• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 Map
 Broward County
 Charlotte County
 Collier County
 Dade County
 De Soto County
 Glades County
 Hardee County
 Hendry County
 Highlands County
 Indian River County
 Lee County
 Manatee County
 Martin County
 Monroe County
 Okeechobee County
 Palm Beach County
 Sarasota County
 St. Lucie County
 Illustrations






Group Title: South Florida : a narrative and graphic guide to the southern counties of the State
Title: South Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000215/00001
 Material Information
Title: South Florida a narrative and graphic guide to the southern counties of the State
Physical Description: 46 p. : maps (1 fold. in pocket) photos. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Road Dept
Publisher: State Road Dept. of Fla. in cooperation with Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: [1950?]
 Subjects
Subject: Guidebooks -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000215
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01845181
lccn - a 53004490

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Map
        Page 2
    Broward County
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Charlotte County
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Collier County
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Dade County
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    De Soto County
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Glades County
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Hardee County
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Hendry County
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Highlands County
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Indian River County
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Lee County
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Manatee County
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Martin County
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Monroe County
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Okeechobee County
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Palm Beach County
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Sarasota County
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    St. Lucie County
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Illustrations
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
Full Text





SOUTH


FLORIDA


A Narrative and Graphic
Guide to the Southern
Counties of the State


STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA
ALFRED A. MCKETHAN, Chairman
J. GLOVER TAYLOR MERRILL P. BARBER
MARION G. NELSON TRUSTEN P. DRAKE, JR.
in cooperation with
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA






















65635



















S,, "The Sunshine State,"
Sis being visited for the first time by thousands,
and being discovered as America's "Land of
Opportunity." "The Sunshine State," bound-
ed on three sides by the Atlantic Ocean and
the Gulf of Mexico, is an incomparable haven
for good living. Florida's versatile economy-agricultural, industrial
and recreational-while showing amazing growth and expansion in
this post-war era, has hardly begun to approach its full potential.
We offer to our visitors much to see and do in Florida on a year-
round basis. Good roads are provided to Florida's world renowned
beaches, its beautiful lakes and rivers, its scenic attractions, its unsur-
passed citrus groves, its winter vegetable gardens of America, its vast
cattle ranches, its timber lands, its extensive farming areas, its rapidly
growing industrial centers; yes, through a land of opportunity unlim-
ited, a land of health, and, since the early days of the first explorers,
recognized as the land of perpetual youth.
This booklet, one of a series of three: North Florida, Central Florida
and South Florida, with an official Florida State Road Department road
map inserted in the back, has been prepared to give a comprehensive
word and picture story of each county in the State as a guide in your
travels. The information contained herein, we believe, will help you to
make the most of your trip throughout "The Sunshine State" and por-
tray for you the tremendous advantages to be found in Florida.





Chairman
State Road Department of Florida












Other Sources of


Information on Florida




FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Immigration Tallahassee

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
State Capitol Tallahassee

FLORIDA STATE ADVERTISING COMMISSION
700 Commission Bldg. Tallahassee

FLORIDA STATE IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION
P. O. Box 930 Tallahassee

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
P. O. Drawer 631 Tallahassee

FLORIDA INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION
Tallahassee

FLORIDA STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
510-520 Hildebrandt Bldg. Jacksonville

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
311 West Monroe St. Jacksonville

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES


Population figures are official preliminary figures from the U. S. Bureau
of the Census. All county maps are in correct proportion to each other with
the exception of Monroe County, which has been reduced further because
of space limitations. Effective buying income, as used from Sales Manage-
ment Magazine, means total personal income less individual Federal
income taxes. Total annual wages represent only those employees covered
by Florida Employment Compensation Act. Retail Sales for 1948 are from
U. S. Bureau of Census; bank resources from Sales Management Magazine.
















CONTENTS


SOUTH FLORIDA COUNTIES


Broward ........................ 3



Charlotte ....................... 6



C ollier .......................... 8



Dade ............. ............. 10



DeSoto ............ ... ......... 14



Glades .......................... 16


Hardee


Hendry ......................... 20



Highlands ....................... 22


Indian River ..................... 24



Lee ............... ............. 26



Manatee ........................ 29



M artin .......................... 32



M onroe ......................... 34



Okeechobee ..................... 37



Palm Beach ..................... 39



Sarasota ........................ 42



St. Lucie ........................ 45


Illustrations begin on page 47















































































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BROWARD ................. Ft. Lauderdale
CHARLOTTE ................ Punta Gorda
COLLIER . . . . Everglades
DADE ........ ...... ........... M iam i
DeSOTO .......... .... ........... Arcadia
GLADES ..................... Moore Haven '. ,
HARDEE ............... ... Wauchula











HENDRY ......... ......... LaBelle
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SOUTH FLORIDA








HIGHLACounty County... Sebring







INDIAN RIVER ................ Vero Beach
LEE BROWARD............. ....... Ft.Myer
CHARLOTTE .......... Punta Gorda








MANATCOLLIER ............... ... EBradenton
MARTIN ........... .. .... .. Stuart
DeSO TO ......... ......... .... Key W est
GLADES ............ Moore Haven







HARDEE ..................... OkeWchobee
HENDRY ...................... LaBelle :a.e.

HIGHLANDS.................. Sebring ..





INDIAN RIVERACH ............... West Palm Beach
LEE ............. ................Ft. Myers
MANATEE......................Bradenton


MONROE ..................... Key West 4
OKEECHOBEE................Okeechobee
PALM BEACH ........... West Palm Beach
SARASOTA ..................... Sarasota
ST. LUCIE .................... Ft. Pierce


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BROWARD COUNTY
County Scat: Fort Lauderdale
Population: 83,318
Incorporated Cities: Dania, Deerfield Beach, Fort Lauderdale,
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Hallandale, Hillsboro Beach, Hollywood,
Oakland Park, Pompano Beach, Wilton Manors.


BROWARD COUNTY is located on the lower east coast of Florida and its
778,240 acres are bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the north
by Palm Beach county, on the west by Hendry and Collier counties, and
on the south by Dade county. The county seat, Fort Lauderdale, is 25
miles north of Miami, 45 miles south of West Palm Beach, and 327 miles
southeast of Jacksonville.
The elevation at Fort Lauderdale is 7 feet above sea level. Farther
south, at Hollywood, the elevation is 8 feet above sea level. The weather
is semi-tropical, varying from an average of 68.6 degrees in January to
an average of 82.0 degrees in August, for an annual average temperature
of 75.2 degrees. The average annual rainfall is 65.19 inches and the
heaviest rainfall recorded is in November.
The tourist industry, agriculture, and some construction industries,
make up the principal sources of income in the county. With the entire
east coast of Broward county fronting on the warm Atlantic Ocean, the
many beaches are a year-round tourist attraction. Some communities in
the county receive virtually all of their income from tourists and all the
principal cities are located on the coast.




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A variety of vegetables, beans, peppers, cucumbers, potatoes, squashes,
tomatoes, lima beans, and eggplant, are grown in the county for ship-
ment to northern markets. Oranges, lemons, limes, and a variety of other
small fruits are grown in the county. There are 108,111 acres devoted to
farm lands of which 4,373 are planted to citrus, and 17,600 to vegetables.
Cattle are raised to a great extent and there are 70,785 acres of pasture
land to fill the needs of the cattle-raisers. There are 11,000 head of dairy
cattle and 17,000 head of beef cattle. There are 54,800 acres of timber
lands. Commercial fishing during 1948 amounted to 895,200 pounds of
food fish caught and marketed in the county. Raising of poultry is a large
activity here, supplying the needs of Palm Beach and Miami markets.
One of the largest vegetable markets in the United States is located at
Pompano.

Port Everglades, adjacent to Fort Lauderdale, offers port and dock
facilities for large ocean shipping. The busy port, dredged to clear 35 feet,
is a considerable asset to Broward county.

Total assessed valuation in 1948 was $206,301,512. Banking resources
amounted to $64,865,000 and retail sales totalled $93,630,000. Total annual
wages in 1948 amounted to $23,619,708. Effective buying income was $1,-
127 per capital and $63,441,000 for the county in 1949.

Because of its tourist attraction, sports fishing is a major industry
here. Salt-water sailfish, blue marlin, white marlin, tarpon, tuna, kingfish,
dolphin, wahoo, barracuda, amberjack, bonita, mackerel, cobia, snook, chan-
nel bass, pompano, bluefish, grouper, snapper, and many other varieties of
fish are caught in the Gulf Stream and the Atlantic Ocean. Salt-water and
fresh-water fish are also caught in the Intracoastal Waterway. Charter
boats are available for fishing trips. Quail, dove, deer, rabbits, ducks,
pheasants, turkey, and snipes are found in this section.

Many recreational facilities are available in the county and the cities
own extensive beach fronts and maintain city parks and recreation centers.
Gulfstream Race Track is located here and dog races and automobile
races are held during the seasons. The Toronto Maple Leafs hold spring
training in Fort Lauderdale.

U. S. Highways 1 and A1A traverse the east coast of the county. Flor-
ida highways 7, 25, 84, 810, 814, 820 and 823 are in the county. The New
River Canal runs through Broward county from Lake Okeechobee to Fort
Lauderdale and the Miami Canal crosses the county from Lake Okeecho-
bee to Miami. Florida East Coast Railroad and Seaboard Airline Rail-
way provide rail service. Greyhound Lines and Coast Cities Coaches pro-
vide bus service.









There are twenty-five elementary and 10 secondary schools in the coun-
ty and one of the most modern schools in the nation, South Broward High
School, is located at Hollywood. School enrollment in 1947-48 was 11,-
994. There are ten newspapers published in the county, one daily paper,
the Fort Lauderdale News, and nine weeklies. These include the Dania
Press, County Record, Florida Spur, Sun Colony, Broward Sun, Hal-
landale Pioneer, Hollywood Beach Beacon, Hollywood Herald and Holly-
wood Sun-Tattler. One hundred and ninety-eight hospital beds are
available.
One of the first Seminole Indian reservations to be established is lo-
cated within the county and archaeologists have uncovered many fine
ruins of extinct Indian tribes in this section. Broward county was cre-
ated in 1915 from Palm Beach and Dade counties.
The county was originally Indian Territory and Major William Lau-
derdale established a fort at what is now Fort Lauderdale-then farther
into Indian territory than any fort in the State. Hallandale, founded in
1898, is one of the oldest communities on the lower east coast of Florida.
New River, running through the center of Fort Lauderdale, is only 9
miles long and is the deepest river in the world for its length and width.
According to old Indian legend, the river appeared overnight. The county
was named for Governor N. B. Broward.










CHARLOTTE COUNTY

County Seat: Punta Gorda
Population: 4,267
Incorporated Cities: Punta Gorda.


