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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The board of control
 Letter of transmittal
 Questions and answers about instructional...
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Illustrations
 The scope of the study
 The available instructional...
 The use of instructional space
 Interpretation of the data
 Rates of utilization and instructional...
 Conclusion


PALMM FAMU



The utilization of instructional space in the State University System
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 Material Information
Title: The utilization of instructional space in the State University System
Physical Description: 3 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1962
Publication Date: [1958-63]
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Classroom utilization   ( lcsh )
College buildings -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Fall 1958-Fall 1962.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18581635
System ID: AM00000208:00003

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    The board of control
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
    Questions and answers about instructional space utilization in the state university system of Florida
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Table of Contents
        Page viii
    List of Tables
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
    List of Illustrations
        Page xii
    The scope of the study
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The available instructional space
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The use of instructional space
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Interpretation of the data
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Rates of utilization and instructional space needs
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Conclusion
        Page 70
        Page 71
Full Text




























































































bI










THE U-J


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OF


J nJ ST RUCTJ AL

IN THE


State


UlJn


versity


S system


rAI L


THE BOA RD


OF CONTROL


TAL LA HASS EE


FLORI DA


3 _PA C E















THE BOARD OF CONTROL


BAYA M. HARRISON, JR.
Chairman
St. Petersburg



GERT H. W. SCHMIDT
Jacksonville



FRANK M. BUCHANAN
Miami



CHARLES R. FORMAN
Ft. Lauderdale



JOHN C. PACE
Pensacola



WAYNE C. McCALL
Ocala



CHESTER E. WHITTLE
Orlando



* * * *


J. B. CULPEPPER
Executive Director
Tallahassee













The Office of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida
November 21, 1963


This is an analytical report on the use, during the fall trimester of 1962,
of the space that was then dedicated to instruction in the State University
System of Florida. Instructional space as treated in this report includes
only the following four types of teaching facility space: (1) general
classrooms, (2) seminar rooms, (3) teaching laboratories, and (4) teaching
auditoriums. All other physical plant space, including the service areas
for instructional space as defined above, does not come within the considera-
tion of this report except as it may suggest the relative amount of space
which is dedicated to instruction.

This volume summarizes the studies which were made in each of the institu-
tions, viz., the University of Florida, the Florida State University, the
University of South Florida, and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University. The institutional studies were made on the basis of directions,
definitions, and forms which were adapted by the staff of the Board of Control
from the Manual for Studies of Space Utilization in Colleges and Universities
by John Dale Russell and James I. Doi (published by the American Association
of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Athens, Ohio, 1957). The
full reports of the institutional studies are available in the respective
universities and in the Office of the Board of Control.

While this report is a critical analysis of the extent and patterns of instruc-
tional space use, it does not take into account the qualitative aspects of the
available space. Consequently the reader should bear in mind that any suggestions
for increasing the rates of utilization are based on the assumption that all of
the instructional space is in good condition and is suitable for the purposes used
(or that it can be so renovated). This assumption may be most untenable where
large amounts of space arehoused in temporary or very old buildings.

The first report in this series was based on the fall semester of 1958, and a
second report was issued covering the fall of 1960. The next report following
this present one will be based on the fall of 1964. In the meantime, the publi-
cation of a detailed inventory of all available space has been planned in which
the relationship of instructional space to total plant space will be clearly
delineated.

Robert N. Willis
Research Officer and
Budget Analyst


iii



















QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT
INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE UTILIZATION IN
THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA


A few of the questions most frequently asked about space use are listed

below and followed by answers derived from the text of this report. It

is hoped that the significant findings herein may be thus brought into

clearer focus.


Question: What exactly is meant by utilization of instructional space?

Answer: Generally speaking, it implies the frequency of the use of rooms

in university buildings which have been assigned to house regularly sched-

uled classroom activities.


Question: How much of the space in the total university plant is classified

as instructional space?

Answer: The latest space inventory indicates that 18% of the assignable

area in non-residential buildings was used in the fall of 1962 to house

regularly scheduled classes.


Question: How often are classrooms used?

Answer: Usage varies by institution and by rooms. For example, the average

usage of general classrooms ranged from 20.4 periods per week at the Florida

A & M University to a high of 28.2 at the Florida State University. Some

rooms, probably because of location, size, condition, etc., were not scheduled










at all; some rooms, however, were used as much as 50 room-periods per week.

The 5 teaching auditoriums at the Florida State University were used on an

average of 36.3 room-periods per week.


Question: What is considered good usage?

Answer: There is no definitive answer to this question. Information available

indicates that some institutions use general classrooms on an average of only

9 room-periods per week; a few institutions achieve an average usage of 45

room periods per week. Between 24 and 26 room-periods per week is perhaps the

best estimate available of the current average usage achieved by most institutions

comparable to the institutions within the State University System of Florida.

However, because of the heavy increase in college enrollments, this average will

in all probability rise sharply in the near future.


Question: What is the maximum usage which could be obtained if rooms were in

use during the hours when classes are scheduled?

Answer: Classes begin at 7:30 a.m. (at the University of Florida) and end at

approximately 10:20 p.m. Saturday classes run up to 12:00 noon. Hence, classes

are scheduled over a period of about 80 hours per week. Under a 55-minute

class-period arrangement it would be possible to obtain between 70 and 75 room-

periods of use per week, depending upon the length of the interval between

classes. It was observed above, however, that virtually all institutions over

the country use classrooms 45 or less periods per week. Thus, 45 room-periods

per week, while not a :theoretical" maximum, is representative of the upper

limits of the current operating maximum being attained over the nation. Greater

usage than this, implying an expanded student body, would be accompanied by

a corresponding expansion of resources, e.g., personnel, support space, materials

and equipment, required to operate the universities on such an intensive level.









Question: Is instructional space used more frequently at certain hours of

the day than at others?

Answer: Yes. The morning hours between 9:00 and 12:00 noon continue to be

most popular. Approximately 44% of the student-stations used are used during

these 3 hours. A comparable afternoon block of time is between 1:00 and 4:00

o'clock, when about 30% of student-station use occurs. Student-station use

after 5:00 p.m. accounted for 4% of the total station usage during the fall

of 1962.


Question: Is instructional space used more on some days than on other?

Answer: Yes. On Mondays and Wednesdays student-station use constitutes 44%

of the total use. Tuesday and Fridays are also approximately equal in usage,

when 38% of student-station occupancy occurs. Less than 1% of student-station

occupancy occurs on Saturdays. Student-station occupancy at the Florida A & M

University last fall was 88% greater on Saturdays than at all of the other insti-

tutions combined.


Question: Are the rooms over-crowded when used?

Answer: Not as a rule. During the fall of 1962 (system-wide) 62% of the student-

stations were occupied when rooms were in use.


Question: What percentage of class-period meetings are small? Large?

Answer: During the fall of 1962 14.5% of the classes held had 10 or fewer

students. However, 6.2% of the classes had 51 or more students. Classes

having 101 or more students constituted 1.8% of all class-period meetings.

The preponderance of classes held (72.3% for the entire system) had between

11 and 40 students. Exactly 50% of the classes were held with more than 22

students in them (median class size).











Question: To what extent is instruction carried on in areas not regularly

classified as instructional space?


