• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Epidemiology
 Tuberculosis
 Venereal disease control
 Malaria control in war areas
 Local health service
 Public health nursing
 Dental health
 Maternal and child health
 Health education
 Sanitary engineering
 Finances and accounting
 Merit system council
 Narcotics
 Laboratories






Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00015
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000243
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Letter of transmittal
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
        Unnumbered ( 4 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Epidemiology
        Page 1
        Page 2
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    Tuberculosis
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Venereal disease control
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
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    Malaria control in war areas
        Page 92
        Page 93
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        Page 95
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    Local health service
        Page 107
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    Public health nursing
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Dental health
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Maternal and child health
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Health education
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
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    Sanitary engineering
        Page 157
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    Finances and accounting
        Page 181
        Page 182
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        Page 184
        Page 185
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    Merit system council
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Narcotics
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
    Laboratories
        Page 192
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Full Text




STATE OF FLORIDA




FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
of the
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1944




HENRY HANSON, M. D.
Florida State Health Officer


FG3r
t5 FLORIDA STATE BOARIb'.HgTH
JacksonvilleidMpr
6 .. 1946
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:^i~6 5;" ''




.i. ,VEt REFERENCE LIBR1Af~
i.,AD.ISN, VWISCONSIN


STATE OF FLORIDA'





FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
of the


STATE


BOARD OF HEALTH


FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1944





HENRY HANSON, M. D.
Florida State Health Officer


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
Jacksonville 1, Florida
1946


















His Excellency, MILLARD F. CALDWELL,
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida


SIR:


I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida State Board of
Health for the period January 1, 1944, to December 31, 1944, in-

clusive.


Respectfully submitted,

HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D.
President


Pensacola, Florida
September 1, 1945



















The Honorable HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Pensacola, Florida


DEAR DR. BRYANS:


I herewith submit the forty-fifth annual report of the Florida
State Board of Health for the year ending December 31, 1944.


Sincerely yours,

HENRY HANSON, M. D.
State Health Officer



Jacksonville, Florida
September 1, 1945
















TABLE OF CONTENTS


Epidemiology -----------

Tuberculosis ----------______....-

Venereal Disease Control ____

Malaria Control in War Areas -.-

Local Health Service ----

Public Health Nursing --

Dental Health __-..-----

Maternal and Child Health ---

Health Education -----

Sanitary Engineering ---

Finances and Accounting --

Merit System Council _---

Narcotics ... -------


Laboratories ----


1
- --- ---- 1

-------------------------- -- 70

------- 75

--.--.........----------- 92

--------107

--.----- 122

1--------26

1--------32

--- ---- 135

--------157

---- -----181

----------187

-..---.- ---- --- 189

-.-.----- ----- -- 192












EPIDEMIOLOGY

E. F. HOFFMAN, M.D., M.S.P.H., Director

PERSONNEL
The Bureau of Epidemiology continued under the direction of Dr.
E. F. Hoffman, during 1944. Scarcity of available personnel material
this year again made the employment of an assistant and student epi-
demiologist impossible. Reliance of epidemiological follow-up work
had to be placed with local Health Departments, many of which were
also short of personnel. Assistant collaborating epidemiologists were
appointed for all the counties of the State. A few of these appoint-
ments were not formally accepted. Epidemiological follow-up work
in the State leaves much to' be desired. It is felt that adequate epi-
demiological follow-up work will only be attained when sufficient,
adequately trained personnel is made available at the local level.

CENTRAL OFFICE ACTIVITIES
The clerical personnel of the central office is still inadequate. The
present staff consists of a senior stenographer, typist, junior clerk and
a part-time filing clerk. The services of an additional statistical clerk
and the services of a filing clerk full time are needed.
The typist sets up the files, checks all morbidity and carrier re-
ports for duplication, files these reports and types chronological lists
of all the morbidity reports; prepares each stencil for the weekly
morbidity report and assists with the typing load in general.
The junior clerk tabulates all morbidity reports from the county
assistant collaborating epidemiologists correcting duplication errors;
prepares weekly, monthly and annual morbidity reports from this
Bureau and the latter part of 1944 began punching all available data
for break-down on an I. B. M. punch card.
The health card detail, issuing biologicals, drugs and insulin is a
full-time job.

NEW RULES, REGULATIONS AND POLICIES
All physicians, hospitals, armed force stations and government
institutions were requested to send morbidity reports to this Bureau
through the county assistant collaborating epidemiologists. Although








2 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


this is being done by all the full-time organized counties and many of
the unorganized counties where clerical assistance is available, the
lack of clerical personnel in some of the counties, the rapid turnover
of untrained personnel, in the county health organizations, hospitals
and armed force stations has caused this reporting to be irregular at
times and frequently inaccurate and incomplete. All assistant col-
laborating epidemiologists were requested to keep a copy of each
individual morbidity report on file in their respective offices. Local
morbidity files were to be set-up for filing morbidity reports alpha-
betically by diseases by years. Though most of the organized coun-
ties and several of the counties without full-time County Health De-
partments now have such files many of them are still incomplete and
poorly kept.
All collaborating epidemiologists were requested by the' collabo-
rating State epidemiologist (State Health Officer) to send in daily
and weekly tabulated lists of morbidity and mortality on forms sup-
plied by this Bureau. The lists are being prepared for morbidity in
most of the counties having clerical service available. However,
very few reports are coming in as to the current mortality incidence
of reportable diseases. Many of the weekly reports are still in-
accurate and incomplete when received.
Although the epidemiologists were expected, with the assistance of
their personnel, to do an epidemiological investigation and report on
the special form for that purpose very few of these investigations were
recorded in some counties. Partly because of lack of trained person-
nel and partly due to the fact that the necessary forms could not be
made available, the reporting to this Bureau of the epidemiological
follow-up work has been very sporadic this year. A revised epidemi-
ological case record form for local use is being prepared which when
available should simplify the recording of the essential detail of the
necessary epidemiological follow-up visits.
Arrangements have now been made by the Bureau of Vital Statis-
tics with the Bureau df Local Health Service that the Health Officer
may upon request be appointed as registrar for the county in which
he directs public health work. This arrangement should make mor-
tality statistics more available for comparison with morbidity statistics
in planning subsequent public health programs.
No new rules or regulations were adopted during the year 1944.
Copies of an especially prepared 1940 edition of the official report








EPIDEMIOLOGY 3


of the American Public Health Association The Control of Communi-
cable Diseases, were distributed to' local Health Department personnel
and physicians to be used as a guide in the control of diseases in con-
junction with the communicable disease chapter of the Florida State
Sanitary Code. Thp communicable disease chapter of the Code has
been rewritten with the suggestion to rename it the Preventable
Disease Section of the Code. It has been recommended to the legisla-
tive committee that this chapter together with the current official
report of the American Public Health Association be enacted into
Florida law.
The incidence and follow-up visits on carriers throughout the
counties have been reported much better than previously but there
are still carriers which have not been reported consistently by some
of the counties.

REPORTING BY ARMED FORCE STATIONS
Due to the rapid turnover of service personnel the reporting in
general from the various armed force stations is somewhat spotty.
However, there is a marked improvement of the reporting by armed
force stations to this Bureau through the County Health Depart-
ments.

TABULATION AND ANALYSIS OF STATISTICAL DATA
County Health Departments each should now have available the
necessary statistical data on morbidity as well as mortality at the
close of each year. This material should be in such form as to facili-
tate the planning of future programs.
This Bureau is now working on a morbidity case summary I. B. M.
punch card which will serve to supply this Bureau with a complete
summary of all the data relative to the reporting and epidemiological
follow-up investigation of any case of reportable disease. These
forms should be available for use by the middle of the next calendar
year.

GRAPHS AND SPOT MAPS
Line graphs showing the weekly rise and fall of morbidity inci-
dence fo'r the year 1944 are included in this report under the sum-
mary statement of morbidity incidence for each dangerous commu-
nicable disease. Spot maps also accompany these graphs.








4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


HEALTH EDUCATION
Five thousand copies of the revised wall chart containing "Vital
Information Concerning the Prevention of Communicable Diseases"
were distributed to physicians, health departments, schools, colleges
and other interested persons inside and outside of the State.
The supply of the booklet on "Inf6rmation Concerning The Use
of Biological" was depleted. The booklet has been revised and a new
supply is in preparation. During the year the Bureau contributed
toward several newspaper releases on communicable diseases and
assisted the Bureau of Health Education in the preparation of edu-
cational materials.
A total of 29 individuals have enrolled in the University of Florida
Extension Course Epidemiology 1, Public Health. Of this number nine
have completed the course, five are over half way through the twenty-
four assignments and eleven are just beginning or about a third through
the course. Eleven of the enrollees have never turned in assignments
for one cause or another. Several have gone into military service or
have left the field of public health for better paying jobs.


HEALTH CERTIFICATION OF FOOD HANDLERS

Early in the year a committee was appointed consisting of one
representative from each of the State Boards and Commissions to de-
velop a health card application and certification forms acceptable to
all groups. Boards and Commissions concerned with health certifica-
tion, as required by law, who were represented in this group were:
the State Hotel Commission, State Department of Education, State
Board of Health, Barbers Sanitary Commission, State Board Beauty
Culture Examiners and Florida Board of Massage. After considerable
discussion at two meetings a set of forms, acceptable to the group,
was decided upon. These forms are now available for all manner of
health certification as required by State law or for any one else having
a definite need for health certification.
Although the frequent changes which were necessary at first in
developing the form, give cause for considerable confusion, yet much
interest has been shown by many of the private physicians in the use
of the accepted forms. It is felt that this form should be used, with-
out change, for a reasonable length of time to determine its practical
worth.








EPIDEMIOLOGY 5


A total of 18,385 health certificates were issued this year as com-
pared to 10,900 issued in 1943. The type of epidemiological follow-up
work in connection with the issuing of these cards has improved in
some of the counties. In other counties the Health Officers have shown
little interest in doing a good job of carrying out the real purpose of
the card, that of encouraging periodic check-up and of finding unrecog-
nized cases and carriers of intestinal infections, general diseases and
tuberculosis.


DISTRIBUTION OF INSULIN

Tables A and B show the general distribution and cost of insulin
for 1944. Since this work has been decentralized most of the counties
have kept accurate records of the insulin distributed. It is hoped
that those who failed to report for one reason or another will be
able to do better next year.


MEDICAL PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
Assistant collaborating epidemiologists were appointed in every
county in the State this year. In the absence of an organized Health
Department in some of the counties some one physician was appointed
to act in this capacity. Most of these men were too busy with the
general practice of medicine to give any time to epidemiological re-
porting, follow-up work and study. However, several of the general
practitioners, acting in this capacity, did try to initiate better reporting
from some of the unorganized counties. It is felt that some progress
was therefore made in initiating a more systematic procedure for re-
porting in these areas. Several of the unorganized counties, St. Johns,
Putnam, Indian River, Palm Beach, Manatee and Columbia, have made
an effort to develop year-round programs of immunization and hook-
worm treatment as part of a maternal, infant, pre-school and school
health service. In some of the clinics school health examinations are
also being done. These clinics have been financed for the most part
from State funds. Some of the counties employ a full-time or part-
time nurse.


ANTHRAX, BERIBERI, BOTULISM
No cases of anthrax, beriberi or botulism have been reported dur-
ing the last five years.










TABLE A.-REPOBT OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF INSULIN BY NUMBER OF VIALS, EACH STRENGTH AND TYPE, IS- '
SUED PER TOTAL NUMBER OF REQUESTS, AND TOTAL STOCK ISSUED EACH COUNTY UNIT BY THE
BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, 1944
Protamine Zinc Globin Plain Insulin
10 U 40 10 U 80 10 U 80 10 U 20 10 U 40 10 U 80


Counties S a 5 0 )
I I I, I I I g o a I5 | a 00.

TOTAL.........................................2,985 1,254 2.581 1,360 692 1,615 5 5 30 451 98 619 2,097 599 1,653 238 70 154
*Alachua ............... ..................151 48 117 31 17 43 .................................................. 10 24 7 55 77 17 50
Baker.........................9 40 2 8 .................... 38 19 40 2 1 8.. ...........5 1.6 6 13
*Bay .. ....... ................. .. ...- ... ..... .... ... ............... .... 9 ............ ... ...... 15 ........... ...........
*Bradford..... ............. .. 30 14 37 .......... ........ 5 ................ .. 5..... ....... ...... 5 8 5 15 ... .......
Brevard .............................. .. ............................................................................... ................ 5 1 ............ 9 11 ....................................... .
*Broward ...... .......... ... 9 2 16 .............. 5 .......... ........... 1 11 10 3 30........ ...
Charlotteun .. ............................................................................. ...... ....................... ........ ... ............ --.................. .......... ... -- .......... ...
Citrus.... ............................... 62 34 ........ ............ ...................... ... ............................. ........................... .............. 2
*Clay...................... ........ 26 8 31 31....... 11 40 .................... 5 ............ 5 25 8 31 ...................... 5
Collier ............................................ ............. ................. ................................... ............... ..................... .. ... ..... ............ ............ .. .......... .. ............ .... .
Collier..... ... ............... ........................................................ .......................... 29 11 ..........................................
Columbia................... 66 20 .......... 13 7 .............................. ....................... 29 11
*Dade....... 254 123 275 245 133 271 ....................... 5 6 3 16 42 20 66 .............
DeSoto....................................... 4 2 ..... ........ ... ...................................................... ...... ....... 234 43 ........ 69 12 ....
Dixie....
*Duvaal ...... ..........- .. ... 841 392 910 672 346 766 ............... ..... 10 143 21 168 311 102 360 .... .
*Escambia .. .. ........... 43 10 72 50 24 50 ........................................... 18 60 11 74 ............................
*Franklin..................... ...............2 28 7 2 ...7 .. 28.........6 1 25 ........... ............ 6
*Gadsden.......... .............. ..... 74 31 82 8 4 11 .......... .. .................. 12 6 27 58 13 64 ........ ......... 5
Gilchrist .................................... ........... ..... ...... .... .......... .... .......... .... .. ... ........ ....... ..... ...... ..... .......- ..
Glades ........................... ........... ................ ..... ..... ........................ ....... .. ... ........
Gulf ............................................... ................... ............ .... ............ ............ .......... ....................... .......... .. ............ ..... .... .......--
Hardee ..................................... 41 18 ....... 17 7 ..... ... .. ............ ..... ....... ............ ........... 2 1 22 6 ...........
Hernando..................................... 13 3 ............ ............ ............ ... ......................... .... ...... ....................... ..................

*Hillsborough *** ..... 15 6 35 17 9 27 ........ ........ .......... 6 2 6 48 17 78 ............... -
Holmes......... ............................. .........1 1 11 2 .........
Indian River................................ 18 9.................... ........... .....
*Jackson.................................... 3 2 7........ ........ 5 ... ......... .. ....
S*Jeferson ... ........... ...............80 3 82............... ............ .5 ....... .... ............. ..... .... 7
Lafayette................









TABLE A.-REPORT OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF INSULIN BY NUMBER OF VIALS, EACH STRENGTH AND TYPE, IS-
SUED PER TOTAL NUMBER OF REQUESTS, AND TOTAL STOCK ISSUED EACH COUNTY UNIT BY THE
BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, 1944.-(Continued)

Protamine Zinc Globin Plain Insulin
10U40 10 U80 10 U 80 10 U 20 10 U 40 10 U 80


Counties 1 I S 4 9
30 .A 3 .0 5 0 A 2 .0 .0


*Lake................. ......................... 44 19 50 ........................ 5 ............ ................. ...................... 8 26 10 37 ..... ...................
Lee.................................................. 25 12 ............ ............ ............ ... ............ ........... ........... ............. .. ..................... 2 1 ........... 7 3
*Leon ***..................... .........- .... 19 10 24 ...................... 6 ........... .............. ......... 12 6 22 22 10 26
*Levy............................. ..... 31 12 37 ......... ............ 5 ........... ......... ......... ............ ...... .... 5 2 1 10 ................................
Liberty............................. ............................ ....................................
*Madison...................................... 24 6 36 6 3 20 ....-....... ......... .......... 106 16 113 45 9 48 ........ ......... 10
M anatee................................................... ........... ............ ........... ........ .................................................................... ............ ............ ............
*Marion...................... .......... 72 23 63 30 10 32 .................................... ........................ 5 16 2 10.......
M artin................................................................................. ............ .......................................
*M onroe........................................ 48 30 69 ............ ............ 5 ............ ................................. ............ 5 3 2 13 ...............
*Nassau....... ................. 28 18 44 7 3 12 ................ ............................. ........... 5 9 4 16 ....................
*Okaloosa ......................... ..................... ........ 3 2 1 22 .................................... 4 1 10 82 20 96 ....... ..........
Okeechobee. .............................. .............. ............ ............................ ................. .............. .. ............... ....... .
*Orange ***............... ............ 155 73 163 119 58 133 5 6 10 23 7 55 130 57 151 58 28 79
Osceola.............................. .. ......... ......... ............ ........................ ............ ........... ............ ............ ....................
*Palm Beach (supplied x yr.)..... 182 79 100 .......... ............ 5 ........5 ............................ 23 7 8 2 2 2 ....................
Pasco..................................... 34 5 ............ ........................ .. ............ ........... ............ ............ ........................ 20 4 ..... .... .......................
*Pinellas................................ 95 36 100 ........................ 5 ..................... .......... ............... 15 ........................ 10 ...... ............
Polk............................................... 167 61 ............ 44 20 ............ ............ ............ ............ 23 4 ............ 384 93 ............ 4 3
Putnam ........ .......... .. .......... ........ 10 6 ............ 1 1 ............ .......... ....... ... ............ 9 1 .......... 50 14 ............ ...... .. .........
St. Johns........................................ .......... 38 8 ........ ......... .. ... ........... ............ ............ 31 11 ............ 30 9 ....... ......... .........
St. Lucie .................................. 79 ........ .79 17 ............... ......... .. ...... ........................ ..... 6 1 ......... ... .......... ........
*Santa Rosa.................................... 7 2 24 ............. .......... 10 ...................... ....................... ...10 ........ .. ........ 83 23
Sarasota... ...................... .. .......... 29 6 ............ ....................... ................. ........ .... ...................... ........... 3 1 .1 1........... 1
*Seminole............... ................... ............ 10 ...................... 5 .. ............................. 10 3 12 69 18 77 ..............
*Sumter............ ...................... 1 1 5 ........................ 5 .................................. ...........5 3 1.... ........1 5..... ......
Suwannee ............................ ..... 19 9 .....-.-..... ..---- ............. ............ ........................ 30 5 ... .................................
*Taylor *** ......... ..................... ............ ........... 9 4 1 8 ................ ......... ............ ... 0 1 1 15 ....................
*U union *** ...................................... ............ ............ 5 ............................ ... ................................................................... ......... .. .... .............................
*Volusia................................ ... 58 36 66 32 20 41 .......................1............. ... ........ 12 48 24 63.. ....
W akulla................................. ............ ....... ............................................ ..... ............ ............ .................... ................ ..... .... ..
Wakulla.................
*Walton..................................... 6 2 16 28 15 30 2.......... ....................... 6 2 14 56 15 70 .. ......
*W ashington................... ..... ..... 8 5 12 1 1 19 .................................... 1 1 5 20 8 28 ... .. ..........
*Units Distributing Insulin
***Do not have accurate reports



















TABLE B.-INSULIN PURCHASES-NUMBER OF VIALS OF EACH STRENGTH AND TYPE, AVERAGE PRICE PER
VIAL AND TOTAL EXPENDITURES, 1944

Retail Druggists Protamine Zinc Plain Insulin Globin Insulin Total Expenditure 0
Supplying Insulin -
10 U 40 10 U 80 10 U 20 10 U 40 10 U 80 10 U 80


Total Vials Purchased 3,000 1,450 525 2,000 50 47 $4,986.F50



Halliday's Apotherary 1,850 925 225 1,300 50 25
Jacksonville, Florida @$.63 @$1.20 @$.32 @$.55 @$1.10 @$1.34 $3,151.00




J. K. Attwood 1,150 525 300 700
Jacksonville, Florida @$.63 @$1.20 @$.32 @$.55 22 $1,835.50









EPIDEMIOLOGY 9


CANCER

There were 351 cases of cancer reported during 1944 as compared
to 429 cases in 1943 and 384 cases in 1942. The five-year mean de-
creased from 344 in 1943 to 310 in 1944. In 1943 a total of 2,032 resi-
dent deaths were reported for cancer. According to these figures
only about 15% of all actual cases of cancer are reported prior to
death. Early reporting of cancerous or suspected cancerous growths
would undoubtably lead to the establishment of better and more
prompt treatment facilities with a possible reduction in mortality. An
Act to promote the prevention and care of cancer is being introduced
into the 1945 Legislature. It is hoped that the enactment of such a
Bill into law will provide the much needed facilities for the reduction
of the high incidence of deaths due to this disease in Florida.
Statistical figures on the morbidity incidence of cancer will be
found in tables 6, 7, 8 and 9.



CONJUNCTIVITIS

A total of 40 cases of conjunctivitis were reported in 1944 as com-
pared to 15 cases in 1943. There is every reason to believe that this
disease is very incompletely reported.



TABLE C.-PELLAGRA (RECORDED) *DEATHS AND RATES PER 100,000
POPULATION BY COLOR AND BY COUNTIES-FLORIDA, 1917-1944

State Total White White Colored Colored
Year Population Deaths Rate Population Deaths Rate Population Deaths Rate
1943 1,911,998 36 1.9 1,394,138 18 1.3 517,865 18 3.5
1942 1,911,998 52 2.7 1,394,138 27 1.9 517,865 25 4.8
1941 1,911,998 63 3.3 1,394.133 29 2.1 517,865 34 6.6
1940 1,911,998 72 3.8 1,394,133 31 2.2 517,865 41 7.9
1939 1,853,660 75 4.0 1,345,558 35 2.6 508,102 40 7.9
1938 1,795,322 104 5.8 1,296,983 52 4.0 498,339 52 10.4
1937 1,736,984 103 5.9 1,248,408 39 3.1 488,576 64 13.1
1936 1,678,646 133 7.9 1,199,833 56 4.7 478,813 77 16.1
1935 1,620,308 181 11.2 1,151,258 59 5.1 469,050 122 26.0
1934 1,585,596 230 14.5 1,124,007 88 7.8 461,589 142 30.8
1933 1,554,000 193 12.4 1,103,000 69 6.3 451,000 124 27.5
1932 1,528,000 199 13.0 1,081,000 67 6.2 447,000 132 29.5
1931 1,506,000 220 14.6 1,064,000 66 6.2 442,000 154 34.8
1930 1,480,000 238 16.1 1,045,000 85 8.1 435,000 153 35.2
1929 1,431,645 313 21.9 1,006,324 104 10.3 425,321 209 49.1
1928 1,382,889 290 21.0 967,569 93 9.6 415,320 197 47.4
1927 1,334,134 220 16.5 928,814 104 11.2 405,320 116 28.6
1926 1,285,380 130 10.1 890,059 48 5.4 395,321 82 20.7
1925 1,236,625 135 10.1 851,304 45 5.3 385.321 80 20.8
1924 1,187,870 100 8.4 812,549 43 5.3 375,321 57 15.2
1923 1,139,114 91 8.0 773,794 34 4.4 365,320 57 15.6
1922 1,090,359 104 9.5 735,039 48 6.5 355,320 56 15.8
1921 1,041,604 129 12.4 696,285 46 6.6 345,319 83 24.0
1920 992,848 111 11.2 657,530 45 6.8 335,318 66 19.7
1919 957,353 113 11.8 628,135 52 8.3 329,218 61 18.5
1918 935,119 184 19.7 608,098 77 12.7 327,021 107 32.5
1917 912,886 218 23.9 588,062 105 17.9 324.824 113 34.8








10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CHICKENPOX
A total of 1,803 cases of chickenpox were reported in 1944. This
compares favorably with the 1,714 average for the past five years.
This disease, though for the most part very mild, does frequently cause
severe symptoms in previously unexposed adults.

