<%BANNER%>
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 Front Cover
 Letter to Mr. Clarence Thomas
 Letter to the honorable Ralph...
 Assessment of methodology for measuring...
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of appendices
 Introduction
 Section I: Enhancement of Florida...
 Section II: Equal educational opportunities...
 Section III: Equal imployment...
 Section IV: Monitoring activit...
 A: State university system's response...
 B: Capital outlay allocations to...
 C: Resolutions adopted by the board...
 D: Chancellor's memorandum 76-02...


PALMM FAMU



Annual report of progress
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000241/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of progress revised plan for equalizing educational opportunity in public education in Florida
Portion of title: Revised plan for equalizing educational opportunity in public education in Florida
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: State University System of Florida -- Office for Equal Opportunity Programs
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1980
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Educational equalization -- Florida   ( lcsh )
State universities and colleges -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Board of Regents, Office for Equal Opportunity Programs, State University System of Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 1982-83.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19463242
System ID: AM00000241:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Letter to Mr. Clarence Thomas
        Unnumbered ( 2 )
    Letter to the honorable Ralph Turlington
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
    Assessment of methodology for measuring progress toward goal two of the revised plan
        Page Assessment 1
        Page Assessment 2
        Page Assessment 3
        Page Assessment 4
        Page Assessment 5
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    List of Tables
        Page ii
        Page iii
    List of appendices
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
        Page vi
    Section I: Enhancement of Florida A & M University
        Page 1
        Introduction
            Page 1
        Implementation of new programs
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
        Enrollments in high demand and/or unduplicated programs
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Recruitment of non-minority students
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Funding and physical facilities
            Page 16
            Formula funding and special funding
                Page 16
                Page 17
                Page 18
                Page 19
                Page 20
            Program budgeting
                Page 21
                Page 22
            Funding for physical facilities
                Page 23
                Page 24
    Section II: Equal educational opportunities for students
        Page 25
        Introduction
            Page 25
        Increasing access to the state university system
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Financial aid
                Page 36
                Page 37
        Enrollment planning and admissions standards
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Admissions under the ten percent exception provision
                Page 42
                Page 43
            Essential academic skills testing program
                Page 44
                Page 45
                Page 46
        Academic support and retention
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Asessing attrition rates
                Page 49
                Page 50
                Page 51
                Page 52
                Page 53
                Page 54
                Page 55
                Page 56
                Page 57
                Page 58
            Asessing minority student representation
                Page 59
                Page 60
                Page 61
                Page 62
    Section III: Equal imployment opportunity
        Page 63
        Introduction
            Page 64
            Page 65
        Increasing black faculty and staff representation
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Overall black representation
            Page 72
            Page 73
    Section IV: Monitoring activities
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    A: State university system's response to the January 15, 1981 evaluation by the office for civil rights (February and April, 1981 correspondence)
        Page A-a
        Page A-b
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
        Page A 11
        Page A 12
        Page A 13
        Page A 14
        Page A 15
        Page A 16
        Page A 17
        Page A 18
        Page A 19
    B: Capital outlay allocations to Florida A & M Univesity for 1981-82
        Page B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
        Page B 11
        Page B 12
        Page B 13
        Page B 14
        Page B 15
    C: Resolutions adopted by the board of regents on May 22, 1981
        Page C
        Page C 1
        Page C 2
        Page C 3
        Page C 4
        Page C 5
    D: Chancellor's memorandum 76-02 (revised) and EEO impact assessments conducted during 1980-81
        Page D
        Page D 1
        Page D 2
        Page D 3
        Page D 4
        Page D 5
        Page D 6
        Page D 7
        Page D 8
        Page D 9
        Page D 10
        Page D 11
        Page D 12
        Page D 13
        Page D 14
        Page D 15
        Page D 16
        Page D 17
        Page D 18
        Page D 19
        Page D 20
        Page D 21
        Page D 22
        Page D 23
        Page D 24
Full Text







OI ^







~of P~ogesss

1980-41

Board of Regents
Ofice for Equal Opportu~ty Prgrams
Sta~e Unrersity System of Florida
Ta lljhssee, Florida


Sfor dcatil Oppor










i STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
STALLAHASSEE 32301
RALP 0. TURLINGTON
COMMISSION

SSeptember 8, 1981




Mr. Clarence Thomas
Acting Assistant Secretary
for Civil Rights
Department of Education
330 C Street, South West
Washington, D. C. 20201

Dear Clarence:

In accordance with the State of Florida's commitments under the 1978
Revised Plan for Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Public Higher
Education in Florida, I am pleased to forward the State University
System's Annual Report of Progress for 1980-81.

4 The enclosed document outlines the activities and accomplishments of
the State University System during the past year, and reflects the
continued enhancement of the System's equal educational opportunity
efforts. Annual Reports from each State University System institution
have been forwarded under separate cover as appendices to this document.
Two companion reports, the 1980-81 Desegregation Status Report, and
the 1981 Study of Student Attrition within the State University System
of Florida, have also been forwarded under separate cover.

As agreed in my letter of June 19, 1981, to Deputy Assistant Secretary
Califa, I have enclosed a report on the results of,our study concern-
ing methodology for assessing progress toward Goal Two of the Revised
Plan.

We appreciate your continuing support of our efforts to advance equal
access and equal opportunity in public higher education in Florida.

Sincerely,



Ralph D. Turlington

a dag

cc: Bill Thomas, Director, Atlanta Office for Civil Rights
Chancellor Barbara W. Newell


affirmative action/equal opportunity employer










ST STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA
107 W. Gaines Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32304



September 8, 1981
Office of the Chancellor


The Honorable Ralph Turlington
Commissioner of Education
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Ralph:

In fulfillment of our commitments under the 1978 Revised Plan.
for Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Public Higher Education
in Florida, I am forwarding to you, for transmittal to the Office
for Civil Rights, the State University System's Annual Report of
Progress for 1980-81.

.The enclosed document provides an overview of State University
System activities during the past year, and an assessment of the
progress which continues to be made toward meeting the System's
equal educational opportunity goals. 1980-81 Annual Reports from
each State University System institution are enclosed as appendices
to this document. In accordance with our commitments regarding
student retention, interim retention goals for black students are
presented in each university's report on Action Form Five. In
addition, the 1981 Study of Student Attrition within the State
University System is transmitted herewith. A second companion
document, the 1980-81 Desegregation Status Report, will be forwarded
under separate cover.

As agreed to in your letter of June 19, 1981, tr Antonio J. Califa,
Deputy Assistant Secretary, I am also forwarding for transmittal
to OCR, the results of our study concerning methodology for
assessing progress toward Goal Two of the Revised Plan.

Thank you for your continued support of the State University System's
equal educational opportunity goals and commitments.


Sincerely,



Barbara W. Newell
Chancellor


cc: Dubose Ausley, Chairman, Board of Regents
Executive Staff
Council of Presidents
EEO Coordinators
University of Florida Florid State University Florida A&M Universityv University ofSouth Forida Florilda Atlantic Universir:
Gainesville Tal!ahassee Tallahassee 7Tnpa Bora Raton
University of C rst Florida University of Centrl Forida University of Nc:nh Florida Florida International University
Pensacola Orla'do Jacksovr!!e Miani


S-









Assessment of Methodology for
Measuring Progress Toward Goal Two
of the Revised Plan


As stated in the June 19, 1981, letter to Antonio J. Califa, Deputy

Assistant Secretary, from Commissioner of Education Ralph -Turlington,

Florida agreed to conduct a study of the impact of using the state's

proposed methodology for measuring progress toward Goal Two of the 1978
Revised Plan.
Under Goal Two, Florida is committed to "increase the enrollment of

blacks entering the upper division of predominantly white universities

until the proportion approximates the black proportion who compete lower

division work in the universities and community colleges" (page 56, 1978

Revised Plan). The state has agreed to use the black proportion-of all

students entering the junior year as the measure of progress toward this

goal. The black proportion of community college A.A. degree recipients

plus the black proportion of university students who complete the

sophomore year will be used to establish the parity index. Since it was
recognized that students may be counted in the .performance measure

(entrance to junior year) who are not counted in the parity measure

(completion of sophomore year) the state agreed to "examine the .impact

upon the performance measure of including those students excluded from the

parity group."

The study undertaken by the State University System Office for Equal

Opportunity Programs has shown that inclusion of other transfer students

in the assessment of progress toward Goal Two has minimal impact upon the

performance measurement.










As shown in Attachment A, the performance measure based upon

community college transfers with the A.A. degree, plus university students

who attained junior status, was 8.14 percent. Inclusion of the other

transfer group reduces the measure by 0.38 percentage points, to 7.76
percent. Surprisingly, over six times as many white students as black

students are classified as other transfers to the predominantly white

institutions. Yet, of those black students in this category who trans-

ferred into the System as a whole, 129, or 49.0 percent entered Florida

A&M University. An additional twenty-three white students enrolled at

FAMU as other transfers. FAMU enrolled, however, only eight black (and

two white) community college transfers with the A.A. degree.

Although there is little impact upon performance measurement when
other transfer students are included in the assessment of progress among
the predominantly white institutions, it is clear that students in this

category are .of some significance in the enrollment of junior-level

students at FAMU. In fact, this group comprised one quarter of FAMU's

junior class in 1979-80.

Although parity was not achieved among the predominantly white
institutions,.the disparity between the parity and performance indices was

quite small. A 2.19 percentage point difference occurred between the

parity index and performance measure when the other transfer group was

excluded from the analysis. The disparity increases to 2.57 percentage
points when the other transfer group is included.

It should be noted that for the System as a whole, parity was
achieved. As shown in Attachment B, the parity index for the System (all

nine universities) was 12.11 percent. The performance measure, with other









transfers excluded, was 11.55 percent, or 0.56 percentage points less than

the parity index. Inclusion of the other transfer group had a negligible

impact on the System's performance measure, with inclusion of this group

reducing the measure by 0.13 percentage points, to 11.42 percent. As

demonstrated in the analysis of System performance, FAMU continues to be

the institution of choice for a substantial number of Florida's black

students.

In view of the results of. this study, Florida will continue to

measure progress toward Goal Two of the Revised Plan as indicated in the

April 17, 1981, letter from Ralph Turlington, Commissioner of Education,

to Frederick P. Cioffi, Acting Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights.































3





. . . . . . . . . . -.L-- afl.


ATTACHMENT A


PARITY AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR GOAL TWO
PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTIONS


ASSESSMENT


A
SUS Students Who Attained
Sophomore Status in 1979-80
# %


B
Community College A.A.
Degree Recipients 1979-80
(# %


C
Parity Meaure
for 1979-80
# %


393 10.25 1,602 10.35 1,995 10.33

3,441 89.75 13,883 89.65 17,324 89.67


Total




Performance:


3,834


D
C.C. Transfers with
A.A. Degree 1979-80
# %


100.00


15,485


E
SUS Students.Who Attained
Junior Status in 1979-80


100.00


F +


Subtotal


19,319 100.00


Other
Junior
#


"G
Transfers at
Level 1979-80
%


H
Performance
Measure 1979-80
# %


549 8.53 391 7.64 940 8.14 133 5.85 1,073 7.76

5,886 91.47 4,728 92.36 10,614 91.86 2,139 94.15 12,753 92.24


6,435


100.00


5,119


100.00


11,554


100.00 2,272 100.00


13,826


100.00


i SOURCE: SUS Data from Student Data Course File.


8/81


Pari ty:
'I,


Black

White


Black

White

Total








ATTACHMENT B
PARITY AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR GOAL TWO ASSESSMENT
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM


SUS Students Who Attained
Sophomore Status in 1979-80
# %


B
Community College A.A.
Degree Recipients 1979-80
# %


C
Parity Meaure
for 1979-80
# %


Black

White

Total


Performance:


792 18.50 1,602 10.35 2,394 12.11

3.490 81.50 13,883 89.65 17,373 87.89


4,282


100.00


15,485


100.00


19,767 100.00


D
Transfers with
Degree 1979-80


E
SSUS Students Who Attained
Junior Status in 1979-80


= F


Subtotal


Other
Junior


G
Transfers at
Level 1979-80


H
Performance
Measure 1979-80


# % #i % ## % # % # %

557 8.64 830 14.91 1,387 11.55 262 10.81 1,649 11.42

5,888 91.36 4,736 85.09 10,624 88.45 2,162 89.19 12,786 88.58


6,445


100.00


5,566


100.00


12,011


100.00 2,424 100.00


14,435


100.00


SOURCE: SUS Data from Student Data Course File.


8/81


Pari ty:

//


C.C.
A.A.


Black

White

Total













TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page
List of Tables......................................... .................ii

List of Appendices. .............................. ............... ........iv

Introduction.........................................................v

Section I. Enhancement of Florida A&M University.........................1

A. Introduction ........... ............................................. 1

B. Implementation of New Programs..................................... 2

C. Enrollments in High Demand and/or Unduplicated Programs............6

D. Recruitment of Non-Minority Students..............................10

E. Funding and Physical Facilities..................................16

1. Formula Funding and Special Funding............................16
2. Program Budgeting....... ....................................21
3. Funding for Physical Facilities..............................23

Section II. Equal Educational Opportunities for Students................25

A. Introduction..................................................... 25

B. Increasing Access to the State University System..................26

1. Financial Aid............................................... 37

C. Enrollment Planning and Admissions Standards......................38

1. Admissions Under the Ten Percent Exception Provision...........42
2. Essential Academic Skills Testing Program.....................44

D. Academic Support and Retention...................................47

1. Assessing Attrition Rates....................................49
2. Assessing Minority.Student Representation.....................59

Section III. Equal Employment Opportunity..............................63

A. Introduction..................................................... 64

B. 'Increasing Black Faculty and Staff Representation.................66

C. Overall Black Representation.....................................72

Section IV. Monitoring Activities......................................74

i












LIST OF TABLES


Table Page


I-A Florida A&M University, New Program Approvals 3

I-B Results of the Elimination of Duplicate Programs
within the State University System, as of Spring
Quarter, 1981 8

I-C Enrollment in High Demand and/or Unduplicated
Programs at Florida A&M University, Academic Year
1980-81 11

I-D Incentive Grants Program Summary, Non-Minority
Students at Florida A&M University 14

I-E Florida A&M University Percent White Enrollment
by Year 15

II-F Institutional Initiatives for Black Student
Recruitment 28

II-G SUS Special Summer Program Participants as Percent
of Black Enrollment in Graduate and First
Professional Programs, Fall, 1980 33

II-H Student Grant-in-Aid Program Participants as Percent
of Black Student Enrollment in Graduate and
Professional Programs, Academic Year 1980-81 35

II-I Direct Grants and Scholarship Programs for Black
Students, 1980-81 37

II-J State University System of Florida Summary of
Financial Aid Awards by Aid Category and Race/Ethnic
Identification, Academic Year 1979-80 39

II-K Enrollments under the Ten Percent Exception
Provision at the First-Time-in-College Level,
Predominantly White Institutions, Fall Quarter, 1980. 43

II-L Graduate Enrollment under the Ten Percent Exception
Provision, Predominantly White Institutions,
Fall, 1980 45

II-M Report on First-Time-in-College Freshmen Admitted
as Exceptions to the BOR Admissions Policy 51











List of Tables
(Continued)

Table Page

II-N State University System of Florida Attrition
Rates, Florida Resident Classified Students 53

II-O Attrition Rates of FTIC Florida Resident Classified
Students 54

II-P Attrition Rates of Community College Transfers,
Florida Resident Classified Students 56

II-Q State University System of Florida Degrees Awarded 57

II-R State University System Black Enrollment Summary 63

III-S Percentage of Blacks Hired by Application Source
and Type of Position 71













LIST OF APPENDICES


Appendix A


Appendix B

Appendix C


Appendix D


State University System's Response to the January 15,
1981 Evaluation by the Office for Civil Rights
(February and April, 1981 correspondence)

Capital Outlay Allocations to Florida A&M University
for 1981-82

Resolutions Adopted by the Board of Regents on
May 22, 1981

Chancellor's Memorandum 76-02 (Revised) and EEO..Impact
Assessments conducted during 1980-81











INTRODUCTION


The State University System of Florida's 1980-81 Annual Report of

Progress presents a System overview of the initiatives undertaken during

the past year to meet the goals and objectives of the 1978 Revised Plan

for Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Public Higher Education in

Florida.