Answer: A total of 432,126 student-semester-hours were produced during the

fall of 1962 (system-wide). Approximately 6% of these hours were produced

without regular class meetings, i.e., without the use of regular instructional

space. Student-station periods of occupancy in specialized instructional

areas and in rooms not regularly available for classeswere equivalent to 11.4%

of the number of student-station periods in rooms regularly available for

classes at the Florida State University last fall. Similar use was less than

3% at the Florida A & M University and the University of South Florida. No

data were reported by the University of Florida.


Question: How can the utilization of instructional space be increased?

Answer: In several ways: (1) by fuller use during the afternoon and evening

hours, (2) by extending the instructional load more uniformily over the days

of the week and over the 3 trimesters, (3) by closer matching of room capacity

and class size (4) by eliminating duplicate sections and repeat courses (courses

offered each trimester) having enrollments below a reasonable class size, (5)

by making more of the physical plant available for instruction, and (6) by

more uniform use of buildings. These are only a few of possible approaches

to higher rates of utilization of existing space.














TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page
FOREWORD ............................................. .. iii


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ................................... iv


LIST OF TABLES ......................................... viii


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ................................... xii


Part

I. THE SCOPE OF THE STUDY ............................ 1


II. THE AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE ................. 3


III. THE USE OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE .................... 15


IV. INTERPRETATION OF THE DATA ........................ 42


V. RATES OF UTILIZATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
NEEDS ............................................. 6


VI. CONCLUSIONS ...................... ................. 70


viii












LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

I. Available Instructional Space, By Type of Space
and By Institution, Fall 1962 ..................... 4

II. Characteristics of Instructional Space, By Type
of Space and By Institution, Fall 1962 ............... 6

III. Instructional Space in Temporary Buildings, By
Type of Space and By Institution, Fall 1962 .......... 8

IV. Instructional Load Related to the Number of
Instructional Rooms, to Student Stations and to
the Floor Area in All Types of Instructional Space ... 10

IV-A. Average Number of Student Stations Occupied Per
Week By a Full-Time Equivalent Student, By
Institution and Type of Space, Fall 1962 ............. 11

V-A. Amount of Space in Square Feet Classified as
Instructional Space, All Non-Residential
Buildings, Fall 1962 ................................. 12

V. Percentage of Room Space (Sq. Ft.) in Non-
Residential Buildings Devoted to Various
Functions, Fall 1962 ................................. 13

VI. Utilization of All Types of Instructional Space,
By Institution, Fall 1962 ............................ 16

VI-A. Distribution of Instructional Rooms By the
Number of Periods Used Per Week ...................... 18

VI-B. Extent of the Variation in the Utilization
of Instructional Space Among Buildings,
University of Florida, Fall 1962 ..................... 19
Florida State University, Fall 1962 .................. 21
Florida A & M University, Fall 1962 .................. 22
University of South Florida, Fall 1962 ............... 23

VII. Average Number of Room Periods and Student
Station Periods Used Per Week, By the Hour
of the Day and By Institution, All Types of
Instructional Space, Fall 1962 ....................... 25













VII-A. Schedule of Daily Class Periods State
University System of Florida, Fall 1962 ............ 27

VII-B. Variation by Period of the Day in the Use
of Student Stations, All Types of Instructional
Space, Fall 1962 ................................... 28

VIII. Average Number of Periods Rooms and Student
Stations are Used Each Day of the Week ............. 30

VIII-A. Variation by Day of the Week in the Use of
Student Station, All Types of Instructional
Space, Fall 1962 ................................... 31

IX. Average Number of Room Periods and Student
Station Periods Used Per Week, By Capacity of
the Rooms and By Institution, All Types of
Instructional Space, Fall 1962 ..................... 32

X. Percentage of Student Stations Actually Used
During Periods Rooms are Assigned, By Type
of Instructional Space and By Institution,
Fall 1962 .......................................... 34

XI-A. Class Size in Relation to Room Capacity, All
Types of Instructional Space, University of
Florida, Fall 1962 ................................. 35

XI-B. Class Size in Relation to Room Capacity, All
Types of Instructional Space, Florida State
University, Fall 1962 .............................. 36

XI-C. Class Size in Relation to Room Capacity, All
Types of Instructional Space, Florida A & M
University, Fall 1962 .............................. 37

XI-D. Class Size in Relation to Room Capacity, All
Types of Instructional Space, University of
South Florida, Fall 1962 ........................... 38

XII. Relation of Class Size to Capacity of Rooms
Used, All Types of Instructional Space, All
Types of Instructional Space, Fall 1962 ............ 40

XIV. Extent to Which Instruction is Carried on in
Specialized Instructional Areas and in Rooms
not Regularly Available for Class Activities,
Fall 1962 .......................................... 41


Table


Page













XV. Comparison with Earlier Years of the Rate of
Utilization of Rooms and Student Stations 44

XVI. Total Number of Student Semester Hours of
Instruction Produced During the First
Semester, Second Semester, Summer Session
for the Years 1958-59 through 1961-62 57

XVII. Variations in the Student Capacity of all
Instructional Rooms Available in the State
University System, Fall 1962, Associated
with each of Several Percentages of Student
Stations Occupied when Rooms are in Use 59

XVII-A. Variations in the Student Capacity of
Instructional Rooms in the State University
System, Fall 1962, Associated with each of
Several Percentages of Total Non-Residential
Building Space made Available for Classroom
Use 61

XVIII. Amount of Floor Space in Instructional Rooms
that Would Be Required in the State University
System for 135,439 Full-Time-Equivalent Students
at each of Several Designated Levels of Utilization 64


Table


Page













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


Figure Page

I. Distribution of Instructional Space,
By Type and By Institution, Fall 1962 5

II. A Comparison of Room Period Utilization
in Florida Universities with that of
Other Institutions, Fall 1962 46

III. A Comparison of Average Number of Periods
Per Week that Student Stations are Used
in Florida Universities with that of Other
Institutions, Fall 1962 48

IV. A Comparison of the Percentage of Student
Stations Used when Rooms are Actually in
Use in Florida Universities with that of
Other Institutions, Fall 1962 49












PART I

THE SCOPE OF THE STUDY


The Problem.--The study on which this report is based has been set up (1) to

identify the amount of instructional space available in the State University

System and (2) to determine the extent to which the available instructional

space is used. Plans have been made for these studies to be conducted during

the second year of the biennium, using the fall trimester data in each case,

in order that this summary report covering the entire State University System

may be completed and issued just prior to the convening of the Legislature.

This present report is based on the 1962 fall trimester.


Definition of Instructional Space.--Instructional space is defined as com-

prising those rooms which are available throughout the day to house regular-

ly scheduled class activities.


Under this definition the occasional use of such space as faculty offices

or research laboratories to house regularly scheduled class activities has

not been treated as instructional space for those times when used as such.

Neither does the occasional use of classrooms for nonclass activities exclude

rooms from consideration so long as they are available for assignment and for

class use throughout the day.


The following three measures are used to express the amount of instructional

space available:

1. Rooms.--Instructional space as defined above has been classified

into four broad categories according to the functions the various

rooms serve. These four types of instructional rooms are (1) general

-1-









-2-

classrooms, (2) seminar rooms, (3) teaching laboratories (including

shops), and (4) teaching auditoriums.


