• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal to the...
 Letter of transmittal to the President...
 Table of Contents
 Epidemiology
 Tuberculosis
 Venereal disease control
 Malaria control
 Malaria research
 Sanitary engineering
 Maternal and child health
 Bureau of dental health
 Public health nursing
 Local health service
 Laboratories
 Narcotics
 Bureau of vital statistics
 Health education
 Merit system council
 Finance and accounts






Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00013
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000243
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Letter of transmittal to the Governor
        Page i
    Letter of transmittal to the President of the State Board of Health
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    Epidemiology
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
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        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Tuberculosis
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Venereal disease control
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
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    Malaria control
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
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        Page 76
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    Malaria research
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
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        Page 132
    Sanitary engineering
        Page 133
        Page 134
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        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    Maternal and child health
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Bureau of dental health
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
    Public health nursing
        Page 159
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    Local health service
        Page 163
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    Laboratories
        Page 174
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    Narcotics
        Page 203
        Page 204
    Bureau of vital statistics
        Page 205
        Page 206
    Health education
        Page 207
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    Merit system council
        Page 228
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    Finance and accounts
        Page 232
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Full Text



STATE OF FLORIDA


FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL
of the


REPORT


STATE


BOARD


OF HEALTH


FOR THE YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1942






HENRY HANSON, M. D.
Florida State Health Officer




FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
Jacksonville
1943




















Pensacola, Florida
October 1, 1943
His Excellency, SPESSARD L. HOLLAND
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida


SIR:


I beg to hand you herewith a report of the Florida State Board of
Health for the period January 1, 1942, to December 31, 1942, inclusive.

Respectfully submitted,


HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D., President







Jacksonville, Florida
October 1, 1943
HERBERT L. BRYANS, M. D., President
Florida State Board of Health
Pensacola, Florida
DEAR DR. BRYANS:
Insofar as the work or report for 1942 is concerned, I can only speak
from personal knowledge of what took place after July 15, 1942, when I
was appointed Florida State Health Officer. The first half of 1942 was
spent in South America, British Guiana, Dutch Guiana and in Brazil, in an
intensive study of malaria.
The State Board of Health has grown since my term as State Health
Officer six and one half years ago. There are now the following bureaus
and divisions:
1. Epidemiology 9. Malaria Research
2. Tuberculosis 10. Engineering
3. Venereal Disease Control 11. Vital Statistics
4. Malaria Control 12. Accounting
5. Maternal and Child Health 13. Narcotics
6. Dental Health 14. Laboratories
7. Public Health Nursing 15. Health Education
8. Local Health Service 16. Entomology
It is a bit difficult to attempt to go into any details in connection with
any of these bureaus.
1. In the Bureau of Epidemiology the most important work during the
latter part of the year was the finding of typhoid carriers in connection with
the typhoid outbreak which occurred in Citrus County.
2. In the Division of Tuberculosis miniature plates have been taken
which have been a very good guide to the persons who may have incipient
tuberculosis. Where these shadows have looked suspicious, they have been
confirmed by larger plates.
3. The Bureau of Venereal Disease Control has had one of the largest
and most difficult jobs of all in the State Health Department, but their
report shows that much progress has been made.
4. The Bureau of Malaria Control has, in addition to its regular work,
given a series of lectures and instructions to the military personnel who have
been assigned to tropical countries for duty.
5. The Bureau of Maternal and Child Health has grown a great deal
during the last six and one half years. Since Dr. R. H. Hood left we have
had a somewhat make-shift existence and at the close of the year we did not
have anyone in view for director of the Bureau.
6. The Bureau of Dental Health is one of the newer Bureaus which
is doing great service in its clinics being held all over the state.









7. The Bureau of Public Health Nursing has continued doing good
work as usual but it has been rather difficult to keep the type of nurses we
want. Many of them have gone into the Army or Navy, or some other
phase of war work.
8. The Bureau of Local Health Service has rather a hard job but this
service, as it is at the present time organized, does not provide service for
all counties in the state. It will probably be necessary to organize the unor-
ganized counties into districts.
9. The Division of Malaria Research has continued its research in Talla-
hassee and Chattahoochee as heretofore. Much valuable material has been
published by this Division.
10. The Bureau of Engineering has a greatly increased amount of work
because of the tremendous number of military camps within the state. There
have been many problems to be solved in this Bureau, such as plans for
hospitals and new water and sewerage installations in connection with the
Army camps.
11. The Bureau of Vital Statistics had a tremendous amount of work in
getting out birth certificates. At the close of the year there seemed to be
little let up on this phase of the work in this Bureau. For details see the
section on Vital Statistics.
12. The Accounting Division now handles millions in contrast to a
few hundred thousand dollars when I was here before.
13. The Bureau of Narcotics, as usual, is doing excellent work. This
Bureau has had several additional functions during the last six and one half
years. One of these is the enforcement of the Medical Practice Act within
the state.
14. The Laboratories probably have had the most phenomenal growth
of all. Last year the laboratories in the state did more than one million and
a half examinations. The details of this you will find in the laboratory re-
port and do not require a great deal of discussion here.
15. The Bureau of Health Education has the functions of distributing
material on all health problems, and also is working in cooperation with the
State Department of Education on the preparation of a syllabus for the
schools. This bureau edits Health Notes and other literature which goes out
on health education.
16. The Bureau of Entomology, on account of the absence of Doctors
King and Bradley, and others who handle our entomological problems, has
been unable to do anything during the past year. Our entomological work
has been done by the entomologists in the Bureau of Malaria Control.
Very truly yours,
HENRY HANSON, M. D.
State Health Officer









TABLE OF CONTENTS
page
Letter of transmittal to the Governor......................... ................... I

Letter of transmittal to the President of the State Board of Health............ II

Table of Contents ..................... ................................... IV

REPORTS

Epidem biology ............................................................... ..................... 1

T uberculosis ............................................... ............................ 40

V enereal D disease Control ............................................. ......................... 46

M alaria Control ..................................................................... 72

M alaria Research ....................................... ......................... 128

Sanitary Engineering .................................................................. 133

M aternal and Child H ealth........................................... .........................151

Bureau of D mental H ealth............................................ ......................154

Public Health Nursing.............................. ................................. 159

Local Health Service..................................................................163

L laboratories ........................................... ......................................... 174

N narcotics ........................................................................... 203

Bureau of Vital Statistics..............................................205

H health Education ..................... .......................................... ..207

M erit System Council................................................ ........................228

Finance and A ccounts.............................................................. ........ 32











EPIDEMIOLOGY


E. F. HOFFMAN, M.D., Acting Director

PERSONNEL
The activities of the Bureau of Epidemiology up to July 1, 1942, were
under the direction of Harry B. Smith, M.D., M.P.H., who resigned at that
time to accept a position as director of the Bureau of Venereal Disease Control
of the State Board of Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Robert F. Sayre,
M.D., part time Epidemiologist, resigned to enter the Army as Captain in
the A. M. C. and E. F. Hoffman, M. S. P. H., who was also acting as a part
time Epidemiologist in the Bureau, was assigned as Acting Director of the
Bureau.

OFFICE ACTIVITIES
Although the Bureau was designed primarily to effect the investigation
and study of communicable and noncommunicable reportable diseases affect-
ing the populace of the State, these procedures entail certain office procedures
which are essential as a basis for carrying out the field work and studies. The
office secretary, under the direction of the director, attended to the usual
office procedures of opening, sorting, filing, writing and mailing correspond-
ence; checking, recording and filing morbidity reports; preparation of mor-
bidity tables for assembling of statistical data for publications; the taking of
dictation and typing of reports on field trips; the preparation and mailing
of circular letters and memoranda to local health department directors, phy-
sicians and others concerned in the activities carried out by this Bureau.

NEW RULES, REGULATIONS AND POLICIES
The Rules and Regulations for the Control of Communicable Diseases
drafted, adopted and published in 1941 as part of the State Sanitary Code,
was designated as Chapter XXXIV in 1942.
In order to get the necessary data for epidemiological investigations and
study, copies of Regulations 5 and 37-B of the Rules and Regulations for the
Control of Communicable Diseases of the State Sanitary Code were submit-
ted to the State Board of Health for consideration. These revisions omitted
the clauses which heretofore permitted the reporting of a venereal disease or
a positive laboratory finding of such a disease by number rather than the








2 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


name of the patient. The revised regulations which now require that these
reports include the name of the patient were favorably acted upon by the
State Board of Health on November 25, 1942. The stigma which the deleted
clauses placed on the sufferers of venereal diseases was thus removed and
epidemiological investigations on all of these cases made possible.
In addition to the changes in Regulations 5 and 37-B of this chapter,
Regulation 38-B pertaining to the certification of all food handlers was
drafted and adopted by the State Board of Health. This Regulation makes
the certification of all food handlers a responsibility of the State Health
Officer.
The policy of writing each physician in whose name a positive laboratory
report was made, for which no corresponding morbidity report has been
received, was continued. In this way the laboratory findings were verified
by the clinical findings of the attending physician and unreported cases are
promptly reported on receipt of a letter of reminder from this Bureau. An
effort is also being made to check all death certificates on deaths due to com-
municable diseases to see that corresponding morbidity reports are placed on
file.
It is only by the complete reporting of all cases that a true picture of an
outbreak or epidemic of a communicable disease can be obtained. A true
picture of such an occurrence is essential to the proper study and control of
the particular outbreak and the control of similar future outbreaks.

TABULATION AND ANALYSIS OF STATISTICAL DATA
Another function of the Bureau of Epidemiology is the tabulation and
analysis of statistical data concerning morbidity and mortality incidence of
the reportable diseases in Florida.
During the latter part of 1942, efforts were begun to prepare for physi-
cians, health department personnel and students, accurate statistical tables for
comparison for data of the current year and data for past years. Some of these
tables are included in this report.
The new method of indexing the morbidity reports received alphabetically
by disease by counties started in 1941, was continued throughout the year,
as was also the new ledger for the daily recording of disease incidence by
each local jurisdiction within the state and the new card index for typhoid
carriers. Much of the secretary's time has been taken up in the receipting
and filling of applications for insulin and the mailing of same to the diabetic
applicants. The detail of checking this service has reached such proportions
as should justify the employment of a single clerk for this work alone.








EPIDEMIOLOGY 3


GRAPHS AND SPOT MAPS
Line graph charts showing the weekly incidence of the more dangerous
communicable diseases (scarlet fever, poliomyelitis, typhoid and typhus fever)
for the current year 1942 in comparison with epidemic years were made
and displayed in the main office of the Bureau. Spot maps showing the cur-
rent incidence of communicable diseases (scarlet fever, measles, diphtheria,
typhoid, typhus, meningitis and poliomyelitis) were also maintained through-
out the year 1942. It is hoped that each year the presentation of this material
will improve'and can be made still more useful in the local studies and pres-
entation of data for the reportable diseases.

HEALTH EDUCATION
In addition to providing an article on epidemiology for the monthly
publication Health Notes, a new leaflet on rabies was written and the School
Chart on Communicable Diseases revised and rewritten to conform to Chap-
ter XXXIV of the State Sanitary Code, Rules and Regulations for the Control
of Communicable Diseases, and is being distributed by each school teacher
in the State for display in the schoolroom.
Assistance was given the Bureau of Health Education in revision of the
Communicable Disease portion of the Health Service Section of Plans for
Florida's School Health Program, published jointly by the Florida Depart-
ment of Education and the Florida State Board of Health.

MEDICAL PERSONNEL ACTIVITIES
The activities of the medical personnel were confined to the investigation
of communicable diseases reported from the counties without organized
health department services. The local directors of the organized health
departments of county units or cities were relied upon to do whatever epi-
demiological activities were necessary within their own jurisdictions, but
they occasionally called on the Bureau consultants for advisory assistance.
During the course of,the year various special field trips were necessary
for the epidemiological investigation and the followup of communicable
diseases reported and the general administration of epidemiological proce-
dures in the unorganized counties and the county and city health departments.
A total of 94 special visits were made by the Bureau of Epidemiology staff
during the year 1942. A summary of the number of these visits by purpose
will be found in Table I of this report. Numerous miscellaneous details
pertaining to epidemiology were often attended to on the occasion of these
visits to the various parts of the State.








4 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN FLORIDA IN 1942
An important phase of Epidemiology is the conducting of epidemiolog-
ical investigations with the object of learning the cause, source and incidence
of disease, and instituting the proper procedures for prevention and con-
trol. For the purpose of furthering the making of better epidemiological
investigations on the more important communicable diseases, the miscellane-
ous epidemiological case record forms were reviewed and a general composite
case record form devised.
The Bureau is requesting that epidemiological case records be obtained
on all the more dangerous communicable diseases.

TYPHOID FEVER
During the calendar year 1942 a total of 196 cases of typhoid were re-
ported in Florida. Epidemiological case records were obtained on 121 of
these cases. The sources of all of these infections were not determined. A
large number of them were traced to one or other of the 15 typhoid carriers
discovered during the course of epidemiological investigations for the year.
Of special mention is the outbreak of typhoid fever attributed to consumed
oysters.

OYSTER-BORNE TYPHOID FEVER OUTBREAK
Of the 196 cases of typhoid fever reported to the Bureau of Epidemiology
in the year 1942, 66 cases occurred in 14 Florida counties, (Hamilton, Hills-
borough, Putnam, Pinellas, Marion, Pasco, Hardee, Dixie, Levy, Suwannee,
Columbia, Lake, Hernando, Citrus) were traced to a single oyster distrib-
uting house in Crystal River, Florida, Citrus County. Forty-three of these
cases occurred in the two Counties of Hillsborough and Pinellas and the
remainder in the counties extending northward along the Gulf coast as far
north as Hamilton County. This distribution of cases corresponds with
the distribution of oysters from the particular oyster shucking house in Crys-
tal River.
The first case to come to the attention of this Bureau was investigated by
Dr. E. F. Hoffman on January 30, 1942 in Putnam County. This case had
its onset on January 16, 1,942. Three other cases investigated in the latter
part of February were found to have developed the fever about a week prior
to the date of this patient's onset, (January 12, 1942). Following these
investigations more cases were reported, which on investigation, also gave
histories of having eaten oysters coming from a Crystal River oyster packing
house. Therefore, on February 28, 1942, at a conference of the directors
of the Bureaus of Local Health Service, Engineering and Epidemiology, it








EPIDEMIOLOGY 5


was decided to revoke this oyster packing house's license to distribute oysters,
and stop the distribution and sale of oysters. This was done and a thorough
investigation made of the plant.
Because of the sprinkling of cases over the more or less extensive distri-
bution area of this plant, it was felt that a typhoid carrier must have been
employed in the plant. It was thought that we were correct in our supposi-
tions when it was discovered that one of the oyster packers, a woman who
had typhoid in July of 1941 was working three weeks prior to the onset
of the first case. The employer had discovered, however, that she had typhoid
and had promptly dismissed her. She was requested to submit stool speci-
mens, all of which proved negative. A gall-bladder drainage on her also
produced no typhoid bacilli. Attention was then given to another woman
packer, a male Negro helper and a young man who distributed the oysters
by truck. All tests proved negative. All three of these individuals had their
gall-bladders drained, but all tests were negative. The truck driver had been
inducted into the Army, so all tests had to be made by the medical officer
at the Army camp. Specimens of all the employees of the oyster packing
house in question were requested.
There was considerable suspicion and misunderstanding at these first
attempts to get authentic specimens and several individuals evaded submitting
proper specimens. Among them was a male Negro 69 years old who had
lived in this community all his life as a fisherman and oyster gatherer. He,
at the time of the outbreak and just prior to it, was gathering oysters and
occasionally helping with the shucking. Certain other employees stated that
he also occasionally entered the packing room to assist in the loading of
oysters onto the distribution truck. When the house was closed to oyster
packing and distributing, several of the former employees dispersed through-
out the State, so as to make it impossible to get specimens on all the persons
employed just prior and at the time of the outbreak. It was therefore felt
that to prevent a reoccurrence of the situation, the specific oyster house, as
well as the other oyster distributing house in Crystal River, should be required
to have their employees submit authentic stool specimens for examination
prior to certification of physical fitness for employment. This was done be-
fore the specific oyster house manager was allowed to reopen his plant. It
was through this procedure that the carrier was discovered and subsequent
laboratory reports confirmed our suspicions.
At one time, in the course of the investigation, attention was directed to
the oyster bed areas because of a "false lead" as to the possible source of
the infection. A special pollution survey of certain waters in the Crystal
River area was made by personnel of the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering,
and the report on the survey will be found in that Bureau.








6 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


It is the belief of this Bureau of Epidemiology that the carrier in question
was responsible for this outbreak and in view of his long residence and
occupation as a fisherman and oyster gatherer, may have in time past been
the cause of one or more similar outbreaks in this same area. Just how he
contaminated some of the oysters and not others cannot be explained. He
has been asked to refrain from going out on the water and from handling
food in any way. This he has agreed to do and it is understood that he is
keeping his word. The oyster house in question has been permitted to reopen
and we are confident that there will not be a reoccurrence, unless our requests
are ignored. However, we have advised the Crystal River oyster dealers
that if any case of typhoid is traceable to any oyster packing house in Flor-
ida, that the house in question will be immediately closed until the source
of the infection can be determined.
Included in this report are tables showing the morbidity and mortality
data on typhoid fever for 1942 and previous years. (See Tables VI, VII,
VIII, IX, XII and XIII.)

TYPHUS FEVER
There were 313 cases of endemic typhus fever reported for 1942. There
has been a progressive increase in the number of cases of this disease re-
ported since 1918. Most of these cases have their source of infection in
the rat flea. The recommendation of prompt emergency rat eradication to
be followed by a longtime rat harborage control and rat extermination pro-
gram is made wherever cases of this disease are reported.
Tables showing the morbidity and mortality statistics relative to typhus
fever in Florida for 1942 and the past years will be found in Tables VI, VII,
VIII, IX and XXVII.

SMALLPOX
Only one case of smallpox was reported in 1942. It is questionable as to
whether even this one was a true case of smallpox. Several investigations
were made during the year on cases of severe chickenpox suspected of being
smallpox. When these cases were investigated, the history of contacts, incu-
bation periods, clinical course of disease and nature of lesions, proved beyond
a doubt that they were not smallpox.
Morbidity and mortality data relative to smallpox will be found in Tables
VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, and XXIV.

CHICKENPOX
There were 1,388 cases of chickenpox reported in 1942. A number of
these cases were of such severe nature as to be mistaken for smallpox. How-







EPIDEMIOLOGY 7


ever, many of the individuals affected with chickenpox were observed not to
have smallpox vaccination scars. In one particular instance of a reported
case of smallpox the diagnosis was clarified when it was discovered that 14
out of 24 other contacts of the same source of the infection were suffering
from typical chickenpox. Few of these contacts, all of whom were colored,
had been vaccinated for smallpox. This exemplifies a situation which is
common through the State. It is not difficult to predict what would actually
happen if the same population were exposed to the smallpox virus.

SCARLET FEVER
There were 281 cases of scarlet fever reported in 1942. Statistical data
reveals that the incidence of scarlet fever in Florida is small, ranging between
135 to 500 cases reported annually for the last 25 years. The fatality rate
0.42 compares favorably with that of the United States as a whole, which is
0.37.
In the past scarlet fever was considered a disease entity. The clinical
syndrome, called scarlet fever, is now looked upon as but one manifestation
of an invasion of the throat by one or more of thirty-three or more types
of hemolytic streptococci. The severe symptoms of toxicity, sore throat,
high fever and rash associated with an invasion of the body by the Strepto-
coccus scarlatina and originally designated "scarlet fever" is now recognized
to have its counterpart in similar less severe toxic manifestations as the
result of invasion of the throat by less virulent strains of streptococci. The
mildness of scarlet fever in Florida and other areas with warm climates
may be attributed to these weaker strains.
The morbidity and mortality data referable to scarlet fever may be found
in Tables II, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX and XVI.
All cases of Streptococcus exanthemata should be isolated and quarantine
established for scarlet fever.

WHOOPING COUGH
Whooping cough is a disease of younger children with a high mortality
rate in infancy. In 1942 there were 828 cases of whooping cough reported.
A study of the deaths due to whooping cough for the past ten years shows
that 65 percent of the 533 deaths reported for whooping cough, 1932-1941
inclusive, occurred in the age interval of less than 1 year. Ninety percent of
the deaths occurred under two years of age and ninety-four percent under
five years of age. Past studies have shown that it takes four to five months
for relative immunity to develop after the injection of pertussis vaccine. The
actual duration of this relative protection is not definitely known, although







8 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


clinical experience indicates it may be two or three years. Active immunity
should be maintained throughout these early years of life and no dependence
made on the use of serum as a treatment measure after the child has been
exposed.
Morbidity and mortality data relative to the incidence of this disease in
1942 and previous years in Florida may be noted in Tables II, III, IV, V, VI,
VII, VIII, IX and XVI.

DIPHTHERIA
As a result of immunization, Schick testing, arid the detection of car-
riers by culture, diphtheria has declined materially throughout the United
States. In Florida there were 258 cases reported. The death rate has de-
creased from 10.1 in 1917 to 1.2 in 1941. 'There has, however, been no
change in the mortality rate for infants and preschool children generally
during this period of time. We are told that if 80 percent of the school
population is immunized the incidence of diphtheria will be decreased and
that if 50 to 65 percent of the infant and preschool children are immunized
in addition, diphtheria will cease to occur. More attention should therefore
be given to the routine immunization against diphtheria during infancy.
Data relative to diphtheria may be noted in Tables II, IV, V, VI, VII,
VIII, IX, XI and XVII.

HOOKWORM
There were 10,745 cases of hookworm disease reported for 1942 as com-
pared to 173 cases in 1918. There has been a gradual increase in the find-
ing and reporting of hookworm infestation. These figures given for hook-
worm have not been cross-checked for duplication at their origin. A vigor-
ous effort is being made to institute a standard morbidity file in the local
health jurisdictions and to encourage the checking of all morbidity reports
for duplication. Special emphasis is being placed on this in the case of
hookworm.
Data on the morbidity incidence for hookworm may be noted in Tables
VI, VII, VIII, IX and XVII.
In order to safeguard and conserve human mass energy and provide an
emergency program in line with the physical fitness program requested in the
Proclamations of both President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Governor Spes-
sard L. Holland, the following year-round immunization and hookworm
treatment is being recommended throughout the State of Florida.







EPIDEMIOLOGY 9

RECOMMENDED IMMUNIZATION AND HOOKWORM TREATMENT
PROGRAM
It is recommended that a continuous year-round program of immuniza-
tion and hookworm treatment be provided each locality throughout the State.
This service should be available to anyone, so that no one need go unpro-
tected or untreated for hookworm because of lack of funds.
The service should be provided on a basis of a minimum of one hour of
service per week annually for every 500 school children, or every 5,000 of
general population.
Wherever possible, local medical assistance should be obtained to assist
in the conduction of the year-round immunization and hookworm treatment
services.
The service should be sponsored by some local organization such as the
P.-T.A., Defense Council, or some other group, and when such a service is
newly established, this group, in connection with the schools, should be en-
couraged to make a community survey to determine the actual number of
immunization and hookworm treatments needed.
Adequate quarters should be provided. The service should be staffed
with the rotating services of available local doctors, local registered nurses
and a clerk, wherever the local health department personnel is sufficient for
conducting the service. The service should be a continuation of the mass
immunization programs now being conducted and should constitute a round-
ing out of work already being done, rather than a replacement. Children
should be prepared to understand and evaluate the services by the teacher,
who selects one or two children with the greatest need each week until the
entire class is protected. Parents should be encouraged to attend the clinics
with the children and bring their own immunization up to date.
The service should be financed wherever possible by a local contribu-
tion, matched by funds from the State Board of Health. A definite fund for
this service should be provided as part of the annual budget of each local
health department. It is felt that by such an all year-round service, accom-
panied by an educational program, a greater percentage of the population
will become immunized and will continue to maintain their immunity. It is
also felt that by continuous treatment the mental and physical retardation
(stunting of growth), now so prevalent among infested school children, will
be markedly decreased.
It is being planned that the hookworm treatment program will be fol-
lowed, as soon as re-establishment of the sanitation personnel becomes
possible, by a more adequate and intensive sanitation program for the estab-
lishment of better sanitation facilities and removal of the source of reinfec-
tion in infected soil.











10 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


TABLE 1.
SUMMARY OF SPECIAL FIELD VISITS, BUREAU OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 1942.
PURPOSE
Typhoid Fever ControL................................................... ............... ....... ...... 39
Typhus Fever Control ...... ......... ... ..... .......... .................................. 2
Paratyphoid Fever Control ............. ....................... ........ 3
Undulant Fever Control..................................................... 3
Meningitis Control --................................ ...................... 4
Venereal Disease Control.............................. ....................... 1
Poliomyelitis Control ........................................ ................. 3
D iphtheria Control ............ ........................... ................................... 2
Rabies Control ---- ............................... ................ 1
Suspected Sm allpox ....................... .... .................... ................ 5
Suspected Leprosy ................----................................. 1
Immunization and Hookworm Treatment............ ............-................ 25
Certification of Food Handlers-- --........... -- -................................ 1
A. P. H. A. Meeting... .................. ....................... .............. 1
Talks ................... ........ ....................... ................ ..... ................ 2
Cerebral Palsy ....... ........... .................. .. ......... -.................................. 1

94
TABLE 2.-Number of Cases of Scarlet Fever, Whooping Cough, Diphtheria and Measles Reported in
Florida-1918-1942 Inclusive.


