• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal to the...
 Letter of transmittal to president...
 Table of Contents
 Laboratory, report
 Library, report
 Multigraphing, report
 Sanitation, bureau, report
 Drug inspection, report
 Public health nursing, report
 Communicable diseases, bureau,...
 County health work, bureau,...
 Auditing, division, report
 Malaria research, division,...
 Vital statistics, bureau,...






Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000243/00006
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - State Board of Health, State of Florida
Series Title: Publication - Florida. State Board of Health
Physical Description: v. : ill., ports. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Health
Florida -- State Board of Health
Publisher: State Board of Health.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Public health -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1968.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year for 1893/94 ends Mar. 31; for 189<7>-1968, Dec. 31.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reports for 1923-32 combined in one issue.
General Note: Reports for 1910-<17> issued as its Publication.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000243
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569394
lccn - 07039608
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Division of Health, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Letter of transmittal to the governor
        Page i
    Letter of transmittal to president of the state board of health
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Laboratory, report
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Library, report
        Page 17
    Multigraphing, report
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Sanitation, bureau, report
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Drug inspection, report
        Page 41
    Public health nursing, report
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Florida emergency relief nurses, report
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
    Communicable diseases, bureau, report
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    County health work, bureau, report
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Escambia county health department, report
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Leon county health department
            Page 72
            Page 73
    Auditing, division, report
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Malaria research, division, report
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Vital statistics, bureau, report
        Page V 1
        Page V 2
        Page V 3
        Page V 4
        Page V 5
        Page V 6
        Page V 7
        Page V 8
        Page V 9
        Page V 10
        Page V 11
        Page V 12
        Page V 13
        Page V 14
        Table 1: Estimated population by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 15
        Table 2: Estimated population by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 16
            Page V 17
        Table 3: Births (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident, by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 18
            Page V 19
        Table 4: Births (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident, by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 20
            Page V 21
        Table 5: Deaths (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident, by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 22
            Page V 23
        Table 6: Deaths (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident, by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 24
        Table 7: Infant mortality - deaths of infants under 1 year of age recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births, by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 25
            Page V 26
            Page V 27
            Page V 28
            Page V 29
        Table 8: Infant mortality - deaths of infants under 1 year of age recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births, by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 30
            Page V 31
            Page V 32
            Page V 33
        Table 9: Stillbirths and illegitimate births recorded and resident by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 34
            Page V 35
            Page V 36
            Page V 37
        Table 10: Stillbirths and illegitimate births recorded and resident by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 38
            Page V 39
            Page V 40
            Page V 41
        Table 11: Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperal state, recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births, by color, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 42
            Page V 43
            Page V 44
            Page V 45
        Table 12: Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperal state, recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births, by color, by cities, Florida, 1934
            Page V 46
            Page V 47
            Page V 48
            Page V 49
        Table 13: Marriages performed, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 50
            Page V 51
        Table 14: Divorces and annulments granted, by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 52
        Table 15: Deaths from typhoid fever, by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 53
        Table 16: Deaths from diphtheria, by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 54
        Table 17: Deaths from tuberculosis (all forms), by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 55
        Table 18: Deaths from malaria, by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 56
        Table 19: Deaths from pellagra, by color, by months, and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 57
        Table 20: Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperal state, by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 58
        Table 21: Deaths from automobile accidents, by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 59
        Table 22: Deaths from cancer (all forms), by color, by months and by counties, Florida, 1934
            Page V 60
        Table 23: Deaths from typhoid fever, by color, by age and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 61
        Table 24: Deaths from diphtheria, by color, by age and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 62
        Table 25: Deaths from tuberculosis (all forms) by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 63
        Table 26: Deaths from malaria, by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 64
        Table 27: Deaths from pellagra, by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 65
        Table 28: Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperal state by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 66
        Table 29: Deaths from automobile accidents, by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 67
        Table 30: Deaths from cancer (all forms) by color, by age, and by sex, Florida, 1934
            Page V 68
        Table 31: Deaths recorded and resident by color and by diseases, Florida, 1934
            Page V 69
            Page V 70
            Page V 71
            Page V 72
            Page V 73
            Page V 74
            Page V 75
            Page V 76
            Page V 77
            Page V 78
            Page V 79
            Page V 80
            Page V 81
            Page V 82
            Page V 83
            Page V 84
            Page V 85
            Page V 86
            Page V 87
        Table 32: Combined totals for certain causes of death, recorded and resident, Florida, 1934
            Page V 88
        Registration affairs
            Page V 89
        Conclusion
            Page V 90
Full Text







FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH





















THIRTY-SIXTH

ANNUAL REPORT

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1935



























JACKSONVILLE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
1936










FLORIDA.STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
II



















THIRTY-SIXTH

ANNUAL REPORT ( ^-

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1935











ADMINISTRATION OFFICES

JACKSONVILLE

BRANCH LABORATORIES
TAMPA
PENSACOLA
MIAMI
TALLAHASSEE









JACKSONVILLE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
. 388

















December 30, 1936








His Excellency, David Sholtz
Governor of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida


Sir:


I beg to hand you herewith a report of the

State Board of Health for the period of January 1,

1935 to December 31, 1935, inclusive.


Respectfully submitted,


Florida State Board of Health
N. A. Baltzell, M.D., President
















December 28, 1936








Dr. N. A. Baltzell, President
State Board of Health
Marianna, Florida


13y dear Dr. Baltzell:


I herewith submit the report of the State

Board of Health for the year 1935,


Respectfully,


W. A. MoPhaul, M.D.,
State Health Officer


WTLMP.b





III

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of transmittal to the Governor .......----------------------- -- .---
Letter of transmittal to President of State Board of Health----------II
Table of Content s- ------*--------.---.-..----- -----------------.- III
Laboratory, report -..----....... --.....--- -..--- ---.-- -.............. ----- -----. .--. 1
Library, report -. --.. --.---..................... -***- --..- ...........---- --.----*- ...... ..........------- .................. 17
Multigraphing, report- -.------ .................- ...---..---- .... ... -18
Sanitat ion, Bureau, report ........ .........- .............. ..---.... -.-.. -- -- ....... .......-.................. 20
Drug Inspection, report .-........ ----..... ..... .......-.. ......--.------.. ......-- -- ........-............... ....- 41
Public Health Nursing, report ---- -- ---- ................- --.-- .. -- --- -...- ................. .. 42
Florida Emergency Relief Nurses, report ..................................................... 52
Communicable Diseases, Bureau, report ..-- ---..- -.......... ..... .-... -....... -........... 61
Coungy health Work, Bureau, report -.. ---- ----- ...... .......-......... -.... .................. -- .....68
S itcambia County Nealth Dopn.tment, report----- .. ---------- .. 70
Leon County Health Department .......- ..-- .- .... .... ---...... ...-...-- ............ 72
Auditing, Division, report ...- -.. .......... .......- .................... 74
Malaria Research, Division, report -- ............... ....... .--...... 84
Vital Statistics, Bureau, report .---- ------ -- ....--.--..---.. V-1
Tables
#1 Estimated population by color, by counties, Florida,1934 V-15
#2 Estimated population by color, by cities, Florida, 1934- .V-16
#3 Births (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident,
by color, by counties, Florida, 1934 --- -----....-........-.......... V-18
#4 Births (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident,
by color, by cities, Florida, 1934 --- ... ........... V-20
#5 Deaths (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident,
by color, by counties, Florida 1934- ..... -..-.....- -................................ V- -22
#6 Deaths (exclusive of stillbirths) recorded and resident,
by color, by cities, Florida 1934 ... ----- --- -........................... ........................ .. .. V--24
#7 Infant Mortality deaths af infants under one year of
age recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births,
by color, by counties, Florida 1934 ----.-- .. ............-....... -V-25
#6 Infant mortality deaths of infants under 1 year of age
recorded, resident and rates per 1,000 live births, by
color, by cities, Florida 1934. -.... --...... ....... ......- ..- .. ..--.. ..................-- ........ V-30
#9 Stillbirths and illegitimate births recorded and resident
by color, by counties, Florida 1934 ............--......... -- -....... .....-.. V-34
#10 Stillbirths and illegitimate births recorded and resident
by color, by cities, Florida 1934 -.................. --- ... ..........----. V-38
#11 Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the
puerperal state, recorded, resident and rates per 1,000
live births, by color, by counties, Florida 1934 .----........ ..- V-42
#12 Deaths from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the
puerperal state, recorded, resident and rates per 1,000
live births, by color, by cities, Florida 1934- ....--V-46
#13 Marriages performed, by counties, Florida, 1934--- ............... V--50
#14 Divorces and annulments granted, by counties, Florida 193W-52
#15 Deaths from typhoid fever, by color, by months and by
counties, Florida, 1934 ..... ------...........------------- -53
#16 Deaths from diphtheria, by color, by months and by
counties, Florida, 1934 -- .................... ..... ............---.--- --..- .. ------- 54








TABLE OF CW:TENTS (CON'T.)
Page
#17-Dea.ths from tuberculosis (all forms) by color, by months
and by Counties, Florida, 1934 --....- -.-.-.....------- -- ......... ... ....- ---- ----55
#18-Dcaths from malaria, by color, by months and by counties,
Florida, 1934 ---- -- ---------------- ---- ---. 56
#19-Deaths from pellagra, by color, by months, and by counties,
Florida, 1934 ----.- -. -......... ------- --..... --- --..-- -57
#20-Deathe from diseases of pregnancy, childbirth and the
puorperal state, by color, by months ard by. Counties,
Florida 1934 --------- -. .......................-- --..-.---- ---- ------ -- V-58
#21-Deaths from automobile accidents, by color, by months
and by Counties, Florida, 1934 ..........--.-------- --- ......--.- ---. V-59
#22-Deaths from cancer (all forms) by color, by months and by
Counties, Florida, 1934 -------- --- ---------- -..- V-60
#23-Doaths from typhoid fever, by color, by age and bj sex,
Florida, 1934.-- -- -- ----.......-.......- ------ ------..--.........- ---- -V-61
#24-Deaths from diphtheria, by color, by ago and by sex,
Florida, 1934.... **-- --- *..- ------ --- V-62
#26-Deaths from tuberculosis (all form) by color, by ago,
and by sex, Florida, 1934----- -. ..- - .............-............-63
#26-Doaths from malaria, by color, by age and by sex,
Florida 1934 .-.......- ... -- --....... -- .....-- -- ........-- ---- ---- -- V-64
#27-Deaths from pellagra, by color, by age and by sex,
Florida, 1934 ----- *.--..- -- -- ... -....... --- ------- -- V465
#28-Deaths from diseases of prognancy, childbirth and the
puerperal state by color, by age, and by sex, Florida '34 .---V-66
#~S-Deaths from automobile accidents, by color, by age and by
sex, Florida, 1934 -- ------ .............--- -..- ......----..- ---.- ..... .. .... V-67
#30-Deaths from cancer (all forms) by color, by age, and by
sex, Florida, 1934 ...- -..-..-- ------..................................... ---- .....-.................. --- V-68
#31-Deaths recorded and resident by color and by diseases,
Florida, 1934 ------------ -- ... ............ .........--- --.------.........................- --------...V-69
32-Combinod totals for certain causes of death, recorded and
resident, Florida, 1934 ...-- ---- ....- -- ----......... ............................. V-88

Registration affairs ------ ------ ---- ---.-.. -- -.---...........- .. V-89






-1-


January 1, 1936

Dr. W. A. McPhaul
State Health Officer
State Board of Health
Jacksonville, Florida.

Sir:

I have the honor to submit herewith a tabular report of the work
of the laboratories during the calendar year 1955. Table I sets forth the
gross amount of work done during the year as well as the way in which it
was partitioned among the various branches. Table 2 shows the distribution
of the work by months in the various laboratories. The gross figures
indicate the falling off of about 10,000 procedures which is accounted for
by dimunition of the number of specimens submitted for the detection of
Intestinal Parasites. In all other respects the work shows the increase
which would be expected with the natural increase in population.

INTBTINAL PARASITES

The whole number of specimens submitted for the detection of
Intestinal parasites in 1955 was 62,099 as against 80,175 for the previous
year. As explained in last year's report, the amount of work in this line
was greatly increased by the activities of the ERA. The proportion of speci-
mens found to contain parasites in 1935 was 28%, a figure not significantly
different from that found in previous years.

MOUTH AND THROAT CULTURE

There was a slight increase in the total number of specimens
submitted for Mouth and Throat cultures including Diphtheria, Vincent's
Angina and Streptococcic sore throat. Diphtheria did not differ markedly
from the previous year but there was a great increase in the number of speci-
mens for Vincent's Angina and in the percentage of these found positive.

MALARIA

A falling off of several thousand in the number of specimens
submitted for the detection of malarial parasites indicates a relaxation of
effort rather than any great change in the frequency of the occurrence of
this condition. Not so many surveys were made.

TYPHOID FEVR AND ALLIED CONDITIONS

The number of specimens submitted for the detection of Typhoid Fever
and Allied Conditions suffered a very slight increase.

TURBCUIDSIS

The number of specimens submitted for the detection of tubercle
baoilli suffered the usual slight increase.





-2-


GONORRHEA

An increase of 15% or more in the number of specimens submitted for
the detection of the Gonococcus was probably the result of increased activity
along the line of venereal disease control. The percentage of positives
agrees very closely with those found in previous years.

SYPHILIS

The number of specimens submitted for the detection of Syphilis
suffered a slight increase not out of line with normal increase in population
and the number of specimens found positive suffered an actual reduction which
possibly points to the fact that many specimens were taken as a routine made
to satisfy a requirement rather than because of the physician suspicioning
the disease.

RABIES

There was a slight decrease in the number of specimens submitted
for the detection of Rabies but it was not enough to point to any great
success in the control of the disease.

BIOLOGICAL

Table 3 shows the distribution of Biologicals.


We have been sadly handicapped by the lack of clerical help such
as was furnished us for a portion of last year by the ERA. In some depart-
ments our records are at least 8 months behind with no immediate hope of ever
catching up.

SPECIAL PARACRAPH

The most important matter for this report is the fact that the
International Health Board has assigned Doctor John Phair of it's technical
staff to assist in bringing our laboratory procedures as nearly up to the
minute as possible with the limited means at our command. Doctor Phair has
had an extraordinarily broad preparation and experience in public health
laboratory work, including a 2 year assignment in France devoted to the study
of Dhdulant Fever.

Respectfully submitted,


(Signod) Paul Eaton
Director of Laboratories





-3-


Jackson


TABLE I

EAMUINAIONS MADE IN THE LABORATORIES DURING THE YEAR 1935


LABORATORY BAUKINATIONS

DIACLOSTIC MIfI AND WATE TOTAL


rille, Fla. 12,787 4482 177,269


BRANChB:
Tampa, Florida.


Pensaoola, Fa.


Illai, Florida.


Tallahassee, Fla.


67,620


13,688


47,774


9,481


4684


1614


8912


827


72,304


15,302


56,686


10,508


20,519 331,869


TOTAL


511,350 -






-4-


TABLE II

TOTAL NUMBER (F ErCINATIONS MADE BY M~IBS DURING THE YEAR 1935


JACESONVILLE


January

February



April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December


13387

11552

16094

16585

15336

14955

16219

14675

13755

17561

14674

12476


TAMPA PaISACOIA

7826 1219

5521 1124

6451 1106

6672 1285

5677 1474

5000 1287

5575 1282

4217 1225

4575 1559

7235 1795

7192 1199

6387 747


MItII

6962

5120

4876

4525

3968

5471

3794

3137

3271

7488

4565

5511


TATLTAKARRER

808

510

726

556

1145

1162

1041

1228

406

1109

877

742


72304 15502 56686


TOTAL

50202



29235



27598

25875

27911

24482

23564

55186

28505

25863


TOEAL 177269


10308 551869





1935
CENTRAL LABORATORY
Jaoksonville, Florida.


Jan Feb
A'IMbI PABASITEB
HOOKOBM: Poe. 1210 646
Neg. 2019 1420
unsat. 19 12
AnCARIS 26 14
0YtRIS 4 1
STRONGYLOIDES 14 5
TAPEWORM 9 12
TRICHIURIS 1


THBQAT GCUTUIE
rIPHTHERIA:Pos
Neg
Unsat
VINCENT ANGINA
Pond
Neg.
S STREPTOoo
PoNe,
Neg


16 17
665 776
1


MALARIA:
Posi 48 52
Nbg. 1039 1176
Unsat&
AGGIDTINATION TESTS
TYPHOID: PoB. 1 1
Neg* 576 648
Partial 1
Unsat.


PARA TYPHOID A:
Neg.
FAEA TYPHOID B:
Neg.
WEI FEUX: Pos.
Kegm
Partial
BRUCELLA ABOBTUS
PCe.
Neg.


Mar Apr May

1483 1399 908
3565 2975 2080
124 48 40
53 62 55
15 4 17
9 7 9
19 7 18
15 2 21

8 3 7
655 740 520
2


41 69 76
884 1378 1456
1

8 2 1
881 1101 1228
3 1
1 2 2


69 55 91 110


112


91 110 112
2 4
89 106 112


2
46 48 63


June July Aug

761 529 549
1601 1220 1140
16 6 13
44 26 35
7 3 6
13 16
6 11 4
13 1 7

15 9 15
757 896 905


28 22 14
50 50 60

1 11 4
15 13 11

110 100 97
1276 1530 1704
1 1


a
1257

2

102

102

102


1320 1341

1 1

147 112

147 112

144 112


Sept Oot NOT Dec Total

390 865 1429 657 10817
1021 3019 1879 1365 23304
13 41 40 56 428
8 6 50 18 417
1 7 9 5 .79
2 5 14 4 108
6 8 6 2 108
1 16 B 79

24 43 78 40 275
1295 1621 11.7 1035 10992
3


216
581

91
174


137 102 172 111 1115
1337 1564 1611 1961 16916
1 4

8 2 11 6 36
1268 1124 907 567 12218
3 1 9
2 11


142 103

142 103
4 8
138 92
3


71 78 T? 114 100 107 100


Grand
Total


11270


797


285



18035




12268


92 59 1194 11i

92 59 1194 94
5 2 33
6 56 1156
I I 5 /1194
5 -

2 2 6
81 43 928






1935
CENTRAL LABORATORY- cc
Jacksonville, Florid
Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July


BRUCELLA ABOBTUS-
Continued.
Partial
Unsat.
TULAREMIA:Partial
Neg.
SPOTTED FEVER:

TYPHOID CULTURES
Blood: Neg.
Urine & Stool:
Neg
TLBERCULOSIS
Microscopic:
Pos.
Meg.
Unsat.
Aninal Inooulations

Brokchial
Spirochaetoais
Pon*
"Neg.
OPHTHAIMIA:Poe.
Neg.
GONORHEA:Pos.
Neg
Uniat


Po0.
Neg.
Partial
Unadt.

Pos.
Neg,
Unsat.