DENGUE
Although Florida lies within the areas where dengue fever occurs
no case of this disease was reported in 1944. And although the mosquito
vectors capable to transmitting this disease are still prevalent, the
absence of a definite foci o'f infection precludes the frequent occur-
rence of this disease today.


INFANTILE DIARRHEA
In 1944 there were 28 cases of infantile diarrhea reported to this
Bureau as compared to 7 in 1941 when the reporting of this disease
began. In 1943 there were a total of 168 resident deaths due to diar-
rhea and enteritis in children under 2 years of age reported to' the
Bureau of Vital Statistics. These figures together with the assump-
tion that many more children must have diarrhea than actually die
from these diseases shows again that the reporting of infantile diar-
rhea to the Health Departments is woefully lax and that the County
Health Departments need to be on their toes to see that all cases of
infantile diarrheas as well as other communicable diseases are con-
sistently reported to the State Board of Health. Certainly if these
illnesses and deaths are occurring unbeknown to the local Health De-
partment personnel, such Health Departments cannot be considered
as functioning to the best interests and protection of the public health.
Little can therefore be expected from them in the way of reduction
of morbidity or mortality.


DIPHTHERIA
In 1944 there were 284 cases of diptheria reported as compared
to 243 in 1943 and 258 in 1942. The last six-year average of 253.1 cases
shows a 42.5% reduction in incidence of the disease over the previous
six-year average of 440.5 cases, almost 50%. Over the same period of
years there has been a comparable 50% decrease in morbidity incidence
of this disease, the death rate having decreased from 3.2 to 1.5 per
100,000 population.











EPIDEMIOLOGY 11


TABLE 1.-CASES OF DIPHTHERIA REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY
YEARS, 1935-1944, FLORIDA.


County 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Alachua............................... 1 1 5 2 2 2 2 5 3 7
Baker ...... .................... 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 5
Bay............ ......... 0 0 7 1 10 4 0 6 2 0
Bradford........................ 0 0 5 2 1 0 3 1 2 0
Brevard.................................. 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Broward......................... 3 14 4 9 5 5 3 7 3 0
Calhoun ........ ....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus................................ 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Clay ..... ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 25 0 3
Collier ........ ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia...... ................ 7 3 1 3 2 1 0 10 1 0
Dade ................... 65 33 51 24 26 10 9 16 6 11
DeSoto........................... 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie ........ ..... 0 0 142 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DuvaL .................................. 105 61 31 107 72 53 47 46 65 42
Escambia. .............................. 13 4 0 49 8 8 4 7 33 26
Flagler................. ............. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Franklin....... ......... 0 5 0 0 1 0 3 0 3
Gadsden .... ...... 1 1 0 1 6 1 5 12 3 4
Gilchrist -................ .......... 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 1
Glades............. ................... 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0
Gulf................. ................... 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 10
Hamilton ...................... 0 0 3 0 0 3 4 0 0
Hardee. ......... ...... ........ 1 1 5 2 1 4 9 1 0 3
Hendry.................................. 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Hernando............................... 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands ............... 3 3 8 4 6 3 7 7 8 3
Hillsboro .. ............... 101 46 79 128 54 46 33 18 29 37
Holmes................................. 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Indian River........................ 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 1
Jackson. ..............--..... 0 1 24 0 1 0 3 1 0 0
Jefferson............................... 0 0 0 0 1 2 4 4 2 0
Lafayette...... ................. 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake...... .... ........... 1 1 6 1 2 4 0 3 4 10
Lee..... ....... ..... 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 4 0 0
Leon...................................... 0 2 1 4 3 7 2 6 5 13
Levy........................... .. 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1
Liberty........... .........0. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison.............. ... 1 1 4 2 0 0 0 0 0
Manatee........................ 0 5 9 7 2 0 3 1 1 31
Martin. .................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Marion......................... 2 1 13 6 0 6 0 1 1 7
Monroe...........................- 0 4 9 1 3 1 0 6 3 0
Nassau................................ 1 0 0 4 0 0 4 0 2 2
Okaloosa..................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 9 4
Okeechobee. ........... ........ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Orange........ .......... 19 29 39 11 17 17 9 2 6 3
Oseola........... .......... ......... 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 0
Palm Beach.................... 8 18 18 6 2 1 1 4 0 2
Pasco.......................... ...... 3 4 1 0 2 1 0 6 2 3
Pinellas............. ......... 27 6 39 31 11 8 9 9 4
Polk.......................... 28 22 26 41 17 16 16 20 5
Putnam.................................. 6 1 3 7 1 0 1 0 0 0
St. Johns ............................... 4 5 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0
St. Lucie........................ 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Santa Rosa..................... 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 7 5 4
Sarasota ..... ............ 4 9 11 6 3 6 4 6 0 2
Seminole................... 7 6 0 0 0 0 2 2 6
Sumter......... ........ 4 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
Suwannee......... .... 3 2 5 0 0 1 1 0 1 2
Taylor.. ......... ...... 1 1 5 3 0 1 2 5 1 3
Union.. .................0 1 4 2 0 0 0 4 0 0
Volusi.................... 2 9 17 10 26 5 7 14 12 3
Wakulla.. ........ ....... 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0
Walton...................... 0 1 0 1 0 0 4 17
Washington.... ........... 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2

TOTAL................. .... 425 309 615 490 299 223 212 268 243 2844








12 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


A total of 42 deaths occurred in 1943; 34 of these were white chil-.
dren and 8 colored. Eighty percent of these occurred in children un-
der four years of age. Again if we wish to wipe out entirely the
deaths due to diphtheria we must put emphasis on the immunization
of the infant and preschool children.


TABLE 2.-NUMBER OF CASES OF SCARLET FEVER, WHOOPING COUGH,
DIPHTHERIA AND MEASLES REPORTED IN FLORIDA-
1935-1944 INCLUSIVE

SCARLET WHOOPING DIPHTHERIA MEASLES
FEVER COUGH
1944 466 981 384 5,201
1943 365 1,134 243 1,483
1942 281 828 258 4,250
1941 205 747 212 11,261
1940 270 383 223 2,305
1989 398 1,124 277 2,716
1938 352 876 456 9,149
1937 377 504 609 635
1936 299 383 309 807
1935 273 532 426 1,176
Total 3,296 7,492 3,397 38,483



DYSENTERY

A total of 603 cases of dysentery were reported in 1944 as com-
pared to the total of 16 cases reported 14 years ago in 1931. The 1944
incidence shows that not only is the disease better reported but that its
occurrence is on the increase.


AMEBIC DYSENTERY

A total of 104 cases of amebic dysentery was reported in 1944.
Twenty-eight of these were reported from Gadsden County, most of
them being cases which occurred at the State Hospital for the Insane
at Chattahoochee. It should be noted that the reported incidence
of this disease generally is increasing.


BACILLARY DYSENTERY

It should be noted that a total of 491 cases of this group of infec-
tions was reported for 1944 as compared to 47 cases in 1942, showing
a marked increase. A total of 34 deaths due to dysentery (all types)
was reported in 1944 as compared to 29 deaths in 1940.









EPIDEMIOLOGY 13


BACILLARY DYSENTERY OUTBREAK, FLORIDA COLLEGE
FOR WOMEN, TALLAHASSEE

On March 13, 1944, an outbreak of dysentery occurred at the Flor-
ida State College for Women. This outbreak involved almost exclu-
sively the 2,000 students enrolled at the college. A total of 562 per-
sons reporting ill to the student infirmary were observed from the
onset of the outbreak until the last case was reported on March 27,
1944. A clinical diagnosis of bacillary dysentery was made on 487
of the cases. Only 454 of which were found to have had contact with
the suspected vehicle, meat loaf and cheese loaf. There were no deaths.
It was concluded that the foods were contaminated in preparation by
food handlers employed in the college laboratory. Dr. Paul J. Cough-
lin, P.A. Surgeon (R.)U.S.P.H.S., director of the Leon County Health
Unit, who investigated the cases made the following narrative report
on 2/3/45 to the State Board of Health:
"Two foodhandlers had symptoms four days before onset of outbreak. Both
had positive stools for Flexner bacilli; one was refractory to two courses of
sulfaguanidine but responded to the third. Both worked on the above men-
tioned food which was eaten by practically all the students affected. When
these were removed from work the outbreak subsided except for sporadic cases
which could very easily be attributed to cross contamination from other stu-
dents as all the cases could not be isolated effectively as the infirmary only held
80 students at one time."


TABLE 3.-TOTAL MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY INCIDENCE FOR
DYSENTERY, POLIOMYELITIS AND TYPHOID FOR THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, 1940-1944

Dysentery (all types) Poliomyelitis Typhoid Fever
Year Cases Deaths Cases Deaths Cases Deaths
1944 603 34 108 17 95 15
1943 336 38 28 7 68 17
1942 73 37 43 56 196 26
1941 57 34 263 17 106 26
1940 44 29 33 7 109 23
Totals 1,113 172 475 104 574 107



INFLUENZA

A total of 727 cases of influenza were reported for 1944 as com-
pared to 782 cases reported in 1943 and 227 cases in 1942. The 1944
cases for the most part occurred during the first three months of the
year and may be considered as the continuation of the moderate epi-
demic having its seasonal onset in October of 1943.










14 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944











CASES OF DIPTHERIA PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


S NONE REPORTED
1 0.0 TO 10.0
BEE 10.0 TO 40.00
M 40.0 & ABOVE


0


Map 1










EPIDEMIOLOGY 15


Graph 1.
Diphtheria Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.










16 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF DYSENTERY PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


I NONE REPORTED
1 0.0 TO 10.0
10.0 TO 40.00
- 400 & ABOVE


Map 2









EPIDEMIOLOGY 17


Graph 2.
Dysentery Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.










18 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 4.-MORBIDITY INCIDENCE OF DYSENTERY BY COUNTIES FOR
FLORIDA 1935-1944.

County. .......................... 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Alachua ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Baker................................ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 8
Bay.................................. 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 4 0
Bradford ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14
Brevard ................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
Broward......................... .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Calhoun .......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte ...... ........... 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus.................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clay................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5
Collier. ....... ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia ............... 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Dade........................... 7 20 28 14 13 14 8 7 151 11
DeSoto................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixi............. ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duva............................... 0 5 12 31 4 7 3 15 9 7
Escambia ............................. 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0
Flagler................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin................... .... 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 1 1
Gadsden........ ........... .. 0 0 0 0 36 18 25 15 100 28
Gilchrist............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Gulf............................. 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 4
Hamilton....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Hardee.............................. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hendry.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hernando....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands.... .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Hillsborogh.................. 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 8 9
Holmes...... ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Indian River ... ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jackson................_............. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3
Jefferson........ ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lafayette.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake ..... ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 5 2
Lee ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leon ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 473
Levy... ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Liberty............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison......................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manatee................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Marion......................... 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Martin........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Monroe.... ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Nassau ............. ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0
Okaloosa........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Okeechobee............. ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Orange .................. ........ 4 0 0 0 2 0 11 1 6 3
Osceola ....... ........... O0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Palm Beach...................... 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 4
Paco ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Pinellasa ...................... 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 0
Polk ......................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3
Putnam............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
St. Johns........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
St. Lucie.._.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Santa Rosa........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota........................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0
Seminole............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Sumter ........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SuWannee............. ......... 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Taylor ................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Union............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Volusia ................................. 1 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 4
Wakulla .............................. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Walton..... ............. 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 11
Washington ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAL................ 19 30 45 67 59 44 57 70 312 603








EPIDEMIOLOGY 19


INFECTIOUS JAUNDICE
A total of 36 cases of infectious jaundice were reported in 1944
as compared to 27 in 1943 when reporting on this disease began. There
is reason to believe that many cases of this disease are still not reported.

LEPROSY
Three new cases of leprosy were reported and committed to the
leprosarium at Carville, Louisiana. Modern methods of treatment of
leprosy have made it possible for several cases of leprosy to be re-
leased or paroled from the leprosarium as noninfectious. The State
Board of Health requires that these individuals be considered as po-
tential carriers; that they be kept under surveillance and are checked
every three months for reoccurrence of infectious open lesions.

MALARIA
A total of 522 cases of malaria were reported in 1944 as compared
to 119 cases in 1943. Of this total of 522 cases, 496 were recurrent
cases in armed service personnel, most of which had their initial at-
tacks of the infection while serving abroad. Only 26 of the total were
reported as new cases of malaria infection.

MEASLES
A total of 5,201 cases of measles were reported for 1944 showing
an epidemic year of milder severity as compared to the 11,261 cases
reported four years ago in 1941; 9,149 cases four years prior to that
in 1938, and 8,115 cases reported four years prior to 1938 in 1934.
It appears from these figures that there is a cyclic increase in the num-
ber of cases reported every four years, which can most probably be
accounted for on the basis of exposure of new crops of preschool
children, not previously exposed to older brothers and sisters suffer-
ing from the disease.
There were 17 deaths from measles in 1944, 11 white children and
6 colored. The death rate for measles has decreased from 6.9 in
1934, when there were 110 deaths due to' measles, to 0.9 in 1944.
Arrangements were made to make immune serum globulin avail-
able from the American Red Cross through the State Board of Health
at cost. However, the Board had no funds to make this serum avail-
able to the local Health Departments. Local Health Departments were
therefore requested to cover the cost of the material. As a result few










20 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF MENINGITIS PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


* I NONE REPORTED

0m0mTO 100

10oo TO 4000

40 0 & AOVt


Map 3










EPIDEMIOLOGY 21


Graph 3.
Meningitis Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.








22 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


requests for immune serum globulin were received by the Bu-
reau of Epidemiology during 1944. It is hoped that State funds for
the purchase of such material will be made available in the 1945
budget. The deaths as well as innumerable complications caused by
measles each year could be prevented through the use of immune
globulin serum, if given at the time of exposure.

MENINGITIS
A total of 258 cases of epidemic meningitis were reported in 1944
and 252 cases in 1943. This is a considerable increase in incidence
over the five previous years. This increase may be attributed to the
large numbers of service men being channeled through the numerous
armed service training stations set up in the State. The majority of
the cases repoYted were reported from these stations during the first
four months of the year, the peak of incidence occurring during Feb-
!ruary. There were 45 deaths due to cerebrospinal meningitis in 1944.
Two deaths due to a severe fulminating type of meningitis occurred
in two teen-age school children in the western part of the State. Death
took place in both cases within 14 hours of the onset of the illness.

MYCOSIS
One case of mycosis actinomycosiss) was reported for the year 1944
as compared to no cases reported in 1943. A total of seven deaths due
to mycoses in general were reported to the Bureau of Vital Statistics
in 1944 showing again a lag in morbidity reporting.

PARATYPHOID FEVER AND SALMONELLOSIS
A total of 33 cases of salmonellosis including paratyphoid fever
were reported in 1944. Many more laboratory reports positive for
salmonella were reported, some of which were reported as carriers.

FOOD POISONING OUTBREAK DUE TO SALMONELLA AT A
RESTAURANT IN DADE COUNTY
An outbreak of food poisoning was reported from Dade County,
Florida, by Dr. T. E. Cato, director of the Dade County Health De-
partment, on February 13, 1945. The outbreak was reported as hav-
ing had its onset the previous year beginning on May 20, 1944, and
ending on the date of onset of the last case May 21, 1944. Seventy
cases were reported with no deaths. No epidemiological records were











EPIDEMIOLOGY


made but positive stool cultures were reported from the Branch State
Laboratory at Miami. Dr. Cato's narrative report was given as
follows:

"This outbreak of food poisoning was very interesting and very unusual in
that dill pickles were determined to be the vehicle for transmitting the causative
organism, salmonella sendai. So far as I know, this is the first case of food
poisoning that has been attributed to pickles and while salmonella sendai was
first isolated in 1925 from cases of enteric fever in Japan, it seems that few
cases of food poisoning have been traced to this particular organism.

"Epidemiological investigation revealed that the pickles was the only food
common to all of the cases. The restaurant in question has the most modern
equipment and refrigeration and at the time of the food poisoning, everything
was in excellent condition. Samples of all foods that possibly could have been
the source were examined bacteriologically but none were found to contain the
organism except the dill pickles and a sample of the brine from the barrel which
contained pickles. It is not clear how the pickles became contaminated, whether
by repeated handling in the process of removing pickles from the barrel by a
carrier or, as seems much more probable, by fecal contamination of the pickles
or of the barrel before the pickles were placed in the barrel.

"Stool cultures were taken from 35 persons employed in this restaurant and
11 of them showed positive for salmonella sendai. It is felt that all 11 of
these persons, however, received their infection from the pickles and were not
the source of the infection. All 11 of the food handlers were stopped from
handling food until repeated stool examinations showed them to be free from the
infecting organism. Most of the 11 cleared up promptly but one case continued
to discharge the organism for a number of weeks."



TABLE D.-TYPE AND NUMBER OF CARRIERS BY COUNTIES FOR

THE STATE OF FLORIDA-BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY-1944.


Diphtheria Giardia Dysentery Dysentery Typhoid Tubercle
County Bacilli Lamblia Bacillary Amebic Bacilli Salmonella Bacilli
Alachua ....... ................ ... ... ...... ......... ...............
Baker........... ................ ............ ........1 ................ 2
Bay...... .... ............ ....... 4 ........... ............. ................ .....
Brador ...... ............... ............ ............ 10 .... ...... 0....... ..... -.- ......-..
C itrus ...... ................ ........... ............ ............ 1 ................ ............
Clay: ............. .............. ....... .................... 1 .............. ...........
Dade........... ................ ........... .......... .. ............ 3 ......... ..... ............
De Soto........ ............... ............ ........... .. ........ ............
Duva ........ 11 ............ .... ....... 1 1 ...........
Esambia..... 11 .........- ...... 1 1 .............. -........
Franklin. .. ................ ....... .... ............ 3 1 7 ............
Gadsden. .. ............. ........... ............ ......... 1 1 .......
G ulf............. .... ........... ............ ........... ....... ....1 ........ ............
Highlands .. 3 ............ ........ ................... ...........
Hillsborough ............ .. ............ ........ 4 ........... ..........
Jefferson..... 2 ........... .......... ........... .. ....... ............... ..........
Lake ......... ............... .. .... 1 1 4 12 .........
Lee ............. ................ ............ ............ ................ ...........
Liberty......... ............ ....... ..... ..... ............ 1 ............. ........
LibOrange .......... ........... ............ .. ........ 1 ................ ............
OPalm Beah... 1 ........ ......... ........ 1 ..........
Paseo .......... .............. .......... .......... ........ . 1.......... .........
Polk.............. 1 ........... ............. .......... 1 ....... ....... ........
Santa o2 ........... ..... ............ ................ ........
St Johns ...... .............. ............ ............ ............ 2 ........ ..... ...........
Taylor .......... ....................... .. ........... ....... .... .... ......... .. 1.... ..........
Volusia ...... 3 5 1 7 6 9 1
W alton_ ... .. ......... ....... ...... 1 ................
Total............ 34 5 7 22 45 32 3










24 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF TYPHOID FEVER PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


S NONE REPORTED
oo 1 00 TO 100
10 0 TO 40 00
- 40.0 i ABOVE


0


Map 4










EPIDEMIOLOGY 25


Graph 4.
Typhoid Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.








26 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


PNEUMONIA
A total of 1,617 cases of pneumonia were reported for 1944. Of
this number 362 were reported as broncho pneumonia, 479 as lobar
pneumonia and 776 as atypical pneumonia. The majority of pneu-
monia cases occurred in the personnel of the armed forces stationed
or channeled through the war-time training stations of this State.

POLIOMYELITIS
A total of 108 cases of poliomyelitis were reported for 1944 as
compared to 28 in 1943. This shows a slight increase over the five-
year mean which was 95 cases for the year 1940-1944 inclusive. A
large number of these cases occurred in the families of service men
which may account for some of the increased incidence for the year.
There undoubtably were also more contacts by travelers to and from
Florida to cases in the nearby Southern States where poliomyelitis
was particularly prevalent during the year.

PSITTACOSIS
No cases of psittacosis in the human or psittacine birds were re-
ported during 1944. Several requests were received and granted for
permission to carry psittacine birds out of the State. All requests for
the importation of psittacine birds were refused.

PUERPERAL SEPSIS
Only two cases of puerperal sepsis were reported for 1944, whereas
a total of 30 deaths due to puerperal sepsis were reported to the Bu-
reau of Vital Statistics. Much better and earlier reporting of this
disease is indicated if these deaths are to be prevented.

TYPHUS FEVER
The cases of endemic typhus fever reported to the State Board of
Health are listed by counties and by years in the accompanying tables.
It will be noted in Table 14, Morbidity Incidence of Endemic Ty-
phus By Counties, By Years, For the Ten Year Period 1935-1944, that
the total number of reported cases for Florida for this period is 1,858
and that the number increased from 27 cases reported in 1935 to 484
cases for the year 1944. This is practically an eighteen-fold increase
in cases during the ten-year period. There has been a steady rise
in the reported incidence of the disease since 1940, the most marked








EPIDEMIOLOGY 27


of which was in 1944 when the reported cases exceeded those for 1943
by 170 cases.
Endemic typhus fever has appeared in all sections of the State
having been reported from 59 of the 67 Florida counties in one or
more of the years 1935-1944. These figures while striking in them-
selves do not tell the full story as many cases of endemic typhus fever
are not reported and obviously the incidence of the disease is con-
siderably higher than the figures indicate.

This disease has assumed serious proportions in some areas of the
State. There were 150 deaths recorded during the ten-year period of
which 119 were white and 31 colored. The ratio of deaths to cases
is approximately eight percent, which indicates the disease is above
average severity in Florida.
Since the rat is the reservoir of the infection and the rat-flea the
vector, the necessity for more vigorous and extensive rat control
measures is obvious if the spread of endemic and other of the rat-
borne diseases is to be controlled.

SCARLET FEVER
A total of 416 cases of scarlet fever were reported in 1944 as
compared to 306 in 1943 and 281 cases in 1942. There was one death,
one white and no colored reported in 1944.

SEPTIC SORE THROAT
A total of 112 cases of septic sore throat were reported in 1944.

SMALLPOX
Only one case of smallpox was reported during 1944. This case
was never verified by this Bureau. A total of 28,553 smallpox vac-
cinations were reported for Florida in 1944 as compared to 32,068 in
1943.