The narrative portion of this document consists of a review of System

activities and assessment of progress in the areas of:

1) Enhancement of Florida A&M University

2) Equal Educational Opportunities for Students

3) Equal Employment Opportunity

4) Monitoring Activities


Annual Reports on programs and activities implemented under the

specific Action Forms of the Revised Plan have been provided by each State

University System institution, and are forwarded under separate cover as

appendices to this document.

A statistical evaluation of the State University System's progress in

meeting the numerical goals and commitments of the Revised Plan is pre-

sented in a companion document to this report, the 1980-81 Desegregation

Status Report. The 1981 Study of Student Attrition within the State Uni-

versity System of Florida, also published as a companion report, fulfills

the state's commitment to assess the retention and progression rates of

students in Florida's public universities.











Through submission of the 1980-81 Annual Report, the State University

System of Florida documents its continuing good faith efforts to fulfill

the commitments made in the 1978 Revised Plan, and acknowledges the
problems associatedwith the implementation of that Plan. However, through

evaluation and necessary modification, the State University System is

assured that progress will continue to be made toward achievement of the

goals herein committed.











Section I

Enhancement of Florida A&M University

A. Introduction


In February, 1978, the State University System's Revised Plan for

Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Public Higher Education in Florida

was approved by the former Department of Health, Education and Welfare,

now the Department of Education. The Plan committed the State University

System to continue to take actions to strengthen and enhance the role of

Florida A&M University, the State's only public traditionally black insti-

tution. By building upon existing high demand programs such as Business

and Industry, and Pharmacy, and through location of other high demand

programs such as Architecture, Journalism, and Allied Health, the State
University System has continued to make progress toward the overall ob-

jective of strengthening the role of Florida A&M University in the mission

of the State University System. Further, measurable procedures and

actions have been taken to insure that the resources, programs, and

facilities of the university will enable it to provide its important

services equitably in a unitary system of public higher education.

On-going enhancement actions since 1978 include supplemental financial

support of selected academic programs, funding for student recruitment and

academic support services, and financial support for renovation and
construction of new physical plant facilities.

Acknowledging the problems associated with eliminating educationally

unnecessary program duplication (discussed later in this section), the

State University System has initiated necessary modifications as agreed to











Section I

Enhancement of Florida A&M University

A. Introduction


In February, 1978, the State University System's Revised Plan for

Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Public Higher Education in Florida

was approved by the former Department of Health, Education and Welfare,

now the Department of Education. The Plan committed the State University

System to continue to take actions to strengthen and enhance the role of

Florida A&M University, the State's only public traditionally black insti-

tution. By building upon existing high demand programs such as Business

and Industry, and Pharmacy, and through location of other high demand

programs such as Architecture, Journalism, and Allied Health, the State
University System has continued to make progress toward the overall ob-

jective of strengthening the role of Florida A&M University in the mission

of the State University System. Further, measurable procedures and

actions have been taken to insure that the resources, programs, and

facilities of the university will enable it to provide its important

services equitably in a unitary system of public higher education.

On-going enhancement actions since 1978 include supplemental financial

support of selected academic programs, funding for student recruitment and

academic support services, and financial support for renovation and
construction of new physical plant facilities.

Acknowledging the problems associated with eliminating educationally

unnecessary program duplication (discussed later in this section), the

State University System has initiated necessary modifications as agreed to











by the Department of Education in April, 1981, to assure that continued

progress will be made in maintaining and achieving the goals committed to

for the enhancement of Florida A&M University.




B. Implementation of New Programs


In July, 1978, the Board of Regents authorized Florida A&M University

to develop and implement nine new academic programs over a five-year

period. A total of eleven programs have actually been authorized since
two additional programs were approved prior to July, 1978, and scheduled

for implementation in 1979-80. A timetable for implementation of these

new programs was originally provided in the State University System's

Duplication Study in 1978. However, in February, 1981, the State notified
the Department of Education of a revised timetable for the establishment

of these new programs which takes into account actual and projected

funding appropriations by the Legislature in each year of the 1981-83 and

1983-85 biennium and the construction and/or renovation of physical

facilities to house the programs.

New program planning authorizations with revised implementation dates

for Florida A&M University are presented in Table I-A.











TABLE I-A
FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY NEW PROGRAM APPROVALS


PROGRAM '

Business Administration
Architectural/Construction Technolc
Business Education
Broadcast Engineering
Magazine Production
Medical Records Administration
Physical Therapy
Respiratory Therapy
Health Management
Landscape Design
Film Electronics Media
Three new tracks in:
Graphic Design/Illustration
Composing System
Printing Management


KEVLSVD IMPLEMENTATION UAITE

September, 19801
Igy September, 19803
September, 1980
Deleted 5
September, 19826
September, 19816
September, 19817
September, 1981
September, 19828
September, 1983 9
1983-85 Biennium


1. Business Administration: Initially scheduled to start in the Winter

Quarter 1980, the university admitted its first students into the

program in the Fall Quarter, 1980. During the Summer Quarter of

1980-81, the School of Business and Industry was provided approx-

imately $10,000 to'hire temporary support staff and recruit qualified

students. It is projected that the program will enroll approximately

5 students in Fall, 1981.


2. Architectural/Construction Technology: Although the program enrolled

forty-four students in 1979-80 (of which forty-seven percent were

white) it was not fully implemented until the 1980-81 year. The

program now has approximately seventy-five majors.


3. Business Education: While planning for the program was completed by

September, 1980, the university did not admit its first student into


"""'`"^"











the program until Winter Quarter, 1981. Approximately $7,000 was

made available to the program for the recruitment of students. The

university has extended this program off-campus and anticipates a

Fall, 1981, enrollment of approximately 181 students in five counties

across the state.


4. Broadcast Engineering: The university withdrew this program from

consideration and is moving forward to develop a track in magazine

production.


5. Magazine Production: This program has been recommended by the

university as an appropriate substitute for Broadcast Engineering.


6. Medical Records Administration and Physical Therapy: Division

directors for these programs were recently appointed and admission of

students is projected at 12 for Medical Records and 60 for Physical

Therapy in Fall, 1981. The Legislature appropriated $250,000 for

implementation of these programs. An additional $107,790 from Title

III funds have been allocated to the School of Allied Health Services

where these programs will be located.


7. Respiratory Therapy: Initially scheduled for implementation in

September, 1982, the university accelerated the implementation

schedule because of high local demand for trained professionals in

this field. However, the 1981 Legislature did not appropriate

sufficient funds for the implementation of this program as scheduled.











It is anticipated that this program and the Health Care Management

program will receive the necessary allocations during the next legis-

lative session.


8. Landscape Design: This program is being delayed one year pending

employment of personnel to plan and implement it.


9. Film Electronics Media: This program has been delayed because of the

current lack of space to house it. The Banneker Engineering Tech-

nology Center, which now houses the School of Architecture and

Engineering Technology, will be given entirely to the School of

Journalism, Graphics and Media Arts following the completion of the

new School of Architecture building and the renovation of Perry Paige

Hall to house Engineering Technology.


During 1980-81, Florida A&M University continued to direct efforts to

strengthen existing programs. In 1978, the Board of Regents terminated

the Bachelor and Masters programs in Industrial Arts Education at Florida

State University in order to eliminate duplication of these programs with

Florida A&M University. Because no students transferred from Florida

State University at either the undergraduate or graduate levels, Florida

A&M University has decided to offer the Masters degree program off-campus

in order to bolster enrollment and better meet the needs of Industrial

Arts teachers in the public schools. In Winter Quarter, 1981, the program

was allocated $25,000 to strengthen the off-campus program. As a result,

the program was able to expand its offerings in six counties over the










state. In Spring Quarter, 1981, the program enrolled a total of

fifty-nine students of which 90 percent were white. In Summer, 1981, the

program enrolled a total of thirty-six students of which 72 percent were

white.

The off-campus program has allowed the department to more than double

its graduate student enrollment and increase the racial diversity of the

program.


C. Enrollments in High Demand and/or Unduplicated Programs


In letters to the former Acting Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights,

Mr. Fredrick P. Cioffi, in February and April, 1981, the State of Florida

reaffirmed its commitment to strengthen Florida A&M University and to

increase the racial diversity of the student body (See Appendix A).

Through the planned improvement of the physical facilities, the addition

of new degree programs as described herein, in addition to the quality

improvement of present high demand program offerings, the University will

be more attractive to all students, regardless of race.

The State's actions to use program realignment and/or termination as

a mechanism to diversify the racial mix of System institutions have not

yielded the results anticipated in the 1978 Duplication Study. A

follow-up study conducted in 1980-81 for the Board of Regents Office for

Equal Opportunity Programs has confirmed that implementation of the

decisions made by the Board of Regents in 1978 in eliminating some of the

program duplication between the three older residential institutions,

focusing, however, primarily upon Florida State University and Florida A&M










University because of geographical proximity, did not result in any

significant redistribution of the 522 students enrolled in the thirteen

realigned and/or terminated programs As of Spring Quarter, 1980, 27.0

percent of the students remained enrolled in the same institution and 73.0
percent either graduated, dropped out of school, changed majors or trans-

ferred to another system institution. Of this 73.0 percent, 67 students

changed majors (13.0 percent); 47 students transferred to another univer-

sity within the System (9.0 percent) of which 33 students stayed in the
same major. Twenty percent or 102 students dropped out of school and 167

students (33.0 percent) graduated. During 1980-81, the number of students

who remained enrolled at the same institution decreased to 20 students or

4.0 percent, and an additional 19 students graduated (35.0 percent). Only

one of the affected institutions experienced a positive change in the

racial composition of its student enrollment as a result of student

migration. However, the majority of the students either transferred to

other universities, changed majors or dropped out of school. After three

years, the net effect of the program terminations and/or realignments is
that 35.6 percent of the students have graduated; 19.0 percent changed

majors; 13 percent transferred to other universities; and 28.0 percent

dropped out of school. (See Table I-B) Of the 70 students (13.0 percent)

who transferred to another institution 32 (45.0 percent) had dropped out

of the receiving institution by Spring Quarter, 1981. Of those students
who dropped out, 23, or 71.0 percent were transfers from Florida A&M


A report on the Elimination of Duplicate Programs within the State
University System. Office for Equal Opportunity Programs, Board of
Regents Office (October, 1980). An updated report was completed in
August, 1981.




























IABLt 1-B
RESULTS OIf Ill EllHINAIION O
DUPLICAlE PROGRAMS dIIIIH IlfE SlATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
AS OF 0381 SPRING QUARIEI. 1981
(lleadcounts)


Enrolled Graduated IropoutsIrnsfers to her tsc. Iramnsers to O r lv Ttal Students Eected
ifIleRI PlRnoiAHi whi kh--i Btickohri o a ilaack 0t o i Tet acME ii Tq te Bac:Tot TeTr 5.TMFi nitiiac hiTe a
FAIU 0101 B.S. In Gelnral Agrtculture 0 I 0 1 2 I 2 6 0 4 1 6 0 1 I a 1 0 0 1
FAmi 0102 .S1. In Agronomy d 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
fAHU 0103 B.S. In Soil Science O 0 0 0 1 2 1 4 1 1 2 8 1 2 O 3 1 0 0 I
FAIM O6U10 .S. I llorliculture 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
IAHU 0120 8.S. In Planl Scleanc 0 0 0 O 0 I 0 1 0 0 0 0 O I 0 0 0 0
FAIN 0840 B.S. In Iloe (lcoinelcs Educatlon 1 0 0 1 O 6 0 6 2 IS 2 19 O IS 0 1I 2 1 I 10
seul Agricultural Educatlon
FAIU 1220 .S. In Speech and clearing 0 0 0 0 1 01 11 I 19 0 20 0 10 0 10 0 OB 0 10
FAIU 1303 .5S. In Clothlll and lex Itllle 0 2 2 31 3 3 0 53 0 53 0 I 0 18 0 32 0 32

FAHI 1305 B.S. In Hume anul fmlly Life 0 0 O 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0I 3 0 1 0 1
IAlH 1306 B.S. In Bletetlcs ald Nutrlllon 6 1 0 1 0 08 O 9 O 9 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1
FASU 1601 B.S. In Library Science 0 0 0 0 2 2 0O 5 0 S 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

FAI-1IBTA I 4L 68 3 14-- -- i -- 11 1 2 i i- 6 51 I 56 103 2--- 0 1
II 0838 B.S. L H.S. In Business EducaLlon 0 0 0 0 37 3 0 40 1 2 0 3 1 0 0 1 3 L 0 4 42 6 0 48
IFU 0839 B.5. I H.S. In dustrial Arts and 11 3 I 15 58 10 4 72 11 3 3 23 33 2 2 37 10 0 129 18 10 1 51
Vocatlluol Education
TOIAL 12 7 1 20 96 81 7 186 22 117 8 141 3S 61 3 99 17 52 1 10 184 318 20 522
IlEAIMCIUI f


SUIHARIY


4.21 22.42 1.53 28.16 6.10 11.69 0.58 18.97


3.26 9.9 0.19 13.41


2.30 1.14 0.19 3.83 16.39 15.52 1.12 35.63











University. These 23 students represented 41.0 percent of the total

number of students who transferred from that institution.

The study also revealed that net losses from migration to other
institutions were greatest at the traditionally black institution.

Eighteen percent of the affected students at Florida A&M University

transferred with their program to a predominantly white institution, in

contrast to only one student at a predominantly white institution trans-
ferring with the program to a traditionally black institution.

This longitudinal study serves to document that program termination

and/or realignment of degree programs will not force migration of enrolled

students to another university so long as the freedom to change to an

alternate degree program remains. Sufficient time has elapsed to confirm
that "student choice" is the confounding element in significantly altering

the racial composition of neighboring traditionally black and pre-

dominantly white institutions. Unlike the K-12 educational system, with

the absence of mandatory student assignment in higher education,

significant structural realignment of a university involving heavily
populated programs may lead to irreparable damage to the viability of an

institution.

Building upon the knowledge gained from this research, the State

University System reached agreement with the Office for Civil Rights to

strive to increase the racial diversity of the student enrollment at

Florida A&M University through the identification and use of alternative

strategies, "in order to achieve a goal of .40% of the University's

students being enrolled in unduplicated and/or high demand programs by the

end of the Plan," (April 1, 1981, letter to OCR).