YEAR


SCARLET
FEVER


WHOOPING
COUGH


828
747
383
1,124
876
504
383
532
723
508
379
254
398
1,171
321
654
748
493
444
410
94
333
347
203
557


DIPHTHERIA


258
212
223
277
456
609
309
426
491
452
735
501
491
580
588
1,095
1,224
768
681
619
886
856
576
510
329


MEASLES


4,250
11,261
2,305
2,716
9,149
635
307
1,176
8,115
1,048
217
3,799
5,287
1,117
1,709
2,582
1,126
128
3,244
2,896
140
575
369
775
2,187


Total 6,526 13,414 14,152 67,113
TABLE 3.-Deaths from Whooping Cough by age intervals, Florida-1932-1941

Year Total Age Interval
All Ages
-1 1 2 3 4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
1941 38 28 5 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0
1940 39 29 2 5 1 0 1 0 0 0 1
1939 60 43 12 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 68* 45 15 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
1937 69 38 10 3 1 2 2 1 1 0 1
1936 25 14 8 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
1935 59 38 16 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0
1934 110 64 22 8 4 5 4 0 0 0 3
1933 44 28 8 3 1 0 3 0 0 1 0
1932 31 24 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Total 533 351 101 32 10 10 16 3 1 2 6

Rate % 65.9 18.9 6.0 1.9 1.9 3.0 0.6 0.2 0.4 1.1
*Age unknown for one death.


- 1I i


I


_I_


I I











EPIDEMIOLOGY


TABLE 4.-Death Rates (Deaths per 100,000) from Measles, Diphtheria, Whooping Cough, and
Scarlet Fever, United States and Florida-1932-1941.
Measles Diphtheria Wh. Cough Scar. Fever
Year
U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla. U.S. Fla.
1941 0.9 1.2 2.0 0.1
1940 0.5 0.4 1.1 1.5 2.2 2.0 0.5 0.1
1939 0.9 0.8 1.5 1.8 2.3 3.2 0.7 0.3
1938 2.5 1.7 2.0 1.8 3.7 3.8 0.9 0.2
1937 1.2 0.3 2.0 3.2 3.9 3.4 1.4 0.1
1936 1.0 0.4 2.4 3.4 2.1 1.5 1.9 0.1
1935 3.1 2.1 3.1 3.6 3.7 3.6 2.1 0.1
1934 5.5 6.9 3.3 5.3 5.9 6.9 2.0 0.3
1933 2.2 0.2 3.9 3.6 3.5 2.8 2.0 0.6
1932 1.6 0.7 4.5 5.4 4.5 2.0 2.1 0.5
*Figures not available.

Fatality Rates (Deaths per 100 cases reported) for Measles, Diphtheria, Whooping Cough, and Scarlet
Fever, Florida-1932-1941.

Year Measles Diphtheria Whooping Cough Scarlet Fever
1941 0.15 10.85 5.09 0.98
1940 0.30 12.56 10.18 0.37
1939 0.55 11.91 5.34 1.51
1938 0.33 7.02 7.76 1.14
1937 0.79 9.03 11.71 0.53
1936 2.28 18.45 6.53 0.67
1935 2.89 13.62 11.09 0.37
1934 1.36 17.11 15.21 2.63
1933 0.29 12.39 8.66 4.93
1932 5.07 11.29 8.18 2.98

Fatality Rates (Death per 100 cases reported) for Measles, Diphtheria, Whooping Cough, and Scarlet
Fever, for the United States* and for Florida-1940.

Measles Diphtheria Whooping Cough Scarlet Fever
U.S. 0.23 9.44 1.56 0.42
Fla. 0.30 12.56 10.18 0.37
*Computed from the number of cases and deaths reported in Public Health Reports, 1942.
TABLE 5.-Deaths and Death Rates (Deaths per 100,000) by Color from Measles, Diphtheria,
Whooping Cough, and Scarlet Fever, Florida-1932-1941.
Measles Diphtheria

Year Deaths Rates Deaths Rates
Year
T W C T W C T W C T W C
1941 17 15 2 0.9 1.1 0.4 23 18 5 1.2 1.3 1.0
1940 7 5 2 0.4 0.4 0.4 28 20 8 1.5 1.4 1.5
1939 15 9 6 0.8 0.7 1.2 33 25 8 1.8 1.9 1.6
1938 30 22 8 1.7 1.7 1.6 32 22 10 1.8 1.7 2.0
1937 5 4 1 0.3 0.3 0.2 55 42 13 3.2 3.4 2.7
1936 7 5 2 0.4 0.4 0.4 57 47 10 3.4 3.9 2.1
1935 34 31 3 2.1 2.7 0.6 58 53 5 3.6 4.6 1.1
1934 110 84 26 6.9 7.5 5.6 84 69 15 5.3 6.1 3.2
1933 3 2 1 0.2 0.2 0.2 56 45 11 3.6 4.1 2.4
1932 11 7 4 0.7 0.6 0.9 83 72 11 5.4 6.7 2.5

Whooping Cough Scarlet Fever

Year Deaths Rates Deaths Rates
Year
T W C T W C T W C T W C
1941 38 19 19 2.0 1.4 3.7 2 1 1 0.1 0.1 0.2
1940 39 23 16 2.0 1.6 3.1 1 1 0 0.1 0.1
1939 60 30 30 3.2 2.2 5.9 6 5 1 0.3 0.4 0.2
1938 68 37 31 3.8 2.9 6.2 4 3 1 0.2 0.2 0.2
1937 59 30 29 3.4 2.4 5.9 2 2 0 0.1 0.2
1936 25 15 10 1.5 1.3 2.1 2 2 0 0.1 0.2
1935 59 31 28 3.6 2.7 6.0 1 1 0 0.1 0.1
1934 110 59 51 6.9 5.2 11.0 5 5 0 0.3 0.4
1933 44 24 20 2.8 2.2 4.4 10 9 1 0.6 0.8 0.2
1932 31 17 14 2.0 1.6 3.1 7 6 1 0.5 0.6 0.2


















TABLE 6.-NUMBER OF CASES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND HOOKWORM REPORTED IN FLORIDA-1918 TO 1943. z

t I 1 I I I I I I I I I z






1941 .................................. 183 27 205 747 212 981 57 145 21,258 3,832 11,261 263 196 7,944
1940 ............................... 115 7 270 383 223 1,018 44 149 19,889 653 2,305 33 111 9,455 0
1939 ......-. ................. 29 20 398 1,124 277 562 59 435 21,092 402 2,716 66 152 5,766
1938.................................... 170 61 352 876 456 739 62 471 18,243 112 9,149 32 75 6,081
1937--....................... 142 168 377 504 609 1,120 53 894 14,532 544 635 35 107 8,321
1936................................ 97 120 299 387 309 621 49 869 3,287 587 307 42 55 2,211
1935---.......................---- -........... 173 19 73 532 426 523 19 813 4,389 662 1,176 16 27 6,739
1934.. ......................... 132 5 190 723 491 603 41 1,106 5,198 65 8,115 16 36 8,984
1933............................ 186 10 203 508 452 661 33 1,011 4,833 1,267 1,048 8 54 4,870
1932 .....................-....... 267 8 235 379 735 591 21 318 4,063 335 217 8 42 3,07681
1931 ................................ 4 186 36 266 254 501 511 16 339 31965 1,5343 3,799 17 31 3,062
1930. ............................. 141 18 341 31 491 487 24 576 4,199 104 5,287 11 39 2,054
1929 .............................. 181 18 351 1,171 580 762 48 1,535 4,273 3,769 1,117 33 48 1,972
1928 .....-.....- ............ 338 20 376 321 588 943 75 844 4,307 1,631 1,709 23 49 1,092
19273 ............................ 91 42 501 654 1,09 1107 81 3601 4,955 481 2,582 39 45 1,983
1926.................................. 652 18 459 748 1,224 1,335 90 400 3,509 1,213 1,126 16 16 784
1925.................................. 72 16 175 493 768 1,468 88 665 5,736 761 128 59 2 3,467
1924............................ 641 24 156 444 681 1,573 130 1,030 5,066 345 3,244 8 4 4,890
1923_................................. 609 23 94 410 619 1,210 81 1,050 2,090 1,015 2,896 15 0 1,466
1922 .................. .. 545 8 104 94 886 1,404 117 970 1,762 1,635 140 16 0 3,869
1921 ......................-.... 733 20 172 333 856 1,313 130 979 2,952 643 575 7 1 675
1920. ................................. 525 28 164 347 576 1,248 92 1,865 2,993 10,379 369 6 1 1,055
1919 ............................... 539 34 146 203 510 1,009 199 1,895 2,429 2,010 775 6 1 2,057
1918........................... 491 75 138 557 329 522 264 931 1,640 11,631 2,187 6 1 173












TABLE 7.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY MONTHS (INFECTIOUS, PARASITIC AND OTHERS ACCORDING TO THE INTERNA-
TIONAL LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH) FLORIDA, 1942.


Int. Code
No. dDisease

1 Typhoid .................---------
2 Paratyphoid.-... ---........---....
39B Typhus---........ ...........----------------
28 Malaria ..........-....------
34 Smallpox....................-----
35 Measles.....-......... ......
8 Scarlet Fever ...........----.
9 Whooping Cough.-- .....
10 Diphtheria -................------
33 Influenza.----------....... --
27 Dysentery (all forms).............
44C Mumps-....-......-------.......
115B Strep. Sore Throat. .......
32B Vincent's Angina...........
36 Poliomyletis (Acute)..........----
37A Acute Infect. Encephalitis
6 Epidemic Meningitis.....
38E Chicken Pox ...........-.......
38D German Measles..------...............
38F Dengue.................--------..........-----
12 Tetanus..... .. --.........-- ...
39C Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever (all forms)..
13-22 Tuberculosis-.. -- -...........---
30 Syphilis ...................-------
44A Chancroid......-------...............
25 Gonococcus_ ---....................----
25 Ophthalmia Neonatorum........
45-55 Cancer (all forms) ...........------......
69 Pellagra--------............... -------
88 Trachoma...----.......-...-- ....----
107-109 Pneumonia (all forms)-...--.....
40 Hookworm ...............----..
42 Trichinosis...-----.....--............--
5 Undulant Fever.....------.............
26A Tularemia..-- ..............


Total J an. Feb. Mar.I Apr. I May June I Jul


196
15
313
86
1
*4,324
281
828
258
227
73
1,789
35
145
43
1
25
1,388
143
1
19
0
1,163
30,104
452
10,165
16
384
74
1
841
10,745
1
37
7


7
5
11
1
1
201
35
110
31
60
3
63
3
2
1
0
7
79
4
0
3

0
78
2,073
23
621
1
26
1
0
80
935
0
0
0


18 23
0 0
19 25
2 2
0 0
612 728
36 22
88 120
24 8
34 39
0 2
118 184
7 4
3 0
1 0
0 0
2 3
151 350
14 48
0 0
1 0
0 0
112 142
1,742 1,637
81 31
561 486
1 1
28 37
1 9
0 0
114 113
1,084 1,377
0 1
2 2
0 0


29
0
6
0
0
1,011
24
62
9
16
2
310
2
1
2
0
1
317
40
0
0
0
92
2,271
27
801
2
42
8
0
66
797
0
0
0


38
1
14
2
1,227
14
155
16
7
5
389
5
2
4
0
0
306
25
1
2
0
143
2,391
43
580
3
62
16
0
85
903
0
3
0


I Aug. I


4


*(74 Cases of Measles Reported Late from Volusia County)


,


I


8
1
23
10
0
300
6
43
11
10
3
137
0
3
3
0
1
60
4
0
1
0
82
2,288
43
599
1
25
5
0
59
495
0
7
2


18
2
27
3
0
80
7
70
7
8
7
70
0
4
4
0
4
21
0
0
2
0
87
2,238
39
811
2
36
10
0
40
1,129
0
2
2


29
2
54
13
0
29
14
58
10
19
9
5
33
7
0
3
13
1
0
4

0
111
2,683
41
922
0
31
11

72
633
0
5
2


Sept. Oct.

7 8
0 2
49 36
21 17
0 0
29 7
13 22
24 24
13 73
5 12
5 7
85 105
0 1
20 40
5 6
0 1
0 1
8 6
2 0
0 0
3 1
0 0
66 114
2,256 3,752
25 40
944 1,561
0 1
22 32
9 3
0 0
28 61
259 1,508
0 0
6 5
0 0


Nov. Dec.

7 4
2 0
30 19
11 4
0 0
16 *84
38 50
40 34
32 24
8 9
5 25
118 142
1 7
16 21
7 3
0 0
0 3
30 47
1 4
0 0
2 0 rn
0 0 -"
74 62 -
3,096 3,677 0
34 25 rn
1,033 1,246
1 3
15 28 -
1 0 0
0 0
39 84
1,112 513 0
0 0 0
2 3
0 1


* (7 Caes o Mesle Reprte Lat frm Vlusi Conty













TABLE 8.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS (INFECTIOUS, PARASITIC AND OTHER, ACCORDING TO THE INTERNA-
TIONAL LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH) FLORIDA, 1942.


Int. JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE
Code Disease Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending

3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27
1 Typhoid................................ 3 1 0 3 0 3 5 4 6 9 6 3 5 2 12 6 9 7 16 7 4 4 3 3 0 2
2 Paratyphoid ....................... 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
39B Typhus............................... 2 1 4 2 2 5 4 4 6 12 3 5 5 3 1 0 2 2 2 1 3 6 1 9 11 2
28 Malaria............................... 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 4 3 1
34 Smallpox ................................. 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
35 Measles ................................ 9 23 45 49 75 113 161 116 222 165 207 185 171 260 283 297 171 363 306 219 93 246 73 71 80 76
8 Scarlet Fever ............... 12 7 6 3 7 11 17 3 5 7 10 4 1 8 7 5 4 5 3 4 0 2 2 1 1 2
9 Whooping Cough ........... 10 24 21 27 28 39 16 19 14 23 40 37 20 23 13 12 14 30 62 12 13 38 9 10 11 13
10 Diphtheria......................... 5 7 4 9 6 5 9 7 3 3 0 3 2 4 1 2 2 2 6 6 1 1 0 5 3 3
33 Influenza............................. 13 15 14 8 10 14 3 4 13 5 10 20 4 1 11 3 1 1 4 1 0 1 0 2 1 7
44C Mumps..................................... 12 21 7 14 9 27 37 12 42 42 44 49 49 71 70 123 46 77 54 69 31 158 50 43 27 17
27 Dysentery (all forms)............ 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 1 1
115B Strep. Sore Throat ........... 0 1 0 1 1 1 3 1 2 0 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
32B Vincent's Angina-..............---- 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0
36 Acute Poliomyelitis. ............ 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1
37A Acute Infec. Encephalitis........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6 Epidemic Meningitis ................ 2 1 0 1 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
38E Chicken Pox -............................. 2 10 16 21 30 28 54 27 42 64 127 83 76 73 76 131 37 87 46 62 43 68 20 20 9 11
38D German Measles............... 2 0 0 2 0 1 2 2 9 0 4 20 24 1011 7 12 10 7 5 2 1 0 1 3 0
38F Dengue......................... ....... .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
12 Tetanus.......-----........................ 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
39C Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever..........---- ....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
13-22 Tuberculosis (all forms)...--..... 7 9 3 46 13 29 30 29 24 20 35 73 14 27 34 15 16 37 33 10 36 27 19 23 20 20
30 Syphilis-........................----- ...... 247 400 445 515 466 487 479 306 470 379 504 439 315 624 619 519 509 349 733 569 498 242 622 573 610 483
44A Chancroid.........-------..................-- 3 12 1 2 5 11 5 49 16 9 1 14 7 8 6 7 6 4 16 9 7 7 6 1 31 5
25 Gonococcus ---..............-----. 97 175 48 121 180 130 101 177 153 134 71 156 125 157 136 363 145 61 175 126 108 110 167 104 186 142
25 Opthalmia Neonatorum _. 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0
45-55 Cancer (all forms) ................... 0 11 0 12 3 1 9 8 10 1 7 17 12 14 22 6 0 9 23 3 17 10 4 6 12 3
69 Pellagra....................................- 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 3 0 4 0 4 2 3 3 3 5 4 0 1 0
88 Trachoma...........................-- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
107-109 Pneumonia (all forms).... 4 24 12 27 13 22 29 26 37 12 29 47 24 18 33 10 '5 14 26 13 23 9 10 10 18 21
40 Hookworm....------........ 161 103 187 247 237 292 209 331 252 551 338 304 184 403 166 111 117 219 163 422 29 70 246 89 101 59
42 Trichinosis-.........................--- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 Undulant Fever -----................. 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3 1 3
26A Tularemia................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0










TABLE 8.-CASES OF REPORTABLE DISEASES BY WEEKS (INFECTIOUS, PARASITIC AND OTHER, ACCORDING TO THE INTERNA-
TIONAL LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH) FLORIDA, 1942.-(Continued.)


Int.
Code Disease
No.


1 Typhoid...............
2 Paratyphoid...............
39B Typhus ...........................
28 Malaria .... .......................
34 Smallpox...... ....................
35 Measles .................
8 Scarlet Fever...................
9 Whooping Cough....... .
10 Diphtheria--................
33 Influenza........................
44C Mumps....- ................
27 Dysentry (all forms)...........
115B Strep. Sore Throat...........
32B Vincent's Angina..................
36 Acute Poliomyelitis......
37A Acute Infec. Encephalitis..
6 Epidemic Meningitis. .....-
38E Chicken Pox..................
38D German Measles.................
38F Dengue.... ...................
12 Tetanus..... ............
39C Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever ..........
13-22 Tuberculosis (all forms)....
30 Syphilis..... .......
44A Chancroid.............................
25 Gorococcus ........................-
25 Opthalmia Neonatorum..
45-55 Cancer (all forms)..........-
69 Pellagra......................
88 Trachoma.............................
107-109 Pneumonia (all forms)........
40 Hookworm .........................
42 Trichinosis ............... ....
5 Undulant Fever........
26A Tularemia.-..................


JULY


AUGUST SEPTEMBER


OCTOBER


NOVEMBER


DECEMBER


Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending I Week Ending Week Ending Week Ending
II


4 11 18 25


3 8 7
1 0 0
2 5 9
387
100

0 1 2
259
012
000
22 13 34
1 2 4
4 18 29
1 1 2
O04
18 6 20
0 0 4
0 0 0
004
000
0 1 1
1 2 0
0 0 0
2 1 1
9 3 8
0 0 0
120
000

938
000
000
100
000

21 7 22
709 467 492
18 12 4
169 339 123
1 1 0
363
3 6 3
2 1 3
000
4 4 16
94 59 129
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 0


8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26


3 2 10 9
1 0 0 0
8 10 15 11
0 2 5 3
0 0 0 0
0000
11 6 8 2
3 0 6 0
22 8 6 18
3 3 2 2
3 4 1 1
3411
21 8 13 15
5 1 1 2
2 0 0 2
3 9 13 7
1 1 2 3
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 3
3 0 1 5
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0
0000



1011
0000

21 20 33 26
335 725 674 500
12 9 9 1
107 371 165 133
0 0 0 0
1 6 1 17
6 2 0 1
6201
0 0 0 0
6 17 3 14
140 168 101 110
0 0 0 0
2 1 1 0
0 1 1 0
0110


4 1 1
0 0 0
14 7 8
5 4 6
0 0 0
000
11 10 6
5 1 5
11 2 5
1 2 5
3 0 1
39 13 11
0 1 1
0 0 0
6 1 8
2 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
1 0 2
0 2 0
0 0 0
1 0 1
000







0 0 0
201
000






11 18 16
438 441 707
6 5 4
230 306 250
0 0 0
2 5 10
1 1 7
0 0 0
101
000








8 5 11
101 59 46
0 0 0
1 1 2
0 0 0


3 10 17 24

4 1 0 1
0 0 1 0
3 5 10 9
3 1 5 5
S0 0 0
2 0 1 2
1 3 3 8
3 7 5 6
7 11 9 13
0 0 1 3
21 16 17 28
0 1 0 1
0 0 0 1
2 6 6 20
1 2 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 1 3 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0

38 21 16 18
593 604 744 757
8 .6 9 10
364 224 312 335
1 0 0 0
6 9 11 (i
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
4 10 17 11
86 60 277 606
0 0 0 0
1 0 2 1
0 0 0 0


1-1


7 14 21 28

3 2 1 1
3211
0 1 0 1
6 18 4 2
3 1 7 0
3170
0000
2 1 5 8
2158
7 10 9 12
4 16 11 9
8 5 16 3
3131
25 54 21 18
1 2 2 0
1 0 0 0
3 1 4 8
1 2 3 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3 5 7 15
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 1 1 0
0000

26 7 20 21
1,231 849 577 439
10 7 6 11
264 262 220 287
0 0 1 0
3 7 3 2
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
5 4 6 24
143 58 468 443
0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0


*(Figure includes 74 cases reported late for Volusia County)


5 12 19 26 2

2 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
3 4 3 3 6
3 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 0 4 1 *78
13 7 12 5 13
18 3 2 5 6
4 7 7 0 6
2 1 4 1 1
39 18 53 2 30
2 0 20 0 3
1 0 5 0 1
1 17 3 0 0
0 0 3 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 2 0 0 0
2 2 19 0 24
1 0 0 1 2
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0 0

22 3 21 5 11
270 773 774 853 1,007
8 2 10 4 1
288 120 255 63 520
1 0 1 0 1
5 4 16 0 3
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
11 5 32 7 29
129 191 103 90 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 2 0 1
0 1 0 0 0


I I


v


.,


.,


n












TABLE 9.-REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR 1942. o0





o 0 0 Z
E, o

0. 1 M4 4 ) Cz

Typhoid ........................ 196 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 11 0
Paratyphoid........ ................ 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0
Typhus. .. ............. ----........ 313 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 5 3 1 10 37 1
Malaria .....- --....... ..............- 86 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 7 1 nm
Smallpox .... ........ ....... 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Measles................. ...--.... 4,324 88 10 2 3 0 95 0 0 0 13 0 2 898 0 O
Scarlet Fever ........................ 281 0 0 21 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0 3 47 0
Whooping Cough............... 828 0 9 0 2 0 40 0 0 0 3 0 0 279 0 ;
Diphtheria ....................... 258 5 5 6 1 0 7 0 0 1 25 0 10 16 0 -4
Influenza ......................... 227 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 74 0
Mumps ........................... 1,789 11 9 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 10 0 4 297 0
Vincent's ................. 145 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 26 0
Dysentery .. .................... 73 00 0 0 0 1 000 0 0 0 0 7 0 ,
Strep. Infection.................. 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 0
Leprosy ... ....... ............0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis............ ..... ...... 43 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 8 0 )
Leth. Encephalitis.........-...... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Meningitis .................... 25 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Chickenpox .....- ........ ......1,888 4 3 0 1 0 38 0 0 0 7 0 4 337 0
German Measles ................ .. 143 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 18 0
Dengue ................................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tetanus.... ..... ........ 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0
Tuberculosis............... ........ 1,163 4 10 12 2 0 26 2 1 0 2 0 84 393 3
Syphilis....... ........................ 30,104 961 76 412 183 168 773 27 169 17 391 190 59 4,229 264
Chancroid.......................... 452 0 0 10 3 0 3 0 0 0 2 59 0 51 1
G nococus............................ 10,165 197 21 25 97 12 100 2 8 0 1,539 1 8 522 14
Opth. Neonatorum............ .. 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Cancer- ............................ 384 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 319 0
Pellagra ..................... 74 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 0
Trachoma............................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Pneumonia ...................... ...... 841 0 0 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 471 0
Hookworm .......................... 10,745 0 420 637 97 0 39 0 0 0 0 1 229 101 0
Trichnosis ............................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Undulant ..... .............- ........... 37 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0
Tularemia............................... 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Anthrax- .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0










TABLE 9.-REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR 1942.-(Continued.)




E 0 0

0 0
Z M Z II


Q H o a CS a a
Typhoid...................-............. 0 23 11 0 1 12 0 0 1 3 4 0 1 5 30 0
Paratyphoid.....---.............--.----- 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Typhus....--........... -- ..........--- 0 65 18 0 2 2 0 0 0 6 3 1 0 1 34 0
Malaria................--. ---- 0 5 5 1 3 19 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 2 3 0
Smallpox.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Measles............0.... .. 0 1,368 78 5 39 57 0 0 34 32 2 5 0 7 451 23
Scarlet Fever.................- ..... 0 35 26 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 29 0
Whooping Cough-.........----..... 0 116 18 0 0 1 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 2 75 0
Diphtheria_--........... ...... 0 46 7 0 3 12 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 7 18 0
Influenza......................... 0 11 23 0 0 45 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 19 1
Mumps................ .--------. 0 734 881 13 3 18 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 0 61 0
Vincent's................-..-.......--... 0 6 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 101 0
Dysentery........................ 0 15 0 0 0 15 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Strep. Infection................... 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy--............ .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis.......-............ 1 9 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Leth. Encephalitis............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 "
Meningitis-.......-............ 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 "0
Chickenpox ...--............... 0 554 34 0 7 9 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 1 67 0 -
German Measles.............-.. 0 55 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 V
Dengue....................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m
Tetanus......................... 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Tuberculosis....................... 2 163 30 1 3 36 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 108 3 S
Syphilis.....................--......- 74 3.547 660 79 96 371 42 110 148 77 95 205 53 344 2,437 18 -
Chancroid.........-....................--- 0 54 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 38 0 O
Gonococcus.............-...- ......- 1 2,543 514 11 30 56 0 7 16 50 17 6 0 35 803 1
Opth. Neonatorum-................ 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 r
Cancer.. ...................-.........- 0 6 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Pellagra ......-.....-...- .... 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Trachoma... ..-.........-......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia-....-..........-..-........ ... 0 67 13 0 6 91 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 104 0
Hookworm................................ 0 631 179 14 13 238 36 13 13 311 0 1 0 56 47 0
Trichinosis................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Undulant....... ....................... 0 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Tularemia......................- 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Anthrax.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0












TABLE 9.-REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR 1942.-(Continued.)