TYPHOID
A total of 95 cases of typhoid fever were reported in 1944 as com-
pared to 68 in 1943 and a five-year mean (1940-44) of 122 cases. A
total of 46,725 typhoid immunizations were done in 1944 as compared
to 51,762 in 1945.









28 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF PNEUMONIA PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


I I NONE REPORTED
GI 0.0 TO o00
I 100 TO 4000
400 & ABOVE


Map 5


~..4"
~:i~iP









EPIDEMIOLOGY 29


Graph 5.
Pneumonia Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.











SO ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF TYPHUS FEVER PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


NONE REPORTED

11| 0.0 TO 10.0

10.0 TO 40.0

40.0 & ABOVE
KNOWN CASES
NOT REPORTED
OFFICIALLY
0.0 TO 100


0


Map 6









EPIDEMIOLOGY 31


Graph 6.
Typhus Fever Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.










TABLE 5.-MORBIDITY INCIDENCE OF ENDEMIC TYPHUS BY COUNTIES, BY YEARS, FOR THE TEN YEAR PERIOD -
1935-1944 FOR FLORIDA


Year





Totals
1944
1943
1942
1941
1940
1939
1938
1937
1936
1935





Year


State
Totals




1,858
484
314
313
196
111
152
75
131
55
27





State
Totals


0
V d M
S


.2 1
.a a


9 7 5 1 1 10 0 1 18 2 43 40229 6 1 67 282 421 951 21 2381 0 0 10 61 1 914612071 8 3123


r
Q 0 >


Totals 1,858 5 3 26 14 34 5 1 12 7 26 0 2 27 2 0 79 10 10 12 2 98 10 20 8 0 11 16 9 7 14 40 8 81 1 18 4
S.-.-------------- -- --------0------------ --
1944 484 1 0 8 2 9 11 0 0 211 0 114 2 019 0 5 3 0 25 4 0 1 0 3 4 5 1 3 7 0 20 0 15 0
1943 314 0 1 6 2 7 0 2 0 9 0 1 5 0 0 17 0 1 1 8 1 0 2 0 7 0 2 1 1 4 0 8 0 2 4
1942 313 4 0 4 3 4 1 0 6 3 1 0 0 3 0 0 14 0 2 1 1 1 1 17 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 026 1 1 0
1941 196 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 4 013 1 1 0 0 0 4 1 1 1 0 013 0 0 0
1940 111 01 6 3 0 0 00 1 0 0 1 0 0 10 0 0 2012 2 020 0 1 000 3 0 80 00
1939 152 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 0 0 7 7 0 1 0 15 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2 6 7 1 0 0 0
1938 75 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0
1937 131 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 4 0 2 1 0 0 0 3 1 9 1 4 0 0 0
1936 55 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0
1935 27 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0







EPIDEMIOLOGY 33


UNDULANT FEVER
A total of 30 cases of undulant fever were reported in 1944 as
compared to 36 in 1943. There is reason to believe that undulant
fever is very casually reported in Florida. There was one death
due to undulant fever reported in 1944.

WHOOPING COUGH
A total of 981 cases of whooping cough were reported in 1944
as compared to 1,134 cases in 1943 and 828 cases in 1942. The last
five years show a mean of 814 cases. There were 48 deaths reported
as being due to whooping cough in 1944. Of this number of deaths
20 were white children and 28 colored. The death rate for whooping
cough has increased in the last five years (1939-1943) from 3.2 to 3.6
per 100,000 population. This Bureau has, through funds made avail-
able by the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health, provided pertussis
vaccine upon request of any private or clinic physician for free dis-
tribution and administration to the susceptible age group of the child
population. Request for this material during 1944 show an increased
effort in the immunization of children against whooping cough.

INTESTINAL PARASITES
Hookworm: A total of 6,547 cases of hookworm were reported
for 1944 which is slightly less than the 6,887 reported in 1943. Al-
though these figures are lower than in the years just previous, the
figures are undoubtedly more nearly correct as each card has been
checked for duplication, whereas previously one or more duplicate
cards on the same case was frequently counted. Most of these cases
are being treated. A total of 11,800 hookworm treatments were given.
Other Infestations: Other intestinal parasite infestations re-
ported for 1944 were giardiasis, 210; ascariasis, 623; oxyuriasis, 74;
trichuriasis, 59, and teniasis, 13.









34 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 6.-DEATHS FROM WHOOPING COUGH BY AGE INTERVALS,
FLORIDA 1935-1944.


AGE INTERVAL
Year Total
All Ages

-1 1 2 3 4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
1944 48 29 11 3 4 1 0 0 0 0 0
1943 69 50 10 7 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
1942 48 30 11 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
1941 38 28 5 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0
1940 39 29 2 5 1 0 1 0 0 0 1
1939 60 43 12 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 68* 45 15 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
1937 59 38 10 3 1 2 2 1 1 0 1
1936 25 14 8 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
1935 59 38 16 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0
Total 513 344 100 33 11 6 10 3 1 1 3

Rate% 67.0 19.4 7.4 2.0 1.1 1.9 0.5 0.1 0.1 0.5

*Age unknown for one death.
TABLE 7.-DEATH RATES (DEATHS PER 100,000) FROM MEASLES, DIPH-
THERIA, WHOOPING COUGH, AND SCARLET FEVER,
UNITED STATES AND FLORIDA--1935-1944.

Measles Diphtheria Wh. Cough Scar. Fever
Year
U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla.
1944 0.9 2.2 2.5 0.1
1943 1.0 0.4 0.9 1.4 2.5 3.6 0.3 0.2
1942 1.0 2.9 1.0 1.5 1.9 2.5 0.8 0.2
1941 1.7 0.9 1.0 1.2 2.8 2.0 0.8 0.1
1940 0.5 0.4 1.1 1.5 2.2 2.0 0.5 0.1
1939 0.9 0.8 1.5 1.8 2.3 3.2 0.7 0.3
1938 2.5 1.7 2.0 1.8 3.7 3.8 0.9 0.2
1937 1.2 0.3 2.0 3.2 3.9 3.4 1.4 0.1
1936 1.0 0.4 2.4 3.4 2.1 1.5 1.9 0.1
1935 3.1 2.1 3.1 3.6 3.7 3.6 2.1 0.1

TABLE 8.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES (DEATHS PER 100,000) BY
COLOR FROM MEASLES, DIPHTHERIA, WHOOPING COUGH,
AND SCARLET FEVER, FLORIDA-1935-1944.

Measles Diphtheria
Year Deaths Rates Deaths Rates

T W C T W C T W C T W C
1944 17 11 6 0.9 0.8 1.2 42 34 8 2.2 2.4 1.5
1943 7 6 1 0.4 0.4 0.2 26 21 5 1.4 1.5 1.0
1942 56 33 23 2.9 2.4 4.4 28 21 7 1.5 1.5 1.4
1941 17 15 2 0.9 1.1 0.4 23 18 5 1.2 1.3 1.0
1940 7 5 2 0.4 0.4 0.4 28 20 8 1.5 1.4 1.5
1939 15 9 6 0.8 0.7 1.2 33 25 8 1.8 1.9 1.6
1938 30 22 8 1.7 1.7 1.6 32 22 10 1.8 1.7 2.0
1987 5 4 1 0.3 0.3 0.2 55 42 13 3.2 3.4 2.7
1936 7 5 2 0.4 0.4 0.4 57 47 10 3.4 3.9 2.1
1935 34 81 3 2.1 2.7 0.6 58 53 5 3.6 4.6 1 .1
Whooping Cough Scarlet Fever
Year Deaths Rates Deaths Rates

T W C T W C T W C T W C
1944 48 20 28 2.5 1.4 5.4 1 1 0 0.1 0.1
1943 69 32 37 3.6 2.3 7.1 4 3 1 0.2 0.2 0.2
1942 48 25 23 2.5 1.8 4.4 3 2 1 0.2 0.1 0.2
1941 38 19 19 2.0 1.4 3.7 2 1 1 0.1 0.1 0.2
1940 39 23 16 2.0 1.6 3.1 1 1 0 0.1 0.1
1939 60 30 30 3.2 2.2 5.9 6 5 1 0.3 0.4 0.2
1938 68 87 31 3.8 2.9 6.2 4 3 1 0.2 0.2 0.2
1937 59 80 29 3.4 2.4 5.9 2 2 0 0.1 0.2
1986 25 15 10 1.5 1.8 2.1 2 2 0 0.1 0.2
1935 69 81 28 3.6 2.7 6.0 11 1 0 0.1 0.1











EPIDEMIOLOGY 35


TABLE 9.-CASES OF TYPHOID FEVER REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY
YEARS 1935-1944, FLORIDA.

County 193511936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Alahua.............................. 4 0 3 3 0 0 1 0 4 3
Baker................................ 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 1 0 5
Bay .................................... 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Bradford ................. 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brevard.. ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Broward......................... 0 1 1 6 2 6 1 1 0 3
Calhoun ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte ...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus ...... ........ 0 0 1 3 4 0 0 1 1 1
Clay...... ................ 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 1
Collier.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia ........................ 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 2 2 3
Dade.................................. 13 18 25 19 18 43 20 11 2 9
DeSoto .. ... ........ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie .. ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
DuvaL ................. 8 8 16 49 13 8 36 26 6 8
Escambia....................... 16 3 10 21 11 4 6 11 8 4
Flagler.................... 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin........ ..... 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0
Gadsden.................... 0 0 1 3 6 2 16 12 6 1
Gilhrist............ .............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gulf................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Hamilto .......... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0
Hardee .................. 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0
Hendry........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Hernando.. ............. 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Highlands ............---- 3 1 0 0 5 1 1 5 0 0
Hillsboro.......... .. ............ 54 23 19 12 17 8 9 30 4 18
Holmes.... ........ .......... 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Indian River..................... 0 0 2 0 0 1 10 0 0 0
Jackson .......... .. 0 0 2 4 0 0 1 0 1 0
Jefferson............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 2
Lafayette .................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1-
Lake ..................... 1 0 2 5 2 5 0 1 1 0
Lee......... .................. 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Leon............................ 3 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 1
Levy......................... ..... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Liberty............................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0
Madison........ .................. 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0
Manatee......................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Marion........... ......... ......... 2 1 1 0 4 0 1 5 2 4
Martin.......................... 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Monroe................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2
Nassau.......................... 0 1 1 2 4 0 1 1 3 0
Okaloosa ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Okeechobee....................... 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Orange... ................... 2 8 7 8 2 4 9 1 1 2
Osceola.............. .................. 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Palm Beach........................ 8 1 4 0 4 1 3 4 7 3
Pasco.............. .......... ...... 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 7 0 0
Pinellas........................... 8 7 7 6 21 7 8 36 1 4
Polk............................. 19 5 1 2 1 4 0 3 3 0
Putnam.......................... 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 0
St.Johns........................... 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 1
St. Lucie ............. 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0
Santa Rosa............................. O 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota ................... 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Seminole................ .......... O 0 0 0 2 0 3 2 0 1
Sumter ............. ..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Suwannee.......... ....... 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1
Taylor... ............ 0 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0
Union................................ 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Volusia........................ 3 1 3 3 5 7 11 8 3 3
Wakulla....................... 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Walton.. ... ...........0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8
Washington........................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
TOTAL.. .................69 941 127 160 128 109 166 196 68 95 ...











36 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 10.-CASES OF SMALLPOX REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY YEARS
1935-1944, FLORIDA.


County 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
Alachua........................... 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Baker............. .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bay r ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Bradford ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brevard...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Broward.... ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Calhoun ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus .................................. 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clay ........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Collier ............. .................. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Columbia.. ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ade .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DeSoto........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie............ .................... 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Duvald............................. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Escamhbia......................... 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flagler..................... ..... 0.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin.. .............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gadsden ................... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Gilchrist....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Gulf ...................... .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hamilton....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hardee.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hendry.. ................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hernando...... ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hillsoro....................... 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Holmes........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Indian River................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jackson ....................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jefferson........... ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lafayette.................. ........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake............................. 0 0 0 0 0 01 0 0 0 0
Lee.................. ............... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Leon ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Levy........................ 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liberty .... ..............0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madison ........ ............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manatee....... .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Marion............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Martin... ........................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Monroe ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nassau. ................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Okaloosa .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Okeehobee..................... 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Orange.......................... 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Osceola ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Palm Beach......................... .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pasco ......... ............ ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pinellas .. ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Polk. Jona.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Putnam .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
St. Johns............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
St. Lucie..................0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Santa Rosa...................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota ......................... O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Seminole.......... ............. .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sumter............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Suwannee................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Taylor........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Union......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Volusia......................... 0 0 5 7 0 2 0 0 0 0
Wakulla.........................0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00
Walton--... .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Washington .. ..0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAL-.................................. 14 0 8 15 4 7 0 1 2 1



















TABLE 11.-NUMBER OF CASES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND HOOKWORM REPORTED IN FLORIDA, 1931-1941*


Diseases Code Number 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941


Anthrax............................- .... .....
Beriberi................................ -
Botulism ........ .. .............. .....
Cancer........ .............................. ..
Chancroid...................... ...
Chickenpox (Varicella).................. ......
Cholera Asiatic........... ....-......... .
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)....--
Dengue............................... ...
Diarrhea, Infantile....................
Diphtheria........................
Dysentery... ................... .... .
Encephalitis, Epi.................. .........
Erysipelas......... --......... .----
German Measles.............-..-....- ........
G landers......... .............................. ............
Gonorrhea.......... ............ ............
Granuloma Inguinale......................
Hookworm.....-..... ........................
Influenza.......................-
Jaundice, Infectious...........................
Leprosy.............. ...........
Lymphopathia Ven............................
Malaria.................. ...........................
M easles (Rubeola) ....................................
Meningitis.................. ..................
Mumps (Parotitis) ................ ..............
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...................
Blastomycosis........ .......- ...
Favus...................... .. ..


7
68
177
45-55
44A
38E
4
88
38F
119A-120A
10
27A-27C
37C
11
38D
26B
25
44A
40
33
32A
23
44A
28
35
6
44C
43
43
43


181
23
1,209



501
16
1


704

3,062
1,543

3

339
3,799
36
246


189
25
341


2

735
21



713

3,076
335

8

318
217
8
159
---- ----


179
32
703

5

452
33
2


616

4,870
1,267

5

1,011
1,048
10
163
..........


211
65
1,097


2,005

491
41
5


702

8,984
65

1

1,106
8,115
5
571

.... ......


200
83
1,416
...... 2.
24

426
19
2


1,207

6,739
662

2
813
1,176

1,101
..........


240
96
750

12

309
31
1


1,146

2,211
587


869
307
120
1,084


1
-----i-

233
97
979


6
609
53
............


2,411

8,321
544


894
635
168
744
............


..-.-.......


292
49
1,435

............25
25
456
62
8
8

2,092

6,081
112
1

471
9,149
61
659


..... ....


.....-......

356
56
1,139
..............

8

299
59
10

28

1,650

56,766
402

2

435
2,716
20
598
.............


339
97
2,014


4

223
44
9

151

1,824

9,455
653


140
2,305
7
265


1

351
152
908


6
7
212
57
6

1,474

3,065

7,944 '
3,832 M
tl

145
11,261 H
27
650

. --...-..
.. .. .















TABLE 11.-NUMBER OF CASES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND HOOKWORM REPORTED IN FLORIDA, 1931-1941*
(Continued)

Diseases Code Number 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
Opthalmia Neonatorum.............................. 25 ...2 ...3 5 16 3 15 15
Paratyphoid Fever........................................ 2 3 1 3 3 4 4 9 10 14 6 17 L
Pellagra...... ........ ............. ........................... 69 64 60 72 151 74 35 37 188 172 120 9
Plague ............... ...................................... 3
Pneumonia, Broncho............................. .... 107 425 349 419 439 451 634 551 727 820 965 1,125
Other ....... ............................ 109
Poliomyelitis.................................... 36 17 8 8 16 16 42 35 32 66 33 263
Psittacosisn.....e .. .. .................. ..... .......... .. ......... .. ... .......... .......... ....... ....... .......... ......... ...........
Puerperal Infection...................................... 147B .......... .......... -- ---- .... .. ..........
Rabies, Human.............................................. 38B ........ .. ........ ....... ......... 3
Animal............................. .... 38B 1 ..... .......... 1 21 44 17 15 ............
Rickettsial Diseases ................................... 39
Brills or Typhus... .................. 39A 31 42 54 36 27 55 131 122 152 11 196
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev............. 39C ......... ...... ...... ...... ......
Scarlet Fever (Scarletina)........................ 8 266 235 203 190 273 299 377 352 398 270 205
Septic Sore Throat........ ................... ........ 115B .. ...... ........ .......... ........ ........... 36 70 42 38
Smallpox (Variola) .......... ............... 34 27 33 1 3 14 .......... 7 15 4 7 ............
Syphilis-.... ......... ............... 30 3,965 4,063 4,833 5,198 4,389 3,287 14,532 18,243 21,092 19,889 21,258
Tetanus............................... ........... 12 20 16 23 16 27 31 11 ............ 15 17 12
Trachoma.....................-----............-.. 88 ... .......... .......... ....... 3 54 ............ 12 2 11 9
Trichinosis.......... ............ ...... .............. 42 1 ..... ..... .......... 2 13 3 2 2 .......... 2
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary........................ 13 511 591 661 603 523 621 1,120 1,177 916 1,018 981
S Other Forms.......................... 14-22 .......... .........
Tularemia. ....................... .................... 26A 2 2 1 1 .......... .......... 6 2 25 16 3
Typhoid Fever......................................... 1 183 266 183 129 169 93 133 160 128 109 166
Undulant Fever................................ .. 5 3 2 5 9 68 16 37 42 54 46 21
Vincent's Angina............................. ...... 32B ... ........ ........ ...... ...... ......... 193 441 133 52 71
Whooping Cough..................................... 9 254 379 508 723 532 383 540 912 1,124 383 747
Yellow Fever............................................... 38A. .
Other Diseases: Giardiasis....... .............. 29
*1942-1944 figures given in Table 9, page









EPIDEMIOLOGY 39


SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES
During the past two years an effort has been made to improve mor-
bidity reporting and communicable disease control. These services
have been systematized with emphasis on local epidemiological follow-
up work. More complete, accurate and prompt reporting has begn
accomplished with the cooperation of the United States Armed Forces
during the last two years of the war.
Better methods of statistical tabulation and statistical presenta-
tion have been developed as well as improved educational material on
preventable disease, in cooperation with the Bureau of Health Edu-
cation.
The distribution of insulin to all indigent diabetics has been
decentralized. Insulin is now being distributed through the local
health authorities.
Pertussis vaccine and special hookworm treatments have been
supplied the local health authorities through funds supplied by the
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health of the State Board of Health.
Frequent advisory visits to the County Health Departments has
served to better prepare local public health personnel for preventable
disease control work.

ANNUAL PLAN OF BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY-1944-45
Continued efforts will be made to obtain more complete, accurate
and prompt reporting of diseases from the counties with the coopera-
tion of the United States Public Health Service and the United
States Armed Forces.
Efforts will also be made to further improve preventable disease
control work with emphasis on epidemiological follow-up work.
In cooperation with the Bureau of Maternal and'Child Health year-
round services for the administration of immunizations and hookworm
treatments will be extended as part of the maternal, infant, pre-
school, school and adult services rendered in conjunction with the
Public Health Clinics in each county. Continued efforts will be made
to provide pertussis vaccine, combined pertussis diphtheria and teta-











40 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF SCARLET FEVER PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


= 1NONE REPORTED
Om 00 TO100

EM OO TO 40 00

M 40.0 ABOVE


0 -
0 .
<> ** '


Map 7










EPIDEMIOLOGY 41


Scarlet Fever Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.
Graph 7.











42 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


CASES OF POLIOMYELITIS PER 100,000 POPULATION,
BY COUNTIES, 1944


I NONE REPORTED
M 0.0 TO 10.0
11 10.0 TO 40.00

M 40.0 & ABOVE


0
Oli.'
, ..*


Map 8










EPIDEMIOLOGY 43


Graph 8.
Poliomyelitis Morbidity Incidence For Florida 1944 For Each Week By Months.








44 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


nus-diphtheria vaccines routinely to the private or clinic doctor for
free distribution and administration to all susceptible age groups of
children.
Further efforts will be made to extend the course in epidemiology
for credit to all public health personnel through the Extension Di-
vision and the general curriculum of the University of Florida,
Gainesville.
Better methods of statistical tabulation and presentation will be
developed as well as improved educational material on preventable
diseases in cooperation with the other Bureaus. The I. B. M. punch
card system of recording and tabulating morbidity statistics will be
extended.
That portion of the Sanitary Code relating to the control of pre-
ventable diseases will be rewritten to facilitate the present-day needs.
The application of the uniform health card for the State will be
further extended to include other occupational and vocational groups
and further effort will be made to provide for better facilities and
methods for its application.
The distribution of insulin will be still further decentralized to
include those counties which do not as yet have local insulin distribu-
tion services.
Efforts will be made to increase the Bureau's office personnel to
include enough clerical help to adequately render the services under-
taken. An assistant epidemiologist is needed as well as a trained sta-
tistical clerk and a punch operator.
Efforts will also be made to secure adequate facilities for punch-
ing the data now being obtained on the newly designed I. B. M.
punch card.
Efforts will be made to extend and maintain personnel for local
epidemiological work in each county of the State.
Advisory visits on request and otherwise will be made to the
counties of the State to promote the establishment of better epidem-
iological facilities and if possible to 'better prepare local public health
and medical personnel to do better disease control work.











EPIDEMIOLOGY


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.'


DISEASE
Anthrax..................................
Beriberi............................
Botulism.........-.. ............
Cancer ..............................
Chancroid.............................
Chickenpox (Varicella)........
Cholera, Asiatic.............
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)..
Dengue............................
Diarrhea, Infantile..........
Diphtheria.....................
Dysentery, Amebiasis.....
Bacillary ..........
Other................
Encephalitis, Epi.................
Erysipelas..... .............
German Measles..................
Glanders..........................
Gonorrhea....................... .....
Granuloma Inguinale..........
Hookworm...........................
Influenza......................
Jaundice, Infectious............
Leprosy.......................
Lymphopathia Ven.............
Malaria............................
Measles (Rubeola) ............
Meningitis ----......................
Mumps (Parotitis) ..........
Mycosis, Actinomycosis.....
Blastomycosis......
Favus...................
Opthalmia Neonatorum......
Paratyphoid Fever..............
Pellagra............................
Plague...............................
Pneumonia, Broncho ..........
Lobar.............
Other..............-
Poliomyelitis.. ....................
Psittacosis ...........................
Puerperal Infection..............
Rabies, Human...............
Animal....................
Rickettsial Diseases............
Brills or Typhus..................
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev.......
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).-...
Septic Sore Throat..............
Small ox (Variola) ............
Syphilis ........... ..................
Tetanus..................................
Trachoma..............................
Trichinosis .....................
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary...
S Other Forms..
Tularemia .........................
Typhoid Fever......................
Undulant Fever..............-....
Vincent's Angina..................
Whooping Cough. ...............
Yellow Fever..................
Giardiasis ...........................
Ascariasis (Roundworm)....
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread)
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)....
Teniasis (Tapeworm)..........
Catarrhal Fever ..................