C IARLOTTE COUNTY, comprising 513,920 acres, of which 273,321 acres are
devoted to farm lands, lies along the southwest coast of Florida. It is bor-
dered by Sarasota, DeSoto, Glades and Lee counties and on the west by
Charlotte Harbor Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. The county has one of the
longest coast lines in the State. Punta Gorda, the county seat, is located on
the Bay, with one of the largest harbors in the State. Punta Gorda is 47
miles from Sarasota, 169 miles from Miami, and 24 miles from Fort Myers.
The climate is semi-tropical with an annual average temperature of
73.4 degrees with an average high of 81.9 degrees in August and an av-
erage low of 64.0 degrees in January. Average annual rainfall is 50.76
inches, the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August and September.
The elevation of the county is 3 feet above sea level.
The county is noted primarily for its high fish production, both com-
mercial and sports fishing. It is one of the leading commercial fishing cen-
ters in the State and during 1948, 3,426,230 pounds of food fish, 6,189
pounds of non-food fish and 35,000 pounds of crabs, Florida lobsters,
shrimp and other food fish were caught and marketed. The shrimp indus-
try, growing tremendously this year, promises to become a major indus-
try here. Sports fishing is an important asset to the county's economy
and Charlotte county is known throughout the State and nation for its




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excellent fishing possibilities. Tarpon fishing is a favorite sport and game
and fish attract sportsmen from all over the nation to Charlotte County.
Tourists come annually to enjoy these and other diversions and make an
important contribution to the county's economy. At Punta Gorda there is
a most unique fishing pier-a mile-long stretch of concrete and steel, part
of a former highway bridge, which extends out into the deepest waters of
the harbor. Through the winter season the city of Punta Gorda provides
prizes for the biggest fish caught in all varieties and a huge fish fry for
tourists is held each March. A city-owned trailer park is available for
tourists who bring their homes with them. An air show is held at the city
airport on New Year's Day.
Agriculture is another great source of income in the county. Peppers,
tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, cabbage, eggplant, and watermelons are ship-
ped in carload lots during the truck growing season. The leading staple
crops are field peas and forage crops. Oranges and grapefruits are grown
commercially and other citrus fruits, as well as bananas, mangoes, pa-
payas, cocoanuts, strawberries, and other small semi-tropical fruits are
grown. Two plants for the canning of guava jelly, making candies and
other tropical fruit products operate successfully in Punta Gorda. Grow-
ing gladioli for the commercial market is an important source of income
here. Raising of beef cattle ranks high in the county's economy and there
are now between 35,000 and 50,000 head of fine beef cattle, including sev-
eral Brahman herds. Woodland acreage totals 364,200 acres.
Quail, turkey, deer, and duck are found here and a 60,000 acre preserve
has been established in the county. Tarpon, redfish, snook, trout and other
salt-water fish are caught in salt-waters of the county and all types of
fresh-water fish are caught in the many lakes and streams in this section.
Total assessed valuation in 1948 amounted to $7,959,624. Bank resources
amounted to $2,500,000 and retail sales in the county totalled $2,955,000.
Annual wages paid in the county were $260,569. Effective buying income
was $931 per capital and $3,909,000 for the county in 1949.
U. S. Highways 17 and 41 cross the county, U. S. 41 bridging Char-
lotte Harbor Bay and connecting the town of Charlotte Harbor with Punta
Gorda. Florida highways 31, 771, 776 and 775 also enter the county. The
famed Tamiami Trail crosses Charlotte county, meeting U. S. 17 in Punta
Gorda, and both the Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Airline Railway
provide scheduled rail service. Bus service is provided by Tamiami Trail-
ways.
There are three elementary schools and one secondary school in the
county. Total school enrollment in 1947-48 was 656 pupils. A weekly news-
paper, the Punta Gorda Herald, is published at the county seat.
The county was formed in 1921 from the southern section of De Soto
county. It was named for the harbor of Charlotte Bay.











COLLIER COUNTY

County Seal: Everglades
Population: 6,452
Incorporated Cities: Everglades, Naples.


COLLIER COUNTY is located on the lower west coast of Florida, compris-
ing 1,267,200 acres. The county is bordered on the north by Lee and Hendry
counties, on the cast by Broward and Dade counties, on the south by Monroe
county and on the west by the Gulf of Mexico. Ev -.rg-l,1..-, the county seat,
is 74 miles west of Miami, and 74 miles southeast of Fort Myers. It is sit-
uated on Chokoloskee Bay near the Gulf of Mexico.

Elevation above sea level at Everglades is 4 feet. The weather varies from
an average of 67.8 degrees in December to an average of 82.4 degrees in
July with an annual average of 67.8 degrees. Average annual rainfall is
51.40 inches, the heaviest in June, July, August and September.






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Collier county was the scene of the first discovery of oil in Florida.
There are several flowing wells near Sunniland. Lumber, truck farming,
commercial fishing, ranching, tourists, and oil are important industries.
There are 333,628 acres devoted to farm lands and tomatoes, cucum-
bers, squash, beans, potatoes, peppers, melons and other truck crops. Vege-
table growing in the Immokalee section is being greatly expanded. An im-
portant economic asset, the seafood industry in Collier county was second
in the State in 1948, with 7,047,578 pounds of food fish and 1,500 pounds
of shrimp, Florida lobsters, and crabs. Many fine ranches stocked with
purebred cattle are located in the county with 327,439 acres of pastured
farm lands.
One of the last large stands of cypress in the United States is located
here and the county's timber represents one of its most valuable resources.
Woodland acreage amounts to 1,114,400 acres. A growing tourist industry
is adding to the county's economy.
This area is famous for hunting quail, wild turkey, duck, raccoon, deer,
bear, panther, and wildcat. Special guides, equipped with "swamp buggies,"
traverse the jungle-like interior on wild game hunts. Tarpon, snook, mullet,
redfish, trout, grouper, black fish, jackfish, sheepshead, barracuda, mack-
erel, kingfish, bonita and pompano are among the many varieties of fish
caught in the Gulf of Mexico and Chokoloskee Bay. Fishing guides are avail-
able and there are many fine beaches for swimming.
Assessed valuation of the county in 1948 amounted to $11,422,300 and
banking resources totalled $882,000. Retail sales amounted to $2,418,000.
Total annual wages in 1948 were $1,539,957. Effective buying income was
$861 per capital and $4,218,000 for the county in 1949.
U. S. Highway 94, the famed Tamiami Trail, crosses the county and
Florida highways 29, 92, and 951 connect the separated points of the
county. The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad provides rail service and bus
service is available by Tamiami Trailways. The county is considered the
gateway to the Everglades National Park.
There are eight elementary and four secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment in 1947-48 of 1,019 pupils. There is a weekly county
newspaper, the Collier County News, published at Everglades.
Collier county was created in 1923 from Lee county and was named for
the late Baron Collier. Originally Indian territory, it is here that the Indians
made their last stand in Florida. A Seminole Indian reservation is main-
tained in the eastern part of the county on the far side of the Big Cypress
Swamp. Mound builders who inhabited this section before the dawn of his-
tory left many shell and earth mounds. Much of the county is still uninhab-
ited jungle and swamp.










DADE COUNTY
County Seat: Miami
Population: 489,838
Incorporated Cities: Bal Harbor Village, Bar Harbor Island, Bis-
cayne Park, Coral Gables, El Portal, Florida City, Golden Beach,
Hialeah, Homestead, Indian Creek Village, Miami, Miami Beach,
Miami Shores, Miami Springs, North Bay Village, North Miami,
North Miami Beach, Opa Locka, Pennsuco, South Miami, Surf-
side, Sweetwater, Virginia Gardens, West Miami.


D ADE COUNTY is located on the southeast coast of Florida at the end of
the peninsula. It is bounded on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the south


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by Monroe county and Florida Bay, on the west by Monroe and Collier
counties and on the north by Broward county. The county comprises
1,392,640 acres, the largest land area of any county in the State. Miami, the
county seat, is located 350 miles southeast of Jacksonville. It is on Biscayne
Bay near the Atlantic Ocean.

The most tropical conditions to be found on the mainland of the United
States are found here and in adjoining counties, but because of the At-
lantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, from which there are strong trade
winds, there is not the heat of the tropics. Yet the nearness of the Gulf
Stream brings warmth to the area. The annual average temperature in
Miami is 75.1 degrees with an average low of 67.9 in January and an av-
erage high of 82.1 in August, with warm weather noted the year around.
Average annual rainfall is 57.77 inches and the heaviest rainfall in May, June
and September. The temperature and rainfall varies but slightly at dif-
ferent points in the county. Elevation above sea level is 15 feet at Miami.

Dade county is perhaps the most cosmopolitan county in the State,
both in people and industry. Although accurate statistics are not avail-
able as to the exact number of tourists who visit the county each year,
Dade county's reputation is world-wide and catering to vacationists is un-
doubtedly the county's main source of income.

Modern hotels, amusement and recreation centers, public and private
beaches and parks and other tourist and vacationist attractions are in great
abundance. Tourists come from over the nation to enjoy the pleasures of the
swimming, golf, tennis, polo, fishing, boating, yachting, cruising, bathing,
horseback riding, and other sports available. There are many sight-seeing
attractions, both commercial and public. The Lipton Cup Sailing Race and
the Miami-Nassau Yacht Race, and other bgat races held here yearly draw
many visitors. Dog racing is held at Miami and Miami Beach and horse racing
is held at Tropical and Hialeah race tracks. The International Tennis tour-
nament is held here. The Orange Bowl football game is an annual New
Year's Day attraction. World-famed as a resort the county is often referred
to as the "Riviera of America."

However, in addition to the large tourist industry, the county has a
growing variety of industries in the manufacturing of many products.
Among these are clothing, mattresses, tents, awnings, sails, baskets, crates,
veneer, furniture, wagons, auto and truck bodies, boats, steel products,
paving blocks, brooms, septic tanks, caskets, fertilizer, lampshades, chem-
icals, radios, medicine, paint, hosiery, window shades and others. Many
of the souvenirs taken home by visitors are manufactured in the county.
Several food products are manufactured and distributed in the county in-
cluding mayonnaise, potato chips and candy. There are fruit and vege-









table canneries in the county and limerock plants, planing mills, brick
kilns and concrete and building material plants.

Farming is important, too. A 1945 census showed 1,159 farms in the
county and 77,631 acres devoted to farmlands. In 1948-49 a survey showed
7,498 acres planted to citrus and 23,250 acres planted to vegetables. The
citrus crops of the county are valuable and Dade county has a reputation
for producing a high quality of oranges, grapefruit, limes, and lemons.
Tropical fruits, such as avocados, mangoes, papaya, bananas, guavas and
kumquats are grown to a considerable extent. The leading truck vegetables
are tomatoes, beans, and potatoes. Farm produce is marketed both locally
and for shipment to northern markets. Beef and dairy cattle and poultry
are also raised to a considerable extent in the county and baby chicks are
exported to South America.

Commercial fishing is another major industry. Dade county was third
in the State in 1948 in total pounds of food fish caught and marketed, with
5,535,980 pounds. Dade county also marketed 2,333,723 pounds of crabs,
crayfish, shrimp and other miscellaneous seafoods in the same year.