0 H




Typhoid---....... 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 5 0 2 1 0

Paratyphoid.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Typhus._...-..-................. 0 3 4 0 4 3 4 1 0 6 3 1 0 0 3 1 m
M alaria..................................... 0 0 3 0 1 0 7 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 -0
Smallpox.... ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Measles............... .. 4 0 20 0 41 28 13 0 0 0 0 3 0 47 27 0
Scarlet Fever..... ........... 0 0 0 0 16 0 16 0 0 1 2 0 0 4 0 0 M
Whooping Cough............... 0 0 1 0 21 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 -4
Diphtheria --....................----..- 0 1 4 0 3 4 6 0 0 0 1 1 0 6 0 2
Influenza............ ................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Mumps.-----..-...---.................. 1 0 14 0 15 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 12 13 12
Vincent's-......................... 0 3 0 0 1 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 e
Dysentery.....................--- 0 0 0 0 1 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0
Strep. Infection ...............---.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leprosy........ -----.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis ............................ 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0
Leth. Encephalitis .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Meningitis ..................... 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Chickenpox............................... 0 0 8 1 41 1 3 5 0 4 0 0 0 4 4 0
German Measles............... 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tetanus.................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dengue ......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuberculosis ....................... 1 11 7 1 9 1 20 2 1 1 4 1 0 3 24 2
Syphilis............---------- ............... 210 258 411 14 604 650 659 301 4 235 563 359 66 147 309 141
Chancroid............................. 0 0 1 0 1 0 8 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 6 0
Gonococcus.... ................ 11 109 42 4 95 108 1,111 15 0 13 35 27 2 80 59 24
Opth. Neonatorum. .......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cancer............ ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0
Pellagra ................. ............. 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0
Trachoma .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pneumonia- ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1
Hookworm- ........--- ............ 1 227 1,265 0 158 4 236 59 0 0 0 0 1 0 260 740
Trichinosis..----.................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Undulant ............................. 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tularemia...........................----- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Anthrax......---........................------ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0









TABLE 9.-REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA FOR THE YEAR 1942.-(Continued.)










Typhus ............................................... 0 14 2 1 1 17 1 0 1 0 1 2 26 1 1 0
H Z





Smallpox......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0






Diphtheria ............................. ......... 0 2 0 4 6 5 20 0 0 0 7 6 2 0 0 5 4 14 0 5 0
I0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 W0 0 0 0




TyMumpshoid ...............---- --_-. 1 1 4 7 36 3 2 2 0 0 0 47 0 1 1 0 14 0 0 0
ParaVincent'syphoid........... ............... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TDyse ryps ....................... .. 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 0
MalaStrep.Infect............................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 02 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
SmaLeprosy............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Poliomyelitis .. .................................... 0 0 0 10 2 76 72 0 0 11 234 2 0 0 0 *179 6 24 0
et Fh.Enephaliver.............................. 0 11 1 3 0 14 60 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 40 0 0
MenWhooping Coughtis ............--- .........0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 4 0
Chicknfluenpox........................ 0 0 0 46 0 0 0 0 01 7 20 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
German Measlesps ---................................ 0 206 0 15 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0
Vincent'se............................--.... 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 010 0 0 0 0 -
DysTetanustery..................................... 0 1 0 1 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tuber Infctionsis................................... O 11 0 0 27 0 0 0 0 5 2 20 0 0 0 10 0 0 0
Syphilis....................................... 2 1,023 131 1,24 114 0 1,111 690 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0164 45 0
P oliomyelitis ---........................................ 0 2 0 1 0 10 5 0 0 0 0 3 1 30 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
eOpth. Neonatorumis..--.. ----.............. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Caen ter .......................................... 1. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0
Chikenpoxllaa ..... ...... .........---- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
GeTracman Measles............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Pneumoniag .............. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
etookworm.. .................................. 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
Trichinulosis .... .................... 0 1 0 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 10 3
yphindln......................-------- 2 1,03 1 01 2,24 0 0 11 12 0 801 0 0 0

Optarh.Neona...t........ ... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Cancer ............ ... ---- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0
elangra.. .... ............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TRoc Mouta po r ......... ......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
euo ass Measles ..................... 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
SHookwrml..............-------- .......... 121-- 0 273 0 1 69 2 2 2 5 0 16 22 0 2 30 254 945 0 10 23418 160 4
rithnosis-..-- m-............------- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 01 01 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
cun --......................----- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Tularemia................................ 1 0 0 0 0 01 0 0 01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Anthrax.. --------------........................0 0 0 0 0 0 0 01 01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever-. 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0


*74 Cases of Measles Reported Late from Volusia County. *










20 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942





TABLE 10.-CASES OF SMALLPOX REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY YEARS
1930-1942, FLORIDA.


County 1930 1931 1932
Alachua........ .............. .... ............ 0.. O 0 0
Baker...... ...................... 0 0 4
Bay....... ........................... 0 1 0
Bradford.......---......................... 0 0 0
Brevard ...... ..................... 0 0
Broward ............ ................... 0 0 0
Calhoun ............ ---..................... 0 2 0
Charlotte.......... .............. 0 0 0
Citrus .. ................................... O 0 0
Clay.... .......................------ 0 0 0
Collier ............ ---................. 0 0 0
Columbia ----.---- ...--.-... 0 0 0
Dade...... ...................... 0 2 0
DeSoto...........---..................... 0 0 0
Dixie............................................... 1 0 0
Duval.......-..........--....................... 0 0 0
Escambia ........................ 0 1 0
Flagler........--- ..-- ................ ....... 0 0 0
Franklin........................................... 0 0 0
Gadsden......................................... 0 3 0
Gilchrist................................ 0....... 0 0
Glades ...................................... 0 0 0
Gulf ...................... .... ........ 0 0 0
Hamilton....................-------................. 0 0 0
Hardee............................................ 0 0
Hendry ... ....................... 0 0 0
Hernando..... --- ------- .................. 0 0 0
Highlands ... .................. 0 0 0
Hillsboro -_-...... .---.............. 1 0 0
Holmes ............................................. 2 0 0
Indian River............................... 0 0 0
Jackson ...................................... 0 0 13
Jefferson ...................................... 0 0 0
Lafayette ...... -------..................... 0 1 1
Lake .................................................. 3 0 0
Lee..............--- ...........................-----. 0 0 0
Leon................................................. 0 0 0
Levy........... ......................... 0 0 0
Liberty ....--- ...................... 0 0 0
Madison ... .................... 0 0 0
Manatee ..................................... 6 0 0
Marion .........................................-- 0 0 0
Martin ........................................... 0 0 0
Monroe ................................ --------- -- 0 0 0
Nassau ................................... 0 1 0
Okaloosa. ----... ..................-- 0 0 0
Okeechobee.................................. 0 0 0
Orange ............................ 5 0 0
Osceola ---- ------........ .................. 0 7 0
Palm Beach .........................--------....... 0 0 0
Pasco ... ....... --------......................... 0 0 0
Pinellas........................................... 2 0 1
Polk .......................................... ... 4 1 2
Putnam. ........... ....................... 1 1 0
St. Johns .............. ..................... 0 2 0
St. Lucie ---------....................... 0 0 0
Santa Rosa.............. .................. 0 0 0
Sarasota.....----......... ..--------- 0 3 0
Seminole ..................................... 0 0 0
Sumter.... ........-----.......................... 0 0 0
Suwannee ....................................... 0 0 0
Taylor ............... ............ 0 0 0
Union..... ---- -------...................... 0 0 0
Volusia........--------------........... ............... 1 1 2
Wakulla.................. .........--..... 1 0 0
Walton ...................----- -- .................. 0 0 9
Washington........-- ----...................... 1 0
TOTAL........ --------.......................... 27 27 32


1933 1934 1935 1936 1937


1938 1939 1940
0 0 0
0 0 0


1 3 14 0 8 15 4 7 0 1










EPIDEMIOLOGY 21





TABLE 11.-CASES OF DIPHTHERIA REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY YEARS 1930-
1942, FLORIDA.


County 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942
Alachua......--............................... 0 10 3 2 1 1 5 2 2 2 2 5
Baker .... ........................... 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5
Bay .... .......... ............. 4 5 0 3 2 0 0 7 1 10 4 0 6
Bradford... ....................... 0 3 1 2 1 0 0 5 2 1 0 3 1
Brevard.. .............. ...... 0... 4 7 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0
Broward ..-.....-..- .......... 12 3 6 9 7 3 14 4 9 6 5 3 7
Calhoun...........-...- ..-- 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte.........................----- 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus....--. .. ----- ......................2 3 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Clay ............... ................................ 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 25
Collier ........ ..................... 1 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia .........-------- 5 1 8 2 4 7 3 1 3 2 1 0 19
Dade ................. 117 77 85 52 62 65 33 51 24 26 10 9 16
DeSoto .................... .... 2 3 7 2 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 0
Dixie ............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0142 0 0 0 0 0
Duval ..... ..................... 71 62 164 121 96 105 61 31 107 72 53 47 46
Escambia .. .... .................. 7 12 31 21 12 13 4 0 49 8 8 4 7
Flagler ....... .................... 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Franklin....------.................... 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 3
Gadsden .......................... 8 7 3 2 2 1 1 0 1 6 1 5 12
Gilchrist....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0
Glades__ ....................................... 1 3 6 1 6 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0
Gulf ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0
Hamilton...-- ................... 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 5 4
Hardee.. ....................... 3 7 1 2 1 1 5... 7 2 1 4 9 1
Hendry.......................................... .. 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Hernando... ........................... 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Highlands.. ..........----------- ............ 4 8 10 3 4 3 3 8 4 6 3 7 7
Hillsboro ............................. 106 95 146 86 153 101 46 79 128 54 46 33 18
Holmes ....... ..................... 1 1 5 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
Indian River............................ 1 2 3 5 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0
Jackson......................................... 1 8 2 3 0 0 1 24 0 1 0 3 1
Jefferson............-- ......................... 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 4 4
Lafayette.... .... .................0 0 1 0 3 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lake ................................ ................ 9 8 17 2 4 1 1 6 1 2 4 0 3
Lee ................................................. 2 1 6 7 0 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 4
Leon ................. ............... 10 8 8 1 0 2 1 4 3 7 2
Levy ................ ............ 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0
Liberty...--- .............. ............. 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Madison.. ...................... 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 4 2 0 0 0 0
Manatee-........ ............... 4 8 18 0 2 0 5 9 7 2 0 3 1
Martin .............. .......1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Marion ................ ....................... 4 1 2 5 1 2 1 13 6 0 6 0 1
Monroe ..... ................. .... 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 9 1 3 1 0 6
Nassau ............................ 0 2 7 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 4 0
Okaloosa.....----........ ---- .............0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2
Okeechobee ........ ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Orange .............. _................ 13 7 13 8 8 19 29 39 11 17 17 9 2
Osceola ...................... .... 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0
Palm Beach....................... 1 12 11 13 8 18 18 6 2 1 1 4
Pasco .... ....................... 2 7 7 13 3 4 1 0 2 1 0 6
Pinellas... ....... .............. .. 11 8 3 32 14 27 6 39 31 11 8 9 5
Polk ............... ............... 44 36 49 7 23 28 22 26 41 17 16 16 20
Putnam_.... ...... ......................... 0 1 4 2 3 6 1 3 7 1 0 1 0
St. Johns............................. .... ... 3 3 1 1 3 4 5 1 2 0 0 0 0
St.Lucie .....--------.................... 4 1 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 0
Santa Rosa .... ................ 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 7
Sarasota.... ...... ................ 8. 14 9 9 16 4 9 11 6 3 6 4 6
Seminole ................................4 6 4 7 2 0 7 6 0 0 0 0 2
Sumter ................. .. ...... 2 0 2 3 3 4 1 2 0 0 0 2 0
Suwannee -........................10 2 0 0 1 3 2 5 0 0 1 1 0
Taylor .................................. 3 17 14 4 2 1 1 5 3 0 1 2 5
Union -......................---- ...... 2 2 0 0 2 0 1 4 2 0 0 0 4
Volusia........--................... 4 16 38 5 6 2 9 17 10 26 5 7 14
Wakulla .. ........................ 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0
Walton....................... ............ .. 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 5
Washington .......................... 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
TOTAL ... ............................... 492 483 735 452 491 425 309 615 490 299 223 212 258











22 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942




TABLE 12.-CASES OF TYPHOID FEVER REPORTED BY COUNTIES BY YEARS
1930-1942, FLORIDA.


County 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942
Alachua....................................... 1 0 1 0 0 4 0 3 3 0 0 1 0
Baker...................................... 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 1
Bay.......................................... 1 0 7 2 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
Bradford. .......-.........-.................. O0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Brevard.............. ........... .......... 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Broward............ .......-......... .--- 3 6 3 5 2 0 1 1 6 2 6 1 1
Calhoun........................... .... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Charlotte............ ............................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Citrus......................... .......... O 0 2 0 7 0 0 1 3 4 0 0 1
Clay.............................. .............. 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1
Collier................... ... ............ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Columbia...................................... 0 1 6 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 2
Dade............................................... 14 10 15 26 23 13 18 25 19 18 43 20 11
DeSoto.......................... ....... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Dixie...................... -.. .... ...... 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Duval...................................... 13 11 21 14 11 8 8 16 49 13 8 36 23
Escambia....................... ...... 7 31 68 21 7 16 3 10 21 11 4 6 11
Flagler.................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0
Franklin...................................... 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Gadsden................................... 1 11 8 3 2 0 0 1 3 6 2 16 12
Gilchrist...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Glades ..... ... ................. ..... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gulf................ ......................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Hamilton........-- ..................... 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Hardee...................................... 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4
Hendry................. ..... .... ...... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Hernando............................. 0 0 1 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1
Highlands............................. 2 7 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 1 1 5
Hillsboro.-................. ..... 45 37 28 20 18 54 23 19 12 17 8 9 30
Holmes.................................. 3 7 4 7 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Indian River................................... 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 10 0
Jackson._................................. 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 2 4 0 0 1 0
Jefferson....................... .. ... ......-- 3 2 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1
Lafayette.......... ........... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lake..... ..................... 1 0 2 3 11 1 0 2 5 2 5 0 1
Lee..................... ........ .. 0 10 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0
Leon....................................... 4 8 10 6 7 3 1 0 0 0 2 2 0
Levy..-....-...... ........- ....... 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liberty........ .............. 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
Madison..... ................. 0 1 1 2 6 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0
Manatee ....--.... ................... 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Marion..- ............................. 2 1 5 2 2 2 1 1 0 4 0 1 5
Martin...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0
Monroe ---................................. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Nassau..................... .................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 4 0 1 1
Okaloosa -...... ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Okeehobee................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
Orange...............---- 1 3 7 1 1 2 8 7 8 2 4 9 1
Osceola .............. ..... 3 0 2 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Palm Beach...... 2 1 4 22 1 8 1 4 0 4 1 3 4
Pasco ......-..........----.... ....... 1 0 1 6 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 7
Pinellas................... ..................... 2 3 2 2 1 8 7 7 6 21 7 8 36
Polk................. .................... ...... 6 21 12 2 4 19 5 1 2 1 4 0 3
Putnam ....................... 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2
St. Johns ...................... 3 0 4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2
St. Lucie............ .......... ....... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Santa Rosa--............................ ---- 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Sarasota .... .................. 2 1 3 3 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 0
Seminole................ ............... 4 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 2
Sumter ........... ...0.. 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Suwannee........................ 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Taylor ............... ........... ....... 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 2 1 1 1
Union ........................ 4 3 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Volusia ......................... 5 2 5 19 3 3 1 3 3 5 7 11 8
Wakula .... ............... 1 1 0 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
Walton......... .............. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
W ashingtfn ....................-- .... 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAL...........-....................- 141 184 266 183 129 169 91 127 160 128 109 166 196










TABLE 13.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF. DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 ( RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


I 194211941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 193519393193 19321931 119301192911928 1927 1926119251192411923 192211921 1920 19191191811917


1. Typhoid Fever

Deaths Total 26 26 23 27 46 45 39 58 46 63 85 87 72 83 121 142 187 187 157 177 163 186 140 176 255 221
Male 15 8 7 11 17 18 9 19 13 20 25 24 23 21 44 49 62 64 42 55 32 59 50 58 87 53
White
Female 3 3 39 9 9 5 7 8 12 11 22 6 15 27 25 40 52 42 39 45 55 33 47 55 63
Male 5 8 3 5 10 11 1 12 13 17 32 18 27 22 27 44 48 35 36 42 49 41 29 33 63 61
Colored
Female 3 7 4 8 10 7 1 20 12 14 17 23 16 25 23 24 37 36 37 41 37 31 28 38 50 44
Rates: Total 1.4 1.4 1.2 1.5 2. 2. 3.6 2.9 4.1 5.6 5.8 4.9 5.8 8.710.614.515.113.215.514.917.914.1 18.427.324.2
White 1. 0.8 1.1 1.0 2.0 2.2 1.2 2.3 1.9 2.9 3.3 4. 2.8 3.6 7.3 8.0 11.513.610.312.110.516.412.616.723.419.7
Colored 1.5 2.9 1.4 2.6 4.0 3.7 5.2 6.8 5.4 6.9 11.0 9.3 9.9 11.1 12.0 16.8 21.5 18.4 19.5 22.7 24.2 20.9 17.0 21.634.6 32.3

2. Paratyphoid Fever Paratyphoid Fever 1917-1920 included in Typhoid Fever figures No. 1 (above)

Deaths: Total 2 3 2 1 1 3 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 1 4 1 2 0 1 0
Male 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0
White
Female 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
Male 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 00
Colored

Rates: Total
White
Colored


* Deaths per 100,000 Population


Floriaa State Boara of HIealtn
From Bureau of Vital Statistics













TABLE 14.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)

1 1942 1941 1940 1939119381937 193619 3 19193419331193211931 1930119291192811927 1926119251192411923119221192119201191911918 1917
Z
3. Bubonic Plague Z
---C
Deaths: Total 6

wI-
Male 5
White
Female 0
m
Male 1 -o
Colored F le
Female 0
Rates: Total --
White
Colored
Not listed 1917-1920
5. Undulant Fever N

Deaths: Total 1 2 3 5 3 3 2 3 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Male 1 1 3 4 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0
White
Female 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Male 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Colored
Female 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population










TABLE 15.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


| 1942 1941 11940193 193911 9368193 5 193 4 19351933193211931 1930l 929 1928 1927 1926 1925 192411923 1922 19211920 1919 1918 1917

6. Cerebrospinal Meningitis

Deaths: Total 13 16 8 12 18 66 58 13 8 9 3 10 5 11 8 7 6 2 10 24 3 9 11 19 37 2
Male 5 3 5 5 517 20 6 6 4 0 5 2 8 6 4 2 0 6 17 1 2 5 6 13 2
White
Female 3 7 0 3 5 12 10 3 0 5 2 4 0 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 0 2 5 8 11 0
Male 1 4 3 4 5 25 18 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 5 1 4 8 0
Colored
Female 4 2 0 0 3 12 10 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 2 4 2 0 01 5
Rates: Total 0.7 0.8 0.4 0.6 1.0 3.8 3.5 0.8 0.5 0.6 0.2 0.7 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.8 2.1 0.3 0.9 1.1 2.0 4.0 0.2
White 0.6 0.7 0.4 0.6 0.8 2.3 2.5 0.8 0.5 0.8 0.2 0.8 0.2 0.9 0.7 0.5 0.6 0.1 1.0 2.5 0.1 0.6 1.5 2.2 3.9 0.3
Colored 1.0 1.2 0.6 0.8 1.6 7.6 5.8 0.9 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.7 0.5 0.2 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.5 1.4 0.6 1.4 0.3 1.5 4.0

7. Anthrax

Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 11 1
Male 0 2 2 1 1 0 0
White
Female 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
Male 1 1 0 0 0 1 0
Colored
Female 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of iealtn
From Bureau of Vital Statistic


* Deaths per 100,000 Population













TABLE 16.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


11942 19411940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1935 1934|1933 1932 1931 1930 192919281927192 1 1925 1924 1923 1922119211920119191918 1917


8. Scarlet Fever

Deaths: Total 3 2 1 6 4 2 2 1 5 10 7 7 5 4 8 12 15 4 2 5 4 10 9 4 5 2
Male 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 1 2 4 2 1 3 5 7 3 1 1 0 3 5 3 3 1
White
Female 1 0 1 5 1 2 1 0 4 8 4 3 1 3 3 6 7 1 1 2 3 5 4 1 2 1
Male 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0
Colored
Female 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

9. Whooping Cough

*Deaths: Total 48 38 39 60 68 59 25 59 110 44 31 25 56 86 43 67 155 66 111 71 30 68 64 51 151 49
Male 16 9 12 13 18 13 8 18 33 8 7 7 9 19 8 12 14 16 46 20 7 18 20 13 39 14
White
Female 9 10 11 17 19 17 7 13 26 16 10 9 20 26 12 22 14 23 29 21 14 19 20 16 51 16
Male 13 4 8 13 12 6 5 13 29 10 8 4 6 15 12 18 16 10 16 15 5 15 12 8 30 6
Colored
Female 10 15 8 17 19 23 5 15 22 10 6 5 21 26 11 15 11 17 20 15 4 16 12 14 31 13
Rates: Total 2.5 2.0 2.0 3.2 3.8 3.4 1.5 3.6 6.9 2.8 2.0 1.7 3.8 6.0 3.1 5.0 4.3 5.3 9.3 6.2 2.8 6.5 6.4 5.316.1 5.4
White 1.8 1.4 1.6 2.2 2.9 2.4 1.3 2.7 5.2 2.2 1.6 1.5 2.8 4.5 2.1 3.7 3.1 4.6 9.2 5.3 2.9 5.3 6.1 4.6 14.8 5.1
Colored 4.4 3.7 3.1 5.9 6.2 5.9 2.1 6.0111.0 4.4 3.1 2.0 6.2 9.6 5.5 8.1 6.8 7.0 9.6 8.2 2.5 9.0 7.2 6.718.7 5.8


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population










TABLE 17.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


11 1942 1941 11940 1939 19381193719361935 1934 1933 19321193 11193019291928192711926 19251192411923 1922 1921 11920 19191918 1917

10. Diphtheria

Deaths: Total 28 23 28 33 32 55 57 58 84 56 83 74 79 67 69 93 123 105 99 86 95 69 78 57 86 92
Male 13 8 6 16 14 25 24 28 42 28 33 33 28 27 20 37 56 45 42 35 41 35 33 30 33 31
White
Female 8 10 14 9 8 17 23 25 27 17 39 28 29 25 32 47 46 46 31 85 44 24 25 20 33 39
Male 4 2 7 5 9 5 5 83 8 5 4 8 11 11 9 3 13 6 14 5 6 3 13 3 8 15
Colored
Female 3 3 1 3 1 8 5 2 7 6 7 5 11 4 8 6 8 8 12 11 4 7 7 4 12 7
Rates: Total 1.5 1.2 1.5 1.8 1.8 3.2 3.4 3.6 5.3 3.6 5.4 4.9 5.3 4.7 5.0 7.0 9.6 8.5 8.3 7.5 8.7 6.6 7.9 6.0 9.2110.1
White 1.5 1.3 1.4 1.9 1.7 3.4 3.9 4.6 6.1 4.1 6.7 5.7 5.5 5.2 5.4 9.0 11.5 10.7 9.0 9.011.6 8.5 8.8 8.0 10.9 11.9
Colored 1.4 1.0 1.5 1.6 2.0 2.7 2.1 1.1 3.2 2.4 2.5 2.9 5.1 3.5 4.1 2.2 5.3 3.6 6.9 4.4 2.8 2.9 6.0 2.1 6.1 6.8

11. Erysipelas

Deaths: Total 3 4 8 13 16 10 27 17 18 18 18 24 24 20 19 15 14 19 13 12 17 17 20 21 14 17
Male 2 1 2 4 10 3 17 7 5 9 7 9 16 4 7 6 4 6 8 6 9 9 8 9 7 7
White
Female 1 2 5 8 3 5 9 8 11 7 8 10 7 13 10 8 8 11 4 6 7 7 10 12 3 9
Male 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 3 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 3 1
Colored
Female 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored
f.L1 D J5 h tU U~UI5UU15


Iloriua State -oaru ow eaL-
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


tae s per 100,000 n













TABLE 18.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


S~II 19421 19411 1940! 19391 19381 19371 19361 19351 19341 19331 19321 19311 1930! 19291 19281 19271 19261 !925I 1924! 19231 19221 19211 19201 19191 1918! 1917


12. Tetanus

Deaths: Total 28 31 59 37 57 51 45 51 55 64 49 60 53 58 61 80 97 90 68 61 63 66 58 36 50 49
Male 8 8 13 13 10 12 8 10 14 18 13 10 15 14 19 22 21 16 13 18 12 9 7 18 15
White
Female 2 4 0 3 15 6 5 4 11 7 2 13 5 10 6 10 11 8 8 7 7 9 7 5 2 8
Male 16 12 29 19 16 17 21 27 24 31 19 21 25 22 28 34 41 39 30 29 25 24 24 14 24 14
Colored
Female 2 7 17 10 13 18 7 12 10 12 10 13 13 11 13 17 23 22 14 12 13 21 18 10 6 12
Rates: Total 1.5 1.6 3.1 2.0 3.2 2.9 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.1 3.2 4.0 3.6 4.1 4.4 6.0 7.5 7.3 5.7 5.4 5.8 6.3 5.8 3.8 5.3 5.4
White 0.7 0.9 0.9 0.6 2.2 1.3 1.4 1.0 1.9 1.9 1.9 2.4 1.4 2.5 2.1 3.1 3.7 3.4 3.0 2.6 3.4 3.0 2.4 1.9 3.3 3.9
Colored 3.5 3.7 8.9 5.7 5.8 7.2 5.8 8.3 7.4 9.5 6.5 7.7 8.7 7.8 9.9 12.6 16.2 15.8 11.7 11.2 10.7 13.0 12.5 7.3 9.2 8.0
13. Tuberculosis (All Forms)
(13-22)