Aug Sept Oct Nov Deo Total


1 3


Grand
Total


4 942


336


11 8 18 17 30 33 34 51 39 37 47 10 335

1 1


3 1 3 1


1 1 3


5 1 3 3


22 7 43 27 19 18 11 29 14 12 49 15 266


38 54 30 54 37
240 246 307 287 28C
1 1 1 1


43 39
251 190
1 2


33
201


11 6 15 19 8 8 2 3


6
162
642
2

691
4718
271
185

8
6


6 8 1 14
157 328 339 304

6 7 9 15
140 178 148 171
625 753 6Y3 791
4 8 2 6

589 770 827 842
3984 4740 4918 4808
198 214 274 293
152 181 311 343


13
282
2
15
16)
795
2

866
4878
218
542


2
12 3 6
1


2
229

16
176
706
1

1084
5895
393
522

2
9
1


5
229

55

806


775
4502
340
517


31 44 23 27
179 316 194 202


6 4 3 8


9
201

41
195
725
3

643
4565
237
352


6
354

12
217
885
14

855
4887
255
288


6


10 6
207 223

6 4
216 191
802 603
6 3

716 477
3872 3786
205 234
211 223


453
2893
7

93


80
2853
2
192
2115
8806
51

9135
55553
3132
3827


266




3353


194


10972




71647


KPnhn:



RABIES:
Dog:








1935
C(NTRAL LABCRATORY- cont,
Jacksonville, Florida
Jan Fob MBr Apr May Jure Yuly Aug Sept Oct Nov IeC Total


RABIES-cont .
Cat: Pos.


Goat: Pos.
Hog: Neg.
Horse: Neg.
Mule: Neg.
Rat: Neg.
Squirrel: Neg.

ICE CREAM:
Jt IOCELLANEOUS:


5 2


4 4


1 2 2 .1


1 1 I


1 1
355 259 273 331 408 421
20 18 3
19 16 19 19 31 28


526 565
22 13
30 31


338 401 295 253
1
30 38 23 25


1
I
3
4405
77
309


13387 11552 16094 16~5 15336 14955 16219 14675 13755 17561 14674 12476 177269 177269


Calf:
Cow:


Neg.
Pos.
Poe.
Neg.


Grand
Total


22
1

4
1
1
1
1
1
159
4405
77


TOTAL






1955
TAMPA LABORATORY
Jan Feb NIr Apr May une July Aug
ANIMAL PARASITES
HOCKWORM: Pos. 554 256 476 505 394 290 375 74
Neg. 1543 1242 1824 1555 1056 603 720 449
Unsat. 2 2
ASCARIS 234 95 61 168 68 35 12 13
EamYUIS 27 6 9 12 3 1 4
STRONGYLOIDES 23 3 2 6 1 2 6
TAPEWORM 17 2 3 3 3 3 1 1
TRICHIURIS 211 153 69 200 92 22 21 14
THROAT CULTURES
rIPHTHERIA:Poe .54 36 23 11 1 1 16 29
Neg 346 434 290 293 10 1.41 178 164
Unsat 8 4
VINCENT ANGINA


Poa.
Neg.
STREPTOCOCCUS
POB.
Neg.
MALARIA:


24 58 108
68 53 47


78 66 13
48 50 70


a
1 1


Pos. 14 21 16 42 53 103 90 59
Neg. 177 163 276 308 383 416 428 396
Uwsat. 1
AGGIUTINATION TESTS
TYPHOID: Poe. 1 13 1 3 2 6


Neg.
Partial
PARA TYPHOID A:
Partial
Neg.
PARA TYPHOID B:
POS.
Neg.
Partial
WEIL FELIX Poe.
Negi
Partial


72 101 137 207 269 394 393 373
15 7 20 35 28 55 35 15

1
2 6 2 2 3 3 5 7

1
2 6 2 2 3 3 4 6
1 1
3 1 2 3 3
3 7 8 11 6 11 5 10
1 1 3 1 2


Sept Ot NoTV ec

184 595 494 590
626 1350 1367 1660


Total

4787
13995
4


16 786
13 94
6 64
40
18 867


34 105 85 28
391 484 469 261
3


11 32
40 74


6 6


53 48 98 50
304 319 234 B1w


10 3 4
291 300 263 188
24 27 27 6


10 9 6 2


6 2


116


Grand
Total


20637



4039


1202


128



4235



3325


443
3581
15

502
700

92
36

647
3587
1

43
2988
294








Jan Feb


IRUCELLA ABORTUS
Neg.
TCILARIA: Neg.
TYPHOID CULTURES
Blood: Pos.
Neg.
Unsat.
Urine & Stool
Poe.
Neg.
Unsat.
TCBERCULOSIS
Microscopio:
Poe *
Neg*

Uniat.
CNORHE:LM: Pos.
Neg.
Unsat.
GCNORRHEA: Pos.
Neg.
Unset..
SYPHILIS:
Eahn; Poe.
Neg.
Partial
Unaat


Dog:

Cat:


WATER:

ICE CREAUt
MISCELLANEUS:


Poe.
Neg.
Neg


187
2719
319
168


119
1546
223
55


1
11 2


35
173
1
5
18


Mar ips


6 2
2


1 1



16 : 4
1


43 40
146 156


17
108

3
14


91 80
291 233


1935
TAMPA LABORATORY -cont.


May June


July Aug


Sept Oot Nov


eo* Total


2 3 5 3
2

1
1 82


2
3 18 9


21
127


1
16 15
16 11 15


75 80
316 304
4


134
1598
192
74


118
1780
203
69


84
309


189
1606
145
81


39
135
2


1 6 18 9
i 6 18 9


46
118


1
16 27 18


93
258


174
1356
139
102


91 75
330 275
1


202
1603
:89
90


1


174
1230

LU


5
118
1


41 43 .40 42 417
93 125 110 104 1494
4
10
19 22 8 9 193
I 1
74 94 69 61 967
M37 330 283 248 3414
1 1 7


120
1365
119
90


186 207
2316 2588
159 137
86 77


126
2051
142
87


1
2 3 5 1 5 1 2 1


38
296
42
25


35
318
65
43


44
358
32
29


53
292
47
23


57
300
50
22


60
304
48
30


52
305
57
27


57
288
33
10


1
36
272
30
9


53 34 39
310 292 294
40 31 32
11 6 6


1935
21758
2070
1090

1
30
1



"I
558
3619
607
241


7826 5581 6431 6672 5677 8000 5575 4217 4573 7233 7192 6387


Grand
Total


1915


264


4388


TOTAL


72304 72304









Jan Feb
At IMAL PARASITES
HOOXTORM: Poe. 214 102
Neg. 269 275
Unsat. 2


ASCARIS:
CMYURIS:
STRONGYLOIDES:
TAPEWORM:
TBICHIURIS:
THROAT CULTURES
DIPHTHERIAtPos
Neg
Unsat
VINCENT ANGINA
PQo.
Neg.
STREPTOCOCCUS


MALARIA:


Pos.
PO5,
Neg.
Pos.
Neg.


Unsat.
AGGIDTINATIGO TESTS
TYPHOID: Poe.
Neg.
Partial
Unsat.
PARA TYPHOID A:
Neg.
PARA TYPHOID B:
POBs
Neg.
Partial
mEIL FELX:
Partial.
Neg.


1 1
24 13
2


7 2
6
3
27 35
1 1


25 31
2


25 33

1 1
20 30
4 2

3
25 30


1955
PIESACOLA LABORATORY
Mar Apr May June July Aug


74 67
85 111

I
1
16 5
1


77 116 97
188 129 145
4 5
1
1 2 1


4 1
1


7 23
3


2
1

21


Grand
Sept Oct Nov Dec Total Total


53
265
2


161
222
1


113
181


2 3 1
1 1 1 1 8 4 1


3 13 5 2
5 16 9 34 62 30 7
1


13 8
19 17


2
17 14
66 56
1


1
19 28 43 40 61 43
1
1

19 28 41 36 46 37


41 36 46 37


19 26 41 37 46 37


3 1
2
63 2
62 22


59 66 31
5


1187
2001
19
26
9
6
24
2

25
233


207
300

22
15
119
560
5

1
457
10
1


58 66 36 12 437


58 66 36 10
2


422
10

3


56 66 36 12 431 434





1935-cont.
PSAOLA LABCRATORY-oont
Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oot Nov Deo Total


TYPHOID CULTURES
Stool & Urine
Neg.
TUBERCULOSIS
Microscopic:
Poe.
Neg.
Uneat.
QPHTHAIMA: Neg.
GCNORRHEA: Poa.
Neg.
Unsat.
8IPHILIS


Grand
Total


9 2


4
41 20


9 14
57 104


10 6
36 20


13 8
69 135


Kahn: Poe. 64 95 103 133 181 188 151 74
Neg. 241 230 324 355 391 345 353 391
Partial 9 8 17 2 7 3 3 27
SUnsat. 36 2 14 6 10 8 11 15
0 WITER: 2 36 18 8
ILK: 64 124 85 155 207 168 115 98
ICE CREAM: 2 2
MSCELLANEOUS: 2 7 4 7


3 2 1
19 24 24 31
168 175 145 127
2 4

42 33 23 25
346 394 277 217
33 43 55 26
2 7 1 3
2 1
198 171 59 97
2
4 2 3


6 1


8 3
31 25


379
6


54
323
2
6
191
1168
8

1112
3864
233
135
67
1541
6
29


1219 1124 1106 1285 1474 1287 1282 1225


1367




5344
67
1541
6
29


1559 1795 1199 747 15302 15302


TOTAL










WIL FELIX: Neg.
TUBERCULOSIS :Pos.
Neg.
Unsat.
CEHTHAIMIA: Pos.
Neg.


19,5
MIAMI LABORATORY-oont. Grand
Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oot NoT Iec Total Total
33 38 53 45 48 45 66 38 41 49 44 22 522 522
5 5 3 14 12 2 2 6 1 2 5 2 57
97 77 69 72 60 59 87 41 27 40 66 77 692
3 1 1 1 1 7 756
2 1 3
1 2 8 1 2 1 2 1


Unsat. 1 1 1 1
GCNORRHEA: Pos. 47 50 .41 29 29 12 13 25 38 36 31 56
Neg. 276 214 205 173 154 168 156 137 145 197 167 181
Unsat. 13 3 12 5 3 7 1 6 6 6


4
385
2171
62


2618


SYPHILIS
KahL: Pos. 380 235 198 17? 163 190 175 167 144 181 167 174 2351
Neg. 5833 2311 1699 1428 1579 1392 1530 1423 1330 2289 1956 5545 24115
Partial 161 151 147 103 95 111 116 104 188 130 91 121 1516
Unsat. 91 72 81 50 51 69 47 39 32 92 37 40 701 28685
LEPROSY: Poe. 2 1 3
Neg. 2 4 1 5 1 15 16


RABIES
I T


Juog 5


Neg.
Unsat.
Cat: Neg.
Unsat.

MILK:
ICE CREAM:
MISCEIAINEOUS:


1 1
240 196 184 248 218 204 236 184 180 289 194 144
501 524 488 948 459 497 651 418 445 660 267 597
12 18 12 12 17 15 12 15 12 12 11
95 84 80 169 142 154 162 96 125 142 11i 114


1
4
1
2
2
2517
6255
140
1472


6962 5120 4876 4525 3968 3471 3794 3137 3271 7488 4563 5511 56686


I


10
2517
6255
140
1472

56686


* J


Poe.


TOTAL:





1935
MlAMl LABORATORY
Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept


Grand
Oct Nov Dec Total Total


AI IMAL PARASITES
HOOKWCBM: Poa.
Neg.
Unsat.
ASCARIS
CXYURIS
STRONGYLOIDES
TAPEWORM
THROAT CULTURES
DIPHTHERIA:Pos
Neg
Unsat
VINCENT ANGINA
Po0.
Neg.
Unsat
STREPTOCOCCUS
sBLLrRIIB'rcGus
P6s.
Neg.
Unsat.
MALARIA: Pos.
Neg.
Unsat,
ACGLUTINATION TESTS
TYPHOID: Poe.
Neg.
Partial
Uneat,
IARA TYPHOID A:
Neg..
PARA TYPHOID B:
Partial
Neg.
TYPHOID CULTURES
Stool & Urine
Neg.
Unsate


3 2 1 3
140 111 161 275
3 5 3 6
5
1 1


5 10 22
680 711 1045
88 44 15


3
187
4
1


25 25 10
141 142 101
3 4 4
1
1
1 1


11 4 8
408 379 119
15 10 2


12 18
125 126
1 3


7 9 24
117 159 2795
4 1 78


2
1 3 4 3 4 3 1 1


1

9 10
979 477
9 5


121
1699
40
8
3
2
2

121
7960
273

238
780
176


1
6 2 3


32 37
2


48 44
1


66 37
1


49 42
2


8
411
10


2
2C 507
10
2 4


33 38 53 45 48 45 66 38. 41 49 44 22


2
33 38 53 45 48 45


37 11 15
1


1
66 38 41 49 43


33 25 15 5 10
1


522


3
22 519


6 12 18 214
3


1875



8354



1194



43


429




523

522


522



217







1955
TAILAHASSJ1E LABORATORY
Jan Feb 1ar Apr May June July Aug


ANIMAL PARASITES
HOOKWOTM: Poa.
Neg.
Unsat.
ASCARIS
C1YURIS
TAPEWORM
TfICHIURIS
THROAT CULTURES
DIPHTHERIA:
PO.
Porn.
Neg.
Unsat.
VINCENT ANGINA
Pos.
Neg.
STREPTOCOCGUS
Posa
Neg.
MALARIA: Pos.
Neg.
Unsat.
AGGLUTINATION TESTS
TYPHOID: Poa.
Neg.


PARA TYPHOID

PARA TYPHOID


A:
Neg.
B:


Pos.
Neg.
WIIL FELIX: Pos.
Neg.
BLUCEULA ABORTUS:
Neg.
TYPHOID CULTURES
Blood: Neg.


2 22
a 45
1
6 1


Sept

15
15


7 1


1
19 8 13 21 8 6 8 12 3 27
1 1


8
12



8
150


5
10



17
109


4 21 28 40
104 260 278 235


1
21 14 28


3
11


1
22
224


Grand
Oct Nov Dec Total Total


392
548
12
16
1

1 975


1
29 10 164
2 161


2
5
21 41
105 234
1


2
29

1
15
55
201


1
58 22 51 31


3
17


5
14
117


1
28


9 3 3 3 3 2 3 20 7 7 12 21


9 3 5 3 5 2 5
2


54
169


5
26
278
2112
4


12
433

95


2594


1
20 7 7 12 20


5 2 1 2 3 3 2 20 7 7 20 22


1 1







TALLIAASSEE LABO3ATORY- Cont.
Jan Feb Mbar Apr May June July Aug


TUBERCULOSIS
Microscopic Pos. 2
Neg. 18
01HTHALMIA: Neg. 1
GLNORHREA: Pos. 8
Neg. 44
Unsat.


S'HIII.IS
Kahn,


6
6 26


Sept Oat

3
3 19


Grand
Nov Deo Total Total


27
22 185


212
2


170
508
3 681


Poe. 76 55 108 62 57 93 85 133
Neg. 215 158 221 181 289 352 315 366
Partial 3 4 1 9 35 3
Unsat. 10 8 4 2 14 ?P 15 100


WIJ E:

ICE CREAM:
MISCELLANEOUS:

4 TOTAL


169


40 88

5 4


3


38 96
90 291
2 3
6 10


80 72 76 42 76
5
1 2 8


808 510 726 556 1143 1162 1041 1228


406 1109


73 46
204 158
1 2
10 4


922
2840
63


42 45 8]

15 5


>6 4031
2 8
L4 814
11 11
57 37


877 742 10308 10308


8X







TABLE III

BIOLOGICS DISTRIBUTED DURING
1935


JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL


t M
IJU




AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER


DIPHTHERIA
ANTITOXIN
0000, 5000
units units

52 26

105 31

12 37

22 44

25 18

9 14

38 38

49 27

95 56

116 56

100 32

60 10


TOXIN TYPHOIl
SCHICK TOXOII ANTITQXIN VACCINE


3800

3490

11510

550

50



360

1230

2840

3410

5480

900


1775

839

3026

735

56

201

838

62C

1890

2210

1023

1267


2748

3664

3481

1217

155

1193

3446

4196

5689

5268

2640

2300


VACCINE ANTIRABIC
VIRUS VIRUS


5970

1970

2364

407



414

1450

78B

1582

1570

712

1066


TETANUS
ANTITAOIN
1500 10000
unite units



2 1

1

4


36620 14480 60 53997


TOTAL 683 329


16290 265 7 1






-17-


W. A. McPhaul, M.D.,
State Health Officer

My dear Doctor MoPhauls-

I submit herewith the report of the State Board of Health Library
for the year 19355

Books in the Library ............ .................. .3564
Books added during 1935 ............................. 294
Gifts ...................................... 214
Purchased ..........*......................... 64
On hand ..................................... 16
Bound periodicals in the Library ..................1155
Bound during 1955 .......................... 78
Pamphlets, reprints in the Library .................6782
Added during 1935 ............................1776

Reference searches ................................. 851
Letters of inquiry ................................. 731
Books loaned ..................................... 641
Pamphlets, reprints, loaned ........................ 854
Periodicals loaned ................................ 222
(The above loan figures do not include material
used in the building)
Bibliographies compiled ............................ 53
Translations ............ .......................... 10
Abstracts made .................................... 105


The service of the Library has continued to increase. It has been
used by many physicians, nurses and public health workers located in all
parts of the state. The State Board of Health Staff and personnel make
constant use of the Library.

Respectfully submitted,


Elizabeth Bohnenbergor
Librarian













January 1, 1936





Dr. W. A. McPhaul,
State Health Officer
State Board of Health
Jacksonville, Florida

Dear Doctor McPhauli

I hereby submit to you the report of the
nultigraph department for the year 1935.

The foregoing table shows the activity of
the department for the number of prints made and other
figures of necessary routine to complete jobs for
delivery.

Respectfully submitted,


Ernest Ganten,
Operator





MULTIGRAPH DEPARTMENT
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
Jacksonville, Florida


TABLE SHOWING THE VARIOUS JOB ACTIVITY FOR THE YEAR


Sheets
1935 Multigraphed


Jan.
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
---N-ov.
Dec.


305,900
224,500
139,048
53,600
60,559
170,650
41,700
98,050
75,700
163,779
241,289
140,845
1,715,620


Sheets
Mimeographed Pads


51,595
36,445
97,750
41,310
14,955
36,314
39,130
7,658
58,085
147,740
20,787
10,796
562,656


3,329
10

701
154


320
816
1,080
20
1,020
7,440


Sheets
Assembled


11,395
7,623

8,825
11,000
3,368
1,763

6,362
61,322

52,615
164,273


Sheets
Perforated


20,000

200,000

72,000
50

26,000
318,050


Sheets
1935 Punched


Jan.
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


2,000


Sheets


Books


Numbered Stappled


2.000


10,000


12,000


1,849
300

1,585
495
1,330
502


303
6,035
1,016
1,225
2,000 14,640


Number of Multigraph forms
Number of Mimeograph stencils
Cutting and trimming paper,
Wrapping,


368
1,377
Not recorded
Not recorded.


Books
Stripp d


1,027






1,027





-20-


BUREAU OF SANITATION
T. S. Kennedy, M. D., Director

--INTRODUCTION-

The service rendered by the Bureau of Sanitation is to assist cities, towns
and individuals in solving their sanitary engineering problems. This was the
purpose for which the Bureau was created and, as would be expected, the field of
activities has constantly increased fran year to year as new industries and con-
ditions with corresponding problems have arisen. The Bureau is concerned with
all matters pertaining to public health and sanitation which are non-medical
in character.

--PERSNNEL-

As during 1934, the Bureau personnel at the beginning of the year con-
sisted of Director, Assistant Director and Water Analyst, Clerk and four District
Sanitary Officers, with the services of the Field Sngineor, who had been taken
over from the Malaria Control Work of the Rockefeller Foundation.

On February first the writer was appointed Director of the Bureau by the
Board, succeeding Louva 0. Lenert. At the same time Fred A. Safay, former
District Sanitary Officer, who, since November 19Z3, had been detailed to the
U. S. Public Health Service Malaria Control Project as Assistant State
Director, was recalled by the Board to his former position with headquarters
in Jacksonville, On February 12, David B. Lee, Field Engineer mentioned above,
was appointed to the position of District Sanitary Officer in the West Florida
area with headquarters in Marianna.