A review of the enrollment by programs at Florida A&M University

indicates that significant progress toward this objective has already been

realized as presented in Table I-C. While the overall enrollment at the

institution has decreased over the past few years, there continues to be
enrollment growth in selected programs. Enrollment in high demand and/or

unduplicated programs during 1980-81 represented 36.0 percent of the

University's total enrollment.1 White students represented 18.4 percent

of the enrollment in these programs. Of greater significance is the fact

that 78.0 percent of the white students enrolled at the University are in
these high demand and/or unduplicated programs.

It is anticipated that enrollment growth will continue in these

programs as well as those programs planned for implementation in Fall,

1981.




D. Recruitment of Non-Minority Students


In June, 1981, the State University System forwarded to the Office
for Civil Rights of the Department of Education revised institutional
programs and procedures for recruiting, admitting and retaining black

students at predominantly white universities and white students at Florida

A&M University. In February, 1981, the Board of Regents directed the

presidents of the universities to reexamine and, as appropriate, review


Consistent with the 1978 Duplication Study, only those high demand
programs that do not duplicate programs at Florida State University
are included. Excluded are the Schools of Business and Nursing even
though these are fully recognized as high demand programs.











TABLE I-C

ENROLLMENT IN HIGH DEMAND AND/OR UNDUPLICATED
PROGRAMS AT FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
ACADEMIC YEAR 1980-81


PROGRAM TOTAL ENROLLMENT

Architecture 199

Allied Health ---

Pharmacy 288

Journalism 142

Science & Technology 968

Business Education 215

Industrial Arts Education 156

TOTAL 1968

Total University
Enrollment (Fall, 1980) 5371


Source: Florida A&M Student
8/27/81


WHITE

113
--m--

62

10

92

6

80

363


463


PERCENT WHITE

56.78%


21.52%

7.04%

9.50%

2.79%

51.28%

18.44%


8.62%


Data Course File for 1980-81










the university plans and procedures for recruiting, admitting and retain-

ing black students (white students at Florida A&M). As a result of

discussions with staff from the Office for Civil Rights in March, 1981,

University Presidents were requested by the Chancellor to incorporate

within their revised recruitment plans, specific measures developed in

conjunction with the Office for Civil Rights (See Apprendix A). Univer-

sity Presidents presented and discussed their institutional plans at the

May 21, 1981, meeting of the Board Of Regents Planning Committee. The
full BOR approved these plans for submission to OCR on May 22, 1981.


The specific measures addressed by Florida A&M University included

the following:


1. An outreach program designed to inform prospective white and
black students of opportunities at FAMU.

2. Regular visits to high schools and community colleges with
large proportions of white students.

3. Use of an integrated recruiting team and a balanced recruitment
program to reach both black and white students.
4. Expansion of program offerings at times and locations especially
attractive to non-traditional students.

5. A recruitment package specifically geared to white prospective
students including financial aid and career information.

Results of the implementation of the University's plan will be
reported on in the August, 1982 Annual Report.


The development of a broad-based recruitment plan for Florida A&M

University is designed to balance the recruitment of both black and white










students and represents a marked change from the earlier desegregation

initiative of the Incentive Grants Program implemented under the 1974

Plan.


With the official phasing out of the program during 1980-81, in

retrospect, it can be evaluated as having successfully fulfilled its

mission of significantly increasing the proportion of non-black student

enrollment over a four year period. Designed to enroll 960 new

non-minority students at Florida A&M University, the program attracted a

total of 545 non-minority students from 1974-75 through 1980-81, of which

248 or 46.0 percent graduated, and was allocated a total of $1,380,127

(See Table I-D). Participation in the program was based upon high

academic achievement with continued eligibility contingent upon the

maintenance of at least a 2.5 G.P.A. during the freshman/sophomore year

and at least a 3.0 average in the junior year. Financial awards ranged

from $328 per quarter to a maximum of $382 per quarter during the

student's academic career.

The major influx of non-minority students was evident during the
1976-77 academic year when 327 new students enrolled in the program. A

review of the enrollment history of non-minority students at Florida A&M

University shows that the enrollment of non-minority students reached its

zenith during the years of the Incentive Grants Program (See Table I-E).

While less than five percent of the students at the University were white

prior to 1973, more than 10 percent of the student body was white during

most of the years of the program. With the cutoff of new entry into the

program in 1978, Florida A&M's white enrollment fell below ten percent.






















TABLE 1-0

INCENTIVE GRANTS PROGRAM SUMMARY
NON-MINORITY STUDENTS AT FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY


ACADEMIC YEAR
SUMMARY MEASURE 174-75 1975-76 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80 1980-81 Total
Total number of unduplicated students served 47 265 327 290 158A 63* 15* 545

Total resources allocated $159,000 242,580 290,500 339,501 223,300 107,670 17,576 1,380,127
Total resources expended: grants $ 24,946 225.916 279,104 259.494 165,647 72,224 16,060 1,075,525
other costs $ 0 36,464 10,368 0 0 0 0 46,830
TOTAL PROGRAM COSTS $ 24.946 262,380 289,470 259,494 165,647 72,224 16,060 1,122,405

Average dollar award to participants per quarter $ 328 331 345 350 370 382 382 350
Total number of degrees awarded to participants 0 9 33 41 76 39 11 248
Total number of new transfer students
participating in this program 0 91 99 98 0 0 0 288


ANo new students were eligible to enter the Incentive Grants Program during these years.


8/6/81













Table I-E
F.A.M.U. PERCENT WHITE ENROLLMENT*BY YEAR


*Headcount Enrollment

LEGEND
Percent
White
1980.0


ACADEMIC YEAR


-u
m

C)


I-





-1
Sm

m
z


r-
r-
-2
m
z
-1











The high proportion of both black and white student enrollments in

the high demand programs at Florida A&M University serves to demonstrate

that the attainment of successful racial diversity of the traditionally

black university is closely aligned with the adaptation of a broader

curricula (beyond the liberal arts and teacher training tradition) res-

ponsive to the disparate needs of various types of students.




E. Funding and Physical Facilities


The Revised Plan states that "Within the resources provided by the

State Legislature for the operation of the public universities, Florida

A&M University will continue to receive equitable allocation of resources

which are related to the scope and mission of the institution. If it is

determined that additional enhancement funds are needed to assist the

institution in fulfilling its defined mission within the State University

System, such funding will be requested from the Legislature." (page 32).

A review of the financial support provided by the Board of Regents

over the past year, indicates that the State University System has recog-

nized the commitments which the Plan represents and has endeavored to make

the fullest possible good faith effort to implement the Plan with the

funds appropriated to the Board of Regents.


1. Formula Funding and Special Funding

Most of the funds allocated to the public universities in Florida are

distributed by a formula related either to the teaching workload or the











The high proportion of both black and white student enrollments in

the high demand programs at Florida A&M University serves to demonstrate

that the attainment of successful racial diversity of the traditionally

black university is closely aligned with the adaptation of a broader

curricula (beyond the liberal arts and teacher training tradition) res-

ponsive to the disparate needs of various types of students.




E. Funding and Physical Facilities


The Revised Plan states that "Within the resources provided by the

State Legislature for the operation of the public universities, Florida

A&M University will continue to receive equitable allocation of resources

which are related to the scope and mission of the institution. If it is

determined that additional enhancement funds are needed to assist the

institution in fulfilling its defined mission within the State University

System, such funding will be requested from the Legislature." (page 32).

A review of the financial support provided by the Board of Regents

over the past year, indicates that the State University System has recog-

nized the commitments which the Plan represents and has endeavored to make

the fullest possible good faith effort to implement the Plan with the

funds appropriated to the Board of Regents.


1. Formula Funding and Special Funding

Most of the funds allocated to the public universities in Florida are

distributed by a formula related either to the teaching workload or the











physical plant operations and maintenance workload. The teaching workload

is measured by student credit hours (or equivalently by FTE students) for

each course level and discipline category. The physical plant workload is

measured by gross square feet of building space. The formulas which are

based on these workload measures have been designed to insure that each

university is funded equally for comparable workload. In addition to

these workload, formula generated funds, all universities receive some

additional funds for specifically designated purposes not directly related

to the size of the physical plant or to the teaching workload.

These special funds include funds allocated specifically to implement

parts of the Revised Plan as well as funds to meet other goals of the

System. Beginning with fiscal year 1978-79, the Legislature has appro-

priated funds for improving the quality of selected academic programs at

each university. These quality improvement goals for the System are

similar to the enhancement goals for Florida A&M University as outlined in

the Revised Plan. The funds allocated to the University as a part of the

Systemwide quality improvement effort have been used to meet some of the

enhancement goals of the Revised Plan. Other non-formula allocations have

also been used to meet some of the Florida A&M University enhancement

goals.

In 1980-81, the Legislature appropriated the following allocations to

Florida A&M University above the regular formula-generated funds provided

to continue current programs:


(1) $1,112,098 in Quality Improvement Funds for enhancement of
programs identified by the university: Architecture, Pharmacy,
Humanities and Social Sciences, Science and Technology, Financial Aid
Office, Development Office, and Registrar's Office.










(2) $100,000 for enhancement of the School of Business and Industry.

(3) $46,496 for the Research Center for Vitaculture and Small Farm
Development established in 1979-80 by the Legislature.

(4) $122,479 for the Center of Excellence in Architecture esta-
blished in 1978-79 by the Legislature.

(5) $233,323 for Library books. Included in this total was $40,000
special funding for the new Pharmacy Doctorate program. These
library funds are in addition to the regular funds provided for that
purpose.

(6) $154,267 for the Women's Athletics Programs.
In addition to the above $2,768,263 in appropriations, the Legis-

lature identified certain programs which received a total of $331,834

taken off-the-top of the funds provided for the Educational and General

budget for the System. Programs receiving such funds at Florida A&M

University in 1980-81 were the following:

(7) Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS) $21,651
(8) Black Archives $27,705
(9) Division of Rural Development $55,286
(10) School of Business and Industry $227,192

An additional $216,406 was made available to Florida A&M University

through special EEO allocations provided by the Board of Regents' Office

for Equal Opportunity Programs. These funds were designated for use by

the University in specific programs under the Revised Plan and also

included $107,200 to be used for academic program implementation and/or

support:

University Retention Programs $ 57,355
Student Recruitment/Support $ 34,651
Employee Grants-in-Aid $ 17,200
Academic Programs Implementation $107 200
Total $216,406










In 1980-81, Florida A&M University received a total of $3,316,503 in

additional funds beyond the enrollment generated funding, to support the

enhancement of the University.


In accordance with the Revised Plan, Florida A&M University requested

in its 1981-82 Legislative Request Budget, funds for the enhancement

and/or implementation of six programs. These were: Architectural/Con-
struction Technology $158,631; Landscape Design $216,8161; and the

four Allied Health Programs $556,513. The total amount requested was

$931,960. However, based upon the revised implementation schedule for

Landscape Design, the legislative request budget for enhancement was

$715,144.

Legislative action resulted in an appropriation of approximately

$40,209 less than the revised enhancement budget request. 2Building upon

the 1980-81 dollars provided to the University above the formula-generated

Educational and General Allocation,he Legislature provided a total of

$674,935 in new dollars to Florida A&M University: $424,935 in quality

improvement funds to continue the enhancement of programs identified by

the University in 1980-81 as receiving QIP monies and $250,000 for imple-

mentation of the Allied Health Programs. In other actions, the 1981

Legislature provided $236,075 to Florida A&M University for the enhance-

ment of scientific and technical equipment and $84,195 in special library

book funds. Most significant was the appropriation of $75,000 to Florida


This program was originally scheduled for implementation in
September, 1981. In February, 1981, the University revised the
implementation date, moving it to 1983.










A&M University and Florida State University to develop an engineering

program utilizing Florida State's Science and Technical disciplines and
Florida A&M's Engineering Technology Program. It is projected that these

funds will be used by both institutions in the planning for the Joint

Engineering Program.

In addition to the $1,032,7051 Legislatively appropriated for en-
hancement, Florida A&M's 1981-82 allocation will continue funds for those

"Special Programs" identified in the 1980-81 Educational and General

Allocation as follows:2


(1) Center of Excellence in Architecture
(2) Quality Improvement funds for Architecture, Pharmacy,
Humanities and Social Sciences, Science and Technology,
Financial Aid Office, Development Office and Registrar's
Office.
(3) Center for Vitaculture and Small Farm Development
(4) Division of Rural Development
(5) Program for Medical Sciences
(6) Black Archives
(7) School of Business and Industry (r

In addition to the appropriation the State University System received

for purposes which were identified by the University, the Legislature pro-

vided an amount to continue current programs and to support workload

increases for 1981-82. These funds were distributed over the expenditure

categories: Salaries and Benefits, Other Personal Service Expenses,

Operating Capital Outlay, Special Categories, and Electronic Data Process-


1 This amount includes $37,500 of the $75,000 appropriated to both
2 FAMU and FSU for the Engineering Program.
The specific amount of dollars to be provided for each of these
programs in 1981-82 will be determined at the university level.
The special EEO allocation has not been finalized at this time.










ing. The same principles were used to distribute the funds in each ex-

penditure category to each of the nine System universities, except that

Florida A&M University was held harmless for a legislative reduction in

student enrollment at the lower division level. This reduction was

absorbed by the System and amounted to $31,172.

In 1980-81, several universities in the System, including Florida A&M

University, were held harmless because they did not realize the enrollment

upon which their appropriation for 1980-81 was based. The Legislature, in

making its appropriation, provided that no institution would lose funds

because they did not realize the enrollment on which their 1980-81 funds

were allocated. This was done in order to provide funding stability for

those universities where enrollments may fluctuate somewhat from year to

year.


2. Program Budgeting

Recognizing the critical need for stability in funding at Florida A&M

University at a time when efforts are being directed toward strengthening

existing high demand programs and new programs are being planned and

implemented, the Chancellor and the Board of Regents have initiated a

pilot program in program budgeting at Florida A&M University. In accord-

ance with the April 1, 1981, agreement reached with the Office for Civil

Rights, the Board of Regents has allocated funds to FAMU at a level

consistent with enrollment higher than that projected for the University

in order to assure that the funded enrollment capacity at the institution

will be maintained or increased for the duration of the Revised Plan.










The Board of Regents efforts support the expressed desire of the

Governor and the Legislature to move away from funding based on FTE

students to one based on programs to aid in the attainment of higher

quality in the State University System. The Governor and the Legislature

have been working jointly to develop a proposal for a program budgeting

system and recently retained a consultant to develop such a system. It is

expected that a report will be rendered in December of 1981.

The Chancellor and the Board of Regents assigned two staff members in

July, 1981 to begin exploring the possibility of moving Florida A&M

University to a program based budget as soon as possible after the Gover-

nor and Legislature act to prescribe that system. It is anticipated that

the pilot program in the program budget area at FAMU will serve as a model

for the other universities within the System.

The Governor and the Legislature, under the laws of the State of

Florida, have responsibility for prescribing the budget format and the

system for all state agencies in Florida. Further, the Legislature

determines the specific manner in which appropriations will be made.