Deaths: Total 859 916 961 921 987 966 905 903 953 1,039 1,093 1,067 1,015 1,014 1,102 1,097 1,187 999 1,054 1,079 1,019 951 1,016 993 1,084 1,085
Male 244 239 275 241 243 248 254 250 233 225 232 235 256 226 276 260 305 240 258 291 255 238 232 273 295 285
White /
Female 116 123 104 135 164 152 133 147 148 173 163 192 176 190 205 203 214 186 199 199 185 163 191 188 199 187
Male 257 296 311 277 299 313 283 261 289 327 366 334 287 318 303 299 326 285 288 303 294 253 302 253 302 314
Colored
Female 242 258 271 268 281 253 235 245 283 314 332 306 296 280 318 335 342 288 309 286 285 297 291 279 288 299
Rates: Total 44.9 47.9 50.3 49.7 55.0 55.6 53.9 55.7 60.1 66.9 71.5 70.8 68.6 70.8 79.7 82.2 92.3 80.8 88.7 94.7 93.5 91.3102.3 f03.7 115.9 118.9
White 25.8 26.0 27.2 27.9 31.4 32.0 32.3 34.5 33.9 36.1 36.5 40.1 41.3 41.3 49.7 49.8 58.3 50.9 56.2 63.3 59.9 57.6 64.3 73.4 81.2 8.03
Colored 96.4 107.0 112.4 107.3 116.4 115.8 108.2 107.9 123.9 142.1 156.2 144.8 134.0 140.6 149.5 156.4 169.0 148.7 159.1 161.2 163.0 159.3 176.8 161.6 180.4 188.7


* Deaths per 100,000 Population


r lorida State UBoard o e.i
From Bureau of Vital Statistics










TABLE 19.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


11 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 19361193 11934 193431932 1931 193011929 1928 1927 1926 1925 1924|1923 192211921 1920 1919 1918 1917


24. Septicemia


Deaths: Total
Male
White
Female
Male
Colored
Female

Rates: Total
White
Colored


27 32
7 8
8 10
3 7
9 7
1.4 1.7
1.1 1.3
2.3 2.7


25 37
11 9
8 14
2 3
4 11
1.5 2.3
1.6 2.0
1.3 3.0


* Deaths per 100,000 Population


84 76 64
31 24 28
24 25 14
16 14 10
13 13 12
6.8 6.4 5.6
6.5 6.0 5.4
7.5 7.2 6.0


m
59 -a
16
18 m
10
15 0
r-
6.5 0
5.8 0
7.7


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


-_-- ----











TABLE 20.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


11 1942 1941 194011939 193811937 1936 1935 1934 1933 1932 1931 19301|929 1928 1927 1926 1925 192411923 1922 1921 192019199 191811917

25. Gonococcus Infection Z

C
Deaths: Total 18 9 17 12 19 11 22 31 33 10 5 17 9 17 12 11 9 1 12 5 5 4 4 7 6 7 >
e Male 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 r
Female 0 3 3 2 1 1 6 10 5 2 2 4 3 3 1 3 0 0 3 1 3 0 1 1 0 0
m
Male 3 0 2 2 3 2 3 8 8 1 1 3 2 7 7 2 5 1 3 2 2 2 3 5 5 3 "u
Colored
Female 14 6 12 8 15 5 10 12 18 6 2 9 3 5 5 3 0 5 1 1 0 0 1 0
Rates: Total ..
White
Colored

26. Other Diseases Does not include Tularemia prior to 1941 Includes Tularemia 1921-1929 Tularemia not included 1917-1920
Due to Bacteria

Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Male 0
White
Female 0
Male 1
Colored
Female 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


* Deaths per 100,000 Population


Flordia State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics









TABLE 21.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


27. Dysentery (all forms)

Deaths: Total 37 34 29 41 44 30 46 48 33 40 43 40 37 52 65 79 96 90 101 66 82 108 118 155 267 268
Male 7 9 6 13 1110 12 14 12 8 7 12 10 19 14 21 29 24 32 17 22 28 38 51 82 98
White
Female 7 6 6 10 7 5 10 8 8 13 13 6 7 9 16 21 23 21 23 19 21 32 34 36 78 85
Male 10 13 9 7 12 4 13 12 7 7 11 9 14 17 15 19 19 22 22 16 20 22 20 37 56 48
Colored
Female 13 6 8 11 14 11 11 14 6 12 12 13 6 7 20 18 25 23 24 14 19 26 26 31 51 37
Rates: Total 1.9 1.8 1.5 2.2 2.5 1.7 2.7 3.0 2.1 2.6 2.8 2.7 2.5 3.6 4.7 5.9 7.5 7.3 8.5 5.8 7.510.411.916.228.629.4
White 1.0 1.1 0.9 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.8 1.9 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.7 1.6 2.8 3.1 4.5 5.8 5.3 6.8 4.7 5.9 8.6 11.0 13.9 26.3 31.1
Colored 4.4 3.7 3.3 3.5 5.2 3.1 5.0 5.5 2.8 4.2 5.1 5.0 4.6 5.6 8.4 9.1 11.1 11.7 12.3 8.2 11.0 13.9 13.7 20.7 32.726.2

28. Malaria

Deaths: Total 48 85 99 112 166 205 349 331 445 373 233 205 332 470 388 208 223 209 249 293 247 231 352 440 224 273
Male 11 16 23 26 38 59 96 107 128 113 60 58 102 125 101 47 48 55 75 85 77 61 97 131 64 83
Female 6 14 17 24 34 41 62 89 107 94 63 51 80 134 123 45 50 57 48 76 50 59 100 123 58 75
Male 11 27 26 25 42 61 106 75 110 71 64 49 72 93 79 57 55 41 61 64 57 50 80 96 51 61
Colored
Female 20 28 33 37 52 44 85 60 100 95 46 47 78 118 85 59 70 56 65 68 63 61 75 90 51 54
Rates: Total 2.5 4.4 5.2 6.0 9.2 11.8 20.8 20.4 28.124.0 15.2 13.6 22.4 32.8 28.1 15.6 17.3 16.9 21.0 25.7 22.7 22.2 35.5 46.0 24.0 29.9
White 1.2 2.2 2.9 3.7 5.6 8.0 13.2 17.0 20.9 18.8 11.4 10.2 17.4 25.7 23.2 9.9 11.0 13.215.120.817.317.2 30.0 40.4 20.126.9
Colored 6.0 10.6 11.4 12.2 18.9 21.5 39.9 28.8 45.5 36.8 24.6 21.7 34.5 49.6 39.5 28.6 31.6 25.2 33.6 36.133.8 32.146.2 56.531.2 35.4


* Deaths per 100.000 Population


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


11 194211941 1940 19391938 1193711936 1935119341193311932 19311930 192911928 1927 1926 19195 1924 1923192211921 1920119191191811917












TABLE 22.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY).


I 1942 194 11940 1939 193811937 19361935|1934 1933 1932I19311l9301929928 1927 1926 1925 1924 1923 19212 1921919 191811917
Z


30. Syphilis

Deaths: Total 379 508 445 447 440 464 391 425 485 450 382 458 424 375 438 .367 334 235 190 179 140 129 119 108 132 206
Male 92 104 76 72 71 85 61 85 73 65 67 84 77 57 69 70 51 47 26 24 19 19 16 12 21 31
White
Female 27 35 34 19 30 34 28 23 21 25 23 24 24 19 20 23 26 25 11 13 8 5 5 5 9 8

Colored Male 177 248 216 238 222 207 214 212 273 243 171 222 224 192 222 182 164 109 108 82 69 65 64 50 60 114
Female 83 121 119 11 117 138 88 105 118 117 121 128 99 106 127 92 93 54 45 60 44 40 34 41 42 53
Rates: Total
Rates: Total 19.8 26.623.3 24.1 24.5 26.7 23.3 26.2 30.6 29.0 25.0 30.4 28.6 26.1 31.7 27.5 26.0 19.0 16.0 15.7 12.8 12.4 12.0 11.3 14.1 22.6
White 8.510.0 7.9 6.8 7.8 9.5 7.4 9.4 8.4 8.2 8.310.2 9.7 7.6 9.210.0 8.7 8.5 4.6 4.8 3.7 3.4 3.2 2.7 4.9 6.6
Colored 50.2 71.3 64.770.1 68.070.6 63.1 67.6 84.7 79.865.3 79.274.370.1 84.092.3 65.0 42.3 40.838.9 31.830.429.2 27.6 312 51.4


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population










TABLE 23.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


i 1942 19411194011939 1938119371193611935 1934 1933 193211931 193011929 19281192711926 1925119241192311922 1921 119201919 1918 1917

31. Relapsing Fever

Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Male 1 0
White
Female 0 0
Male 0 1
Colored
Female 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

32. Other Diseases Due to Spirochetes Included in No. 29 prior to 1941 Spirochetosis 1921-1929 Included in No. 42
1917-1920

Deaths: Total 7 5 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Male 4 2 1 1 0
White
Female 2 1. 1 0 1
Male 0 1 1 0 0
Colored
Female 1 1 0 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population













TABLE 24.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)

|I 1942119411194011939119381193711936119351193411933119321193111930 192911928119271192621192924111923119221921 19201 19191 191811917 Z

33. Influenza a


Deaths: Total 293 543 569 529 393 658 880 624 394 608 514 607 342 903 666 323 668 338 160 235 189 84 868 920 3,161 170
Male 51 153 151 144 111 181 280 168 99 189 137 171 88 258 214 80 186 96 44 76 51 24 277 297 1,056 57
White
Female 66 134 143 103 75 142 213 158 98 145 123 158 71 240 164 90 184 96 32 63 67 24 283 253 755 50
Male 92 149 135 144 106 184 228 155 116 142 130 149 104 228 140 87 145 73 45 39 37 16 163 179 690 32
Colored
Female 84 107 140 138 101 151 159 143 81 132 124 129 79 177 148 66 153 73 39 57 34 20 145 191 660 31
Rates: Total 15.328.4129.8 28.5 21.9 37.952.438.524.8 39.133.6 40.3 23.163.148.224.2 52.027.3 13.5620.617.3 8.187.4 96.1 338.018.6
White 8.420.6121.1 18.4114.325.941.1283.317.530.324.130.915.249.539.118.341.622.6 9.4 18.0116.1 6.9 85.2 87.6 297.8 18.2
Colored 34.0149.4153.1 55.5141.5168.6 80.8163.542.760.856.862.942.195.269.337.775.437.922.426.320.010.491.9 112.4412.819.4

34. Smallpox

Deaths: Total 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 12 7 0 0 0 4 14 3 0 0 1
Male 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 0
White
Female 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 1
Male 0 1 7 4 1 9 2 0
Colored
Female 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


r-


m
V
0u
0

-4


* Deaths per 100,000 Population









TABLE 25.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


Ji 1942 1941 1940 19391193811937|1936 19351984 1933 1 19301193 929 19281192711926|19251192411923119221192219211920191919181917

35. Measles

Deaths: Total 56 17 7 15 30 5 7 34 110 3 11 36 61 13 20 21 24 8 214 74 1 6 12 43 136 170
Male 16 5 2 6 11 2 1 14 50 1 2 18 19 5 7 9 9 5 77 25 0 2 4 19 60 61
White
Female 17 10 3 3 11 2 4 17 34 1 5 12 24 6 8 6 10 1 67 23 0 2 6 18 51 40
Male 10 1 2 2 6 1 1 1 11 1 1 5 10 0 2 4 0 29 14 0 0 2 4 16 31
Colored
Colored Female 13 1 0 4 2 0 1 2 15 0 3 1 8 2 3 4 1 2 41 12 1 2 0 2 9 38
Rates: Total 2.9 0.9 0.4 0.8 1.7 0.3 0.4 2.1 6.9 0.2 0.7 2.4 4.1 0.9 1.4 1.6 1.9 0.6118.0 6.5 0.1 0.6 1.2 4.5 14.5 18.6
White 2.4 1.1 0.4 0.7 1.7 0.3 0.4 2.7 7.5 0.2 0.6 2.8 4.1 1.1 1.6 1.6 2.1 0.7117.7 6.2 0.6 1.5 5.9 18.3 17.2
Colored 4.4 0.4 0.4 1.2 1.6 0.2 0.4 0.6 5.6 0.2 0.9 1.4 4.1 0.5 1.2 1.5 1.3 0.5118.7 7.1 0.3 0.8 0.6 1.8 7.6 21.2

36. Acute Poliomyelitis and Acute Polioencephalitis

Deaths: Total 4 34 7 7 8 6 8 7 5 9 9 7 15 9 11 8 12 22 4 6 8 5 4 7 7 1
Male 0 19 4 3 3 2 2 5 4 2 4 3 6 4 7 3 4 10 0 2 3 2 1 4 4 0
White
Female 2 11 2 1 4 1 3 0 0 5 4 1 8 3 2 3 5 9 2 2 3 2 1 2 0 1
Male 0 2 0 2 1 3 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 3 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0
Colored
Female 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored


* Deaths per 100,000 Population


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics













TABLE 26.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


37. Acute Infectious Encephalitis


Deaths: Total 2 8 5 9 10 5 9 1 5 10 6 9 8 11 11 9 12 17 10 6 4 9 14 17 13 6
Male 2 6 5 6 2 4 2 0 2 8 2 1 4 6 3 4 6 5 6 2 1 3 6 2 6 3
White
Female 0 1 0 3 3 1 5 1 3 2 3 6 3 5 6 1 6 11 4 1 2 3 4 5 2 2
Male 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 3 1 2 1 4 3 1
Colored
Female 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0
Rates: Total
White
Colored

38. Other Diseases Due To Filtrable Viruses Prior to 1941 Does Not Include Herpes Zoster Includes No. 44, 1917-1920

Deaths: Total 2 3 3 1 6 3 5 0 4 2 5 3 7 5 5 5 12 12 4 7 69 7 3 4 1 6
Male 0 2 1 0 3 1 3 0 2 0 4 1 2 5 2 1 3 4 1 0 19 2 1 1 0 4
White
Female 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 1 2 2 2 2 0 20 4 0 2 1 1
Male 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 3 0 4 12 1 2 1 0 1
Colored

Rates: Total
White
Colored
an erJUUUrouaiu


Flornda State Boaru OL nealtn
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


11 19421941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 19351193411933|1932119312193011929 1928j 927 192611925194192l9 21922 192 1 192 191918917 Z9


z
C

r-



rri
0

-I


'0


Deaths per 100,0 n











TABLE 27.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)

I 19421941 19l40 1939 193811937 193611935 1934119331193231 193011929 192811927119261192511924119231192211921119201919811918


39. Typhus Fever

Deaths: Total 23 13
Male 10 8
White
Female 6 4
Male 5 0
Colored
Female 2 1
Rates: Total
White
Colored


15 7 10
5 4 5
4 2 3
4 0 0
2 1 2


12
8


0
1


9 5 8 3 4 3 2 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 3 4 3 4 3 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 00 00 0 0 1100 0O0F 0


m
10 -
5
4 r
1
0 0
r-
0
-<












TABLE 28.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


II 194211941 19401193911938119371193611935 1934 1933|1932 193111930 1929 1928192711926|19251924 192311922|1921 192011919 1918 (917
z
41. Hydatid Disease Z

Deaths: Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Male 0 0 0 0
White
Female 1 1 0 0
Male 0 1 0 1 -a
Colored
Female 0 0 1 0 O
Rates: Total
White
Colored

42. Other Diseases Caused By Helminths

Deaths: Total 5 4 1 4 5 7 12 9 12 4 10 8 6 2 12 6 5 3 3 4 4 3 8 9 7 12
Male 2 1 1 0 0 2 1 3 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 4 0
White
Female 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 3 2 1 1 4 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 5
Ma!e 2 1 0 2 4 2 7 2 3 0 4 2 1 1 3 2 2 1 0 0 9 1 5 1 0 4
Colored
Female 1 1 0 2 0 2 4 4 6 2 3 5 3 0 5 3 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 4 1 3
Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population










TABLE 29.-DEATHS AND DEATH RATES* OF INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (INT. LIST OF CAUSES OF DEATH 1-44) BY
CAUSE, COLOR, AND SEX, FLORIDA, (RECORDED) 1917-1942 (RATES ARE GIVEN FOR THE MORE PREVALENT DISEASES ONLY)


I1 1942119411194011939111197131l3194l3192l3~930l2198tl21962119 2419361923112191121111981


43. Mycoses

Deaths: Total 5 3 4 3 5 5 2 1 3 4 6 3 5 5 3 9 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Male 4 1 3 2 4 1 0 2 3 1 1 2 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
White Female 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Male 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 1 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Colored Female 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Rates: Total
White
Colored

44. Other Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Includes Tularemia Prior to 1941 Included in Other No's. 1917-1921

Deaths: Total 37 34 24 25 21 16 16 11 12 17 15 17 15 13 14 15 13 6 4 3 1 3
Male 21 21 10 16 8 8 9 5 7 5 6 6 6 9 8 6 7 1 2 0 1 2
White Female 5 1 10 3 6 5 5 3 2 7 5 4 8 4 4 4 3 3 1 1 0 1

Male 8 5 2 5 5 3 1 2 1 5 2 4 0 0 2 3 3 1 1 1 0 0
Colored Female 3 7 2 1 2 0 1 1 2 0 2 3 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0

Rates: Total
White
Colored


Florida State Board of Health
From Bureau of Vital Statistics


* Deaths per 100,000 Population









TUBERCULOSIS

LYNN E. BAKER, M.D., Director
During 1942 there has been no change in the personnel of the Division
of Tuberculosis which consists of a director, x-ray technician and a secretary.
During the past year great emphasis was placed on the educational phase
of the tuberculosis control program.
Through the cooperation of the State Department of Education and the
Florida Tuberculosis and Health Association, numerous tuberculosis institutes
were held throughout the state. A few of these meetings were held for
white teachers as well as other leaders in the community, while others are
planned for the near future. Through the cooperation of the State Welfare
Board, similar conferences were held in some of the districts for the welfare
workers.
Some fifty-five institutes were held throughout Florida for Negro teach-
ers, thus giving each Negro teacher in the state an opportunity to learn more
about tuberculosis. Reference material was furnished so that tuberculosis can
be included in the school program. Similar institutes were held in many
counties for the Negro ministers.
A teaching unit on tuberculosis has been written and is now being
printed. This will be ready for distribution to all teachers in Florida in the
near future.
Due to travel restrictions, the Annual Tuberculosis Institute for public
health physicians and nurses was cancelled this year.
During 1942 the mobile x-ray unit was taken to many counties in the
state. A total of 38,597 microfilms were taken during the year as shown
in Table I. Of this number 37,641 proved satisfactory for interpretation-
approximately 97.5%. This is a very substantial improvement over 1941,
when only 87.4% of the films were satisfactory. Fewer "break downs" have
occurred since the x-ray equipment has been inspected regularly, but occa-
sionally this happens, and probably will continue to occur in spite of every
precaution.
Approximately 1.9% of the miniature films were interpreted as suspi-
cious of active pulmonary tuberculosis. Further study was recommended on
these suspicious cases, including conventional 14 x 17" x-ray films to deter-
mine definitely if active pulmonary tuberculosis was present.
At the time this report was written (March 15) only 330 (approxi-
mately 50%) reports had been received at the State Board of Health on
this important follow-up work, as shown in Table II. Presumably, many of
the remaining 353 people on whom large films were recommended have
been studied further, but no report has been received.







TUBERCULOSIS 41


If the vital follow-up work is not done, there is no point in x-raying
large groups of people with the mobile x-ray unit. After all, the purpose of
this mass screening program by the 35mm. film is to find as many unde-
tected cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis as possible-not to see how
many miniature films can be taken.
The demand for the mobile x-ray unit has become so great that it is
difficult to include all the counties desiring this service. After the present
schedule is completed, the mobile x-ray unit will not be taken to any county
which has failed to complete the study of the suspicious cases.
It is interesting to note that 69 cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis
were found in the 330 people on whom the follow-up work was completed.
At the same time there were 61 other patients who are still under observa-
tion for activity. If each one of the 683 cases had been studied further, it
is fair to assume that more than twice the number of cases of active pulmon-
ary tuberculosis would have been found, and even more would be under
observation for active pulmonary tuberculosis.
The names of all men reported to the State Board of Health who were
rejected by the armed forces because of tuberculosis were reported to the
respective counties. Many of these have proved to have active pulmonary
tuberculosis, and have been hospitalized. In others, after careful study, the
tuberculosis has proved to be arrested. Unfortunately, some of these men
have not been located so that further study could be done.
During the year a few more diagnostic chest clinics were established in
some of the larger counties to serve the low income groups. It is hoped
that many more of these clinics will be established in the remaining larger
counties in Florida. Perhaps arrangements can be made for these clinics to
serve some of the smaller adjoining counties who have no x-ray facilities. It
is vitally important that each county develop an efficient case-finding pro-
gram which functions the year around.
From all indications the death rate from tuberculosis in 1942 will be
the lowest ever recorded in Florida. If this steady decrease is to be main-
tained during these war times, it means the continued cooperation of the
physicians in Florida, the Tuberculosis and Public Health Committee of the
Florida Medical Association, the State Tuberculosis Sanatorium, the Florida
Tuberculosis and Health Association, as well as the many other official and
volunteer organizations-state, county and city-who are giving valuable
assistance in the tuberculosis control program of Florida.
















TABLE 1.-SUMMARY OF MINIATURE FILMS TAKEN BY MOBILE X-RAY UNIT-1942.


Films Films
Films Films Suspicious Showing Films
Number Per cent Interpreted Showing Of Active Enlarged Showing
Date County Films Satisfactory Satisfactory as Some Pulmonary Heart or Other
Taken Films Films Negative Pathology- Tuberculosis Aorta Pathology


Jan. 27-29 Bradford........................... ...........- 616 613 99.5 594 19 11 4 4
Jan. 30-31 Flagler............................................. 380 376 98.9 355 21 12 9 0
Feb. 2-5 Lake......... ................................ 15,08 1,500 99.5 1,445 55 30 21 4
Feb. 9-21 Levy.............................................. 1,562 1,550 99.2 1,500 50 24 21 5
Feb. 23-25 Gilchrist.............................................. 597 592 99.2 577 15 12 2 1
Mar. 2 Hardee~ ....... ............................ 578 569 98.4 550 19 7 11 1
Mar. 6 Nassau_ ....................................... 274 269 98.2 262 7 3 3 1
Mar. 9-10 Clay-CCC Camps .......................... 299 299 100.0 289 10 4 5 1
Mar. 27 Fla. Farm Colony......... ............. 406 376 93.1 373 3 2 0 1
Mar. 28 Alachua. .....-- .............-- 459 413 90.0 402 11 6 4 1
Apr. 13-18 Fla. State Col. for Women. ........... 1,826 1,791 98.1 1,754 37 19 12 6
Apr. 20-21 Fla. Ind. School for Boys.............. 493 469 95.1 466 3 3 0 0
Apr. 22-23 Walton........ .............................. 937 918 98.0 851 67 12 49 6
Apr. 24-25 Okaloosa ..............__............... 716 711 99.3 672 39 16 22 1
Apr. 27-28 Calhoun. ...... .... ............ 298 291 97.7 269 22 9 10 3
Apr. 29-May 2 Fla. A. & M. College........................ 745 688 92.3 666 22 11 6 5
May 4-9 Leon... .. ..................... 874 866 99.1 816 50 29 17 4
May 11-16 Broward................................ 640 636 99.4 604 32 20 10 2
May 18-25 Dade................... 1,897 1,463 77.1 1,425 38 20 10 8
June 1-8 Putnam ....... .......... .......... 358 349 97.5 326 23 13 9 1
June 15-27 Duval ............................... 1,700 1,657 97.5 1,582 75 27 45 3
July 6-17 Orange ........ ........................ 1,190 1,185 99.6 1,115 70 32 33 5
Sept. 14-19 Seminole.............................. 2,323 2,306 99.3 2,162 144 56 82 6
Sept. 21-22 Orange ........... ..................- 501 498 99.4 479 19 10 6 3
Sept. 23-Oct. 3 Polk ..3,537 3,490 98.6 3,380 110 62 39 9
Oct. 8-12 Highlands.................................. 679 675 99.3 648 27 22 4 1
Oct. 13 Glades....................................... ... 120 119 99.2 115 4 2 2 0
Oct. 14-15 Hardee._................................. 415 414 99.8 404 10 4 4 2
Oct. 16-17 Okeechobee.................................. 306 306 100.0 297 9 7 2 0
Oct. 19-20 St. Lucie.................................... 1,185 1,180 99.6 1,129 51 30 19 2
Oct. 21-22 Indian River. ................. ... 384 383 99.7 373 10 7 2 1
Oct. 23-24 Brevard............. ................. .. 607 603 99.3 588 15 10 3 2
Oct. 26-31 Palm Beach.................................... 2,674 2,638 98.7 2,573 65 43 10 12



















TABLE 1.-SUMMARY OF MINIATURE FILMS TAKEN BY MOBILE X-RAY UNIT-1942.-(Continued.)


Films Films
Films Films Suspicious Showing Films
Number Per cent Interpreted Showing Of active Enlarged Showing
Date County Films Satisfactory Satisfactory as Some Pulmonary Heart or Other
Taken Films Films Negative Pathology Tuberculosis Aorta Pathology


Nov. 2-6 Broward.......................................... 1,572 1,563 99.4 1,530 33 21 11 1
Nov. 9-21 Dade............................................... --- 1,092 1,079 98.5 1,036 43 25 13 5
Nov. 23-24 Monroe .............................................. 281 281 100.0 266 15 12 2 1
Nov. 27-Dec. 3 Volusia.......... ---................ 1,868 1,854 99.3 1,791 63 44 13 6
Dec. 4-7 Clay ...--------.................... ..... 301 299 99.3 294 5 4 1 0
Dec. 8-9 Bradford ...............- ........................ 744 739 99.3 716 23 17 4 2
Dec. 10-12 Baker. --.. ---.......---------....----.... 771 760 98.6 753 7 6 1 0 .
Dec. 14-18 Nassau--..............------ .................. 884 873 98.7 860 13 8 3 2
TOTALS .............. ..................... .. 38,597 37,641 36,287 1,354 712* 524 118
m
There were twenty-nine patients in this group with pulmonary tuberculosis, apparently arrested or arrested who were under treatment by private physicians and were X
being x-rayed periodically with large films. Thus in Table II these were excluded from the suspicious cases, leaving 683 on whom large films were recommended.

