatives, health department personnel, and
representatives from each local group or agency concerned with
health. The same type of project was outlined for Negroes.
The application listed the employment of a full-time consultant
trained in public health education and having wide experience,
a Negro assistant, and a secretary. The consultant's work would
be to organize pre-training programs for personnel concerned in
each area, to work with the state directing and advisory com-
mitees, with each local planning committee, and with the schools,
health departments and other agencies concerned at both the
state and local level.
The keynote of the entire project was cooperative action, based
[891






90 ANNUAL REPORT 1945


upon the belief that the schools can do little to solve health prob-
lems from within the school alone. The home and community
must be included in their efforts. It was also believed that
schools could do more effective health teaching if close relation-
ships existed with local health departments, thereby basing
school health teaching programs upon the same health problems
attacked by the health department. Community effort was held
to be essential, also; for without this cooperation certain health
problems cannot be solved.
Because the Florida program was based upon community
and state cooperation and because it was believed to be sound
and well worth trying, the Florida application was approved. Ap-
proximately $9,500 were deposited to the credit of the State
Department of Education by the Kellogg Foundation in March,
1945. At the present writing, however, efforts have failed to find
a consultant. As soon as such a person is employed, the project
will begin.

HEALTH EDUCATION ACTIVITIES
Seeing the impossibility of accomplishing worthwhile results
from merely combing the state, attempting futily to assist with
public health education in 67 counties with only one person doing
such work, the director concentrated efforts on several areas so
that results could be seen.
An important meeting was held early in January on this
question and included representatives of the Sloan Project in
Applied Economics of the University of Florida, the School Serv-
ice Bureau of the College of Education, and the Florida Tuber-
culosis and Health Association.
Those present decided:
1. That to determine what might be done by united action,
definite efforts should be made to work together on cer-
tain school and community areas.
2. That further meetings should be held to check on the
progress.
3. That a plan should be evolved by these experiences which
could serve as a guide for solving school health problems
anywhere in the state.
The procedure decided upon and followed was to visit the
county superintendent to determine the nature of his problem,
to present the plan of cooperation, and-if he desired-to present
this plan to every county principal at a school principals' meet-
ing; that they might select one or two schools willing to try out
the program during the remainder of the school year. In the







HEALTH EDUCATION


end, if it were successful the other schools in the county could
put the program in effect the next school year.
The first call came from Marion County where the East
Marion School decided that nutrition, tuberculosis and hook-
worm should be given major emphasis in an over-all school pro-
ject. Then followed the schools of Archer and Micanopy in Ala-
chua County, the schools of Prospect, Oneca and Samoset in
Marion County, and the Glen St. Mary School in Baker County.
It would take too long to describe all the steps, all the health
activities, that were parts of the projects as they evolved in the
schools. However, each grade had definite problems of its own
and outstanding was the degree to which home cooperation was
achieved. The evidences of active cooperation on the part of
all groups concerned-local, county and state-proved the values
of this method of attack. The full report of the projects is
described in Florida Health Notes, May and September, 1945.

TUBERCULOSIS EDUCATION
When the Division of Tuberculosis announced the first mass
x-ray examinations in Alachua County it was obvious that a
broad educational program was necessary. Early in June plans
were made for the educational program to precede and accom-
pany the mobile x-ray unit on its circuit throughout the county.
Besides using block leaders for filling out appointment blanks
and distributing leaflets, organizing Negro committees, inserting
leaflets in utility bills, and planning an intensive publicity pro-
gram with the local publicity chairman, several special methods
were employed which created favorable response:
1. Radio station hook-up at x-ray unit headquarters where
people were interviewed and asked to give their reactions
to the x-raying and broadcasts on the Farm and Home
Hour.
2. University Day held when all university students were
given chance for x-ray and were lead by the President of
the University.
3. Use of 35mm. trailer in motion picture houses throughout
the county. Film designed by the Bureau of Health Edu-
cation staff, but commercially proceeded, which urged
people to have x-rays made and listed the x-ray unit's
schedule.
4. Novel lapel tag stating "My chest's been X-rayed, has
yours?" given to all food handlers x-rayed and to prom-
inent members of civic clubs to wear during the campaign.