Code No.
7
68
177
45-55
44A
38E
4
88
38F
119A-120A
10
27B
27A
27C
37C
11
38D
26B
25
44A
40
33
32A
23
44A
28
35
6
44C
43
43
43
25
2
69
3
107
108
109
36
38F
147B
38B
38B
39
39A
39C
8
115B
34
30
12
88
42
13
14-22
26A
1
5
32B
9
38A
29
43
43
43
43
104-106


STATE


COUNTIES


1940-441 1942 1943 1944 Alachua Baker
Population: 2,080,003 38,213 5,862


5-Yr.
Mean

0
0
0
310
415
1,716
0
11
3
15
244
0
0
0
9
14
718
0
6,395
43
8,315
1,238
10
1
64
22
4,912
113
1,388
0
0
0
15
20
46
0
0
0
0
95
0
1
1
9
0
283
0
317
52
2
24,776
20
5
1
1,099
4
5
122
3
201
814
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
C


Total Total Total
For For This
Year Year Year
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
384 429 351
452 840 535
1,388 2,469 1,803
0 0 0
0 15 40
1 5 0
0 42 28
258 243 284
25 132 104
47 180 491
1 24 8
1 14 19
0 32 39
143 1,495 329
0 0 0
10,165 16,925 14,351
0 0 217
10,745 6,887 6,547
227 782 727
0 27 36
0 1 3
24 254 248
86 119 522
4,324 1,483 5,201
25 252 258
1,789 2,631 1,607
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
19 23 16
15 31 33
74 26 5
0 0 0
841 1,238 362
0 198 479
0 347 776
43 28 108
0 0 0
0 0 2
0 1 0
0 31 8
0 0 0
313 314 484
1 0 0
281 365 416
35 36 112
1 2 1
30,104 33,540 19,087
19 29 25
1 2 2
1 1 1
1,163 1,220 1,114
0 0 23
7 2 1
196 68 95
37 36 30
145 306 433
828 1,134 981
0 0 0
0 16 210
0 390 623
0 52 74
0 58 59
0 17 13
0 44 188


Total
This
Year

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
3
0
0
0
5
0
25
0
234
0
0
0
0
0
6
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
31
0
0
0
1
0
0
5
0
0
7
0
19
21
4
0
0
0











46 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)


Counties
Bay Bradford Brevard Broward
26,210 12,724 18,069 51,530
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Yeaa Year
Anthrax................. .......... 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi............................... 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism................................ 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer....... .................. 45-55 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0
Chancroid....................... 44A 5 4 3 4 1 0 2 12
Chickenpox (Varicella).. 38E 1 0 0 8 0 2 120 42
Cholera, Asiatic .....-- ....... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
Dengue......................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile........ 119A-120A 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria...................... 10 2 5 2 0 0 2 3 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis...... 27B 0 0 0 14 0 0 1 0
Bacillary......... 27A 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Other ...... 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi............... 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Erysipelas.... ................. 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
German Measles........... 38D 0 0 0 0 10 5 21 12
Glanders..-...- ----- ...26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
.Gonorrhea ................... 25 422 454 86 97 91 33 231 258
Granuloma Inguinale...... 44A 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 5
Hookworm..................... 40 658 99 193 479 0 0 15 8
Influenza.......................... 33 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Leprosy............................ .... 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1
Malaria...................... 28 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0
Measles (Rubeola)............ 35 5 1 1 7 5 2 38 104
Meningitis................... 6 0 2 0 1 0 0 5 2
Mumps (Parotitis)......... 44C 3 6 8 2 9 3 17 68
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis..... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus................ 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Pellagra......................... 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague.................................. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho......... 107 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 2
Lobar.............. 108 0 0 4 3 0 0 0 4
Other............. 109 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 3
Poliomyelitis.---..........-....... 36 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Psittacosi...................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human............ 38B 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Animal............. 38B 0 0 26 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases.......... 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus............ 39A 1 1 1 1 1 0 5 5
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev...... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)...- 8 5 3 0 1 0 2 5 2
Septic Sore Throat........... 115B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Smallpox (Variola)............ 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis............................ 30 553 437 199 193 419 73 742 479
Tetanus........................ 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma...................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis....................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 8 4 1 12 0 3 39 24
Other Forms.. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Tularemia.............................. 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever............... 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 3
Undulant Fever................ 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0
Vincent's Angina............ 32B 0 0 0 0 4 0 16 43
Whooping Cough................. 9 30 1 4 6 0 0 13 39
Yellow Fever.................. 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis.......................- 29 0 3 0 8 0 0 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm)..._. 43 0 0 0 141 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm) .......... 43 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0
.Catarrhal Fever .................. 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9











EPIDEMIOLOGY 47

TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Calhoun Charlotte Citrus Clay
7,320 3,586 4,950 9,195
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax................................ 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi........................... 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism............................. 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer.................................. 45-55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chancroid........................... 44A 0 0 3 2 0 1 198 25
Chickenpox (Varicella)...... 38E 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 24
Cholera, Asiatic................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye). 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14
Dengue............................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile............ 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Diphtheria...................... 10 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3
Dysentery, Amebiasis........ 27B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Bacillary........... 27A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other.............. 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Encephalitis, Epi.....-......... 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas........................... 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2
German Measles ............ 38D 0 0 0 0 0 0 701 94
Glanders............................ 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea ......................... 25 5 1 33 17 0 11 1,923 157
Granuloma Inguinale........ 44A 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
Hookworm......................... 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 248 140
Influenza........................... .. 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 1
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0
Leprosy............................. 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Lymphopathia Ven........... 44A 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 7
Malaria............................ 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 264
Measles (Rubeola).-........... 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 318
Meningitis. ..................... 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 59
Mumps (Parotitis) ............ 44C 0 0 0 0 0 0 174 114
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis..- 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus................... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Paratyphoid Fever......... 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Pellagra........................... 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague.............................. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho.......... 107 0 0 0 0 0 0 207 72
Lobar.............. 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 89 239
Other ........... 109 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 408
Poliomyelitis........ ......... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Psittacosis....................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection............. 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human................. 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal................. 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus...... ......... 39A 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 6
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev........ 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)..... 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 25
Septic Sore Throat.............. 11B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Smallpox (Variola) .............. 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis............................ 30 48 9 65 15 0 170 424 224
Tetanus............................ 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma....................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis......................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 0 1 0 0 0 0 45 16
S Other Forms... 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Tularemia........................ 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever....................-- 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Undulant Fever.................... 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Vincent's Angina ............. 32B 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 62
Whooping Cough.................. 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 14
Yellow Fever...................... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis ...................... ... 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Ascariasis (Roundworm)_... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 31
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).-. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever .................. 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3










48 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Collier Columbia Dade DeSoto
4,271 15,266 301,144 8,299
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax........................ 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi....... ............ 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism.............. 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer..... ................... 45-55 1 0 27 0 387 310 0 0
Chancroid ................ .... 44A 0 3 0 0 95 148 1 0
Chickenpox (Varicella)...... 38E 0 0 0 0 533 480 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic.................. 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 4 8 0 0
Dengue ..... ......... 38F 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile.......... 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 16 9 0 0
Diphtheria..... ...... 10 0 0 1 0 6 11 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasi.. 27B 0 0 0 0 6 10 0 0
Bacillary .... 27A 0 0 0 0 145 1 0 0
Other ..... 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi.............. 37C 0 0 0 1 12 10 0 0
Erysipelas ............. 11 0 0 0 0 3 9 0 0
German Measles........ .... 38D 0 0 2 0 316 83 1 0
Glanders ...... 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea....... 25 14 3 26 31 1,349 2,016 47 50
Granuloma Inguinale ........ 44A 0 0 0 0 1 35 0 2
Hookworm.................. 40 5 0 10 7 16 7 0 0
Influenza..... ............ 33 1 0 1 0 96 72 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious........ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Leprosy... ....... 23 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Lymphopatha Ven.-.... 44A 0 0 0 0 9 34 0 0
Malaria ..... ............ 28 0 0 0 0 15 8 0 0
Measles (Rubeola)........... 35 0 0 0 0 457 1,289 0 0
Meningitis..................... 6 0 0 1 0 39 32 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis) .-.. 44C 0 0 0 0 720 216 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus ........ 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum..... 25 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever ...... 2 0 0 0 2 6 1 0 0
Pellagra...... ...... 69 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0
Plague ......... .................. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho.... 107 1 0 7 0 76 135 0 0
Lobar ...... 108 0 0 3 0 23 80 0 0
Other.......... 109 0 0 0 0 83 120 0 0
Poliomyelitis ......... 6 0 0 0 0 7 35 0 0
Psittacosis ................ 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection........... 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human............ 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal............... 38B 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases......... 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus ....... 39A 0 0 6 8 18 61 0 1
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev._.-. 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)... 8 0 0 1 0 87 42 0 0
Septic Sore Throat .......... 115B 0 0 0 0 21 12 0 0
Smallpox (Variola)..__.. 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis ..... ........ 30 34 23 781 104 4,458 2,588 166 53
Tetanus .............................. 12 0 1 0 0 12 7 0 0
Trachoma .......................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis ................. 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.. 13 0 2 35 1 407 322 1 3
Other Forms. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0
Tularemia...... .......... 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever ............ 1 0 0 2 3 2 9 0 0
Undulant Fever.................. 5 0 0 0 0 6 5 0 0
Vincent's Angina................ 32B 0 0 0 0 54 99 0 0
Whooping Cough. ...... 9 0 0 0 0 317 348 0 0
Yellow Fever........... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis....... .......... 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm) ..... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm). 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever .... ... 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0











EPIDEMIOLOGY 49


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Dixie Duval Escambia Flagler
6,244 258,381 87,946 2,394
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax............................ 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi............................ 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism.......................... 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer............................... 45-55 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Chancroid......................... 44A 0 0 192 105 13 34 0 1
Chickenpox (Varicella)...... 38E 0 0 5645 338 17 15 1 0
Cholera, Asiatic............. 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)- 88 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0
Dengue.................. ........... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile......... 119A-120A 0 0 12 6 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria ....... ...... 10 0 0 65 42 33 26 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis.......... 27B 0 0 3 3 1 0 0 0
Bacillary......... 27A 0 0 6 3 0 0 0 0
Other.............. 27C 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi ............ 37C 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas........ ....... 11 0 0 14 20 0 0 0 0
German Measles .............. 38D 0 0 48 46 5 16 0 0
Glanders.......................... 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea .......................... 25 0 5 3,535 2,355 1,127 1,487 8 55
Granuloma Inguinale......... 44A 0 0 0 21 0 12 0 7
Hookworm....................... 40 0 0 278 265 103 73 0 0
Influenza.......................... 33 0 0 15 15 4 3 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
Leprosy.......................... .... 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven. ...... 44A 0 0 3 45 3 5 0 1
Malaria.......... .................. 28 0 0 14 33 1 1 0 4
Measles (Rubeola).............. 35 0 0 104 823 24 21 0 0
Meningitis -.............-.......... 6 0 0 47 50 13 15 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis).......... 44C 0 0 848 103 13 6 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus................ 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 4 4 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever.. ........ 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0
Pellagra.................................. 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague.......... .................... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho.-....... 107 0 0 45 17 0 0 0 1
Lobar............... 108 0 0 11 21 0 0 0 0
Other.............. 109 0 0 35 43 0 1 0 0
Poliomyelitis.......................... 36 0 0 1 9 1 9 0 2
Psittacosis........................ 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human................. 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal................ 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus............ 39A 0 0 72 84 37 55 0 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev....-. 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).... 8 0 0 70 119 29 46 1 0
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B 0 0 10 27 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola).............. 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis........................... 30 215 14 6,255 3,954 793 813 94 108
Tetanus.......................... 12 0 0 12 10 0 0 0 0
Trachoma........................ 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis.......... ............. 42 0 0 0 1 0 0 "0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 0 1 148 109 22 47 0 0
Other Forms.. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia............................ 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever..................... 1 1 0 6 8 8 4 0 0
Undulant Fever.................... 5 0 0 4 5 2 0 2 0
Vincent's Angina.................. 32B 0 0 57 70 4 0 0 0
Whooping Cough ................ 9 0 0 281 104 18 4 0 0
Yellow Fever..................... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis............................ 29 0 0 0 53 0 1 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm) ... 43 0 0 0 31 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm)............. 43 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0
Catarrhal Fever ................ 104-106 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0











50 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties

Franklin Gadsden Gilchrist Glades

10,376 30,029 3,399 1,952


DISEASE

Anthrax .......------.................
Beriberi............ ...............
Botulism.........................
Cancer. ............. .... .............
Chancroid.............................
Chickenpox (Varicella)........
Cholera, Asiatic....................
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)..
Dengue.....................
Diarrhea, Infantile............
Diphtheria.........................
Dysentery, Amebiasis..........
S Bacillary........
Other ..............
Encephalitis, Epi.................
Erysipelas..............................
German Measles ..........
Glanders ..........................
Gonorrhea. .........................
Granuloma Inguinale..........
Hookworm.......................
Influenza.................................
Jaundice, Infectious............
Leprosy..................................
Lymphopathia Ven.............
Malaria -............-------
Measles (Rubeola)-........
Meningitis .......................
Mumps (Parotitis). ........
Mycosis, Actinomycosis......
Blastomycosis......
Favus..............
Opthalmia Neonatorum......
Paratyphoid Fever..............
Pellagra....... ............
Plague..........................
Pneumonia, Broncho. .......
Lobar.............
Other................
Poliomyelitis.. ....................
Psittacosis........................
Puerperal Infection..............
Rabies, Human................
Animal....................
Rickettsial Diseases............
Brills or Typhus................
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev......
Scarlet Fev. (Searletina).....
Septic Sore Throat .............
Smallpox (Variola) ..............
Syphilis..................................
Tetanus............................
Trachoma..............................
Trichinosis......................
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary ....
Other Forms..
Tularemia........................
Typhoid Fever .....................
Undulant Fever....................
Vincent's Angina.......-...-....
Whooping Cough ..............
Yellow Fever.....................
Giardiasis..............-...........-
Ascariasis (Roundworm)......
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread)
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)....
Teniasis (Tapeworm)..........
Catarrhal Fever .............


Code No.
7
68
177
45-55
44A
38E
4
88
88F
119A-120A
10
27B
27A
27C
37C
11
38D
26B
25
44A
40
33
32A
23
44A
28
35
6
44C
43
43
43
25
2
69
3
107
108
109
36
38F
147B
38B
38B
39
39A
39C
8
115B
34
30
12
88
42
13
14-22
26A
1
5
32B
9
38A
29
43
43
43
43
104-106


Total
Last
Year
0
0
0
0
2
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
11
0
158
0
38
32
0
0
1
4
25
8
53
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
54
6
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
117
0
0
0
6
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


Total
Last
Year

0
0
0
8
1
18
0
2
0
0
3
99
1
0
0
6
1
0
41
0
484
40
0
0
0
5
6
0
23
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
76
28
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0
4
3
0
482
0
0
0
41
0
1
6
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


Total
This
Year

0
0
0
3
1
3
0
0
0
0
4
28
0
0
0
2
0
0
53
2
81
79
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
40
26
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
279
0
0
0
21
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year











EPIDEMIOLOGY 51


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Gulf Hamilton Hardee Hendry Hernando
7,474 8,856 8,468 5,047 5,132
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last his Last This Last This Last This Last Thia
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year


Anthrax............................... 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi........................... 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism........................... 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer......................... 45-55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chanroid....... ................. 44A 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Chickenpox (Varicella)........ 38E 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 0 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .0
Dengue.............................. 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile. ---....... 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria...................... 10 0 10 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bacillary............ 27A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other............. 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi.............. 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas ........ .......... 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles................. 38D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glanders......................... 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea........................ 25 13 13 0 6 5 10 57 24 2 5
Granuloma Inguinale.......... 44A 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
Hookworm...................... 40 3 15 0 0 0 0 25 2 1 1
Influenza.......................... 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy.......................... 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Malaria..... ................ 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Measles (Rubeola) .............. 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Meningiti........................... 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis): ........... 44C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis..... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus............... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pellagra................................ 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague..... .............. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho......... 107 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Lobar............... 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other ............... 109 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis...................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Psittacosis........................ 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection......... 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human.................... 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal................. 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus................ 39A 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev...... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)...... 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Septic Sore Throat.......... 115B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola)......... 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis.......................... 30 143 84 4 3 36 34 181 135 141 9
Tetanus............................ .. 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma....................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis....................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1
Other Forms.. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia.............................. 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever...................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Undulant Fever .................... 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vincent's Angina............. 32B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Whooping Cough............. 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Yellow Fever................... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis............................. 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm)...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm)........ 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever .................. 104-106 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0











52 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944-(Cont.)


DISEASE Code No.
Anthrax ............. .. ....------- 7
Beriberi............ --------.-- 68
Botulism......--............-----------.. 177
Cancer.............................. 45-55
Chancroid ..........................-- 44A
Chickenpox (Varicella)........ 38E
Cholera, Asiatic.................. 4
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88
Dengue..-.. ...........------. 38F
Diarrhea, Infantile........ 119A-120A
Diphtheria........---......... 10
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B
Bacillary.... 27A
Other. ...-....... 27C
Encephalitis, Epi.............. 37C
Erysipelas..... ........... 11
German Measles.................. 38D
Glanders...................-..- 26B
Gonorrhea ........--...... ---........ 25
Granuloma Inguinale.......... 44A
Hookworm... ........................ 40
Influenza 3.............. .......- 33
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A
Leprosy.... ...... 23
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A
Malaria.........................-..--- 28
Measles (Rubeola).........-- 35
M eningitis...................... 6
Mumps (Parotitis).---........- 44C
Mycosis, Actinomycosis 43
Blastomycosis...... 43
Favus................ 43
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25
Paratyphoid Fever ............ 2
Pellagra.................... 69
Plague.............................. 3
Pneumonia, Broncho ........ 107
Lobar................ 108
Other............ 109
Poliomyelitis ..................... 36
Psittacosis.................... 38F
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B
Rabies, Human................. 38B
Animal.................. 38B
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39
Brills or Typhus................ 39A
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev..--. 390
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina) .... 8
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B
Smallpox (Variola).............. 34
Syphilis............................ 30
Tetanus.................................. 12
Trachoma ....................... 88
Trichinosis.......................... 42
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13
Other Forms.. 14-22
Tularemia........................ 26A
Typhoid Fever................. 1
Undulant Fever ................ 5
Vincent's Angina.................. 32B
Whooping Cough.................. 9
Yellow Fever........................ 38A
Giardiasis........ .... ........... 29
Ascariasis (Roundworm)...... 43
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43
Catarrhal Fever ............ 104-106


Counties
Highlands' Hillsboro Holmes Ind. River
14,047 197,419 13,629 9,329


Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year


Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year










EPIDEMIOLOGY 53


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Jackson Jefferson Lafayette Lake
31,053 11,007 3,505 28,196
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax.............................. 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi.............................. 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism............................ 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer................................... 45-55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chancroid........................... 44A 0 3 0 2 0 0 2 2
Chickenpox (Varicella)...... 38E 0 0 3 61 0 0 23 21
Cholera, Asiatic............ 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue.......................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile............. 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria..... ............. 10 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 10
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0
Bacillary ........... 27A 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 2
Other............. 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi............ 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Erysipelas...................... 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles............... 38D 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0
Glanders.......................... 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea........................ 25 133 164 64 47 0 1 95 96
Granuloma Inguinale........ 44A 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1
Hookworm................. 40 64 355 610 707 0 9 182 196
Influenza........................ 33 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy....................... 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A 0 0 00 1 0 0 0 1
Malaria............. .............. 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Measles (Rubeola) ............ 35 0 0 1 4 0 0 15 400
Meningitis................... 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Mumps (Parotitis).-...... 44C 1 0 4 34 0 0 26 20
Mycosis, Actinomycosis. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis..... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus ............. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Paratyphoid Fever ...... .. 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 5
Pellagra..... ............... 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Plague ....................... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho............ 107 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lobar. 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other ............. 109 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Psittacosi.............. ....... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection............. 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human..... ....... 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal............ .... 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus.......... 39A 2 2 0 1 1 0 6 8
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev.. 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)... 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola) .............. 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis...................... 30 211 113 201 78 14 4 380 201
Tetanus.......................... 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma........................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis. ............... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 4 1 6 1 1 1 16 22
S Other Forms. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia........................ 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever............... 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 0
Undulant Fever................ 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vincent's Angina...... 32B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Whooping Cough.................. 9 0 0 3 14 0 0 1 41
Yellow Fever................ 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis .................... 29 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 13
Ascariasis (Roundworm)... 43 0 3 1 233 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm) 43 0 6 0 2 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm)...... 43 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever ... .. 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0











54 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Lee Leon Levy Liberty
21,598 35,674 11,611 2,902

Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax............................-- 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi...................---.-. 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism....-....----------..-- 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer .......-...--....--- .------ 45-55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chancroid..... .............. 44A 1 1 17 15 2 0 0 0
Chickenpox (Varicella)........ 38E 4 0 4 9 0 14 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic ......---- 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue... .............--- .-- 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile........-- 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria...... ..... ....... 10 0 0 5 13 0 1 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Bacillary......... 27A 0 0 0 471 0 1 0 0
Other ...--....... 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi ................ 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas. ...................... 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles......-........ 38D 1 0 3 7 0 0 0 0
Glanders....................---- 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea....................... 25 39 41 687 1,128 62 3 1 1
Granuloma Inguinale.......... 44A 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0
Hookworm........................ 40 17 0 142 175 61 114 0 3
Influenza -......................... 33 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious...... 32A 0 0 1 10 0 0 0 0
Leprosy.........................- -- 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A 0 1 1 21 0 0 0 0
Malaria......................... 28 9 0 2 20 0 0 0 0
Measles (Rubeola)._........... 35 18 0 21 35 0 6 0 0
Meningitis ..--..----............ 6 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis).............. 44C 7 0 10 11 3 38 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis ... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis..... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus............... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum .. 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Pellagra............................ 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague.................. ....... .. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho... ....... 107 0 1 22 2 0 0 0 0
Lobar............. 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other ............... 109 0 0 2 31 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis..:................- 36 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Psittacosis......................-- 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection............. 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human ................ 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SAnimal................ 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus.................. 39A 2 2 7 9 3 1 0 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev.--... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)-... 8 0 1 20 12 0 0 1 0
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola) .............. 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis......... ................. 30 286 149 450 357 152 10 7 0
Tetanus..........-- ............... 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma....-............... 88 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis..................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary... 13 1 1 16 7 0 7 0 0
S Other Forms... 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia....................... 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever................. 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0
Undulant Fever................... 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vincent's Angina................. 32B 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Whooping Cough..............--. 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Yellow Fever........................ 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis ............................ 29 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm)._. 43 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever ................. 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0











EPIDEMIOLOGY


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)


DISEASE

Anthrax ...............................
Beriberi..............................
Botulism.........................
Cancer................................--
Chancroid.........................
Chickenpox (VariceUa)........
Cholera, Asiatic...................
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)..
D engue.................................
Diarrhea, Infantile._ .......
Diphtheria-.......................--
Dysentery, Amebiasis......
Bacillary..........
Other...........-
Encephalitis, Epi................
Erysipelas..... ....................
German Measles..............
Glanders......................
Gonorrhea....................
Granuloma Inguinale........
Hookworm ..................
Influenza..................................
Jaundice, Infectious ............
Leprosy .........----......--
Lymphopathia Ven...........
Malaria ...........................
Measles (Rubeola). ..........
Meningitis. ....................
Mumps (Parotitis) ..........
Mycosis, Actinomycosis......
Blastomycosis.....
Favus ..................
Opthalmia Neonatorum......
Paratyphoid Fever..............
Pellagra............................
Plague....................................
Pneumonia, Broncho. ........
Lobar. ............
Other................
Poliomyelitis. -....................
Psittacosis............-...............
Puerperal Infection.............
Rabies, Human................
Animal................
Rickettsial Diseases............
Brills or Typhus..................
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev.----.
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).....
Septic Sore Throat..............
Smallpox (Variola)..............
Syphilis..............................
Tetanus.............................
Trachoma.......................
Trichinosis.....................
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary....
Other Forms..
Tularemia .......................
Typhoid Fever...................
Undulant Fever ...................
Vincent's Angina..................
Whooping Cough...............
Yellow Fever...................
Giardiasis.............................
Ascariasis (Roundworm).-...
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread)
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)...
Teniasis (Tapeworm) ..........
Catarrhal Fever ............