C
I-
O
4

uJ
















TABLE 2.-SUMMARY OF FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF SUSPICIOUS CASES 1942.

No Under
Follow-up Follow-up Active Observation- Pulmonary
Date County Suspicious Study Study Pulmonary Activity Tuberculosis Other
Cases Reported Reported Tuberculosis Questionable Arrested Pathology Negative


Jan. 27-29 Bradford ............ ......- 11 3 8 0 0 0 0 3
Jan. 30-31 Flagler .... -_- .- 12 3 9 1 0 0 0 2
Feb. 2-5 Lake .. .- -- ..-- 30 12 18 3 2 0 2 5
Feb. 9-21 Levy ...--- .... .................. 24 1 23 0 1 0 0 0
Feb. 23-25 Gilchrist.......h-l -.. ..... -- 10 1 9 0 0 0 0 1
Mar. 2 Hardee- ........ .............. .... 7 7 0 2 0 1 2 2
Mar. 6 Nassau .......-................... 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 1
Mar. 9-10 Clay-CCC Camps.............. 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
Mar. 27 Fla. Farm Colony.. ....... .._ 2 0 2 0 0 0 0. 0
Mar. 28 Alachua ..........- ..... 6 5 1 2 0 1 0 2
Apr 13-18 Fla. State Col. for Women........... 19 19 0 0 3 0 2 14
pr. 20-21 Fla.d. School for Boys.-.......-... 3 3 0 0 1 0 1 1
pr. 22-23 Walton................................... 12 10 2 0 0 1 4
Apr. 24-25 Okaloosa -....-...-....- 16 0 16 0 0 0 0 0
Apr. 27-28 Calhoun ...- .........- 9 9 0 0 0 1 1 7
Apr. 29-May 2 Fla. A. & M. College-- -__-- 11 1 10 0 0 0 0 1
May 4-9 Leon_ -- ..... ...........- -... 28 23 5 7 8 0 0 8
May 11-16 Broward -._..... .... 19 11 8 4 0 5 1 1
May 18-25 Dade.... .......................................... 20 16 4 0 0 2 3 11
June 1-8 Putnam.............................................. 12 8 4 2 3 0 0 3
June 15-27 Duval- .....----------------------- 27 27 0 7 7 0 5 8
July 6-17 Orang ....... ............ 31 28 3 7 3 7 2 9
Sept. 14-19 Seminole-......... --...... .. 56 0 56 0 0 0 0 0
Sept. 21-22 Orange_ -..........--- .. 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0
Sept. 23-Oct. 3 Polk...........---.. ... 54 7 47 3 1 1 1 1
Oct. 8-12 Highlands --..................... 22 0 22 0 0 0 0 0
Oct. 13 Glades....... ......................... 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Oct. 14-15 Hardee.--..................-- .. 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
Oct. 16-17 Okeechobee ...-.... .-....--. 7 0 7 0 0 0 0 0
Oct. 19-20 St. Lucie.............. 28 24 4 3 1 4 0 16
Oct. 21-22 Indian River .... --- --..- 7 7 0 2 3 0 2 0
Oct. 23-24 Brevard............... ...... 9 0 9 0 0 0 0 0
Oct. 26-31 Palm Beach _.....-........--...--.... 36 0 36 0 0 0 0 0




















TABLE 2.-SUMMARY OF FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF SUSPICIOUS CASES-1942.-(Continued.)

No Under
Follow-up Follow-up Active Observation- Pulmonary
Suspicious Study Study Pulmonary Activity Tuberculosis Other
Date County Cases Reported Reported Tuberculosis Questionable Arrested Pathology Negative

Nov. 2-6 Broward ........... ............. 20 17 3 5 5 2 1 4
Nov. 9-21 Dade .. ........................ 25 19 6 4 1 2 5 7
Nov. 23-24 Monroe..... .................... 11 5 6 2 2 0 0 1
Nov. 27-Dec. 3 Volusia ..---... ---- ... 43 43 0 7 16 4 3 13
Dec. 4-7 Clay. ........ -----.... 4 2 2 0 1 0 0 1
Dec. 8-9 Bradford ...... .. ..- --- 17 8 9 1 1 0 3 3
Dec. 10-12 Baker. ...-... .. .. .... 5 5 0 0 2 0 1 2
Dec. 14-18 Nassau_ ......- .............- 7 5 2 2 0 0 0 3

TOTALS ...... ......... ..........-....- 683 330 353 69 61 31 36 134
TTL ------------------------ --------- :: 8 1. 3









VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL

WILSON T. SOWDER, M.D., M.P.H., Director
R. F. SONDAG, M.D., Assistant Director
The past year has been a momentous one for venereal disease control in
the state, because of the enormity of the problems presented to the Division
of Venereal Disease Control. Not only do we have the normal ones which
have been with us for years, but also the additional problems, arising from
the presence in the state of large concentrations of military and naval forces.
The scope of the venereal disease problem in the state was brought to the
attention of the Division, and to the public itself, by the first really accurate
figures on the prevalence of the venereal diseases in the history of the state
by the examination of Selective Service registrants. (See Graphs 1 and 2,
Tables 1 and 2.)

Prior to the beginning of Selective Service, many surveys and estimates
on the prevalence of venereal diseases were made, some on a scientific basis
and some not so scientific; but the first really reliable figures were made
available to us through the examination of Selective Service registrants. Ta-
bles 1 and 2 and Graphs 1 and 2 show the number of Selective Service regis-
trants found infected by states among the first 1,895,778 men examined. The
enormous difference in the rates among white and Negro selectees is evident,
being about eight times as high in the Negro race as in the white in Florida.
However, Florida's standing among both white and Negro races, as compared
to other states, will immediately catch the eye of all who glance at these
graphs (1 and 2).

The wisdom of publicizing these rates may be questioned, since Florida
is essentially a tourist state and some may feel that it will give it bad pub-
licity and hurt its trade. These figures, however, will be given publicity
throughout the country by various agencies and there is no possible way by








* GRAPH 1. SYPHILIS RATES PER 1,000 WHITE MEN AGED 21-35, UNITED STATES
BASED ON 1,895,778 SELECTEE SEROLOGIC REPORTS, 44 STATES AND
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, THROUGH AUGUST, 1941.
0 P.o P P 0
NEW MEXICO
TEXAS
FLORIDA
ARIZONA
S.CAROLINA
W.VIRGINIA
OKLAWOMA
TENNESSEE
GEORGIA
LOUISIANA
MISSISSIPPI
NEVADA
VIRGINIA
ARKANSAS
INDIANA
MISSOURI
N.CAROLINA
MARYLAND
ALABAMA
CALIFORNIA
MAINE
WYOMING
DIST. OFCOL.

DELAWARE
ILLINOIS
KANSAS
COLORADO
PENN.
MICUIGAN
IOWA
WASHINGTON
NEWYORK
MONTANA
NEWJERSEYm m
NEBRASKA
RHODE ISLAND IIIII
S. DAKOTA
CON NECTICUT MM
MASS.
MINNESOTA II
UTAW
N.DAKOTA m
N. HAMPSHIRE M
WISCONSIN m
UNITED STATES










48 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


* GRAPH 2. SYPHILIS RATES PER 1,000 NEGRO MEN AGED 21-35, UNITED STATES
BASED ON 1,895,778 SELECTEE SEROLOGIC REPORTS, 44 STATES AND
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-THROUGH AUGUST, 1941.




FLORIDA
TEXAS
GEORGIA
MARYLAND
MISS.
ARKANSAS
NEW MEXICO
SCAROLINA
ARIZONA
TENNESSEE
DST OfCOL.
LOUISIANA
INDIANA
OKLAWOMA
VIRGINIA
DELAWARE
N.CAROLINA
MISSOURI
ALABAMA
CAUTORNIA
W.VIRGINIA
ILLINOIS
KANSAS
CONN.
NEBRASKA
COLORADO
NLW YORK
NEWJERSEY


MICHIGAN
IOWA
WASIINGTON
WISCONSIN
MINNESOTA
MASS.
RHODE ISLAND
MAINE *
MONTANA *
NEVADA
N lAMPSI1IRE
N. DAKOTA
S.DAKOTA
UTAl
WYOMING *
UNITEDSIATIS











VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


* TABLE 1. SYPHILIS RATES PER THOUSAND WHITE AND NEGRO MEN AGED 21-

35 IN THE UNITED STATES, BASED ON 1,895,778 SELECTEE SEROLOGIC
REPORTS AND ARRANGED IN DESCENDING ORDER BY STATES.


White Syphilis Negro Syphilis
Area Rate Area Rate


State:
New Mexico...................................
Texas.............................................
Florida....................... .............
Arizona........................... ...........
South Carolina...................... .........
West Virginia .......................
Oklahoma.......................... .......
Tennessee................... ..........
Georgia.......................................
Louisiana ..................... ........
Mississippi ......................................
Nevada........................................
Virginia..................... .............
Arkansas ................. .........
Indiana ........................................
Missouri......................... ........
North Carolina..............................
Maryland..................... ... .
Alabama ......................................
California ........................................
Maine............................... ...........
Wyoming.....................................
District of Columbia ....................
Ohio................................ ..........
Delaware..................................
Illinois.....................................
Kansas.................... ..........
Colorado............................................
Pennsylvania...........................
Michigan ................... .........
Iowa .................................. ..........
Washington........................ .....
New York...............................
Montana.......................................
New Jersey..................... ..........
Nebraska...............................
Rhode Island..................................
South Dakota..................................
Connecticut .................. ......
Massachusetts .................. .........
Minnesota ...............................
Utah............. .................... ...
North Dakota...............................
New Hampshire .....................
Wisconsin....................................


Total:
44 states and the District of
Columbia..............................


23.5


State:
Florida.......................................... 405.9
Texas.......... ................... .. 343.2
Georgia.............................................. 327.6
Maryland......................................... 24.6
Mississippi ............................... 321.6
Arkansas......................................... 314.3
New Mexico...... ............... 304.8
South Carolina .... ..................... 296.3
Arizona ........ .. ..... .......... 295.8
Tennessee .............................. .......... 277.8
District of Columbia................ 272.9
Louisiana...................................... 272.0
Indiana ......................... .. 267.2
Oklahoma........................ .... 254.5
Virginia............................................. 245.9
.Delaware..................................... 239.6
.North Carolina.......................... 237.4
Missouri............. ......................... 231.6
Alabama.................... .................... 227.1
California .......................... 212.3
West Virginia............................... 211.7
Illinois.................................... 211.4
Kansas ..................................... 210.5
Connecticut................................. 207.1
.Nebraska..................................... 204.4
I. Colorado............................. .... 201.3
. New York ............................. 197.3
1. New Jersey............................. 193.0
. Ohio.............................. ... 191.2
P. Pennsylvania................................. 190.5
.Michigan......................................... 182.6
Iowa................................ 182.1
3. Washington ............................. 174.6
, Wisconsin......................................... 157.0
,Minnesota.................................... 141.9
1. Massachusetts............................. 115.8
.Rhode Island.................................. 91.8
Maine ................................ ........ *
Montana.....................................
Nevada.......................................... *
New Hampshire ........... ....... *
North Dakota...... ......................
South Dakota...............................
Utah ..............................................
Wyoming............................... ........
Total:
44 states and the District of
Columbia ................................ 272.0


* Number tested insufficient for computation of rate.











50 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


TABLE 2. NUMBER OF SELECTEES REJECTED BECAUSE OF SYPHILIS BY RACE
AND COUNTY THROUGH DECEMBER, 1942.


COUNTY


A lachua................................................
B aker ..... .............................................
Bayker-............----------..............-- ---------------
Baydr-- ----------------------------
Bradford ........----------- ------------
Brevard-..............-------- ----------
Broward..... .....................
Calhoun............................---------------
Charlotte...............---------------
Citrus..................-------------
Clay ----..... --------............
Collier............................. -------
Columbia ..................---------------................................
Dade......................--- ...--- .......-------- ---------
DeSoto-.................-..----- --------------
Dixie.......................................-----....----- --------
Duval...........................-- ----
Escambia......... ..................
F lagler.................................
Franklin................................ ....
Gadsden......... .-------------------
Gilchrist .........--...-- -----
Glades............................... ................
Gulf....---............---..--- -------...............
Hamilton.......... .--------- --
Hardee......................................----------- ---------
Hendry ............................ ..................
Hernando ...........-.. ............
Highlands............ .................
Hillsborough............ ....................
Holmes......... ................... ........
Indian River........ ................. .....
Jackson........................... ........
Jefferson..............................
Lafayette..............................
Lake....................................
Lee........ ...................------
Leon............. .......... ..........
Levy............................. --
Liberty................ ................
Madison.............................. ......
Manatee.................................
Marion..... .............................
M artin..........................................................
Monroe..............................................
Nassau.......................................... ....
Okaloosa.............. ................
Okeechobee.................................. ...........
Orange............................. .................
Osceola..................... ............... ..
Palm Beach.......................... ...........
Pasco................................. ..........
P inellas..................................... .............
Polk....................................... ...........
Putnam........... .....................
St. Johns ............... ........................
St. Lucie...................................... ...........
Santa Rosa...............................................
Sarasota ............................ ..........
Seminole................................... ....
Sumter............. ........ .........
Suwannee............................................
Taylor......................... .....
Union............... ...................
Volusia......................................... ....
Waukulla........................................... .... ..
Walton.................................... .....
Washington...........................
TOTALS..................................


NUMBER WITH POSITIVE BLOODS


COLORED

532
30
179
95
177
736
26
39
73
58
139
173
2641
70
168
'3498
476
33
58
180
38
94
110
103
19
166
70
155
1599
44
130
198
107
16
318
235
416
198
10
179
258
390
96
99
136
29
25
624
141
1608
112
688
816
328
199
292
42
284
373
112
117
151
51
574
42
40
41
21254


*Includes those whose color is not stated.


WHITE TOTAL*

46 581
8 38
96 220
32 127
26 203
81 821
35 61
16 55
9 82
12 70
6 145
31 204
585 3227
26 96
20 188
581 4094
181 660
0 37
26 84
11 192
6 44
8 102
20 130
14 118
19 38
18 186
9 79
23 178
377 1981
38 82
16 146
59 258
16 123
4 20
30 351
29 264
38 457
22 220
5 15
17 196
40 298
41 436
6 102
47 155
15 152
28 57
6 32
121 748
13 155
127 1735
30 142
102 790
121 942
22 350
39 238
20 312
25 67
67 351
13 386
18 130
15 132
20 171
13 64
85 659
3 45
33 73
26 __67
3692 II 24962








VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 51

which the citizens of Florida can keep the rest of the country from knowing

of its unenviable record. This provides a very urgent reason why Floridians,

themselves, should know these facts, so that they may bend every effort to
combat them. The correction of this blot upon the state is not only necessary
for the health of the people, but the expenditure of funds towards this end

is a sound business investment. A good start can be made during the War,
while the attention of the nation, and particularly that part of it which is

interested in Florida as a place for a vacation, is devoted to the War. It is

felt that if the State of Florida will exert all its efforts toward the control
of venereal diseases that by the end of the War, its record of accomplish-
ment will be so good that there will be no danger of the venereal disease
situation being a black mark against it.

The reason for Florida's high syphilis rate is not definitely known. It

will be noted, however, from the Graphs (1 and 2) that syphilis rates are
higher in the southeastern states and it is reasonable to suppose that there is
a common factor bringing it about. It is conceded that efforts toward vene-
real disease control in the past have not been sufficient, but this is true also

of many other states having very low syphilis rates. It would appear from

the geographic distribution of the disease that there is a climatic factor in-

volved, and it is not unreasonable to suppose that the spirochete of syphilis
prefers a warm climate and that syphilis in a sense is a subtropical disease.
There are undoubtedly other factors involved, such as the younger age of the
population in the southeastern states and the lesser educational facilities avail-

able to its young people.

Table 2 shows the number of selectees found to have syphilis by counties
in Florida. There are naturally differences in the number of cases discovered







52 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


in the various counties. Most of these differences can be explained by differ-
ences in the size of the population and in the proportion of white and col-
ored. There is no reason to think that in Florida there is any great difference
among the various counties or cities in the prevalences of the disease, when
these factors are taken into consideration. Factors that do influence the preva-
lence of venereal diseases are: size of population; race; educational level;
economic status; and age. The highest venereal disease rates are found among
the young, the ignorant, the uneducated, and the poor.

The venereal diseases, when compared numerically with other common
diseases in the State of Florida, are strikingly more prevalent. In the twenty
year period from 1922 through 1941, 18,219 cases of tuberculosis were
reported to the State Board of Health; 11,623 cases of diphtheria; 5,625
cases of scarlet fever; and 756 cases of poliomyelitis. Over this same period,
156,646 cases of syphilis were reported and 15,491 cases of gonorrhea.
While figures for 1942 for the other diseases are not available, 30,174 cases
of syphilis and 10,174 cases of gonorrhea were reported. MORE CASES
OF VENEREAL DISEASES WERE REPORTED EACH WEEK, ON THE
AVERAGE, IN 1942, THAN OF POLIOMYELITIS DURING THE EN-
TIRE PAST TWENTY YEARS. SEVEN TIMES AS MANY CASES OF
VENEREAL DISEASES WERE REPORTED IN 19,42 AS OF SCARLET
FEVER FOR THE ENTIRE PAST TWENTY YEARS. NEARLY FOUR
TIMES AS MANY CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASES WERE REPORT-
ED IN 1942 AS OF DIPHTHERIA FOR THE ENTIRE PAST TWENTY
YEARS. TWICE AS MANY CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASES WERE
REPORTED IN 1942 AS OF TUBERCULOSIS DURING THE ENTIRE
PAST TWENTY YEARS.

These are startling facts, but they do not mean that the prevalence of
the venereal diseases has increased, but merely that we are becoming aware
of them. Infected persons are being found, treated, and reported to the State
Board of Health. We believe that if a venereal disease control program is
carried on at the same level as during the past year, the occurrence of the
venereal diseases will decline at a rapid rate. In fact, we believe that the
occurrence of new cases has been less than in previous years, in spite of the
increase in cases reported, as shown by Graph 3 and 4 and Table 3.







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


* TABLE 3. NUMBER OF NEW CASES OF SYPHILIS AND GONORRHEA REPORTED
IN FLORIDA FROM 1932 TO 1942 BY YEAR.

YEAR SYPHILIS GONORRHEA
1932 4,063 713
1933 4,833 616
1934 5,198 702
1935 4,389 1,207
1936 3,287 1,146
1937 14,532 2,411
1938 18,243 2,092
1939 21,092 1,650
1940 19,889 1,870
1941 21,258 3,084
1942 30,104 10,174
GRAPH 3. CASES OF SYPHILIS (NOT PREVIOUSLY) REPORTED IN FLORIDA,
BY YEAR.

35-


30.


S25.
z

0





> 5.
5--


10.






1932 1933 1934 1935 196 1937 1938 1939 1940 19 194
1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942







54 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


GRAPH 4. NEW CASES OF GONORRHEA REPORTED IN FLORIDA AT
END OF EACH YEAR 1932-1942.




II-
I10

9.

8.

Z

5-







2.



... ll.
1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942
Florida's normal venereal disease problem was greatly aggravated by the
influx of military and naval personnel. This, in turn, was accompanied by
an influx of commercialized prostitutes, who are known to be the primary
spreaders of venereal diseases, particularly among the members of the armed
forces. It was necessary for most drastic steps to be taken in many instances
to protect the members of the armed forces, so that the number of man-days
-lost from the venereal diseases could be kept to the absolute minimum attain-
able. The results in this direction have been very striking. Army and Navy
medical officers throughout the state have reported a decline in their vene-
real disease rates during the past year.
During the year funds for the venereal disease control program were sub-
stantally increased, particularly by the allocation of increased amounts for







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


this purpose by the U. S. Public Health Service. Funds from this source were
approximately doubled. In addition, about a dozen U. S. Public Health Serv-
ice Officers and thirty follow-up workers were assigned to the state to assist
in the program. Assistance was also given by the U. S. Public Health Service
in the form of statisticians and statistical clerks for the tabulation and dis-
tribution of data on infected selectees and other persons. The Work Projects
Administration substantially increased its assistance during the year to the
Division of Venereal Disease Control. While there was no increase in State
Funds for the purpose, many local communities for the first time made avail-
able sums of money to combat these diseases.
The most important factor, however, in furthering the programs during
the year was the increase in the interest of the public itself, brought about
by their increasing awareness of the seriousness of the situation. This was
due, partly as a result of the rejection of large numbers of infected selectees.
Also, the result of continuing effort on the part of this Division and the
Bureau of Health Education over a period of years began to show its effect.
Official and voluntary agencies rendered outstanding contributions during the
year towards bringing the matter to the attention of the people. The Office
of Civilian Defense, the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the American Social
Hygiene Association and the Division of Social Protection of the Federal
Security Agency rendered outstanding services in this respect.
It is believed that the accomplishments within the past year have been
outstanding. Maps 1 and 2, Graph 5, and Table 4, show the increase in the
number of clinics and in the number of counties having clinics.







56 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


* MAP 1. COUNTIES WITH VENEREAL DISEASE CLINICS COOPERATING WITH
THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, DECEMBER 1941, TOTAL 31.




















od Lee atoni PM S
I
CoF-


.. ,'







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


* MAP 2. COUNTIES WITH VENEREAL DISEASE CLINICS COOPERATING WITH "
THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, DECEMBER 1942, TOTAL-61.




"" ,/ "' -L '. I "- "i ". ...- -- .


'.. '. "* ..,_ '
..' ,!"r- ,'" '''- -'"

I. i\
ri !r



"j --. '- ., _
,~-~r\ I-- -


-t
V') */* -








58 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


* GRAPH 5. NUMBER OF CLINICS BY YEAR SINCE ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION
OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL IN FLORIDA.
200.


150






100-


1938 1939 1940 '1941 1942
*TABLE 4. NUMBER OF ORGANIZED VENEREAL DISEASE CLINICS COOPERATING
WITH THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH BY YEAR SINCE 1938.


YEAR
1938
1939
1940
1941


NUMBER OF CLINICS
42
67
87
106


1942 | 153
A few of the counties shown in Map 1 had clinics financed entirely by
local funds at the beginning of the year. These were given assistance by the
State Board of Health for the first time, during the year, and the increase
in the number of patients treated is shown by Tables 5 and 6.











VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 59


* TABLE 5. NUMBER OF CASES OF SYPHILIS UNDER TREATMENT IN CLINICS IN
FLORIDA BY COUNTY, BY MONTH IN 1942.

COUNTY Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Alachua..................... 211 227 233 219 228 322 362 409 482 566 531 514
Baker.............................. 73 71 68 60 78 80 70 67 103 105 115 99
Bay.............................. 135 215 242 278 345 361 374 368 327 381 406 433
Bradford........................ 239 402 362 393 380 372 576 668 375 410 432 404
Broward........................... 402 451 452 393 340 324 302 338 433 320 351 430
Calhoun........................... ...... .... .. ...... ......... ... ...... ..... ...... ...... 30 44
Charlotte....................... 19 21 27 25 21 26 26 85 141 154 160 152
Clay.............................. 137 139 80 81 93 100 85 96 84 94 142 123
Collier..................................... ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 102 135
Dade................................. 717 721 785 891 1001 1008 1285 1572 1606 2499* 2680* 2800*
DeSoto...................... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... 84 167 216 235
Dixie................................. .................. ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 111 164 208
Duval........................... 2569 2309 2241 2429 2617 2778 2634 2831 3100 3322 3259 3308
Escambia...................- 477 479 507 404 470 500 570 465 551 512 503 452
Flagler............................. 52 52 49 64 64 53 56 56 77 105 349 130
Franklin................... 34 101 112 114 109 83 87 107 128 136 162 156
Gadsden......................... 170 179 215 223 237 226 191 192 200 207 198 191
Glades........................... 45 53 15 9 15 62 90 156 175 149 147 144
Gulf................................... 95 115 105 162 179 143 185 194 203 252 219 269
Gilchrist...................... 45 39 35 43 66 72 66 71 71 76 57 48
Hamilton......................... 217 230 228 201 193 170 134 140 106 cl cl clt
Hardee................ .......... ........ ...... ...... ...... .. ........ ....... 56 60 59 60
Hendry........................... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 184 219 280 282 291
Highlands...................... 24 23 34 52 71 56 261 235 325 270 282 296
Hillsborough.................. 1390 1406 1524 2046 2118 2048 2209 2300* 2600* 2800* 2053 1860
Indian River.................. ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 25 74 168 235
Jackson................... 287 275 287 305 285 283 307 336 278 386 383 351
Jefferson...................... .................. 57 132 213 257 297 335 371 493 508
Lake.............................. 335 307 417 531 535 520 550 549 592 606 616 627
Lee.................................................. .................. ...... 543 440 499 508 497
Leon......................... 348 348 424 502 576 688 522 562 812 792 905 839
Levy....................... 365 399 448 480 480 529 558 604 646 540 551 536
Madison........................ ...... .... ...... ...... ...... 51 134 238 309 443 461 490
Manatee.......................... 407 428 438 461 487 415 469 472 557 610 614 552
M arion.............................. .. .... .. ................... ..... ......... ............... 214 281 369
M artin............................ ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ..... 18 15 17 23 31 30
Monroe............................ 30 35 40 42 49 45 49 63 70 111 129 147
Nassau........... ........... 209 235 256 249 258 254 266 285 265 268 312 315
Orange......................... 27 45 88 101 145 146 137 137 168 138 131 128
Okaloosa........................ 1006 1002 996 1008* 1008* 1008* 983 963 1014 1057 1179 1188
Osceola...... .................. 70 26 22 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 52 134 177
Palm Beach................. 573 563 611 818 1275 1186 734 931 1140 1245 1133 1029
Pasco................ ......... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... 2 15 39
Pinellas ......................... 688 629 685 657 595 650 618 749 715 1031 1056 1080*
Polk................................ 103 183 251 265 343 365 366 469 489 557 654 675*
Putnam........... .... ........... ...... ...... .... ............... ...... 116 238 355 374
St. Lucle.......................... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 25 117 190 306 321
St. Johns...................... .... .... ........................... ..... 150 149 225 236
Sarasota..................... 145 161 181 228 308 365 432 490 543 598 625 646
Santa Rosa................... 71 63 65 63 69* 69* 50 67 57 64 56 50
Seminole..................... 60 246 404 485 540 494 506 544 491 457 536 647
Sum ter................ ............. ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 180 201
Suwannee........................ ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 19 79 162
State Inst...................... 688 731 698 697 665 711 708 646 652 642 425 622
Taylor..................... 114 123 130 114 103 98 100 96 87 92 96 86
Volusia......................................... ...... 73 200 376 510 644 776 850* 975*
Wakulla... .................... 41 39 35 79 138 167 54 132 85 117 152 123
Walton............................. 61 86 97 117 142 156 160 134 148 145 146 149
W.. gton................................... ........ ...... ..... .... ... 48 82
TOTAL............. 12559 13157 13887 15346 16831 17477 17917 20391 22388 25376 26732 26994
Estimated (Reports not available for these months).
Clinic closed in October.