The county is increasing in importance as an air transportation center
and planes take off from Miami Airport to all parts of the world every
day. It has been estimated that in the fiscal year ending March 15, 1948,
payrolls and local purchases of airlines and their affiliates and expendi-
tures by passengers in transit totalled $68,996,396. The importance of
Miami as an air terminal and shipping point received impetus during
World War II when the city was used as an embarkation point for thou-
sands of troops and is now widely recognized.

Miami is the principal Latin American aerial gateway. During 1949
nearly 500,000 international passengers either entered or left the United
States through the Miami International Airport. During this same period
approximately forty million pounds of international air cargo was cleared
through Miami. The easy accessibility of the Dade county area to Latin
America is resulting in increasing trade between the two areas and a
large influx of Latin American visitors.

Dade county has the highest assessed valuation in the State and in 1948
the county valuation was set at $1,009,981,379. Retail sales in the year
amounted to $588,765,000 and bank resources were estimated at $442,000,-
000. Total annual wages in the county in 1948 amounted to $273,497,473.
Effective buying income was $571,688,000 and per capital buying income
was $1,336 in 1949.
Fishing is one of the favorite sports of the area and many different
varieties of big game fish abound in the Atlantic Ocean. Charter boats









are available for daily or overnight fishing trips. Deer, wild turkey, duck,
quail, dove, squirrel, coot, and marsh hen are found in the area.
U. S. Highways 1 and 94 and Florida highways 7, 25, 27, A1A and 828
cross the county. Both the Florida East Coast Railroad and the Seaboard
Airline Railway provide rail service. Bus service is provided by Grey-
hound Lines, Tamiami Trail Tours, Glades Motor Lines and National
Trailways. Eastern Air Lines, National Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Pan-
American World Airways, KLM Royal Dutch Airways, Expreso-Aereo
Inter-Americano and British South American Airways all provide com-
mercial scheduled air transportation from Miami International Airport
to all parts of the world.
The University of Miami is located at Coral Gables and many private
schools are available in the county. In addition, the Dade county school
board operates one of the largest vocational schools in the nation.
Dade county has the largest and one of the most modern school systems
in the state operating sixty-three elementary and twenty-two secondary
schools. During 1947-48 total school enrollment in the county was 59,484.
Hospital facilities are available in the county and a 1948 survey listed
1,651 hospital beds. There are four daily newspapers and fourteen weekly
newspapers in the county. The daily papers are Miami Herald, Miami
Daily News, Miami Review and Miami Beach Sun. The weekly papers are
Home News Weekly, Hialeah Review, Homestead Leader-Enterprise, Red-
land District News, Allapattah News, Miami Citizen, Florida Echo, Miami
Springs Home News, Jewish Floridian, Miami Life, Southeastern Airport
News, Miami Beach Times, South Miami Times, and Opa Locka Streamliner.
Dade county was formed in 1836 with a few isolated settlers living on
farms. It was not until 1894, however, when a Mrs. Tuttle sent a bouquet
of fresh orange blossoms to industrialist Henry M. Flagler, then freez-
ing in the cold north, that the major portion of the county was opened up to
the world. In 1896 Flagler's railroad reached Miami and the boom was on
which was to turn Dade county into one of the richest areas in the country.
The county was named for Major Francis L. Dade, massacred with his
command at the start of the Second Seminole War. Once Seminole Indian
territory, many of the county names are Indian in origin.
A large portion of the newly established Everglades National Park is
located in Dade county. Through the assistance of the federal government,
the Everglades area is being opened to the public, with the stipulation
that the natural beauty that makes the park one of America's only re-
maining swamp-jungle not be touched-another attraction which will draw
visitors to the borders of Dade county from all over the nation.










DE SOTO COUNTY

County Seat: Arcadia
Population: 9,184
Incorporated Cities: Arcadia.


D E SOTO COUNTY is located in south Florida, its 403,840 acres bordered
on the north by Hardee county, on the west by Manatee and Sarasota
counties, on the south by Charlotte county and on the east by Highlands
county. Arcadia, the county seat, is situated in almost the center of the
county, 85 miles southeast of Tampa and 176 miles northwest of Miami.
The annual average temperature is 72.8 degrees, varying from an aver-
age high of 81.9 degrees in August to an average low of 63.0 degrees in
January, with no extremes in temperature. Average annual rainfall is
50.66 inches, the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August and Septem-
ber. Elevation above sea level is 56 feet at Arcadia.
Citrus, cattle, agriculture and the tourist industry provide the main
sources of income. De Soto county has always been a large producer of
high-grade beef cattle and revenue from this source mounts into consid-
erable sums annually. During 1945, the latest year in which a survey is
available, some 366,049 acres of the county were devoted to pasture
lands to fill the needs of this major industry. The largest state-owned live-
stock market is located at Arcadia and an all-Florida rodeo for cowboys is
held twice yearly. There is also a considerable amount of dairy and hog
production.
With a warm temperate climate well adapted to citrus fruits, the citrus
industry takes the lead in agricultural production; 8,837 acres were
planted to citrus in 1948-49. The leading crops are cucumbers, beans, wa-
termelons, squash, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, corn, Irish potatoes, sweet
potatoes, field peas and forage crops.
A few small manufactur-
ing plants which handle
chemicals, millwork, candy,
s """""" "" furniture, baskets and ce-
(/ Brownville ment and concrete products
PinL vel 0Iz1
S o / o/ I are located in the county.
yon 0 Bunker-Lansing
/ d O Mineral deposits include
SArcadiD j marl, pebbles, phosphate de-
| E E1 J S T 0 I posits, and mineral water.









Assessed valuation of the county was $7,830,220 in 1948. Retail sales
amounted to $5,777,000 and bank resources totalled $3,196,000. Annual
wages were $1,331,344. Effective buying income was $1,249 per capital and
$8,366,000 for the county in 1949.
Hunting is limited in the county but fresh-water fish of many varie-
ties are caught in nearby creeks and in waters of Charlotte Bay which
enter the county near Fort Ogden.
U. S. Highway 17 and Florida highways 31, 70 and 72 enter the county.
The Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Airline Railway provide rail serv-
ice. Bus service is available by Glades Motor Lines.
There are five elementary and three secondary schools in the county
with a school enrollment of 1,829 pupils in 1947-48. A 1948 survey shows
680 hospital beds available in the county. A weekly newspaper, the Ar-
cadian, is published at Arcadia.
Until 1921 De Soto county was one of the largest counties in the State.
In that year it was divided, forming four new counties, leaving the pres-
ent boundaries. The county is named for the Spanish explorer, Hernando
De Soto. Arcadia was named for Arcadia, Greece, the traditional home of
pastoral poetry; hence, a region of ideal rustic simplicity and contentment.










GLADES COUNTY
County Seat: Moore Haven
Population: 2,197
Incorporated Cities: Moore Haven


G LADES COUNTY is in south Florida, one of the five counties which bor-
der on Lake Okeechobee. Highlands county is to the north, Charlotte
county to the west and Hendry county to the south. Moore Haven, the
county seat, is situated on the shores of Lake Okeechobee and is 100
miles northwest of Miami, 70 miles west of Palm Beach and 58 miles
northeast of Fort Myers.
The elevation above sea level at Moore Haven is from 8 to 22 feet. The
climate is mild with an average low of 64.0 degrees in January and an
average high of 81.2 degrees in August for an annual average temperature
of 72.8 degrees. The average annual rainfall is 49.95 inches, the heaviest
rain falling in June, July, August and September. There is very little
frost in the county.
Agriculture and cattle raising are the principal sources of income. A
portion of the Caloosahatchee Valley is in this county and the general
location of Glades county offers natural advantages for the growing of
winter vegetables. Truck vegetables, sugar cane and citrus fruits are the
leading crops grown and some remarkable records of production in truck
farming have been made in this county. The county comprises some


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480,000 acres of which 98,298 acres were devoted to farm lands in 1945;
99,900 acres of the county are forest lands.
Cattle raising is of considerable importance in this section and as the
lands of the county are mostly of the prairie type, interspersed with pine
lands, hammock lands and cypress growth, cattle production is high. There
were 74,189 acres of pastured lands on farms in 1945. In addition to the
raising of beef cattle, the dairy industry is growing rapidly and there are
15 dairies now operating in the immediate vicinity of Moore Haven with
others in the process of construction. A milk receiving station has been
erected and milk is pumped into tank cars here for shipment to other
parts of the State. There is only limited commercial fishing, largely for
catfish, in the county. In 1948, 117,350 pounds of food fish and 10,000
pounds of crabs, crayfish, etc., were caught and marketed.
Assessed valuation of Glades county in 1948 was $3,360,237. Retail
sales totalled $1,092,000. Annual wages amounted to $31,007. Effective
buying income in 1949 was $921 per capital and $2,119,000 for the county.
Turkey, deer, quail, squirrel, dove and duck are found in this area and
unposted hunting grounds are available. Bass, perch and other fresh-
water fish are caught here. An annual festival, "Chalo-Nitka," Indian for
"big bass," has been inaugurated here. The festival features boat races
on the Caloosahatchee River, which flows through Moore Haven, and the
crowning of a "King of the Bass" for the person who catches the largest
bass in the Caloosahatchee River or Lake Okeechobee.
Florida highways 25, 78 and 720 connect the various communities in the
county, highway 78 going completely around the big lake. The Atlantic
Coast Line provides rail service and bus service is available by Glades
Motor Lines.
There are three elementary and one secondary school in the county
with a school enrollment of 404 pupils in 1947-48. A weekly newspaper is
published at Clewiston, the Moore Haven Democrat.
Glades county was created from De Soto county in 1921 and takes its
name from the Everglades, a small portion of which is in the county. Once
Indian territory, a large Seminole Indian Reservation is still located in
the northeast end of the county along Florida highway 78 between Lake-
port and the City of Okeechobee, in a neighboring county. Moore Haven
was named after an early settler of the area and was the first town in
the United States to have a woman mayor.










HARDEE COUNTY

County Seat: Wauchula
Population: 10,022
Incorporated Cities: Bowling Green, Wauchula, Zolfo Springs.