During July, at the regular meeting of the Board the name of the Bureau
was changed from Bureau of Engineering to Bureau of Sanitation.

--ACTIVITIES-

In a general way the Bureau functions have to do with:

Advising and conducting investigations concerning water supplies publico
and private) sewerage and sewage disposal, mosquito control (fresh and salt
marsh species) malaria control (non-medical activities) dairy and milk sanitation
waste disposal (other than sewage) sanitation of schools, swimming pools,
canneries, oyster packing establishments, public fairs, tourist and other camps,
crab meat packing houses, jails, and public 6tate institutions and child
caring homes, plans for new water supply and sewage disposal plants, improve-
ment to existing installations, also the sanitary facilities for new school
buildings and swimming pool plans are submitted to the bureau for review and
approval. Pollution surveys are conducted for determination of restricted
areas for gathering shellfish.





-21-


Permits are issued after due investigation for the operation of swimming
pools, '..crist camps, bottled water distribution, canneries, oyster and crab
meat houses, sinking of drainage wolls for disposal of surface waste water,
and for the impounding of water in areas over an acre in extent. With the
exception of the drainage wells and impounding areas all permits issued by the
Bureau are for annual operation.

Typhoid fever and rabid dog investigations are made in cooperation with
the Bureau of Comnunicable Diseases and local health officers.

Disaster relief and rehabilitation work is a duty for which the Bureau
personnel is always kept in readiness.

It is exceedingly difficult in a brief annual report to fully discuss
the State's many problems dependent for solution on the application of
sanitation. Space would not pounit a discussion to cover the extent of work
performed by this Bureau in its varied activities for sanitation and health
protection. To simplify this report, render it intelligible, yet give i clear
understanding of the Bureau's work and accoaplishmento, this report will be
divided into sections each covering a specified phase of the work. The follow-
ing outline will be used in presenting, in a very general way, Bureau activities
during the past year:

1. Water Supply.
2. Sowerage and sewage disposal.
5. Mosquito and Malaria control
4. Uasto (other than sewage) Disposal.
5. Milk Sanitation
6. Rabies Control
7. Sanitation of
a. Schools
b. Swimming pools
c. Canneries
d. Oyster packing establishments
e. Public fairs
f. Tourist Camps
g. Public Institutions Child Laring Homes
h, State Institutions
i. Crab meat packing plants.
8. Special reports and investigations.

-W-ATL SUPPLY-

The water supply of a town is one of the most vital concerns in community
life. This is likewise true of the private supply at individual homes. Since
potable (safe) water supplies are so important to a community's well-being, it
is necessary to have laws enacted to provide for supervision of those
supplies by some state agency; in Florida this agency is the State Board of
Health and the actual operation of this supervision is delegated to the Bureau
of Sanitation.





-22-


The purpose of this supervision is a public health one, the object being
to secure and insure for users a safe, satisfactory, potable water for domestic
use and consumption. In this natter of supervision it is the aim of the
Bureau to work with and guide those in charge of these supplies, pointing out
desirable practice in connection with water plant operation.

It will therefore be seen that t- investigate, protect, control and
supervise the public and private wate- supplies in the State is one of the
important duties of the Bureau.

The sources of Florida's public water supplies are varied including
springs, lakes, deep and shallow wells and rivers. Because of the varied nature
of the supplies and the difference in quality and quantity of water to be
derived, detailed studies and investigations are necessary when improvements
are considered to existing systems or new sources of supply are to be in-
stalled. Proper method and degree of treatment also design features are
essential points to be covered in the engineer's report to the State Board of
Health. Following these studies complete plans and specifications are sub-
mitted to the Bureau far approval or recommendations.

Among the cities and towns in the State requesting assistance on their
water supply problems during 1935 and where now installations or improvements
have boon considered through Federal assistance, the following are listed.
Plans and specifications for those installations were submitted to the Bureau
for approval.

Daytoa Beach: New water plant providing softening and chlorination.

St. Augustine: New water plant to provide softening and chlorination.

Ft. Eyers: New plant with treatment followed by chlorination.

Port St. Joe: Plans considered for plant but unapproved by PWA.

Miami: Enlargement of filtration plant to double its capacity.

Sarasota: Investigation tc be n.do for now water plant with necessary
treatment when type of plant to be used selected. Loan arranged with
this understanding. Investigation incomplete at end of year.

Panama City: Water treatment plant.

Belle Glade: Filtration plant using canal water.

Bialeah: Water filtration plant, softening, color removal, chlorination.

Atlantic Beach: Water supply using deep wells.

Moore Rhven: Water filtration plant, chlorination and sedimentation -
canal water.

Cottondale: Wator works plant plans not approved. Matter brought to
attention of State WPA that a sewerage system without water supply would
be impossible. To end of year no definite action taken. Before approval





-23-


on the above projects was eiven, representatives from the Bureau made de-
tailed investigations of the work proposed and with the consulting
engineer reviewed the plans and specifications.

Pinellas Coun: Surface supply using sedimentr.tion, filtration and
chlorination. his supply to furnish water for all towns on peninsula
from Indian Pass to Passagrille.

Punta Gorda: New plant providing sedimentation, filtration and chlorina-
tion.

Arcadia: The deep, flowing artesian well supply at Arcadia is objectionable
for public use because of high mineral content in amounts of Iron, Alumina,
Magnesium and Fluorine. Studies indicated that deep wells at various
depths in this area would produce water similar to that in the present
deep well. Shallow wells would yield insufficient amount of water with
high iron content. Attention was therefore turned to Pease River. This
river, carrying a large volume of water, flows within 1800 foot of the'
present pumping station. Ac a result of a detailed study to determine,
permanent abundance of supply, hardness, availability, chemicals needed
for treatment, (color removal) etc., this source was chosen for Arcadia's
future water supply. Complete plans and specifications were submitted to
the Bureau for approval. These included sedicmntation, filtration, color
removal and chlorination.

Opa-Lookn: Contract was awarded in Docember for new supply from deep
wells to provide standard limo treatment, iron removal and clarifiors.
Chlorination will be provided as for old supply.

Gainesville: Florida Farm Colony (State Institution) installed new
reservoir and chlorinator for the deep rell supply.

--Bacteriological Water Laboratory--

In connection with, and as a part of its duty as regards water supply, the
Bacteriological Water Laboratory of the Board is operated by this Bureau. Stan-
dard Methods of Water Analyses of the American Public Health Association are
used in all laboratory work undertaken. Through current reports, review of
laboratory procedure, research and study of media being developed for use in
this rk, the Bureau keeps abreast of the times and endeavors to be of every
assistance to the water works operators in the itatu as well as to individuals
in solving their water supply problems.

The work of the Water Laboratory is concerned primarily with the bacterio-
logical examination of samples of water from the public supplies throughout the
State. In accord with State Board of Health regulation (Rulo No. 97 1929)
samples from all supplies intended for public use are subject to regular
examination at periods designated by the Bureau. At the present time the Bureau
has two classifications for those supplies namely, (a) those supplies from which
samples must be submitted each month, and (b) supplies where samples arc sub-
mitted at quarterly intervals. Under class (a) are those surface or shallow
well supplies where chance contamination is possible and whore it is considered
desirable to maintain a strict supervision to note any change in sanitary quality






-24-


and efficient operation of sterilization equipment. Class (b) includes a
majority of our public supplies and represents deep wells, that experience,
over an extended period, has indicated, produce water of good sanitary quality.

The Board does not employ a full time water chemist and for that reason
only partial chemical tests are conducted in the Bureau laboratory. These
tests are made only during special investigations or to assist cities and towns
in providing them with an index as to the quality of water the supply under con-
sideration, will produce. 'his information covers such items as hardness,
alkalinity, chlorides, sulphates and data pertaining to the Ph value and the
residual chlorine content of treated water.

The water laboratory provides upon request ortho-tolidin solution and color
standards to all water treatment plant operators for making determinations
to indicate chlorine residual in the treated water.

Bacteriological examinations are conducted also on samples frco pri-ate
supplies. These include bottled waters, properly equipped and operated swimming
pools, areas in the vicinity of existing or proposed bathing beaches, wator over
shellfish areas and oyster beds under investigation, and the supplies used in
connection with canneries, camps and schools when source is other than the public
supply. Frequent requests are received for examination of water from dug,
open top wells, but experience indicates that such :-pplies are invariably so
contaminated by surface drainage that it is futile to make examinations until
surface contamination has been completely excluded. When this is done exnmi-
nations can be profitably undertaken. Therefore the bureau advises against the
use of open, dug wells unless adequately protected with concrete curb and the
installation of approved force type pump heed. Sketch showing such properly
protected dug well is furnished those interested.

Knowledge of, and familiarity with, water supply problems in the State and
their constant, direct contact with iatar plant operators, makes it possible for
the District Sanitary Officers to render helpful assistance in the water supply
problems coming up for attention. Their close association with the water works
superintendents further secures for us the willing cooperation of these operators
at all times. All re-inspections and check sample collections are made by
these officers.

On the attached sheet will be found number and results of bacteriological
examinations mado by the laboratory during 1935. As mentioned previously
one of the most important services the Bureau renders the State is in the thorough,
constant, close supervision of the water supplies.








BACTERIOLOGICAL ESAMINATIONS OF WATER AS CONDUCTED BY LABORATORY OF THE BUREAU OF SANITATION
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 1935 -


Number of samples examined during 1935 4887.
Gj0_D Indicates low bacterial Count, no presumptive evidence of contamination 48 hours incubation.
DOUBTFUL Indicates presumptive evidence of contamination, (exceeding 50 gas fermentation in 48 hours in three
or less 10 cubic centimeter portions or in the one and one-tenth cubic ccntimoter portions, but no confirmation
on Eosin Methylene Blue Agar).
BAD Indicates high count and presumptive evidence in four or more 10 cubic centimeter portions, in one or one
tenth cubic centimeter portions with positive B-Coli determination on Eosin Methylono Bluo Agar.






-26-


--Certification to the Treasury Departmont--

Field investigations, plant inspections and laboratory analyses in
connection with certification to the Troasury Department, U. S. Public Health
Service, of supplies furnishing drinking water to interstate carriers are
made by the Bureau.

Continuing the work sta:-ted in 1954 to eliminate cross-connections the
Bureau was able to remove the provisional certificate rating from water supplies
of four cities in the State. Detailed surveys wore conducted by those cities
to locate all existing cross-connections and when found such connections awre
ordered removed and proper control measures approved by the Bureau provided.
At the end of the year the crcss-connection work begun in tyvo of the larger
cities was incomplete and as a result only provisional certification could be
recommondod for the supplies. This work should continue next year and upon
completion the BLrcau will be in a position to consider full certification to
the Treasury Departmont.

For the eighth succesEive ycar Florida has been ,-oportod 100C on this
common carrier certification work by the U. S. Public Health Service. This in-
cludes all water supplies used by railroads, steamship lines and air planes for
drinking and culinary purposes.

--American Water Works Association--

On March 27 and 30, the Director and District Sanitary Officers of the
Bureau were in attendance at the Ninth Annual Meeting of the Florida Section,
American Water Works Association which was held in West Palm Beach. During this
two day session papers on timely, present day water works problems were presented
by prominent men, expert in their particular field of water works practice.
Discussions of and questions concerning subjects covered by these papers by
those in attendance brought forth much interest, Among the subjects presented
were:

1. Artesian Water in Florida Peninsular
2. Fluorine in Florida Waters
3. Water Resources in Florida
4. T.stc and Odor Control Practice in Various Sections of the Country.
5. Mst Probable Number Concepts in Water
6. Licensing Water Works Operators.
7. Why Use B. Coli as Pollution Indicator
8. Cross-Connections

--Bottled Wator--

The use of bottled water for drinking in Florida is quite extensive, princi-
pally because of the tastes and odors resulting from the high mineral content in
many of the municipal supplies. Considered from a sanitary standpoint the
supplies possess excellent qualities free from excessive bacterial counts and
contamination of a potentially dangerous character, yet saoe of these under-
ground supplies have chemical qualities which are objectionable to the initial
users. Because of this the use of bottled water in the State is quite extensive





-27-


and a regulation to govern the manufacture, importation and bottling of water
for sale in the State was promulgated by the Bureau and passed by the Board
several years ago. (Rule 26, 1918)

Operating under the above ruling permits are issued by the Bureau to properly
equipped and operated bottled water concerns' each year. Previous to renewing
permits to those places already in operation, re-inspections of the plants are
made, the operator submits application for a permit and samples for examinations,
In considering now establishments, plans for plant layout and details of
operation practice are furnished by the Bureau, 3mplos of the water examined
bacterially and finally samples as prepared for sale on the market are tested
to note quality following handling and bottling.

Source of supply is carefully inspected and instructions as to adequate
protection given. As a part of this bottled water regulation samples fran all
plants operating in the Stato are examined at regular intervals or more fre-
quently if conditions warrant it. The regulation further provides for control
of bottled water shipped in from other States applications arc r ecoived from
these places and samples duly examined. During the year 64 bottled wator plants
operating under permits from the Bureau wore furnishing water for sale.

--Ice Plants--

Considering the sanitary control of raw water ice plants the Bureau during
the year conducted a survey of these manufacturers to secure data to assist in
drawing up plans for regulatory control, if the findings indicate necessity for
such regulations. To the end of the year these plans were not sufficiently
perfected for presentation to the Board, however, it is hoped that during 1936
arrangements can be made to effect sumn needed control over this important
commodity.

From the survey undertaken which included 118 towns and cities, the follow-
ing information was obtained.

Plants Inspected -------------------------------155
Raw Water Plants -------------------------------------150
Distilled Water Plants --------------------------------- 5
Plants Using Surface Water, Canals, Rivers, akes --------- 4
Plants Using Shallow Wells -------------------------------- 32
Supplies that had been Bacteriologically Examind --------- 86
Plants using Deep Wells ---------------------------114
No. Plants Cross-Connected to City Supply --------------- 2
---- -------------------------------------

--SEWERAGE AND SErAE DISOSAL--

Work pertaining to sewerage and sewage treatment and disposal is of importance
equal to water supply. Proper moans of sewage disposal whether for a household,
industrial concern, camp, institution or municipality is a matter of grave public
health concern.





-28-


To assist and guide cities, towns and individuals in the matter or proper
means of safe sewage disposal the Bureau conducts sanitary surveys and investi-
gations of proposed installations and furnishes plans and specifications for
approved types of septic tanks and privies. These septic tank plans cover
individual residential installations, tanks to b e used at schools, cemps, small
hotels or boarding houses. When a sewerage system with accompanying disposal
plant is considered for a community or municipality or other large group
installation it is necessary to have plans and specifications drawn by an
engineer following which they are submitted to the Bureau for State Board of
Health review and approval.

To avail themselves of assistance possible from Federal Funds through PRA
loans several Florida cities and towns submitted plans to the State Office for
consideration. Before final action was possible on such projects it was necessary
to receive State Eoard cf Health approval. During the past year investigations
necessary in connection with review of such imp-ovorents have consumom. ,ori-
siderable time of the Bureau Personnel for it is only after field investigations
have been rade that a review of the plans in the office is possible. In several
instances it was only because the Bureau recommneiations had urged the municipality
to make necessary sewerage improvements, that the plans when received in the
government office were given favorable consideration. Through Bureau roccmnonda-
tions sewerage systems including new installations, modifications or improvements
to existing systems were approved by PWA State Office for the following towns:

Leesburg: Septic tank with chlorination.

Do Funiak S)rings: Septic tank with chlorination.

Lakeland: Extonsions to present system.

Milton: New sewage disposal plant.

Jacksonville Beach: Secage Disposal Plant with septic tank and disposal
of tank effluent into canal following chlorination.

Tavaros: Sanitary Sowers.

KEy West: Soworage system Irahoff Tanks.

Williston: Septic tank installed method of tank effluent not approved
by Bureau.

Pensacola: Sewage Disposal Plants two separate plants to consist of
screening, sedimentation and chlorination.

Apalachicola: Bureau has been in correspondence with city officials in
Apclachicola relative to the necessity of a seworaeo system and proper
disposal plant and following several conferences to the end of the year
no definite rpc;rt was available concerning such installation,





-29-


Chattahoochee: During the year a complete sewerage system was installed
at the State Hospital at Chattahoochee. This was the first complete
disposal plant installed for this institution. The plant was built with e ;-
convict labor furnished by the State.

Fort Lauderdale: Here an endeavor is being made to make improvements to
the sewerage system which was begun several years ago but never completed.
The fact that the system was not completed had caused a very unfavorable
condition and the Bureau has used every effort to urge prompt, definite
action on this matter by the city officials. Some real constructive
work was undertaken by the city manager and city attorney during the
sunner and the project submitted to State PWA Offices however, during
the last few days of December the Bureau was advised by the City of
Fort Lauderdale also our District Officer in that area that an election
was necessary before this project could be finally approved.

Sanitary Privy Construction

Throughout the year the Bureau carried on its regular program of educational
work to prevent soil pollution and eliminate insanitary privies. The District
Sanitary officers were especially active in securing sanitary installations at
rural schools as well as installations at individual homes where hookworm surveys
showed special need.

Privies on railroad property at stations and section houses which were in
need of repair were given attention by Railway ('fficiils in accord with Bureau
recommendations.

The privy sanitation program of the Bureau was largely augmented by ERA
Community Sanitation projects. The U. S. Public Health Service cooperated with
the State Board of Health in promoting and supervising this work by furnishing
additional supervisory personnel. The work accomplished under this program, as
reported to Washington by the State Health Officer, was as follows:

Privies constructed....................... 4,271
Privies repaired................. ............ 792
Septic Tanks Built.,,...................... 156
Average number men working daily during year. 155
Highest number men reported working 387
Lowest t 44

S.. .* -DAIRY AND MIl SANITATION-

Milk and dairy sanitation undertaken by the Bureau is largely one of encourage-
mont in the adoption of the Standard Milk Ordinance of the U. S. Public Hoallh
Service and U. S. Department of Agriculture which has been adopted as a standard
by the State Board of Health. The Bureau instructs local personnel in proper
interpretation of the ordinance in an effort to co-ordinate the work and a District
Sanitary Officer, upon request of the local city officials, assists in making the
necessary routine inspections from which the U. S. Public Health Service rates
the cities milk supplies.

The Bureau further handles dairy sanitation in the smaller dairies through-
out the state under the Board's dairy regulations which are minimum requirements
concerning dairy operation. The Department of Agriculture assists in dairy
sanitation by insisting that all dairies making application for a license to
operate first comply with the State Board of Health regulations.






-30-


During the year the following cities were added to the list of those having
passed the Standard Milk Ordinance:

1. Miami
2. Hollywood
5. Key 'est,

--RABID DOG INVESTIGATIONS AI) COITBOL--

It has been said that a dog vaccinated against rabies is twelve and one-half
times safer than the unvaccinated dog, and will net infect other dogs. For this
reason and to control as far as possible the dog suffering from rabies, the State
Board of Health, through the Bureau, several years ago drow up for passage by
cities and towns an ordinance covering this matter. The suggested ordinance
provides for the licensing of all dogs within the city or town, and a fee for such
license. It further provides that no dog shall be licensed until evidence can
be produced to show that the dog has been inoculated against rabies within a
period of one year. Authority is given the person so designated by the city to
pick up any unlicensed dog found running at largc following the passage of the
ordinance by the city. The dog may be redeemed by the payment of the license
and inoculation fee.