Given these circumstances, it would not be possible to develop a program

based budget for Florida A&M or any other university unless the system and

formats of the budget process at the Executive and Legislative levels are

compatible with that change. However, it is believed that the statements

made by the Governor and Legislature are indicative of their desire to

move in that direction. Staff work at this time will give the Board of

Regents the opportunity to move swiftly to implement such a program.















In the Fall of each year, the nine universities of the State Univer-

sity System submit to the Board of Regents Office, legislative requests

for fixed capital outlay need in priority order. These Project Priority

Lists constitute the System's Legislative Fixed Capital Outlay Priority
List. A draft of the System request is forwarded to the universities for

review by the president and appropriate staff prior to approval by the

Council of Presidents and subsequent review by the Board of Regents'

Facilities Committee. After review and approval by the full Board of

Regents, the System Project Priority List is forwarded to the Commissioner

of Education for submission to the Legislature. From the available

dollars available each year for the construction of educational facilities

in the State University System, the final decision as to which projects

are funded rests with the Legislature.

In 1980-81, the Legislature allocated funds in the following amounts

for the planning and construction of three new buildings on the Florida

A&M University campus:


Nursing/Allied Health Business Architecture
Planning $218,000 $406,900 $404,600

Construction 2,429,600 4,552,130 ---

$2,648,100 $4,959,030 $404,600
An additional $647,000 was allocated for the construction of a new
facility for the Women's Intercollegiate Athletic Program and $100,230 for

renovation of academic and/or administrative space. The renovation of


3. Funding for Physical Facilities











Perry Paige Hall and Lee Hall are scheduled to begin during the next

fiscal year with completion projected when the new buildings are occupied

and program movement is completed.

Of the eighteen projects requested by Florida A&M University for

1981-82, two of the projects were included in the number one priority of

the System request. In addition, dollars to furnish the School of Nursing

building and for construction of the School of Architecture building were

included in the third and fourth priority for the System. The Legislature

funded each of these projects with the exception of the School of Archi-

tecture building. Florida A&M did receive $715,000 of the $1,343,798

appropriated for Laboratory Schools.

To accommodate additional construction projects for the universities,

the 1981 Legislature authorized the bonding of capital improvement fees.

Florida A&M requested funding for nine projects totaling 7.5 million

dollars. Of this amount, the Legislature funded $6,150,000. In early

April, 1981, the Legislature also authorized $550,000 to Florida A&M

University for the immediate renovation of Bragg Stadium. The total

allocation for the stadium amounts to $5,150,000.

Finally, the Board of Regents has approved the use of available

Capital Improvement Fees in the amount of $2,900,000 for the renovation of

Gibbs Hall Dormitory. This renovation will greatly enhance available

on-campus housing. Appendix B contains supporting documentation of

Capital Outlay Allocations to Florida A&M University.











Section II

Equal Educational Opportunities for Students

A. Introduction


As previously discussed in Section I, the State of Florida has

recently reaffirmed its commitment to the goal of assuring equal educ-

ational opportunity to students in public higher education. On

May 22, 1981, the Board of Regents of the State University System also

reaffirmed its commitment to evaluate and monitor activities implementing

the Revised Plan, and pledged to "provide directives to the universities,

as appropriate, to accomplish the EEO objectives of the State University

System." In addition, the Board approved a recommendation from its

Planning Committee to receive bi-annual reports from the presidents on

each institution's progress in meeting Affirmative Action goals for both

students and employees. These reports "shall identify reasons for lack of

goal achievement, if appropriate, and describe specific measures being

taken by the university to counteract the reasons previously identified."

(see Appendix C).
The Revised Plan also contains six specific Action Forms which have

the overall purpose of increasing first-time enrollments in the System of

black students and retaining these students once admitted. More ex-

plicitly, the Action Forms are:

1. Plans to increase black student enrollment at all levels.

2. Program to increase black graduate students within the

State University System.











Section II

Equal Educational Opportunities for Students

A. Introduction


As previously discussed in Section I, the State of Florida has

recently reaffirmed its commitment to the goal of assuring equal educ-

ational opportunity to students in public higher education. On

May 22, 1981, the Board of Regents of the State University System also

reaffirmed its commitment to evaluate and monitor activities implementing

the Revised Plan, and pledged to "provide directives to the universities,

as appropriate, to accomplish the EEO objectives of the State University

System." In addition, the Board approved a recommendation from its

Planning Committee to receive bi-annual reports from the presidents on

each institution's progress in meeting Affirmative Action goals for both

students and employees. These reports "shall identify reasons for lack of

goal achievement, if appropriate, and describe specific measures being

taken by the university to counteract the reasons previously identified."

(see Appendix C).
The Revised Plan also contains six specific Action Forms which have

the overall purpose of increasing first-time enrollments in the System of

black students and retaining these students once admitted. More ex-

plicitly, the Action Forms are:

1. Plans to increase black student enrollment at all levels.

2. Program to increase black graduate students within the

State University System.










3. Board of Regents Special Summer Program for black graduate

and professional students.

4. University Admissions Standards.

5. Retention Programs for black students.

6. Equal Access of Financial Aid within the State University

System.


While each of the Action Forms listed above continued to be imple-

mented during the 1980-81 academic year, special emphasis was placed on

evaluating the impact of programs and on providing a comprehensive review

of admission standards. Resource allocations for programmatic imple-

mentation were disbursed from primarily four sources: The Board of

Regents' EEO Allocation, individual institutional resources, the

Commissioner of Education's Project Grant Program, and Federal funds.

Institutional activities are reviewed in the University Annual

Reports provided under separate cover. The following discussion presents

an overall summary and assessment of institutional and Board of Regents

activities.




B. Increasing Access to the State University System


Total headcount enrollment in the System grew 13.1 percent between

1976-78 and 1980-81, from 112,743 to 127,490. During that same period,

enrollment of black students increased 1.2 percent, from 11,755 to 11,977,










and the enrollment of white students increased 12.1 percent, from 93,014

to 104,314.

Between 1977 and 1978, black enrollment in the System far exceeded
black enrollment increases nationally. The black enrollment increase in

the System for this period was 4.0 percent, while nationally, the increase

was 0.7 percent. However, since that time, the System has experienced a

two percent decrease in Black enrollment, primarily because of the five
percent decrease in enrollment at the traditionally Black institution
during the same period of time. Even though the predominantly white

institutions have increased their black enrollment by 12.0 percent since

1977, the 11.0 percent decrease in black enrollment at Florida A&M Univer-

sity has off-set any systemwide gain.

The revised institutional plans for recruiting, admitting, and

retaining students, which were submitted to the Office for Civil Rights on

June 1, 1981, are intended to counteract this downward trend and reveal a

broad range of efforts to increase the representation of minority
students. A matrix identifying the major recruiting initiatives to be

implemented and/or which are on-going at each institution is presented in
Table II-F. Generally, recruiting activities are built around programs

wherein racially-mixed recruiting teams visit high schools and community

colleges on a planned state-wide, or service-area tour. The institutions

also host college career days for area black high school or Community

College students. Black faculty, staff, students and alumni are en-

couraged to actively participate in university recruitment programs and
activities.





















TABLE II-F

INSTITUTIONAL INITIATIVES FOR BLACK STUDENT RECRUITMENT*


(Reported to Office for Civil


Rights
UF


June 1. 1981)

FSU


FAMU USF FAU UWF UCF FIU UNF


Increased use of 10% Exception Admission Provision

Bi-racial recruitment team faculty/staff

Use of minority student recruiters

Participation of Minority Alumni

Tracking system on prospective black students

Scholarships (Assistantships, waivers, etc.)

Special Publications

Target Institutions w/large black enrollments

Locator Service/Minority Student Bank

Public Service Announcements

Training Session/Community Workshops

Imedlate Admission Decisions/with Financial Aid

Minority Admissions Officer (Counselor, Liaison)

Use of TRIO (Upward Bound, Talent Search. Special Services)


X X X

X X X
x x x

X X

X x

x X

X X X

X X X
x

X X X

x x
X X
X


X X X


*White Students at Florida A&M University

Source: Institutional Recruitment Plans Submitted to Board of Regents May 8, 1981.

7/22/81


x
x x










A second major recruiting thrust involves the use of direct financial
assistance in the form of incentive grants or scholarships for minority

undergraduate students. Information concerning federal financial assist-

ance is broadly disseminated, and special assistance in making application

for such aid is available, as needed.

Recruiting at the graduate level is based almost entirely within the

individual academic departments, including, in the majority of instances,

the allocation of financial assistance. A Board of Regents program which

complements university departmental efforts at the graduate level is the

Special Summer Program for Black Graduate and Professional Students,

implemented under Action Form Three of the Revised Plan.

Designed as a "prestart" retention program for new entering graduate

and professional students, participants must be regularly admitted

students enrolled in full-time summer study. The program introduces

students to the career options and requirements in their chosen field of

study, and provides academic advisement and orientation to the university.

Regular coursework and workshops in selected disciplines are also pro-

vided. Consistent with the Revised Plan, priority for participation is

given to graduates of the nine state universities.

An important aspect of the Special Summer Program is the opportunity
it provides for fostering and facilitating supportive networks among

incoming black students. Black faculty and staff are active participants

in the program, and through the various special activities sponsored

during the quarter, black students, faculty and staff from a variety of

disciplines are brought together.










The SUS Special Summer Program was implemented at the University of

Florida in Summer, 1979. The University received $62,886 from the EEO

Special Allocation for stipends for the 1979 program participants. Of the

38 participants in the initial program 35 or 92.0 percent were still

enrolled at the University of Florida during the 1980-81 academic year.

In addition, of the 35 students, 29 (or 82.9 percent) received some form

of direct financial assistance from the institution upon completion of the

Summer Program. During 1980-81 ten (or 26.3 percent) of the 1979 program

participants completed requirements for the graduate degree, and an

eleventh student is scheduled to graduate in August, 1981. Among the

three non-returning students, two withdrew from the university and one is

deceased.

During the 1979-80 academic year, the Special Summer Program was

expanded to include selected disciplines at Florida State University,

Florida A&M University, the University of South Florida, and the Univer-

sity of West Florida to further enhance the progress of the System in

meeting its parity commitment with black graduate student enrollment in

selected disciplines. Early in the year, funds totaling $41,020 were

distributed to these universities for the purpose of planning 1980 Summer

programs. The University of Florida also received $12,500 to plan for its

1980 summer program. (Although Florida A&M University received planning

funds, program implementation was deferred until Summer, 1981). An

additional $110,386 was distributed for stipends for the 1980 Summer

Program participants. To help compensate for the loss in summer earnings,

participants received stipends ranging from $1,300 to $1,500 to help

defray tuition and living expenses.










During the 1980 Summer Quarter, forty-nine students participated in
Special Summer Programs at the University of Florida, Florida State

University, the University of South Florida, and the University of West

Florida. These students represented 47.6 percent of all black in-state
students who entered graduate and professional programs in the State

University System in Fall, 1980, and 30.6 percent of all black first-year

graduate and professional students at the predominantly white insti-
tutions.

Of the thirty-four students who participated in the University of
Florida's program, 94.0 percent continued full-time graduate level study

at the university during the 1980-81 academic year (one student continued

on a part-time basis) and all except the part-time student, received
financial assistance to continue their education.

Seven students participated in the 1980 Special Summer Program at the
University of South Florida. Four students were enrolled in Library

Science, two in Anthropology, and one in Psychology. However, only two,

or 29.0 percent of the program participants continued study at the insti-
tution during 1980-81.

The 1980 Summer Program at the University of West Florida involved

two students, both of whom are pursuing graduate degrees in the Biological

Sciences. UWF's participation in the Special Summer Program enabled the

Biology Department to increase its black student enrollment by 100 per-
cent.

The Special Summer Program at Florida State University is designed
for entering law students. During the 1980 Summer Quarter, six black

students participated in the program, with only one experiencing academic










difficulty during 1980-81. The University anticipates that this student

will be eligible for reinstatement in 1981-82.

During the 1980-81 academic year, planning funds were again distri-

buted to all universities which had participated in the 1980 Summer

Program. Funding was also made available to FAMU for continued planning

activities, and the Florida Atlantic University requested, and was granted

planning funds for implementation of a Special Summer Program in Summer,

1981. The 1980-81 EEO Special Allocation for the 1981 Summer Program

planning activities totaled $36,500 with funds for student stipends to be

distributed from the 1981-82 EEO budget. A report on the 1981 State

University System Special Summer Program will be provided in the 1981-82

Annual Report to the Office for Civil Rights.

The following table (II-G) shows the graduate. and professional

programs in which the 1980 Summer Program participants were enrolled. The

thirty-seven participants in graduate programs represented 4.5 percent of

the total black graduate enrollment in Fall 1980, and 5.02 percent of the

black graduate enrollment at the predominantly white institutions. The

twelve participants in first-professional programs represented 9.8 percent

of blacks enrolled in first-professional programs in the System, and 11.0

percent of blacks enrolled at the predominantly white institutions.

Although the System experienced an overall decline in the represen-

tation of black students in graduate and first-professional programs--

decreasing from 6.5 percent of the Black/White enrollment in Fall, 1979,

to 5.5 percent in Fall, 1980, it is hoped that further expansion of the

SUS Special Summer Program in 1981-82 will result in an increase in the

number of black students enrolled in graduate level study.








TABLE II-G

SUS SPECIAL SUMMER PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AS PERCENT OF
BLACK ENROLLMENT IN GRADUATE AND FIRST PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Fall, 1980


Percent Black of Program Participants
SUS Black Black/White As % of Black
Discipline Enrollment Enrollment # Enrollment

Graduate Programs

Agriculture and Natural Resources 10 3.0 2 20.0

Biological Science 6 1.2 3 50.0

Business and Management 86 3.6 5 5.8

Physical Sciences 3 0.6 3 100.0

All Other 701 7.6 24 3.4

Overall Representation 818 5.7 37 4.5


First Professional Programs

Law 61 4.1 11 18.0

Pharmacy 14 42.4 1 7.1

Overall Representation 123 4.5 12 9.8


TOTAL OVERALL REPRESENTATION 941 5.5 49 5.2


SOURCE: Enrollment data, OE 2300-2.3, Opening Fall Enrollment


8/81











A second program with direct impact on the enrollment of black

graduate and professional students in the System is the Student

Grant-in-Aid Program, funded at $90,000 during 1980-81. Implemented under

Action Form Two of the Revised Plan, awards in the amount of $4,500 are

made on a systemwide basis to university nominees in academic disciplines

in which blacks are underrepresented, with priority given to nominees in

the selected high demand disciplines for which the System has established

specific parity goals.

Twenty-two students received full or partial awards in Medicine, Law,

Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Architecture, and other selected areas.

Students receiving financial assistance through the Grant-in-Aid Program

represented 2.3 percent of the black enrollment in graduate and pro-

fessional programs in the System as of Fall, 1980. One hundred percent of

the black students enrolled in Veterinary Medicine in the System received

support through this program as well as 9.0 percent of the black enroll-

ment in first professional programs. Twenty-seven percent of the 1980-81

participants completed their educational programs as of August, 1981. The

remaining students made substantial progress toward degree completion

during this same time.

Table II-H shows the Fall, 1980, black enrollment in specific dis-

ciplines, and the percentage of black students who received Grants-in-Aid

awards in these areas. Fifty percent of the grant recipients were en-

rolled in first-professional programs.