H ARDEE COUNTY, located in south Florida, is a rectangular-shaped coun-
ty with an area of 406,400 acres, bounded on the north by Polk county,
on the west by Manatee county, on the south by De Soto county, and on
the east by Highlands county. Wauchula, the county seat, is 40 miles from
Lakeland and 67 miles from Sarasota.
The weather is temperate, with an annual average temperature of 73.0
degrees, an average low of 63.0 degrees in January and an average high
of 82.3 degrees in August. The average annual rainfall is 58.07 inches,
the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August and September.
The county is primarily agricultural and is known as the "Cucumber
Capital of the World" because of the large cucumber crop in the county.
Other major crops are tomatoes, eggplant, strawberries, squash and pep-
pers. In addition, all types of truck crops and citrus fruits are grown here.
Other crops are watermelons, string beans, corn, Irish potatoes, sweet po-
tatoes, field peas, peanuts and forage crops. Strawberries are also a crop
of considerable importance in the county. A 1945 survey showed 1,034
farms in the county and 333,445 acres devoted to farmlands.
This is the natural home of the orange, and oranges, grapefruit, tange-
rines, kumquats, lemons and other tropical and semi-tropical fruits are
grown in great numbers. During 1948-49 there were 11,076 acres devoted
to the growing of citrus fruits.
With many thousands of acres of fine pasture lands, 294,254 acres were
used for this purpose in 1948-49 and Hardee county has developed into a
cattle-center of importance.
Thousands heads of fine pure-
bred cattle, including Brah-
r ... -oi Green man, Angus, Hereford, as well
I Ft. Green orrey as better-grade F orida
SFL Greeno 0 ad range-cattle, are raised on
Sauchula Hardee county ranges. Pure-
o endry OVandolah .Sprs bred hogs, poultry and dairy
S/ Zolo Springs cattle, are also raised here.
H oA ED
] Ona Moome ,crew.vie Assessed valuation of the
Altman o county amounted to $5,076,-









847 in 1948. Bank resources in that year were $3,769,000 and retail sales
totalled $6,733,000. Annual wages in 1948 were $685,379. Effective buy-
ing income was $999 per capital and $8,591,000 for the county in 1949.
Hardee county's two principal crops, cucumbers and strawberries, are
the subject of annual festivals which attract visitors from throughout the
State. These are the Strawberry Festival at Bowling Green and the Cu-
cumber Festival at Wauchula, held annually.
Quail, dove, squirrel and rabbit are plentiful in the county and un-
posted hunting grounds are available. Fresh-water bass, perch, and bream
are caught in Lake Arbuckle and the many streams in the county, all of
which abound in fresh-water fish of all kinds.
U. S. highway 17 runs north and south through Wauchula and the cen-
ter of the county and Florida highways 62, 64, 650 and 652 provide easy
access to the various communities. The Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard
Airline Railway provide rail service. Bus service is available by Tamiami
Trailways.
There are six elementary and one secondary school in the county with
a school enrollment of 2,076 pupils in 1947-48. Two newspapers, both pub-
lished weekly at Wauchula, serve the county. They are the Wauchula Ad-
vocate and the Wauchula Herald.
Hardee county was created in 1921 from De Soto county. It was named
for Governor Hardee, then in office. Wauchula, the county seat, is on the
site of an early military post, Fort Hartsuff, built to protect the early set-
tlers during the Seminole Wars. Wauchula is an old Indian word meaning
"Sandhill Crane."










HENDRY COUNTY

County Seat: La Belle
Population: 5,997
Incorporated Cities: Clewiston, La Belle


H ENDRY COUNTY, in the southwest part of Florida, touching Lake Okee-
chobee, is bordered by Glades, Lee, Collier, Broward, and Palm Beach coun-
ties. La Belle, the county seat, is located near the northwest tip of the
county, in the center of the Caloosahatchee Valley. It is 30 miles from
Clewiston, the other principal city in the county, 77 miles from West
Palm Beach and 120 miles from Miami. The county comprises 737,920
acres.
The weather is mild with an annual average temperature of 72.8 de-
grees, with an average high of 81.2 degrees in August and an average
low of 64.0 degrees in January. Average annual rainfall is 49.95 inches,
the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August and September.


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The county is noted through the State as the center of the sugar indus-
try in Florida and along with other agriculture pursuits, such as truck farm-
ing, comprises the county's main source of income. A 1945 survey showed
362,352 acres devoted to farm lands.
Vast acres of the county are given over to the planting of sugar cane,
which is turned into raw sugar at the large plant at Clewiston. It is said that
Clewiston has one of the largest single unit cane factories in the nation.
Many additional arces are being planted annually and huge fleets of trac-
tors and special-built field machinery are maintained for planting, culti-
vating and hauling the cane to railroad loading stations to be taken to the
mill for processing. The muck lands just south of Lake Okeechobee are
especially suited for the growing of cane and there are 25,000 acres in
sugar cane in the county.
The muck lands of the county are also well suited for the planting and
growing of winter vegetables and the county has a large and important
truck farming industry, mainly in winter vegetables raised in the winter
months and shipped to northern markets for high prices. Cattle raising,
citrus, poultry ra;-iil, and timber are also important economic factors in
the county. About 197,800 acres are devoted to timberlands. There is some
commercial fishing on Lake Okeechobee.
Assessed valuation of Hendry county was $10,467,682 in 1948. Retail
sales totalled $5,272,000 and bank resources amounted to $2,048,000 in the
same year. Total annual wages paid here amounted to $2,076,689. Ef-
fective buying income was $1,787 per capital and $9,292,000 for the county
in 1949.
Deer, wild turkey, quail, dove and various small game are found in
this area. Fresh-water black bass, catfish and bream are caught in Lake
Okeechobee and various other fresh-water fish are caught in the Caloosa-
hatchee River.
Florida highways 25, 29, 80 and 832 cross through the county and the
Atlantic Coast Line provides rail service. Bus service is provided by
Tamiami Trail Tours.
There are four elementary and two secondary schools in the county with
an enrollment of 1,260 pupils in 1949-50. A 40-bed hospital is under con-
struction at this writing. There are two newspapers in the county, pub-
lished weekly. They are the Clewiston News, published at Clewiston, and
the Hendry County News, published at La Belle.
Once Indian territory, a portion of the Seminole Indian Reservation un-
der the direction of the United States Department of the Interior is located
here. Hendry county was named for one of the first settlers of this area.
The county was formed in 1923 from the eastern side of Lee county.










HIGHLANDS COUNTY

County Seat: Sebring
Population: 13,485
Incorporated Cities: Avon Park, De Soto City, Lake Placid,
Sebring.


HIGHLANDS COUNTY, consisting of 698,240 acres, is located in south Flor-
ida and is bounded by Hardee, De Soto, Glades, Okeechobee and Polk coun-
ties. The Kissimmee River winds its way along the eastern edge of the coun-
ty area forming a natural boundary between Highlands and Okeechobee
county. Sebring, the county seat, is located in the northwest portion of
the county, as are other principal cities of Avon Park, Lake Placid and
De Soto City. Sebring is 91 miles southeast of Tampa, 9 miles south of
Avon Park and 58 miles northwest of Okeechobee, and is built around Rex
Beach Lake, formerly known as Lake Jackson.

The weather is temperate the year-round, with an annual average tem-
perature of 73.0 degrees varying from an average of 63.2 degrees in Jan-
uary to an average of 81.8 degrees in August. Average annual rainfall is
52.22 inches with the heaviest rainfall noted in June, July, August and
September. The eleva-
tion at Sebring is 160
feet above sea level, 145
S. --. .- feet above sea level at
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Citrus, tourists, truck
crops and cattle com-
prise the main sources
of income in the coun-
ty. Its location in the
highlands section of
Florida gives it many
advantages for fruit
and truck growing and
practically all types of
soils are found here.
The outstanding ag-
ricultural product of
Highlands county is cit-
rus fruit. During 1948-
49 a survey disclosed


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that 15,090 acres were devoted to citrus; the fruit is packed or canned and
shipped from many points within the county. Oranges, grapefruit, tange-
rines, in;!lgei-, avocados, limes, pineapples, bananas and other tropical and
semi-tropical fruits are grown here. The county is second in the State in the
production and shipping of avocados and limes. The leading truck crops
are tomatoes, and beans. Blackberries, strawberries, grapes, corn, Irish po-
tatoes, sweet potatoes, sugar cane and forage crops are also grown here.
There were 503,478 acres devoted to farm lands in 1945. The beef-cattle and
poultry-raising industries are also of economic importance in this area as
is the timber industry. Some 477,599 acres of farm lands were devoted to
pasture lands for cattle in 1945. Commercial forest lands make up some
302,800 acres.
Highlands county is a favorite for tourists and many thousands of vis-
itors come to the county each year. The population of Sebring increases
about 15 per cent during the winter months, due to the influx of visitors.
The cities of Avon Park and Lake Placid also attract many tourists dur-
ing the season.
Assessed valuation of the county during 1948 was $16,628,932. Bank re-
sources amounted to $5,374,000 and retail sales in the county totalled $8,-
579,000. Total annual wages paid in 1948 amounted to $1,601,528. Ef-
fective buying income was $561 per capital and $9,151,000 for the county in
1949.
Hunting, fishing, boating and other recreational activities are avail-
able in the county. Dove, quail, deer, turkey, squirrel, racoon, fox and
rabbit are found in this section. Perch, bass, bream, shellcrackers and
catfish are caught in great numbers in the many fresh water lakes in
the county. The three largest lakes are Lake Istokpoga, Lake Stearns and
Lake Childs. There are 16 lakes in or near Avon Park alone. Highlands
Hammock State Park is located here. Natural orchids grow here and a
giant oak, 950 years old, is still standing in the county.
U. S. highway 27 and Florida highways 17, 25 and 70 run through the
county and rail service is provided by Seaboard Airline Railway and At-
lantic Coast Line. Greyhound Lines provide bus service. Although there
is no scheduled air service charter flights are available.
There are nine elementary and four secondary schools in the county
with a school enrollment of 3,092 pupils in 1947-48. Three newspapers are
published in the county. They are the Avon Park Sun, Sebring News,
and Sebring American, all published weekly.
Highlands county was created in 1921 from part of De Soto county and
was named for the abundant highlands in the area; Sebring was founded
in 1912 by the late George E. Sebring. Avon Park, founded in 1886 by
Oliver M. Crosby of New York and Mr. and Mrs. William King of Eng-
land. The city was named for the English home of Shakespeare, Strat-
ford-on-Avon.










INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
County Seat: Vero Beach
Population: 11,850
Incorporated Cities: Fellsmere, Sebastian, Vero Beach.