Through the efforts of the District Sanita.y .Off icrs of the Bureau more
than sixty towns in the State have passed this dog ordinance and it is gratify-
ing to note that the umibor of rabid dog cases reported to the Bureau during
1955 has shown a decided decrease.

Rabies is not a seasonal disease and the belief that it occurs only in
summer, during the "dog days" July and August is a fallacy. From investigators
it is reported that figures show July, August can SQptorber wore months of low
incidence, with a gradual increase during fall and jintur months with the peak
around March first. For this reason representatives of the Bureau are over on
the alert to bring the rattor forcibly to the attention of the City Officials,
urging the passage of the suggested ordinance, reporting of all cases where
abid dogs Lave appeared, and preventing to a minimum the promiscuous running
of dogs at large. Instructions are also given the local authorities concerning
quarantining of dogs under suspicion. During the year ton rabid dog investi-
gations were made by the Bureau personnel.

-- SCHOOL SANITATION --

Through conferences with officials of the State Board of Public Instruction
the Bureau has endeavored to promote to completion work previously stated to
sanitato schools in the rural areas of the State. Proper water supply facilities
and sanitary means cf sewage disposal woro matters on which the Bureau urged the
County School Boards to take much needed action. Shortage of funds for school
operation resulted in an almost complete curtailment of any sanitary improvemont
work at the Schools.





-31-


In an effort to secure information from the school boards in all counties,
concerning the extent of work which had been completed, also information as to
work yet to b e undertaken or needed at the schools, a questionnaire was sent
to each Superintendent of the boards of Public Instruction in the Counties.
In response to the 67 questionnaires sent out, 25 replies were received less
than half of the counties responding.

From the 25 counties heard from the following shows data obtained:

No. of toilet units built ---------------- 583
'(flush, pit or incinerator type)
Nostoilets repaired --------------------- 196
(all typos)
No. to be- ovided ---------------------- 134

This survey also indicated that a majority of the schools cbtains their
water supply from driven wells. City supplies were used in several instances.

The need of school sanitation work cannot b e too strongly stressed.

The District Sanitary Officers in the course of their routine inspections
were successful in having conditions at several of the schools cared for.
Privy installations, imprcvoment to shallow well nwtor supplies and repairs
to buildings were features receiving the attention of the field force of the
Bureau. An cffcrt was made to encourage the Superintendents and school princi-
pals to have examinations made of the water supply used in the schools at
least twice yearly. This would apply only where private or shallow well
supplies are used and not to the public supplies which are subject to regular
examination in accord with State Ioerd of Health requirements.

--CANNERIES--

Operating under State Board of Health Rul. No. 99 (1930), canning plant
sanitation is handled by the Bureau and reoglar inspoctionsof all canneries
are made by the District Sanitary Officers. These plants mooting requirements
of the Board are given permits by the Bureau for annual operation. During
the season 1934-35 permits wore issued to the following number of canneries
handling the material listed:

Tomato ---------22
Grapofruit---------17
Vegotables--------
Miscellaneous------80

Rule No. 99 relates to the sanitation and operation of all commercial
canneries packing cooked or processed food designed for human consumption.
Under this rule the Bureau is not concerned with the chemical or the bacterio-
logical quality of the food either before or after packing this matter
comes under the jurisdiction of the State Department of Agriculture.






-32-


The Bureau has received at all times the willing cooperation of the
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, State Depart-
ment of Agriculture and the local City Food Inspectors, in cannery sanitation
work. During April, the peak month for tomato canning operations, the Chief
Chemist of the Federal Food and Drug Administration, made a tour of inspection
of the plants in company with the District Sanitary Officers in territories
where these plants are located. It is indeed gratifying to note that in
reporting on this inspection the Chief of the Atlanta Station commended the
Bureau on the work being done and the conditions found in the plants as a whole
as a result of the efforts of the District Sanitary Officers.

A problem of real concern in this canning plant sanitation work is the
disposal of cannery wastes. Because of the character of the wasto the matter
of disposal has caused much trouble. iquipmont to handle the liquid wastes and
plans for treatment of the final waste before disposal are matters that require
solution by the Burcru personnel. With the steady increase in the canning
industry each year the problem of sanitation is coasuminC more and more of the
Bureau's attention.

-Kitchen Canncries--

Under the F. E. R. A., home canning kit chens were operated to handle
the local vegetable and fruit supply of the farmers. Those canneries could
not b e considered commercial canneries to be covered by State Board of Health
regulations, yet the sanitation of such places and manner of handling the
products wore matters of concern to the Bureau. While those canning kitchens
were operating the Bureau maintained supervision over their operation.

--CRAB MEAT SANITTION--

Within a very short period of time the crab meat industry has grown to
a position of real importance in Florida. The Bureau, realizing the necessity
for proper sanitary control of this product to meet the rapid expansion of
the industry, drew up for passage by the State Board of Health, a ruling
relative to this matter. The purpose of this ruling is to regulate the
construction and operation of crab moat plants and the handling and shipment
of the product which will result in a protection to both consumer and the
industry itself. This rule, (No. 105) was passed by the Board and became
effective September first, 1955.

Following are the points covered by the recently enacted rule:

1. Construction cf building, plant layout and equipment.
2. Safe, adequate and approved water supply and sanitary facilities.
3. Cleanliness of plant and personnel.
4. Sanitary handling of the product.
5. Regular plant inspection.
6. Certification of product when requirements are net.
7. Action for non-compliance with rule.





-33-


In accord with the provisions of this rule, regular inspection of all
crab meat plants are made by District sanitary Officers of the Board and the
operators are furnished with detailed instructions concerning plant layout
and operation, as well as directions concerning the handling and care of the
product. The Board's requirements are not extensive and compliance will not
work a hardship upon any operator.

Certificates are issued to all plants meeting provision of the rule and
numbers are assigned accordingly. The certificate number is prefixed by the
letters FLA. Crab meat containers bearing a certificate number will indicate
that the product is from a plant which operates under the supervision of the
Board. To the end of the year nine c rab meat plant certificates had been
issued, and approximately 40,000 pounds of meat were shipped by these plants
since September first.

--FOOD AID DRUG OFFICIALS CONIiTCE--

In accord with direction from the State Health Officer the writer and
District Sanitary Offic-er Safay attended the annual meeting of the Food and
Drug Officials of the Southeastern States in Atlanta on June 27 and 28.

The program presented subjects of special interest to the Bureau in
covering milk control laws and activities in sonne-tion .with crab meat
packing plants. The writer was appointed mezier of the -xecutive Committee
of this Association for the coming year.

--STELLFISH SANITATION--

The U. S. Public Health Service Minimum requirements for approval of
state shellfish control measures and certification for shippers in interstate
traffic, and the State Board of Health Rule No. 102, passed by the Board in
1932, and modified as Rule No. 102-A in 19S5, are the basis for all shellfish
work of the Bureau.

Shellfish sanitation activities have continued as previously outlined
and the condemned areas as indicated in 1934 are still the boundaries recognized
against the taking of shellfish. During the early part of the year District
Sanitary Officers Safay and Lee assisted by Inspectors of the Conservation
Department and the Escambia County Health Unit conducted extensive surveys
in East Bay and Blackwater Bays, also in Ascambia Bay in the Peninsula area,
The findings of these surveys failed to give sufficient evidence of pollution of
the waters to warrant a change in the condemned area linos. We had expected to
re-check this area before the end of the year, but were unable to do so. It
is hoped that during 1936 surveys will be possible in several sections concern-
ing which some question exists as to suitability for taking oysters.

During the 1935-36 season 88 certificates were issued to oyster houses
for shipment of shell or shucked stock. Regular inspections have been main-
tained at all houses during the year by the District Sanitary Officers and
once each month lists of permitted oyster houses are prepared for publication
and sent to interested city officials and individuals throughout the state,




-34-


All licenses to oyster dealers issued by the State Conservation Department
bear the following "State Board of Health regulations must be comp led rith".
This action on the part of the Conservation Department durinC6 the ye-r in
cooperating with the Bureau, was greatly appreciated, and had a direct bearing
on the oyster dealers concerning the State Boards ruling.

--DRAINAGE WLLS--

During the year permits were issued by the Bureau for 17 drainage wells
in the State. All of these permits were for wells to be used for the disposal
of surface drainage only. Eight of these poirits wore issued to the U. S.
Engineers Office, Ocala, and wore for wells necessary in connection with Canal
Drainage work.

Upon receipt of an application for a permit to sink a drainage well an
inspection and detailed survey of the area is made by a representative of this
department. Exact location and information in relation to existing wever wells
or contnminating infljuonces.are points which !ave a direct bearing upon the
granting of permits.

Forms for keeping logs of wells as drilled are furnished by the Bureau
and are submitted by the driller in duplicate one copy being sent to the
office of the State Geologist for their recc:dCs.

As mentioned in previous reports it is the intention of the Bureau to
discourage as far as possible the drilling of drainage wells and permits are
issued only after an investigation indicates that the well will be used for no
other purpose than the disposal of waste water and surface drainage and
further that drinking water wells in the vicinity will not be influenced by
such drainage.

--SWMMING POOL SAIUTATICN--

Swimming pool sanitation, under the supervision of the Lureau in accord
with Chapter 7825 Laws of Florida, No. 43, Act of Legislature 1919, and State
Board of Health Rulo No. 42, 1919, continued during 1935 as in the past.
Seventy pools received permits for operation by the Bureau for the year
June first 1935 to June first, 1936.

Plans for new pools were submitted to the Bureau for approval from several
points during the year. The Sanitary Officers maintained close inspection
of all pools operating during the sumner months.

Bathing place sanitation is also a function of the Bureau ani detailed
surveys have been necessary in several instances where it was proposed to
establish a bathing beach on lakes or inland waters of the Stato. During these
investigations, studios of the water available arc made by sample collections
over a period of several weeks. These results, coupled with the report of
the sanitary surveys, supply information necessary to giving cur opinion con-
cerning the use of the point in question.

Through the eff -ts of the Bureau Director an abandoned swimming pool in
the Tampa area that h-d become a dangerous hazard, was eliminated by proper
fencing.




-35-


--TOURIST CAMPS--

During the 1934-35 season 259 permits were issued by the Bureau for the
operation of tourist c amps in the State. This is the greatest number of
permits issued for any year since control of tourist camp sanitation has been
under the Bureau's direction. This procedure is a continuation of the Bureau's
policy in controlling the operation of these camps, under State Law Chapter
12419, No. 614 and State Board of Health Rule 91 (1926) modified to 91-A
by the Board on September first, 1935. Regular inspections of these camps are
made by the District Sanitary Officers and where new camps are considered
plans and specifications for required sanitary facilities, as well as
recommended procedure for camp lay-out is provided by the Bureau. Close check
is maintained on all cm-zp vuter supplies anc method of sewage disposal.

The matter of house car and trailer accommodations at camps has been
a problem during the past two years and during the fall of 1955 a definite
stand had to be taken by tno Bureau concerning proper space and adequate
facilities in camps attempting to a ccommodato such equipment. An increase
in the number of plumbing fixtures is necessary if house cars are rented
camping space since the occupants of such cars are dependent upon the con-
veniences provided by the camps. Thus house cars and trailers, so popular
with the travelling public at this time had brought up an additional problem in
camp sanitation and was one of the reasons for the amendment of Rule No. 91.

--Transient Camps--

Cooperating with the State FEPA office also to insure proper sanitary and
health conditions at the various transient camps which had boon established
by the Federal Relief Administration, regular, periodic inspections were made
at all camps where those transients were cared for. Including the colored
camp in Jacksonville, two such camps were located throughout the State. Forms
were prepared for use in making those inspections and copies furnished the
FERA office for information.

--Sumner Camps--

General sanitation at summer camps operated by Young Men's Christian
Association, Young Women's Christian Association, Girl and Boy Scout Troops
is under Bureau control. Cooperating with the Scout Executives, who furnish
lists of all camps and periods when they shall be in operation to this depart-
ment, the District Sanitary Officers, mado inspections and advised with those
in charge concerning improvements needed prior to the opening of the camp.
This is true also of the summer camps of the Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., or church
societies that provide camping periods for members. The Bureau endeavors to
offer assistance and control over features having a bearing on sanitation
and public health, paying particular attention to the following:

1. Water Supply.
2. Sewage Disposal.
3. Prevalence of mosquitoes and efforts to control, screen, etc.
4. Care, preparation, handling and storing of food supplies.
5. Garbage collection, storage and final disposal.
6. General Cleanliness.




-36.


--Camp Roosevelt and Canal Zone Sanitation--

Sanitation in connection with Camp Roosevelt and other construction
camps installed in the cross-state Canal zone area has been a matter of
utmost importance to the Bureau. Before adequate plans bad been made
for necessary sanitary facilities in these camps, the workers began to
arrive and measures to handle the situation required prompt action on the
part of the State Board of Health. As a result it was necessary for our
District Sanitary Officer stationed in Ocak to spend practically all
of his time during September and early October working with the camp
officials to devise wvys and means to handle a situation made serious by
a dual problem absence of proper sanitary facilities and inadequate
protection of food and the sanitary preparation of same.

The officials of the U. S. Engineers office, however, were ready and
willing to cooperate and assist in any mwy possible on these matters
pertaining to sanitation and public health. Pl"ns for proper septic
tank installations were provided by the Bureau and where privy installations
were necessary plans for approved types were given. The matter of
proper garbage and waste disposal, as well as mosquito and fly control
were given attention, and the sanitary officers appointed by the Engineers
to handle those matters were instructed by the Bureau's representative
Kr. Holloway.

The matter of safe water supply, was one that gave much real con-
corn. As is the case with new well installations, where materials used
are not properly sterilized previous to use; examinations on samples
collected indicated poor sanitary quality. This prevented approval of
the several deep wells immediately following completion and in some
instances it was several weeks before results were obtained that would
permit the Bureau to pass favorably upon these supplies. Upon rocmamondation
of the Bureau, officials at the camp arranged to have the main supply
subjected to chlorination and by the close of the year all supplies were
giving constant, satisfactory results.

To the end cf the year camp sanitation at all points on the canal where
construction work was going on was still under the supervision of the
Bureau's sanitary officers, cooperating with the sanitary officers of the
Federal Government.





-37.


--MOSQUITO COmNROL-

The regular Bureau activities along mosquito control lines during the year
were almost entirely in connection with clean-up campaigns promulgated by the Dis-
trict Sanitary Officers of the Bureau in connection with local community effort
to remove breeding places of the domestic or household species which breeds in
any accumulation of water around the homes, the control work beginning early in
the Summer and continuing until late Fall. To avoid a repetition of the previous
year's dengue fever outbreak, the local officials and individual household owners
were contacted by our field force who stressed the importance of these campaigns
and outlined procedure necessary to make them effective. The matter was kept
before the public by Bureau literature and press notices on the subject.

Special personnel was furnished by the U. S. Public Health Service for
promoting and supervising drainage work in connection with mosquito control ERA
and WPA projects sponsored by the State Board of Health.

However, by direction of the State Health Officer, the District Sanitary
Officers of the Bureau cooperated in promoting projects, and secured information
in various counties covering malaria and mosquito projects, and secured support
of local officials. This information compiled and reported included data relative
to location end extent of area to be surveyed, estimated cost, and number of
laborers required.

During June, District Sanitary Officer Russell Broughman, cooperating with
the Hillsborough County officials and the Burecu of 5ttomology, U. S. Department
of Agriculture, made a mosquito survey of that county, in an effort to secure
necessary information for a WPA project.

During the first 8 months of the year, ERA drainage projects wore worked
in connection with malaria control and pest mosquito breeding. These were
sponsored and promoted by the State Board of Health end conducted under the
technical supervision of the Board, the malaria control work being done in
cooperation with the U. S. Public Health Service who made possible the employ-
ment of special supervisory personnel, and the pest mosquito work in cooperation
with the Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of Agriculture. The report of
the State Health Officer covering this work may be summarized as follows:

Malaria Control Work

Main Ditch (Lineal ft.) .......................****.. 247,263
Laterals (Lin. ft.) ........................*........ 92.992
Reclaimed Ditch (Lin. ft.) .......................... 214,438
Fills (Cubic yds.) .......... ............ .... 13;527
Streams reconditioned (Lin, ft.) ................... 95,679
Right-of-way Cleared (Acres) ....................... 187.33
Ponds Cleaned (Acres).......................... ..*.. 120.91
Houses screened ..**................... ...***.......* 424
Doors Screened ................. ..e**************** 955
Windows Screened ................................**.*. 510
Porches Screened ........ ...............*......**** 9,139
Average number men working daily during year ........ 626
Highest number men reported working during year ..... 1,487
Lowest number men reported working during year ...... 105





-38-


Pest Mosquito Control

Main Ditch (Lineal ft.) ...............o.......... 170,542
Laterals (Lineal ft.) ............... .............. 50,428
Reclaimed ditch (Lin. ft.) ......................... 53;890
Fills (Cubic yds.) ................................ 8;596
Streams Reconditioned (Lin. ft.).................... 30,944
Right-of-way cleared (Acres) ....................... 64o12
Ponds cleaned (Acres) ............... ............ 2.4
Average number men reported working daily during yr. 93
Highest number men reported working during year..... 545
Lowest number men reported working during year...... 4

During the last months of the year, WPA projects were sponsored
and approved for 47 counties. However, none of those projects were worked,
and for thfs reasonwe were unable to accomplish all we had hoped to do
in connection with mosquito control*


-STOR1 RELIEF DUTY--


The hurricane of September 3, which resulted in heavy material damage
and great loss of life on the lower east coast, south of Miami, also to the
Cedar Key area and in Taylor County in the vicinity of Perry, made it
necessary for ell field personnel of the Bureau, with the exception of
David B. Lee in west Florida, to be called into service.

The destruction caused by this disaster End the insanitary health
conditions arising as a result of the wind and tidal wave action, will be'
covered in detail by report of another delTartment of the Board, therefore,
this report will only briefly mention service rendered by the Bureau in
an effort to assist in matters pertaining to general disaster relief, water
supply and waste disposal as well as care and handling of food. In the work
on the keys it was also necessary for the District Sanitary Officers to
assist in directing crews organized for the handling and care of bodies
found in the wreckage.

Upon receiving word of the hurricane from District Sanitary Officer
S. D. Mcroady in Miami on the afternoon of September 3, the writer pro-
ceeded to that area, picking up District Sanitary Officer Holloway en-
route and stopping long enough in Orlando to direct District Sanitary
Officer Broughman to procood to Tampa and await further orders there.




-39-


Arriving in the storm area left Miami and proceeded to Tavernier where a
hurried survey indicated that ..ith the assistance available we would be
unable to attempt to cope with the situation the devastation was so
complete, so beyond any effort, that'could be made by the limited number of
workers it was possible to -assemble, Knowing that the State Highway Depart-
ment had a crew of workmen in that area a wire was sent to Governor Sholtz
who promptly placed at our disposal the services of these men by authorization
in his wire reading:

"Answering telegram just received you are authorized to use
State Highway Department employees for sanitary work in
afflicted area and this telegram will be evidence for your
authority to call on them for such service and direct their
work".

It was in directing these workmen and others secured for service that our
District Sanitary Officers carried on.

Space will not permit a complete report of accomplishments of our men,
but at this time I wish to taok the opportunity to commend District Sanitary
Officers Macready and Holloway for their untiring and willing service ren-
dered in the work on the keys. George B. Reed, a former officer of the
Bureau, was available for work in Tavernier through the State Road Depart-
mont and performed his work in truly well-trained manner. When the storm,
travelling wostward around the coast, hit the small fishing village of
Cedar Key, causing much damage the work of District Sanitary Officer Safay
was likewise a credit to the Board. Safay also initiated work in Taylor
County, having chocked the conditions in the entire storm area and the re-
sults of work performed by the Bureau officers, the writer feels that the
confidence placed in these men is justified. As director of the Bureau, I
remained in Taylor County for several days directing operations there.

-SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS--

Among the special investigations claiming the attention of the Bureau
during 1935, the following may be listed:

-State Hospital Sanitation-

Scattered cases of amoebic dysentery in the Florida State Hospital at
Chattahoochee over an ortended period was responsible for a general inspection
of tho Institution during the latter part of November to determine, if
possible, sanitary conditions which might in anyway have a bearing on the
cause or spread of this disease.

Several days were consumed in making this investigation during which
Superintendent, Colonel Preston Ayros, and Medical Supervisor, Doctor Pounl
gave the writer every a assistance possible Case history of all patients
having had the disease was secured and studied in connection with the find-
ings of the physical survey.





-40-


Report on this investigation was submitted to the State Health Officer.

Recommendations in this report included:

1. Adequate screening of all porches used by patients.
2. Removal of drinking fountains from toilet rooms.
3. Connect lavatories with well supply rather than spring water
supply.
4. Physical examinations for patients that work in kitchen
and dining room
5. Install approved type of pit privies at saw mill.
6. Have additional toilets put in yards.
7. An additional technician should be employed.
8. Additional Isolation ward space should be provided,

--ilk and Oyster Supplies on Common Carriers --

Cooperating vrith the U. S. Public Health Service reports were sub-
mitted to that department in Washington covering the milk and oyster
supplies used on common carriers. These reports gavo information con-
cerning approval of the supplies as produced and the sources from which
they were taken.

Roepectfully submit Led,





T. S. Kennedy, M.D.,
Director.







Dear Doctor McPhaul:


The following is a report of the Division of Drug
Inspection for the fiscal year 1935-1936.

The Division of Drqg Inspection is charged with the
enforcement of the State Drug and Sign act, and the State Uniform
Narcotic Drug Act. 'Its pcrsonn6l consists of two agents vested with
State Police powers, one located in Tampa, Florida, and one in Jack-
sonville, Florida. The nature of the duties of this bureau is such
that 85% of the work is criminal investigative or securing of evi-
dence necessary for the successful prosecution of violators of the
drug and narcotic laws in a court of competent jurisdiction. The
work is very technical and of a hazardous nature and only years of
experience qualify a man for the position.

During the past year, a decided decrease is noted in
the number of violations of the State Drug and Sign Act, but a noted
increase in the number of violations of the State Uniform Narcotic Drug
Act, especially the bootlegging of cannabis (Marihauna) cigarettes.
This drug has rapidly spread ovur the entire United States and is at
present being investigated by the United States Department of Justice
and the Bureau of Narcotics. Many reports have been received of those
cigarettes being sold to high-school children, and in Miami, during
the winter season, twenty-two peddlers wore apprehended.

This bureau has made an effort in the past six months
towards curbing the illegal practice of medicine, that is to say, espe-
cially persons coming into the state during the winter season attempt-
ing to practice without license or medical training.

At this time, the writer desires to recommend that
proper legislation be enacted giving the State Board of Health broader
powers in the enforcement of medical Irws, and revising the present
medical laws, with special reference to the penalty which is misdemeanor.


The Division of Drug Inspection is badly in
additional agents and an encrcased appropriation of not less
thousand dollars, necessary to employ two agents- one to be
at Tallahassee and one at Miami, Florida.


need of two
than ten
stationed


The following is the number of cases prosecuted, cases
pending the results of work of tw agents


Total number of cases. . .
Total number of convictions. .
Cases pending. . . .
Cases passed to absentee docket. .
Cases nolle pressed. . . .
Violations corrected there no legal action
Open inspections . . ..
Fines assessed by the court. ..
Number marihaina cigarettes seized .
Ounces marihauna seized. . .


. 49
S. 48
. S 5

. 1
taken 42
. 1265
. $ 600.00
. 249
. 14


Respectfully submitted,


(Signed) H. M. Doss
Chief Inspector





- 42 -


STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

Division of Public Health Nursing

Annual Report 1935

Personnel

Ruth E. Iettinger, Director
Joyce Ely, Assistant Director & Supervisor of Midwives
Jule 0. Graves. Field Nurse
LaULa Mary Goggans, Field Nurse
Johonna L. Sogaard, Field Nurse
Annie Gabriel, Field Nurse
Helen Van Osdell, Secretary
Anne M. King, Clerk


Supervisors of Nurses:
Miss Annie Carlisle
Mrs. Myrtle Conquist
Mrs. Nancy Flannagan
Miss Mary L. Harrison
Mrs. Lydia Holzscheiter
Miss Margaret Hoxsey
Mrs. Mary W. Matthews
Miss Cynthia May Mabbette
Mrs. Inez L. Nelson
Mrs. Vivian Ross
Miss Anna Grace Yhipple
Miss Mary A. Henley
Miss Edith Haslam


Headquarters
n

n
if

II


Milton
Tampa-West Palm Beach
Fort Pierce
Madison
New Port Richey
Jacksonville
Miami
Tallahassee
Orlando
Jacksonville
Ft. IMers-Pensacola
Tampa
Pensacola


It has been the objective of this division to conduct the work
of the ERA State-Wide Nursing Project that it would react in the establish-
ment of a permanent local health organization. To enlist the interest of
the general public, the public health nursing councils were stressed even
more than. in previous years. As a result three counties have assumed the
financial responsibility of the nurses and twelve counties have offered
transportation for the nurses when the project is released. The 265
nurses we employed on this project, due to the cut in the ERA appropria-
tion on May 9th, the personnel was reduced one half. Even though it was


Miss
Miss
Miss
kiss
Miss
Miss
Miss
Miss





-43-


necessary to release these nurses the same program was carried out
by those retained. The spirit evidenced by the nurses, however,
was most gratifying several remained on duty even though they
were not remunerated.

At the request of Dr. 0. G. Kendrioks, Crippled Children's
Commissioner, a survey was made in every county of the state 1478
crippled children were found.

The first of July, the medical service for relief clients
was discontinued, which reduced the morbidity cases considerably
and gave the nurses more time to devote to educational work, includ-
Hag Home Hygiene, First Aid and prenatal classes. From January
through October, 3232 Home Hygiene class meetings were conducted and
532 First Aid.

On December lst. the ERA Nursing Service was discontinued.
Through the interest. and generosity of the Education Department,
Mrs. Herbertha Leonardy, State Director, offered to pay 64 nurses on
the same basis as the nursery school teachers, with the understand-
ing that these nurses would be placed on the state-wide pay roll
when the WPA project was approved, which enabled us to retain at
least a skeleton organisation and conduct classes in Home Hygiene
and First Aid.

Permanent Nurses

In going over our files it was noted that few nurses em-
ployed by county, city and volunteer agencies submitted reports to
this office. A survey was made and it was found that 91 nurses were
employed permanently in the state, as follows:

By county commissioners and county school boards 26 nurses
By County Health Units 6
By City Comnissioners and City School Boards 33
By Corporations for Industrial Nursing 7
By Red Cross Chapters 4
By Life Insurance Companies 8
By Florida Crippled Children's Commission. 4
By the Junior League 1
By Junior League and Kiwanis Club 1
By United States Naval Air Station 1

TOTAL . . 91 "

These nurses were requested to submit reports on forms fur-
Iished by the State Board of Health and an excellent response has
been received. In going over the reports, it was noted that mazm of
these nurses were combining their health work with welfare work or






-44-


probation work, which naturally interferes with their public health
program and in some cases absorbs most of the nurses' time. If it
were possible to subsidize the salaries of these nurses through the
State Board of Health, this could be eliminated and the full time
of the nurses concentrated on public health nursing. A tabulated
report of the work done by these nurses is attached.

Staff Education

Mrs. Charlotte Heilman and Miss Alice DuggarN both from
the American National Red Cross, conducted an institutein Marianna,
Jacksonville and Orlendo, with a total attendance of 140 nurses.
The course was a follow-up from last year on iTeeching Methods",
applying them to the Red Cross' ome Hygiene and Care of the Sick
classes.

Mr. Rotane S. Eaton, Field Representative of the First
Aid and Life Saving Service, American National Red Cross, conducted
six First Aid Institutes for the nurses. Nurses from 48 counties
attended and are now authorized to teach First Aid classes, Since
there are so many accidents and minor injuries in the nursery
schools, the nursery school teachers wure invited to attend these
institutes.

A series of tuberculosis institutes were held by Miss Mae
McCormick, Executive Secretary of the Florida.Tberculosis and
Health Association, explaining to the nurses the state set-up and
with one of the physicians of the community demonstrating pneumoth-
orax treatment.

A training center for FERA nurses was opened the first
of January in Alachua County. Before assigning a nurse to a county
she wrs given three weeks rural work in this center in addition to
the three weeks training in Jacksonville or Tampa. However, with
the cut in personnel in May, it became necessary to discontinue
the training centers.

Institute

One of the most outstanding features during the year was
the Institute in Gainesville at the University of Florida, conduct-
ed by the General Extension Division, with the cooperation of the
Florida State Board of Examiners'Association and .the Florida State
Board of Health. An advisory committee appointed by the dean of
the General Extension Division prepared the program.. The director
was made chairman of the Public Health program. One hundred and
eighty six nurses attended, of whom 126 were in the field of public
health. Miss Leah Blaisdell from the Now York State Department of
Health and Mrs. Anita Jones from the Children's Bureau were the
principal instructors. Symposiums were conducted each afternoon
following the special sessions at which time the different physic-





-45-


ians discussed various subjects.

In addition to these institutes, the district supervisor
conducted monthly institutes, and Miss Joyce Ely, State Supervisor
of Midwives, held institutes with the nurses of each county, dem-
onstrating to them, the State Board of Health methods of teaching
the midwives.

Midvd. fery

Monthly classes for the midwives have been held by the
nurses in practically every county throughout the state. These
classes usually include inspection of each midwife's equipment,
demonstration by the nurse, and supervised practice periods.

Four institutes of one-week each wore held for the mid-
wives in Miami, Tampa, and two in Tallahassee, with a total attend-
ance of 326. The first annual institute for graduate midwives was
held in Tampa and the ten in the state attended.

'A Miy Day program was held in practically every county
of the state, sponsored by the Public Health Nursing. Councils as-
sisted by the nurses. Toe .demonstraticis arid plays that were pre-
sented by the schools were practically the same as .last year, in-
cluding the crowning of the May Queen, parades, .,inint and pre-
school clinics with doctors in attendance. Several of the counties
had splendid window displays, emphasizing proper foods and clothing
for prenatals and baby layettes.

A law governing'employment of public health nurses in the
state was introduced into the Legislature. It passed the Senate
without difficulty but due to the failure to be read the third time
in the House until the last few days of the session, it was overlook-
ed because the attention of the Representatives was devoted to the
methods of raising funds for the schools. We plan to have this bill
introduced again in the next Legislature.

The nurses assisted in making pellagra surveys and in dis-
tributing yeast on prescription of a doctor. The yeast was donated
by the American National Red Cross through the local Red Cross Ghap-
ters free of charge.

During the Milwaukee meeting of the American Public Health
Association in October, the director was asked if one of our County
Health Departments could be used as a training center for field
experience to be given by Peabody. We are hoping that this can be
developed in the near future so that Florida nurses can be given
credit for their one month's field experience.




-46-


ANNUAL REPORT OF DISTRICT SUiBVISORS OF NURSES


Number of counties visited: 67 Number of visits to cou

Number of communities visited: 2433 Number of visits to com

Number of nurses employed: White 2097 Colored 211

Number of private duty nurses
on duty during the year: White .47 Colored 8

Number of new nurses employed
during the year: White 52 Colored 3

Number of Institutes held: 78 Attendance: White 92

Number of classes held with nurses: 281 Attendance: White 132

Number of Public Health Nursing Comiaittees attended: 189

Number of talks given during the year: 80

PERSONI INTERVIEWS

Number of interviews with Relief Administrators, Rclier Directors,
and Case Aides: 550I

Number of interviews with nurses not employed: White 490

Number of interviews with Health Officers: 281

Number interviews with doctors, not Public Health: White 1048

Number of interviews with interested individuals: White 6071

Number of interviews with members of state staff: 648

MII IFE WORK


Number home visits to midwives:

Investigations of midwives:

Number classes and demonstrations held:

Attendance:

Number of midwives examined:

Number of conferences with midwives

Number midwives practicing without registration:

Number hours clerical work: 4395
Number Home Hygiene Classes under instruction: 316
Number First Aid Classes under instruction: 191


White

White

White

White

White

White

White


nties:

Munities:


2345

3386


7 Colored 65

3 Colored 111











Colored 60


Colored

Colored


Colored

Colored

Colored

Colored

Colored

Colored

Colored


59

508


173

141

113

764

146

212

81






-47-


ANNUAL REPORT CF NURSES EMPLOYED BY OFFICIAL & VOLUNTEER AGENCIES


Health
Supervision Uaternity
W 0 W C


Total No. cases under
care at beginning of
month
Intake
a. New
b. Re-admitted
Total Under care dur-
ing month
No. carried cases
visited
Total under care vis-
ited
dismissed
Carried over


3888
641
674
242


410
598
534
158


262
92
92
3


Morbidity
W C


652
720
501
111


326
598
484
115


4605 913 189 32 1569 909

574 549 106 13 228 525


1396
750
3655


576
538
776


106
77
164


1293
1030


575
226
665


Total


4941
1604
1566
285


1031
1259
10,.5
239


HOME VISITS
Total No. homes visited first time
Total No. homes r3-visited
Total No. visits to homes
Total No. visits to cases

HEALTH SUPERVISION
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults

MATINITY
Prenatal
Delivery
Post Partum
Newborn

MORBIDITY
Non-communicable diseases
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults

COBQJNICABLE DISEASES
(Exclusive of Tuberculosis)
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults


6630 2170

867 1087


1881
1224
5460


1:159
195
1495


Whit e
9:5

2531
3612


652
810
1545
518


795
11
266
107


390
249
1897
1155


943
144
836
448


Colored
514
391
926
1320


2
33
263
136


71
1
8
4



15
9
67
243



2
81
155
188






-48-


TUBERCULOSIS White Colored
No. of Positive Cases Visited219 238
No. of Suspects Visited 211 26
No. of Contacts Visited & Listed 100 67

VISITS IN BEHALF OF
Health Supervision 760 216
Maternity 167 1
Morbidity 965 62
Visits for Special Activities 186 22
Non-effectual Visits Not seen 113 12
Not found 37 22
Miscellaneous 324

HEALTH SUPEIiVISION
Infants to 1 year 138 19
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.) 433 116
School Children 4026 156
Adults 915 704

MATERNITY
Ante-partum 35 11
Post-partum 11 5

CLINICS OR CONFERENCES GROUP
Infant New 28 0
Returned 4 0
Preschool New 24 3
Returned 0 3
Prenatal New 46 5
Returned 25 0
Orthopedic New 15 7
Returned 7 0
Dental New 544 4
Returned 5 0
Treatment 83 0
Other Clinics (Specify)
General 32 34
Hookworm 21' 2
Employees' Medical Examination 82 0
Lunchroom Workers 13 0
(With Wasserman)
Tonsils 75 0

No. of Individuals Referred for Med-
ical Examination 2987 246
No. of cases hospitalized 467 87
No. of adults securing corrections 653 194
No. of children examined by dentist 1940 0
Check up on Summer Round-up 915 0











HOOKW0OR CONTROL White Colored
No. of containers distributed 5700 58
No. of containers collected 2844 -
No. of treatments given 1256
No. of families with open or no
toilets 573

DMINIZATION
No. of clinics held for vaccina-
tion against sn.llpox 180 -
No. vaccinated 1053 -
No. of Schick Tests Positive 174 -
No. of Schick Tests Negative 425 -
No. of clinics hol' for the Admin-
istration of Toxoid, TAT 31 -
No. receiving trcttment 1472 -
No. of clinics held for the Al:min-
istration of Typhoid Vaccine 55 -
No. completing 3 treatments 1550 -

CONFERENCES INDIVIDUAL
Health Officers 224 -
Other physicians 6.7-
Teachers 19C6 -
Social Service Workers 463 -
District Supervisor of Nurses 61 -
Other Nurses 558 -
Interested Individuals 2759 -

SUPERVISION OF UIIIVES
No. of home visits to mid-ivos 16 .99
No. of conferences with midrives 2 102
No. of investigations of midwives 7 25
No. of Demonstrations, Classes or
Institutes held 27 12
Attendance 13 126
No. of Bags Inspected Complete 135
No. of Bags Inspected Incomplete 17

EDIUCTIONAL ACTIVITY COWINITY
No. of talks by nurse 382 -
Group Meetings 40 -
Attendance 2481 -
School children 2785 -
Attondenco 2005 -
Teachers 200 -
Attcndance 80 -
Parents' Meetings in School 35 -
Attendance 2691 -
Institutes attended 3 -
Home Hygiene Classes 9
Attendance 151
First Aid Classes 20 -





-50-


BIRTH RIISTRiTION White Colored
Registrars Visited 6 3
Unreported Births DiscovereC. -

NURSERY SCHOOLS
No. of children with one or more
symptoms of defects 788 -
No. of cases referred to doctor 93 -
No. of inspections -
Infrnt and Pre-school 25
Corrections on Infant &
Pro-school 9

ACTIVITIES IN SCHOOL
No, of schools visited 298 14
No. of schools given assistance 429 6
No. of individual inspections
by nurse 12434 160
No. of routine examinations
by doctor 1081
No. of children with one or more
symptoms of defects 1944
No. of special examinations 1305

INDICATIONS OF:
Enlarged Glands 2094
Skin Disease 48 -
Scalp Disease 58 4
Hookworm 1242
Defect Orthopedic 249 -
Eye Trouble 607 -
Defective Vision R 588 -
L 169 -
Defective Hearing R 44 -
L 134 2
Diseased Gums 86 -
Defective Teeth 5213 -
Adenoids Symptoms 431 -
Abnormal Throat 2072
Abnormal Weight 1176
Nervous Symptoms 8 -
General 17 -

CORRECTIONS:
Enlarged Glands 592 11
Skin Disease 5364
Scalp Disease 29 -
Hookworm 205
Defect Orthopedic 6 -
Eye Trouble 222 -
Defective Vision R 72 -
Defective Hearing R 2 -
Diseased Gums 10 -
Defective Teeth 1266
Adenoids 14 -





-51-


CORRECTIOMB: Cont'd. White Colored
Abnormal Throat 21 -
Abnormal Weight 96 -
Nervous Symptoms 2 -
General 154
Tonsils 101 -

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY COMIDNTY
T. B. Meetings 3
Attendance 55
Women's Club Meetings 3 -
Attendance 235 -
Pellagra Meetings 8 -
Attendance 395 -
4-H Club Group 1 -
Attendance 24 -
parent-Teachers Association MKetings 5 -
Attcndanco 699 -
Nurses' Institutes 4 -


250


Attendance












ANNUAL REPORT FLORID EMERGENCY RELIEF NURSES


Total No. cases under
care at beginning of
month
Intake
a. New
b. Re-admitted
Total under care dur-
ing month
Dismissed


Health
Supervision
W C


50071
29813
20776
8457


10577
5924
4785
1139


79284 16501
24824 5835


Iaternity
W C


17927
5066
4376
690


6062
1999
1782
217


22995 8061
9581 1879


Morbidity
W 'C


35320
23173
19198
3975


12780
10394
7517
8877


Total


103318,
57452
44350
13102


58493 23174 160770
21860 8235 56265


HONE VISITS
Total No. homes visited first time
Total No. homes re-visited
Total No. visits to homes
Total No. visits to cases