TABLE II-H


STUDENT GRANT-IN-AID PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AS PERCENT OF
BLACK STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
ACADEMIC YEAR 1980-81


SUS Black Enrollment Participants as % of
First Professional 1980-81 Black Enrollment in SUS
and Graduate Programs # % Black of Black/White # %

First Professional

Pharmacy 15 22.7 1 6.7
Medicine 43 6.3 5 11.6
Veterinary Medicine 2 0.7 2 100.0
Law 87 4.5 3 3.4

Graduate Programs

Architecture 2 1.8 1 50.0
Audiology and Speech Pathology 12 6.3 3 25.0
Criminology 19 11.2 1 5.3
Clothing and Textiles 1 10.0 1 100.0
Psychology 63 7.1 1 4.0
Electrical Engineering 1 0.5 1 100.0
Education Administration 147 12.1 1 0.7
Special Education 16 4.5 1 6.3
Public Policy 1 2.8 1 100.0

Overall Representation in
First Professional Programs *123 4.5 11 8.9

Overall Representation in
Graduate Programs *818 5.7 11 1.4

Total Representation in
Graduate Study *941 5.5 22 2.3
* rsosritqatreroiet ny


KpeRresents Fal l quarter enrollment, only-
SOURCE: Enrollments by discipline, 1980-81 Student Data


Course File (four quarter unduplicated headcount).










1. Financial Aid


Minority student recruitment efforts appear to be greatly enhanced by

direct financial assistance programs. However, financial aid is of even
greater importance in the retention of minority students, and can be

critical for those students admitted under the ten percent exception

provision.

Under Action Form Six of the Revised Plan, the universities are

responsible for annual review and assessment of their financial aid
policies and practices. Reviews are conducted to ensure that black

students do not bear a greater burden than white students, in relation to

need, in incurring loan or work obligations. The composition of the "aid

package" is also reviewed to insure that first-time-in-college students

with weak academic records receive assistance which, to the extent
possible, excludes work obligations. Analyses of the participation rates

of black students in various state and federal financial assistance

programs is provided in each university's Annual Report (appended).

Universities are also encouraged to develop innovative financial
assistance programs for both undergraduate and graduate students. Several

universities have developed incentive grants, or need-based aid programs

for academically successful black students. These programs, which are

summarized in Table II-I, represent only a handful of the many other

resources available to the minority student. Scholarship programs

supported by private donors, federal and state programs for study in

specific disciplines, and endowed scholarship programs in certain colleges

or schools are all utilized to provide financial assistance for black











DIRECT GRANTS AND


SCH


uN


Program P

UCF

Equal Educational Opportunity
(EEO) Program
Black Scholar Award

Minority Achievement Award

USF

Minority Incentive Grants

Graduate Educational
Opportunity Grants

UF

Grants for Undergraduate Minority
and Economically Disadvantaged

Minority Honors Program

Grants for Graduate Minority
and Economically Disadvantaged
Students

SUS Special Summer Program
Participants (Funding beyond
Summer Quarter)


TABLE II-I

fOLARSHIP PROGRAMS FOR BLACK STUDENTS
1980-81

mnber of Amount of Total
awards Awards


$300-350
per quarter

$300 per
quarter

$275 per
quarter


$250-330
per quarter


Program
Cost


17,650

5,400

6,325


224,375

50,000

150,000


25,000


Graduate Minority Fellowships 2 $2,100 per 4,200
year
UWF Foundation and General 24 -- 8,526
Student Aid Fee Scholarships
FSU

Graduate and Professional Oppor- 15 $4,500 67,500
tunities Fellowship Program (GPOP) plus tuition, books
& travel to meetings

University Fellowships 10

University Scholarships 89 -- 56,824

FIU

University-Wide Scholarships 28

Scholarships for Black 11 -- 17,200
Graduate Students

FAMU

Grants (white students) 83 -- 109,998

Scholarships (white students) 26 -- 32,744

Note: Total for Students may represent a duplicated headcount.
Source: University Annual Report (1980-81).

8/81










students in predominantly white institutions, and for white students at

Florida A&M University.

The most recent SUS data available on financial assistance awarded to
undergraduate students is for the 1979-80 academic year. During that

year, black students comprised 10.56 percent of the total black/white
undergraduate population in the System and received 29.5 percent of all
grants, 14.8 percent of loans, and 20.0 percent of scholarships awarded.

Black undergraduates also received 27.2 percent of the financial assist-

ance provided through student employment programs. The following table

summarizes financial aid awards to black students in 1979-80.




C. Enrollment Planning and Admissions Standards


In response to the changing demographic patterns of the State,
postsecondary education has initiated a shift in priorities, from enroll-
ment expansion to the promotion of quality.- Confronted with the dual

demographic patterns of a rapidly increasing older population concentrated

in certain areas of the State, and a projected ten percent decrease in

high school graduates between 1981 and 19841, along with increasing

financial constraints and high inflation, the Governor and the Legislature
have indicated that the shift to improve quality is both timely and

appropriate.


"A Call to Action," Final report to the Joint Legislative and
Executive Commission on Postsecondary Education by the Academy
for Educational Development (December, 1979).









TABLE II-J

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL AID AWARDS

BY AID CATEGORY AND RACE/ETHNIC IDENTIFICATION

ACADEMIC YEAR 1979-80


FINANCIAL AID CATEGORY (1)

GRANTS
Number-percent of awards

LOANS
Number-percent of awards

SCHOLARSHIPS
Number-percent of awards

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Number-percent of awards


BLACK


6,689 (29


2,971 (14


939 (20


3,016 (27


NON-HISPANIC


NON-HISPANIC
WHITE


.5) 15,972 (70.5)


.8) 17,135 (85.2)


.0) 3,760 (80.0)


.2) 8,087 (72.8)


TOTAL AWARDS (2)


22,661 (100)


20,106 (100)

4,699 (100)


11,103 (100)


NOTE: (1) Number and Percent of awards include duplicated recipients.
(2) Includes awards to students of all race/ethnic groups.

SOURCE: OCR 6000-B3, for academic year 1979-80; data collected in 1980-81 for previous year.


8/81










During 1980-81, the State Board of Education adopted the following

policy for all levels of Florida's education:

The 1980's will bring less rapid growth in the number of students to
be served in the state system of public education than in the 1970's.
This slower growth will permit the state, the schools, the colleges,
the students, and the people to place greater emphasis upon program
quality. Every part of our educational system should examine its
activities and develop specific strategies and plans to enhance the
quality of i.ts programs and services to Floridians. National stan-
dards, where appropriate, should be used to assess the quality of
educational programs. Based upon the applicable national standards,
Florida's programs should be among those of the top ten or twelve
states by the mid to late 1980's. Priorities within the legislative
budget requests should be established which will permit a high rate
of progress in moving toward these goals of excellence.

To assure measurable progress toward the quality goal, the 1981

Legislature has mandated limited enrollment growth in the System and

placed an upper bound on funded lower division FTE from 1981-86. On

April 3, 1981, the Board of Regents adopted an enrollment plan for the

System which allows a steady, but slow increase in enrollment over the

next five years. Consistent with the State University System's Arti-

culation Agreement with the community colleges, basic growth in the System

is predicted to occur at the upper division level to accommodate community
college transfers. With the projected decrease in the pool of high school

graduates, entry at the first-time-in-college level is projected to remain

relatively stable, allowing universities to continue to enroll approxi-

mately the same proportion of freshmen students. During this time,

enrollment at the graduate level is projected to show a modest increase,

and reflect shifting enrollment patterns from teacher education programs

to business and other high demand career-oriented and/or technical discip-

lines.











During April, 1981, the Board of Regents increased the minimum

standards for admission to the System from an 800 total verbal/math score

on the SAT or 17 composite score on the ACT, to the requirement of at

least a "C" high school grade point average and a score at or above the

40th percentile of college-bound seniors on a nationally-normed college

admissions exam1. Students with a 3.00 HSGPA are eligible for admission

irrespective of their score results. Students with less than a "C"

average and test scores below the minimum, may be admitted under the Ten

Percent Exception Provision. Universities desiring to admit more than ten

percent of the entering class as exceptions are permitted to request that

authority from the Board of Regents. Universities may also establish

higher admission standards than the systemwide standards if they choose.

The assessment of this rule change indicated that there would be

minimal adverse impact on minority admissions with fuller use of the Ten

Percent Exception Provision.

In November, 1980, the Board of Regents approved alternative ad-

missions criteria for Florida A&M University, providing additional

flexibility in the admission of first-time-in-college students to the

institution. At the request of the Board of Regents in June, 1981, the

universities codified their admission policies in rule form under the

Florida Administrative Procedures Act and were required to file the

appropriate EEO Impact assessment. Each university's submission was

SCurrently, state law requires all students admitted into Teacher
Education Programs to have test scores at or above the 40th
percentile.











reviewed by Regents staff to insure that adequate consideration was given

to the requirement of minority admissions. The Board of Regents' minimum

admissions rule, however, was rejected by the State Board of Education on

June 16, 1981. This issue is scheduled to be revisited by the State Board

during September, 1981. In the interim, the State University System

admissions rules are undergoing further review, with special attention

being given to alternative measures which will not adversely impact

admission of minority students while concurrently moving the System toward

achievement of the quality objective adopted by the State Board of

Education.




1. Admissions Under the Ten Percent Exception Provision


Under Action Form Four of the Revised Plan, universities must

evaluate their admissions policies and practices on an annual basis to

insure that no arbitrary or artificial barriers are in place. Prior to

final action involving modification of university admissions criteria, an

EEO Impact Assessment must be submitted to the Regents Office for

approval.

Universities also report annually on use of the ten percent exception

provision in the admissions process. (See University reports appended

under separate cover.) Table II-K presents a summary of the number of

black FTIC students admitted under this provision in 1980-81. While

blacks admitted under the ten percent exception policy represented only

1-9 percent of total black/white FTIC students at the predominantly white
2.1











TABLE II-K

ENROLLMENTS UNDER THE TEN PERCENT EXCEPTION PROVISION
AT THE FIRST-TIME-IN-COLLEGE LEVEL
PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTIONS
FALL QUARTER, 1980


Institutions

Florida State University


University of Florida


University of Central Florida
-P.-
4.

University of South Florida

Total


^HIIC Enrol lment


Black/White Total # Black

2,333 253


2,667 117


1,109 33


1,898 73

8,007' 476


% Black

10.8


4.4


3.0


3.8

5.9


"*Total Number
of Exceptions

244




24


154


Enrollments

' White
# %

123 50.4




16 66.7


108 70.1


or Exceptions
Percent Black Percent Black
Black of B/W of Black FTIC
# % Enrollment Enrollment

114 46.7 4.9 45.1 -


20 0.7 17.1


3 12.5 0.3 9.1


33 21.4 1.7 45.2


170 2.1 35.7


*Source: Fall, 1980, OCR B-1; includes In-State and Out-of-State.
""Based upon admissions file as reported by universities. Total includes all racial categories and students who did not report.race.


8/81


TABLE II-K
ENROLLMENTS UNDER THE TEN PERCENT EXCEPTION PROVISION
AT THE FIRST-TIME-IN-COLLEGE LEVEL
PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTIONS
FALL QUARTER, 1980










35.71
institutions, 9-37 percent of all black FTIC students were admitted under

the exception provision. Table II-L shows the number of black students

admitted into graduate programs under the ten percent exception provision.

While the 192 black graduate and first professional students admitted as

exceptions represented 3.0 percent of the total black/white students in

the first year of study in 1980-81, they represented 55.8 percent of the

black first-year students.




2. Essential Academic Skills Testing Program


As reported in the 1979-80 Annual Report, passage of the Omnibus
Education Act of 1979 required the State Board of Education to identify

the essential academic skills in the areas of communication and com-

putation necessary for students to be successful at the associate and

baccalaureate degree levels. The State Board is further required to seek

ways to assess student performance in these two areas, set standards for

moving from one level to the next, and to monitor student performance on

an annual basis.

Over the past year and a half, a committee of community college and

university representatives has developed a list of essential academic

skills in communications and computations. This list of skills, which was

approved by the State Board of Education on August 4, 1981, will form the

basis for development of a "sophomore exit test."

Under the new rule for college-level communication and computation
skills in state universities (Rule 6A-10.314, Florida Administrative









Table II-L

Graduate Enrollment Under the Ten Percent Exception Provision

Predominantly White Institutions

Fall, 1980


*Total Exceptions


44

99

102

422

66

40

191

124


White


30

48

73

279

52

34

166

89


1,088


Black


68.2

48.5

71.6

66.1

78.8

85.0

86.9

71.8


70.9


6

21

26

84

5

5

25

20


192


13.6

21.2

25.5

19.9

7.8

12.5

13.1

16.1


17.6


**First-year
Graduate Enrollment
# %


344

6,128

6,472


5.3

94.7

100.0


Exceptions Exceptions
Enrollment
S% race


192

771

963


19.9

80.1

100.0


as Percent of:
bv Total
Enrollment


55.8

12.6


3.0

11.9


*Based upon admissions files as reported by the universities.
Includes all racial categories and students who did not report race.

**Source: OCR B-l, Fall, 1980.


8/81


FAU

FIU

FSU

UF

UCF

UNF

USF

UWF


TOTAL


Black

White

Total











Code), the SUS institutions may require admissions tests for entrance to

upper division programs. These tests must be approved by the Board of

Regents and State Board of Education, and must be shown to be valid

predictors of successful performance in the programs for which the student

has applied. Further, any requirement for an examination must be ap-

plicable to all students seeking admission.

Proviso language contained within the 1981 Appropriations Act re-

quires that students submit scores from tests on communication and com-

putation skills as a consideration for admission to upper division
programs. A sophomore test will be developed for approval by the State

Board of Education during 1981-82. Once the test has been approved and

administered, validity studies will be performed to determine how well the

test scores function as predictors of academic success at the upper
division level. Based on these studies, the State Board of Education will

then establish minimum passing standards which will be uniform statewide.

It is expected that the sophomore, or essential skills test, will not be

fully implemented until the 1983-84 academic year. In addition, prior to
the implementation of such tests, an EEO Impact Study will be conducted to

assess the impact on the progression of Black students.

The move toward essential skills testing in Florida is not intended

to be a means for excluding students from post-secondary education.

Rather, it is hoped that the testing program will result in improved
student performance in the critical areas of communications and com-

putations through improved curricula and instruction. The state univer-

sities are currently reviewing the essential skills list to determine the

extent to which curricula may need to be revised. The SUS English and











Math Program Review scheduled for Fall, 1981, should reinforce university

efforts to insure that students have instructional support to meet the

standards implied in the testing program.




D. Academic Support and Retention


Implicit in Florida's commitment to achieve equality of opportunity

in higher education is the objective to assure that all students are
"provided effective personal and academic support to ensure achievement of

educational goals" (Revised Plan: page 76). Academic support thus con-

stitutes a major element of the comprehensive plan for equalizing educa-

tional opportunities.

In support of this objective, each university has developed a full

complement of academic support services. Retention programs in the System

are available to all students without regard to race, and those programs

which target the black student represent only a portion of the broad range
of retention services available at the state universities. Retention
programs have been designed to meet the needs of first-time-in-college

students as well as community college transfers. Some program efforts are

tailored to reach students identified as "marginal" or in need of

short-term academic support. Some programs concentrate on the basic

skills, offering reading, writing and mathematics laboratories, while
others have incorporated alternative delivery systems. All institutions

are continuing to give emphasis to various types of special supportive











programs to assist students to overcome any real or perceived academic

deficiencies.