INDIAN RIVER COUNTY, located in south Florida on the Atlantic Ocean,
is bounded by Brevard County on the north, Osceola County on the west,
Okeechobee and St. Lucie Counties on the south and the Atlantic Ocean on
the east. The county comprises 336,000 acres. Vero Beach, the county
seat, is located on Indian River on the Atlantic Ocean side of the county,
220 miles from Jacksonville and 140 miles from Miami.
The weather is mild with an annual average temperature of 73.4 degrees
varying from an average of 63.4 degrees in January to an average of
81.3 degrees in August. The heaviest rainfall is in June, July, August
and September, with an average annual rainfall of 52.84 inches. The ele-
vation of the county is 25 feet above sea level at Fellsmere.
Citrus fruit production is the principal source of income in the county,
with an income of over $2,000,000 annually from these sources in Vero
Beach alone. Tourists, farming, cattle raising, sugar production and com-
mercial fishing are other major income sources.
Indian River County is famed throughout the nation for its citrus.
Oranges and grapefruit from-this section bring high prices in northern
markets and have won many awards. Lemons, bananas, mangoes, avo-
cados, Japanese persimmons and other small fruits are grown here. Some
13,075 acres were
planted to citrus
during 1948-49. Beef
and dairy cattle,
hogs and poultry
^ are also raised in
ose, this section. A 1945
Roselan
S...- survey showed 150,-
Kitchin Orchid 687 acres of the
Fellsmere o
River \ aasso county devoted to
SRIVge Be farm lands. There
IAN RIVERT ld are about 5,000
/Lake Wilminton Toledo0
Goifford acres of sugar cane
Rio Mar and raw sugar is re-
Vero Beach fined here. There


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are 98,300 acres of commercial forest lands in the county. Mineral re-
sources include marl, sand and peat.
Commercial fishing is an important economic asset with 665,847 pounds
of food fish, 627,825 pounds of non-food-fish and 143,000 pounds of crabs,
crayfish, shrimp, etc., being caught and marketed here in 1948. The county,
especially the communities on the Indian River, has an extensive tourist
trade and the warm climate of this area, the many fine, easily-accessible
beaches, and other natural resources of the county attract thousands of
visitors annually. This city is also the spring training camp for the Brook-
lyn Dodgers and about 26 affiliated farm teams.
The assessed valuation of Indian River County in 1948 was $16,467,366.
Banking resources amounted to $4,006,000 and retail sales totalled $8,-
949,000. Annual wages paid in 1948 amounted to $1,748,953. Effective buy-
ing income in 1949 was $1,109 per capital and $9,977,000 for the county.
Quail, turkey, duck and deer are found in this section and salt-water
trout, bass, snapper, pompano, sheepshead, mackerel and grouper are
caught in the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River. Fresh-water bass and
bream are caught in the Canals and Blue Cypress Lake and Lake Wil-
mington.
U. S. highway 1 and Florida highways 60, 502, 507, 510, 512, 605 and
A1A provide easy access by motor transportation. Florida East Coast
Railroad provides rail service and Greyhound Lines provide bus transpor-
tation. Air service is provided by Eastern Air Lines.
There are eight elementary and three secondary schools in the county.
During 1947-48 school enrollment amounted to 2,141 pupils. Hospital
facilities include 30 hospital beds in the county. A weekly newspaper, the
Vero Beach Press Journal, is published here.
The county, formed in 1925 from St. Lucie County, was named after the
Indian River. Vero Beach was originally called Vero, derived from "veri-
tas" meaning "truth" and was founded in 1880.










LEE COUNTY

County Seat: Fort Myers
Population: 23,211
Incorporated Cities: Fort Myers.


L EE COUNTY, located on the southwestern coast of Florida on the Gulf
of Mexico, has an area of 652,800 acres and is bordered by Collier coun-
ty to the south, Hendry county to the east and Charlotte county to the
north. The Gulf of Mexico forms the county's west border and the Ca-
loosahatchee River flows across the northern half of the county. Fort
Myers, the county seat and principal city, is on the Caloosahatchee River
13 miles from the Gulf. It is 145 miles northeast of Miami and 126 miles
southeast of Tampa.
The annual average temperature is 73.4 degrees with an average low of
63.8 degrees in January and an average high of 81.5 degrees in August.
There are no extremes of temperature and frost is rare. Heaviest rain-
fall is in the months of June, July, August and September with an average
annual rainfall of 52.39 inches. Elevation is 7 feet above sea level at Fort
Myers.





Boca Grande" C"" ot -0
(Bocagrande P.O.^ a T amiamiO O O
South Boca Grand4 b o 0 )-
(South Bocagrande P. o H a" Bokeeliav
Main Kntrance II
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Useppa IslJ d H asenville O0 East Fort M
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e CAPTIVE I L E
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Wulferi aarlos San Carlos

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Big Carlos Pss Council U
Laparita
LittlH Carlos Pa,, Bonita Springs
SI ig Hicnkory PassO -
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Tourists, agriculture and commercial fishing represent the main sources
of income. Oranges, grapefruit, limes and lemons are grown here to some
extent and the county is w.nll adaipt--:d to the growing of mangoes, avo-
cados, papyas, guavas and other tropical fruit. There were 6,511 acres
devoted to citrus fruits during 1948-49. The leading truck crops of the
county are Irish potatoes, peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, squash, cucum-
bers, and watermelons. Corn, sweet potatoes, sugar cane, field peas and
other staple crops are grown here. In 1945 there were 104,064 acres de-
voted to farm lands, 3,340 acres planted with vegetables in 1948-49. There
is also some beef and dairy cattle, hog and poultry raising in the county.
The gladioli industry is one of the county's more important economic
assets. During the season florists from all over the nation send represen-
tatives to the county and Lee county gladioli are shipped by train and
plane to northern markets where they command high prices. Commer-
cial fishing in the county operates to a considerable extent the year round
and during 1947 there were 1,499,255 pounds of food fish and 160,143
pounds of crabs, crayfish, shrimp and other varieties caught and market-
ed. In 1948 the yield increased to 2,675,373 pounds of food fish and 549,-
774 pounds of crabs, etc. The third best shelling beach in the world, Sani-
bel Island, is located here.
Lee county, and especially Fort Myers, is famed throughout the nation
as a tourist center. Fort Myers is noted as the winter home of such famous
personages as the late Thomas A. Edison, Harvey Firestone and Henry
Ford. A "Pageant of Light," in honor of Edison, is held here every year
and this entire section of the State takes part in ceremonies commemorat-
ing the invention of the incandescent lamp. Edison came to Fort Myers
in 1886 in search of a suitable filament for the incandescent lamp and, think-
ing that the fibre of the bamboo plant would be suitable he established a
home in Fort Myers and spent many months in experimentation here.
Rubber experiments were also conducted here by Harvey Firestone. Their
workshops still stand and are of considerable interest to visitors. Recre-
ational activities in the county are many and varied, especially designed
for the thousands of winter visitors who visit here yearly.

Assessed valuation of Lee county in 1948 was $26,608,809. Banking re-
sources amounted to $13,151,000 and retail sales totalled $22,370,000. Total
annual wages in the county in 1948 amounted to $3,798,562. Effective buy-
ing income in 1949 was estimated at $910 per capital and $25,105,000 for the
county.

Deer, squirrel, wildcat, skunk, flying squirrel, panther, opossum, red
and gray fox, bear, bobcat, rabbit, turkey, quail, marsh hen, duck, geese,
coot and dove are found in this area. Salt-water tarpon, trout, kingfish,









mangrove snapper, sheepshead mackerel, drum, flounder, pompano, snook,
jackfish, redfish, grouper, blue crab and clams are caught in the Caloosa-
hatchee River and the Gulf of Mexico. Fresh-water black bass, speckled
perch, jack, pikes and bream are caught in Orange River, Upper Caloo-
sahatchee River and other lakes and streams in the county.
U. S. highway 41 and Florida highways 80, 82 and 867 provide good
roads in the county, connecting the principal communities. Rail service is
provided by the Atlantic Coast Line and Tamiami Trail Tours and
Glades Motor Lines provide bus transportation. Air service Ito Fort
Myers is provided by National Airlines.
There are thirteen elementary and six secondary schools in the county
with 4,322 pupils enrolled in 1947-48. Fifty hospital beds are available.
Two newspapers are published in Lee county, both in Fort Myers. They
are the Fort Myers News Press, published daily and the Southwest Flo-
ridian, published weekly.
Until it was divided by the Legislature in 1923, Lee county was the
largest county in Florida. The county was named in honor of General
Robert E. Lee. Fort Myers was built in 1850 on the site of Fort Harvie
and was named for Colonel Abraham Charles Myers, then chief quar-
termaster of Florida.









MANATEE COUNTY
County Seat: Bradenton
Population: 34,547
Incorporated Cities: Anna Maria, Bradenton, Holmes Beach,
Palmetto.


M ANATEE COUNTY is located on the west coast of Florida, below the cen-
ter of the State, the east shore of the county on the Gulf of Mexico. The
county, comprising 540,160 acres, is bounded by Hillsborough, Hardee, De
Soto and Sarasota counties. Bradenton, the county seat, is on the Mana-
tee River near the Gulf of Mexico, 42 miles south of Tampa and 23 miles
south of St. Petersburg.
The weather in this gulf coast county is warm with no extremes in
temperature. The annual average temperature is 71.8 degrees with an av-
erage low of 61.5 degrees in January and an average high of 81.2 de-
grees in August. The average annual rainfall is 54.60 inches with the
heaviest rainfall in the months of June, July, August and September. The
elevation above sea level is 17 feet at Bradenton and 9 feet at Anna Maria.
Agriculture, commercial fishing and tourists are the principal sources







O ( Pineyy int Willow 0 Little Minate |
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of income. One of the richest agricultural counties in the State, the coun-
ty produces and processes large amounts of citrus fruits and winter veg-
etables. Oranges, grapefruits, bananas, mangoes, avocados and guavas are
grown here with oranges the predominant fruit; 9,923 acres of citrus fruit
were planted in 1948-49. The leading truck crops are peppers, cucumbers, cel-
ery, tomatoes, English peas, eggplants, string beans and watermelons. The
principal field crops are corn, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, field peas and
hays. In 1945 there were 834 farms embracing 282,148 acres. The gladioli
industry and cattle raising are also important here.
Manatee county is also one of the principal fishing areas in the State.
During 1947, 3,119,905 pounds of food fish, 250 gallons of shellfish and
1,906,754 pounds of crabs, crayfish, shrimp and other miscellaneous sea-
foods were caught and marketed. In 1948 the yield increased to 3,564,-
053 pounds of food fish, 1,100 pounds of non-food fish, 1,130 gallons of
shellfish and 13,000 pounds of crabs, etc. Mineral resources of the county
include limestone, marl, clay and mineral water. There are some deposits
of fullers earth.
During the winter months thousands of tourists and winter visitors
from all over the nation come to Manatee county and this area is fast
becoming one of the principal resort areas on the west coast. The Boston
Braves hold spring training in Bradenton.
Assessed valuation of the county in 1948 was $33,224,004. Bank resources
were $19,633,000, and retail sales totalled $26,068,000. Total annual wages
amounted to $4,271,032 and effective buying income was $919 per capital
and $29,676,000 for the county in 1949.
Quail, dove and duck are found in this section. Salt-water snook, red-
fish, grouper, snapper, mackerel, kingfish, pompano, flounder, trout, sheeps-
head, cobia, jack and tarpon are caught in the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa
Bay. Fresh-water bass and bream are caught in Ward's Lake, Myakka
River and other lakes and streams in the county.
U. S. highways 41 and 541 and Florida highways 37, 43, 62, 64, 70, 675,
683, 684, and 780 provide easy access to the various communities in the
county. The Seaboard Airline Railway and Atlantic Coast Line provide
rail transportation and Tamiami Trail Tours provide bus service. Sched-
uled air flights are available by National Air Lines and chartered flight
service is also available.
There are eighteen elementary and seven secondary schools in the coun-
ty. In 1947-48 school enrollment totalled 6,447 pupils. There are 117 hos-
pital beds available in the county. Two newspapers are published here.
They are the Herald, a daily newspaper published at Bradenton, and the
News, a weekly newspaper published at Palmetto.









The county was created in 1855. In 1921 the lower half of the county
was cut off to form Sarasota county. Manatee. county derives its name
from the sea cow, or manatee, found in nearby waters. The Spanish ex-
plorer Hernando De Soto, on his famed trek through Florida, landed on
Terra Ceia Island, May 25, 1539. His army landed south of the island at
Shaw's Point.
Bradenton was named for Dr. Joseph Braden who owned a sugar plan-
tation near the city. The ruins of Braden castle, a home built by the doctor
in 1850, still stands. The Gamble Mansion at Ellenton, built between 1842
and 1845, was the temporary refuge of Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of
State of the Southern Confederacy, in his flight from Union pursuers.