HEAL.'i SUPERVISION
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults

MATERNITY
Prenatal
Delivery
Post Partum
Newborn

MORBIDITY
Non-communicable diseases
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults

CO1MJNICABLE DISEASES
(Exclusive of Tuberculosis)
Infants to 1 year
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.)
School children
Adults

TUBERCULOSIS
No. of positive cases visited
No. of suspects visited
No. of contacts visited & listed


29419
18317
14084
4233

47736
15949


White
33616
84397
129661
159929


14964
27609
21770
33837


17847
909
10143
6891



10029
9058
11664
26327



3689
5706
7087
6704


2586
2097
2675


Colored
11421
25379
38008
53470


4378
3727
5381
9573


6198
854
3559
3139



1693
1766
2772
12292



699
925
1536
2940


1869
666
1350




-53-


VISITS IN BEHAI QO White Colored
Health Supervision 3 6 79
Maternity 13448 3732
Morbidity 85689 7240
Visits for special activities 11105 1886
Non-effectual visits not seen 5888 1108
mot found 2647 1115

HEAltH SUPERVISION
Infants to 1 year 6793 1273
Pre-school (1 to 6 yrs.) 9228 1567
School Children 12040 2316
Adults 26110 6262

M&TNITY
Ante-partum 2085 598
Po st-partum 828 238

CLINICS OR CONFERENCE GROUP
Infant New 1072 190
Returned 1970 306

Preschool New 1811 399
Returned 1493 244

Prenatal New 481 247
Returned 595 176

Orthopedic New 179 43
Returned 390 13

Dental New 1245 85
Returned 1246 324
Treatment 1239 908

Other clinics 7412 1896

No, of individuals referred
for Medical Examination 61855 18114
No. of cases hospitalized 2538 580
No. of adults securing corrections 52719 17494

HOOKORM CONTROL
No. of containers distributed 21637 2963
No. of containers collected 15538 2216
No. of treatments given 8934 543
No. of families with open or no


19394 3981


toilets





-54-


IMMUNIZATION White Colored
No. of Clinics held for vaccina-
tion against smallpox 347 340
No. vaccinated 6690 4093
No. of Clinics held for the admin-
istration of Toxoid, TAT 611 148
No. receiving treatment 6208 1063
No. of Clinics held for the admin-
istration of typhoid vaccine 11458 3613

CONFERENCES INDIVIDUAL
Health Officers 4275
Other Physicians 21056 1720
Teachers 11639 2203
Social Service Workers 33013 2299
District Supervisor of Nurses 7463
Other Nurses 22867 1569
Interested Individuals 42326 7184

SUPERVISION OF MIDWIVES
No. of home visits to midwives 2152 2440
No. of conferences with midwives 475 2371
No. of investigations of midwives 305 840
No. of Demonstrations, Classes or
Institutes held 163 571
Attendance 587 2987
No. of bags inspected complete 297 1451
No. of bags inspected incomplete 236 664

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY COMMUNITY
Wo. 7I" 5ta1is Ty nurses 1004 203
Group Meetings 2066 307
Attendance 27031 2093
School Children 5153 1007
Attendance 26659 2419
Teachers 2928 503
Parents' Meetings in School 1126 98
Attendance 6658 375
Institutes Attended 1929 167
Home Hygiene Classes 5756 1184
Attendance 21496 4026
First Aid Classes 694 121
Attendance 5596 841
Others 716 94

BIRTH REGISTRATION
Registrars Visited 840 7
Unreported births discovered 644 143

HEALTH CENTERS
County Fairs 34 1
Others 187 -





-55-


NURSERY SCHOOLS White Colored
No. of children inspected 9183 859
No. of children with one or more
symptoms of defects 2458 55
No. of cases referred to doctor 914 32
No. of Inspections -
Infant and Pre-school 5187 131
Corrections on Infant and Pre-
school 469 38

ACTIVrIIES IN SCHOOL
No. of schools visited 4340 858
No. of schools given assistance 4583 628
No. of individual inspections by
nurse 51375 5969
No. of routine examinations by Dr. 6750 285
No. of children with one or more
symptoms of defects 23461 2524
No. of special examinations 11521 547

INDICATIONS OF:
Enlarged glands 1441 98
Skin disease 3063 311
Scalp disease 704 381
Hookworm 1740 96
Defect Orthopedic 156 37
Eye trouble 1419 176
Defective Vision R 680 95
L 530 35
Defective Hearing R 35 4
L 139 20
Diseased Gums 889 85
Defective Teeth 4196 249
Adenoids Symptoms 2113 363
Abnormal Throat 3016 282
Abnormal Weight 1399 46
Nervous Symptoms 246 19

CORRECTIONS:
Enlarged glands 70 43
Skin Disease 117 172
Tonsils 97 28
Hookworm 286 10
Orthopedic 10 6
Eye trouble & glasses 182 96
Dental 502 55
Scalp disease 9 62
Scabies 32 -
Impetigo 20 -
Adenoids 9 29
Abnormal weight 7 7
Nervous symptoms 1 1
Diphtheria cultures 28 -
Canal Workers Examination 56 3











CLASSES


Number new classes
organized -

Number classes brought
forward from pre-
ceding month -

Total number classes
conducted -

Total number classes
completed -

Number students receiv-
ed certificates -







CLASSES


Total No. classes brought
forward from preceding
month -

Total No. new classes
organized during
month -

Total No. classes con-
ducted

Total No. classes com-
pleted

Number students received
certificates


-56-


HOME HYGIENE REPORT


TYPE OF GROUP
Adults School
w C W C

159 79 45 120 1



75 56 70 3 1


234 135 115 129 2


55 20 19 4


94 41 1 0




FIRST AID REPORT


TYPE OF GROUP
Adults School
W C W C


28 65 42 0


ENROLLMENT
Adults Sohool
W C W C

518 796 574 209


.268


:786


94


94


667


1463


56


56


829


1403


16


16


102


311


0


0


ENROLLMENT
Adults School
W C W C


603 86 490 10


483


1086


148


148


44


130


0


0


526


1016


56


56


97


107


32


32





-57-


REPORT OF NURSERY SCHOOLS


Number of visits to nursery schools . .

Number of visits to nursery schools . ..

Number of children inspected . . .

Number examined by doctor ........


Number excluded ..



MATTRESS FACTORY REPORT


Number of visits to factory . .

Number of inspections made . .

Number of eases referred to physicians .

Number of cases referred to visiting nurse



HOSPITAL & CLINIC REPORT
HOSPITAL & CLINIC REPORT


* .

* 9


HOSPITAL:

Nuriber relief cases admitted .

Number relief cases discharged .

Length of time remained in hospital



CLINIC:

Number of relief eases treated .

Type of cases;- Number Medical .

Number Surgical .

Number referred to county nurses


. 9 .9




(average): 1 to






. . *

. 9 9 .

* . .
. .


117

435

4379

470

221







158

5717

132

74


231

177

11 days






14724

12931

1330

49





-58-


MIDWIFERY

1935

W C Total
Number midwives registered for 1935 78 600 678

Number of midwives licensed for 1935 87 631 718

Class A 11 0 11
Class B 12 31 43
Class C 64 600 664

Number of midwi-es licensed for 1936 13 '265 278

Class A 1 0 1
Class B 1 16 17
Class C 11 204 260

Number of midwives refused license 4 19 23

Number of midwives license revoked 1 6 7

No. voluntarily returning license & resigned 4 13 17

No. license suspended on account of syphilis 1 2 3

No. midwives completing treatment for syphilis 0 10 10

No. of positive hookworm reports 1 0 1

No. midwives having physical examination 39 467 506







.-59-


LITERATURE. AND SUPPLIES SEf OUT .

children's Bureau Booklets

Infant Care . . .
Prenatal Care ............... ... .
The Child fiom i to 6 .. ..........
Are You Training Your Child to be Happyn .....
Breast Feeding ..... . .. ....
Why Drink Milk? .... .............
Why Sleep? .... . . .
What Builds Babies? . .
Minimum Standards of Prenatal Care . .
Sunlight for Babies . ..... .
Out of Babyhood into Childhood . . .
Height & Weight Charts . . . .


State Board of Health Pamphlets


Hookworm . ..
Malaria ...........
Tuberculosis Pamphlets ....
What to do When . . .
Mosquito Pamphlets . .
Sanitary Privy . . .
Filthy Fly ...........
Why Births Should be Registered .
Communicable Diseases . .


Maternity Lotters


Sets of Prenatal Letters . . .
Sets of Postnatal Letters . .
Complete Sets . . ..
Total . . . . .


School Supplies

School Children Inspection Cards (Nurses) .
School Examination Cards (Physicians) ..
Nurses' Notice to Parents . . .
Doctors' Notice to Parents . . .
Henryson Height & Weight Charts . . .
Snollen Eye Charts . ... .
Hookworm Specimen Reports (Negative) . .
Hookworm Specimen Reports (Positivo) . .
Physical Examination Records for Nurses & Teachers


1235
1187
1037
142
27
27
23
30
24
14
14
6


6330
684
618
473
258
966
674
500
25


7780
5822
553
14155


33980
5325
36052
9080
59
19
1236
849
1400














r


ri



r









-60-


Midwife Supplies

Midwife Monthly Report Cards . . . 3029
Midwife Instruction Sheets . . . 858
Patterns for Cord Dressings & Masks. . . 882
Layette Instruction Sheets .. . . 624
Books of Birth Certificates . . .. 517
Yoint Pledge Blanks ...... ... .... .. 1064
Midwife Manuals ..... ............... 102
Maternity letter Request Slips . . 1100
Blanks for Physical Exrmination of Midwives . 933
Abdominal BBider Patterns .. . . 6
Outline of Midwife Program & Demonstrations for
Midwife Clsses . . . .. ...... 6
Silver Nitrate . . . . 5496


usp ct f-lxuhlit tedJl.11

Ruih E. Mettinger, RN-Director
Division of Public Health Nursing






-61-


F. A. Brink, M. D., Director
Bureau of Communicable Diseases




Dr. Morgan was given leave of absence from September 15th for a scholastic
year of post graduate study in public health at Harvard Medical School under
a scholarship grant from the Rockefeller Foundation.

Dr. F. V. Chappell was assigned to District No. 1 following Dr. Morgan's de-
parture.

Dr. Pease was on leave for fifteen days without pay during the latter half of
August.

The Bureau has served as a clearing house for information concerning conmmn-
icable diseases and related problems. The major part of such service is
rendered through correspondence. In addition, a great many people have
visited the office for personal conference with the Director concerning their
health problems.

The field work of the Director included the following:

(1) Thirty-two annual inspections of child caring institutions, board-
ing homes for children and boarding homes for tubercular patients.

(2) Investigation of the Jacksonville City Prison Farm by special re-
quest of the Duval County Grand Jury.

(3) Investigation of school transportation facilities in Putnam County
where a complaint was made regarding overcrowding and overloading of one of
the school buses. Arrangements were made to divide the load and relieve the
situation somewhat.

(4) Sixty-five special cammunicable disease investigations, including
six cases of leprosy.

(5) Twenty-one addresses were delivered on various public health sub-
jects at public meetings, conventions and civic clubs.

(6) Three radio broadcasts were prepared and delivered, two over the
University of Florida station and one from the Orlando station.





-62-


DISTRICT HEALTH OFFICERS

The five district health officers devote practically their entire time to field
work which consists of health education, camunicable disease and other inves-
tigations, immunizations and physical examinations.

Because each district health officer has a large territory and because of the
policy of the State Board of Health not to invade the field of the family phy-
sician, the aim has been to place on the public and the practicing physicians
a share of the responsibility for the prevention and control of communicable
diseases. To this end the district health officers were urged to carry on a
more extensive program in the educational field of communicable disease control
and general public health measures. This was accomplished in a vory satis-
factory way by means of newspaper articles and talks to schools, clubs and
other gatherings. By this means there was engendered an increased interest in
general public health promotion and particularly in the protection of pre-
school children by immunization.

An increased amount of time and attention has been given by the district health
*officers to ths investigation of communicable diseases to determine sources of
infection and apply effective measures for their control.

Schick testing and immunizing (diphtheria, typhoid and smallpox) in the public
schools and special clinics vere continued in response to a popular demand
from many corrunities.

There is a continuing demand from local school authorities and Parent-Teacher
Associations for the physical examination of school children. The purpose of
these examinations is to detect communicable diseases and physical defects
which handicap the child and which can be corrected. Many coanunities have
had the service of the district health officers for this work. In many other
ccomunities the local doctors have examined the children.

The practicing physicians hnve contributed in no small degree to the success-
ful program of communicable disease control. With most of them it is routine
practice, when treating patients with communicable disease, to see that they
are properly isolated and visitors excluded. Attendants are instructed as to
the procedure necessary to prevent the spread of infection. For this service
the physicians are highly commended.

For their assistance and cooperation in cocmunicnble disease control, the ERA
nurses nerit the highest praise. Particularly valuable was their assistance
with clinics and in giving home instructions in the care of the sick.

COUNTY HEALTH UNITS

The County Health Units have in the past been a part of the Communicable
Disease Bureau and under the supervision of the Director.

On January 1, 1935, Dr. James T. Gcoge reported to cooperate pith this Bureau
in the organization and direction of county health units. Dr. Googe will
file a report.

One county unit was organized and began operating in Jackson County on Sep-
tenber lst, with Dr. Paul G. Shell as County Health Officer.






-63-


TUBERCULOSIS

Since Dr. W. A. Claxton was taken ill in December 1954, there has been no
tuberculosis clinician on the State Board of Health staff. Two of the district
health officers have held tuberculin testing clinics. By special request a
number of patients were examined by the Director and the district health
officers for evidence of active tuberculosis.

HOOKWORM TREAENTS

Continued approval was given to the administration of hookwoom treatments by
district health officers in communities remote from medical service and where
local physicians gave their approval. Band in hand with treatment went in-
struction in the simple measures of prevention. Parents are repeatedly urged
to provide sanitary conveniences and prevent soil pollution.

The following miscellaneous activities are of significance:

Dr. Morgan held a special clinic at Sanford and examined preschool children at
a booth inside the fair grounds. He also participated in a health survey of
the Seminole Indians.

Dr. McClure hold pellagra clinics in Liberty and Jefferson Counties. To the
patients he grve powdered yeast, Those clinics met a peculiar need.

At Dunnellon and Webster, Dr. Dame took thick blood smears to dotemine the
prevalence of malaria.

Dr. Chappell and Dr. Griffitts cooperating, took blood specimens to determine
the prevalence of malaria at Jacksonville Beach and Mayport.

Another activity of the Bureau was the handling of certain therapeutic pro-
ducts.

YEAST

During the year there were purchased rnd distributed six hundred (600) two-
pound packages of dried brewers yeast. This was done as a means for the con-
trol of pellrgra.

Beginning in January the National Red Cross began the distribution of yeast.
Throe hundred pounds were shipped to this office and distributed mainly in
Duval County. An unknown amount was distributed through local Red Cross
Chapters throughout the state. This had the effect of reducing considerably
the demands which were made on the State BoLrd of Hoalth for this product. A
considerable reduction in the number of pellagra cases and deaths has been
noted.

NEOARSPHENAMINE

Though there ras no special item in the budget for the purchase of neoars-
phonamine, 1500 doses of this drug were furnished to physicians for the free
treatment of thoir private indigent syphilitics.




-64-


INSULIN

The Bureau of Cammunicable Diseases was charged with the task of distributing
insulin as required by an act of the 1935 legislature. This act provided for
an appropriation of $7500.00 with which to purchase insulin and distribute the
same to diabetics who were unable to buy. $7000.00 worth of insulin was pur-
chased and allotted to the several counties according to population. So far
as possible this was distributed to County Physicians, together with appli-
cation blanks and record forms so that the supply would be available to local
physicians and their patients, A small portion of the fund was used to pay
postage and other items of expense. There is still a small balance in the
fund. Provision was made for the county distributors to report frcm tize to
time and at the end of the fiscal year on the distribution of this product.



There was no serious outbreak or epidemic of communicable disease during 1935.
A mall number oi' anlljpox cases (14) was reported in Levy County. They were
investigated and the diagnosis confirmed by Dr. Dame.

Scattered cases of dengue were reported but in no instance did the disease be-
come widespread.

During the outbreak of infantile paralysis in other states, there were much
anxiety and many inquiries as to the danger of the disease invading Florida.
There was no increase over the previous year in the number of cases reported.

Diphtheria showed a slight decrease in the number of cases reported while
typhoid showed a slight increase.

There was a relatively large increase in the number of cases of undulant fever
(Brucellosis) reported, the total being 68. All but one were reported from
Dcde County. This increase appears to have beer due to the active interest of
a group of Micmi doctors in making a diagnosis of obscure illnesses. In all
probability there are many cases of undulant fever throughout the state every
year which go unrecognized.



On the following pages are the tabular reports showing:

(1) A summary of the principal activities of the five district
health officers.

(2) Pamphlets distributed.

(3) The number of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
to the State Board of Health.

Each table shows a comparison of 1935 figures with those of the four previous
years.






-65-


Table No. 1


SUMMARY F ACTIVITIES DURING 1931-1935, INCLUSIVE

1931 1932 1933 1934 1935

Interviews & Conferences 6397 7746 5279 5917 5227

Public Addresses 691 821 698 914 754

Newspaper Articles 198 169 117 89 147

Schools Visited 2140 2809 1924 2291 1887

Clinics Attended 1809 2698 1611 2390 1821

Persons Examined 6705 10,769 6198 3743 4380

C. D. Investigated 1017 1136 589 908 622

Cases Isolated or Excluded 659 572 255 514 352

Houses Placarded 293 73 31 75 159

Smallpox Vaccinations 11,276 17,325 10,804 16,973 14,927

Typhoid Inoculations 55,409 94,160 62,468 62,282 50,133

Schick Tests 19,889 21,000 13,792 21,370 18,470

T. A. and/or Toxoid 23,865 21,439 10,311 10,549 6755

Throat Swabs 4598 2605 417 1604 1035

Other Specimens 2789 2948 550 487 475

Tuberculin Tests 2798 10,769 4697 595 560

Malaria Smears 57 5146 683 8324 1278

Hookworm Treatments 1144 2100 4329 1730 2786





-66-


Table No. 2


NUMBER OF PAMPHLETS DISTRIBUTED BY THE BUREAU OF
1931-1955, INMGLSIVE


CCUNICABLE DISEASES


1931 1952 1955 1934 1935


Manpower
Outdoing the Ostrich
Sex Education in the Home
Keeping Fit
The Girl's Part
Healthy Happy Womanhood
Sex Education in the Schools
Wonderful Story of Life for Boys
Wonderful Story of Life for Girls
Syphilis Information
Gonorrhea Informatioq
Social Hygiene Outline


Tuberculosis
Typhoid
Malaria
Hookworm
Pellagra
whooping Cough
Diphtheria
Sore Eyes
Saellpox
Wnat to do When
Influenza
F1y
Rubies
Mosquito Control
Privy


3850
1879
4921
11,265
589
285
3739
1149
2874
4384
440


1895
341
2440
8675
455
120
2585
250
1730
4235
155
500
50
100


1120
25
10,132
13,977
800
51
2675
106
639
1615
245
337
10
677
186


2918 1388


5383
11,058
312

762
212
317
3377
210
364

712
417


5096
4256
46

196

151
2641
2200
10
5
106
196


Communicable Disease Placards


758

210
390
388
283
234


248

287
393
389
381
305


165
165


737
599
747
523
100
720
416
21
21
440
80
650


334
124
313
381

1146
287
218
28
65
65
150


94
79
110
154

126
96
54
52
33
55
55


245 300 150







-67-


Table No. 3


Number of cases of certain communicable diseases reported to the
State Board of Health, 1931-1935, Inclusive

1931 1932 1933 1934 1935

Typhoid 183 266 185 129 169

Typhus 31 42 54 55 27

Malaria 339 318 1011 1106 8is

Smallpox 27 33 1 3 14

Measles 3779 217 1048 8115 1176

Scarlet Fever 266 235 203 190 273

Diphtheria 501 735 452 491 426

Influenza 1545 535 1267 65 662

Poliomyelitis 17 8 7 16 16

Encephalitis 1 1 2 5 2

Tuberculosis 511 591 661 605 523

Syphilis 3965 4065 4833 5198 4389

Gonorrhea 714 713 616 702 1207

Pellagra 64 60 73 151 74

Undulant 3 2 6 8 68

Tularemia 2 2 1 1 2






-68-


BUREAU OF COUNTY HEALTH WORK
J. T. Googe, M. D., Director


Activities of this department have been planned as to their objectives for the
establishment of more adequate local health services in Florida on a cooperative
basis, on the unit plan. Experience, spread over a long period of time, has
conclusively proven that public health organized and maintained on this basis
is most economical, productive of best results, and invites into this scien-
tific field the highest type of trained personnel who would devote their life's
work to the field of public health work.