2. Student Stations.--A student station is defined as .an identifiable

accommodation for one student in an instructional room. A student

station may be a seat in a classroom or a work space in a laboratory.


3. Square Feet of Floor Area.--The floor area included is the net usable

floor space in instructional rooms.


The Use of Instructional Space.--In this study instructional space is con-

sidered to be in use during the time that it is assigned to house regularly

scheduled class activities. Such additional use as is made of instructional

space for other instructional activities and services and for noninstruc-

tional activities is not counted. All of the regularly scheduled class activ-

ities are counted regardless of the time of the day or evening at which the

use occurred.


The basic unit of time for reporting use is a period of approximately fifty-

five minutes.


A room-period of use is defined as the use of one room by a class for one

period. Similarly, a student-station-period of use is defined as the use by

a student of one student station for a single period. These two measures

are used to express the magnitude of instructional operations housed in in-

structional space.


The Extent of Use of Instructional Space.--The average number of periods per

week (and per day) that rooms and student stations are used has been employed

to express the extent to which instructional space is used.












PART II

THE AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE


The Total Available Instructional Space.--As of the fall trimester 1962, in

the four State universities then in operation, there were 34,827 student sta-

tions using 687,743 square feet of floor space in 810 rooms which were avail-

able throughout the day for regularly scheduled class activities. The number

of student stations increased by approximately 3% over 1960, whereas the number

of instructional rooms decreased by 49 rooms as a result of conversion to other

types of space, such as research laboratories and offices (a net reduction

of 18,827 square feet of instructional space over the amount available in

1960).


Table I reports (1) the number of rooms, (2) the number of student stations,

and (3) the number of square feet of floor area, all distributed by type of

instructional space .for each of the institutions and for the system as a whole.


Figure I illustrates graphically the total floor area (687,743 square feet)

distributed by institution and by type of space. The relative sizes of each

institution's instructional area may readily be compared. This floor space

will correspond roughly to the numbers of FTE students accommodated.*


Table II shows (1) the number of square feet of floor area per student sta-

tion for each type of instructional space in each institution. The figures

are especially important inasmuch as the number of student stations in each

room is determined by counting the number of accommodations rather than by

using an optimum amount of space per station to determine room capacity. Hence,

the figures shown in Part 1 of Table II reveal the extent to which the four


* See Table IV, page 10






TABLE I


AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE*
By Type of Space and By Institution

Fall 1962


General Teaching Teaching All Types
Institution Class- Seminar Labora- Audi- Instructional
rooms Rooms stories toriums Space

1. Number of Rooms

University of Florida 230 8 134 13 385
Florida State University 130 6 81 5 222
Florida A & M University 69 2 63 1 135
University of South Florida 53 1 11 3 68

Entire System 482 17 289 22 810


2. Number of Student Stations

University of Florida 10,186 149 3,840 3,083 17,258
Florida State University 5,632 133 1,925 834 8,524
Florida A & M University 3,136 42 1,210 680 5,068
University of South Florida 2,261 36 702 978 3,977

Entire System 21,215 360 7,677 5,575 34,827


3. Square Feet of Floor Area

University of Florida 155,808 2,637 156,386 29,836 344,667
Florida State University 85,855 2,560 70,109 9,609 168,133
Florida A & M University 44,233 494 67,028 9,164 120,919
University of South Florida 28,660 527 15,547 9,290 54,024

Entire System 314,556 6,218 309,070 57,899 687,743

* Includes space located in Temporary buildings (See Table 3 for detail on temporary space).












Figure I


DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Type and By Institution
Fall 1962


General Classrooms
45.2%


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

344,667 square feet

co




Teaching Laboratories
45.4%



o U
oO

*E-
Co







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
168,133 Square feet


General Classrooms Teaching Laboratories
51.1% 41.7%
c

C 0 H 0
to o E-

FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY
S120,919 square feet

General Classrooms Teaching Laboratories
36.6% 55.4% .-C


ia o a o
wi*o
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA (54,024 square feet)
General Teaching Teaching
Classrooms 53.0% Labs 28.8% Aud. 17.2%


Me
S *-




04)




co

Wm
H c>
0 ..











-1 c


ENTIRE SYSTEM: 687,743 SQUARE FEET








TABLE II


CHARACTERISTICS OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Type of Space and By Institution
Fall 1962

All Types
General Teaching Teaching Instruc-
Class- Seminar Labora- Audito- tional
Institution rooms Rooms stories riums Space


1. Average Number of Square Feet
Per Student-Station
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of South Florida

Entire System


2. Average Number of Student-
Stations Per Room

University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of South Florida
Entire System


3. Average Number of Square Feet
of Floor Area Per Room


University of
Florida State
Florida A & M
University of

Entire System


Florida
University
University
South Florida


15.3
15.2
14.1
12.7
14.3


44
43
45
43
44





677
660
-641
541

653


17.7
19.2
11.8
14.6

17.3





19
22
21
36


40.7
36.4
55.4
22.1

40.3





29
24
19
64


21 .. 27


330
427
247
527

366


1,167
866
1,064
1,413

1,069


9.7
11.5
13.5
9.5

10.4





237
167
680
326
253





2,295
1,922
9,164
3,097

2,632


20.0
19.7
23.9
13.6

19.7





45
38
38
58
43


895
757
896
794

849










-7-

institutions differ in the average amount of space used per student station

in each type of instructional room. The area per station has decreased by

6% since 1960, indicating that the average number of stations per room has

increased. Both statistics suggest a trend toward larger class sizes.


Table II also shows (2) the average number of student stations per room,

and (3) the average number of square feet of floor area per room for each

type of space.


Space in Temporary Buildings.--For the entire system there were 2,107 student

stations using 58,242 square feet of floor area in 69 rooAs housed in tempo-

rary buildings, i.e., in buildings deemed to be unsuited for indefinite use

in the future. In 1960 there were 84 instructional rooms located in tempo-

rary buildings.


Table III shows (1) the number of rooms, (2) the number of student stations,

and (3) the floor area in temporary facilities used for instructional space.

Also shown in Table III is (4) the floor area in the 69 rooms in temporary

buildings expressed as a percentage of the total floor area of all the in-

structional rooms in each type of space. Only 8.5% of the total instruc-

tional space was located in temporary buildings during the fall of 1962,

whereas in the fall of 1960, 9.9% was classified as temporary.


Instructional Space Related to Instructional Load.--The total instructional

load in the State University System for the fall trimester 1962 was 29,191

full-time-equivalent students, which represents an increase of 12% over the

fall semester 1960, when the instructional load was 25,980. The amount of

space assigned for instructional purposes, however, has decreased by 3% over

the same period.