MARTIN COUNTY
County Seat: Stuart
Population: 7,665
Incorporated Cities: Stuart.


M ARTIN COUNTY, comprising an area of 368,640 acres, is located on the
east coast of Florida, the east boundary bordering on the Atlantic Ocean.
It is bordered by St. Lucie county on the north, Palm Beach county on
the south and Okeechobee county on the west. The St. Lucie canal crosses
the county from Lake Okeechobee into the St. Lucie River which enters
the Atlantic Ocean at Stuart, the county seat. Most of the county's west
border is formed by Lake Okeechobee. Stuart, the principal city, is 41
miles from West Palm Beach and 152 miles from Daytona Beach.
The annual average temperature is 73.7 degrees varying from an aver-
age of 65.1 degrees in January to an average of 81.8 degrees in August,
and is of a semi-tropical nature the year round. Annual rainfall is 49.79
inches, the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August, September and Oc-
tober. Elevation above sea level is 14 feet at Stuart.
Agriculture is the main industry of the county. Martin county citrus
groves produce oranges and grapefruit of a high quality and winter veg-
etables are grown here extensively. String beans, tomatoes, cabbages,
peppers, squash, eggplant, watermelons and cucumbers are among the
leading truck crops. Potatoes, corn and forage crops are also grown here




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and a great amount of acreage is planted to sugar cane, principally along
the Okeechobee portion of the county. Bananas, guavas, persimmons,
avocados, papayas, coconuts, mangoes and other semi-tropical fruits are
grown here. In 1945 there were 263 farms in the county, consisting of
175,682 acres. In 1948-49 there were 2,790 acres planted with vegetables.
Beef and dairy cattle, hogs and poultry raising are also important sources
of income in the county.
Commercial fishing, principally in non-food varieties, is an important
and integral part of the local economy. During 1948, 1,726,760 pounds of
non-food fish were caught and marketed. In addition, 461,387 pounds of
food fish and 10,530 pounds of crabs, shrimp, crayfish, etc., were caught
and sold. Mineral resources of the county include marl and peat. A naval
stores industry also adds to the county's economy and there are 307,600
acres of commercial forest lands in Martin county. Shark liver oil is
processed here.
Martin county, especially along the beach communities on the Atlantic
Ocean, draws many visitors and tourists to its borders each year. Sports
fishing and general beach recreational activities provide the main tourist
attraction and the income from this source is an important part of the
county economy. Sailfish is in abundance here and chartered boats are
available for deep-sea fishing trips. Sailfish, white and blue marlin, sword-
fish, wahoo, amberjack, cobia, dolphin, Spanish mackerel, barracuda, bo-
nito, tuna, tarpon, snook, pompano and snapper are caught here. Black
bass, pickerel, bream and perch are caught in the fresh water of the
county. Quail and duck are also found here.
Assessed valuation of the county was $14,726,983 in 1948. In the same
year bank resources amounted to $3,383,000, retail sales totalled $5,454,-
000, and annual wages were $799,335. Effective buying income was $1,167
per capital and $7,116,000 for the county in 1949.
U. S. highway 1 and Florida highways A1A, 15, 76 and 710 enter the
county, highway 15 making its way along the edge of Lake Okeechobee.
Rail transportation is provided by Florida East Coast and Seaboard Air-
line Railroads and bus transportation is provided by Florida Motor Lines.
There are eleven elementary and two secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment of 1,374 pupils in 1948-49. There are 30 hospital beds
available. A weekly newspaper, the News, is published at Stuart.
Martin county was formed in 1925 from the northern portion of Palm
Beach county and a small part of St. Lucie county. It was named for for-
mer Governor John W. Martin.












MONROE COUNTY

County Seat: Key West

Population: 25,159

Incorporated Cities: Key West.


.VIONROE COUNTY is unique in that it is composed, not of a solid land
area, but largely of small islands jutting out along the southern tip of
the Florida peninsula, southwest into the Gulf of Mexico. The islands, or
keys, are of coral and limestone formation and are bounded by the Gulf
of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, Florida Bay being formed in the pocket
between the islands and the mainland. A great land portion of Monroe
county is located on the mainland, at the southwest end of the peninsula,
but it is largely undeveloped. The Everglades National Park covers most
of the mainland acreage of the county and the principal cities are located
on the keys. The county area is 1,245,440 acres. Key West, the county seat,




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is located at the end of the long string of islands on an island 31/2 miles
long and 1 mile wide, the southernmost city in the United States. It is 157
miles southwest of Miami and 90 miles north of Havana, Cuba.
The weather here is tropical with an annual average temperature of
77.1 degrees with an average low of 69.9 degrees in January and an av-
erage high of 83.6 degrees in August. The lowest temperature ever re-
corded here was 41 degrees and the highest 93 degrees. No frost has
ever been seen on the islands which are swept by regular trade winds from
the east. Annual rainfall is 38.08 inches with the heaviest rainfall from
May to November, but the county has the least amount of rainfall of any
county in Florida. Elevation above sea level at Key West is 10 feet.
Tourists, sports fishing, commercial fishing and the U. S. Navy instal-
lation at Key West comprise the principal sources of income of the coun-
ty, with the fishing industry the leading enterprise here. During 1948 there
were 1,993,517 pounds of food fish, 500 pounds of non-food fish and 1,-
450,025 pounds of crabs, Florida lobsters, shrimp, etc., caught and
marketed in the county. Sea turtles are shipped here from the Caribbean
for marketing in this county. Large shrimp beds have recently been dis-
covered in waters adjacent to the county and a "pink-gold" rush is on
as this digest is published.
Monroe county is not regarded as an agricultural county but citrus
crops, particularly limes, do well here. Grapes, bananas, mangoes, avo-
cados, sugar apples, sapodillas and cocoanuts are found here and peppers,
eggplants, tomatoes and asparagus are grown to a limited extent. In 1945
there were 55 farms in the county embracing 1,773 acres of farmlands.
Tourists who come from all over the nation to the county comprise a
major sources of income, but the largest single payroll in Monroe County
is from the U. S. Naval Submarine Base at Key West which employs
about 1,000 civilian workers in addition to the regular Navy personnel.
President Harry S. Truman maintains a resort home, the Little White
House, at the base and Key West has been the scene of many conferences
of national and international scope.
Hunting on the keys is limited to small game and Key West is a bird
refuge. About 600 species of salt-water fish are found in the waters of
the Gulf Stream, Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Fishing from
boats and from bridges on the overseas highway is popular and many
fleets of deep sea boats operate in the county.
Assessed valuation of Monroe county in 1948 was $38,692,677. Bank-
ing resources amounted to $6,874,000 and retail sales totalled $16,112,000.
Total annual wages in 1948 amounted to $2,131,898. Effective buying in-
come was $629 per capital and $12,084,000 for the county in 1949.









U. S. highway 1 connects the various keys with each other and with
the mainland, ending at Key West. Known as the Overseas Highway,
this modern road connects the keys, covering vast expanses of water and is
one of the most scenic motor routes in the nation. Annually, thousands
of visitors come here to drive over this famous highway. Bus service is
provided by Greyhound Lines and scheduled air flights are available by
National Airlines and Aerovias Q. S. A. Key West is a terminal for air
travel to Cuba and cities in South America. There is no rail service
available.
There are eight elementary and two secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment of 2,858 pupils in 1947-48. There are 68 available hos
pital beds in the county. A daily newspaper, the Key West Citizen, is
published at Key West.
Monroe county was formed in 1824 and was named for James Monroe,
president at that time. Key West was once the base for Spanish adven-
turers and pirate crews. They were driven out of the keys by Commo-
dore David Porter with part of the U. S. Fleet in 1823. Groups of cock
ney English and Negroes from the Bahamas were among the first perma-
nent settlers. Later, families from New England, Virginia and South
Carolina settled here, along with many Tories who had fled the Bahamas
during the American Revolution. Salvaging cargoes from vessels wrecked
on outlying reefs was a profitable business during the early days of Key
West; some salvaging is still done and sunken wrecks of old ships are still
found occasionally. In 1870 Key West was the world's largest cigar man-
ufacturing center. The city was an important naval base during the Span-
ish American War and during both World Wars.









OKEECHOBEE COUNTY

County Seat: Okeechobee
Population: 3,444
Incorporated Cities: Okeechobee.


O KEECHOBEE COUNTY, located in south Florida, just north of the great
lake from which it received its name, comprises some 487,040 acres, bound-
ed by Osceola, Indian River, Saint Lucie, Martin, Highlands and Glades
counties and by Lake Okeechobee, the largest body of fresh water wholly
within the United States without a natural outlet. The Kissimmee River
forms the west border of the county. Okeechobee, the county seat, is lo-
cated on the lake, 36 miles from Fort Pierce and 74 miles from West Palm
Beach.
The annual average temperature is 72.5 degrees with an average low of
63.3 degrees in January and an average high of 81.3 degrees in August.
Annual rainfall is 47.94 inches with the heaviest rainfall noted in June,
July, August and September. Elevation above sea level is 27 feet.
Commercial fishing, the raising of beef cattle and agricultural prod-
ucts are the county's principal sources of income. Like other counties in
this Lake Okeechobee area
it is noted especially for
its fishing industry in the
big lake and its winter OleyO "
truck crops in the fertile 0 Oowaw
soil in the Lake Okeecho- 0 1 Io
bee area. Along the shores "
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simmee River is a strip 0
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ganic soil particularly % t Basger
adapted to truck farming, t BassiOpal
tropical fruits and sugar 0
cane. Irish potatoes, sweet
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corn are grown to some Sherman
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truck crops as peppers, Upth ve
truck crops as peppers, Beach


LAKE
OKEECHOBEE









cabbage, tomatoes, string beans, lima beans and cucumbers. In 1945 there
were 210 farms in the county embracing 264,742 acres of farm lands.
Cattle raising is an important source of income in the county and the
prairie section of this area has been used for cattle ranges for a long
period of time. The cattle industry has been on the increase since before
World War II and considerable acreage is devoted to improved pasture
with Pangola, Bermuda, Bahia and Torpedo grasses. Along with pasture
improvement has come improvement in the grade of the cattle through
the breeding of purebred bulls (mostly Brahman) to range cattle. Pas-
ture lands in farms comprised 257,513 acres in 1945. The county has
some acreage of virgin timber, principally pine and cypress; 104,300 acres
are devoted to commercial timberlands, 23.8 per cent of the total county
area. Mineral resources of Okeechobee county include marl and peat.
Assessed valuation in 1948 was $3,383,895. Retail sales totalled $2,350,-
000 and banking resources amounted to $1,245,000. Total annual wages
paid in the county in 1948 were $412,467. Per capital effective buying in-
come in 1949 was estimated at $986, $2,957,000 for the entire county.
Hunting and fishing are two of the principal attractions for tourists in
this area, and the visitor who comes to this area for hunting or sports
fishing is a valuable asset to the local economy. Okeechobee is the home
of the largemouth black bass; in addition to bass many varieties of fish
are found in Lake Okeechobee and Kissimmee River.
Florida highways 15 and 70 both enter Okeechobee county; a new high-
way to Sebring through the wilderness of the western part of the county
is now under construction. Rail transportation is provided by the Sea-
board Air Line Railway. Bus transportation is available by Greyhound
Lines.
There are three elementary and two secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment in 1947-48 of 735 pupils. Two newspapers, the News
and the Herald, are published here.
Okeechobee County was formed in 1917 and was named from the great
lake, whose name in turn was derived from the Indian oki, water," and
chobi, "big."