Experience has taught that the soundest public health programs should foster
as their chief objectives the prevention of disease, both acute and chronic;
the promotion of health for the individual, including maternal, infant, pre-
school and school child hygiene, and certain activities for the promotih)n of
the health of a-1illts; and activities for sanitation of the environment, in-
cluding safeguarding water supplies, protection of milk and other foods, con-
trol of disease carrying insects and rodents, and for the sanitary disposal of
human waste.

The above constitute constructive elements of public health. Carrying forward
a program on these structures, not alone should lower the prevalence of pre-
ventable diseases, which long has been considered the primary function of pub-
lic health, but promote a health consciousness among the people leading to a
higher goal, on their part, of freedom from remedial physical handicaps, end a
still higher objective that of building a sturdier citizenry through the
practice of proper health habits and the consumption of the necessary body
buildings and body maintaining foods. A public health program, properly con-
ducted does not include a medical care program. When such activities are in-
cluded, the more constructive elements listed above tend to be lost, and the
sounder gains are not accomplished.

To be most effective any program of health, whether local or otherwise, should
be developed in cooperation with and under the guidance of organized medicine,
dentistry, and other allied professional groups. Unless this is done, scien-
tific guidance is soon disregarded and the organization ceases to produce the
most desired results, and will fall in disrepute. The program, likewise, should
be organized and conducted in cooperation with the teaching profession, parent-
teacher and other interested lay organizations.

On this background of thinking the structure of local health work, this bureau
has fostered, has been undertaken.

Florida long has lagged in the development of her local health services. All
her sister states of the south have made strides in this respect far out-
striping this commonwealth in this needed and generally accepted governmental
function. This state reflects her failure in this matter clearly in certain
death rates. The maternal death rate was higher for 1935 from these causes
than for any state in the union. The death rate from tuberculosis is amongst
the highest and too many babies fail to reach their first birthday, and
maturity, because of preventable diseases. In addition, many diseases are
prevalent that should not be because of lack of health consciousness on the






-69-


part of the citizenry of this state. They do not know the conditions existing
that are responsible for the prevalence of these diseases, nor are they Lware of
practical steps that may be taken to prevent them. Truly, many people, "perish
for lack of knowledge" in these days, in this state.

This bureau sought, among its first activities, to meet with the physicians in
their societies, to discuss with them the cooperative program contemplated by
the State Board of Health in its relationship with the counties. Subsequent to
these meetings lay groups and officials in many parts of the state were contacted
as regards this matter. There is doubt if anywhere there has been a more whole
hearted approval from all groups of any plan of public health organization.

Two county units were in operation during the year; namely, Leon, rith Dr. L. J.
Graves as Director, end Escnmbia, with Dr. W. A. McPhaul as Director. On Sep-
tember 1st a county health unit was established in Jackson County with Dr. Paul
G. Shell as Director.

Reports of the Leon and Escambia County Health Units will be found on the follow-
ing pages.





-70.-


ESCAMBIA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Dr. W. A. McPhaul, Director


The routine work of the Escambia County Health Department during the year 1955
was a consistent continuation of the previous year's activities. The outstanding
result of the year's work was the marked interest in public health and the work
of the health department manifested by the citizens of Escambia County. The
building of sanitary privies, the inspection of wells, the placarding of houses
harboring cases of communicable disease is a necessary and important function of
any local health department. But, in agreement with the present idealogy of pub-
lic health, we consider as a more important achievement than all the aforementioned.
the fact that a greater percent of the population has become aware of the import-
ance of the public health to their own individual lives.

A number of suspected cases of typhoid was reported. However, upon investigation
many proved not to be typhoid. In one instance, probable typhoid was reported in
a colored family where there were five very sick people one died. I do not
think it was typhoid. The history showed that of eating over ripe watermelons.
Another suspected case in East Pensacola Heights was later diagnosed as malaria.

In three instances suspected smallpox was repcr'-ed to the health department, but
upon investigation proved to be chickenpox.

I visited the Naval Hospital at the invitation of the Officer of the Day to
examine a suspected case of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, a tentative diagnosis
made by the Hospital authorities. I was of the opinion that it was typhus fever.

Approximately 300 preschool children were examined during the summer round-up
under the auspices of the Parent-Teacher Association.

One of the nurses assisted at the clinic held for crippled children on December 9.
Dr. Fort examined some forty cases, after which the nurses assisted the Legion
Auxiliary committee in doing the follow up work. Arrangements were made for each
case to have whatever treatment Dr. Fort advised.

AN ITEMIZED ACCOUNT OF SOME OF THE ROUTINE WORK IS LISTED BELOW:

VISITS TO:
Tuberculosis Cases 77
Prenatal Cases 338
Postnatal Cases 747
Sick Calls 308
IMMUNIZATIONS:
Typhoid 1205
Smallpox 168
Diphtheria 1572

Health Inspections 2450
Hookworm Treatments 390
Ascaris Treatments 11
Informal Health Talks 940






-71-


TUBERCULOSIS S&NATORIUB

The opening of the Escambia County Tuberculosis Sanatorium was an event of major
importance with reference to public health in this county, and I might add, in
all northwest Florida. The great amount of publicity that was given the opening
of this institution will be an incentive for other counties to seek means and
methods of building sanatoria and controlling the spread of tuberculosis. Many
inquiries have been received seeking information about this hospital.

The Sanatorium is located about two miles northwest of Pensacola on a six acro
plat of land donated by the State Board of Health. The building is modern in
every respect cnd rws built according to specifications furnished by the National
Tuberculosis Association. Its furnishings are complete. There is a modern
operating room, X-ray equipment, storage house, garage, a private water system
and sewerage disposal plant, also an incinerator. The Sanatorium can accommodate
twenty-four patients. There was begun during the year, an annex for the housing
of colored tuberculosis patients.

The Institution is operated in connection -ith the EscrJnbia County Health Depart-
ment and its purpose is to treat and cure tuberculosis and carry on an educational
campaign against this disease. Weekly clinics are held then cases are examined
and contacts carefully gone over to find incipient cases. Only cases that can be
cured will be accepted. The death rate should be cut in half during the next few
years

The staff consists of a superintendent who is a graduate nurse and has had tuber-
culosis institutional training, a physician in charge who also conducts the weekly
clinics, three graduate nurses, two orderlies, two cooks, and a ground keeper.
Funds for the maintenance are appropriated by the City and County on a fifty-
fifty basis. $15,000.00 have been appropriated for the first fiscal year.

The building of the Escambia County Tuberculosis Sanatorium is an outgrowth of
the Escambia County Health Department and considerable time has been given in
purchasing equipment and preparing for the opening. The Director and his co-
workers feel justly proud of the establishment of this Institution which will
mean so much to this community.





-72-


LEON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
L. J. Graves, M. D., Director


SCHOOL WORK: All white school children in the county are given annual physical
examinations. At these examinations if some defect is found time is taken then
to instruct the child about the condition and advise further examination by the
family physician or dentist. In this way we get the child interested in himself,
which is of first importance in securing corrections. A check on the Leon High
School students shows that 34% of them have had tonsils removed and a small per-
cent was found to have defective permanent teeth. This is mentioned to show that
the students as well as teachers and parents have responded.

We are fortunate in having an active Civic Health Council which sponsors the fur-
nishing of milk to the needy school children in both grammar schools.

The Kiwanis Club paid the hospital bill for 24 tonsil operations for indigent
school children, the doctors gave their services. This Club elso purchased fill-
ing material and the de-tiste gave their time; thus considerable dental rork was
done for needy children. Several children were fitted with glasses through
donations from the Lions and Kiwanis Clubs. Many other organizations and indi-.
viduals have contributed in helping to carry out the school health program. This
splendid cooperation has been responsible for the excellent results obtained
among the school children.

ITMUNIZATION WORK: Typhoid, diphtheria and smallpox immunizations are carried on
in all schools and communities in the county. There has not been a case of small-
pox in the county during the five years the Health Department has been in opera-
tion. It has been more than three years since we had a death from either diph-
theria or typhoid.

Schick tests have been made on practically all of the school children so that the
toxoid we give is mostly to the preschool group.

MALARIA: In January a malaria survey of the county was made which included tak-
ing blood smears and making spleen examinations. Of the nearly 1,000 smears
made only 3.6% was found positive as compared with 10% in 1933 among the same group
and at the same time of year. In the urban school children of Tcllahassee, only
about one-half of one percent was positive.

Statistics from the State Board of Health show that the death rate from malaria in
this county is considerably lower than that in all the adjacent counties. Some
very effective drainage work was done during 1935 and 1934, but we were unable to
get the project approved during the past year.

PELLAGRA: During the early spring, meetings were held in various communities of
the county to discuss pellagra, its cause and prevention. The Red Cross fur-
nishes yeast to all cases when recommended by a physician. The importance of
milk and vegetables was stressed as an aid in preventing this disease.

TUBERCULOSIS: An active Tuberculosis Association has been formed among the white
and colored and the foundation is laid for same progressive work in the coming
year. During the Seal Sale all the schools in the county entered a contest on
poster making and essays on tuberculosis. I consider this an excellent addca-
tional feature.





-73-


A health pageant given by school children at Florida State Collbgo for Women de-
picting the 8 Point Program. This was in cooperation with the ERA Recreational
Director.

The prenatal work for both rhite and colored was increased. The layette service
given by the Mother's Aid Committee of the Civic Health Council was carried on as
usual and the annual Mother's Party on Friday before Mother's Day was especially
interesting. This year the Girl Scouts also entered into this type of service
and "adopted" a prenatal for haom they provided all the necessities.

The Tuberculosis Committee has been very active, they have provided a sleeping
porch for a tuberiular patient, furnished milk to tuberculosis contacts in the
school, x-rays when advised by doctors. Their educational activities have been
especially outstanding.

Keen interest and cooperation has b3en given by the community in all health prob-
lems, especially the various Civic organizations who provided channels for cor-
rection of defects and the Civic Health Council hho furnished milk to the under-
nourished school children.

MOSQUITO CONTROL WORK: Oiling and dusting were maintained throughout the year
within the three mile area of Tallahassee. The house to house inspections were
carried on the year round and as a result we escaped dengue fever.

OYSTERS: An active part was trken in seeing that oysters served here came from
certified sources and sold by permit. Also became interested in what appeared to
be a doubtful source of oyster supply from nearby waters where there seemed to
originate too many typhoid cases frcm an area not properly sanitated.

DAIRIES: Checked dairies each month. Tops put on three water tanks. One water
system rebuilt. One new water system. Replaced some wooden pits with concrete
ones.
TOILET INSTALLATION: 119 pit toilets have been installed during the year. Of
this number 116 wore concrete slab and riser type and built in conformity with
the U. S. Public Health Service plans. Three are Florida type, two built of
concrete and one built of wood. A number of toilets have been repaired and re-
stored to a sanitary type.

SEPTIC TANKS: 22 septic tanks have been built. Smae of these are built with
baffle and some without. 19 of these tanks are built of concrete and two of brick.

INSPECTIONS: 3,195 private inspections have been made. These inspections include
sewage disposal plants, water supplies, and screening of private homes.

1,556 public and semi-public inspections were made. These inspections include
public acting places, food handling establishments, camps, schools, public nui-
sances, etc.

MOSQUITO CONTROL BY COUNTY SANITARY INSPECTORS: 2,527 inspections on mosquito con-
trol have been made. Those inspections include possible breeding places of all
kinds and were made in every rural community in the county. 71 homes have been
effectively screened. Several miles of drainage ditches have been cleaned.

WATER SUPPLIES: 19 private water supplies have been improved. These improvements
are pumps, tight covers, new curbs, new wells, etc.




-74-


Jacksonville; Florida
January 1, 1936








Dr. W. A. MoPhaul
State Health Officer
Jacksonville, Florida



Dear Doctor MoPhaul:

I hand you herewith Financial Statement of the State
Board of Health for Fiscal year, beginning July 1, 1934 and
ending June 30, 1935.

Heretofore, I have rendered my statement for the Annual
Report according to the Calendar Year, but flect the true financial condition for the twelve months'
period, because tho first six months of the Calendar Year -
January through Juno -- also reprosonted the last division of
the Fiscal Year; and tho last half of tho Calendar Year --
July through Docembor -- comprisod the first six months of
tho now Fiscal Year. As all budgets for State Dopartments
operate for the Fiscal Yoar, of course, a Calendar Year
statement would show operations under two budgets with no
coordination.

7"o render Annual Financial Reports at the end of each
Fiscal Year to tho Governor, State Comptroller, and State
Auditor, as well as mombors of tho Board, and tho following
statomonts are port of our regular Annual Financial Report
for 1934-1935 although not quite as dotailod.

As the financial statomant anbodiod in the Thirty Fifth
Annual Roport of the State Board of Health is for Calendar
Yoar 1934, of course, tho Roooipts and Disbursomonts from
July 1, through Docombor 31, are duplicated in the succood-
ing statanents, but after this year thoy will run regularly,
beginning whoro the last loft off.

Rospoctfully submitted,

G. Wilson Baltzoll

Auditor.
CGB/ls





-75-


ANNUAL STATEMIT

FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE 50 1935.


PROVISIONS OF LEGISLATURE

AND

DISBURSEMENTS AS COMPARED WITH APKROPRIATICOS BILL
--i i


The 1933 Legislature levied 2/2 mill State Tax for the maintenance and
support of the State Board of Health (Chapter 16179) but limited the amounts
to be expended (Appropriations Bill Chapter 158h8) as follows:


Salaries
Necessary and Regular Expense


$ 98,650.00
81,008.75


S179,558.75



As compared with Appropriations Bill, results for fiscal year ending June
30, 1935:


Total ;
Disbursements


Appropriations Under
Bill Limits


Salaries
Operating Expenses
Less: Unexpended balance of
Salaries $ 705.85
Refunds 2,05.08


$ 83,921.24



3,010.93


$ 97,944.15 $ 98,650.00 $ 705.85


80,910.31
$ 178,854.46


81,008.75
* 179,658.75


NOTE


The Legislature authorized any unexpended balance in Salaries be
used to pay Operating, but not vice versa; so this balance was transferred
to Necessary and Regular Expense and also $2,305.08, which was received for
refunds of hookworh bottles, Pellagra Yeast and other Miscellaneous Refunds
during the year.


98.44
$804,23





-76-


ANNUAL STATEMENT

FRCM JULY 1, 1984 TO JNE 30, 1935


GBMERAL STATEMENT


Balance Brought Forward from last Fiscal Year
Receipts 1934 1935:
Taxes and Miscellaneous Revenue
Supplied from General Revenue


Disbursements


$ 29,831.92


$ 198,795.88
9,268.13


(Expended under Budget)


Less amounts spent to replace articles for which
reimbursement was made
Surplus from Selaries


2,S05.08
705.85


From State Board of Health's Millage was
deducted by State Comptroller for Commission
Fund for Tax Assessors and Collectors
Leaving Operating Balance June 50, 1935


208,064.01
237,295.93
178 854.46
58,441.47



3.010.93
55,430.54



11 340.90
S4460859,64


State Comptroller shows Balance as of June 30, 1935 $ 41,446.07
The difference being in July bills paid and charged
to June Disbursementsa


Registrars' Fees
July Special Accounts


$ 528.50
2,115.07


Revealing Operating Balance Above


2,643.57


$ 44,089.64





-77-


ANNUAL STATEMENT

FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUKE 50, 1935

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS BY MONTHS


RECEIPTS


DISBURSEIENTS


Taxes and
Miscellaneous
Revenue


1934 July $
August
September
October
November
December
1935 January
February
larch
April
May
June


13,239.67
7,777.70
S5,774.16
6,604.40
15,741.00
56,996.86
-22,218.46
12,062.64
13,070.65
18,640.44
10,494.15
16,175.77
198,795.88


General
Revenue

V6



8,268.13



1,000.00



9,268.13


Total

$ 13,239.67
7,777.70
5,774.16
6,604.40
24,009.13
56,996.86
22,218.46
12,062.64
14,070.65
18,6-00.44
10,4-4.13
16,175.77
208,064.01


Paid In
Following
Month

$ 18,337.55
14,042.63
16,431.60
18,600.59
15,654.17
13,865.64
18,623.19
14,531.56
13,989.11
13,343.44
11,524.40
12,723.71 (:tid
181,865.39 in
(June)


* From these disbursements should be deducted Refunds of 2,305.08
179,560. 1
and Surplus from Salaries 705.85
$ 178,854.46**

** The amount actually incurred under Appropriations.


DEDUCTIONS FROM VILLAGE FOR
COMMISSION FUND FOR TAX ASSESSORS AND COLLECTORS


1934 July
August
October


1935


November
December
January
March
May
June


$ 1,525.35
81.58
1,453.51
707.74
1,639.26
2,448.98
1,208.14
1,632.65
643.89

S 11,340.90





-78-


ANNUAL STATEMENT

FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE 30, 1935


NATURE OF RECEIPTS


Taxes
Tax Redemptions


Miscellaneous Refunds
Sale of Pellagra Yeast and other Medicines


Ronts Tampa Laboratory


$ 171,661.85
24,578,95


2,098.03
207,05


( City of Tampa )


Supplied from General oevonue

Total Receipts





When these moneys were received they were sent to the
Stato Treasuror for deposit to orodit of State Board
of Health. They are also a deduction against Dis-
bursoments as the articles had to be replaced and if
the refunds wore not deducted thoy would show up twice
in Disbursements or as many times as materials were
purchased for replacement.


196,240.80



2,305.08 *

250.00
198,795.88

9,268.13


B 208,064.01






-79-


ANlUAL STATEMENT


FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE 30, 1935


DISBURSEIMETS BY DEPARTMENTS


SALARIES AND NECESSARY AND REGULAR EXPENSE


SALARIES


Adm-nii station
Laboratorie.s
Communioable Diseases
Engineering
Vital Statistics
Public Health Nursing


VOUCHERS
PAID

S14;179,35
27,472.50
20;862.90
14,668.30
15;20000
7,561.10


Total Salaries


OPERATING EXPENSES


Administration
Laboratories
Ccnmunicable Diseases
Engineering
Vital Statistics
Public Health Nursing
Biologioals
Assistance to County Health Units


9,160,67
11,876.80
6;978115
11,461.42
16;882.61
6;317.78
17;427.76
5,816.05


Total Operating Expenses

Total Disbursements


83,921.24

S181,865.89





-80-


ANNUAL STATEMENT

FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE 30, 1935


STATE BOARD OF HEALTH


CENTRALIZATION OF MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE RECORDS


Balance Brought Forward from June 30, 1954
Receipts


S38,910.44
17,045,56
260056,o6


Disbursements t


Salaries
Office Rent
Postage and Supplies
Miscellaneous


S4,911.20
3,300,00
5,520.94
317.13


Balance June 30, 1935


14,049.27

6,906.73


REGISTRATION OF DOCTORS, TIDWIIVES, TC.