During 1980-81, $439,000 of the EEO Special Allocation was distri-

buted to the universities for support of retention programs. Each insti-

tution received a base allocation of $36,000. The remaining $115,000 in

supplemental retention funding were distributed to the universities to

provide additional support for meeting the needs of Black first-time-

in-college students and all students admitted with entrance scores lower

than those normally required by the State University System. Supplemental
funding was also provided to the upper division institutions to assist in

meeting the increased need for expanded services to community college

transfers. The balance of funding required to operate university reten-

tion programs is provided from internal university resources and external
grants secured by the institution.

In response to concerns raised during 1980-81 by the Office for Civil

Rights, Florida notified OCR that those universities which had not esta-

blished formal retention goals would be instructed to do so and include

these goals in the institution's Annual Report. The Special Assistant to
the Chancellor notified the universities of this requirement, and provided

each university with institution-specific data from the Systemwide Study

of Student Progression and Retention for use in analyzing retention

trends. Some universities developed retention goals based on these data
while others used data available through institutional research offices.
Retention goals for black students, based on university analyses of

retention patterns, are presented in each university's Annual Report on

Action Form Five. No extreme variances between the rates of retention for











black and white students appears to exist, although black students in

general appear to experience a higher rate of attrition than do their

white counterparts. In some instances, black students are retained at

rates which exceed those of white students. These reports are appended

under separate cover.




1. Assessing Attrition Rates


In support of the commitment to assess attrition rates by race, and

provide programs to eliminate any disparities between the attrition rates

of white and black students, the universities have determined that

"minority-specific" retention programs, which target black students

needing such services, have assisted in reducing disparities in attrition
rates.

The four-year institutions have developed a wide range of retention

programs to assist the first-time-in-college student. These programs

place special emphasis on meeting the needs of students admitted under
the ten percent exception provision, and analysis of the rates of

retention for these students indicates that the university programs have

met with a high degree of success.

As a result of changes made in 1980-81 to the System's Student Data

Course File, it is now possible to track the progress of students
admitted under the ten percent exception provision. A study conducted by










Regents' staff showed that of the 3391 students admitted to the
predominantly white institutions as exceptions in Fall, 1980, 311, or

91.7 percent were still enrolled as of the Spring Quarter, 1981. Black

students achieved the highest returning rate, with 97.5 percent still
enrolled as of the Spring Quarter (Table II-M). In addition, black
students did not experience any attrition until the third quarter, when

three of the original 121 students did not re-enroll. Also of note is

the fact that none of the black students withdrew from school during any
of the three terms.
The BOR study showed that among this group of "high risk" students,
54.3 percent achieved a grade point average of "C" or better during Fall

Quarter, 1980. This academic success was improved during the next two

quarters, when over 58.0 percent of the students achieved a "C" or better
GPA for the term. Although the percentage of black students who
maintained satisfactory grades was less than for the group as a whole,

the percentage of black students achieving "C" or better GPA's increased

as the year progressed. By Spring Quarter, 1981, 47.5 percent of the
black students earned a grade point average of "C" or better.
Although this study examined data for students admitted during only
one quarter (Fall, 1980), it appears reasonable to project that about

one-half of students admitted under the ten-percent exception provision

will perform satisfactorily during the first year of study. Most


SThe number of black students admitted under the ten percent
exception provision as reported by the universities totals 170
(see Table II-K). The study undertaken by Regents' staff is based
on the Student Data Course File, exceptions to the BOR minimum
admissions criteria.























TABLE II-M
Report on First-Time-In-College Freshman* Admitted as Exceptions to the
BOR Admissions Policy Listed by Ethnic Category 1980 Fall Quarter
Student Performance Reported for Fall/Winter & Spring Quarters


White
Students
No.


Black
Students
No.


Hispanic
Students
No. %


Other
Students


No. % No. %


Fall Term 1980


No. of students admitted and enrolled
Academic Performance
Falling (Below D average)
Academic Difficulty (D average)
Satisfactory (C average)
Good (B average or better)
Withdrew during term


Winter Term 1981

No. of students reenrolllng and percent
of those enrolling Fall term
Academic Performance
Falling (Below D average)
Academic Difficulty (0 average)
Satisfactory (C average)
Good (B average or better)
Cancelled enrollment/nonpayment
Withdrew during term


Spring Term 1981

No. of students reenrolling and percent
of those enrolled Fall term
Academic Performance
Falling (Below D average)
Academic Difficulty (D average)
Satisfactory (C average
Good (B average or better)
Cancelled enrollment/nonpayment
Withdrew during term


177 100.00 121 100.00 22 100.00


6.78
29.94
43.50
18.08
1.70


154 87.01


8.44
23.38
54.54
12.34
.65
.65


12.40
43.80
34.71
9.09


13.64
31.82
50.00
4.54


121 100.00 18 81.82


13.22
38.84
40.50
6.61
.83


16.67
27.78
38.88
16.67


159 89.83 118 97.52 19 86.36


9.43
23.27
53.46
12.58
.63
.63


11.86
39.83
41.53
5.93
.85


21.05
26.32
36.84
15.79


19 100.00 339


5.26
42.11
42.11
10.52


16 84.21 309 91.15


6.25
18.75
50.00
18.75

6.25


15 78.95 311 91.74


20.00
46.67
26.67

6.66


nF, F ir 'll F ,ind IFF.


Totals


100.00

9.14
35.69
40.71
13.57
.89


10.68
29.45
47.89
10.68
.65
.65


10.61
29.58
47.59
10.94
.64
.64










striking, however, is that after one year, these "special. admits"
experienced a rate of attrition which was significantly less than the

attrition rates of FTIC students as a whole.

Data from the Systemwide Study of Student Attrition1 show that

overall, first-time-in-college students who entered in each of the years
from 1976-77 to 1979-80 experienced rates of attrition after one year

ranging from 18.7 percent to 20.5 percent. The attrition rates for white

FTIC students ranged, after one year, from 18.5 percent to 19.5 percent,

while the rates for black FTIC students increased from 19.2 percent for
1976-77 entrants, to 26.7 percent for students who entered in 1979-80.
For students who entered the State University System as FTIC in

1976-77, the base year of the Systemwide Attrition Study, data are now

available over a four year period. As shown in Table II-O, virtually no

disparity existed between the attrition rates of both black and white

students after one year. As is expected, the cumulative attrition rate
for both groups of students increased over the four years; however,

increases in the attrition of black students exceeded those for white

students. After four years, 47.5 percent of the black students had left
the System, while 34.7 percent of white students were not retained.
Comparisons with national studies indicate, however, that both groups

achieved well above the national norm of sixty percent attrition after

four years. During the 1981-82 academic year, the Office for Equal

Opportunity Programs will undertake an in-depth review of student


1 The 1981 Study of Student Attrition Within the State University
System of Florida. Office for Equal Opportunity Programs, Board
of Regents (July, 1981).


















Entering 1976

First Time in

Junior Colleg

Other Transfe

First Profess

Post-Bac. and


TABLE II-N
State University System of Florida
Attrition Rates
Florida Resident Classified Students

After After After
,-77 One Year Two Years Three Years

College 18.77 28.47. 32.97.

e Transfer 19.77 30.5% 35.4%

2r 28.37. 41.07. 44.87.

;ional 5.8 8.07. 20.8%.

Other 32.4% 44.47. 50.07.


After
Four Years

36.97

37.87

46.87.

21.07.

53.87.


Entering 1977-78

First Time in College

Junior College Transfer

Other Transfer

First Professional

Post-Bac. and Other


Entering 1978-79

First Time in College

Junior College Transfer

Other Transfer

First Professional

Post-Bac..and Other


Entering 1979-80

First Time in College

Junior College Transfer

Other Transfer

First Professional

Post-Bac. and Other


27.77.

31.0%

37.37.

12.57.

75.8%


32.87

36.4%

40.9%

12.5%

78.37


19.57.

21.2%.

27.17.

6.5%

73.07%


20.4%

21.0%

29.5%

5.6%

20.3%.


29.7%

31.2%

39.2%

9.0%

31.0%


20.5%

20.1%

26.9%

4.8%

47.4%










TABLE II-O
ATTRITION RATES OF FTIC
FLORIDA RESIDENT CLASSIFIED STUDENTS


After After After After
One Year Two Years Three Years Four Years
1976-77 Entrants
Black 19.2 32.7 39.5 47.5
White 18.5 27.6 31.7 34.7

*Total 18.7 28.4 32.9 36.9

1977-78 Entrants
Black 23.2 32.5 39.6

White 18.6 26.7 31.6

Total 19.5 27.7 32.8

1978-79 Entrants
Black 26.0 39.6

White 19.1 27.8

Total 20.4 29.7

1979-80 Entrants
Black 26.7

White 19.5

Total 20.5

*Total includes all racial categories and students who did not report race.
SOURCE: 1981 Study of Student Attrition within the State University System
of Florida.

8/81











progression and retention in order to isolate factors which may be

contributing to the disparity between the attrition rates of black and

white university students.

At all SUS institutions, retention programs are in place to assist

students who transfer from the community colleges to the university.

Programs which target the black transfer student appear to be quite

successful, as the attrition rates of black community college transfer

students are comparable to those of their white counterparts.

Attrition rates for black community college transfer students who

entered the System during the four base years of the study ranged, after

one year of study, from 21.2 percent to 24.7 percent, while the rates for

white students remained near twenty or twenty-one percent. After two

years of study, 33.9 percent to 35.4 percent of black students were not

retained, while the attrition rate of white students who entered during

the base years remained relatively stable at just over 30.0 percent.

Attrition rates shown in Table II-P for community college transfer

students three and four years from date of entry primarily reflect

continuing part-time attendance. As would be expected, these rates

increase substantially over rates seen during the first two years of

attendance.

Although disparities exist between the retention rates of black and

of white students, the percentage of bachelors degrees awarded to black

students has increased significantly (Table II-Q). For the System as a

whole, blacks received 6.4 percent of the baccalaureate degrees conferred

in 1975-76. In 1979-80, blacks earned 8.1 percent of the bachelors

degrees. During 1975-76, 3.7 percent of baccalaureate degrees conferred










TABLE II-P


ATTRITION RATES OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRANSFERS,
FLORIDA RESIDENT CLASSIFIED STUDENTS


After After XAfter XAfter
One Year Two Years Three Years Four Years


1976-77 Entrants

Black

White

**Total

1977-78 Entrants

Black

White

Total

1978-79 Entrants
Black

White

Total

1979-80 Entrants


Black

White

Total


21.2

19.5

19.7


22.1

21.3

21.2


21.9

21.0

21.0


33.9

30.1

30.5


34.3

30.7

31.0


42.2

34.5

35.4


46.2

36.6

37.8


44.8

35.5

36.4


35.4

30.7

31.2


24.7

20.0

20.1


*Primarily reflects continuing part-time population.
**Total includes all racial categories and students who did not report race.
SOURCE: 1981 Study of Student Attrition within the State University System
of Florida.

8/81























TABLE II-Q

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM DEGREES AWARDED

-ACADEMIC YEAR
STATE UNIVERSITIES DEGREE 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80
% Black Number Black % Black Number Black % Black Number Black % Black Number Black


Florida Atlantic University



Florida International University



Florida State University



University of Central Florida



University of Florida



University of North Florida



University of South Florida


Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral


4.11
8.38

8.33

6.11
10.90


5.19
6.41
3.91
7.41

3.03
7.39


2.54
4.56
5.05
4.08

5.89
7.02


4.18
2.87
1.56
3.57


4.69
7.71

0.00

7.13
6.95


5.71
6.05
8.33
3.96

3.07
6.05


2.88
3.18
6.04
3.36

6.56
4.82


4.64
2.73
0.00
0.00


64
37

0

153
.29


211
80
11
12

58
21


141
36
32
10

49
17



175
23
0
0


5.98
5.23

4.76

8.29
7.01


6.96
6.35
3.68
4.37

2.85
4.52


2.91
2.52
5.94
3.19

6.95
4.95


5.29
3.34
1.05
0.00


4.10
4.18

5.88

8.11
7.31


7.44
6.01
1.08
4.32

3.64
5.02


3.00
3.68
5.75
3.20

6.22
6.74



4.99
3.22
2.08
0.00


114
28



270
69
2
16

73
15


151
42
34
9

49
24



188
24
2
0

























TABLE II-Q

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM DEGREES AWARDED


ACADEMIC YEAR
STATE UNIVERSITIES DEGREE 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80
% Black Number Black % Black Number Black % Black Number Black % Black Number Black


University of West Florida



Predominately White Institutions



o Florida A&M University



State University System


Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral

Bachelor's
Master's
First Professional
Doctoral


5.05
3.68


4.20
5.85
4.53
5.76

90.70
87.19


7.08
8.63
4.53
5.76


67
11


836
335
32
40

620
177


1,456
512
32
40


6.05
2.13


4.69
4.79
5.95
3.38

83.55
84.00


7.09
7.36
5.95
3.38


1,446
397


5.53
3.55


5.23
4.58
4.83
3.65

86.38
82.39


8.09
7.16


43 4.83
22 3.65


1,1


71 6.06
11 4.36


)20 5.08
235 4.86
36 4.36
26 3.72

615 90.49
145 91.67
100.0

535 8.14
380 6.99
36 4.69
26 3.72


NOTE: Percents are proportion black of all race/ethnic groups


NOTE: Percents are proportion black of all race/ethnic groups
Data are from Tables B-19 through 8-22 in Florida's Desegregation Status Reports

SOURCE: NCES 2300-2.1 Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred, 1977-78 to 1979-80.


(1977-78 through 1980-81).


81
13


979
232
38
26

647
110

3

1,626
342
41
26











at the predominantly white institutions were awarded to black students.

By 1979-80, the percentage representation of black bachelor's degree

recipients was 5.1 percent.

The absolute number of bachelor's degrees awarded to black students
at the predominantly white institutions also increased during this
five-year period. In 1975-76, 731 blacks received B.A. degrees, while in

1979-80, 979 degrees were conferred--an increase of 39-9.percent. During

this same period of time, the number of baccalaureate degrees awarded to
11.7
black students at Florida A&M University increased by -1-4 percent. It
is thus clear that a substantial proportion of the increase in the number
of black baccalaureate degree holders in Florida is due to the increase

in the number of degrees conferred by the predominantly white

institutions. However, FAMU continues to be the major producer of black
baccalaureates. Of the black students in the System who earned
2A.8
bachelor's degrees in 1979-80, 4~-3 percent were graduates of Florida A&M

University.




2. Assessing Minority Student Representation


The State University System of Florida and its member institutions

have expended considerable effort to effect an increase in black student
enrollment, retention and graduation rates. By implementing high school
and community college recruitment programs, providing extensive academic

support services and access to financial assistance, an increase in the

number of black students matriculating through Florida's public











universities has been achieved.

In absolute terms, the number of black students attending the

predominantly white institutions has increased over the past several

years (Table II-R). In 1977-78, 6,381 black students attended the

predominantly white institutions. By 1980-81, 7,238 were in

attendance--an increase of 13.4 percent.