60 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


* TABLE 6. NUMBER OF CASES GONORRHEA UNDER TREATMENT IN CLINICS IN
FLORIDA BY COUNTY, BY MONTH IN 1942.

COUNTY Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Alachua....................... ... ... ...... ... .. .. ...... ...... 14 24 15 14 20
Baker............................... 1 ...... 1 2 2 2 4 8 6 2 8 2
Bay.................................... 7 16 22 25 43 55 92 44 49 37 81 57
Bradford.......................... 38 50 56 58 60 80 108 77 81 222 189 68
Broward........................... 8 13 10 6 15 14 8 23 56 38 38 24
Calhoun..... .................. ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...
Charlotte...................... .. .... ............. ...... ...... ...... 3 ...... 3
Clay.................................. 31 180 190 211 164 154 50 142 10 10 16 15
Collier............ ............ ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ....
Dade.................................. 38 29 25 25 36 45 49 49 31 55* 55* 55*
D eSoto.............................. ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 1 4 6 7
D ixie................................. ...... ...... ...... ...... .... ..... ..... ...... ..... 2 ......
Duval............................... 371 451 489 489 489 489 458 544 775 834 806 791
Escambia-........-....--------. 35 19 24 23 34 34 34 65 49 25 54 47
Flagler...............-- --..... 2 3 ...... 1 1 3 2 ...... 2 2 ...... ......
Franklin.-............---- --.... 2 3 2 5 9 3 7 10 6 10 8 6
Gadsden......-----------.. ---. 8 8 6 1 4 8 5 2 2 1 3 2
Glades..........----- ----. .. 1 1 ...... 5 4 2 2 1 1 1 2 3
Gulf..............................--- ------ ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... 2 2 2 ...... ...... 1 ......
Gilchrist..........--...--. -- --... ...... ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 4 2 3 ...... ...... 1
Hamilton........................- 4 5 6 6 5 9 18 23 30 ...... ...... ......
Hardee...............----- --. --...... ..... ...... ------ ...... ------ ...... ...... 5 3 4 5
Hendry.....--- ------------- -- -............ 7 8 7 5 10
Highlands ..-----. --------- 6 2 ...... 5 2 16 8 5 5 2 13 3
Hillsborough................. 32 44 45 45 12 106 31 206 88 58 42 46
Indian River.----- ---------..... .------......--- .. 1 2 4 4
Jackson.....------------- ------------.--- ----- ------ ------ ------ ----- 20 14 11 .5
Jefferson ..------.. ---- --- -.---- ------ ------ 6 4 7 10 12 2 15 11 6
Lake.................- .... ... -- 16 15 12 1 5 17 18 27 21 16 24 32
Lee............---- ...... ------- -- ---.....-- ....--.. -- .- --.- ---.... 115 1 2 ...... ......
Leon ...-----.-- --..------ 168 205 697 504 304 519 414 454 592 581 577 321
Levy................. ..... 7 8 3 ...... 1 6 1 9 6 7 2 6
Madison....---.- ...-.-- ..... ...... ...... ......-- ...... 6 8 13 4 11 8
Manatee .....-.........- .....-. ---- 2 3 6 4 4 9 9 ...... 12 11 3
Marion....--------------.-- ----- ------ ------ ------.-----. .- ...... ----- ------ 13 22 18
M martin ---..... ..--------------- ------- .............
Monroe .......-......----... 1 1 2 3 2 3 8 14 14 35 29 31
Nassau ...---------- ------ 1 10 14 25 5 3 4 6 9 6 2 11
Okaloosa.....-----..---------- ---- -...---- ...... 6 17 19 10 13 2 2 ...... 3
Orange....------------------ 23 45 70 71 71 71 85 85 76 59 170 185
Osceola-......----------- ----- ---------------...... ...... ...... ...... -- ------...... ......
Palm Beach.........-...... -- 5 7 13 11 12 2 4 104 72 61 49 39
Pasco...............---------- ---- ------------------...... ...... ...... ...... ................. ...... ......
Pinellas.....---------------.- 7 10 6 4 2 5 ...... 1 46 110 107 120*
Polk --------..... ------------ 12 12 8 9 16 15 8 10 4 10 15 20*
Putnam......-...---- -- ...... ...... --- -- .......--- ----- ----- -- --------..... 2 1 4 24
St. Johns -........-------.--- -- ---- --....... .....- ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 3 2 2 3
St. Lucie...............------- ----- .. -- --...... ..- ... -- ---.... ....... -- 1 10 11 14 12
Santa Rosa..................-- 1 5 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 2
Sarasota ....--------------- 2 1 5 2 7 17 25 53 33 5 3 3
Seminole.............------- -----. 6 9 15 9 21 8 18 24 3 13 17
State Inst.-..-..-------- --........ ..... .....---
Sumter..--......------.----......-- --.... --- ----..------......... -- --...... ...... .-- ..-- 6
Suwannee-...... --... ------ ------- --.. ......- ----- ......---......... 2 3
Taylor--.......------- --------2 7 1 ...... 3 7 3 18 19 4 8 9
Volusia........- .....-.. --.. ...... -.-- ...... ...... 11 27 25 18 46 55* 55* 55*
W akulla...........-.....--.. .... ..... ..... ..... ...... ...... 5 ...... 2 4 3 8
W alton...........................- 5 2 5 4 ...... 3 3 2...... ...... ......
W ashington-....................- --..-- .... ..... ... ...... ...... ......
TOTAL..................... 834 1160 1828 1566 1355 1771 1544 2209 2245 2367 2504 2104*
Estimated (Reports not available for these months).
t Clinic closed in October.







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


The monthly average of patients under treatment in Florida has shown
a progressive increase since 1937. See Graph 6, Table 7.
TABLE 7. MONTHLY AVERAGE OF PATIENTS UNDER TREATMENT IN CLINICS
FLORIDA 1937-1942.
YER Monthly Average of Patients
EAR Under Treatment

1937 423
1938 6,693
1939 7,786
1940 8,843
1941 12,600
1942 20,131
GRAPH 6. MONTHLY AVERAGE OF PATIENTS UNDER TREATMENT IN CLINICS
IN FLORIDA, 1937-1942.
25-





20.








5-



E 94
IM10_










IQ
1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942







62 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


During 1942 this average was nearly twice that of 1941. The increase
in the number of persons under treatment during 1942 is shown by Graph 7,
and Table 8.

TABLE 8. NUMBER OF CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASES UNDER TREATMENT IN
CLINICS BY MONTH IN FLORIDA IN 1942.
Number of Number of
Cases of Cases of
MONTH Venereal Disease MONTH Venereal Disease
Under Treatment Under Treatment
January............. 13,393 July..................... 19,461
February............. 14,317 August ............... 22,600
March.................. 15,715 September........... 24,633
April.................... 16,912 October................ 27,743
May .............. 18,186 November............ 29,236
June..................... 19,248 December ....... 29,098

GRAPH 7. NUMBER OF CASES OF VENEREAL DISEASES UNDER TREATMENT IN
CLINICS IN FLORIDA BY MONTH, 1942.
30.




25.



20.

z






10,
I-











0.
JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY. JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT OCT. NOV. DEC..







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


It will be noted that the number of persons under treatment at the end
of the year was nearly two and one-half times that under treatment at the
beginning of the year. Not the least of the accomplishments during the year
has been the improvement of physical facilities for the treatment of venereal
diseases. While venereal disease clinics are still too often held in crowded
and dingy basements and similar locations, substantial improvement in quar-
ters and in equipment has been provided during the past year in many places.
On the whole, this has been done by the foresightedness of local agencies
under the guidance of local health officers and venereal disease control offi-
cers. Among those showing particular improvement along this line have been
the clinics at Miami, Clewiston, Tampa, Tallahassee, Clearwater, DeLand,
Daytona Beach, Delray Beach and Starke. A few others had made note-
worthy improvements in preceding years. Among these is the clinic in Jack-
sonville. It is to be hoped that this trend toward better quarters and equip-
ment will continue, and it seems likely that it will, due to the increasing
interest of the public and local agencies.
Another outstanding accomplishment in the past year has been the con-
tinued and accelerated effort to combat commercialized prostitution. These
efforts have been so effective that at the end of this year, so far as is known
there are no openly tolerated houses of prostitution or red light districts re-
maining in the State of Florida. This does not mean that there are not many
prostitutes continuing to ply their trade in the state, or that the efforts in all
localities toward the suppression of prostitution have been satisfactory. How-
ever, in most localities, they have been most praiseworthy. Credit for this
accomplishment is not claimed by this Division. The main credit should
properly go to the public-spirited and cooperative mayors, police chiefs and
sheriffs throughout the state who have brought about this result. Noteworthy
contributions toward this end have been made by the Governor, the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, the Chief of the Health and Housing Section of the
Office of Civilian Defense, the representative of the Division of Social Pro-
tection of the Federal Security Agency, the American Social Hygiene Asso-
ciation, the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the State-Wide Public Health
Committee, and many other persons and agencies.
While due to the activities of the above-mentioned persons and agencies,
the commercialized prostitute has been almost eliminated from the picture
in Florida, there remains the enormous problem of the clandestine and "oc-
casional" prostitute, who is just as daligerous to the armed forces and the
civilian population. The efforts of all persons and agencies interested in the
venereal disease control problem are now concentrated on this particular
type of person. An alarming number of these girls are in the 'teen age, but
it is felt that by the concerted effort of all, this problem can be substantially








64 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


reduced. Officials and other interested persons are concentrating particularly
on the parents of these girls in an effort to solve this problem through better
parental education and guidance.
During the year an application was submitted to the Federal Works
Agency for funds for the maintenance and operation of three quarantine hos-
pitals for infected, delinquent women in the state. This application was ap-
proved and two CCC camps have been made available to the State Board of
Health by the Army for this purpose. It is believed that these two hospitals
will be in operation within a short time, and efforts are being made to locate
a third.
The tremendous load on the laboratories brought about by the accelerated
venereal disease program and the examination of large numbers of selective
service registrants is shown in Graphs 8 and 9 and Table 9. In performing
this great increase in volume of work, neither the quality of the tests nor the
efficiency of the laboratory has been sacrificed. The central laboratory has
again been approved by the National Evaluation Study Committee. All
branch state laboratories performing serologic tests are constantly checked
with the central laboratory for efficiency. Every blood serologic examination
receives two independent tests, a Kahn standard and an Eagle diagnostic.
Other tests performed by the laboratory are: Mazzini microscopic examina-
tion on hemolyzed blood specimens, spinal fluid examinations, darkfield ex-
aminations, gonorrhea smears, culture examinations and blood level determi-
nation of sulfonamides.
TABLE 9. SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR SYPHILIS AND MICROSCOPIC EXAMS FOR
GONORRHEA-STATE LABORATORIES-1933 TO 1942.

YEAR SYPHILIS GONORRHEA
1933 97,475 13,131
1934 131,657 17,340
1935 136,558 20,450
1936 145,928 25,376
1937 193,249 28,231
1938 242,704 28,720
1939 288,241 31,958
1940 449,256 35,767
1941 908,360 43,591
1942 1,239,399 58,936








VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


GRAPH 8. SEROLOGIC TESTS FOR SYPHILIS-STATE LABORATORIES, 1933-42.


12-











6.











19 19 935 196 197 19 199 190 19
1955 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 191


42


z
9


0


z








66 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


GRAPH 9. MICROSCOPIC EXAMS FOR GONORRHEA-STATE LABORATORIES,
1933-42.

6-



5-










0-
1-

*- a




1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1958 1939 1940 1941 1942

Table 10 shows the amount of drugs dispensed during 1942. The amount
and cost of drugs dispensed during the last six months of the year was ap-
proximately twice that during the first six months. This ratio is approxi-
mately the same as the increase in the number of patients treated. We were
handicapped throughout the year and particularly during the latter part in
getting a sufficient amount of drugs because of the demands of the Armed
Forces upon the manufacturers for these same drugs. For this reason we were
out of one drug or another at almost all times throughout the year.

TABLE 10.-DISTRIBUTION OF DRUGS AS TO SOURCES AND KIND FURNISHED
BY THE DIVISION THROUGHOUT THE YEAR 1942.

Distributed to Distributed to Tta
DRUG Private Clinics, Hos- Distributed
Physicians pitals, Etc.

Neoarsphenamine 19,122 doses 27,080 doses 46,202 doses
Sulpharsphenamine 365 doses 1,760 doses 2,125 doses
Mapharsen 33,920 doses 336,310 doses 370,230 doses
Tryparsamide 150 doses 5,700 doses 5,850 doses
Bismuth in Oil 57,150 c.c. 546,120 c.c. 603,270 cc.
Sulfathiazole 3,300 grams 539,700 grams 543,000 grams
Distilled Water 553,600 c.c. 2,181,500 c.c. 2,735,100 c.c.







VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL


The record of accomplishments for the year 1942 would not be complete
without acknowledging the indebtedness of the Division to its former Di-
rector, Dr. L. C. Gonzalez, who started the Division of Venereal Disease
Control in 1938, and who resigned in May 1942 to enter private practice.
A number of the tables and charts show the steady increase in the work done
under his direction over that period. It is also obvious that the venereal
disease control program would have made no progress without the constant
interest and effort of the numerous health officers, venereal disease control
officers, and clinicians connected with this work throughout the state.
The outlook for the eradication of the venereal diseases in Florida is most
encouraging, provided public interest is maintained at the present level and
funds made available for the purpose. One of the major reasons for opti-
mism has been the increasing interest and hearty cooperation in the pro-
gram shown by the medical profession. This interest and cooperation has
not only been evidenced by the help of many members of the profession in
the venereal disease clinics throughout the state, but the physicians have taken
advantage of every opportunity to acquaint themselves with the venereal dis-
ease problem, not only from a clinical, but from a public health point of
view. Some doctors have taken time from their practice to take post-graduate
courses in venereal disease control so that they could better serve their com-
munities. Practically all the medical societies have given over at least one of
their entire meetings for a program on venereal diseases. With the coopera-
tion of the Venereal Disease Committee of the Florida Medical Association,
an outstanding authority on gonorrhea, Dr. P. S. Pelouze was brought to
Florida for a month of lectures to the local medical societies and to lay
groups. Due to the increased number of clinics established and to the inter-
est of the medical profession, it can be said that at the end of the year treat-
ment was within the reach of every infected person in the State of Florida.
The medical profession has cooperated wholeheartedly in treating infected
persons who are able to pay even very small fees. Those indigent persons
unable to pay the price physicians usually charge are nearly always within
reach of one of the 153 clinics operating throughout the state.
Among other developments during the year which affect the outlook of
venereal disease control in Florida has been the development of various im-
proved methods of treating syphilis. There are several methods under study
in various parts of the country and all have this advantage: that they require
much less time than the year to eighteen months' course of treatment now
used. In May, 1.942, Doctors Warren, Carpenter and Jones from the Uni-
versity of Rochester, Rochester, New York, after surveying various places in
the country, decided that Jacksonville offered the most advantages for a trial
of the intensive treatment method which they had developed. Quarters for
this work were furnished by the Duval County Welfare Board in the Duval







68 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


County Hospital. Dr. Nathaniel Jones has been in Jacksonville since that
time and has been studying their method on suitable cases, in cooperation
with the U. S. Public Health Service and the Florida State Board of Health.
This method consists in raising the patient's temperature to 106 degrees
for a period of five hours by placing the patient in a heat cabinet developed
at the University of Rochester. Concurrently with the fever induced, a single
dose of an arsenical is given. The results from treating more than a hundred
patients by this method, thus far, have been most encouraging, and are equal,
or superior, to the results obtained by other intensive treatment methods. The
results also compare favorably, at least during the short period of observa-
tion possible since the beginning of the work, with those obtained by the
standard treatment methods.
Physicians and health officers throughout the country are intensely inter-
ested in this new method of treatment and are watching it closely. However,
no claims are being made by those connected with this work, until a longer
period of observation is possible. It is important that the general public
realize that there is adequate reason for this caution, due to the nature of the
disease being treated. Syphilis is a chronic disease of long duration and may
last for a life time. The early symptoms of the disease, such as the initial
sore and skin rash, usually clear up spontaneously, even if not treated, within
a few weeks or months, and no other serious symptoms may become evident
until years later. In testing new treatment methods, therefore, it is necessary
to observe the persons treated for many years in order to see if there are any
relapses or serious late complications.
These observations are being carried on in connection with this treatment
method and it is the hope of all connected with it that it will prove to be
the answer to the quest for an easy and practical way of destroying the syphi-
litic spirochete. It will be remembered that more than thirty years ago the
German chemist, Ehrlich was thought to have made this discovery, when he
perfected the drug salvarsan. At that time, it was thought that a single dose
of this drug was enough to cure a patient inflicted with syphilis. However,
years of observation showed that many persons so treated relapsed and de-
veloped serious late complications. It was for that reason that the present
so-called standard treatment method was evolved, which requires weekly in-
jections of an anti-syphilitic drug for a year or more. For this reason, phy-
sicians and health officers will not discard the older and surer method until
a newer and better one has been tried and proved by the test of time.
Considering the progress made during the past year and in the years pre-
ceding it, the hope for better methods of treatment, and taking into consid-
eration the aroused public interest in the subject, it is believed that the out-
look for venereal disease control in Florida is most encouraging. At the











VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL 69


present writing, Florida has an unenviable record as to the prevalence of

venereal diseases, but it is certain that if the people continue to respond to

the challenge presented, there need be no fear as to the eventual outcome.


TABLE 11.-NUMBER CASES OF CHANCROID, OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM,
GRANULOMA INGUINALE, AND LYMPHOPATHIA VENEREA
REPORTED FOR STATE 1942.


Chancroid
Ophthalmia Neonatorum
Granuloma Inguinale
Lymphopathia Venerea


453
19
135
124


TABLE 12.-NUMBER CASES OF GONORRHEA REPORTED BY COUNTIES AND
FOR STATE-1942.


COUNTY

Alachua..................................................... 105
Baker................................. ................ 20
Bay..................................... ........... 255
Bradford.---------------....-------- 97
B revard .........................................................
Broward.................................................... 110
Calhoun........................................................ 2
Charlotte..............................----------------....... 8
Citrus .... .. .................. .................
Clay....... ................... ......... 61
C ollier............................................................ 1
Columbia....................................................... 8
Dade........ .... ...................... 522
DeSoto...........................................- -- 14
D ixie..................................... ...................... 1
Duval......................... ..................... 2,115
Escambia ........................... .......... 514
Flagler..................................... 11
Franklin................................ .. 30
Gadsden.............................. ................... 56
Gilchrist....... .. ............. ................
Glades-................. ... .......... 7
G ulf.............. .......... .....................
Hamilton...................................... .......... 50
Hardee ............ ................................ 17
Hendry.................................. ............... 6
Hernando .................................... .
Highlands.......................................... 35
Hillsborough..................... ............. 803
Holmes ........ ......... .. ............ 1
Indian River .......................... ........ 11
Jackson ..................................... ..... 109
Jefferson........ ........................................ 42
Lafayette.............. 1...........
Lake.................. .... ............ 97


COUNTY

Lee..........................------ 108
Leon......... ...... ................... 1,111
Levy..... -------............--- ---. 15
Liberty.-............--.--..... .
Madison ............. -........1------ 13
M anatee......... ....................... 35
Marion.........................----- 2
Martin................ .... ........--- 2
Monroe ...... .................. ... 80
N assau......... ....................... 59
Okaloosa..................... .............................. 24
Okeechobee.. ---...-........... .------.. 2
Orange............... .......... ......... 629
Osceola........................---
Palm Beach............ ................ 258
Pasco...... ........... .......... 2
Pinellas .............................. 277
Polk.................... ........ .....
Putnam.................... ............... 6
St. Johns.......................- ......-- 10
St. Lucie................. .. .----.. 14
Santa Rosa..................... ......................... 27
Sarasota ............................... .................. 83
Seminole.............. ........------- 104
Sumter .....................----- 14
Suwannee...................... .-- --
Taylor........ ................ ........ 75
Union..... .............................. 1
Volusia....................... ... ---- 83
Wakulla.................. ........ 15
W alton............ .... .. .............. 12
Washington..... ......................... 0
State Hospital ......... ................... 0
Camp Blanding.............................1,478
Naval Air Station..... ................. 428
Out of State............................... ........-. 9
TOTAL........................................ ........ 10,174













TABLE 13.-DIVIsION OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL ANNUAL fEPORT-1942. CASES OF SYPHILIS REPORTED IN 1942 ACCORD-
ING TO STAGE OF INFECTION, PREGNANCY STATUS, RACE AND SEX, SOURCE OF REFERENCE AND AGE GROUPS BY COUNTIES
AND FOR STATE.


By Stage of Infection


County P F 4 3
Alachua-.... 99 26 384 388
Baker ...........- 1 1 1 0
Bay................ 12 25 152 193
Bradford__..... 11 15 78 65
Brevard........ 6 32 4 15
Broward......... 26 22 318 303
Calhoun........ 0 0 23 3
Charlotte..... 4 5 13 132
Citrus............. 2 3 3 7
Clay......---...... 0 4 25 26
Collier........... 5 58 34 72
Columbia...... 3 9 0 16
Dade......... 488 564 252 2,102
DeSoto-...... 7 10 78 147
Dixie............. 15 41 0 6
Duval--...~. ---- 156 209 926 1,442
Escambia.-..-.. 90 58 298 185
Flagler............ 7 14 24 31
Franklin.......... 18 26 21 31
Gadsden.......... 23 20 43 87
Gilchrist........ 1 0 0 3
Glades_......... 1 0 10 67
Gulf._-........ 7 4 6 99
Hamilton_..... 0 0 25 49
Hardee....... 23 0 17 39
Hendry....._. 0 3 58 126
Hernando. .. 3 9 2 6
Highlands... 11 7 82 195
Hillsborough.. 130 74 706 1,318
Holmes........... 4 0 0 1
Indian River.. 10 22 74 71
Jackson_..... 6 3 62 160
Jefferson_...... 29 41 150 149
Lafayette 0 0 0 1
Lake-_... 30 36 208 257


Late




0 0
S3 2
0 0
3 1
0 0
2 3
0 2
0 0
0 3
0 0
0 1
0 0
1 12
42 32
0 1
0 0
52 39
7 5
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
1 1
1 0
0 4
0 1
0 0
0 2
13 10
0 1
0 1
0 1
0 0
0 1
1 3


White



oM F
0 Zt 9
49 14 965 ...... 17 19 19
0 73 76...... 5 4 7
4 22 412 5 51 33
9 4 182..... 1 12 29
10 96 168...... 3 10 7
19 83 773...... 24 33 25
0 0 26...... 0 9 5
9 4 170 ...... 0 12 12
1 1 17 ...... 0 1
2 4 62 ...... 3 6 10
0 21 190 0 4 2
0 18 59 ...... 0 9 4
41 708 4,229...... 48 357 245
17 4 264 ...... 4 13 9
0 12 74...... 2 0 4
49 643 3,516...... 62 359 317
10 8 661...... 19 92 65
0 3 79...... 2 1 2
0 0 96 ...... 0 11 10
8 16 199.... 2 6 9
1 37 42 0 0
1 31 110 .... 1 1 1
6 24 148 ..... 0 5 1
1 1 77..... 1 5 0
2 10 95 .... 2 11 16
6 11 205...... 1 2 1
2 31 53 ...... 0 5 8
12 35 344...... 1 9 7
49 137 2,437 .... 9 240 215
1 11 18 .... 0 6 3
1 31 210 .... 2 11 2
5 0 237...... 2 16 22
10 53 432 ...... 12 4 12
3 2 7_ 0 2 1
18 58 611... 6 18 13


By Race & Sex


By Age Group


30- 40- 50-

39 49 over


Colored



M F g
z
483 427 17
24 39 2
130 193 5
68 70 3
102 48 1
330 382 3
9 3 0
82 63 1
6 10 0
19 26 1
132 50 2
19 25 2
1,568 1,863 196
113 124 5
39 30 1
1,601 1,154 85
241 255 8
28 45 3
44 29 2
88 94 2
4 5 33
64 37 7
54 79 9
45 27 0
35 32 1
102 99 1
19 21 0
178 148 2
938 1,032 12
6 3 0
103 93 1
85 114 0
161 254 1
2 0 2
279 286 15


Src. of Ref.


965
76
412
182
168
773
26
170
17
62
190
59
4,229
264
74
3,516
661
79
96
199
42
110
148
77
95
205
53
344
2,437
18
210
237
432
7
611


Clinic Priv.
or
Inst. M.D.