Balance Brought
Receipts:


Forward from June 30, 1934


$ 2,226.59


Doctors' Fees $
Warrant Cancelled
Midwivest Fees


2,585.00
1.00
707,50


3,293,50
50526.69


Disbursements:


Doctors
Salaries 1,000.00
Postage & Supplies1,320,09


Midwives
Salaries
Refunds


1,200.00
8.00


1,208,00


Balance June 30, 1935


3,528,09

$ 1,992.00


2,320.09






-81-


ANNUAL STATEMENT

FROM JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE S0, 1935


STATE BOARD OF HEALTH

DRT STORE INSPECTION


Balance Brought Forward from June 30, 1954
Receipts,


Disbursements s


Fees
Refund


$ 1,306.55


$


Salaries
Travel Expense of Inspectors
and securing Evidence
Postage and Supplies
Miscellaneous
Au-o Replacement


6,960.00
16.52



5,015,00

2,255.52
186,68
148.15
r8,15


6 976.32








8,073,48


Balance June 30, 1935 $ 209,59




DIVISION OF MALARIA RESEARCH

As this is strictly a Rockefeller Foundation Activity and all funds
contributed by them, and only disbursed thru State Comptroller, in acoordar.e
with Rockefeller Foundation Budget, the statement given here is the last one
rendered the Rockefeller Foundation for period January 1, 1934 to December
31, 1934, whioh is their fiscal year:
****


Balance Brought Forward
Receipts


NONE
S8,920.00
6,920.00


Disbursements s


Salaries
Rent, Fuel, Eto.
Travel
Contingent


$ 7,680,00
293.01
265.59
669.80


Balance December 31, 1954


8.908,40

$ 11.60 *


* The balance of $11.60 was returned to Rookefeller
Foundation according to Agreement.










RECAPITULATION OF
Received from
and
Disbursed by
(State Board of Health
PAID (Leon County Commission
INTO STATE (Rookefellor Foundation
TREASURY Rosenwald Fund **
Florida Power Company ***
PAID DIRECT(State Board of Health
TO PERSONNELCity of Tallahassee
AND (F. E. R. A.
CONTIEGENT(U. S. P. H. Servioo

Balance on hand June 30, 1934


ANNTTAL STATW-ENT
LEON COUNTY HEALTH 'UNIT
FROM JULY 1, 1934 _T JIM 30, 1985
.198


FUNDS RECE1TED
Funds rooep.ved
and/or
Paid Direct
2499,.99
2839.10
253.33
150-,00
250.00
20,95
7605,.99
1104.27
46e884
- ~T5TorO27
485.49
1565 5.76


AND DISBURSED AND


Dis-
bursed
2499.9 98
3148.94
233.33
150,00

20,95
7605.93
1104.27
466,64
17M.7T6


Balance
.01


COMPARISON


Deficit

309.84 *


250.00


OF RECEIPTS TO BUDGET
Funds reooivod
and/or
Paid Direct Budge
2499;99 2500.(
2839.10 3060.(
233.33 2335.
150.00
250.00


st
00
00
33


20.95
7605.99 7719.00
1104.27 1500.00
466.64 466,67
09.84- 15170.27 15979.M


485.49
--


Paid In
over
Allotment


Paid In
Less Tha
Allotmen
.0
220.9


150.00
250.00
20.95


Rookefeller Foundation towards salary of
Field Inspector in Malaria not on Budget
but disbursed thru Unit 500.00 500.00
16 TT1 7 TM = -7nM50" "09.-84 1517071 T5679 420.95
Deducting Debits from Credits 15730.10 309.84 (Rid oss than Budget) 15170.27

The County deposited $615.59 in June, ]934, from which was balance of $485.49 on July 1, 1934 to apply on this
so that the apparent operating dofioit from County funds will be changed to surplus of $175.65.
** Not on Budget but provided later specifically towards salary of colored nurse and paid to her.
*** Florida Power Company also contributed $250,00 not budgeted but deposited with State Treasurer and merged with
and is part of balance on hand at end of year of $425.66,
Cash Balance on hand July 1, 1935 485.49
Receipts loss than Budget 308,73
Spent Loss than Budget 248,90
Deficit in Disbursements over Roooils 69.83
Reducing Cash Balance to


113.0
395.7
o0
--729i






420.9

fiscal yea.


other fund


425.6(
=:::M


*











ANNUAL STATEMENT

ESCAMBIA COUNTY HEALTH UNIT

FROM JULY 1 1984 TO JUNE 30, 1935


RECAPITULATION OF FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED AND COMPARISON OF RECEIPTS TO BUDGET


Souroes


State Board of Health
County
Rookefeller Foundation
U, S. Publio Health Servioe
City


Funds
Contributed

1200.00
3746.90
600,00
1200.00
9881.27
16628.17


Disbursements

1200,00
3746.90
600,00
1200.00
9881.27
16628.17
=C200CM.


Budget


1200.00
3760,00
600.00
1200.00
10150.00


Under
Budget


13.10


268.73


16910.00 281.83
= J __






84 .






Tallahassee, Florida
January 1, 1936







Dr. W. A. MoPhaul,
State Health Officer
Florida State Board of Health
Jacksonville, Florida

Dear Doctor McPhaul:

I enclose herewith copy of a narrative report

of the activities of the station during 1935, as submitted to

the Home Office of the Rockefeller Foundation.

Respectfully submitted,


Mark F. Boyd, M. D.
Director
Division of Malaria Research


MFB/W ,









Station for Malaria Research

Tallahassee, Florida


Narrative of Activities during 1935



During the year the investigational activities of the station continued

to cultivate the apparently inexhaustible opportunities for research afford-

ed by the malaria therapy service; training in the basic phases of malariology

was given to a number of selected students; while the director made several

foreign and domestic trips for consultative purposes.

1. Completed studies.

In the course of the year the following papers were submitted tn the

home office with a view to publication, which embodied the results of studies

carried on during the period.

Papers submitted for publication.

31) Boyd, Mark F., and Kitchen, S. F., "The Comparative Susceptibility
of A. quadrimaculatus and A. punctipennis to P. vivax and
P. Talciparumn .

32) Boyd, Mark F., Stratman-Thomas, W. K., and Kitchen, S. F.,
"On Acquired Immunity to P. falciparum".

33) Boyd, Mark F., Stratman-Thomas, W. K., and Kitchen, S. F.,
"On the Duration of Infactiousness in Anophelines Harboring
P. falciparum".

34) Boyd, Mark F., and Stratman-Thomas, W. K., "The Transmission of
Quartan Malaria through two Consecutive Human-Anopheline
Passages".

35) Boyd, Mark F., "On the Schizogonous Cycle of P. vivax,"
American Journal Tropical Med. 15 (1936T 605.-

36) Boyd, Mark F., Kitchen, S. F., and Mulronnan, J. A., "On the Relative
Susceptibility of the Inland and Coastal Varieties of A. orucians
to P. falciparum.










87) Boyd, Mark F., and Kitchen, S. F., "On the Efficiency of the
Homologqus Properties of Acquired Immunity to P. vivax".

58) Kitchen, S. F., and Bradloy, G. H., "Anopheles walker as a
Vector of P. faloiparua."

Paper 31. The susceptibility of A. quadrinzoulatus and A. punctipennis

to P. vivax and P. falciparum were simultaneously compared. Both species

of anophelines appeared to be equally susceptible to the strains of P. vivax

employed. Although quadrimaculatus displayed some degree of susceptibility

to all of the strains of falciparum, punotiponnis appeared highly susceptible

to some, and completely refractory to others.

Paper 32, This paper reports studies of acquired immunity to infections

produced by P. falciparum. It is found that patients who recover from an

attack produced by this parasite, will not experience a second clinical attack

if re-inoculated with the same strain, but if re-inoculated with a different

strain, may experience a second attack as severe as the first. Although

re-inoculation with the same strain will not produce a clinical attack, it

is followed, after an incubation period, by an increase in the number of

parasites in the peripheral circulation. It thus appears that faloiparum

attacks produce an effective homologous clinical immunity, but that this is

devoid of any heterologous properties.

Paper 33. It is found that the infectiousness of mosquitoes infected

with p. falciparum deteriorates much more rapidly than is the case of those

infected with P. vivax. Whereas a period of 50 days following gland infec-

tion marks the limit of infectiousness of vivax mosquitoes, the same limit

in falciparum infections is reached in 40 days. The dependable period of

infectiousness is about .10 days loss in each case.










Paper 34. This paper places on record work dene in 1933, when 2 oansec-

utive anopholine-human passages of one strain of P. malaria were effected.

Since that time wo have not undertaken any propagation of quartan by

mosquitoes, as gametocyte production has been very scanty. It is interesting

to note that in our experience, quartan attacks are never initiated by

quotidian paroxysms, as is so often the case with tertian malaria. They all

begin as quartan intermittent and then later may become double quartan or

treble quartan (quotidian) after the illness has been in progress for some

time.

Paper 35. This elaborately illustrated paper shows that by nuclear and

cytoplasmic criteria, there can be distinguished in the blood of patients

infected with P. vivax, five morphological series of cells, designated as

A, B. C, D,,and E. The cells of series A reproduce by sohisegony and are the

generally recognized trophozoites. Those of series C and E are the familiar

micro- and macrogametocytes. The observations reported lead to the belief

that in the schizogony of the cells of series B or D, the morozoites all

become gametocytes of series C or E respectively. In some instances of

schizogony of cells of series A, a differentiated merozoito is noted, which

may mark the initiation of the schizonts of series B or D.

Paper 36. The susceptibility of the inland and coastal races of

A. crucians to P. faloiparum, with simultaneous controls of A. quadrimnoulatus,

was studied. In the experiments the control quadrimaculatus, by satisfactory

infection, demonstrated the infectiousness of the gametocytes, but the crucians

regardless of variety, were but lightly infected or not at all. Both races of

crucians are thus shown to be relatives poor hosts for falciparum, thus confirm-

ing the results of a previous study dealing with the inland variety alone.








Paper 37. This deals with an extensive study of the capacity of a person

with an acquired immunity to P. vivax, to deal with large doses of homologous

parasites suddenly introduced. It was found that recent convalescents from an

acute attack do not show any clinical reaction following intravenous inoculation

with from 19 to 180 million homologous parasites. Such inoculations may however,

produce what appear to be sub-clinical infections. When similar doses of para-

sites are administered to susceptible controls, parasites from the original inocu-

lum can shortly afterward be detected in the peripheral blood of the recipient.

They are thereafter continuously demonstrable until the onset of the clinical

attack. The inoculation of large doses of parasites may immediately induce a

"passive" malaria attack without an incubation period.

Paper 38, This study was made in collaboration with the laboratory of

the U. S. Bureau of Entomology at Orlando, Florida. Specimens of the southern

race of A. walker, received from Orlando, were applied,with quadrimaculatus

controls to falciparum patients. A high incidence of infection of the quadrima-

culatus was secured, while only one light infection of walker was effected. The

northern race of walker was previously ascertained at this laboratory to be sus-

ceptible to P. vivax.

In addition to the foregoing, the director of the station transmitted to

Dr. F. W. O'Connor a revision of his 1933 DeLamar lecture as a contribution to the

program of the 1935 Pan American Medical Congress, with the title of "Observations

on Naturally Induced Malaria made in the course of the Malaria Therapy of Paresis

and Neurosyphilis at the Florida State Hospital", and which was read at one of

the scientific programs held at sea on July 21, 1935. Dr. Henry Hanson, ex State

Health Officer of Florida, courteously introduced the name of the director of the

station as co-author of a paper presented at the 1934 meeting of the American

Public Health Association, with the title of "Some Factors in the Epidemiology of

Malaria."









2. Work in Progress or Planned.

Circumstances did not permit a resumption of a search for a menstrum

for the suspension of sporozoites that would not be lethal. We hope to resume

consideration of this subject.

We plan to ascertain whether, following sporozoite inoculations with

P. falciparum, parasites are present or absent from the peripheral circulation

during the incubation period.

7e desire to ascertain the effect of simultaneous inoculations with both

P. vivax and P. falciparum, and of cross inoculations with the two species under

different circumstances.

We plan on extending studies involving the quantitative enumeration of

P. falciparum in smears taken at four hour intervals.

Studies of the properties of the homologous immunity to P. falciparum

are planned.

The foregoing represent but a few of many available lines of study. We

find that it is difficult to extend a rigid schedule very far in the future, and

consequently follow a rather elastic program. We are convinced that better util-

ization of our opportunities could be secured if an additional staff member were

detailed to the station. The technical practices followed, and the minute

character of the observations made routinely in all phases of our work, which we

regard as essential to the success of our work and the proper utilization of our

opportunities, does not leave the existing staff with as much time available for

special studies as we consider desirable. The additional staff member mentioned

would make some special studies possible, and if practicable, he should be de-

tailed for an extended period, a year if possible.







3. Students

During the year the following persons spent varying periods of time at the

station in order to secure a thorough grounding in a knowledge of malariology.


Name

Robert B. Watson, M. D.

im. Wallace

Jean K. Sphangos, M. D.

Pedro Nogueira, M. D.

Richard Finner

Miss Lourdes Suarez

Francis Cheever

Wm. McDowell Hammon

David Greeley

Alexander Lcangir, r i. D.

P. J. Crawford, M. D.

George Vyronis, M. D.

Maroo Cadena, M. D.

M. Fernandez, M. D.

Miss Concha Richard


Period of study

3 months

4 weeks

4 weeks

8 weeks

3 months

8 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

4 weeks

8 weeks

8 weeks


From Sponsor

Tenn. Valley Rockefeller Foundation
Authority
f if Ig i


Greece

Cuba

Tallahassee

Cuba

Harvard

Harvard

Harvard

Cornell

I.H.D.

U. of Ga.

Colombia

Cuba

Cuba


n n

l n

Volunteer

Rookefeller Foundation
if f


n "



Volunteer

Rockefeller Foundation

Mn

n n


4. Consultation Tours.

During the year the director has made several extensive tours for the purpose

of consulting with I. H. D. staff members or government officials in the field.

He was absent from January 22 to April 23 on a tour to Colombia, Panama, Jamaica

and Cuba. A short absence occurred from April 25 te May 5 for the purpose of

attending a meeting of the malaria consultants of the Tennessee Valley Authority,

and observing the malaria work at the International Health Division laboratories






91


in New York City. Another foreign tour to Puerto Rico and Cuba occupied the time

from September 1 to September 27.


5. Insectaries

The colonies of A. quadrimaoulatus and A. Punctiponnis have been success-

fully maintained during the year. Their maintenance during the winter of 1934-

1935 and in the following cold season of 1935-1936 has been more difficult than

in previous seasons because of more protracted cold periods and isolated periods

of lower temperatures. Another attempt was made to establish a colony of A

erucians, which was unsuccessful. No further work with A orucians along this

line will be undertaken.







6. Induced Malaria

In the malaria therapy service of the. Florida State Hospital, the following

inoculations have bden performed.

1935 Ihoculations at the Florida State Hospital


Inoculations with
A. Tertian malaria (5 series)
.) Mosquitoes
Application:
(1) Takes
... Failure

(2) Takes
Failure


New cases Old cases White


23
6

6
0


Re-inoculation:
Takes 4 0
Failure .0 0
b) Blood
Application:
(1) Takes 4 0
Failure 5 0
B. Qaartan malaria (3 series)
a) Mosquitoes
Takes 3 '- 0 0 0
Failure 0 0
b) Blood
Takes 3 0
Failure 0 0
C. Estivo-autumnal malaria (6 series)
a) Mosquitoes
Application: 33 4
(1) Takes 0 9
Failure 3 11

(2) Takes 1 2
Failure 1 4

(3) Takes 0 3
Failure 0 1

(4) Takes 0 1
Failure 0 0
Re-inoculat ions
Takes 0 3
Failure 0 2
b) Blood Takes 0 10
Failure 0 0
Total inoc. 1934 10 Duplicates 2 56 46
1935 92 Multiple 32
102 Total dupl.34
Less duplicates 34
Total new patients 68


Colored


0
0

"0
0
6

o









1935 Referred Inoculations.


Inoculations with New oases Old oases White Colored
A. Tertian
a) Mosquitoes 5 0
Applications
(1) Takes 4 0
Failure 1 0

(2) Takes 1 0
Failure 0 0


A total of 102 inoculations were performed during the year. Of these

34 represent duplications or multiple inoculations, so that actually the number

of new patients cared for by the service numbered 68. The propagation of the

McCoy strain of P. vivax involved 5 passages. There is no especial difficulty

involved in the preservation of this strain, a marked contrast to our experience

with various strains of P. faloiparum.




V-i
C IAL BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS, FLORIDA

Stewart G. Thompson, D.P.H., Director


PREAMBLE

This report will cover a resume of the activities of the Vital Statistics
Bureau for the calendar year 1936, with statistical tabulations for 1934.
The first state-wide figures on births and deaths published in annual re-
port began with the year 1917. Figures for the entire state prior to
1917 are not available as the Model Vital Statistics Law was passed in
1915 and did not go into universal operation until the end of 1916. Be-
ginning with 1919, mortality figures for Florida may be found in the
publications of the United States Bureau of the Census. Beginning with
the year 1924, birth statistics for Florida may be found in the sae
Census Bureau reports.

ORIGINAL RECORDS

There are on file in the Bureau'of Vital Statistics of the State Board of
Health records including births, deaths, marriages and divorces. The
total original birth certificates on file is 613,540; original death cer-
tificates 382,644; original marriage licenses 156,547; divorces recorded
35,800. Each record is carefully indexed under a continuous alphabetical
filing system and is thus available to the citizens of the State when any
particular record is desired. The records are for use as legal evidence
as well as for statistical information which is compiled as a measuring
unit and used by those interested in curtailing the number of deaths
from preventable causes.

The cooperation and support given the State Board of Health in compiling
vital statistics are deeply appreciated. The physicians in this State
have been very generous in filling out the medical certificates as to the
causes of death and in the filing of original birth certificates through-
out the year. Funeral directors have boon very careful in the prepara-
tion of death certificates and securing of burial permits before moving
bodies. Midwives filed neator"and more legible birth certificates during
the past year than ever before. The five hundred local registrars in the
State have boon very faithful in collecting the birth and death certifi-
cates and mailing the originals to the State Board of Health each month
on schedule time. Those registrars are an important factor in complete
registration and have given wonderful support in their contribution of
time and effort in forwarding completed certificates for births and deaths
occurring in their various districts. County judges, with a few excep-
tions, have boon unusually prompt in forwarding original marriage
licenses. The clerks of the circuit courts are filing records of divorces
with the State Board of Health each month. It is with a sense of deep
gratitude that the State Board of Health in this report highly commends
the efficient service that has boon rendered by'the professional men and
other individuals to whoa we have just referred.

CERTIFIED COPIES

During the past year, 10,722 certified copies of original records were
issued without charge by the State Board of Health. These certified
copies wore requested for various reasons; widows' pensions, adjustment
of lifo insurance claims, evidence in court, land patents, adjustment
of inheritanceo, veterans' compensation, proof of citizenship to secure
positions, etc.




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