Code No.
7
68
177
45-55
44A
38E
4
88
38F
119A-120A
10
27B
27A
27C
37C
11
38D
26B
25
44A
40
33
32A
23
44A
28
35
6
44C
43
43
43
25
2
69
3
107
108
109
36
38F
147B
38B
38B
39
39A
39C
8
115B
34
30
12
88
42
13
14-22
26A
1
5
32B
9
38A
29
43
43
43
43
104-106


Counties

Madison Manatee Marion Martin

15,067 24,725 30,343 6,481

Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last TLast ast This Last This
Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year


- -











56 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Monroe Nassau Okaloosa Okeechobee
20,072 10,775 15,591 2,929
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax................................ 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi................................ 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism......................... 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cncer.............................. 45-55 1 3 4 7 0 1 0 0
Chancroid............................. 44A 5 6 6 3 7 0 0 0
Chicken pox (Varicella)...... 38E 4 100 39 24 7 5 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
De$gue-.............................. 38F 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile............ 119A-120A 0 3 0 0 3 1 0 0
Diphtheria.................... 10 3 0 2 2 9 4 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Bacillary........... 27A 0 5 2 0 2 0 0 0
Other............. 27C 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi.-............ 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas............ .............. 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles-.............. 38D 8 5 0 1 0 0 0 0
Glanders-......_................. 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea....................... 25 171 220 126 102 248 224 0 12
Granuloma Inguinale......... 44A 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hookworm........................ 40 0 11 138 233 105 215 0 0
Influenza............................... 33 0 4 18 3 48 177 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious........... 32A 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Leprosy............................. 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven..-.._ .... 44A 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0
Malaria........................... 28 0 9 1 0 3 1 0 1
Measles (Rubeola)............ 35 16 190 0 44 1 51 0 0
Meningitis..................... 6 1 3 0 2 4 1 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis) ........... 44C 24 42 23 17 17 29 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus................ 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum..... 25 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever............ 2 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 0
Pellagra................................. 69 0 0 13 3 0 0 0 0
Plague.............................. 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho .......... 107 1 0 0 3 16 29 0 0
Lobar............... 108 0 1 0 1 5 28 0 0
Other............... 109 0 0 0 0 14 2 0 0
Poliomyelitis....................... 36 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0
Psittacosis...................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection............. 147B 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human................ 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal.................... 8B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases........... 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus.............. 39A 1 1 5 14 0 2 0 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev....... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).... 8 6 1 1 4 2 1 0 0
Septic Sore Throat............. 115B 0 64 0 2 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola) ........... 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis........................... 0 08 142 202 114 171 61 72 36
Tetanusa................... .... 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma....................... 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis........................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.. 13 8 22 22 8 3 1 0 1
Other Forms.. 14-22 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Tularemia........................ 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever................. 1 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 0
Undulant Fever................... 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vincent's Angina................. 32B 0 14 3 1 2 0 0 0
Whooping Cough................ 9 10 54 51 12 25 8 0 0
Yellow Fever.................... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis..... .............. 29 0 0 0 37 0 0 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm)..... 43 0 2 0 16 0 1 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)._. 43 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever ......----.. 104-106 0 33 0 0 0 49 0 0











EPIDEMIOLOGY


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)


DISEASE
Anthrax................
Beriberi...........................
Botulism ...............................
Cancer.......... ...........
Chancroid............................
Chickenpox (Varicella).....
Cholera, Asiatic......
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)..
Dengue..........................
Diarrhea, Infantile............
Diphtheria.....................-
Dysentery, Amebisi........
S Bacillary......
Other...............
Encephalitis, Epi................
Erysipelas..... ................
German Measles.................
Glanders.......................
Gonorrhea..........................
Granuloma Inguinale.........
Hookworm.......................
Influenza..........................
Jaundice, Infectious......
Leprosy.................................
Lymphopathia Ven............
M alaria ............. ....................
Measles (Rubeola).....
Meningitis........................
Mumps (Parotitis)......
Mycosis, Actinomycosis.
Blastomycosis.....
Favus...........
Opthalmia Neonatorum.....
Paratyphoid Fever........
Pellagra..........................
Plague.................................
Pneumonia, Broncho.......
Lobar...........
Other..............
Poliomyelitis..................
Psittacosis...... .........
Puerperal Infection.............
Rabies, Human........
Animal.........
Rickettsial Diseases..........
Brills or Typhus.................
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev.......
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)....
Septic Sore Throat.............
Smallpox (Variola).............
Syphilis..... ..---------
Tetanus............................
Trachoma .....................
Trichinosis........................
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary....
Other Forms..
Tularemia ............................
Typhoid Fever..............
Undulant Fever...................
Vincent's Angina.................
Whooping Cough..............
Yellow Fever..... ............
Giardiasis.................
Ascariasis (Roundworm)....
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread)
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)....
Teniasis (Tapeworm)....
Catarrhal Fever .............


Code No.
7
68
177
45-55
44A
38E
4
88
38F
119A-120A
10
27B
27A
27C
37C
11
38D
26B
25
44A
40
33
32A
23
44A
28
35
6
44C
43
43
43
25
2
69
3
107
108
109
36
38F
147B
38B
38B
39
39A
39C
8
115B
34
30
12
88
42
13
14-22
26A
1
5
32B
9
38A
29
43
43
43
43
104-106


Counties

Orange Osceola Palm Beach Pasco
179,448 9,687 88,356 13,322
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year


0
0
0
0
69
441
0
0
0
0
6
5
1
0
0
0
112
0
847
0
184
31
0
0
17
6
101
11
196
0
0
0
1
4
1
0
17
0
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
17
0
25
0
1
852
0
0
0
41
0
0
1
0
1
129
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 2
35 0 0 24 20 0 0
95 0 0 167 253 2 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 3 0 0 0
3 2 0 0 2 2 3
3 0 0 0 2 0 0
0 0 0 3 2 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
8 0 0 13 11 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
313 9 4 335 353 4 3
13 0 0 0 12 0 1
224 0 0 1 1 5 5
23 0 0 87 20 3 12
0 0 0 6 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
21 0 0 8 9 0 1
13 0 0 13 17 0 0
727 0 0 47 361 1 12
9 0 0 11 6 2 0
402 0 0 40 124 16 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0
2 0 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 25 5 0 1
3 0 0 7 6 0 0
0 0 0 12 30 0 0
5 0 0 2 3 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
19 0 5 1 3 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
21 2 1 4 17 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
581 113 6 1,274 2,324 174 55
0 0 0 0 3 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
S 0 0 0 0 0
49 1 0 24 57 1 1
2 0 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 7 3 0 0
3 0 0 3 0 0 0
2 0 0 55 62 0 0
123 0 0 71 23 0 0
0 0 0 0 00 0
2 0 0 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0 0 0
8 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0











58 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)


DISEASE Code No.

Anthrax. ............................. 7
Beriberi .............................. 68
Botulism................................ 177
Cancer.............................. 45-55
Chancroid.... ................- 44A
Chickenpox (Varicella)........ 38E
Cholera, Asiatic................ 4
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88
Dengue.............................. 38F
Diarrhea, Infantile............ 119A-120A
Diphtheria........................ 10
Dysentery, Amebiasis.......... 27B
Bacillary ..... 27A
Other................ 27C
Encephalitis, Epi .............. 37C
Erysipelas......................... 11
German Measles............. 38D
Glanders............................ 26B
Gonorrhea......................... 25
Granuloma Inguinale.......... 44A
Hookworm........................ 40
Influenza....................... 33
Jaundice, Infectious........... 32A
Leprosy........................... 23
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A
Malaria-..........-.........- 28
Measles (Rubeola) ............- 35
Meningitis ........................ 6
Mumps (Parotitis) ............ 44C
Mycosis, Actinomycosis..... 43
S Blastomycosis...... 43
Favus.................... 43
Opthalmia Neonatorum.... 25
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2
Pellagra..................... .. 69
Plague................... ............... 3
Pneumonia, Broncho._....... 107
Lobar ........... 108
Other................ 109
Poliomyelitis ....................... 36
Psittacosis.............................. 38F
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B
Rabies, Human.................. 38B
Animal................. 38B
Rickettsial Diseases........... 39
Brills or Typhus................ 39A
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev...... 39C
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina)..... 8
Septic Sore Throat ........... 115B
Smallpox (Variola)............. 34
Syphilis............................. 30
Tetanus................................ 12
Trachoma...... _...... ......... 88
Trichinosis................ 42
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary... 13
Other Forms. 14-22
Tularemia........................ 26A
Typhoid Fever............... 1
Undulant Fever.................. 5
Vincent's Angina.................. 32B
Whooping Cough. ............... 9
Yellow Fever........................ 38A
Giardiasis........................ 29
Ascariasis (Roundworm). ... 43
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43
Trichuriasis (Whipworm)_. 43
Teniasis (Tapeworm).........- 43
Catarrhal Fever ................. 104-106


Counties
Pinellas Polk Putnam St. Johns
110,663 90,356 17,806 20,182
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year


0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
39
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
320
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
37
7
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
82
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o


0
0
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
36
0
3
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
212
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0











EPIDEMIOLOGY


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)


DISEASE Code No.
Anthrax ............................ ..... 7
Beriberi................................ 68
Botulism.......................... 177
Cancer............................... 45-55
Chancroid .......... .............. 44A
Chickenpox (Varicella)...... 38E
Cholera, Asiatic.................... 4
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88
Dengue............................. 38F
Diarrhea, Infantile............. 119A-120A
Diphtheria....... ........... 10
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B
Bacillary........... 27A
Other .............. 27C
Encephalitis, Epi................ 37C
Erysipelas..........................:.. 11
German Measles ................. 38D
Glanders................................ 26B
Gonorrhea. ......................... 25
Granuloma Inguinale-........ 44A
Hookworm..................... 40
Influenza.......................... 33
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A
Leprosy .................................. 2
Lymphopathia Ven ............. 44A
Malaria ............................ 28
Measles (Rubeola) .............. 35
Meningitis .......................... 6
Mumps (Parotitis)........... 44C
Mycosis, Actinomycosis..... 43
Blastomycosis...... 43
Favus ................ 43
Opthalmia Neonatorum-.... 25
Paratyphoid Fever............- 2
Pellagra................................ 69
Plague .............................. .. 3
Pneumonia, Broncho .......... 107
Lobar............... 108
Other.............. 109
Poliomyelitis........................ 36
Psittacosis................... 38F
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B
Rabies, Human.................... 38B
Animal................... 38B
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39
Brills or Typhus.............. 39A
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev...... 39C
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).... 8
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B
Smallpox (Variola) ........... 34
Syphilis........................... 30
Tetanus.................................. 12
Trachoma .......................... 88
Trichinosis ................... 42
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13
Other Forms. 14-22
Tularemia .................... 26A
Typhoid Fever ................... 1
Undulant Fever .................. 5
Vincent's Angina................ 32B
Whooping Cough............... 9
Yellow Fever........ ....... 38A
Giardiasis........................... 29
Ascariasis (Roundworm)... 43
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43
Trichuriasis (Whipworm). 43
Teniasis (Tapeworm)........ 43
Catarrhal Fever .................. 104-106


Counties
St. Lucie Santa Rosa Sarasota Seminole
13,084 13,799 19,514 21,080
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
... 1 1











60 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 1944.-(Cont.)

Counties
Sumter Suwannee Taylor Union
9,532 16,029 9,682 7,228
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax ........................... 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi.................................. 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism .............................. 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer.... ................... ..... 45-55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chancroid......................... 44A 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Chickenpox (Varicella)........ 38E 0 1 0 0 15 6 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic................... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue.............-............-- 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile.............. 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria............................ 10 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 0
Dysentery, Amebiasis.......... 27B 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Bacillary........ 27A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other ......... 27C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi................ 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas.............................. 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles.................. 38D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glanders.......................... 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea ........................... 25 165 6 10 4 58 110 6 9
Granuloma Inguinale.......... 44A 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Hookworm............................ 40 0 63 0 0 282 130 1 0
Influenza ........................... 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious............ 32A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy...................... 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven............. 44A 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Malaria...................... 28 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Measles (Rubeola)............- 35 0 7 0 0 11 24 0 0
Meningitis ............... 6 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0
Mumps (Parotitis) .............. 44C 0 1 0 0 19 24 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus.-............. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pellagra.............. .............. 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague................................ 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho.......... 107 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0
Lobar.............. 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other.............. 109 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Poliomyelitis....................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Psittacosis............................. 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection.............. 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human................ 38B 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Animal................... 38B 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus............. 39A 1 1 1 3 4 7 0 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev..... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).... 8 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Septic Sore Throat.............. 115B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola)............ 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Syphilis............................ 30 190 85 377 9 127 62 258 100
Tetanus........... ................. 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma........................ 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis....................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 0 1 1 1 14 4 11 3
S Other Forms... 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia .......................... 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever..................... 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Undulant Fever.................... 5 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Vincent's Angina................ 32B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Whooping Cough............... 9 0 0 0 0 0 25 1 0
Yellow Fever.................... 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis....... ............... 29 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aseariasis (Roundworm)...... 43 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm).......... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever .................. 104-106 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0











EPIDEMIOLOGY 61


TABLE 12.-MORBIDITY REPORT OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY
COUNTIES FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR 3944

Counties

Volusia Wakulla Walton Washington

53,099 5,717 13,284 10,900
Total Total Total Total Total Total Total Total
Last This Last This Last This Last This
DISEASE Code No. Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Anthrax.............................. 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Beriberi........................... 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Botulism........ ..... .............. 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer....................... 45-55 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chancroid.....................- 44A 1 4 22 1 0 1 0 2
Chickenpox (Varicella)..... 38E 53 69 8 12 1 14 0 0
Cholera, Asiatic............... 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye).. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue .......... ............. 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diarrhea, Infantile......... 119A-120A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Diphtheria................ ..... 10 12 3 0 0 4 17 0 2
Dysentery, Amebiasis......... 27B 3 4 0 0 6 9 0 0
Bacillary ........... 27A 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Other.................. 27C 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Encephalitis, Epi ..........-..-- 37C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Erysipelas............-.....- 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
German Measles................. 38D 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Glanders.............. ............ 26B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gonorrhea .....................-- 25 260 186 290 21 45 69 22 55
Granuloma Inguinale .......... 44A 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 3
Hookworm..................... 40 96 579 32 144 385 448 256 256
Influenza.... -................. 833 1 0 13 0 0 0 0 0
Jaundice, Infectious ............ 32A 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy............................. 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lymphopathia Ven......... 44A 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
Malaria.............................- 28 6 7 0 0 0 0 1 0
Measles (Rubeola)...........- 35 13 97 1 21 0 0 0 3
Meningitis ......................... 6 1 5 1 2 0 0 0 0
Mumps (Parotitis)................ 44C 71 10 30 16 1 3 0 0
Mycosis, Actinomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Blastomycosis...... 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Favus.............. 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Opthalmia Neonatorum...... 25 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Paratyphoid Fever.............. 2 4 0 0 0 1 2 0 0
Pellagra....................... 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Plague ................................ 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia, Broncho .......... 107 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
Lobar................ 108 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
Other............. 109 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis...................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Psittacosis......................... 38F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Puerperal Infection....... 147B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rabies, Human...........-.....- 38B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Animal................- 38B 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Rickettsial Diseases............ 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brills or Typhus................. 39A 8 20 0 0 2 15 4 0
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fev......... 39C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Scarlet Fev. (Scarletina).... 8 9 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Septic Sore Throat............. 115B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smallpox (Variola) ............. 34 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Syphilis...... ................ 30 660 310 111 16 46 58 141 47
Tetanus........................ 12 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trachoma ............................. 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichinosis................... 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary.... 13 24 84 1 2 7 5 2 3
S Other Forms. 14-22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia............................. 26A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Typhoid Fever ................. 1 3 3 0 0 1 8 0 1
Undulant Fever.................... 5 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0
Vincent's Angina..... 32B 12 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Whooping Cough..... 9 8 66 29 0 1 1 0 1
Yellow Fever.................. 38A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Giardiasis.. ............ 29 0 0 0 0 0 43 0 0
Ascariasis (Roundworm) 43 0 86 0 0 0 0 0 0
Oxyuriasis (Pin or Thread) 43 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trichuriasis (Whipworm).. 43 0 15 0 0 0 1 0 0
Teniasis (Tapeworm)..... 43 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catarrhal Fever ... 104-106 0 2 0 4 0 60 0 0










TABLE 13.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS (INFECTIOUS, PARASITIC AND OTHERS ACCORDING TO
THE INTERNATIONAL LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH) FLORIDA, 1944

Code
Disease Number Total Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Anthrax ......... .. ...... ............. 7
Beriberi......... ................... 68... .. ........
Botulism ............ ................... 177 ---- -- ---------- ......... I........... .............. -.......... .......... ............... .... ...... ...........
Botulism.... .. ............... 177
Cancer............ .................... 45-55 351 28 25 41 35 37 10 29 33 40 25 .24 24
Catarrhal Fever................. 104-106 188 144 20 11 6 1 .......... 1 .......... 2 2
Chancroid....................... 44A 535 41 62 51 81 28 45 35 39 41 41 27 44
Chickenpox (Varicella) ... 38E 1,803 254 426 320 413 188 42 17 3 5 11 41 83 I
Cholera, Asiatic ....... 4
Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) 88 40 6 4 ......... 3 1 2 3 4 3 8 8 4 2
D enguen i...itis Pin--- 38F ........0 .. ........ .......... .... ........ ....... 1 ........ -2 ..... ..... .... ........ ......... ........ .........
Dengue................................ 38F
Diarrhea, Infantile ...........119A-120A 28 1 4 .... 3 2 3 2 1 3 3 6
Diphtheria.......................... 10 284 10 14 6 15 19 10 33 24 37 30 56 30 F
Dysentery... ............... .... 27 ...... ..
Amebiasis...................... 27B 104 7 2 5 5 28 6 2 8 2
Bacillary-..................... 27A 491 2 3 1 6 118 328 3 4 .......... 3 4 19
Other............................... 27C 8 ......... 2 ... ....... 3 .......... .......... 1 .......... 1 1 ......
Encephalitis, (Epidemic)... 37C 19 1 1 1 3 4 2 1 2 2 1 1
Erysipelas........................ 11 39 1 1 3 6 3 1 4 4 6 2 6 2
German Measles (Rubella) 38D 329 9 38 79 101 53 21 8 6 1 1 8 4 1
G landers.............. ..... 26B -....... ...... ......... .......... .......... I ......... .......... ... .. i .. .. ......
Gonorrhea....................... 25 14,351 843 1,019 1,255 1,433 1,066 1,248 1,368 1,326 1,344 1,137 815 1,497 A
Granuloma Inguinale......... 44A 217 13 18 17 23 70 26 15 26 8 17 13 21 4
Influenza............................. 33 727 360 137 25 122 33 11 9 6 7 4 8 5
Jaundice, Infectious........... 32A 36 4 2 4 5 4 2 2 4 2 1 2 4
Leprosy ................ ............ 23 ...... .. .......... 1 .........1.... ........ 1
Lymphopathia Venereum.. 44A 248 14 26 28 41 21 20 25 11 14 15 13 20
Malaria............................. 28 522 11 28 23 28 30 32 61 39 51 70 81 61
Measles (Rubeola)............. 35 5,201 265 556 1,214 1,519 838 355 227 87 102 7 23 8
Meningitis........-........... -... 6 258 37 35 42 31 23 20 18 13 5 5 10 19
Mumps (Parotitis)........... 44C 1,607 154 188 254 348 240 111 102 42 34 40 48 56
M ycosis.. ........... 43 ...... 4 ... ....... ............... ... ....
Actinomycosis.......... ...... 43 .............. -.......... ......... .......... ..... .......... .......... ......... ......... .......... ...... 1
Blastomycosis................. 43 .... ................ ..
Other..-........................... 43 -....... .......... --..- ---- -------- -..... ... ......... ..... ........ ........ 1
Ophthalmia Noenatorum.. 25 16 1 2 ........... 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2
Pellagra......... ..........-- 69 5 ......... 1 2 2 .....
Plague.. --......-........ 3 ... .
Pneumonia................ ...... 107-109
Broncho................-........... 107 362 44 41 24 26 58 46 42 22 22 15 20 15
Lobar........................ 108 479 59 29 110 85 55 18 20 13 22 22 26 20
Other......... ........ ... 109 776 88 66 33 29 37 44 74 71 96 47 104 87
Poliomyelitis .................. 36 108 .......... 3 1 2 10 10 28 19 16 9 8 2














TABLE 13.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS (INFECTIOUS, PARASITIC AND OTHERS ACCORDING TO
THE INTERNATIONAL LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH) FLORIDA, 1944.-(Continued)


Disease


Psittacosis.......................
Puerperal Infection ...........
Rabies, Human................
Animal........................
Rickettsial Diseases...........
Brill's or Typhus..........
Rocky Mtn. Spot. Fever
Other ..................
Salmonella.............
Paratyphoid Fever....
Other...-------.........................
Scarlet Fever (Scarlatina)..
Septic Sore Throat......
Smallpox (Variola) .............
Syphilis....--..............
Tetanus........................-
Trachoma..... .-.. ......
Tuberculosis... ...............
Pulmonary. .....................
Other Forms.........
Tularemia ..................-
Typhoid Fever.........
Undulant Fever................
Vincent's Angina ................
Whoop. Cough (Pertussis)
Yellow Fever...............
Helminths...................
Ankylostomiasis (Hw)...
Ascariasis (Roundworm)
Oxyuriasis (Pin o' Th'd)
Teniasis (Tapeworm)......
Tenia Echinococcus..
(Hydatid Disease)......
Other (Fish, Dog,
Rat, Pork, Beef)......
Trichinosis (Trichinella
Spiralis) ......................-
Trichuriasis (W'worm) .
Diastomatosis (Flukes)......
Shistomiasis
(Swimmer's Itch)..
Giardiasis..............