The number of black undergraduate students attending the

predominantly white institutions increased by 11.2 percent during this
.,3A2.
four-year period--from 5,746 in 1977-78 to ,32 in 1980-81. However,

the percentage representation of blacks among the undergraduate

population declined from 6.4 percent to 6.2 percent during the four

years.

Among first professional students, a decline in both the number and

percent representation of black students occurred. In 1977-78, 116

blacks were enrolled in first professional programs. By 1980-81, 109

students were enrolled. This 6.0 percent decrease in absolute numbers

was accompanied by a 17.5 percent decrease in the representation of black

students (4.67 percent in 1977-78 and 3.85 percent in 1980-81).

Concerted effort will be directed to improve the representation of black

students in first professional programs.

Both the number and percent representation of black students

enrolled in graduate level study increased during this period. In

1977-78, 577 black students were enrolled at the predominantly white

institutions. By 1980-81, 737 black graduate students were enrolled at

the predominantly white institutions--an increase of 27.7 percent. The

percentage representation of blacks also increased from 3.97 percent to











4.60 percent.
The increase in black graduate enrollment at the predominantly white

institutions indicates that university efforts have resulted in

significant change. Achievements in this area Systemwide are, however,
significantly influenced by the absolute decline in black graduate
student enrollment at Florida A&M University. While there were 539 black

graduate students at FAMU in 1977-78, the number of students decreased to

438 in 1978-79, 254 in 1979-80, and only 81 during the 1980-81 academic

year. It is anticipated that as the new graduate programs mature, the
graduate student enrollment will increase over the next four years. For
the System as a whole, then, the overall enrollment of black graduate

students has declined from 1,116 (7.37 percent) in 1977-78 to 818

(5.07 percent) in 1980-81.
The enrollment of white students at Florida A&M University has

fluctuated somewhat during the past nine years (see page 15). The lowest

enrollment of whites was in 1971 (147 students representing 4.8 percent

of the student population). A peak in white enrollment occurred in 1976,

when 708 (12.3 percent) white students were enrolled, and again in 1978,
when 620 (10.5 percent) were enrolled. In the intervening years, the
white enrollment has remained fairly constant at just under nine
percent.

Overall white student representation at FAMU in 1980-81 was 8.6

percent (463 students), which compares quite favorably with the
representation of black students achieved by the predominantly white
institutions. In fact, only two other universities exceeded this

percentage: FSU, with a black student representation of 8.98 percent,












and FIU, where blacks comprised 8.91 percent of the overall black/white
population.
Thus, the System as a whole continues to make progress toward the

goal of achieving an equitable racial distribution among the nine public

universities.












TABLE II-R
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM BLACK ENROLLMENT SUMMARY

ACADEMIC YEAR
SITATIE RSIIIES -FALL 1911 FALL 197V FALL 1979 FALL 1980
Under- First Under- First Under- First Under- First
Graduate Profession Graduate Total Graduate Profession Graduate Total Graduate Profession Graduate Total Graduate Profession Graduate lotal
Florida Atlantic University 5.66 4.15 5.52 6.09 4.32 5.81 5.43 3.83 5.23 4.95 3.01 4.11
(357) (55) (412) (391) (41) (432) (349) (35) (384) (333) (29) (362)
Florida International University 9.30 5.94 9.00 10.26 7.16 9.97 9.83 7.80 9.63 9.14 6.48 8.91
(897) (56) (953) (1,052) (76) (1,128) (975) (86) (1,061) (974) (66) (1,040)
Florida State University 9.60 3.58 5.72 8.78 10.40 3.80 5.70 9.42 9.98 3.24 6.52 9.23 9.60 3.13 6.82 8.98
(1,523) (18) (194) (1,735) (1,673) (20) (198) (1.891) (1,664) (17) (225) (1,906) (1,670) (17) (242) (1,929)
University of Central Florida 4.05 3.32 3.98 3.54 4.46 3.62 3.23 2.10 3.14 4.22 2.33 4.06
(385) (33) (418) (351) (40) (391) (360) (20) (380) (499) (26) (525)
University of Florida 4.90 5.51 3.11 4.69 5.23 6.04 3.24 5.01 5.63 5.36 3.46 5.11 5.05 4.31 3.65 4.82
(1,181) (95) (129) (1,405) (1,317) (110) (135) (1,562) (1,402) (106) (144) (1,652) (1,357) (86) (160) (1,603)
University of North Florida 9.21 3.91 8.00 8.64 5.76 8.04 9.31 5.38 8.54 8.85 6.03 8.31
(247) (31) (278) (292) (51) (343) (332) (47) (379) (330) (54) (384)
University of South Florida 5.06 1.18 2.03 4.64 4.96 1.39 2.39 4.65 4.67 1.04 3.15 4.47 4.32 2.10 3.77 4.22
(874) (3) (49) (926) (995) (4) (56) (1,055) (971) (3) (79) (1,053) (935) (6) (117) (1,058)
University of West Florida 6.48 4.31 6.18 7.15 5.02 6.80 7.24 4.82 6.81 6.64 4.37 6.23
(282) (30) (312) (310) (43) (353) (312) (45) (357) (294) (43) (337)
Predominately White Institutions 6.40 4.67 3.97 6.03 6.68 5.09 4.37 6.34 6.43 4.45 4.57 6.15 6.19 3.85 4.60 5.93
(5,746) (116) (577) (6,439) (6,381) (134) (640) (7,155) (6,365) (124) (681) (7,172) (6,392) (109) (737) (7,238)
Florida A&M University 88.28 90.13 88.47 88.95 66.57 86.45 89.04 100.0 80.13 88.55 88.58 87.50 72.32 88.23
(4,777) (539) (5,316) (4,647) (438) (5,085) (4,639) (9) (254) (4,902) (4,644) (14) (81) (4,739)
itate University System 11.00 4.67 7.37 10.43 10.94 5.09 7.05 10.31 10.56 4.82 6.14 9.88 10.17 4.33 5.07 9.39
(10,523) (116) (1,116) (11,755) (11,028) (134) 1,078 (12,240) (11,004) (135) (935) 12,074 (11,036) (123) (818) (11.977)


NOE: Data are percent black of all race/ethnic groups with n-counts of blacks in parentheses
Data are from Tables 8-15 through B-18 in Florida's Desegregation Status Reports (1977-78 through 1980-81).


----


w











Section III

Equal Employment Opportunity

A. Introduction


The 1978 Revised Plan committed the State of Florida to increase the

participation of blacks in public higher education in proportions at least

approximating their representation in the appropriate labor pool. In

support of this commitment, each of the nine universities in the State

University System, developed and implemented plans to support the specific

requirements for equal employment opportunity as required by the
Revised Criteria issued by the Office for Civil Rights in 1977. However,

between 1978 and 1980, seven of the nine universities1 have developed and

had approved affirmative action plans designed to ensure compliance with

the equal employment opportunity provisions of Title VII of the 1964 Civil

Rights Act, and Executive Order 11246. These plans were approved by the

Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), United States

Department of Labor. Because of the variations between the OFCCP guide-

lines and OCR requirements, an agreement was reached with the Department

of Education to eliminate the establishment of duplicate goals for the

same protected class. As stipulated in the April 1, 1981, letter to the
Department, Affirmative Action Plans approved by OFCCP "will constitute


Universities with approved OFCCP Affirmative Action Plans include:
Florida International University, Florida Atlantic University,
University of South Florida, Florida State University, University
of Central Florida, University of Florida, and the University of
West Florida.











acceptable measures and procedures to achieve the employment goals set
forth in the Plan." This Annual Report continues the assessment of

progress made in accordance with the Title VI Affirmative Action require-

ments, with the new agreement becoming effective in the August, 1982,

Report.

In response to OCR Revised Criteria, the State University System

committed to achieve parity with the proportion of black Ph.D. degree

recipients in the National work force and the employment of black faculty

and staff in positions requiring the doctorate degree. For professional

positions which do not require a doctoral degree, the System is committed

to achieving equity with the proportion of black students who received

master's degrees in 1975-76; or 7.6 percent. The System is further

committed to maintaining the representation of blacks in non-academic

positions at a level which is proportionate to the representation of

blacks in Florida's population. It is estimated that blacks now comprise

13.8 percent of the State's population.

The Criteria also requires that black representation on the Board of

Regents be proportionate to the representation of blacks in the State. In

1977, 20.0 percent of Board members were black. Presently, with the

recent expansion of the Board from ten to thirteen members, black re-

presentation stands at 8.0 percent.

This section of the annual report presents information on those

institutional programs and systemwide activities developed and implemented

to support achievement of the specific affirmations contained in the

Revised Plan. The numerical assessment of achievement of employment goals

is presented in the statistical report.











The Revised Plan delineated four specific measures which State

University System institutions and the Regents Office were to address:

Increasing Black Faculty and Staff; Recruitment and Selection Procedures,

Upward Mobility Training Programs; and Establishment and Monitoring of

Employment Goals. A fuller description of these programs is provided in

each university's Annual Report.




B. Increasing Black Faculty and Staff Representation


While the pool of black persons with terminal degrees is growing, the

percentage of blacks earning the doctoral degree in the United States in

1979 was only 4.0 percent. Nearly 1.0 percent of these degree recipients

were graduates of the State University System of Florida. Data on blacks

in the national academic workforce reveal that blacks represented 1.2

percent of the doctoral degree-holders in selected disciplines.

Because of a dearth of black professionals in appropriate discip-

lines, the Revised Plan committed the System to address this problem

through establishment of a "grow your own" program. The Grant-in-Aid

program for black graduate students and employees was designed to aid

universities in overcoming the difficulty in locating and recruiting

qualified blacks and other minorities for specific needs and/or discip-

lines.

The Employee Program, implemented under Action Form Nine, provides

universities with the opportunity to increase the number of black em-

ployees qualified for promotion in Career Service, Administrative and











Professional positions, and/or faculty in non-traditional disciplines.

Employees who have demonstrated the commitment to further their education,

and who have the potential for advancement in the State University System,

are selected by the individual institutions to receive the grants-in-aid.

Partial funding for the program is provided through the EEO Special

Allocation. Each university receives $16,000 to support the hiring of

temporary personnel to replace one career service and one faculty/A&P

employee during the period of educational leave. Recipients are granted

educational leave, for up to one academic year, with full pay and bene-

fits. The Cost of hiring replacement personnel beyond the level of

funding provided through the EEO Special Allocation is absorbed by the

institution. An additional $1,200 in EEO funding is distributed to each

institution to provide career service recipients with an educational

stipend of $400 per quarter. The stipend assists these recipients, who

are frequently employed in lower paying positions, to help defray the

costs of tuition and books.

In the past three years, the program has provided educational leave

for a total of 104 university employees. Of the 70 participants in

1978-79 and 1979-80, .25 were faculty and/or administrative staff and 45

were career service employees. Twenty-six percent of these participants

completed their educational programs and 16.0 percent have been promoted.

The Board of Regents allocated $357,064 to support the program for the two

year period.

During 1980-81, 12 faculty/A&P and 22 career service personnel re-
ceived full or partial grants-in-aid, and the program was allocated a

total of $172,000. Overall, the program continues to be successful by











providing State University System faculty and staff the opportunity to

make substantial progress toward earning and/or completing academic

degrees without the added responsibilities of full-time employment. It

also assists universities in meeting their affirmative action commitment

to increasing promotional opportunities for employees.

The recruitment of black professional personnel is severely affected

due to the scarcity of blacks with the requisite credentials in selected

disciplines. University efforts in this area are aided, however, by two

programs implemented under Action Form Eight of the Revised Plan: the

Central Vacancy Announcement System and Central Applicant Pool.
The objective of the Vacancy Announcement System is to make employ-

ment opportunities in all of public higher education more visible in order

to achieve a greater racial and sexual diversity among applicants. The

System serves the State University System, Division of Community Colleges,

and the Department of Education's Central Office. The Applicant Pool is

used to maintain a "bank of potential applicants for positions in the

System."

During 1980-81, responsibility for maintaining the Central Vacancy

Announcement System and Applicant Pool was transferred to the Office for

Equal Opportunity Programs. To increase the efficiency of the operation,

the weekly vacancy announcement listing was computerized and procedures

for using the computer system were developed, documented and disseminated

throughout the System. Presently, all faculty and administrative

positions must be advertised for a minimum of two weeks. Operational

guidelines to improve the System are presently under review by the Chan-

cellor's Office.











Continuing efforts have been made to expand the size of the Central

Applicant Pool, and concomitantly increase the number of potential black

applicants for SUS vacancies. In June, 1980, 547 blacks were listed in

the Applicant Pool, while in June, 1981, 407 potential black applicants

were in the pool. Although there was a decrease in the number of blacks

listed in the Applicant Pool, the percentage share of System vacancies

filled by blacks increased.

Of the SUS vacancies listed through the Vacancy Announcement System

in 1979-80, blacks were hired in 9.52 percent of the administrative and

professional (A&P) positions, 9.09 percent of the faculty positions, and

12.05 percent of the career service positions. By the 1980-81 academic

year, the proportion of vacancies filled by blacks increased to 15.02

percent for A&P positions, 9.28 percent for faculty positions and 21.63

percent for career service positions.

It should be noted, however, that the hiring process is not limited

to only those persons in the pool. Indeed, during 1980-81, 58.0 percent

of the faculty positions, 57.0 percent of the administrative and pro-

fessional positions, and 41.0 percent of the career service positions were

filled by persons who were neither listed in the Applicant Pool nor

employed in another SUS position. However, 13.0 percent of the A&P, 21.0

percent of the faculty, and 13.0 percent of the career service positions

were filled by individuals who had been listed in the Central Applicant

Pool.

Of the administrative/professional vacancies filled by blacks, 23.5

percent of the new hires had been listed in the Central Applicant Pool,

while 12.5 percent had been employed in another SUS position. Com-











paratively, 3.46 percent of blacks hired in faculty positions were from

the Applicant Pool, while 13.1 percent were from within the System. For

career service employees, 17.6 percent of the black hires were from the

Applicant Pool and 25.8 percent from within the System. This data is

displayed in Table II-S.
Although the Central Applicant Pool is not a major conduit by which

prospective personnel achieve employment in the System, the data indicate

that the pool is being utilized by hiring departments and that blacks in

the pool are obtaining employment.
A major review of the Central Applicant Pool will be conducted by the

Office for Equal Opportunity Programs in 1981-82.
Part of the State University System's commitment with regard to equal

employment opportunity includes the establishment of employment goals

based upon the availability of blacks in the relevant labor pools, and the

monitoring of progress toward achievement of these goals.
In response to these commitments, the Regents Office contracted with

MGT of America, Inc. to develop a computerized hiring goals model which

would consolidate the requirements of Title VI and the Executive Order

11246 and could identify for each institution realistic employment goals

for professional academic positions. The data and computer simulation

techniques have been organized such that goals for each university can be

based on the goals of the System, the availability of qualified blacks,

women and other minorities in the relevant labor pools, the personnel
needs of each university and its organizational components, and the

personnel patterns (retention, retirement, etc.) of each institution.














TABLE III-S


PERCENTAGE OF BLACKS HIRED BY APPLICATION SOURCE
AND TYPE OF POSITION


POSITION TYPE
APPLICATION SOURCE ADMINISTRATIVE FACULTY CAREER SERVICE


External*


Central Applicant Pool


Within the SUS


14.47

23.52

12.50


10.00

3.46

13.09


18.17

17.64

25.80


*Person applying for and filling position was neither current State University System employee nor listed
in the Central Applicant Pool.