92 ANNUAL REPORT, 1945


EDUCATION MATERIALS
As the school and community projects progressed the need
became more apparent for adequate teaching materials of Flori-
da health problems. The health textbooks in use are good, but
as they are printed for national consumption, they do not give
adequate information about southern health problems. Teachers
know far too little about them and there is little, if anything, to
give boys and girls to read or study concerning these problems.
The director of the Sloan Project in Applied Economics, Mr.
Hazen Nutter, had funds which could be used to pay a writer to
write materials for housing education and since many health
problems are related to housing, Mr. Nutter was anxious to have
some good health-housing booklets produced. As the joint pro-
jects grew, it was finally decided that the Sloan Project employ
a writer to work on a story about hookworm for 5, 6, 7, and 8th
grade or above students.
After its first writing, the booklet was submitted to a large
number of persons for preview and criticism and in the course
of events was re-written three times. It had a very thorough
going-over by public health and educational authorities and em-
erged as a 48 page illustrated booklet on hookworm entitled
"Pineville High Meets the Chellenge."
It was planned to jointly publish "Pineville" and since the
printing of large numbers would lower the cost of single copies
it was desired to invite other southern state health department
to participate in the initial printing. The Mississippi State Health
Department ordered 1,000 copes as a result and ten thousand
copies in all were printed.
Efforts were made to secure orders at ten cents a copy from
county school superintendents so that they could supply their
own schools with the booklet. It was felt that the very process
of having school people consider the materials, weight and meas-
ure their needs in respect to hookworm education would be a
needed educational process for school administrators themselves.
The State Board of Health ordered 3,000 copies and these are
available free for use in schools where supervision can be given
to promote effective use of the booklet.
The same type of project is underway in respect to school
materials on typhus and tuberculosis, both of course related to
housing and both to be done by the same cooperative arrange-
ments. Their titles are "Roddy the Rat" (typhus) and "Jack's
Secret" (tuberculosis).
One new pamphlet was made up. Entitled "You Don't Want
Hookworm" it was a combination of two out-of-print pamphlets,






HEALTH EDUCATION


."Hookworm Disease" and "After Hookworm Treatment-What
To Eat and Why."
Much time was spent in previewing films. Out-moded films
were destroyed and more effective ones were purchased or
placed on order. Inventories were made and supplies were pro-
portioned so as to keep abreast of the demand.
Requests for educational materials on specific health problems
have been received from other bureaus and from local units far
in excess of the capacity of the bureau to produce them at the
time needed. All efforts were made to secure out-of-state mater-
ials available or usable on these problems. On several im-
portant health problems there are no materials available for
public health education in Florida and production of Florida
materials for local use is urgent in some cases. In addition to
the production of new materials, needs exist for the revision of
present materials, but the work of the bureau has so broadened
that much writing and editing has necessarily been disadvan-
tageously delayed.

PERSONNEL
It is hoped that the new vacant position of Health Education
Consultant can be filled as soon as possible. The position was
established in 1942 but was vacant in July, 1944, as a result of
the employee's promotion. The needs for and functions of a
health education consultant have been described in previous re-
ports.
Because health problems among the Negroes are so severe
and the racial group is in such urgent need of health education,
the director at the beginning of the year recommended the em-
ployment of at least two field workers in Negro health education.
One field worker was employed in the spring to work in the
northern part of the state with headquarters at Jacksonville and
another will be employed in September to work in the southern
part with headquarters at Tampa.

PUBLICITY CONSULTANT
Activities of the Publicity Consultant which were combined
with those of Acting Director in September represented the pro-
motional needs and actions of the central bureaus and divisions
as well as the local health units. All newspaper, magazine, radio
copy. and photographs for the central group were prepared and
released by the Consultant, while county health units were regu-
larly assisted with publicity, promotion and consulting services
in their local health programs.




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