Code .
Number Total Jan.


Disease


June July Aug. Sept.


38F
147B
38B
A38B
39
39B
39C
39D
2
2
2
8
115B
34
30
12
88
13-22
13
14-22
26A
1
5
32B
9
38A
40-42
40
42
42
41-42

41

42

42
42
44D

44D
29


2

8

484

..33
33

416
112
1
19,087
25
2
1,137
1,114
23
1
95
30
433
981


6,547
623
74
13




1
59


210


18


17
7

56
4

1,525





1
117

1




93


609
142
5

6








10


Feb. Mar.


...... -- ----------

2 2

11 11


1
1 ......--

60 43
4 8
1 -. .... .
2,236 1,493
2 2
77 85
72 82
5 3

7 8
2 1
33 19
111 110



------- ----
504 621
37 47
6 6






4 5


10 9


April May


---- -1 --

...6 42



1 4
1 4

52 15
3 3

3,111 1,302

1
115 73
113 73
2 ..........
1
5 2
4
33 105
120 137


814 606
164 41
12 9
.. ..... ----------
3 2






156 14

"" 6 1 1---


1






22


2

1,479
5


88
1
9
2
25
64

47
477
24
4



..........






10


1
92


5

23
66

1,453
3



2


23

137


643
21
6






1


4

14
6

1,281
3
1




4
33
25


408
19
10







...... .
....4.2


4

2---7
4

1,151


84
2

8
5
27
52


305
16
4






4


....-31


Oct. Nov.







-------. .......
36 49


3 1

35 26
1 6

1,092 1,857
2
.......... 2


1 1
.11 7
5 2
19 47
22 76

439 523
1 73
5 2
-- ..... . .






3


21 21
. ...... ..... ------


Dec.





35


1
---.------




5

1,124
3


112
5

4 M
5
21
35


598

5 M
1 0

.......... 0


..........
--- 2-- -
2


11










64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44)
BY CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)

S1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1 1937 1936 1935

1. Typhoid Fever
Deaths: Total 15 17 26 26 23 27 46 45 39 58
White Male 6 4 15 8 7 11 17 18 9 19
Female 4 2 3 3 9 3 9 9 5 7
Colored ale 4 4 5 8 3 5 10 11 14 12
Female 1 7 3 7 4 8 10 7 11 20
Rates: Total 0.8 0.9 1.4 1.4 1.2 1.5 2.6 2.6 2.3 3.6
White 0.7 0.4 1.3 0.8 1.1 1.0 2.0 2.2 1.2 2.3
Colored 1.0 2.1 1.5 2.9 1.4 2.6 4.0 3.7 5.2 6.8
Paratyphoid Fever 1917-1920 included in Typhoid Fever figures No. 1 (above)
2. Paratyphoid Fever
Deaths: Total 1 3 2 3 2 1 1 3 0 2
White Male 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 2
Female 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0
Colored Male 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Female 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

3. Bubonic Plague
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
White Male
female
Colored Male
Female
Rates: Total
White
Colored

5. Undulant Fever
Deaths: Total 1 1 1 2 3 5 3 3 2 3
White Male 1 1 1 1 3 4 0 2 2 2
Female 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1
Colored Male 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
Female 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

6. Cerebrospinal Meningitis
Deaths: Total 45 43 13 16 8 12 18 66 58 18
White Male 24 23 5 3 5 5 5 17 20 6
Female 10 15 3 7 0 3 5 12 10 3
Colored Male 9 3 1 4 3 4 5 25 18 4
Female 2 2 4 2 0 0 3 12 10 0
Rates: Total 2.4 2.2 0.7 0.8 0.4 0.6 1.0 3.8 3.5 0.8
White 2.4 2.7 0.6 0.7 0.4 0.6 0.8 2.3 2.5 0.8
Colored 2.1 1.0 1.0 1.2 0.6 0.8 1.6 7.6 5.8 0.9

7. Anthrax


Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 u 0 u u 1 u
White Male 0
Female 0
Colored Male 1
Female 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


*Deaths per 100,000 Population Florida State Board of Health


Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics


*Deaths per 100,000 Population









EPIDEMIOLOGY 65


TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATHS 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX,, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944 (Cont.)
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)


1| 1944 1-1943 1942 1941 1 1940 1 1939 1938 i1937 1936 | 1935

8. Scarlet Fever


9. Whooping Cough
Deaths: Total 48 69 48
White Male 8 20 16
Female 12 12 9
Colored FMale 11 29 13
Female 17 8 10
Rates: Total 2.5 3.6 2.5
White 1,4 2.3 1.8
Colored 5.4 7.1 4.4

10. Diphtheria
Deaths: Total 42 26 28
White Male 17 13 13
Female 17 8 8
Colored Male 3 4 4
Female 5 1 3
Rates: Total 2.2 1.4 1.5
White 2.4 1.5 1.5
Colored 1.5 1.0 1.4

11. Erysipelas
Deaths: Total 2 9 3
White Male 1 7 2
Female 1 2 1
Colored Male 0 0 0
Female 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

12. Tetanus
Deaths: Total 55 50 28
White Male 10 11 8
Female 4 7 2
Colored Male 29 15 16
Female 12 17 2
Rates: Total 2.9 2.6 1.5
White 1.0 1.3 0.7
Colored 7.9 6.2 3.5

13-22. Tuberculosis (All Forms)
Deaths: Total 791 834 859
White Male 247 237 244
Female 122 126 116
Colored Male 224 241 257
Female 198 230 242
Rates: Total 41.4 43.6 44.9
White 26.5 26.0 25.8
Colored 81.5 91.0 96.4

*Deaths per 100,000 Population


38 39 60 68 59 25 69
9 12 13 18 13 8 18
10 11 17 19 17 7 18
4 8 13 12 6 5 13
15 8 17 19 23 5 15
2.0 2.0 3.2 3.8 3.4 1.5 3.6
1.4 1.6 2.2 2.9 2.4 1.3 2.7
3.7 3.1 5.9 6.2 5.9 2.1 6.0



23 28 33 32 65 57 58
8 6 16 14 25 24 28
10 14 9 8 17 23 25
2 7 5 9 5 6 3
3 1 3 1 8 5 2
1.2 1.5 1.8 1.8 3.2 3.4 3.6
1.3 1.4 1.9 1.7 3.4 3.9 4.6
1.0 1.5 1.6 2.0 2.7 2.1 1.1


4 8 13 16 10 27 17
1 2 4 10 3 17 7
2 5 8 3 5 9 8
0 1 1 2 1 0 1
1 0 0 1 1 1 1





31 59 37 57 51 45 51
8 13 5 13 10 12 8
4 0 3 15 6 5 4
12 29 19 16 17 21 27
7 17 10 13 18 7 12
1.6 3.1 2.0 3.2 2.9 2.7 3.1
0.9 0.9 0.6 2.2 1.3 1.4 1.0
3.7 8.9 5.7 5.8 7.2 5.8 8.3



916 961 921 987 966 905 903
239 275 241 243 248 254 250
123 104 135 164 152 133 147
296 311 277 299 313 283 261
258 271 268 281 253 235 245
47.9 50.3 49.7 55.0 55.6 53.9 55.7
26.0 27.2 27.9 31.4 32.0 32.8 34.6
107.0 112.4 107.3 116.4 115.8 108.2 107.9

Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistic.


--









66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATHS 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944 (Cont.)
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)


I 1944 1943 I 1942 1941 1940 1 1939 I 1938 1937 1936 I 1935

23. Leprosy
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0
White Male 2
Female 1
Colored Male 0
Female 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

24. Septicemia
Deaths: Total 15 30 40 27 32 31 27 37 25 37
White Male 4 11 8 7 8 14 7 12 11 9
Female 4 9 11 8 10 11 8 12 8 14
Colored ale 3 4 7 3 7 3 5 5 2 3
Female 4 6 14 9 7 3 7 8 4 11
Rates: Total 0.8 1.6 2.1 1.4 1.7 1.7 1.5 2.1 1.5 2.3
White 0.6 1.4 1.4 1.1 1.3 1.9 1.2 1.9 1.6 2.0
Colored 1.4 1.9 4.1 2.3 2.7 1.2 2.4 2.7 1.3 8.0

25. Gonococcus Infection
Deaths: Total 13 15 18 9 17 12 19 11 22 31
White Male 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 1
Colored Male 4 3 3 0 2 2 3 2 3 8
Female 7 8 14 6 12 8 15 5 10 12
Rates: Total
White
Colored

26. Other Diseases Due to Bacteria Does not include Tularemia prior to 1941
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
White Male
Female
Colored Male
Female
Rates: Total
White
Colored

27. Dysentery (All Forms)
Deaths: Total 34 38 37 34 29 41 44 30 46 48
White ale 10 12 7 9 6 13 11 10 12 14
Female 6 10 7 6 6 10 7 5 10 8
Colored Male 8 8 10 13 9 7 12 4 13 12
Female 10 8 13 6 8 11 14 11 11 14
Rates: Total 1.8 2.0 1.9 1.8 1.5 2.2 2.5 1.7 2.7 3.0
White 1.1 1.6 1.0 1.1 0.9 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.8 1.9
Colored 3.5 3.1 4.4 3.7 3.3 3.5 5.2 3.1 5.0 5.5

28. Malaria
Deaths: Total 33 41 48 85 99 112 166 205 349 331
White Male 7 4 11 16 23 26 38 59 96 107
Female 8 7 6 14 17 24 34 41 62 89
Colored Male 8 12 11 27 26 25 42 61 106 75
Female 10 18 20 28 33 37 52 44 85 60
Rates: Total 1.7 2.1 2.5 4.4 5.2 6.0 9.2 11.8 20.8 20.4
White 1.1 0.8 1.2 2.2 2.9 3.7 5.6 8.0 13.2 17.0
Colored 3.5 5.8 6.0 10.6 11.4 12.2 18.9 21.5 39.9 28.8


Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics


*Deaths per 100,000 Population











EPIDEMIOLOGY 67


TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH BATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATHS 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944 (Cont.)
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)


S1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1935

29. Other Parasitic Diseases Includes No. 32 Prior to 1941
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 4 0
White Male 0 0 1 1
Female 1 1 0 3
Colored Male 0 0 0 0
Female 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

30. Syphilis


Deaths: Total 360 401 379 508 445 447 440 464 391 425
White Male 92 93 92 104 76 72 71 85 61 85
Female 24 17 27 35 34 19 30 34 28 23
Colored Male 172 207 177 248 216 238 222 207 214 212
Female 72 84 83 121 119 118 117 138 88 105
Rates: Total 18.8 21.0 19.8 26.6 23.3 24.1 24.5 26.7 23.3 26.2
White 8.3 7.9 8.5 10.0 7.9 6.8 7.8 9.5 7.4 9.4
Colored 47.1 56.2 50.2 71.3 64.7 70.1 68.0 70.6 63.1 67.6


31. Relapsing Fever
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
White Male 1
Female 0
Colored Male 0
Female 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

32. Other Diseases Due to Spirochetes (Included in No. 29 prior to 1941)
Deaths: Total 11 7 7 5
White Male 4 2 4 2
Female 3 0 2 1
Colored Male 3 2 0 1
Female 1 3 1 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored

33. Influenza
Deaths: Total 456 466 293 543 569 529 393 658 880 624
White Male 121 141 51 153 151 144 111 181 280 168
Female 112 99 66 134 143 103 75 142 213 158
Colored Male 129 111 92 149 135 144 106 184 228 155
Female 94 115 84 107 140 138 101 151 169 143
Rates: Total 23.8 24.4 15.3 28.4 29.8 28.5 21.9 37.9 52.4 38.5
White 16.7 17.2 8.4 20.6 21.1 18.4 14.3 25.9 41.1 28.3
Colored 43.1 43.6 34.0 49.4 53.1 55.5 41.5 68.6 80.8 63.5

34. Smallpox
Deaths: Total 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
White Male 1 0
Female 0 1
Colored Male 0 0
Female 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


*Deaths per 100,000 Population


Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics










68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATHS 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944 (Cont.)
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)

11 1944 1943 I 1942 I 19411 1940 1939 1938 I 1937 I 1936 I 1935

35. Measles
Deaths: Total 17 7 56 17 7 15 30 5 7 34
White Male 4 2 16 5 2 6 11 2 1 14
Female 7 4 17 10 3 3 11 2 4 17
Colored Male 2 1 10 1 2 2 6 1 1 1
Female 4 0 13 1 0 4 2 0 1 2
Rates: Total 0.9 0.4 2.9 0.9 0.4 0.8 1.7 0.3 0.4 2.1
White 0.8 0.4 2.4 1.1 0.4 0.7 1.7 0.3 0.4 2.7
Colored 1.2 0.2 2.4 0.4 0.4 1.2 1.6 0.2 0.4 0.6

36. Acute Poliomyelitis & Acute Polioencephalitis
Deaths: Total 12 5 4 34 7 7 8 6 8 7
White Male 7 3 0 19 4 3 3 2 2 5
Female 3 0 2 11 2 1 4 1 3 0
Colored Male 1 1 0 2 0 2 1 3 2 1
Female 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored

37. Acute Infectious Encephalitis
Deaths: Total 11 10 2 8 5 9 10 5 9 I
White Male 6 6 2 6 5 6 2 4 2 0
Female 3 3 0 1 0 3 3 1 5 1
Colored Male 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0
Female 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

38. Other Diseases Due to Filtrable Viruses Prior to 1941 Does Not Include Herpes Zoster
Deaths: Total 5 8 2 3 3 1 6 3 5 0
White Male 1 3 0 2 1 0 3 1 3 0
Female 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0
Colored Male 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0
Female 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

39. Typhus Fever
Deaths: Total 34 21 23 13 15 7 10 12 9 5
White Male 17 10 10 8 5 4 5 8 5 3
Female 10 6 6 4 4 2 3 3 4 2
Colored Male 4 4 5 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
Female 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

40. Ankylostomiasis
Deaths: Total 1 5 2 2 10 6 2 3 1 4
White Male 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 0 1 2
Female 0 1 1 1 7 1 1 0 0 1
Colored Male 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Female 0 3 0 0 1 2 0 3 0 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored


*Deaths per 100,000 Population


Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics










EPIDEMIOLOGY 69


TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND
PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATHS 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1935-1944 (Cont.)
(Rates are Given for the More Prevalent Diseases Only)

1I 1944 1943 I 1942 1941 1940 1939 I 1938 1937 1936 1935

41. Hydatid Disease
Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
White Male 0 0
Female 1 1
Colored Male 0 1
Female 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

42. Other Diseases Caused By Helminths
Deaths: Total 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 7 12 9
White Male 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 2 1 3
Female 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
Colored Male 1 2 1 0 2 4 2 7 2
Female 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 4 4
Rates: Total
White
Colored

43 Mycoses
Deaths: Total 7 6 5 3 4 3 5 5 2 1
White Male 5 5 4 1 3 3 2 4 1 0
Female 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
Colored Male 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0
Female 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored

44. Other Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Includes Tularemia prior to 1941
Deaths: Total 42 36 37 34 24 25 21 16 16 11
White Male 21 13 21 21 10 16 8 8 9 5
Female 7 9 5 1 10 3 6 5 5 3
Colored Male 5 10 8 5 2 5 5 3 1 2
Female 9 4 3 7 2 1 2 0 1 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics


*Deaths per 100,000 Population














TUBERCULOSIS

E. J. TEAGARDEN, M.D., Director

During the first six months of 1944, the Mobile X-ray Unit made
surveys in twenty-three counties. Of 24,996 small films made, 24,706
(98.8%) were satisfactory for interpretation. Of these,' 306 (1.2o%)
showed some evidence of tuberculosis, and 244 (1.0%) showed some
abnormal condition other than tuberculosis. Table 1 gives the results
of the survey by counties.
During July and August, the Mobile X-ray Unit trailer under-
went extensive repairs and alterations. Defective wooden frame mem-
bers were replaced, new sheet steel sheathing was applied, and the
walls were insulated with rock wool. A blower system was installed
to assist in maintaining a uniform temperature inside the trailer, and
a Hygeaire unit was placed in such a position as to sterilize the area
touching subjects' chest and chin by means of ultraviolet radiation.
Beginning in September the Mobile X-ray Unit spent more than
three months in a survey of employees of all the Dural County ship-
yards. This was the first of a series of surveys of war industries
throughout Florida. Table 2 shows the results of this survey, as
well as those of a one-day survey of the State Board of Health em-
ployees.
The need for additional case-finding facilities has been felt for
some time. Recently, the Commonwealth Fund, New York, has
granted the sum of $16,931.52 for the construction of a second Mobile
X-ray Unit. Bids have been received and some orders have been
placed. It is hoped that the unit will be completed some time in 1945.
This will be a 70-mm roll-film unit, complete with grid, automatic film
shift, and Morgan phototimer.
Further support, both moral and material, for the tuberculosis
program is anticipated from the newly created Division of Tubercu-
losis of the United States Public Health Service. Already, a trans-
portable 35-mm X-ray unit, operated by Dr. A. H. Russakoff and
staff of technicians, has come to Florida on loan to assist with the in-
dustrial survey. The State Prison Farm at Raiford was the first








TUBERCULOSIS 71


operating site for this unit, which then moved to the Florida State
Hospital at Chattahoochee, where it was engaged at the end of the
year.
Dr. Russakoff reports as follows on the Raiford survey:
"1,110 microfilms were taken. The response of the employees
and their families was small, probably due to bad weather on that
particular day. With 14" x 17" film follow-up work, 31 patients
were found to have definite reinfection tuberculous infiltrates, and
3 still remained doubtful, making 3.07% positive and doubtful. In
addition to these surveyed, there are 10 known isolated tuberculous
patients who were not included in the survey. There were 32 cases
or 2.88% showing discernible non-tuberculous chest pathology and
94.05% were negative."
Following the survey, the prison authorities agreed to isolate all
infectious cases, and to furnish names and addresses of household con-
tacts for follow-up work.

The Annual Conference on Turberculosis for Health Officers was
held at the State Sanatorium, Orlando, February 16 and 17. Dr.
Henry Chadwick of Cambridge, Massachusetts, spoke on "The Epi-
demiology of Turberculosis" and "The Role of the Family Physi-
cian". Dr. Chadwick, for years a prominent figure in tuberculosis
control, was visiting Florida at the request of the State Tuberculosis
Board and the Florida Tuberculosis and Health Association to con-
duct a survey of present sanatorium facilities and to make recom-
mendations for future construction. His report has been published.*
Other speakers at the Conference were selected from personnel of the
State Sanatorium and the State Board of Health.
During October 10-12, the Annual Short Course in Tuberculosis
was held in Gainesville under the auspices of the University of Flor-
ida. Numerous other institutes and lectures were conducted through-
out the State.
In spite of unfavorable war conditions, it can be predicted that
the tuberculosis death rate for 1944 will be lower than that of any
previous year. While this reflects deserved credit on the many agen-
cies and individuals contributing to the program, it must be realized
that every gain here, as on the battlefield, must be followed-up and
consolidated before being regarded as a final victory. The conquest
of tuberculosis can be effected if and when we throw the necessary









72 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

resources into the field, with strategy based on information, and with
belief in our ultimate goal-complete eradication of this disease.
*"A Plan For the Hospitalization of Tuberculosis Patients of Florida."
Florida Tuberculosis Board and Florida Tuberculosis and Health Associa-
tion. Jacksonville, Fla., 1944.
The director of the Division of Tuberculosis gratefully acknowl-
edges the part played in the tuberculosis control program by the
Tuberculosis and Health Committee of the Florida Medical Associa-
tion, the State Tuberculosis Sanatorium, the Florida Tuberculosis and
Health Association, and other efficient and volunteer agencies, as well
as the private physicians throughout the State.















TABLE 1.-SUMMARY OF MINIATURE FILMS TAKEN BY MOBILE X-RAY UNIT-JANUARY 1, TO JUNE 30, 1944

Number Number Percent Number films Number films Percent films Number films
County films films films interpreted suspicious of suspicious of showing other
taken satisfactory satisfactory negative tuberculosis tuberculosis pathology


State 24,996 24,706 98.8 24,156 306 1.2 244


Citrus ....................................................414 406 98.0 397 4 1.0 5
Escambia ............................... 4,767 4,680 98.2 4,598 56 1.2 26
Hardee.. .......... .................------- 265 265 100.0 258 4 1.5 3
Hernando ............................................. 451 451 100.0 438 4 0.9 9
Hillsborough* ......................... 6,070 6,024 99.2 5,888 70 1.2 66
Holmes ............................. 660 659 99.8 643 5 0.8 11
Jefferson .... ................................ 181 181 100.0 177 2 1.1 2
Lafayette.......... ..167 159 95.2 152 4 2.5 3
Lake ...................814 812 99.8 792 11 1.4 9
Leon ............................. -------- 175 173 98.9 167 4 2.3 2
Levy .................... ...................... ------03 591 98.0 582 4 0.7 5
Madison .................................... 1,006 994 98.8 982 8 0.8 4
Marion ..........................------- .. 1,025 1,019 99.4 998 8 0.8 13
Nassau.......... ...... ......... 602 596 99.0 583 7 1.2 6
Okaloosa ............... ........... 248 248 100.0 245 2 0.8 1
Pasco --.-----------108 108 100.0 103 4 3.7 1
Pinellas...................... ................... 1,378 1,376 99.8 1,309 48 3.5 19
Santa Rosa............. ---..--........------ 112 111 99.1 106 1 0.9 4
Sarasota........................ ---- .......... 388 388 100.0 381 3 0.8 4
Sumter.............................---- ........ 459 458 99.8 454 2 0.4 2
Taylor .................................. .......... 234 230 98.3 225 3 1.3 2
Volusia -.. -----------------...4,445 4,358 98.0 4,268 49 1.1 41
Walton................... .--------............ 424 419 98.8 410 3 0.7 6
*Two surveys. __










-J1








TABLE 2.-SUMMARY OF MINIATURE FILMS TAKEN BY MOBILE X-RAY UNIT IN DUVAL COUNTY SHIPYARDS
AND STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, SEPTEMBER 1, TO DECEMBER 15, 1944


Total Duval County Shipyards.......


Merrill-Stevens Dry Dock
& Repair Company...................

Gibbs Dry Dock
& Repair Company ...............
Civilian Employees, U. S. Navy......

Huckins Yacht Corporation..............

St. Johns River
Shipbuilding Company ..............
State Board of Health.....................