8/81


SOURCE: Office for Equal Opportunity Programs (Vacancy Announcement Section).











During 1980-81, the simulation model was tested and evaluated at the

University of Florida and the University of North Florida. The model was

further refined, and the University of North Florida executed the

programs, held administrative hearings, and utilized the outputs.

Simultaneous with the development, testing and implementation of the

Hiring Goals Model, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs

began audits of university affirmative action programs. A review will be

made of the Hiring Goals Model to determine whether, with modification, it

can accommodate the OFCCP requirements for the establishment of employment

goals.




C. Overall Black Representation


Institutional and System efforts to improve the equitable parti-

cipation of blacks in higher education employment have met with varying

results. In terms of absolute numbers of black professional employees at

predominantly white institutions, more blacks were employed in Execu-

tive/Administrative/Managerial positions in 1980-81 than in the past.

Between 1977-78 and 1980-81, black employment in this category increased

by 31.0 percent. The gains made in these positions were not matched,

however, in the employment of blacks in faculty positions. The number of

black faculty at predominantly white institutions has remained stable--at

about 170 or 3.2 percent since 1977-78.

While it is noted that black professional employees have been hired

at the predominantly white institutions, serious attention is needed to











focus on how to retain more of the black faculty and staff who have been

hired in order to achieve long-term goals.

Employment of black personnel in the System has remained relatively

stable over the past six years. In 1975-76, blacks comprised 18.5 percent

of all full-time employees, while in 1980-81, they represented 18.4

percent of the System's staff. Gains have been made, however, in the

employment of black faculty. In 1975-76, blacks comprised 5.6 percent of

the instructional faculty, while in 1980-81, 6.1 percent of the faculty

were black. In addition, the number and percentage representation of

black tenured faculty has increased significantly--from 69 (2.4 percent)

in 1975-76 to 140 (4.1 percent) in 1980-81.

The State University System is committed to employing blacks in

non-academic positions in proportion to their representation in the

general population of the State. The SUS far exceeds this goal of 13.8

percent black employment, with an overall representation of black per-

sonnel in non-academic positions of 28.9 percent*.















*Non-academic positions include secretary/clerical, technical/para-
professional, skilled crafts, and service/maintenance positions.


/*










Section IV
Monitoring Activities


Although the overall responsibility for ensuring and monitoring equal
access/equal opportunity in Florida's State University System is shared by
several agencies (e.g., State Board of Education, Board of Regents,
Chancellor of the State University System, University Presidents), co-
ordination within the State University System is accomplished by inter-
institutional committees, university Equal Opportunity Coordinators, Board
of Regents Executive Staff and the State University System Office for
Equal Opportunity Programs.

With the establishment in 1976 of the Office for Equal Opportunity
Programs, responsibility for overall coordination of the System's efforts
under the equal educational opportunity Plan was placed within one office
of the Board of Regents. The State University System Office for Equal
Opportunity Programs continues to be responsible for assisting the Chan-
cellor to carry out equal opportunity responsibilities and provides
liaison with the Department of Education, Board of Regents, System Uni-
versities and other State and Federal offices and agencies. Under the
direction of the Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Equal Oppor-
tunity, the Office for Equal Opportunity Programs facilitates, evaluates,
and monitors programs in the implementation of affirmative action/equal
opportunity at all levels within the System. Progress is monitored both
statistically and programmatically.
The EOP Office is also responsible for the allocation and monitoring
of the use of financial resources for affirmative action and equal educa-










tional opportunity programs. During the period from 1974-75 to 1980-81,
$7,678,436 have been distributed to the universities for direct support of

various programs implemented under the Revised Plan. In 1980-81 alone,

$1,200,000 was allocated to support EEO programs and activities. Further,
approximately $100,000 per year is provided in computer support for the
annual statewide progress reports and other special reports.

The EEO Special Allocation constitutes, however, only a portion of

the State funding provided to support EEO programs and activities in the

System. Accurate costs cannot be calculated since it is virtually im-

possible to separately identify the level of internal institutional
funding and the contributions of staff time used to support EEO efforts at

each of the nine universities. Although the System's total annual ex-

penditure for EEO cannot be accurately determined, a sufficient financial

base for program operation has been established at each university through

the combination of EEO Special Allocations, the Commissioner of Educ-

ation's EA/EO Project Grants, Federal and private grant awards, and

internal institutional resources.

Activities of the EOP Office are, in general, carried out under the

auspices of Chancellor's Memorandum 77-12, which defines the role and
responsibilities of the Office, and under Action Form Twelve of the
Revised Plan: "Monitoring and Measuring of Progress to Provide Access and

Equal Opportunity throughout the State University System of Florida." The
commitment to monitor and measure progress is fulfilled by both the Board

of Regents and the State Universities.

Each university has appointed an EEO Coordinator who retains primary
responsibility for monitoring progress under the Revised Plan. In










addition, all universities have established internal EEO Advisory

Committees to address local EEO concerns of both students and employees.

Two statewide committees are charged with monitoring the State University

System's commitments under the Revised Plan: the State University System

EEO Task Force and the Statewide Higher Education Bi-Racial Monitoring

Council.

Each university EEO Coordinator serves on the State University System

EEO Task Force. During 1980-81, the Special Assistant to the Chancellor

convened six meetings of the Task Force to discuss issues of Systemwide

concern as well as to review proposed new policies and implementation of

programs at the institutional level. Recommendations of the Task Force

are forwarded to the Chancellor concerning the impact of proposed policy

changes on EEO/AA plans. Procedures for implementing and strenghtening

EEO efforts at the institutional level are consistently reviewed.

The statewide Higher Education Bi-Racial Monitoring Council also met

during 1980-81. The Bi-Racial Council, which serves as an advisory

committee to the Commissioner of Education, met on January 11 and 12,

1981, at the University of South Florida to assess the institution's EEO

programs and activities. Through a series of open discussions with USF

administrators, faculty, staff and students, the Council was apprised of

campus concerns relative to implementation of the Revised Plan.

As a result of the Council's recommendation to the Commissioner of

Education in 1978-79, the Commissioner of Education's EA/EO Project Grants

were established in 1979-80. Funding for the Project Grants was initially

appropriated by the Legislature for a two-year period beginning in
1979-80. During 1980-81, five universities were awarded Project Grants










147, 12A CF, UlF-, UNF,
totaling $94,113. The Project Grants at USF, FSU, UWF, and FAMU were
used to expand retention services for black students. A description of

the funded proposals is included in the respective university's Annual

Report (appended).

The Office for Equal Opportunity Programs continues to fulfill its

responsibility for coordinating and monitoring institutional imple-

mentation of EEO programs during 1980-81.

During the period July 1, 1980, to June 30, 1981, thirty-four actions
were proposed for which Impact Studies were filed with the Office for

Equal Opportunity Programs. Implementation of new academic degree pro-

grams accounted for the major share of these assessments with twenty-eight
new degree programs being approved as meeting the criteria for such

studies and having a positive impact on the equal educational opportunity

goals of the State University System.

With the cooperation of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs,
Impact Studies are received by the Equal Opportunity Program's Office from
the universities in advance of the Board of Regents meeting. Only after

assessment of the study and final approval is the proposed action con-

sidered by the Program and Planning Committee of the Board.

Chancellor's Memorandum 76-02 (Revised), serves as the policy docu-
ment governing the EEO Impact Assessment procedure. The report of Impact
Assessments considered by the Board of Regents Central Office in 1980-81,
is presented in Appendix D.

The Special Assistant to the Chancellor serves as chairperson of the
SUS EEO Task Force, sits on the Bi-Racial Council, and is a member of the
Commissioner's Project Grants review team. The Special Assistant meets











frequently with other members of the Board of Regents Executive Staff, and

reports directly to the Chancellor on all equal access, equal opportunity

matters. Several reports were made by the Special Assistant to the Board

of Regents Planning Committee on the status of affirmative action in the

System and the status of equal educational opportunity between March and

May, 1981.

Also during 1980-81, the Office for Equal Opportunity Programs

continued to facilitate communications and responses to state and federal

agencies concerning the System's equal -opportunity responsibilities.







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STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE 32301
AAL." 0. TURLINCTON
COMMutSSONt u
February 21, 1981




Mr. Fredrick P. Cioffi
Acting Assistant Secretary for
Civil Rights
Department of Education
330 C Street, S. W.
Washington, D. C. 20201

Dear Mr. Cioffi:

We feel that our colleges and universities have worked hard
and accomplished much. I am pleased that the letter of
January 15, 1981 recognized some of our accomplishments.

However, I was shocked by the thrust of the letter. It is
apparent that some portions of the letter and its'attach-
ments were prepared without considering information that had
been provided to the Department's representatives, and that
they were based upon other errors. I understand that such
errors can occur, especially when there is limited continuity
of personnel who administer a program. Florida takes issue
with the assertions in the letter and its attachments.
Attachment A to this letter responds to the concerns expressed
in the January letter.

Florida's formerly dual system of public higher education has
been dismantled. In.addition, Florida has made substantial
progress in meeting its voluntary affirmative action commit-
ment. Florida's system is not segregated, and we remain
committed to equal opportunity in higher education.

Florida does not wish to have an adversary relationship with
the Department of Education. I would like to continue in
the spirit expressed in David Tatel's letter.of February 3,
1978, which accepted our Plan.


(Ju V. a ^ -


Ralph D. Turlington

fmg


affirmative acion/equal opportunity erotover










Attachment A


Florida's Plan for Equal Access and Equal
Opportunity in Public Higher Education
Response to OCR 1978-79 Evaluation

I Entrance of Black Students into Higher Education

Plan: To continue to enroll as first-time students in the
publc community colleges and universities, take as a whole,
black/white proportions which approximate the black/white
proportions of the appropriate pools of potential students in
the state.

Status: Information collected on the HEGIS 2300-2.3 Opening
FaTllEnrollment form for Fall Quarter, 1979 indicates that of
the black/white first-time-in-college and other first year
entrants to the State University System, 18.63% were black
students. The black/white percentage of public high school
graduates the previous June, was 19.83%.

Action: Florida will continue to enroll first-time students
in the Community College and the State University Systems,
taken as a whole, black/white proportions which approximate
the black/white proportions of the appropriate pools of
potential students.

II Enrollment at FAMU

Status: The state, through the planned improvement of the
physical facilities and the addition of new degree programs,
as described herein, in addition to the quality improvement
of present program offerings, will make FAMU more attractive
to all students. The State reaffirms its request of April 21,
1980, for official interpretation of this criterion.
FAMU has established an Office of Articulation and University
Access. The principal thrust of this office is to disseminate
information concerning university programs, offerings, and
opportunities to community college and high school counselors
and that statewide pool of potential students. Major emphasis
"has been placed on nontraditional students, non-black students
and the attraction of students into areas where minorities are
traditionally underrepresented. The articulation team is a
biracial mix and is part of the total articulation thrust. The
team participates in the State University System tour for
Junior/Community Colleges and the Florida School Relations
Committee for High Schools.

FAMU Counseling Center assumed the responsibility for develop-
ing relevant, as well as diverse, programs for its complex
student population. The Counseling and Assessment Center










assumes the responsibility of providing development, preventive,
and training programs which are specifically designed to im-
prove the student's overall human growth and development.

Some changes in the financial aid application process and the
phasing out of the Incentive Grant Program are two financial
aid factors that have negatively affected the student enroll-
ment at FAMU. The added requirements that have been imposed
by the Validation Process for the BEOG have deferred the en-
rollment of a significant number of those students who were
validated. It was estimated that 300 students were not able
to be validated in time to enroll at the University by the
fall of 1980.

Action: The State will continue to carry out its commitment
for the enhancement of FAMU.

III Black Enrollment in the Upper Division Programs

Plan: To increase the enrollment of blacks entering
the upper division of predominantly white universities until
the proportion approximates the black proportion who complete
lower division work in the universities and community colleges.
Each institution will make an equitable contribution toward
meeting this goal.

Status: During 1978-79, black students comprised 10.72% of
the black/white A.A. degree recipients from the Community
College System. The four upper division institutions enrolled
2,992 A.A. degree recipients; 276 (9.22%) were black students.
The four-year predominantly white institutions enrolled
10,867 A.A. degree recipients; 715 (6.58%) were black students.
All nine institutions enrolled 14,060 A.A. degree recipients;
1,152 (8.19%) were black students. In addition, at the four-
year predominantly white institutions, of the total number of
students enrolled as first-time-in college students in 1976-77
who progressed to junior status in 1979-80, 252 (10.177) were
black students.

Action: The predominantly white institutions will continue to
increase the enrollment of black students entering the upper
division until the proportion of students approximates the
black/white proportions of students.completing lower division
work in the appropriate universities and community colleges.

IV Impact Statement

Plan: Use impact assessments and public hearings when con-
sidering changes and take actions that will not thwart the
achievement of the state's equal opportunity goals.

Advise OCR of proposed major changes in the mission or the
character of any institution within the state systems which may
impact the achievement of equal opportunity goals prior to
their formal adoption by the governing boards.


-2-









Status: The University of North Florida has not established
a branch campus in downtown Jacksonville. It does offer limited
programs downtown. Black students represent 20.0% of the
total black/white enrollment of students. No impact
assessment is needed for the project since it neither thwarts
the objectives of the Plan nor represents a change in the
mission or character of the university. The Board of Regents
has not taken any formal.action on this matter.

No test score or test has been recommended as a prerequisite
for admission to the upper division of the state universities.
A task force has been studying and identifying what it believes
are competencies needed for successful upper division work.
Before any formal action is taken by the Board of Regents, an
impact assessment will be completed and OCR will be appropriately
notified.

OCR has been informed on numerous occasions that the executive
branch of the State could not bind the legislature. The
Colleges of Education admission standard was established by'
the legislature. The legislature acted and the executive
branch must carry out its statutory responsibilities. OCR,
under a former director, agreed that situations, such as this, were
not covered by the Plan. OCR has been notified of the
statutory requirements as passed by the legislature.

Action: The state will continue to meet its commitments
under.the Plan.

V Elimination of Educationally Unnecessary Program Duplication

Plan: Use deliberative processes to evaluate the need for and
quality of degree programs in the state university system. If
the program review process and the role and scope process
identify any educationally unnecessary program duplication, the
state will eliminate such programs, giving due recognition to
the objective of strengthening the traditionally black
university.

Status: In a letter dated October 16, 1978, to former
Chancellor E. T. York, former OCR Director, David S. Tatel
commended Florida for having taken "certain promising actions,
including ... the elimination of several .duplicative programs
between the UF, FSU and FAMU." Some of these programs could
well be considered as relatively "educationally unduplicative"
consistent with OCR's evaluation of one or more similar studies.
Following this letter, a meeting between OCR and SUS was held
in November, 1978. A supplemental response on the duplication
study was forwarded in April, 1979, which was responded to by
an evaluation from OCR in July, 1979. A subsequent meeting
on this evaluation was. held in September, 1979. As a result
of the latter meeting, OCR promised to communicate further
regarding its evaluation of the duplication study. The next
communication regarding this matter is contained in the


-3-