TABLE III
INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE IN TEMPORARY BUILDINGS
By Type of Space and By Institution
Fall 1962


Institution
1. Number of Rooms
University of
Florida State
Florida A & M
University of


Florida
University
University
So. Florida


Entire System

2. No. of Student-Stations
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So. Florida
Entire System

3. Area in Square Feet of.Floor
Space
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So. Florida
Entire System

4. Percent of Total Instructional
Space in Temporary Buildings
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So. Florida
Entire System


General
Classrooms


25
2
8
0
35


1,016
55
305
0
1,376



19,517
1,166
4,167
0
24,850



13.1
1.4
9.4
0
7.9


Seminar
Rooms


0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0



0
0
0
0
0
0


Teaching
Laboratories


32
0
2
0
34


704
0
27
0
731


32,152
0
1,240
0
33,392



21.1
0
1.8
0
10.8


Teaching
Auditoriums


0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0


All Types
Instructional
Space


57
2
10
0
69


1,720
55
332
0
2,107


51,669
1,166
5,407
0
58,242



15.9
1.4
4.5
0
8.5


II










-9-
Table IV shows the relationship between the number of full-time-equivalent

students and (1) the number of rooms, (2) the number of student stations in

each institution and (3) the number of square feet of floor space occupied

by those stations.


Table IV-A reports the average number of student-station-periods occupied

per week by a full-time-equivalent student. Utilization data for each type

of room and for all institutions are given. An average FTE student occupied

general classroom stations approximately 11 times per week, teaching laboratory

stations approximately 3 times per week, and teaching auditorium stations

approximately 2 times per week. In total an average FTE student used approxi-

mately 17 student stations per week in all types of instructional space for

regularly assigned classes.


Relationship of Instructional Space to Total Physical Plant Space (Non-Resi

dential Buildings Only).--Instructional space as defined in this study com-

prises only a small part of the total non-residential physical plant space.

In addition to the four types of instructional space as herein treated, there

are also significant amounts of physical plant space devoted to service areas

for instructional space and specialized instructional facilities such as music

studios, gymnasiums and armories.


A perpetual inventory of all university building space is maintained by each

institution in the system. All buildings are divided into two major groups:

(1) residential buildings, and (2) non-residential buildings. Detailed inven-

tories of the space in each building, reflecting a range of information valu-

able in management, are currently on file in the respective universities and

in the Office of the Board of Control. Altogether, physical plant space







TABLE IV
INSTRUCTIONAL LOAD RELATED TO THE NUMBER OF INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS, TO
STUDENT STATIONS AND TO THE FLOOR AREA
IN ALL TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE

By Institution
Fall 1962


Rooms Student Stations Floor Area

Number of No. of FTE Number Total Sq. Ft.
FTE Total Students Total Per FTE Number Per FTE
Institution Students Number Per Room Number Student Sq. Ft. Student

University of Florida 13,586 385 35.3 17,258 1.3 344,667 25.4


Florida State University 9,615 222 43.3 8,524 .9 168,133 17.5


Florida A & M University 2,766 135 20.5 5,068 1.8 120,919 43.7


University of South Florida 3,224 68 47.4 3,978 1.2 54,024 16.8


ENTIRE SYSTEM 29,191 810 36.0 34,827 1.2 687,743 23.6







TABLE IV-A
AVERAGE NUMBER OF STUDENT STATIONS OCCUPIED PER WEEK
BY A FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENT

By Institution and Type of Space
Fall 1962


General Seminar Teaching Teaching All Instruc-
Institution Classrooms Rooms Laboratories Auditoriums tional Space



University of
Florida 11.14 0.12 4.07 2.54 17.88


Florida State
University 10.67 0.12 2.66 2.22 15.67


Florida A & 1.
University 12.41 0.90 3.27 -0- 15.77


University of
South Florida 12.51 0.14 1.62 2.02 16.29



Entire System 11.26 0.12 3.26 2.14 16.83








-12-

within the State University System of Florida is classified into 90 different

types of space and serves at least 12 broad operating functions. Of the 90

types of space, 17 types are identified as teaching facilities; however, this

report deals with only the four major types of instructional space, viz.,

(1) general classrooms, (2) seminar rooms, (3) teaching laboratories, and

(4) teaching auditoriums. There are also types of space within an institu-

tion which are not classified as instructional but which nevertheless support

the instruction function. Faculty offices, research laboratories, and clerical

and storage space in academic departments are examples of such space.


Table V shows by institution the percentage of total room space in non-resi-

dential buildings devoted to the various functions mentioned above.


It can be seen in Table V that 47.24% of university non-residential build-

ing space is in direct support of the instruction function. When only the

areas which are designed or adapted to be used as teaching facilities are

considered, the percentage is much lower. For example, Table V-A shows the

areas in square feet of all instructional space broken into three major

groupings.
TABLE V-A
AMOUNT OF SPACE IN SQUARE FEET CLASSIFIED
AS INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
All Non-Residential Buildings
Fall 1962

Florida Florida Univ.of
Type of Teaching Univ.of State A & M South Entire
Facilities Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System

Regular Instructional
Space 371,187 216,802 152,557 61,717 802,263

Instructional Space
Service Areas 62,083 13,670 13,182 16,162 110,097

Specialized Instructional
Space 144,031 131,108 34,705 6,197 316,041

Total 577,301 366,580 200,444 84,076 1,228,401








TABLE V
PERCENTAGE OF ROOM SPACE (SQ. FT.) IN NON-RESIDENTIAL
BUILDINGS DEVOTED TO VARIOUS FUNCTIONS
Fall 1962


Function

1. General Administration

2. INSTRUCTION

3. Organized Research

4. Sponsored Research

5. Extension

6. Library

7. Physical Plant and
Maintenance

8. Student Personnel
Services


Univ.of*
Florida

2.60%

41.88

5.22

5.65

1.53

7.56


2.86


2.57


--


9. Organized Activities
Related to Instruction 6.09 8.55

10. Auxiliary Enterprises 6.13 6.73

11. Service Departments 0.13 3.37

12. Public Services 3.90 0.15

13. Museum 1.22 0.18

14. Teaching Hospital 11.41 --

15. Miscellaneous 1.25 --


100.00% 100.00%

Total Area in Square Feet 1,960,290 1,030,244


Florida
State
Univ.

2.42%

58.75

0.37

2.87

0.19

7.37


4.20


4.85


* Includes only major buildings on campus at Gainesville.


-13-


Florida
A & M
Univ.

2.89%

56.01





0.47

6.30


7.84


3.14


9.07

10.61

0.05

3.08

--



0.54


100.00%

565,652


Univ.of
South
Florida

7.00%

31.85

1.80





23.21


19.80


1.55


3.30

10.83

0.48

0.18








100.00%

356,649


6.86

7.28

1.04

2.44

0.68

5.85

0.71


100.00%

3,820,035


Entire
System

3.00%

47.24

2.95

3.67

0.90

8.81


5.41


3.16










-14-

Regular instructional space refers to the type of space treated in this report;

instructional space service areas represent the storage and preparation areas

adjoining regular instructional space; and specialized instructional space

represents such space as music practice rooms and indoor physical education

areas. It can be determined from Table V-A that space classified as teach-

ing facility space constitutes only 32.16% of total room space in non-resi-

dential buildings. If only that portion of teaching facility space is

considered such as treated in this report, i.e., regular instructional space,

the area in square feet (802,263) expressed as a percentage to total space

(3,820,035) is only 21.00%.


Actually, the institutions within the System have reported only 687,743 square

feet of instructional space* for this report, which indicates that 114,520

square feet of floor space has been lost as teaching facility space since

the Space Inventory was made (Summer 1962) either through removing buildings

from the campus (e.g., the Social Telfare Building at the Florida State Uni-

versity) or through assignment of the space to uses other than teaching. The

amount of space treated in this report, therefore, constitutes 18.0% of the

total room space in non-residential buildings for the system as a whole.