PALM BEACH COUNTY

County Seat: West Palm Beach
Population: 114,144
Incorporated Cities: Belle Glade, Boca Raton, Boynton Beach,
Canal Point, Delray Beach, Green Acres, Gulfstream, Highlands
Beach, Jupiter, Lake Park, Lake Worth, Lantana, Manalapan,
Ocean Ridge, Pahokee, Palm Beach, Riviera Beach, South Bay,
West Palm Beach, Westgate.


PALM BEACH COUNTY, comprising 1,717,760 acres, is located in south
Florida, along the famed east coast of the peninsula. It is bordered by
Martin county on the north, Broward county on the south and Hendry
county on the southwest. The Atlantic Ocean forms the eastern shore and
Lake Okeechobee forms part of the western boundary of the county. West
Palm Beach, the county seat, is situated on the eastern shore of the
county, separated from its sister city of Palm Beach by Lake Worth.




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West Palm Beach is 65 miles from Miami, 193 miles from Daytona
Beach and 285 miles from Jacksonville.
The county has a semi-tropical temperature with an average low of 67.2
degrees in January and an average high of 81.7 degrees in August for an
annual average temperature of 74.7 degrees. Annual rainfall is 59.44 inches
with the heaviest rain falling in June, July, August and September on the
Lake Okeechobee part of the county and in June, September and October on
the Atlantic Ocean side of the county. Elevation above sea level varies from
sea level to 20 feet.
Palm Beach county is internationally known as a winter resort and each
year plays host to visitors from every country in the world; many famous
and wealthy international personages maintain winter homes here. Thous-
ands of tourists flock annually to the many communities located on the At-
lantic Ocean, providing one of the county's major sources of income the year
around. There are many attractions here for the visitor, including miles of
fine beaches, and many public and commercial attractions.
Commercial fishing, agriculture, cattle raising and industries allied to
farming and fishing are of great economic importance. Like other counties
which border on Lake Okeechobee, the soil and climate of the area make it
particularly adaptable to the planting of winter crops. A 1945 survey listed
1,139 farms in the county embracing 278,090 acres. The cities of Belle Glade
and Pahokee have gained national prominence for the large winter truck
farm crop harvested for freezing or shipping fresh to northern markets.
The soil is especially fertile and the same land is often planted to four crops
a year with some remarkable high yields being made in winter vegetable
crops. Belle Glade is the world's largest winter vegetable center. In 1948-
19, 73,500 acres were devoted to the planting of vegetables, the largest
acreage put to this use of any county in Florida. There is also a large
acreage of sugar cane near Lake Okeechobee and it has proved to be a
highly satisfactory and profitable crop. Oranges, grapefruit, pineapples,
mangoes, avocados and other tropical fruits are grown here. Gladioli farms
are a rapidly expanding industry.
Palm Beach county was one of the 38 Florida counties with seafood pro-
duction of size during 1948. In that year, 4,269,720 pounds of food fish, 34,-
604 pounds of non-food fish, and 1,207,971 pounds of crabs, crayfish and
other seafoods were caught and marketed in the county. The industry oper-
ates both on the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Okeechobee. Beef and Dairy
cattle and poultry raising are also of considerable importance in the coun-
ty and a 1945 survey showed 118,392 acres of pasture lands in farms to
fill the needs of the cattle industry. There are 417,200 acres of woodland
acreage in this section. Coquina, marl, sand and peat are included in the
mineral resources of the county.









The Port of Palm Beach is one of the leading ports along the Atlantic
seaboard. Customs collections at the port were the greatest of any port in
Florida last year and it is the third ranking port in the State from the
standpoint of tonnage. It is the busiest port in the South Atlantic group
south of Norfolk. The average import and export tonnage through the port
averages 1,000 railroad ears monthly; principal tonnage comes from opera-
tion of the car ferry which plies between West Palm Beach and Cuba, with
petroleum and gasoline second and third, respectively.

Assessed valuation of Palm Beach county in 1948 was $174,272,353. Re-
tail sales totalled $128,152,000 and banking resources amounted to $102,-
250,000. Annual wages were $34,573,437. Effective buying income in 1949 was
estimated at $1,182 per capital and $152,671,000 for the county.

Salt-water snapper, jack, spots, sheepshead, grouper, bluefish, sailfish,
amberjack, barracuda, blue fish, dolphin, tarpon, Spanish mackerel, spec-
kled trout, tuna, wahoo and others are caught in the Atlantic Ocean. Fresh-
water bass, trout, bream, crappie, perch and other varieties are caught in
Lake Okeechobee, Lake Worth, the canals and the many lakes. Quail, dove,
deer, duck, squirrel, turkey and rabbit are caught here.

U. S. highway 1 and Florida highways AIA, 7, 15, 25, 80, 703, 716, 717,
804, 805 and 827 enter the county. In addition, the West Palm Beach,
Hillsborough and North New River canals cross the county from points on
Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic Ocean. Florida East Coast Railroad and
Seaboard Airline Railway provide rail service and Greyhound Lines and
Glades Motor Lines provide bus transportation. Eastern Airlines provides
air transportation from Palm Beach International Airport.

There are forty-seven elementary and sixteen secondary schools in the
county with an enrollment of 16,562 pupils in 1947-48. There are 392
hospital beds available. The State's new tuberculosis sanitarium is located
at Lantana. There are three daily and ten weekly newspapers published in
the county. They are the Lake Worth Leader, Palm Beach Daily News and
West Palm Beach Post-Times, all published daily, and the Belle Glade
Herald, Boynton News, Everglades News, Delray Beach News, Delray
Beach Journal, Lake Worth Herald, Pahokee News, Tiff's Town and
Country, Palm Beach Sun, Union Labor News and Riviera Beach Press,
all published weekly.

Palm Beach county was formed in 1909 and was named for the area's
palms and beaches.









SARASOTA COUNTY

County Seat: Sarasota
Population: 28,544
Incorporated Cities: Sarasota, Venice.


SARASOTA COUNTY is located in south Florida, on the west coast of the
Florida peninsula. Its 378,240 acres are bordered by Manatee, De Soto,
and Charlotte counties and the Gulf of Mexico. Sarasota, the county seat,
is in the northwest portion of the county, 54 miles south of Tampa and 35
miles south of St. Petersburg, on Sarasota Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.

The county has semi-tropical weather with an annual average tempera-
ture of 71.0 degrees, with an average low of 61.5 degrees in January and
an average high of 80.1 degrees in July and August. Average annual rain-
fall is 57.11 inches with the heaviest rain in June, July, August and Sep-
tember. Elevation above sea level is 18 feet.

Tourists, agriculture and commercial fishing are the major sources of
income. The principal agricultural activity is truck farming and the lead-
ing winter vegetable crops are cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, and celery.





LONGBOAT KEX \' -,
IndiaBeac aso
Crescent Beac ^V C) \a' .
Saro 0 0 o^ oMiakka
Sarasota He ts
Big Sarasota Pa ieta 0
SSARASOTA KEY OBee Ridge

Little Sar to onor
Bay OOsprey .
Osprey P. SSdel
CASEY KEY SA A SO A
K OLaurel
Venice Inle "0okomis
SVenice
oo .
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Staple farm crops include corn, oats, potatoes, sugar cane, field peas, vel-
vet beans and hays. In 1945 there were 453 farms in the county embracing
238,537 acres of farm lands. There were 1,245 acres planted to vegetables
in 1948-49. Oranges are the principal fruit grown, with grapefruit and
lemons also grown to a considerable extent; 3,755 acres were planted to
citrus in 1948-49. Watermelons are also grown extensively in the county,
as are strawberries. The raising of purebred beef and dairy cattle is also
of importance, with 219,521 acres devoted to pasture lands in 1945.

The commercial fishing industry is very profitable in Sarasota county
and production is on the increase. During 1947, 1,792,228 pounds of food
fish, 2,850 gallons of shellfish and 12,300 pounds of crabs, crayfish, and
other miscellaneous fish were caught and marketed. A year later, in 1948,
the production had increased to 1,882,495 pounds of food fish, 723 gal-
lons of shellfish (the only decrease) and 3,560 pounds of crabs, etc. In addi-
tion, 14,314 pounds of non-food fish were marketed in 1948 for an overall
gain in production for the year.

There are 208,600 acres of commercial timberlands in the county, 58.0
per cent of the total county area and income from this source is of great
importance. The shell industry, a lychee nut nursery and furniture man-
ufacturing from bamboo and palms are also profitable assets to the area's
economy.

Sarasota County is one of the State's leading west coast tourist cen-
ters and thousands of tourists visit here annually. About 30 per cent of
the income of the city of Sarasota alone is derived from tourists and the
population of the city has increased by more than 50 per cent since 1940
due to the great number of winter visitors who become permanent resi-
dents. The city of Sarasota is the winter home of the Ringling Brothers
and Barnum and Bailey Circus and the state-owned John and Mabel Ring-
ling Museum of Art is a popular attraction. The Boston Red Sox hold
spring training here. The Myakka State Park, Museum of the American
Circus, the Lido Beach Casino, a public bathing facility, greyhound races,
yacht races, sports fishing and other tourist attractions are increasing this
county's standing as a tourist area. The first golf course in this county was
laid out at Sarasota in 1885.

Assessed valuation of the county in 1948 was $35,652,884. Retail sales
amounted to $32,165,000 and banking resources were $21,546,000. Total
annual wages paid in the county were $7,697,949. Effective buying income
in 1949 was $1,141 per capital and $26,581,000 for the county.

Quail and duck are hunted here. Fresh water bass and bream are caught
in the Myakka River. Kingfish, shark, sheepshead, flounder, drum, man-









grove snapper, bluefish, ladyfish, redfish, cobia, catfish, mackerel, jack,
speckled trout, snook, tarpon, pompano and grouper are caught in the Gulf
of Mexico and the bay.

There are eleven elementary and three secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment of 4,595 pupils in 1947-48. There are 64 hospital beds
available. A daily newspaper, the Sarasota Herald Tribune, and two week-
ly newspapers, Sarasota Sun and Venice Gondolier, are published here.

U. S. highway 41 runs along the coast and Florida highways 72, 780 and
789 enter the county. Rail service is provided by Atlantic Coast Line and
Seaboard Airline Railway and bus service is provided by Tamiami Trail-
ways. Scheduled air transportation is available by National Airlines; char-
tered air flight service is also available.