407 558
75 1
358 54
164 18
69 99
686 87
26 0
160 10
0 17
54 8
101 89
15 44
2,275 1,954
211 53
0 74
2,495 1,021
579 82
57 22
90 6
145 54
41 1
109 1
107 41
75 2
63 32
204 1
8 45
272 72
1,976 461
5 13
153 57
236 1
331 101
2 5
497 114


10- 20-

19 29


137 362
5 12
68 192
24 70
11 70
80 305
2 10
13 29
2 6
7 19
8 54
4 24
324 1,466
32 81
7 18
290 1,416
107 351
6 29
10 36
26 83
0 5
11 34
14 62
5 34
10 22
16 78
2 21
23 136
204 847
1 9
13 75
16 78
40 139
1 0
86 208


z
z


3 r


965 m
76
412
182 0
168
773
26
170
17
62
190 o
59 ->
4,229 N
264
74
3,516
661
79
96
199
42
110
148
77
95
205
53
344
2,437
18
210
237
432
7
611


-1 -


...


-v








TABLE 13.-DIVISION OF VENEREAL DISEASE CONTROL ANNUAL REPORT-1942.
CASES OF SYPHILIS REPORTED IN 1942 ACCORDING TO STAGE OF INFECTION, PREGNANCY STATUS, RACE AND SEX, SOURCE OF
REFERENCE AND AGE GROUPS, BY COUNTIES AND FOR STATE.--(Continued.)


County

Lee--..--. --------......-
Leon.......................
Levy--...-- ........
Liberty...................
Madison.................
Manatee...........
Marion...............
Martin....-......
Monroe ......----..
Nassau ...........
Okaloosa.......
Okeechobee...........
Orange....----........
Osceola ..........
Palm Beach......
Pasco _. ... .....
Pinellas................
Polk ..-.........-.
Putnam.. ...........
St. Johns................
St. Lucie_ ...........
Santa Rosa...........
Sarasota..............--
Seminole..............
Sumter.. ........
Suwannee..........
Taylor ............
Union................
Volusia....................
Wakulla.............
Walton...........
Washington............
State HospitaL-.....
Camp Blandin-....
Naval Air Station..

Out of State-..- ..


r5onaa_ ___- -


- I


296
102
3
0
75
234
100
21
77
35
73
0
765
87
408
45
518
460
226
128
36
23
312
760
58
117
105
2
502
0
26
5
29
18
0


-~I~ t-ac 5 nex~~~~


- ............I I....................


15y tage o[ Inlecr on


Late


Ui


0 0
0 0
5 3
0 1
0 0
1 0
0 3
1 2
0 0
0 1
2 2
2 0
0 0
6 38
0 1
5 3
1 4
9 34
1 3
3 5
1 3
0 6
0 1
14 23
2 6
9 6
1 1
1 0
0 0
1 12
0 0
1 0
0 0
111 0
8 0
0 0

2 13

314 298


By Stage or inmecuon


1,91812,38116,966 13,461


10- 20- 30- 40- 50-

19 29 39 49 over


[


S'0

U Zr%
13 37
7 361
0 295
0 0
4 9
27 10
0 52
0 43
0 1
10 251
0 15
0 0
18 71
6 5
8 208
2 34
47 41
14 57
12 34
7 17
4 11
3 0
15 31
48 7
27 27
2 4
2 29
0 0
33 50
1 83
7 112
2 2
1 0
3 30
0 13

0 21

669 4,167


White Colored


| M F M F


1 17 17 317 296
3 23 15 261 351
0 3 2 26 14
0 1 2 0 1
3 10 2 104 117
16 32 13 260 194
12 16 25 157 155
0 2 2 32 28
3 14 11 88 33
2 25 14 150 109
2 14 19 38 67
0 1 0 1 0
12 75 65 463 405
1 6 2 68 54
23 59 37 538 589
1 20 13 31 39
20 65 61 440 529
0 64 58 312 251
0 6 10 231 149
1 8 8 78 169
1 5 2 64 56
3 10 9 20 19
6 20 19 235 286
11 12 12 538 603
7 14 25 89 80
7 17 15 109 116
5 4 2 143 124
0 2 0 20 2
11 40 62 425 397
1 7 2 43 33
4 16 23 49 70
0 6 2 29 8
0 44 20 63 43
0 141 0 177 0
0 27 0 4 0

0 20 3 44 2
390 2,189 1,689 12,848 12,549


S 70...

30,174 ...


Clinic Priv.
or
Inst. M.D.






235 195 40
503 159 344
359 30 329
66 57 9
147 145 2
309 259 5
140 135 5
S 1 344
1,023 966 59
2 1 1

132 11 121
1,245 953 292
114 14 100
1,111 943 168
690 554 136
401 282 119
264 161 103
127 96 31
58 57 1
570 486 84
1,169 1,100 69
227 35 192
259 190 69
301 85 216
24 1 23
944 771 173
85 85 0
164 159 5
45 42 3
172 172 0
329 329 0
31 31 0

70 62 8

30,174 22,062 8,112


23


1
899


I rC. o0 Mel.


Vy agev nvup


By Race & Sex


5 3 12 12 17" 21


2,914 2,637 10,862 8,235 3,79611,730


79


650
659
301 <
4
235 m
503 Z
359 m
66
147
309 m
140 >
2r
1,023
132
1,245
114
1,111 "
690 m
401
264 ,
127
58
570
1,169 "
227 0
259
301
24 -4
944
85
164 0
45 r-
172
329
31

70 ..

30,174


201
155
11
3
97
203
142
22
58
84
64
2
378
38
496
32
404
257
178
83
45
24
172
399
82
99
67
11
267
41
28
19
25
259
23


ill


I I


.


1--, 1-- 1


i-


' '









MALARIA CONTROL

JOHN E. ELMENDORF, JR., M. D., Director
GENERAL
The Bureau of Malaria Control, organized within the Florida State Board
of Health in July, 1941, as a cooperative project financially supported by the
State Board of Health, the United States Public Health Service and the Rocke-
feller Foundation, continued its activities throughout the entire year of 1942.
For the first three-quarters of the year, the Bureau functioned with an
incomplete personnel, since it had been impossible to locate personnel ade-
quately trained to fill the positions of Assistant Malariologist and Malaria
Engineer. At approximately the middle of September, both of these posi-
tions were filled, Dr. Edwin G. Riley being named as Assistant Malariolo-
gist and Mr. James H. Wright to the post of Engineer of the malaria division.
At the last of June, Mr. Fred W. Knipe was assigned by the Rocke-
feller Foundation to the Florida State Board of Health on temporary duty
with the Bureau of Malaria Control.

ROUTINE ACTIVITIES OF THE BUREAU OF MALARIA CONTROL
Early in the year it became apparent that routine activities of malaria con-
trol, predicated on the hypothesis that localities would advance funds for
local control measures, would be impossible. County and local revenues had
been curtailed by decrease in many sources of revenues previously supplied
by special taxes and, furthermore, extraordinary local expenses for emergency
works associated with the establishment of military bases and in preparation
for emergency conditions had been greatly increased.
Accordingly, it was judged unwise to confine the activities of the depart-
ment simply to local investigations of malaria problems and associated with
a general program of education throughout the state. This decision was based
upon the belief that the prosecution of such activities considerably prior to
the time when possible finances would be available for their execution would
result in a feeling of apathy toward malaria control projects later, on the part
of the populace, when it is expected finances will again be available.
Under these circumstances, it had been decided that the most opportune
work for the Bureau of Malaria Control would be the inauguration of a
widespread investigation of the whole State of Florida, both from the clini-
cal and entomological standpoints, in order to clarify further the status of
the local epidemiology of the disease as well as to establish the exact demar-
cation of endemic areas. These investigations were to be general rather than
specialized studies directed toward specific control activities in any special
locality. War developments, however, altered these plans.








MALARIA CONTROL


On February 10, 1942, the U. S. Public Health Service was encharged
by the Federal Government with the responsibility of conducting the pro-
gram of Malaria Control in War Areas. It was originally planned that this
work should be accomplished largely by the use of larvicidal methods of
control and should be practiced in the mile area surrounding all military
bases, defense housing projects and essential war industries, as well as recre-
ational districts for military personnel where malaria existed to such degree
that it would constitute a hazard for the personnel of these activities.
The plans for administration and operation of the projected work were
based upon the concept of cooperation of the various state health depart-
ments in supervising and directing the campaign as well as being the local
agent responsible for its execution.
Finances for the operation of the program, including salaries of person-
nel, purchases of equipment, materials, cars, trucks, etc., were to be furnished
by the U. S. Public Health Service, whereas, the state boards of health were
to supply the local supervisory and directing personnel as well as office space
and funds for minor and incidental expenses.
All personnel of the entire organization within a state was to be placed
under the direct supervision of the State Health Officer or his delegated rep-
resentative.
The Bureau of Malaria Control in Florida seemed ideally suited for the
active administration of this program, since the local financial situation did
not permit of the execution of the proposed routine activities of the Bureau.
The State Health Officer accepted the responsibility of the program and
the Director of the Bureau of Malaria Control was delegated by him to as-
sume active directorship of this new activity.
Although this Bureau was not entirely in accord with a concept of control
based largely upon larvicidal methods, it was realized that with projects being
opened when the breeding season was already at hand, no other method could
offer as good prospect for emergency control operations as the larvicidal
procedures.
Furthermore, as judged by past history, it appeared that another cycle of
increase in the clinical presence of the disease might be imminent in the
Southeast of the United States and no guarantee could be given that this
would not occur during 1942. Under this circumstance, draining and mos-
quito proofing could not have been conducted on a scale sufficiently extensive
to accomplish the practical ends of generalized control.
It also seemed logical to assume that as time progressed, temporary meth-
ods ef control could well develop into other measures more permanent in
their nature. An opportunity would further be afforded for education in ma-








74 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


laria control procedures through practical demonstration and would offer
additional opportunity for a coordination of efforts of all agencies interested
in malaria control.
At the beginning of activities of emergency malaria control, the State
Board of Health was given the responsibility of selecting those areas where
work was deemed to be necessary as judged from the standpoint of evidence
of the presence of malaria to a degree which would constitute a hazard to
the war effort. In many districts little concrete evidence of the actual pres-
ence of the disease existed other than that of the general reputation of areas
as based on past history and also mortality statistics. This situation, involving
paucity of objective information, was due to the fact that the State Board of
Health in previous years had no division for the exclusive study of malaria.
Some clinical evidence on the presence of the disease was available, based
on the records of splenic surveys conducted in 1931 by Dr. Stratman Thomas
and in 1937 and 1941 by Dr. Elmendorf, both working at the time of their
respective surveys, 1931 and 1937, out of Dr. Boyd's laboratory in Talla-
hassee.
After the organization of the Bureau of Malaria Control in July of 1941,
a clinical survey was conducted by Dr. Elmendorf in nine counties and forty-
five localities of Florida, so this direct objective clinical evidence also assisted
those in charge of the campaign in defining certain areas where the poten-
tiality for the propagation of malaria existed.
This available information did not cover all areas of Florida where mili-
tary bases or other bases essential to the military effort existed. Accordingly,
areas for control operations had to be selected on the basis of information
which was available. The principles governing the decision to open such
works are noted on page 117.
To clarify further existence of actual and potential areas of malaria, the
routine clinical survey for the Fall of 1942 was planned to cover as many
as possible of the districts where military bases existed and where the pre-
vious status of the disease had not been objectively studied. In all, thirty-
one towns were studied in this splenic and blood survey and 6,663 children
were examined.
The facts revealed by this survey have assisted materially in defining the
situation relative to the potentiality of these areas to produce malaria. See
Table 1 for analysis clinical survey.
In association with the clinical investigation, special entomological studies
were made in certain localities to ascertain those districts where military bases
existed and where the vector common to Florida, Anopheles quadrimaculatus,
existed as well. See Table No. 2, special studies, Table No. 3.








MALARIA CONTROL 75


TABLE 1.-SPLENIC FINDINGS BY COUNTIES IN FLORIDA
FALL, 1942

S Results of Splenic Examinations

COUNTY
AND
LOCALITY Z

________________ gZ Z Z em


Alachua County:
Gainesville ............................ 433 106 58 41 7 327 24.5
J. J. Finley........................ 96 26 13 12 1 70 27.1
Sidney Lanier .................... 91 22 11 10 1 69 24.2
Kirby Smith ............... 246 58 34 19 5 188 23.6
Bay County:
Panama City ........................ 254 65 34 28 3 189 25.6
Citrus County: 304 113 71 37 5 191 37.2
Crystal River ........................ 78 32 18 12 2 46 41.0
Floral City ........................... 28 6 4 2 0 22 21.4
Hernando ............................. 15 7 6 1 0 8 46.7
Homosassa ............................ 55 19 9 7 3 36 84.5
Inverness ............................. 92 36 26 10 0 56 39.1
LeCanto .................................. 36 13 8 5 0 23 36.1
Clay County:
Green Cove Springs.......... 219 60 25 32 3 159 27.4
Columbia County:1
Lake City ................................ 256 78 46 30 2 178 30.5
DeSoto County: 409 78 35 39 3 331 219.1
Arcadia .................... 290 59 27 28 3 231 20.3
West Elementary .............. 163 33* 14 17 1 130 20.2
Memorial ............................ 127 26 13 11 2 101 20.5
Nocatee .................................. 119 19 8 11 0 100 15.9
Escambia County:
Pensacola ................................ 1,152 319 181 130 8 833 27.7
N. B. Cook.......................... 274 68 34 31 3 206 24.8
Hallmark ........................... 243 59 45 13 1 184 24.3
E. J. Wilson.----................ 102 37 20 17 0 65 36.3
A. Yniestra ....................... 273 79 45 31 3 194 28.9
P. K. Yonge................. 260 76 37 38 1 184 29.2
Highlands County: 603 137 65 I 53 19 466 22.7
Avon Park ............................ 216 54 28 26 0 162 25.0
DeSoto City ............................ 41 11 2 3 6 30 26.8
Sebring .................................... 346 72 35 24 13 274 20.8
Hillsborough County:
Tampa I
Tampa Bay Boulevard...... 118 29 17 12 0 89 24.6
Jefferson County: 1 325 1106-1-83-1 20 3 I 219 I 32.6
Aucilla .................................... 68 28 22 5 1 1 40 1 41.2
Lamont .................................... 22 8 7 1 1 0 14 36.4
Monticello ............... ...........---- 172 45 34 9 2 127 26.2
W acissa ................................- 53 1 19 1 15 1 4- 0 34 35.9
Waukeenah ............................ 10 [ 6 5 1 0 4 1 60.0
*One of these was a No. 3 size spleen.









76 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


TABLE 1.-SPLENIC FINDINGS BY COUNTIES IN FLORIDA
FALL, 1942.-(Continued.)

Results of Splenic Examinations

COUNTY >. .
AND Z Hi
LOCALITY 0m S
-g -40 a)

~______E______-r ZI gZ Z Zw r
Leon County:
Tallahassee ............................ 493 134 78 54 2 359 27.2
Caroline Brevard................. 224 73 40 31 2 151 32.6
Sealey Memorial .............. 269 61 38 23 0 208 22.7
Madison County:
Madison ................................. 260 92 64 23 5 168 35.4
Marion County:
Ocala ................................... 227 55 26 26 3 172 24.2
Grammar ......................... 75 24 11 13 0 51 32.0
Primary ............................. 152 31 15 13 3 121 20.4
Monroe County:
Key West .............................. 321 57 46 11 0 264 17.8
Harris ................................ 126 20 15 5 0 106 15.9
Division Street ................ 195 37 31 6 0 158 19.0
Polk County:
Lakeland ......... ............ 634 142 72 59 9 492 22.4
John Cox ................. 381 91 45 40 6 290 23.9
W ebster .............................. 253 51* 27 19 3 202 20.2
Seminole County:
Sanford .................................. 254 48 25 22 1 206 18.9
Volusia County:
DeLand ........................ ....... 211 46 31 14 1 165 21.8
Wakulla County: 190 65 42 20 3 125 34.2
Crawfordville ........................ 136 50 33 16 1 86 36.8
St. Marks ................................ 54 15 9 4 2 39 27.8
*Two of these were No. 3 size spleens.










TABLE 2.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. ROUTINE ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH MILITARY BASES. MALARIA CONTROL
IN WAR AREAS.
TAMPA -DREW FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline larval Survey
S] j No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians j A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. % o f No. % of No. % of
Insp. j Dips A. quad. | crucians | Det. Taken Total i Taken | Total Taken Total
4-22-42 | 7 I 104 1 6 44 6 13.6 38 I 8.4 0 I
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. I No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date I No. Sta. I Pos. for I Pos. for of Ano. No. % of I No. | % .of No. % of
Insp. I A. juad. I crucians I Taken Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total
4-22-42 I 9 | 5 I 7 543 9 | 1.7 I 534 | 88.3 j 0 I
TAMPA MACDILL FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta. I Total A. quad. | A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. j No. | Pos. for I Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. I % of No. % of
Insp. Dips 1 A. quad. | crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
4-23-42 8 72 0 4 I 30 0 | 30 I 100.0 I 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. cruelans A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. |% of
Insp. A. quad. | crucians | Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total W
4-23-42 3 1 | 3 | 94 1 I 1.0 | 93 99.0 0 I
JACKSONVILLE SOUTHEASTERN NAVAL AIR BASE
Preliminary Anopheline larval Survey 0
-j No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. | A. crucians A. punct. 0
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. | % of | No. J % of Z
Insp. Dips | A. quad. crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total -I
4-13-42 3 40 I 0 j 2 I 10 0 | 10 I100.0 I 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey 0
r-
No. Sta. j No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. | Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. ] A. quad. crucians Taken Taken | Total | Taken Total Taken | Total
5-8-42 | 9 I 1 9 | 52 1 I 2.0 I 51 | 98.0 0 I










TABLE 2.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. ROUTINE ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH MILITARY BASES. MALARIA CONTROL 0
IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
JACKSONVILLE CECIL FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S | No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. | A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of Z
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Z
5-6-42 5 0 5 I 28 0 | 28 100.0 0 C
JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey r-
S No. Sta. No. Sta. ( Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. \% of No. 0 % of
Insp. | A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total m
5-6-42 5 3 5 | 61 9 | 14.8 5 2 | 85.2 | 0
GREEN COVE SPRINGS BENJAMIN LEE FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. %of No. % of I No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken I Total Taken Total
5-6-42 8 1 I 4 I 62 1 1.6 61 98.4 0
CITY OF STAKE
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. S N ta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucans A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. | %tof No. --% of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
5-6-42 4 1 4 24 1 4.1 23 | 95.9 0
CITY OF MARIANNA
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
I I 1 No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for I Pos. for No. Lar. No. | % of | No. % of | No. % of
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians Det. Taken I Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-13-42 1 24 | 1 ] 0 ] 25 25 100.0 0 0 I 0 I
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. | A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. St. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. | crucians | Taken Taken I Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-13-42 j 1 j 1 ] 0 ] 27 27 100.0 0 0 |J 0 |










TABLE 2.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. ROUTINE ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH MILITARY BASES. MALARIA CONTROL
IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
CITY OF SANFORD
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. I No. Sta. [ Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos.for of Ano. No. I % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians ] Taken Taken I Total Taken |Total Taken Total
6-26-42 11 9 11 244 99 | 40.6 | 145 59.4 0
CITY OF DE LAND
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. | % of No. | % of No. % of
Insp. I A. quad. crucians Taken Taken | Total I Taken J Total Taken Total
6-25-42 11 10 11 | 1465 303 I 20.7 | 1162 I 79.3 | 0
CITY OF ARCADIA
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
--No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. I A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. %of
Insp. Dips [ A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken Total Taken |Total Taken Total
4-28-42 4 80 | 2 2 ] 12 5 1 41.7 | 7 1 58.3 I 0 ]
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta'. Total No. A. quad. A. crucianse | A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for I of Ano. No. % of No. % of | No. % of
S Insp. A. quad. | crucians Taken Taken Total Total Ta Total Taken Total
4-28-42 4 1 j 4 16 3 18.8 | 13 81.2 | 0


ARCADIA CARLSTROM FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
SNo. Sta. No. Sta. I Total A. quad. j A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. [ % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians Det. Taken | Total Taken | Total Taken Total
4-27-42 7 115 2 3 8 2 I 25.0 ] 6 | 75.0 0 0 I
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. J No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians ] A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for I Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. I % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total ] Taken I Total Taken | Total
4-27-42 7 0 2 ] 10 0 | 10 I100.0 I 0 I


I-
0





z
-1

0
rI-














TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
AVON PARK BOMBING RANGE
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey Z
SNo. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for | No. Lar. No'. % of No. | % of No. % of
Insp. Dips | A. quad. crucians I Det. Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total >
10-8-42 2 120 I 0 I 2 10 0 | | 10 | 100.0 0 I r
CITY OF CLEWISTON X
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey m
j No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. -
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for INo. Lar. No. I % of No. | % of No. % of O
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken | Total Taken Total Taken Total ;
11-17-42 8 300 I 3 | 7 I 33 11 33.3 | 22 | 66.7 0 [ -I
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
SI No. Sta. | No. Sta. | Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date I No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. | % of No. % of
Insp. T A. quad. I crucians | Taken Taken Total Taken ] Total Taken Total
11-17-42 4 2 3 I 8 4 | 50.0 | 4 | 50.0 | 0
CITY OF FT. MYERS
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
I No. Sta. j No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-22-42 3 | 120 1 I 2 9 2 22.2 7 I 77.8 0
10-23-42 3 ] 130 j 1 0 | 4 4 100.0 | 0 [ --0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
I No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. I % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-22-42 I 1 1 I 0 I 6 6 I 100.0 I 0 I I 0








TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
(Continued)
FT. MYERS PAGE FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline larval Survey
I No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. | A. crucians | A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for | Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. | % of
S Insp. Dips A. quad. | crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-22-42 I 2 | 80 I 0 | 2 I 7 0 I I 7 I 100.0 I 0 |
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
I No. Sta. [ No. Sta. | Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for | Pos. for of Ano. No. % of I No. % of No. % of
I Insp. | A. quad. | crucians | Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-22-42 I 3 I 1 2 8 1 | 12.5 | 7 | 87.5 0 I
FT. MYERS FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
S( No. Sta. | No. Sta. | Total A. quad. A. crucians | A. punct.
Date No. Sta. [ No. Pos. for | Pos. for I No. Lar. No. % of No. j % of No. % of
S Insp. | Dips | A. quad. I crucians | Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-23-42 3 130 | 0 0 I 00 0 I 0 I
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
| No. Sta. No. Sta. j Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for P Pos. for | of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians I Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-23-42 I 2 2 I 1 I 3 2 66.7 1 33.3 0 -
LAKELAND DANE FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
] I No. Sta. I No. Sta. I Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. O
Date No. Sta. No. J Pos. for [ Pos. for | No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. % of Z
1 Insp. Dips A. quad. | crucians Det. Taken Total Taken j Total Taken |Total -.
9-15-42 | 6 200 | 1 3 | 16 2 | 12.5 14 87.5 1 0 a
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey 0
S No. Sta. I No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. r
Date No. Sta. Pos. for | Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
I Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken I Total Taken Total
9-15-42 j 6 1 1 3 2 | 66.7 j 1 1 33.3 0 |











00
TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
(Continued)
LAKELAND MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
] No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. z
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for I No. Lar. No. % of I No. % of No. % of Z
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken Total Taken Total | Taken Total
9-14-42 5 140 2 2 | 6 3 50.0 3 50.0 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey >
No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. f N % o No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken ] Total Taken Total m
9-14-42 3 0 0 0 0 I I 0 I 0 I "
LAKELAND FOOD MACHINERY CORP.
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
-4
I I No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians | A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. I Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. I % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. | Dips A. quad. [ crucians D| et. Taken | Total ITaken | Total Taken Total
9-16-42 4 | 130 | 0 I 4 | 42 0 I 42 100.0 I 0 |
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey N
No. Sta. ] No. Sta. j Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for I Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. | % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians I Taken Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total
9-16-42 2 0 I 2 | 17 0 | 17 100.0 0
SARASOTA AIR FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
No. Sta. ] No. Sta. I Total A. quad. A. crucians | A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. 1Pos. for Pos. for ] No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-20-42 5 170 | 1 1 19 3 15.8 16 | 84.2 | 0 |
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S No. Sta. ( No. Sta. I Total No. I A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. I Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of I No. I% of
Insp. A. quad. crucians ] Taken Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total
10-20-42 | 3 0 I 0 I 0 0 | 0 I 0 |







TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
(Continued)
CITY OF SARASOTA
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
I | ] No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date | No. Sta. [ No. | Pos. for | Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. % of
[ Insp. I Dips I A. quad. | crucians I Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-20-42 5 | 200 | 2 [ 2 | 26 21 80.8 5 19.2 0 |
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta. j Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. f % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken aken Total Taken Total Taken Total
10-20-42 2 1 0 7 7 100.0 0 0
WEST PALM BEACH MORRISON FIELD
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
] No. Sta. No. Sta. ] Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. i % of No. %of No. % of
Insp. Dips A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken [ Total Taken Total Taken Total
11-18-42 12 410 ] 0 8 75 0 | 75 100.0 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for | Pos. for of Ano. No. ] % of No. % of | No. % of
Insp. A. quad. ] crucians | Taken Taken Total Taken ] Total Taken I Total ;
11-19-42 f 4 2 I 2 I 5 2 40.0 3 | 60.0 0 |
OCALA AIR BASE
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey 0
I ] No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. 0
Date No. Sta. No. ] Pos. for Pos. for | No. Lar. No. % of No. I % of No. % of Z
Insp. Dips A. quad. ] crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total --
4-27-42 2 88 ] 2 2 [ 98 44 ] 44.9 54 | 55.1 0 ?
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey O
No. Sta. No. Sta. [ Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of J No. % of | No. % of
Insp. A. quad. I crucians Taken Taken Total ] Taken Total | Taken Total
4-27-42 I 3 3 I 1 [ 20 12 I 60.0 | 8 40.0 | 0 |

















TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. z
(Continued) z
CITY OF GAINESVIILE C
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
[ | No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. r
Date | No. Sta. | No. Pos. for Pos. for No. Lar. No. % of No. | % of No. % of
S Insp. | Dips A. quad. crucians Det. Taken Total Taken | Total Taken Total
4-30-42 | 7 92 3 [ 4 | 56 27 | 48.2 22 39.3 7 | 12.5 r
8-27-42 | 5 | 50 1 | 3 [ 22 10 45.5 I 12 5 4.5 0 |
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
No. Sta. No. Sta. J Total No. A. quad. | A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians I Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
4-30-42 | 4 1 4 64 7 11.0 55 85.9 2 | 3.1
8-28-42 7 3 | 4 | 75 13 17.3 62 I 82.7 0 |
CITY OF LAKE CITY
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
| | | No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians j A. punct.
Date No. Sta. | No. Pos. for Pos. for ] No. Lar. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. | Dips | A. quad. crucians | Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-19-42 6 096 4 1 4 | 81 9 I 11.1 72 88.9 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
j I No. Sta. j No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. | Pos. for | Pos. for I of Ano. No. I% of No. % of No. % o
S Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-19-42 1 7 I 7 I 6 I 819 795 I 97.0 I 24 I 3.0 I 0 I










TABLE 3.-ENTOMOLOGICAL FINDINGS. SPECIAL REPORTS. SPECIAL AREAS. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
(Continued)
LAKE CITY- NAVAL AIR STATION
Preliminary Anopheline Larval Survey
j | ] No. Sta. No. Sta. Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. No. Pos. for Pos. for I No. Lar. No. | % of No. % of No. I % of
Insp. | Dips [ A. quad. crucians Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-19-42 2 32 ] 1 1 36 1. 31 86.1 5 13.9 0
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. | % of No. I % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
6-19-42 2 2 2 I 24 19 79.1 5 20.9 0 I
CITY OF PERRY
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
| No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for ] of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
9-7-42 7 3 5 44 31 | 70.5 13 2 29.5 0 |
CITY OF CARRABELLE
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
INo. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. % of No. % of No. I % of
Insp. A. quad. crucians Taken Taken Total Taken I Total | Taken Total
9-2-42 I 8 1 0 7 31 0 I 81 | 100.0 0
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
Preliminary Anopheline Adult Survey
S No. Sta. No. Sta. Total No. A. quad. A. crucians A. punct.
Date No. Sta. I Pos. for Pos. for of Ano. No. | % of No. | % of I No. % of
Insp. I A. quad. crucians | Taken Taken Total 1 Taken Total Taken Total
8-26-42 24 I 3 I 17 | 128 9 | 7.0 119 93.0 0








86 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


Through the results secured in these surveys there has been established a
scientific basig for inauguration of malaria control works in some of the areas
of Florida where military needs indicate control.
The administrative organization for the direction of the work was estab-
lished as follows:

State Health Officer (Dr. Henry Hanson)
Director
Director of Bureau of Malaria Control (Dr. John E. Elmendorf, Jr.)
SDelegated Director
Representatives in the Field of the Director of the Bureau of Malaria Control
Messrs. Knipe and Mulrennan, Dr. Riley
Administrative Liaison Officer between U. S. Public Health Service and
Local Director
Mr. Sidney E. Roman
Area Supervisors of Control Works for Districts
Engineers
Messrs. Weiner, Teich, Saunders, Thompson, Johnson,
Bayer, Sheppard, and Lagerstadt.
Engineering Aides for Entomological Investigations
Messrs. Rogers, Taylor, Mitchell, Lauderdale, Goldman,
Bialolenki, Crutchfield, Strawn, and Provost.
Central Office Personnel
Bureau of Malaria Control:
Director of Bureau
Assistant Director
Consultant Engineer
Entomologist
Department Malaria Engineer
Entomological Assistant
Secretary
USPHS, Administrative Assistant:
Administrative Assistant
2 Secretaries
1 Office Assistant
USPHS, Entomological Department:
2 Entomologists
1 Secretary








MALARIA CONTROL


Labor Personnel
300 Laborers and Foremen
During the course of the year and beginning with the month of March,
emergency control operations were opened in eleven different and general
areas as follows:
Tallahassee
Pensacola
Eglin Field-Valparaiso
Panama City
Jacksonville
Green Cove Springs-Camp Blanding-Starke
Marianna
Drew Field-Tampa
Arcadia-Carlstrom and Dorr Fields
Sanford
DeLand
The work in these eleven districts included the protection of thirty specific
military areas classified by the Federal Government as the type of activity
meriting such control.
In the practical field work the necessity for the application of larvicides
thas been decided in all instances by entomological findings performed just
before the periodic intervals when the length of the breeding cycle of A.
quadrimaculatus in the locality would indicate its use. As a result of this
practice, larviciding measures have been employed only when the vector A.
quadrimaculatus has been demonstrated. The efficiency of larviciding meas-
ures has also been evaluated in like manner by larval investigations performed
at suitable intervals following the application of the larvicide.
Routine captures of adult mosquitoes have served as a general orientation
for the campaign as well as to constitute a measuring rod to'judge the final
efficiency of operations in the elimination of the vector at the point to be
protected. Adult sampling of the mosquito population has been accomplished
by the utilization of mosquito light traps and the establishment of catching
stations strategically located with reference to known breeding areas and to
areas to be protected, as well as placed routinely throughout the area to secure
a general picture of the whole terrain. (For results of these studies, see
Table 4.)
As practically no clinical malaria has been reported from Florida during
the year 1942, no test of the efficiency of the control operations has been
made.











TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
SUMMARY OF ADULT CAPTURE STATION COLLECTIONS OF ANOPHELINE MOSQUITOES FLORIDA 1942
Total Total I
No. No. No. of A. quad. A. crucians A. punt. A. barber A. atropos A. walker
AREA Zones Insp. Ano. I No. % of No. % of No. % of No. % of No. % of No. % of
_____________ __ Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
Tallahassee ......... ... ............... 3 791 8018 6750 184.1 1230 1 15.3 38 0.5 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Pensacola ..................... ................ 6 1141 6461 532 8.2 5650 87.4 265 4.1 10 0.2 4 0.1 0 0.0
Valparaiso ................ ... ...... 4 361 1390 6 0.4 1377 99.1 7 0.5 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Panama City ....................... 2 289 194 9 4.6 185 95.4 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Jacksonville............................. 4 1199 3240 348 10.7 2890 89.2 1 0.1--1 0 0.0 1 0.1-- 0o 0.0
Green Cove Spgs.-Starke........ 3 854 2743 527 19.2 2214 80.8 0 0.0 ) 0 0.0 2 0.1-- 0 I 0.0
MIarianna .................................. 3 398 905 864 95.5 13 1.4 28 3.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Arcadia ............................... 3 696 510 283 55.5 226 44.3 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.2
Tampa .......................................... 1 76 135 43 31.9 92 68.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Sanford-DeLand ................. 4 123 1164 713 61.3 451 38.7 0 0.0 | 0.0 0 o0.0 0 0.0
Sebring .... ...... ...................... 1 82 44 4 9.1 40 90.9 0 0.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 | 0.0
TOTAL .......................__. 34 6010 24804 10079 40.6 14368 58.2 339 1.4 10 0.4 7 0.03 1 0.1-






TABLE 4-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS.
SUMMARY OF ADULT CAPTURE STATION RECORDS SHOWING NUMBER OF STATIONS POSITIVE FOR EACH SPECIES OF ANOPHELINE
FLORIDA 1942
] A. quad. A. crucians | A. punct. | A. barber | A. atropos | A. walker
AREA Zone No. Sta No. Pos. % No. Pos.| % |No. Pos. % INo. Pos.) % |No. Pos. ) % INo. Pos.I %
Insp. np. Po I os. I p.ns. Pos. Insp. Pos. Insp. Po. Insp. Pos.
1 Tallahassee ....................... 1 450 1 215 47.781 105 323.331 22 1 4.89 1 0 1 0.0 I 0 0.0 0 0 0.0
2 189 1 100 52.91 131 69.31_ 8 4.23 0 0.0 1 0 0.0 0 0.0
S" 3 I 152 791 51.97 1 36 123.68 1 0.53 1 0 1 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
2 Pensacola ............................ 1 143 17 11.89 24 16.78 7 4.89 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
2" 2 370 98 826.49 256 30.471 78 21.08 101 2.701 3 0.81 0 0.0
SI 3 1 257 I 17 6.61 197 76.65 16 6.221 0 1 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
I- 4 273 1 211 7.691 136 49.82 16 5.86 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
"I 5 I 42 1 1 2.381 9 21.43 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
6 56 6 10.71 16 28.57 7 12.50 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
3 Valparaiso .................... ...... 1 55 1 1 1.821 6 110.91 0 0.0 0o 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
I 2 -55 0 0.0 1 38 69.09 1 1 1.82 0 1 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
1 3 197 1 4 1 2.06 92 1 46.70 4 1 2.03 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
-I 4 54 11.85 35 64.81 2 3.70 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
4 Panama City .......................... 1 163 6 3.68 38 23.31 0 0.0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
2 126 1 2 1.59 26 20.63 0 T 0.0 0 0.0| 0 0.0 0 0.0
5 Jacksonville ............................ 1 1 388 1 22 5.67 226 58.251 1 0.26 0 0.0 1 0.261 0 0.0
S2 477 80 16.77 265 55.56 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
3 197 35 17.77 120 60.91 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
..I 4 137 44 32.12 44 32.12 0 0.0 0 .0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
6 Green Oove Spgs-Starke ...... 1 197 36 18.27 72 36.55 1 0 0.0 1 0 I 0.0 I1 1 0.511 0 0.0
1_" -2 172 40 23.261 61 35.46 1 0 0.0 0 1 0.0 0F 0.0 0 1 0.0
1- 3 485 I 111 22.89 218 44.95 0 0.0 T 0.0 1 0 0.0 0 0.0
7 Marianna ................................ 1 145 1 29 20.00 7 4.83 14 9.66 0 0 1 0:0 1 0 0.0j 0 0.0
S2 1 200 58 129.00 3 1.501 4 2.001 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
S3 53 I 01 0.0 0 0.0 1 1.90 0 0.0 0 0.0 O 0.0
9 Arcadia ........................ 1 325 59 18.15 63 19.38 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
2 1 191 1 21 10.99 25 13.09 0 0.0 1 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 1 0.52
I 3 180 I 1 I .56 23 12.78 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
11 Tampa ...................................... 1 76 24 31.58 43 156.57 0 0.0 1 0 0.0 0 0.01 0 0.0
12 Sanford-DeLand .................... 1 42 19 45.24 17 [ 40.48 0 0.01 0 .0 0 0.0 0 0.0
4 16 5 31.25 14 87.50 0 0.0 01 0.01 0 0.0 0 0.0
5 | 44 16] 3.36. 11 25.00 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
6 21 16 76.19 15 71.43 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0


21 Sebring ................................. City 1 82 3 |
TOTAL........................ 34 T 6010 1187


3.66
19.75


16 I 19.51
2388 I 39.73


3.03


0 | 0.0 I 0 0.0 I 0 0.0
10 I 0.16 I 5 0.08 I 1 0.02











90 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942





TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE.
MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
SUMMARY OF ADULT ANOPHELINE INSPECTIONS
FLORIDA 1942


I Total A. I A.
AREA Zone Ano. | quad. crucians
I ITaken I M I F I M F
1 Tallahassee ............ 1 39251443 30351 24 394
"1 21 31871 4691 19771 601 673
31 806 651 6611 61 73
2 Pensacola ................ 1 1 1731 211 221 5 116
] 21[ 23581 1171 3041 2101 1504
"1 31 26001 0 241 1411 2417
"__ 41 11961 101 251 1131 1027
S___51 421 01 11 01 41
"___ 61 921 11 71 251 51
3 Valparaiso ............ 1 601 0 1 21 57
I 21 1451 01 01 101 134
31 7731 11 31 2421 523
S 41 4121 01 11 91 400
4 Panama City ....... 1 113 01 7 11 105
1 2[ 811 11 11 41 75
5 Jacksonville ......I 11 12701 5 281 671 1168
1 21 12541 61 1331 531 1062
31 5171 10] 471 591 401
__I 41 1991 101 1091 81 72
6 G. C. Springs........ 1 3671 81 521 281 278
I 21 5081 441 1271 62 274
| 3 18681 1231 1731 2101 1362
7. Marianna ..... ........ 1 1601 421 861 11 8
21 7441 1191 6171 01 4
I 31 11 01 01 0o 0
9 Arcadia .................... 11 3641 211 2201 20 103
S21 1011 141 271 121 47
31 451 01 11 121 32
11 Tampa .................... 1 135 211 221 321 60
12 DeLand ................. 1 3031 671 1331 161 87
"_ 41 1031 1 131 111 78
5 __ __1871 571 79 11l 40
61 5711 721 2911 19| 189


21 Sebring.... ...............


City 441 0 41 41 S6


TOTAL........................ 34 247041 17481 82311 1477112891


A. A. A.
punct. I barberi | atropos
M I F M FIMI F


A.
walker
M I F


1 281 ol 01 0 01 0
11 7 0 01 01 01 01 0
01 11 0 01 0 01 01 0
21 71 01 0l 01 o0 o0 0
101 1991 21 81 01 41 01 0
01 181 01 01 01 01 01 0
01 211 01 1 01 01 0
o01 01 01 oi01 01 0l1 0
01 81 01 01 01 01 01 0
0j 01 0o 01 01 01 01 0
ol ol o oI or o| olo
01 11 01 01 01 01 01 0
01 41 01 01 01 01 01 0
0| 21 01 01 01 01 01 0
01 0 01 01 01 01 0
01 01 01 01 01 01 01 0
o| ol ol ol o| ol o o

o0 101 0o 11 01 0o 0
01 01 01 01| D 01 0| 0
01 01 01 01 01 01 0
01 01 01 01 Oj 0 01 00
01 01 01 01 01 l O1 0o

01 01 01 0O 0 01 01 0
4 19 0o o0 01 0 1 0
01 41 01 01 01 01 01 0
01 |1 01 o O1 01 01 0
o ol o| o l o ol oo
01 01 01 0 01 01 0| 1
0 1 0 0| 0| 0| 0| 0
01 l 01 01 01 0l 0 l 0
o1 o1 o0 ol o0 o0 o0 0
0l 0l 01 0o 0o 0 el 01
01 01 01 01 01 0 01 0

18 3211 21 81 11 61 0 1


I









TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
SUMMARY OF LIGHT TRAP COLLECTIONS OF ANOPHELINE MOSQUITOES FLORIDA 1942
Total Total A. quad. I A. crucians A. punct. A. atropos A. walker
AREA No. No. Ano. No. % of No. |% of No. % of No. % of No. % of
Traps Colls. Taken Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
II I __11___1_ _1 11_ I I I I I
Tallahassee...................... 4 1 276 585 176 30.1 408 69.7 1 1 0.2 0 0.0 0 0.0
Pensacola......-...-......- 101 779 462 74 16.0 354 76.6 32 6.9 2 0.4 0 0.0
Panama City............ ....... 1 1 49 169 2 1.2 166 98.2 11 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0
Jacksonville............. 7 1 540 1657 1 174 10.5 735 44.4 0 0.0 745 44.9 3 0.2
Green Cove Springs-Starke-. i 290 246 13I 5.3 230 93.5 0 0.0 1 0.4 2 0.8
Marianna..._..................... 2 1 53 59 1 19 32.2 33 55.9 7 11.8 0 0.0 0 0.0
Arcadia. .......... .......... 3 195 155 11 7.1 134 86.5 0 0.0 0 0.0 10 6.4
Tampa................................... 2 147 79 7 8.8 71 89.8 1 1.3 0 0.0 0 0.0
Sebring .................................. 2 | 153 733 2 0.3 697 95.1 0 0.0 1 0.1 33 4.5

TOTAL..........-.......I 34 2482 4145 478 11.5 2828 68.2 42 1.0 749 18.1 48 1.2

TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
SUMMARY OF LARVAL COLLECTIONS OF ANOPHELINE MOSQUITOES FLORIDA- 1942
Total Total Total Total A. quad. A. crucians A. punct. A. walker | A. georgianus
AREA No. No. Ano. Larvae I No. % of No. % of No. % of No. % of No. % of
Insp. Dips Larvae Det. Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total Taken Total
Tallahassee......................... 815 114445 6623 373 132 35.4 231 61.9 10 2.7 0 0.0 0 0.0
Pensacola...-.... 433 88401 3808 1023 29 2.8 808 I 78.9 38 I 3.7 0 | 0.0 148 [ 14.5
Valparaiso ..................0. o0 0 I I i _
Panama City .................... 117 2010 13 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Jacksonville...................-........ 1384 38140 6092 1456 141 9.7 1173 1 80.6 39 1 2.7 14 0.9 | 89 6.1
Green Cove Springs-Starke. 700 15182 5353 1080 58 5.4 1009 93.4 1 0.1 0 0.0- 12 1.1
Marianna........................... 200 57501 727 54 34 62.9 6 11.1 1 14 25.9 1 0 0.0 1 0 0.0
Arcadia........................ ... 322 67001 27601 289 25 8.7 2611 90.3 1 0.3 0 0.0 21 0.7
Tampa.......................... 139 1880 1589 205 67 32.7 136 66.3 2 1.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Sanford-DeLand............ 285 5070 10239 1399 539 38.5 859 61.4 0 0.0 1 0.1 1 0 0.0
Sebring............................... 126 38201 797 363 23 6.3 340 93.7 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
TOTAL............................ 4521 101837 38001 6242 1048 16.8 4823 77.3 105 1.7 15 0.21 251 4.2















Z
z
z
TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. (Continued) c
SUMMARY OF ANOPHELES QUADRIMACULATUS RECORDS SHOWING AVERAGE NUMBER OF ADULTS PER COLLECTION AND AVERAGE >
NUMBER OF LARVAE PER 50 DIP FLORIDA 1942

Light Trap Capture Stations Larval Breeding Areas m
AREA- "
No. Average No. Average No. No. Average O
Colls. Specimens Per Coll. Coils. Specimens Per Coll. Dips Specimens Per 50 Dips
__________ ___ ___ ___________ _______ -4
Tallahassee............................ 276 176 .64 791 6750 8.53 14445 132 .46
Pensacola....... .. ......... 779 74 .08 1141 532 .47 8840 29 .16
Valparaiso........................... 0 361 6 .02 0 | _
Panama City................... .... 49 2 .04 289 9 ~ .03 2010 0 j 0.00
Jacksonville..................... 540 I 174 .32 1199 348 .29 38140 141 .19
Green Cove Spgs.-Starke... 290 13 1 .04 854 527 .62 15182 58 .19
Marianna ............................... 53 19 .36 398 864 2.16 5750 34 .30
Arcadia............................... 195 | 11 .06 696 283 .41 6700 25 .20
Ta pa................................. 147 [ 7 .05 76 43 .56 1880 67 1.78
Sanford-DeLand.................. 0 0 123 713 5.80 5070 539 5.30
Sebring................... ......... 153 2 1 .01 82 4 | .05 3820 23 .30

TOTAL................... 2482 478 .19 6010 10079 1.68 101837 1048 | .05







TABLE 4.-ENTOMOLOGICAL DATA. FIELD SERVICE. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. (Continued)
SUMMARY OF LARVAL ANOPHELINE INSPECTIONS- FLORIDA-1942


AREA


I No.
Zone I Stas.


Total
No.


Total | Av. No.
No. I TLarva


No. large |
larvae & I


Total Species Identified
(4th Instar)


_I Insp. j Dips | Lar. per dip pupae I Quad. I crucians Geo. punct. walker
Tallahassee ...-...-- -- ........................ 1 425 6590 3036 0.46 189 73 87 0 9 0
2 390 7855I 3587 0.46 226 59 144 0 1 0
_" 3_ i f3 0 _______ I
Pensacola .-.... .. ....................... 1 50 890 380 0.44 97 2 69 2 2 0
S 2 110 2800 1533 0.55 486 9 250 120 22 0
3 I 82 1320 221 0.17 79 0 63 2 5 0
4 I 151 2890 996 0.31 432 6 299 6 9 0
5 16 300 253 0.84 46 0 22 18 0 0
6 24 640 425 0.66 160 12 105 0 00
Valparaiso......................... ..............._ .... 1 0I
2 0
I I 0 I I I I I I
__________ f 3_ 0_ I I ~I I I
___ 41 0o I J
Panama City............................... ...... 1 117 2010 13 0.006 2 0 0 0 0 0
S.__ 2 0 I I I I I I I
Jacksonville............................................... 1 398 1 7480 2707 0.36 644 57 385 87 31 0
I_2 21 265 5220 16451 0.20 340 59 278 2 0 1
[ 3 1 332 11150 1087 1 0.097 389 1 308 0 8 13
_" 4 389 14290 653 0.046 280 24 202 0 0 0
Green Cove Springs-Starke...................... 1 127 2060 671 0.32 126 0 115 11 0 0
S __2 200 4062 1355 0.33 113 7 98 0 0 0
__ 3 373 9060 3327 0.37 875 51 796 1 1 0
Marianna......... .... .... .............. 1 23 400 111 0.028 0 0 0 0 0 0
S__2 112 3740 588 0.16 170 33 5 0 6 0
______3 65 1610 128 0.079 12 1 1 0 8 0
Arcadia....................... ... ....... 1 164 3570 2350 0.63 261 21 233 2 0 0
2 86 11590 235 0.14 21 4 17 0 1 0
3 72 1540 175 0.11 11 0 11 0 0 0
Tampa............... .............. ..... ...... 1 139 1880 1589 0.85 240 6 7 136 0 2 0
Sanford-DeLand......................... ... 1 26 830 1133 1.37 170 20 140 0 0 0
_" ___4 107 1980 3877 1.96 408 1 386 0 0 ] 0
_5 56 820 3374 4.11 652 442 144 0 0 0
_" 6 96 1440 1855 1.29 2751 761 189 0 0 1
Sebring........................................ ........ 126 3820 797 0.21 407 23 340 0 0 0
TOTAL..... .-......... .... 4521 101837 38001 0.37 7111 1048 4823 251 105 15








94 ANNUAL REPORT, 1942


1932 1933
233 373


TOTAL DEATHS, FLORIDA, MALARIA, BY YEARS
1934 1985 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942
445 331 349 205 160 112 99 85 44


Areas where no control was exercised have remained just as free of the
disease as those where control was in operation. No malaria has existed in
comparison areas even when the potentiality of such areas to produce the dis-
ease, as judged by splenic findings and existence of the vector, has been com-
parable to the areas actually controlled. The practical test of the efficiency
of operations must await the next appearance of increased clinical manifes-
tations of the disease in the Southeast.

Even though the uncontrolled areas have remained as free from the dis-
ease as the controlled areas, a decided accomplishment has been realized dur-
ing the year consisting of the realization of the training of a personnel both in
the supervisory and labor divisions and the establishment of an organization
which should be able to apply larvicides in the future with high degree of
efficiency and in accordance with and measured by entomological findings.
If clinical manifestations of malaria appear in the near future, a real test of
the efficiency of supervised larviciding as a practical means of control over
wide areas and under various conditions would seem to be imminent.

TABLE 5.-LARVICIDAL OPERATIONS. CLEARING WATER AREAS AND INCI-
DENTAL DITCHING. MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS. U. S. PUBLIC
HEALTH SERVICE. MARCH THROUGH DECEMBER, 1942.

MALARIA CONTROL IN WAR AREAS
STATE OF FLORIDA
March through December, 1942
LARVICIDAL OPERATIONS
Area Covered I
Ditches,
Larvicide Quantity Ditches 4 ft. Ponds, Man-hours
LarvUsed Used wide or less Streams, Employed
Used Used (Lin. Ft.) over 4 ft.
wide (sq. ft.)

Diesel Oil.....................58,403 gals. 4,093,387 97,095,940 21,881
Paris green...................... 3,250 lbs. 4,429,300 6,569
OTHER OPERATIONS
Incidental ditching performed.................. 592,177 72,131
Ditch cleaning.......................... .... 2,019,152 55,194
Clearing.............................. ................. 1,046,914 5,528,291 47,141
Miscellaneous.......................... 13,463
GENERAL SUPERVISION..................... 23,053

TOTAL MAN-HOURS ............................... 251,258


233 373







MALARIA CONTROL


At all periods during the summer when entomological investigations had
demonstrated that actual larvicidal operations were unnecessary, the crews
were engaged in works of temporary drainage. These projects had been pre-
viously selected for drainage, if and when time was available, and chosen on
the basis of their importance as an effective producer of vectors situated well
within the flight range of the vector. Plans had been made for their execution
when labor permitted. Through the year a large amount of such drainage has
been accomplished both in the neighborhood of military bases and in the
associated towns used by military personnel for residential and recreational
purposes. (For details of drainage accomplished, larvicidal and cleaning wa-
ter areas, see Table No. 5.
These works have accomplished not only the elimination of breeding areas
but have served as well as practical demonstration to the residents of the
areas involved of one procedure of malaria control operations. They offer
also the possibility of serving as entering wedges, in those communities where
installed, for the establishment later after the war is terminated of permanent
malaria control operations.
By the nature of this work an opportunity has been afforded for the real-
ization of coordinated cooperative programs for the accomplishment of the
desired ends between such varied agencies as the Federal Government, State
Board of Health, Army, Navy, local communities, civilian agencies, and indi-
vidual landowners.
In order to hold the trained personnel intact throughout the winter
months for the purpose of having available experienced crews and supervis-
ing officers for larviciding in the early Spring and in order to obviate as
much as possible the necessity of larviciding, programs of temporary ditching
were planned and are being performed by all this personnel during the win-
ter months. This work of drainage will continue until the first breeding
begins in the early Spring.
The total expense for the Malaria Control in War Areas program for the
past year averaged approximately $30,000 per month.

AEDES AEGYPTI CONTROL
During the month of May, 1942, the United States Public Health
Service informed the State Health Officer that at the request of the Navy
they had assumed the responsibility of sponsoring and supporting an Aedes
aegypti control program in Key West, Florida, for the prevention of dengue
and yellow fever. The State Health Officer agreed to accept this assignment
and named the Director of the Bureau of Malaria Control to organize, super-
vise and direct this new service. All expenses of this service were to be de-
frayed by the Federal Government through the U. S. Public Health Service.




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