*See Table I, page 4.












PART III

THE USE OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE


Several measures have been developed to indicate the use of instructional

space. While it is possible to derive one ortwo figures to express the

extent to which instructional space is used in any given institution, it is

necessary to develop a set of figures if the data are to be very useful in

comprehending the scope of the utilization of instructional space and in

making recommendations for changes which would bring about more efficient

use of such space.


The figures which are given in the first section of this part, therefore,

must be considered in relation to the other figures which show utilization

for (1) each type of space, (2) each hour of the day, (3) each day of the

week, and (4) rooms of different student capacities.


Data are also included to show the relationship between (1) the size of the

class groups which were housed (Fall 1962) and (2) the capacity of the in-

structional rooms to which they were assigned.


Finally, note is taken of the extent to which regularly scheduled class activ-

ities were accommodated in rooms not available throughout the day for such

use, and hence, are not included as instructional space in this study.


The Over-all Utilization of Instructional Space.--Table VI reports, for each

institution and for the system as a whole, (1) the number of rooms and stu-

dent stations within each type of instructional space, (2) the gross number

of times per week the rooms and student stations were used, and (3) the average

-15-




TABLE VI


UTILIZATION OF ALL TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Institution
Fall 1962
Room Use I Student Station Use
Average No. of No. of Student-Station- Average No. of
Institution No. of Room-Periods Periods Rooms Student Periods Used Periods Stations
SRooms Used Per Week Used Per Week Stations Per Week Used Per Week
University of Florida
General Classrooms 230 5,094 22.1 10,186 151,358 14.9
Seminar Rooms 8 166 20.8 149 1,694 11.4
Teaching Laboratories 134 2,345 17.5 3,840 55,357 14.4
Teaching Auditoriums 13 263 20.2 3,083 34,505 11.2
All Instructional Space 385 7,868 20.4 17,258 242,914 14.1

Florida State University
General Classrooms 130 3,663 28.2 5,632 102,600 18.2
Seminar Rooms 6 90 15.1 133 1,106 8.3
Teaching Laboratories 81 1,344 16.6 1,925 25,596 13.3
Teaching Auditoriums 5 182 36.3 834 21,384 25.6
All Instructional Space 222 5,279 23.8 8,524 150,686 17.7

Florida A & M University
General Classrooms 69 1,407 20.4 3,136 34,321 10.9
Seminar Rooms 2 36 18.0 42 249 5.9
Teaching Laboratories 63 648 10.3 1,210 9,052 7.5
Teaching Auditoriums 1 0 0 680 0 0
All Instructional Space 135 2,091 15.5 5,068 43,622 8.6

University of South Florida
General Classrooms 53 1,390 26.2 2,261 40,337 17.8
Seminar Rooms 1 12 12.0 36 446 12.4
Teaching Laboratories 11 209 19.0 702 5,218 7.4
Teaching Auditoriums 3 46 15.3 978 6,528 6.7
All Instructional Space 68 1,657 24.4 3,978 52,529 13.2

Entire System
General Classrooms 482 11,568 24.0 21,215 328,616 15.5
Seminar Rooms 17 304 17.9 360 3,495 9.7
Teaching Laboratories 289 4,546 15.7 7,677 95,223 12.4
Teaching Auditoriums 22 491 22.3 5,575 62,417 11.2
jAll Instructional Space 810 16,895 20.9 34,827 489,751 14.1


I I


I II










-17-

number of times the rooms and student stations were used. These averages

represent basic indexes of the extent of the utilization of each type of

instructional space. Table VI shows, for the system as a whole, that all

instructional rooms were used on an average of 20.9 periods per week during

the fall of 1962,whercac general classrooms were used 24.0 periods per week.

The table also shows that the average occupancy of student stations through-

out the system, and in all types of instructional space was 14.1 periods

per week. Further comparisons can be made within each institution and

for each type of instructional space. By doing so, differences can be

noted among the institutions with respect to the varying amounts and

degrees of use of each of the types of instructional facilities.


Other bases on which the extent of utilization attained can be evaluated

are presented in Table VI-A and VI-B. In Table VI-A the number of in-

structional rooms are arranged in terms of the number of periods the rooms

were used per week during the fall of 1962. Room periods of use are

grouped in intervals of 4, as shown on the extreme left column of Table

VI-A. It can be seen that intervals of room period use range from inter-

vals of 0-3 to 48-52. For the entire system about 10% of the rooms were

used more than 35 periods. Approximately 5% of all instructional rooms

were used 3 or less periods per week as compared with 12% during 1960.

However, 5% of the rooms were used 40 or more periods per week. The

median number of periods the rooms were used each week is 19.5. Of the

40 instructional rooms which were used throughout the system 3 or less

periods per week during the fall Trimester 1962, 4 of these were not used

more than 1 period per week, whereas 2 of the 810 instructional rooms avail-







TABLE VI-A

DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS BY THE NUMBER OF PERIODS
USED PER WEEK

All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962


Univ. of Florida State Florida A & M University of
jo. of Florida University University South Florida Entire System
Periods No. of Per Cent No. of Per Cent No. of Per Cent No. of Per Cent No. of Per Cent Cumulative
?er 1Heek Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total IPer Cent


48 52

44 47

40 43

36 39

32 35

28 31

24 27

20 23

16 19

12 15

8 11

4- 7

0- 3


:1

5

7

13

24

40

64

55

49

57

23

29

18
385


0.3%

1.3

1.8
4------.-----.

3.4

6.2

10.4

16.6

14.3

12.7

14.8

6.0

7.5

4.7
100.0


5

4

5

19

30

26

32

23

17

22

22

16

1
222


2.3%

1.8

2.3

8.5

13.5

11.7

14.4

10.4

7.7

9.9

9.9

7.2

0.4
100.0


0

1

0

6

6

11

15

11

11

17

19

19

19
135


0%

0.7

0

4.4

4.4

8.2

11.1

8.2

8.2

12.5

14.1

14.1

14.1
100.0


0

1

5

7



7

8

8

7



3

3

2
68


0%

1.5

7.3

10.3

11.8

10.3

11.8

11.8

10.3

13.2

4.4

4.4

2.9
100.0


L I __________ ___________.&


11

17

45

68

84

119

97

84

105

67

67

40
810


0.7%

1.3

2.1

5.5

8.4

10.4

14.7

12.0

10.4

13.0

8.3

8.3

4.9
100.0


100.0%

99.3

98.0

95.9

90.4

82.0

71.6

56.9

44.9

34.5

21.5

13.2

4.9


High
Usage






Medium
Usage











Low
Usage


i





TABLE VI-B
EXTENT OF THE VARIATION IN THE UTILIZATION
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AMONG BUILDINGS

University of Florida
Fall 1962


Room Basis


Student Station Basis


Permanent Buildings

Agricultural Eng.
Anderson
Benton
Dairy Laboratory*
Engineering
Florida Gym
Flint
Floyd
Horticulture Hdhse.*
Law
Leigh
Library
Livestock Pavilion*
Matherly
McCarty
Military
Medical Science
Teaching Hospital
Norman
Peabody
Physics
Poultry Laboratory*
Reed Laboratory*
Rolfs
Sanitary Laboratory*
Stadium
Tigert
Walker