Number
films
taken


9,906


1,019

1,805

47
179

6,856

167


Number
films
satisfactory


9,868



1,014

1,798

47

179

6,830

166


Percent
films
satisfactory


99.6



99.5

99.6

100.0

100.0

99.6

99.4


Number films Number films
interpreted suspicious of
negative tuberculosis


Percent films
suspicious of
tuberculosis


-_--- I 1------I----_-f


Number films
showing other
pathology

0
124


I-
26

24

0

2

72

0


I j I _













VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL

R. F. SONDAG, Surgeon (R) U.S.P.H.S., Director

The past year has been a significant one in venereal disease con-
trol due to the many developments in the treatment of these diseases.
At the beginning of the year, the vast majority of patients under treat-
ment for venereal diseases were receiving this treatment in one of the
clinics cooperating with the Florida State Board of Health. The
Rapid Treatment Centers at Ocala and Wakulla were treating only
females in the infectious stages of syphilis and gonorrhea, and the
Rapid Treatment Center in Jacksonville was doing likewise for both
males and females.
In the early part of the year, the Gulf Coast Medical Center, under
the supervision of the U. S. Public Health Service, was established at
Pensacola. This center accepted for treatment males and females,
white and colored, with early infectious syphilis and gonorrhea. These
Rapid Treatment Centers with a combined capacity of 650 beds were
filled each month as the type of treatment then used required from
two to twelve weeks in most cases, a few being able to complete the
treatment in less than two weeks.

PENICILLIN
During the month of April, the Bureau received its first allocation
of penicillin and this new drug completely changed the treatment
picture for syphilis and gonorrhea. With this new wonder drug, it
was possible to cure gonorrhea in one or two days and syphilis in four
to eight days. As a result of this drug, the average patient's stay
in the hospital was reduced to less than fifteen days, the majority of
patients only remaining on the average of three to five days. This
permitted accommodations for many more patients and later in the
year all Rapid Treatment Center facilities were made available to
both male and female, white and colored patients.
With such a rapid turnover, the hospitals may now accommodate
approximately 1,000 patients per month for penicillin therapy. The
rapid patient turnover has obviated the necessity for continuing the
Wakulla Rapid Treatment Center, since the centers at Pensacola and
Jacksonville are geographically more advantageous to the counties








76 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


served; therefore, the Wakulla Rapid Treatment Center ceased opera-
tions on December 31, 1944, and the Florida State Board of Health
took over the maintenance and operation of the Gulf Coast Medical
Center at Pensacola.
Since penicillin was under strict supervision of the War Produc-
tion Board and its allocation and usage limited, this drug could only
be used on selected cases of syphilis and gonorrhea until the latter
part of the year when the restrictions were eased somewhat to permit
the use of this powerful weapon on a broader scale. The Rapid Treat-
ment Centers now accept all patients with early syphilis and all types
of gonorrhea. Permission to use penicillin on a broader scale caused
an influx of patients into the IRapid Treatment Centers before they
were declared ineligible for this type of treatment.
Up to 1944 the treatment of syphilis was a long procedure and
most patients were reluctant to abide by the weekly schedules which
were necessary to effect a cure; therefore, the introduction of penicil-
lin was a welcome addition to the person concerned with venereal dis-
ease control. It is now possible to be cured in such a short time that
everyone with a venereal disease is most desirous of submitting to this
form of treatment. Since penicillin is still under the jurisdiction of
the War Production Board, and its allocation still limited, this Bureau
must necessarily select the type of cases acceptable for admission to
the Rapid Treatment Centers. Penicillin, no doubt, will become more
generally available in the near future, thus permitting wider use of
this drug in all types of venereal diseases.

FEWER CASES
With the introduction of penicillin and other forms of intensive
treatment in the Rapid Treatment Centers, the clinic patient loads in
the State have been considerably reduced. Elsewhere in this issue
one will find numerous charts and graphs showing the activities of
the Bureau during the year 1944. Since the VD Program in the State
of Florida has been conducted rather intensively for the past three
or four years, it is only reasonable to assume that even with the long
drawn out treatment, patients on this type of therapy would alsd
eventually be cured of their disease. Actually, a large number of
cases were discharged from the clinics throughout the year after hav-
ing completed the required amount of treatment. This, in addition
to the fact that fewer new cases were reported in 1944 than during









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


GRAPH 1.-NUMBER OF CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASE UNDER
TREATMENT IN CLINICS, BY MONTH 1942-44.








78 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


the previous two years, has decreased the clinic population through-
out the State to a level comparable to the case load in the latter part
of 1942 when the program was just gaining momentum.
A review of the charts presented will reveal that during 1942 and
1943 over 30,000 new cases of syphilis were reported each year, while
for 1944 less than 20,000 cases were reported. This may be an indi-
cation that the venereal disease problem in Florida is considerably
less severe due to the intensive program which has been carried out
for the past few years. Those concerned with this problem should
like to interpret these figures as such, but one never knows when
there might be a sharp increase in the opposite direction.
TABLE 1.-NUMBER OF SYPHILIS CASES REPORTED IN FLORIDA BY
PRIVATE PHYSICIANS AND CLINICS, NUMBER AND PERCENT
PRIMARY AND SECONDARY BY YEAR 1941-1944.*

Primary and Per Cent Primary
a Secondary and Secondary
Cases Reported Cases Reported
Ye ar s 7

42 C.) a-c

1941.................... 21,258 14,267 6,991 1,623 1,874 44.8 55.2
1942............ 30,104 22,000 8,104 1,582 2,708 36.9 63.1
1943...... ......... 33,540 27,534 6,006 2,235 1,422 61.1 38.9
1944........... .. 19.087 15,524 3,563 1,849 532 77.7 22.3
(*Out of State Cases Excluded)
LESSENED TRANSMISSION
It is the honest belief of the Bureau that the Rapid Treatment
Centers and their intensive therapy schedules have played a major
role in reducing the reservoir of infected individuals in this State.
It is a medical fact that in order to control an epidemic, the infectious
individuals must be removed from contact with non-infected individu-
als. Such a role is played by the Rapid Treatment Centers. Thou-
sands of infectious patients were isolated and treated until cured in
the Rapid Treatment Centers, thereby eliminating the possibility of
their further spreading the disease to non-infected individuals. In
addition, infectious persons have been interviewed in an effort to
ascertain the origin of their infection and also those whom they them-
selves may have exposed. As far as possible all such contacts were
visited and an effort made to determine if an infection existed. Those
individuals found to be infected were in turn encouraged to report
to a private physician, to a Rapid Treatment Center in this State or
to some other State when the contact had moved out of jurisdiction.








VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


TABLE 2.-NUMBER OF VENEREAL DISEASE CASES REPORTED IN
FLORIDA, BY DISEASE AND YEAR 1940-1944.*

Year Syphilis Gonorrhea Chancroid Granuloma Lymphopathia
Inguinale Venereum

1940................ 19,877 1,824 110 21 21
1941...................... 21,258 3,048 154 76 49
1942................. 30,104 10,165 453 135 124
1943................. 33,540 16,295 844 251 254
1944....- ........... 19,087 14,351 535 217 248
(*Out of State Cases Excluded.)

TRANSPORTATION
One of the major obstacles throughout the year was the problem
of transportation. Recently, the Bureau was fortunate to be able to
purchase from the Army Medical Corps four ambulance type carry-
alls and several station wagons, which are now being used to aid in
the transportation of patients to the Rapid Treatment Centers. On
next page there is a map showing the various routes which have been
established to pick up patients for transportation to the Rapid Treat-
ment Centers. Since the establishment of these routes the influx of
patients at the Rapid Treatment Centers has been spectacular.

WORK PROGRAM
When Rapid Treatment Centers were first instituted in the State
the majority of patients, scheduled to remain not less than ten weeks,
were not confined to bed and thus presented the problem of organizing
activities to consume their free hours. This resulted in a work pro-
gram which afforded patients an opportunity to earn money while
under treatment and was of material assistance in the operation of
the Center. Since the advent of penicillin, such a program is impos-
sible, as the majority of patients are no longer ambulatory and the
stay in the hospital is too brief to profitably utilize patient labor.
Rapid Treatment Centers are now conducted and operated, therefore,
as any well-organized hospital. Patients are admitted as bed patients
and treated in bed until they have received the calculated dosage of
penicillin which will effect a cure for their disease, after which they
are released and instructed to report at specific intervals to their pri-
vate physician or Health Department for follow-up blood tests and
clinical observations.
Private physicians and health directors are cordially invited to
visit these Rapid Treatment Centers that they may personally inspect










80 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


MAP 1.-STATION-WAGON ROUTES FOR TRANSPORTING PATIENTS
TO RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS


o
-.?<









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 81


the facilities. Rapid Treatment Centers in the State have been visited
by many nationally famous physicians and professional workers. The
register at the Jacksonville Center alone lists the names of some out-
standing authorities who have inspected the Center and consider it
one of the finest in the country.

The Florida State Board of Health has been told repeatedly by
persons in authority that from a practical and statistical standpoint
the Rapid Treatment Centers operating here more nearly approach
the ideal than those operating in any other State in the country. Flor-
ida may be justly proud of the part it has played in the national pro-
gram to eliminate venereal diseases.


REGULAR CLINICS
Thus far this discussion has dealt entirely with Rapid Treatment
Centers and little mention has been made of the large number of




TABLE 3.-MONTHLY AVERAGE OF PATIENTS UNDER TREATMENT
IN CLINICS IN FLORIDA, BY YEAR 1940-1944.

Year Monthly Average of Patients Under Treatment In Clinics
1940 8,843
1941 12,600
1942 20,131
1943 30,655
1944 22.206




TABLE 4.-NUMBER OF VENEREAL DISEASE CASES* UNDER TREAT-
MENT IN CLINICS BY MONTH, 1942-1944.

YEAR
Month Y
1942 1943 1944
January.. ......... ... ..... 13,393 30,218 27,943
February ................................... 14,317 29,956 28,631
March......................... .... 15,715 31,311 26,117
April................. .............. 16,912 31,156 25,611
May ............ .......18,186 31,255 24,475
June ................ ........ 19,248 31,296 21,538
July ............ .................... 19,461 30,710 19,823
August ............... .............. 22,600 31,412 19,864
September.....................--.- 24,633 30,472 18,287
October ......... ............... 2.7,743 30,008 18,303
November................ ........... .. 29,236 30,076 17,943
December............................. 29,227 32,285 **18,000
TOTAL............................. 250,671 370,105 266,535

*Includes Rapid Treatment Centers.
**Estimated.








82 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


Health Departments and Clinics which were established prior to the
inception of a rapid treatment program. It is needless to state that
without the diagnostic facilities in the clinics throughout the State,
the Rapid Treatment Centers would be unable to justify their exist-
ence. Many clinics have decreased their case loads to an absolute
minimum by referring all infectious cases to the Rapid Treatment
Centers; whereas, previously these patients would have been treated
over a long period of time in the clinics. Health officers and clinicians
now have a greater opportunity to search for early infectious cases of
venereal diseases, whereas formerly the majority of their time was
consumed in treating the large number under standard therapy. This
enables them to devote more of their time to public health administra-
tion and other health problems.


EDUCATIONAL CAMPAIGN
Late in 1943 plans were formulated to conduct a venereal disease
educational campaign, statewide in scope. The Honorable Spessard
L. Holland, Governor of Florida, proclaimed the month of January.
1944, as Venereal Disease Control Month and with his official proclama-
tion the educational campaign was placed in motion. Wartime health
committees were organized in practically every community in the
State and through the effort of these committees, advertising space in
many leading newspapers called attention to venereal disease preven-
tion; radio programs and window displays were arranged; and post-
ers, pamphlets, leaflets, and many other educational materials were
distributed for community consumption. Although the campaign was
launched primarily for the month of January, the enthusiastic sup-
port of the wartime health committees carried the campaign through
the month of February, and in many localities these committees are
still active. Plans have been made to evaluate the results of this cam-
paign at a later dateand the statistics will be presented in the next
venereal disease number of Health Notes.
It is generally conceded that education and rapid treatment are
the two most important factors aiding in the reduction of venereal
diseases. As mentioned previously it is the consensus of this Bureau
that Rapid Treatment Centers have been instrumental in reducing
the reservoir of infection; however, it would be erroneous to overlook
the part played by education and the effects this intensive campaign
had upon the problem in Florida.











VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


TABLE 5.-NUMBER OF PATIENTS, BY RACE, RELEASED FROM
FLORIDA RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS.**
Listed according to counties committing them to the centers.
(March 1943 through December 31, 1944.)


County



Alachua
Baker
*Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Citrus
Clay
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Duval
*Escambia
Franklin
*Gadsden
Hamilton
Hernando
*Holmes
*Jackson
Jefferson
Hendry
Martin


County



Lafayette
Taylor
Lake
Lee
*Leon
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Monroe
Nassau
*Okaloosa
Orange
Osceola
*Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
*Gulf
*Hillsboro


County



St. Lucie
*Santa Rosa
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Volusia
Wakulla
*Washington
Okeechobee
Dixie
Hardee
Sarasota
Collier
Gilchrist
Indian River
*Walton
Flagler
Charlotte
Glades
Highlands
Union
Unknown

Total


*Does Not Include Patients Sent to Gulf Coast Medical Center.
**Jacksonville, Ocala, Wakulla.


TABLE 6.-AGE DISTRIBUTION, BY RACE AND SEX OF 5,824 PATIENTS
RELEASED FROM RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS.*

White Colored Total
Male Female Male Female Male Female

0-9 7 20 21 32 28 52
10-14 5 39 14 75 19 114
15-19 62 791 157 974 219 1,765
20-24 149 856 188 740 337 1,596
25-29 129 320 87 272 216 592
30-34 91 182 59 120 150 302
35 109 139 50 122 159 261
Unknown 0 6 2 6 2 12
All Ages 552 2,353 578 2,341 1,130 4,694
*Includes Patients Released from Jacksonville, Ocala, and Wakulla Rapid Treatment Centers
from Their Opening Date Through December 31, 1944. Total 5,824.









84 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


THE CHANGING PICTURE
Due to the tremendous general disease problem in the State of
Florida, clinics were established in practically every county in the
State. It was the purpose of these clinics to place under treatment the
large number of selectees who had been rejected for military service
and other individuals infected with venereal diseases who failed to
adhere to' regular treatment with private physicians.
The most important phase of the Venereal Disease Control Program
was the case-holding program; i.e. keeping patients under treatment
until they were cured. With the advent of the intensive methods of
treatment, especially penicillin, this phase of the program is relatively
unimportant. Many individuals now receive all treatment within a
few days and are only required to report for subsequent periodic
examinations to determine whether additional treatment is necessary.
As penicillin becomes more generally available the clinics will play a
less important role in treatment, since many patients will find it more
convenient to report to private physicians for penicillin therapy.
Within the next year we shall probably see again many changes in
the control of venereal diseases, with many of the smaller clinics
closing their doors and the larger ones playing a greater role in diag-
nosis. As in the past, but more so in the future, the burden of con-
trolling venereal diseases will rest upon the private physicians'
shoulders, but regardless of the source of treatment, the importance
of education, case-finding and adequate treatment can not be over-
emphasized.

TABLE 7.-DISEASE AND DIAGNOSIS, BY RACE, OF 5,824 PATIENTS
RELEASED FROM RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS*
Disease White Colored Total
Syphilis
None.......... ... ............................... 1,973 698 2,671
Primary ................................ 83 122 205
Secondary............................. 175 473 848
Early Latent....... ................. 482 1,374 1,866
Late Latent..................... 53 181 184
Cardiovascular.... .................. 0 3 3
Central Nervous System............ 109 53 162
Other Late..... .............. .... 2 2 4
Congenital............................ 28 63 91
Gonorrhea
None ... ................................. 863 1,526 2,389
All Types.............................. 2,042 1,393 3,435
Other V.D.
None...................................... 2,897 2,739 5,636
Chancroid .. ..................... 6 72 78
Granuloma Inguinale.................. 0 30 30
Lymphopathia Venereum.......... 1 52 53
More Than One Other V.D... 1 26 27

*Jacksonville, Ocala, and Wakulla.










VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


TABLE 8.-COMBINATION OF DIAGNOSES, BY RACE, OF 5824 PATIENTS
RELEASED FROM RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS*

Diagnosis Combination White Colored Total
Syphilis Alone............ ................... 591 1,295 1,886
Gonorrhea Alone.. ............................ 1,697 525 2,222
Other V.D. Alone............................... 1 32 33
Syphilis and Gonorrhea........................ 340 803 1,143
Syphilis and Other V.D............................- 2 82 84
Gonorrhea and Other V.D................. 3 23 26
Syphilis and Gonorrhea and Other V.D. 2 43 45
No Venereal Disease................................ 269 116 385

*Jacksonville, Ocala, and Wakulla.



TABLE 9.-TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES TREATED AT JACKSONVILLE,
PENSACOLA, OCALA AND WAKULLA RAPID TREATMENT CENTERS
WITH NUMBER OF PROBABLE REINFECTIONS AND RELAPSES
BY DISEASE SINCE OPENING OF CENTERS THROUGH DEC. 31, 1944.

Syphilis Gonorrhea
Total Probable Probable Total Probable Probable
Reinfections Relapses Reinfections Relapses
White Males 311 0 7 490 30 26
White Females 667 0 20 1,901 163 14
Colored Males 651 2 35 242 11 3
Col. Females 2,150 4 50 1,691 98 19
Total 3.769 6 112 4,324 302 62











86 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 10.-NUMBER OF CASES OF SYPHILIS AND GONORRHEA
REPORTED BY COUNTY, 1940-1944.

1940 1 1941 1942 1943 1944
County
Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon. Syp. Gon.

Alachua .... ...424 12 378 19 965 105 784 118 348 65
Baker..... ...... .... 79 2 118 6 76 20 45 10 31 25
Bay..... .219 25 241 34 412 255 553 422 437 454
Bradford........ ..... 15 2 284 19 182 97 199 86 193 97
Brevard .... ............... 120 3 122 6 168 2 419 91 73 33
Broward...... ............. 630 5 797 54 773 110 742 231 479 258
Calhoun.. -----.................... 1 0 1 0 26 2 48 5 9 1
Charlotte ................. 23 0 29 3 170 8 65 33 15 17
Citrus ........ .............- 9 0 20 10 17 0 170 11 13 7
Clay Ex.... ............... 26 16 142 19 62 61 108 48 155 66
Camp Blanding............... ........... 176 899 329 1,478 316 1,875 69 91
Collier .. ...-.... .... 24 1 58 2 190 1 35 14 23 3
Columbia Ex............. 103 10 84 10 59 8 714 24 88 31
Government Hospital-......-.....- ....... ...............-....- -- ...- ....-... 69 2 17 0
Dade ......... ............... 3,051 475 3,228 485 4,229 522 4,459 1,349 2,588 2,016
DeSoto...... ............. 53 1 68 1 264 14 166 47 53 50
Dixie .....---------------77 1 18 0 74 1 215 0 14 5
Duval ...-............ 2,919 458 2,973 419 3,516 2,115 6,214 3,032 3,909 1,826
Naval Air Base............... ..... 27 93 31 428 36 503 43 529
Eseambia ........ ...... 962 241 765 260 661 514 792 1,127 812 1,487
Flagler........ 25 5 81 5 79 11 94 8 108 55
Franklin ....--- 166 5 117 2 96 30 117 158 142 675
Gadsden Ex.... ...... 408 13 259 11 199 56 299 40 120 53
State Hospital......-...... 155 0 231 0 172 0 183 1 159 0
Gilchrist.- --...... 0 0 99 1 42 0 4 1 1 0
Glades... ................... 43 1 174 5 110 7 18 8 32 6
Gulf ...... 79 0 252 8 148 16 143 13 84 13
Hamilton ..... ...-- --.---. 268 6 223 18 77 50 3 0 3 6
Hardee ............. 49 1 34 0 95 17 36 5 34 10
Hendry ... .----... .----..--- 75 2 3 0 205 6 181 57 135 24
Hernando ... .......... 35 0 20 0 53 0 142 2 9 5
Highlands...... ............ 158 1 211 3 344 35 299 260 183 280
Hillsborough ..........-... 2,225 224 1,827 221 2,437 803 2,920 1,430 1,417 1,815
Holmes ........------------..------. 23 3 6 0 18 1 51 0 51 14
Indian River-..-............. 76 11 47 2 210 11 279 16 68 22
Jackson............. 671 11 342 30 237 109 211 133 113 164
Jefferson ... ...... 63 2 112 0 432 42 201 64 78 47
Lafayette..... ........... 3 0 4 0 7 1 14 0 4 1
Lake ... 473 9 382 8 611 97 380 95 201 96
Lee .... ............-......---82 2 62 1 650 108 286 39 149 41
Leon...... ................. 527 13 438 50 659 1,111 450 687 359 1,128
Levy ............. .......... 36 2 679 1 301 15 152 62 10 3
Liberty ........ .......... 2 0 1 0 4 0 7 1 0 1
Madison ... ................ 62 1 84 0 235 13 476 38 16 4
Manatee .. --...-... 456 0 175 3 503 35 218 187 178 84
Marion ............ 177 9 262 6 359 27 1,026 77 263 111
Martin ...................... 15 0 47 0 66 2 95 8 7 0
Monroe............. ...... 38 32 38 24 147 80 308 171 142 220
Nassau................. 321 19 246 9 309 59 201 126 114 102
Okaloosa .... 19 0 4 14 140 24 171 248 61 224
Okeechobee ............. 65 0 13 0 2 2 72 0 36 12
Orange Ex .................. 817 35 791 133 1,023 629 850 846 580 313
Fla. T. B. Sanat........ ... .......... ...... .. .. .. 2 1 2 0
Osceola .....................87. 1 48 6 132 3 113 9 6 4
Palm Beach.......................... 1,024 20 1,479 41 1,245 258 1,274 335 2,324 353
Pasco.................-........... 71 4 66 0 114 2 175 4 55 3
Pinellas............................ 441 60 1,087 38 1,111 277 927 596 370 319
Polk..... .......................... 917 9 421 2 690 34 1,135 245 526 161
Putnam ......................... 106 8 45 2 401 6 320 39 82 37
Saint Johns........................ 69 2 59 0 264 10 213 36 137 44
Saint Lucie............ 49 0 229 2 127 14 339 105 165 42
Santa Rosa.................... 5 0 81 4 58 27 55 18 33 88
Sarasota ....... ........ 263 17 233 14 570 83 181 46 139 53
Seminole ............................ 207 0 215 6 1,169 104 589 210 335 197
Sumter........ ............... 26 0 43 1 227 14 190 165 85 6
Suwannee........................... 24 0 55 4 259 9 377 10 9 4
Taylor ........................... 132 19 132 18 301 75 127 58 62 110
Union.............................. 9 8 4 4 24 1 20 1 11 7
State Prison ........ ....... ....................... .... 238 5 89 2
Volusia............ .......... 108 10 129 8 944 83 660 260 310 186
Wakulla ................... 35 1 94 0 85 15 111 290 16 21
Walton ............................ 14 1 43 4 164 12 46 45 58 69
Washington..................... 3 5 2 0 45 0 141 22 47 55
Quarantine Hospitals.................... ... ...... ....... -- --- .... 271 616 ..... ............
Crand Total....................19,877 1,824 21,258 3,048 30,104 10,165 33,540 16,925 19,087 14,351
(Out of Sate Cases Excluded)

















LIABLE 11.-DISTRIBUTION OF DRUGS AS TO SOURCE AND KIND FURNISHED BY DIVISION FOR 1942-43-44.
DISTRIBUTED TO
DISTRIBUTED TO CLINICS, HOSPITALS TOTAL DISTRIBUTED
DRUGS PRIVATE PHYSICIANS & OTHERS

1942 1943 1944 1942 1943 1944 1942 1943 1944

Mapharsen 33,920 54,877 36,270 336,310 536,510 398,820 370,230 591,387 435,090

Neoaraphenamine (In doses) 19,122 9,492 3,260 27,080 31,000 9,095 46,202 40,492 12,355

Sulfarsphenamine (In doses) 365 370 155 1,760 3,640 2,760 2,125 4,010 2,915

Tryparsamide (In doses) 150 500 940 5,700 9,190 10,550 5,850 9,690 11,490

Bismuth (In cc) 57,150 77,260 37,470 546,120 743,430 517,720 603,270 820,690 555,190

Sulfathiazole (In grams) 3,300 21,500 4,000 539,700 588,000 1,055,000 543,000 609,500 1,059,000

Distilled Water (In cc) 553,600 552,200 318,600 2,181,500 3,083,300 3,048,900 2,735,100 3,635,500 3,367,500

Penicillin (In Oxford Units). 0 0 0 0 0 1,092,000,000 0 0 1,092,000,000










88 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944

TABLE 12.-SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR SYPHILIS AND MICROSCOPIC
EXAMINATIONS FOR GONORRHEA-FLORIDA STATE
LABORATORIES, 1940-1944.