Sarasota County was created in 1921 from Manatee county. The name
Sarasota comes from an old Indian legend and was applied to a prominent
part of the county's shoreline known as "The Point of Rocks," which
protrudes into the Gulf of Mexico near Crescent Beach. The name was
spelled Porte Sarasota, Boca Sarasota and Sara Zota on early Florida
maps and the exact meaning is not known. Spanish and Cuban fishermen
maintained camps here for over a century before the coming of Ameri-
cans, the first American settlers arriving here in 1842.









ST. LUCIE COUNTY

County Seat: Fort Pierce
Population: 20,073
Incorporated Ciiics: Fort Pierce.


ST. LUCIE COUNTY is located in south Florida, on the lower east coast of
the peninsula, its 386,560 acres bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and Okee-
chobee, Indian River and Martin counties. The county seat, Fort Pierce, is
on the Indian River and the Atlantic Ocean, 225 miles southeast of Jackson-
ville, 125 miles north of Miami and 121 miles southeast of Orlando.

The weather is semi-tropical, with an annual average temperature of 73.7
degrees, varying from an average low of 65.1 degrees in January to an
average of 81.8 degrees in August. The heaviest rainfall is in the months of
June, July, August, September, and October with an average annual rainfall
of 49.79 inches. The elevation above sea level at Fort Pierce is 5 feet.

Citrus growing and processing, truck farming, tourists, commercial fish-
ing and the raising of cattle are the principal sources of income. Nine large
citrus packing plants and three canneries are located here. During 1948-49
there were 16,137 acres planted to citrus. The famous Indian River fruit
are grown in this and surrounding counties and St. Lucie oranges and
grapefruit, the principal crops of the county, are known world-wide. Tan-
gerines and other semi-tropical fruits are also grown here. Soil and cli-
matic conditions are excellent for citrus growing.


Tomatoes, cucumbers,
other fresh vegetables
are produced here for
the early winter mar-
kets; the winter truck
crops are of increas-
ing economic impor-
tance and the acreage
planted to winter veg-
etables is steadily in-
creasing. Water-
melons and pine-
apples are also grown.
as are gladioli. Tn


sweet corn, squash, peas, cabbage, eggplant and


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1945 there were 540 farms in the county comprising 292,::i11 acres. In
1948-49 there were 7,375 acres planted to vegetables. Truck crops are
marketed through the huge State Farmers Market located in Fort Pierce.
The commercial fishing and shrimp industries are important to the
county. During 1948, 1,919,978 pounds of various varieties of food -ii,
86,424 pounds of non-food fish, and 154,846 pounds of shrimp, Florida lob-
sters, crabs and other miscellaneous seafoods were caught and marketed
here. The raising of purebred dairy and beef cattle and poultry are also im-
portant; 218,663 acres were devoted to pasture land for cattle in 1945. With
162,200 acres of forest lands the lumber and allied industries contribute
much to the local economy. Mineral resources are marl, sand, peat and
coquina. Some small industries operate in the county.
The tourist industry is an increasing asset to St. Lucie County and the
county offers fine recreational activities for the visitor and winter tour-
ist; growth of two excellent all-year beaches at Fort Pierce has been
phenomenal. Orange groves and plants are open to inspection and thou-
sands of visitors tour the groves yearly. Fishing is a major sport here,
as is boating, and many thousands of sport fishermen come here yearly.
Big-mouth bass, bream and speckled trout are caught in the fresh-wa-
ter creeks and canals here and salt water -iilli-i, bonita, amber jack, king
mackerel, wahoo, weakfish, barracuda, jewfish, bluefish, pompano, lady fish,
trout, seabass, snook and sheepshead are caught in the Atlantic Ocean
and Indian River. Quail, turkeys and deer are found in this section.
Assessed valuation of St. Lucie County was $21,488,684 in 1948. Re-
tail sales amounted to $18,722,000 and banking resources totalled $11,733,-
000. Annual wages in 1948 were $3,842,504. Effective buying income in
1949 was $994 per capital and $20,871,000 for the county.
U. S. highway 1 crosses the county along the Atlantic Ocean and Flor-
ida highways 70, 605, 705 and A1A enter the county. The Florida East
Coast Railroad provides rail transportation and Greyhound Lines pro-
vides bus service.
There are six elementary and two secondary schools in the county
with an enrollment of 3,318 pupils in 1947-48. There are 43 hospital beds
in the county. Two newspapers, the Fort Pierce News-Tribune, a daily,
and the Fort Pierce Star, a weekly, are published here.
St. Lucie County was formed in 1844 and re-created in 1905. It was named
for St. Lucy of Syracuse, a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Its history
dates back to the Seminole War when one of the forts in a chain marking
the so-called Deadline Fence, a line over which Indians were prohibited,
was established here. Ft. Pierce is named for Major B. K. Pierce, who com-
manded a detachment here beginning in 1838.























71


ABOVE-Part of an immense field of sugar cane in the muck lands
around Lake Okeechobee. Note the size of the cane in relation to
the man in the center of the photograph. LEFT-Section of a large
sugar plant at Clewiston. BELOW-Workers gather gladioli on a
farm in Lee County, in South Florida, the world's largest winter
r .. .., .-l ."m"": aladiola capitol.


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ABOVE-Sean picking in the rich agricultural section of the Everglades, in !
Florida. LEFT-Expert hands sort the beans before packing. BELOW-Part
huge celery crop near Lake Okeechobce. Note the rich, black, fertile c


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BELOW-Making guava jelly, one of many trop-
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Cattle is big business in South Florida. ABOVE-Herd
cattle on a South Florida ranch. LEFT-The Farmers' Market
Fort Pierce. BELOW-Brahman cattle, originally imported fri
India, on one of the state's many fast glowing cattle ranch


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ABOVE-Harvesting tomatoes, a major crop. RIGHT-Oranges, Florida's

golden harvest. BELOW-Citrus being hauled in a grove in South Florida. .i q eH

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Tropical and semi-tropical fruits grow well in South Florida. ABOVE,
LEFT-Papaya. ABOVE, RIGHT-Avocados. BELOW-Pineapple.
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In South Florida is produced
some of the tallest sugar
cane in the world, topping
the height of the average
man by many feet and
allowing for several plantings
each year.
















While snow covers northern
fields, Florida supplies the
nation with winter vege-
tables. Harvesting celery in
the rich lake region of South
Florida.



















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The best salt water sport fishing
S in the world is found in Florida
waters. Thousands of visitors
each year match their wits with
the greatest variety of species
to be found anywhere.













Everglades National Park, the
nation's only subtropical wilder-
* ness, features unique vegetation
f and wildlife in its 1,300,000
acres and is an outstanding
example of the primitive Earth,
never touched by Man.


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Commercial fishing is a major industry in South Florida.
ABOVE, LEFT-Part of a day's catch on the deck of a fishing
boat. ABOVE-Handling Florida lobsters. BELOW-Sea turtles.


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ABOVE-Canning mince meat at a plant in South Florida. RIGHT-
Steaming clams. BELOW-Part of the huge fishing fleet at Key West.







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ABOVE-Air view of a large crate factory in South Florida.
RIGHT-Preparing to fell a cypress tree deep in the Ever-
glades. BELOW-A producing oil well in South Florida.


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Scenes at International Airport, Miami,
of the busiest in the notion, and a major
to South America.


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South Florida has many, diversified indus-
tries. ABOVE-Assembling sets in a
radio factory. BELOW-Interior of a
clothing factory. The garment industry
is growing rapidly in South Florida.



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ABOVE-Air view of Port of Palm Beach, with oil storage
tanks in the foreground. RIGHT-Unloading bananas at a
South Florida port. BELOW-Portion of Miami's busy port.


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ABOVE-A slip at the Port of Palm Beach. LEFT-Unloading crushed rock at a Sojth
Florida port. BELOW-Pipe, being loaded at Miami for shipment to South America.


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Sports fishing is a major sport in South Florida. ABOVE-Netting for the small
LEFT-They put up a good fight. BELOW-Landing a big one on a deep sea fishing


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ABOVE-Miami Beach's famous waterfront. RIGHT-Modern
swimming pools and other recreational facilities await the South
Florida visitor. BELOW-Scene on world-famous Miami Beach.


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ABOVE-The famous and luxurious Lido Beach Casino, at Sarasota. BELOW
-Beach scene at Fort Lauderdale. Mile after mile of beautiful sand beaches
suitable for swimming, sunning and relaxing are available in South Florida.




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ABOVE, LEFT-A nice catch on one of South
Florida's many inland lakes. ABOVE-Hunting
ducks. BELOW-Sailboat racing, a popular sport
in the ocean waters off the coast of South Florida.


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South Florida has many large, cosmopolitan cities. ABOVE-Air view of West Palm Beach, lake
front and business section. BELOW-The City of Miami, with Bayfront Park in the foreground.



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Hugh Taylor Birch State Park at Fort Lauderdale, one of the many in the State Park System
operated and preserved for the recreation, relaxation, and education of its citizens and guests.



The State-owned Ringling Art Museum at Sarasota, a gift of the late John Ringling,
contains art treasures valued at $40,000,000. University students are seen at-
tending art classes at the museum. The Ringling Circus has winter quarters nearby.

IMAIMP -


























The highway that goes to
sea. The famed Overseas
Highway stretches 150
miles through the keys
and over the sea from
Miami to Key West, the
southernmost city in the
United States.












Florida, the nation's playground during winter and summer, offers
incomparable beaches and healthful recreation to visitors from all
over the world. A typical South Florida scene at Miami Beach.


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ABOVE-The beauty of South Florida is typified by this scene. Note the pic-
turesque bridge, the clean, modern architectural lines of the buildings. BELOW
-Horse racing, one of the many thrilling spectator-sports of South Florida.


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ABOVE-Exploring one of the cypress
hammocks in the Everglades of South
Florida. BELOW-Air view of part of
famous Lake Okeechobee. INSET-
One of the locks at the lake.












































Reservations for Florida's Seminole Indians are maintained in South Florida. ABOVE-
Scene at one of the Seminole villages. BELOW-A new generation of Seminole Indians.
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ABOVE-Birdlife in the Everglades, a haven for
a variety of wildlife. LEFT-Stately palms in South.
Florida. BELOW-Alligators in the Everglades.

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ABOVE-The Little White House at the U. S. Naval Base at Key West, winter vacation home of
President Harry S. Truman. BELOW-A classroom building at the University of Miami, Coral Gables.












































ABOVE-Home of Thomas A. Edison, at Fort Myers. Edison carried on many of his experiments here.
BELOW-Gamble Mansion, at Ellenton, memorial to Judah P. Benjamin, member of the Confederate Cabinet.














































LEFT-Banyan tree on the banks of
New River, in Pan-American State
Park, near Fort Lauderdale. ABOVE-
Collier monument in Scminole State
Park, in Collier County. BELOW-
Fairchild Tropical Gardens, Miami.



















































ABOVE-"Catwalk" at Highlands Hammock State Park, at
Sebring. BELOW-Myakka River State Park, near Sarasota.



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