.Total


Number
of
Rooms


328


Ave. No. of
Periods Rooms
Used Per Week


7.8
34.5
23.0
6.0
24.1
15.1
17.8
20.7
4.5
13.4
19.0
20.6
4.0
21.9
15.5
15.6
18.2
19.0
25.0
27.5
17.1
4.0
9.0
9.2
3.0
17.6
24.4
25.4

20.7


Number of
Student
Stations


177
1,055
505
64
1,202
399
373
469
31
600
954
151
144
1,450
1,040
398
1,263
320
1,399
1,023
558
70
14
152
15
255
278
1,166

15,538


Ave. No. of
Periods Student
Stat. Used Per Week


2.6
22.4
17.4
2.3
15.6
8.8
8.3
11.2
3.5
7.5
13.5
11.9
.7
13.8
11.9
11.7
14.2
5.0
19.3
18.8
13.3
13.3
1.1
8.4
4.7
1.2
11.9
15.4
17.6

14.3


Percentage
of Use When
Rms. Assigned


27.0
62.9
76.6
24.7
64.1
61.2
43.4
52.0
78.3
53.6
58.7
51.7
18.4
66.3
65.2
70.7
72.2
28.2
79.0
69.8
68.0
27.9
92.9
49.6
40.0
63.6
56.8
59.5

65.2


* These buildings, because of remote location from the center of the campus or
are used primarily by special interest groups rather thanby a cross-section
usage might be expected to be low.


because of their unique character,
of the student population. Hence






TABLE VI-B Cont'd
EXTENT OF THE VARIATION IN THE UTILIZATION
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AMONG BUILDINGS

University of Florida Cont'd
Fall 1962


Room Basis Student Station Basis
Number Ave. No. of Number of Average No. of Percentage
of Periods Rooms Student Periods Student of Use When
Temporary Buildings Rooms Used Per Week Stations Stat.Used Per tJeek Rms.Assigned


Building C 4 21.2 59 18.8 90.2

Building D 2 35.0 69 20.0 56.4

Building E 12 19.4 346 12.3 61.2

Building F 1 15.0 30 7.6 50.7

Building I 10 12.2 323 7.5 52.3

Building J 4 27.0 136 15.1 54.5

Building K 5 17.4 114 15.1 88.1

Building N 6 8.7 104 6.6 57.8

Building OE 1 24.0 60 9.6 40.0

Building R 4 18.3 311 9.7 48.3

Building U 3 30.7 68 28.2 92.8

Building X 5 22.0 100 15.8 71.8


Total 57


12.2 60.7


18.8 1,720





TABLE VI-B Cont'd


EXTENT OF THE VARIATION IN THE UTILIZATION
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AMONG BUILDINGS

Florida State University
Fall 1962


Room Basis


Permanent Buildings


Number
of
Rooms


Ave. No. of
Periods Rooms
Used Per Week


Number of
Student
Stations


Student Station Basis
Average No. of
Periods Student
Stat.Used Per Week


Percentage
of Use When
Rms. Assigned


Art Educ. Lab. Wing
CBA
Business
Conradi
Dining Hall
Dodd
Education
Geology
History
Home Economics
Library
ROTC
Math-Meteorology*
Montgomery Gym
Music
Psychology
Science
Tully Gym
Westcott

Total



Temporary Building

Lodge

________


* New building (not included in the Fall 1960 Space Utilization Report).


*1


18.3
28.8
22.7
21.4
12.6
23.0
25.5
13.6
33.7
19.1
18.5
15.2
19.1
19.0
20.1
33.2
24.8
23.9
19.6

23.8


55
555
1,367
433
149
105
871
357
1,146
487
204
192
654
118
288
349
706
225
208

8,469


14.5
16.4
13.5
20.8
5.3
18.4
18.7
25.3
25.5
15.3
14.3
14.1
18.7
9.1
10.0
18.3
17.7
16.9
16.8

17.7


74.4
52.7
56.9
84.6
44.7
80.0
72.0
77.3
74.3
67.2
69.8
89.1
60.5
47.4
42.2
55.0
60.0
68.3
86.4

65.6


220


19.0


16.3


87.8


_I( _






TABLE VI-B Cont'd
EXTENT OF THE VARIATION IN THE UTILIZATION
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AMONG BUILDINGS

Florida A & M University
Fall 1962


Room Basis


Student Station Basis


Permanent Buildings

Art Center
Benjamin Banneker
B. B. Annex
Coleman Library
Howard Hall
Jackson Davis
Jones Hall
Law
Perry Paige-H.E.
Perry Paige-H.E.
Tucker Hall

Total



Temporary Buildings

Band Hall
Gymnasium
Gymnasium (Northside)


Number
of
Rooms


Ave. No. of
Periods Rooms
Used Per Week


10.0
9.5
15.7
23.0
9.3
12.2
9.6
16.3
13.2
12.1
24.7

15.8


11.3
16.0
7.3


Number of
Student
Stations


47
123
201
34
124
205
957
84
594
171
2,095

4,736


102
192
38


Ave. No. of
Periods Student
Stat. Used Per Week


12.8
5.4
8.7
5.5
6.3
6.0
7.1
3.5
9.6
7.9
10.1


Percentage
of Use When
Rms. Assigned


118.0
52.0
49.8
24.0
68.6
54.1
57.6
22 4
51.8
62.0
51.0


8.6


52.4


5.6
11.5
5.9


34.4
70.8
80.6


Total 10


12.0 332


9.0 59.5









TABLE VI-B Cont'd
EXTENT OF THE VARIATION III THE UTILIZATION
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AIONG BUILDINGS
University of South Florida
Fall 1962


Room Basis Student Station Basis
Number Ave. No. of Number of Average No. of Percentage
of Periods Rooms Student Periods Student of Use When
Permanent Buildings Rooms Used Per Week Stations Stat.Used Per Week Rms. Assigned



Administration 15 32.2 634 21.0 65.4

S Chemistry 24 24.4 1,448 12.9 53.1

Life Science* 14 21.8 892 11.3 55.1

University Center 14 19.7 452 15.3 62.8

Teaching Auditorium-
Theater 1 8.0 552 5.5 68.4


Total 68 24.4 3,978 13.2 58.3




* New building (not included in the Fall 1960 Space Utilization Report).










-24-

able throughout the entire system were being used as much as 50 periods

per week.


The wide range in the extent to which the utilization of instructional

space varies among the buildings is apparent in Table VI-B. This variation

ranges from a low of 3.0 to a high of 35.0 average room periods per week.

When only the buildings with 10 or more instructional rooms are considered,

average room periods of use per week range from 9.6 at Jones Hall (FAMU)

to 34.5 at Anderson Hall (UF).


Utilization by Period of the Day.--The average number of periods per week

that rooms and student stations were used during each period of the day is

shown in Table VII.


From that table it can be observed that for the system as a whole the heaviest

use of rooms wasmade from 10:00 to 11:00 in the morning. During this period

the average use of all rooms was3.1 times per week for the system as a whole.