YEAR SYPHILIS GONORRHEA

1940 449,256 35,767
1941 908,360 43,591
1942 1,2339,399 58,936
1943 948,299 89,249
1944 839,200* 107,915**

*Includes 10,050 tests made on spinal fluid.
**Includes 22,100 cultures.










VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 89


TABLE 13.-SYPHILIS CASE RATES BY COUNTY INCLUDING NATIONAL
AND STATE AVERAGE BASED ON SELECTIVE SERVICE
REPORTS THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1943.


COLORED RATE
PER 1,000

1. Holmes 432
2. Gilchrist 373
3. Collier 368
4. Lee 368
5. Highlands 367
6. Citrus 364
7. Flagler 349
8. Seminole 337
9. Volusia 332
10. Palm Beach 332
11. Manatee 324
12. Broward 323
13. Glades 319
14. Hendry 316
15. Osceola 315
16. Duval 311
17. Hillsborough 310
18. Sumter 308
19. St. Lucie 306
20. Columbia 304
21. Martin 302
22. Bradford 299
23. Bay 298
24. Lake 297
25. Sarasota 297
26. Levy 295
27. Polk 294
28. Alachua 292
29. Charlotte 292
30. Taylor 291
31. Dade 291
32. DeSoto 286
33. Dixie 286
34. Orange 284
35. Okaloosa 284
36. Pasco 283
37. Pinellas 282
State Average 279
38. Putnam 274
National Avg. 272
39. St. Johns 258
40. Okeechobee 256
41. Madison 256
42. Union 255
43. LaFayette 250
44. Suwannee 247
45. Clay 246
46. Escambia 245
47. Marion 241
48. Leon 241
49. Gulf 240
50. Franklin 240
51. Indian River 232
52. Nassau 237
53. Brevard 238
54. Hernando 232
55. Wakulla 230
56. Baker 224
57. Hamilton 222
58. Monroe 204
59. Hardee 195
60. Jefferson 188
61. Washington 183
62. Gadsden 183
63. Walton 179
64. Jackson 175
65. Santa Rosa 168
66. Calhoun 111
67. Liberty 100


WHITE RATE
PER 1,000

1. Calhoun 72
2. Franklin 67
3. Bay 64
4. Charlotte 59
5. Escambia 56
6. Sarasota 53
7. Lee 49
8. Gulf 48
9. Monroe 48
10. DeSoto 48
11. Hendry 48
12. Levy 46
13. St. Johns 45
14. Duval 45
15. Bradford 43
16. Jefferson 42
17. Citrus 42
18. Highlands 42
19. Taylor 41
20. Manatee 40
21. Union 39
22. Volusia 39
23. Dixie 39
24. Clay 38
25. Palm Beach 38
26. Collier 37
27. Jackson 37
28. Leon 37
29. Nassau 37
State Average 36.7
30. Wakulla 36
31. Walton 36
32. Glades 36
33. Okeechobee 36
34. Osceola 36
35. Flagler 35
36. Dade 35
37. Marion 35
38. Washington 34
39. Indian River 34
40. Broward 34
41. Columbia 34
42. Pasco 34
43. Brevard 33
44. Hillsborough 33
45. Orange 33
46. St. Lucie 33
47. Holmes 32
48. Martin 32
49. Okaloosa 32
50. Hamilton 31
51. Sumter 31
52. Baker 30
53. Hardee 30
54. Hernando 29
55. Putnam 28
56. Pinellas 27
57. Seminole 27
58. Santa Rosa 27
59. Polk 26
60. Alachua 26
61. Lake 25
62. Madison 25
63. LaFayette 24
National Avg. 23.5
64. Suwannee 21
65. Liberty 21
66. Gilchrist 20
67. Gadsden 17


TOTAL RATE
PER 1,000

1. Collier 247
2. Seminole 228
3. Hendry 209
4. Flagler 206
5. Palm Beach 208
6. Lee 193
7. Glades 193
8. Citrus 191
9. St. Lucie 182
10. Dixie 180
11. Highlands 176
12. Broward 175
13. Levy 173
14. Martin 173
15. Taylor 171
16. Volusia 170
17. Manatee 165
18. Duval 164
19. Putnam 162
20. Sarasota 162
21. Alachua 160
22. Columbia 160
23. Lake 156
24. Leon 157
25. Marion 156
26. Osceola 152
27. Madison 149
28. St. Johns 146
29. Gulf 145
30. Franklin 144
31. Jefferson 142
32. Indian River 141
33. Charlotte 142
State Average 140
34. Brevard 138
35. Bay 137
36. Hamilton 132
37. Orange 132
38. Wakulla 132
39. Sumter 131
40. Dade 131
41. Bradford 127
42. DeSoto 127
43. Escambia 127
44. Pinellas 125
45. Gadsden 125
46. Clay 122
47. Nassau 123
48. Polk 121
49. Hernando 118
50. Hillsborough 116
51. Union 116
52. Suwannee 113
53. Baker 112
54. Pasco 110
55. Gilchrist 106
56. Okeechobee 102
57. Monroe 102
58. Jackson 92
59. Calhoun 86
60. Walton 65
61. Holmes 64
62. Okaloosa 62
63. Washington 62
64. LaFayette 60
65. Santa Rosa 50
66. Hardee 49
National ArT. 48
67. Liberty 40







TABLE 14.-BUREAU OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL-ANNUAL REPORT-1944.
Reported Cases of Syphilis according to Stage of Infection, Pregnancy Status, Race and Sex, Source of Reference and Age Groups, by Counties
and For State 1944

By Stage of Infection By Race & Sex Source By Age Group
of Ref.
COUNTYLate White Colored
> a ____________ a)
a Y 3 a a o -

N V z P z E o z

Alachua. ............. 16 6 125 162 9 2 10 18 348 7 14 9 152 170 3 348 320 28 14 1 65 102 122 25 19 348
Baker................... 2 2 3 18 0 0 0 6 31 0 5 7 12 7 0 31 25 6 4 0 0 14 6 6 1 31
Bay...................... 2 20 192 214 0 3 1 5 437 16 49 47 150 191 0 437 407 30 2 1 75 201 115 31 12 437
Bradford.............. 12 12 86 61 0 0 6 16 193 4 12 38 60 83 0 193 185 8 16 3 24 80 53 12 5 193
Brevard.................. 9 9 20 18 6 0 1 10 73 2 4 5 10 52 2 73 37 36 1 0 13 18 24 13 4 73
Broward............... 17 21 255 154 0 1 19 12 479 19 21 18 231 196 13 479 391 88 13 7 66 213 125 29 26 479
Calhoun............... 1 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 9 0 1 2 1 5 0 9 18 1 0 0 1 7 1 0 0 9
Charlotte.............. 1 1 6 6 0 0 1 0 15 1 1 3 4 6 1 15 13 2 0 0 3 5 7 0 0 15
Citrus ................ 1 2 5 2 0 3 0 0 13 0 1 1 1 10 0 13 9 4 0 0 1 5 3 2 2 13
Clay................... 4 3 62 76 0 0 7 3 155 1 8 9 58 76 4 155 147 8 3 3 21 57 41 22 8 155
Collier ................ 2 3 5 8 0 0 0 5 23 0 4 1 9 8 1 23 0 23 5 1 1 7 3 3 3 23
Columbia.. ............ 5 4 35 37 1 0 3 3 88 1 4 1 31 48 4 88 74 14 3 3 17 30 22 5 8 88
Dade.................... 192 166 7861,110 76 29 79 150 2,588 11 326 208 9111,094 49 2,588 1,739 849 71 32 291 986 717 317 174 2,588
DeSoto................. 1 2 14 28 0 1 5 2 53 3 4 2 17 22 8 53 19 34 2 4 4 18 16 7 2 53
Dixie..-................ 0 1 7 4 0 0 0 2 14 0 2 4 4 4 0 14 11 3 1 0 1 5 5 1 1 14
Duval..................... 313 3321,0001,503 25 60 75 601 3,909 72 457 3701,3171,703 62 3,909 3,169 740 155 55 4551,3561,105 505 278 3,909
Escambia... ... 71 107 326 257 8 27 15 1 812 10 56 78 270 399 9 812 682 130 28 4 171 372 171 53 13 812
Flagler .................... 7 3 48 36 1 0 7 6 108 2 0 1 46 58 3 108 104 4 9 1 22 36 15 13 12 108
Franklin............... 82 14 25 11 0 0 2 8 142 0 32 11 88 11 0 142 138 4 1 1 13 101 20 5 1 142
Gadsden............... 6 4 58 42 1 1 2 6 120 3 4 10 45 57 4 120 89 31 3 1 26 44 29 9 8 120
Gilchrist............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Glades................. 0 1 8 20 0 0 2 1 32 0 1 2 22 7 0 32 32 0 0 0 5 12 12 3 0 32
Gulf.................. 1 4 46 30 0 0 0 3 84 3 6 6 21 51 0 84 77 7 9 1 13 33 19 7 2 84
Hamilton............ 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 3 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3
Hardee..................... 5 1 17 9 0 0 1 1 34 0 8 13 4 9 0 34 6 28 2 1 1 14 10 4 2 34
Hendry.................. 6 1 64 61 1 1 1 0 135 1 10 3 109 11 2 135 135 0 2 1 12 65 38 13 4 135
Hernando................ 0 0 4 3 0 1 0 1 9 0 2 1 2 4 0 9 7 2 0 0 1 4 3 1 0 9
Highlands............. 48 14 62 46 0 1 7 5 183 0 33 21 87 37 5 183 154 29 10 5 17 80 51 13 7 183
Hillsborough........... 86 93 395 746 30 26 21 20 1,417 6 200 157 485 40 35 1,417 1,239 178 26 8 137 565 400 166 115 1,417
Holmes................. 0 2 21 27 0 0 1 0 51 0 7 7 16 20 1 51 50 1 1 1 4 15 13 15 2 51
Indian River........ 5 1 31 29 0 1 0 1 68 0 1 1 32 33 1 68 28 40 0 2 3 29 22 10 2 68
Jackson ............... 2 7 49 46 0 1 8 0 113 5 9 8 39 56 1 113 113 0 1 5 16 50 24 8 9 113
Jefferson.................. 2 6 63 7 0 0 0 0 78 3 3 6 25 43 1 78 77 1 3 2 18 24 22 4 5 78
Lafayette.............. 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 1 1 2 4 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 4
Lake .................... 4 5 83 92 0 0 2 15 201 7 17 15 72 85 12 201 134 67 12 3 23 60 60 27 16 201
Lee ...................... 7 5 78 54 2 0 1 2 149 1 11 8 63 62 5 149 128 21 8 1 12 67 41 18 7 149
Leon.......................... 30 42 174 95 0 8 6 4 359 3 17 23 104 213 2 359 306 53 6 1 63 169 78 34 8 359















COUNTY





Levy.--.............. --
Liberty ........-....
Madison.......
Manatee......
Marion .......- .
Martin.....-----....
Monroe...... ...
Nassau............
Okaloosa.. ....
Okeechobee.....--
Orange...............
Osceola ........
Palm Beach............
Pasco....................
Pinellas ...........
Polk ..... ......
Putnam....................
St. Johns.................
St. Lucie..................
Santa Rosa..............
Sarasota ..........
Seminole ..................
Sumter...... ...
Suwannee---..-..
Taylor..............
Union...................
Volusia................
Wakulla...................
Walton................
Washington............
State Hosp..........
Camp Blanding..
Naval Air Station..
Out of State............
Fla. T. B. San......
Gov't. Hospital.....
State Prison............

Florida 'Total..........


IBy Stage of Infection


o
0 0
S
0
0
.5 .5
02 ~


1,224 1,176


Late



I 02
0~ Uj


I I I


By Race & Sex


S White Colored

| --
p, s s S f S
0 01


_1 1 I I. 1--- I I I. a


6,71617,869 208 326


473 1,179 19,170 228 1,894 1,471


7,299 7,887 61919,17015591
7,29 7,8 6191 19,170115,591


Source
of Ref.


By Age Group


698 241 2,378 7,30915,183 2,180 1,181


I(*Includes Unknown Source of Referene).
(*Includes Unknown Source of Reference).


I


By Stage of Infection


--


10
0
16
178
263
7
142
114
61
36
580
6
2,324
55
370
526
82
137
165
33
139
335
85
9
62
11
310
16
58
47
159
69
43
83
2
17
89


.I


I


I


9 1 0 1 4 2 2 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 0 0 1 4 5 3 2 1
119 59 2 2 16 73 46 25 14
231 32 5 0 49 93 69 34 13
7 0 0 0 1 3 2 1 0
134 8 3 1 16 67 41 9 5
83 31 8 9 12 31 27 16 11
52 9 3 3 12 26 11 5 1
35 1 0 0 3 18 6 8 1
425 155 30 9 89 226 145 53 28
2 4 0 0 0 2 1 1 2
2,084 240 51 26 200 917 700 295 135
8 47 0 1 9 21 11 7 6
286 84 8 3 45 126 105 52 31
401 125 8 9 66 193 163 63 24
62 20 2 0 13 27 24 11 5
134 3 5 4 29 59 22 12 6
155 10 8 0 18 63 54 17 5
32 1 0 1 9 16 3 2 2
98 41 11 3 15 44 37 22 7
287 48 23 9 32 142 87 34 8
30 55 2 0 11 23 21 17 11
9 0 0 0 4 0 3 1 1
38 24 4 2 14 17 14 10 1
10 1 3 0 1 2 3 0 2
227 83 65 4 29 98 60 30 24
13 3 0 0 4 3 5 1 3
55 3 23 1 8 13 7 2 4
45 2 1 1 12 14 12 7 0
159 0 1 3 8 16 43 41 47
69 0 0 0 8 46 15 0 0
43 0 1 0 19 19 4 0 0
67 16 10 0 13 27 11 8 14
2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
17 0 3 0 0 1 1 5 7
89 0 6 0 10 29 30 10 4


-'- -'


10
0
16
178
263
7
142
114
61
36
580
6
2,324
55
370
526
82
137
165
33
139
335
85
9
62
11
310
16
58
47
159
69
43
83
2
17
89

19,170










MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS
FOR 1943 and 1944

J. HARLAND PAUL, M.D., Director

The Bureau of Malaria Control is a cooperative organization sup-
ported by the Florida State Board of Health, the United States Public
Health Service, and the Rockefeller Foundation. The present report
covers two years of its activities. Dr. John E. Elmendorf, Jr., of the
Rockefeller Foundation was in charge from January to December,
1943; Mr. John A. Mulrennan, State Entomologist, was Acting Direc-
tor from December, 1943, to March, 1944; and Dr. J. Harland Paul
of the Rockefeller Foundation directed the Bureau for the balance
of 1944.
Other personnel of the Bureau during 1943 and 1944 were as
follows:
Dr. Edwin G. Riley, Assistant Director, in charge of epidemiologi-
cal phases of the program. (Resigned in September, 1943, to enter
military service.)
Mr. Fred W. Knipe, Engineering Consultant, (on temporary as-
signment from the Rockefeller Foundation, recalled in March, 1944,
for service in Europe).
Mr. ;James H. Wright, Agricultural Engineer, in charge of ditch-
ing operations, (granted leave in June, 1944, to enter military serv-
ice).
Mrs. Nina Branch, Medical Technologist, engaged in insect identifi-
cations and blood-slide examinations.
Miss O. Parrish, Mrs. R. E. Johnson, and Miss Mildred Bedingfeld,
at various times secretaries for the Bureau.
The regular staff was greatly augmented throughout the period
by personnel temporarily assigned to the program by the United
States Public Health Service (Malaria Control in War Areas). Those
who occupied important posts at State Headquarters were as follows:
Mr. Sidney E. Roman, Administrative Assistant.
Mr. Paul C. Henderson, Chief of Engineering Section, (transferred
in August, 1944, to U.N.R.R.A.).
Mr. John G. Ault, Chief of Engineering Section, (transferred in
October, 1944, to U.N.IR.R.A.).








MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS


Mr. Curtiss G. Humphreys, Chief of Engineering Section, from
November, 1944.
Dr. Elmer G. Berry, Assistant Entomologist.
Mr. Paul T. Riherd, Assistant Entomologist, (granted leave to
enter military service, April, 1944).
Mr. Bertram Gross, State Supervisor, Aedes aegypti Section, (trans-
ferred July, 1944, to Territory of Hawaii).
The activities of the Bureau during 1943 and 1944 may be
grouped as follows:
(1) Epidemiological investigations, including spleen examinations
on school children and study of blood slides.
(2) Entomological surveys to appraise the possibilities of malaria
transmission around military bases and vital war industries.
(3) Supervision of a State-wide program of larviciding and drain-
age in areas of military importance.
(4) Training of military personnel in malaria control procedures.
(5) Supervision of a limited program for the control of the Aedes
aegypti mosquito that transmits dengue fever and yellow fever.
(6) Supervision of malaria control programs for certain local com-
munities.
(7) Preliminary field work and headquarters reorganization to
initiate a large-scale test of residual spray (DDT) as a method
of malaria control in Florida.
(8) Educational activities.
(9) Special studies and reports.


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
The State-wide spleen and blood survey begun in 1941 was con-
tinued with emphasis placed on the many communities located in the
neighborhood of military installations. Spleen examinations were per-
formed in 18 counties in 1943. Rates ranged downward from 32.5%
in Citrus County. The average of 20.1% for all counties visited would
seem rather high except for the fact that selection was made of those
areas known to have high anopheline populations and where malaria
transmission was known to have occurred in the recent past. Actually,
at no time during 1943 or 1944 was an epidemic of malaria experi-
enced in Florida, although a small number of unconfirmed cases were








94 ANNUAL REPORT, 1944


reported from various sections of the State. After the summer of
1944, the number of cases reported among returning military person-
nel greatly outnumbered reported civilian cases.
Routine blood surveys would seem to be losing their usefulness
under present conditions of low endemicity. In the 1942 blood sur-
vey, results were not previously reported as the data were not available
in time for the 1942 Annual Report. On completion of the examina-
tions 12 smears were found positive out of a total of 11,656. Counties
represented with one or more positive slides were Clay, Dixie, Eseam-
bia, Jackson, Marion, and Volusia.
During the routine surveys of 1943, only one positive slide was
encountered among the 1,235 smears made. This was from a child
in a Pensacola school having a Number One spleen.
A special blood slide collection was made in 1943 for the U. S.
Public Health Service totaling 7,817 specimens. Only one positive
blood smear was reported by their laboratory; this was from the
City of Gainesville. No regular blood survey was attempted in 1944,
but some 156 slides were examined in connection with epidemiological
investigations of reported cases in Volusia and Sarasota Counties.
None of these was positive except for two cases originating outside of
Florida.


ENTOMOLOGICAL SURVEYS
The main functions of the entomological service in connection with
the malaria control program are to provide information for: (1) evalu-
ating the need for or the success of the control work by maintaining a
knowledge of the densities of the adult mosquito vector; (2) insuring
the success of the program by maintaining a knowledge of any un-
controlled breeding of the anopheline larvae; and (3) providing eco-
nomical control by maintaining a knowledge of the specific habitats
in which Anopheles quadrimaculatus may be found breeding.
Overall supervision of entomological activities in Florida MCWA
during 1943-1944 was performed by the State Entomologist and an
Assistant Entomologist. The technical training of personnel to serve
as inspectors for the entomological work required a great deal of
professional time. There were 25 field inspector positions in 1943,
and 30 in 1944. Of the personnel filling these positions, nine had
to be replaced in 1943, and six in 1944, largely because of induction
of these men into the Armed Forces. In the State Office, it was neces-








MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS


sary to maintain two entomologists or technicians to handle the identi-
fication work. Two replacements of this staff were necessary in 1943,
and three in 1944.
Diurnal resting places of adult A. quadrimaculatus serve as capture
stations, and the number of adults found in such stations serves as the
most reliable index of the population of this species. A total of over
36,000 inspections was made in 1943 and 1944, in connection with rou-
tine examination of capture stations located in malaria control zones.
A total of 134,850 anophelines was collected in 1943, and 120,845 in
1944. During both years, the total anopheline collections averaged ap-
proximately 75% A. quadrimaculatus and nearly 25% A. crucians.
A. punctipennis comprised less than 0.2% during both years. One
specimen of A. atropos and four specimens of A. barber were found
in capture stations in 1943; neither of these species was found in such
stations in 1944.
One female A. (Nyssorhynchus) sp., probably albimanus, was found
in a capture station near West Palm Beach on August 19, 1943. This
specimen probably gained ingress to this country via airplane.
On May 16, 1944, a single fourth instar Anopheles albimnanus larva
was collected by Pfc. Ernest Erb while dipping in a canal running
north and south through the eastern section of the Boca Raton Army
Air Field.
Nearly 159,000 anopheline larvae were found in routine collec-
tions made during 1943 and 1944. Of this number, approximately
28,000 larvae (3rd and 4th instars) were identified in the State Ento-
mological Office. A great saving resulted because identifications en-
abled drainage and larvicidal efforts to be directed only toward habi-
tats known to support breeding of A. quadrimaculatus. The average
percentage of A. crucians crucians in the anopheline larval collections
was nearly 75%, while that of A. quadrimaculatus was nearly 25%.
A number of specimens of A. crucians georgianus were found in scat-
tered localities in 1943 and 1944, and a few specimens of A. crucians
bradleyi were collected near Jacksonville in 1944. A few larvae of A.
walker were collected at Leesburg in 1944, and several larvae of A.
barber were found in a tree hole near Jacksonville in the same year.
Light trap collections of anophelines serve as supplemental checks
in the malaria control zones. There were 49 light traps operated in
1943, and 48 in 1944, mostly located in protected sites of Navy and
Army installations. Although A. quadrimaculatus and A. crucians




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