Similarly, the table shows that for the entire system, during the period

of highest use, student stations were used on the average of 2.2 periods per

week. In comparing the universities for rates of usage by hours of the day,

one should keep in mind that trimester class schedules are somewhat different

from the old semester class schedules. Also, the size of the campuses and

different patterns of operation among the universities necessarily require

the various class periods to fall at different times of the day. For exam-

ple, the University of Florida and the Florida State University schedule

15-minute periods between classes to allow students sufficient time to attend

classes at adjacent periods but at points on opposite sides of the campus.

The Florida A & M University and the University of South Florida schedule






TABLE VII
AVERAGE NUMBER OF RDOM PERIODS AND
STUDENT STATION PERIODS USED PER WEEK
By the Hour of the Day and By Institution
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962


Rnnm TTUn


Student Station Use


Room_. StudentStation Use


Florida
A & M
Univ.


Univ. of
South
Florida


Entire
System


Univ.
of
Florida


Florida
State
Univ.


Florida
A & M
Univ.


Univ.of
South
Florida


L 1- 1 .6.4 + + +


2.2

2.6

2.7

2.4

0. 04

1.2

2.2

1.5

0.3

0.01

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.0


2.1

2.7

3.0

3.3

3.0

1.0

3.2

2.2

1.4

0.0

.8

.8

.6

.3


1.9

3.0

3.1

2.7

1.5

2.1

2.6

2.0

0.9

0.1

0.1

0.4

0.3'

0.2


1.0

2.2

2.2

2.1

1.6

1.6

1.5

1.1

.4

.1

0.0

.1

.1

.1


2.3

2.7

2.8

1.9

0.6

1.8

2.1

1.8

0.8

0.1

0.1

0.4

0.3

0.1


1.3

1.5

1.5

1.3

.02

0.7

1.2

0.9

0.1

0.01

0.04

0.04

0.02

0.0


1.4

1.6

1.8

1.8

1.7

0.6

1.8

1.0

0.5

0.0

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.1


Entire
System


1.4

2.1

2.2

1.9

1.1

1.4

1.6

1.2

0.5

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.1


begun exactly on the hour, the nearest hour has been shown


Univ.
of
Florida


Florida
State
Univ.


iour
-f the
Day*


9 AM

10

11

12

1 PM

2

3

4

5

6

7

U

!0

10


1.3

2.9

3.0

2.3

2.2

2.4

2.4

1.8

.9

.1

0.0

.2

*2

.2


2.8

3.4

3.5

2.5

0.7

2.5

3.0

2.6

1.3

0.2

0.1

0.5

0.5

0.2


Total per
Week 20.4 23.8 15.5 24.4 20.9 14.1 17.7 8.6 13.2 14.1


as the time


of beginning.


* Unere class periods have not










-26-

only 10-minute periods. However, classes begin at 7:30 a.m. at the Univer-

sity of Florida but at 8:00 a.m. at the other institutions. While the

Florida State University, the University of South Florida, and the Florida

A & M University each begins classes at the same time of day, classes do

not fall at the same time because of (1) the longer interval between classes

at the Florida State University, (2) Florida A & M University schedules Satur-

day classes, (3) Florida A & M University does not schedule a noon class

period, and (4) the Tuesday-Thursday class periods at the Florida State Univer-

sity are 30 minutes longer than Monday-Wednesday-Friday classes, whereas the

55-minute block is maintained each day of the week at each of the other insti-

tutions. The one exception to this is at Florida A & M University, where

afternoon classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays are different from the Monday-

Wednesday-Friday sequence.


Hence, interpretations of usage by hour of the day are subject to certain

precautions when comparisons among the universities are being made. For

example, class periods are rounded to the nearest hour. As a result the noon

hour (5th period) at the Florida State University appears to be utilized

negligibly, whereas the true rate for this period is more nearly the rates

of the periods coming just before and just after. A schedule of class periods

may be seen in Table VII-A.


In the first section of Table VII-B the actual number of student-station-

periods of use is shown for each institution and for the system as a whole.


For each institution, the index number of 100 is assigned to the period of

the day in which the heaviest use is made of student stations. An index







TABLE VII-A
SCHEDULE OF DAILY CLASS PERIODS*
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF FLORIDA
Fall 1962


Univ. of Florida
M-T-H-T-F


Day
;


Evening 1
2
3
11 4


7:30- 8:25
3:40- 9:35
9:50-10:45
11:00-11:55
12:10- 1:05
1:20- 2:15
2:30- 3:25
3:40- 4:35
4:50- 5:45
--------... ----
7:00- 8:00
8:10- 9:10
9:20-10:20


Florida State Univ.
M-H-F T-Th


8:00- 8:55
9:10-10:05
10:20-11:15
11:30-12:25
12:40- 1:35
1:50- 2:45
3:00- 3:55
4:10- 5:05


8:00- 9:25
9:40-11:05
11:20-12:45
1:00- 2:25
2:40- 4:05
4:20- 5:45


-- *, 7:00- 8:25
8:15- 9:40


Florida A
M-W-F

g:00- 8:55
9:05-10:00
10:10-11:05
11:15-12:10

1:20- 2:15
2:25- 3:20
3:30- 4:25
4:35- 5:30


& M Univ.**
T-Th-S

8:00- 3:55
9:05-10:00
10:10-11:05
11:15-12:10

2:00- 3:30)
2:00- 4:00)
4:00- 5:40


Univ. of South Florida
M-T-W-T-F


8:00- 8:55
9:05-10:00
10:10-11:05
11:15-12:10
12:20- 1:15
1:25- 2:20***
2:30- 3:25
3:35- 4:30
4:40- 5:35


6:00- 6:55
7:05- 8:00
8:10- 9:05
9:15-10:10


In addition to the above regularly scheduled classes, each institution also schedules a three-hour block of
time for evening classes meeting once per week. Such classes are generally held between the hours of 6:00-
9:00 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m., or 7:00-10:00 p.m. on MI-T-W-Th, and from 9:00-12:00 a.m. on Saturdays.

** FAMU schedules a full slate of courses on Saturday mornings. Only laboratory classes are scheduled between
2:00-4:00 p.m. on T-Th. Only military drill is scheduled between 4:00-5:40 p.m. on T-Th.

*** No classes are scheduled during the 6th period on T-U-Th (University Free Hour).


**** Scheduled on 1M-U only.


Class
Period









TABLE VII-B


VARIATION BY PERIOD OF THE DAY IN THE USE OF STUDENT STATIONS
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962


Univ. of
Florida


Florida State
University


Florida A & M
University


University of
South Florida


Number of Student-Station-
Periods Used Per Week


Pei
thE

1.


8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7


19,763
23,109
23,538
15,917
4,792
15,738
17,556
14,956
7,147
981
219
3,420
2,675
875


6,699
7,487
7,791
6,674
137
3,293
6,239
4,353
402
24
193
195
135
0


5,559
6,524
7,349
6,996
6,567
2,446
6,965
4,121
2,093
0
1,242
1,161
994
512


2. Index of Use*


43
99
100
95
72
75
67
50
20
04
03
06
06
05


84
98
100
68
20
67
75
64
30
04
01
15
11
04


86
S 96
100
86
02
42
80
56
05
0.3
02
02
02
0


76
89
100
95
89
33
95
56
28
00
17
16
14
07


*The index number for each institution for each hour of the day is the percentage
that the number of student-station-periods used that hour is of the highest number
of student-station-periods used in that institution for any hour of the day.


-28-


riod of
e Day


16,472
37,568
37,885
35,913
27,247
28,364
25,217
18,995
7,706
1,434

2,177
2,123
1,813


Entire
System


9 AM
10
11
12
1 PM
2
3
4
5
6
7


48,493
74,688
76,563
65,500
38,743
49,841
55,977
42,425
17,348
2,439
1,654
6,953
5,927
3,200


8 9 AM
9 10
10 11
11 12
12 1 PM
1 2
2-3
3-4
4-5
5 -6
6- 7
7-8
8-9
9 10


63
98
100
86
51
65
73
55
23
03
02
09
08
04










-29-

number for each of the other periods is derived by expressing the number of

student-station-periods used as a percentage of the number used during the

base (peak) period. The index numbers for each of the institutions are shown

in the second section of Table VII-B.


That table shows, for example, that for the entire system, the load placed

upon student stations during the period from 4 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon

was 23% of that carried during the period in which the load was heaviest, i.e.,

from 10 to 11 in the morning when student stations were used on the average of

2.2 periods per week.


Utilization by the Day of the Week.--Table VIII and VIII-A show similar varia-

tions in the extent of use of instructional space by the day of the week.


From Table VIII it can be observed that, for the entire system, rooms were used

on the average of 4.6 periods on Monday and Wednesday, while student stations

were used 3.1 and 3.0 for the same period respectively. From Table VIII-A

it can be seen that the student-station-period use on Thursday was 78% of the

load on Monday. Particularly noteworthy is the even distribution of student-

station usage which occurred at the Florida State University. Over the 5-day

period the lowest usage attained was within 13% of the highest attained. Also,

student-station usage on Saturdays at the Florida A & M University was 34% of

the maximum attained on Wednesdays.


Utilization by Capacity of the Rooms.--Table IX shows the average number of

periods per week that rooms of different student capacities were used. It

can be observed, for example, that, for the system as a whole, rooms with

capacities for accommodating 31 or more students tends to be used more fre-

quently than rooms capable of accommodating fewer than 31 students. Rooms








TABLE VIII

AVERAGE NUMER OF PERIODS ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS
ARE USED EACH DAY OF THE WEEK
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962

Room Use Student Station Use

Univ. Florida Florida Univ. of Univ. Florida Florida Univ. of
Day of of State A & M South Entire of State A & M South Entire
The Week Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System

Monday 4.6 5.2 3.2 5.3 4.6 3.2 3.7 1.8 3.1 3.1

Tuesday 3.8 4.6 2.7 4.4 3.9 2.6 3.4 1.4 2.7 2.6

Wednesday 4.6 5.1 3.2 5.3 4.6 3.2 3.8 1.8 2.7 3.0

Thursday 3.5 4.5 2.7 4.4 3.7 2.4 3.3 1.4 2.1 2.4

Friday 3.8 4.4 2.7 5.0 3.9 2.6 3.5 1.6 2.6 2.7

Saturday
Morning 0.13 0.01 1.1 0.0 0.25 0.1 0.01 0.6 0.0 0.14


Total
Per Week 20.4 23.8 15.5 24.4 20.9 14.1 17.7 8.6 13.2 14.1










TABLE VIII-A

VARIATION BY DAY OF THE WEEK IN THE USE OF STUDENT STATIONS

All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962


Day of Univ. of Florida State
the Week Florida University
1. Number of Student-Station-
Periods Used Per Week

Monday 55,257 32,045

Tuesday 45,354 28,978

Wednesday 54,082 32,070

Thursday 41,219 27,811

Friday 45,357 29,698

Saturday 1,645 84


Florida A & M
University




9,077

7,127

9,143

7,119

8,067

3,089


University of
South Florida




12,139

10,664

10,554

8,525

10,647


2. Index of Use*

Monday 100 99 99 100 100

Tuesday 82 90 78 88 85

Wednesday 98 100 100 87 98

Thursday 75 87 78 70 78

Friday 32 93 88 88 86

Saturday 03 01 34 00 04




* The index number for each institution for each day of the week is the percentage that
the number of student-station-periods used that day is of the highest number of s
station-periods used in that institution for any day of the week.


-31-


Entire
System




108,518

92,123

105,849

84,674

93,769

4,818


__

















University
of Florida


Average
Room
Periods


TABLE IX
AVERAGE NUMBER OF ROOM PERIODS AND STUDENT STATION
PERIODS USED PER WEEK


By the Capacity of the Rooms and By Institution
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962


Average
Student
Station
Periods


Florida State
University


Florida A & 1i
University


University of
South Florida


Entire
System


II I- a M A .I I
k~VLU ~ ti~ ~ A


Average
Room
Periods


Average
Student
Station
Periods


Average
Room
Periods


Average
Student
Station
Periods


Average
Room
Periods


Student
Station
Periods


Average
Room
Periods


--I I __ __ _IL IL I1 N I


1 1 II


14.4


14.2

10.0

21.3

25.1

24.0

22.4

25.0

18.9

20.7

26.0


23.9

13.4

14.7

14.6

17.8

12.4

14.6

12.0

9.2

10.0

13.9


10.8

17.2

20.3

25.7

27.2

32.2

29.1

30.3

34.0

39.8

0.0


13.1

15.9

16.8

17.9

17.3

18.6

13.7

11.5

22.4

28.4

0.0


7.3

11.8

14.4

17.1

20.8

22.4

20.5

0.0

26.7

25.0

0.0


4.6

10.1

on o


10.2

11.5

10.4

8.2

0.0

9.3

12.8

0.0


0.0

11.4

16.7

25.8

28.5

37.0

27.0

0.0

0.0

16.8

8.0


0.0

11.5

13.0

19.4

17.8

23.1

12.6

0.0

0.0

5.9

5.5


11.2

14.2

18.5

22.3

25.8

26.0

24.1

27.0

23.2

22.8

17.2


Student
Station
Periods


14.9

13.1

14.4

15.3

16.9

13.9

13.4

12.5

11.8

12.4

8.7


ALL 20.4 14.1 23.8 17.7 15.5 8.6 24.4 13.2 20.9 14.1


Capacity


1 10


11

21

31

41

51

61

o1l

101

151

253


- 20

- 30

- 40

- 50

- 60

- 80

-100

-150

-250

--


I


II


I


I I


I









-33-

for accommodating 01 or more students (teaching auditoriums) were used as much

as 40 periods per week at the Florida State University. The most frequently

used rooms in terms of size were the rooms in which there were 51 to 60 student

stations. The least frequently used were those containing 10 or fewer student

stations.


The Relationship Between the Size of Classes and the Capacity of the Rooms to

Which They Are Assigned.--It may be noted that student stations are used less

frequently on the average than are the rooms.


Table X shows the extent to which all student stations were occupied during the

periods in which the rooms were assigned. It may be observed that at Florida

State University, during the periods in which rooms were in use, an average

of 66% of the stations were occupied. Similar data by type of instructional

space are shown for each of the institutions.


Closely related data are shown in TableXI-A-B-C-D which report, for each

university, the relationship between (1) the number of class meetings* per

week for each of several sizes of class groups and (2) the room capacities

in which the classes meet.


The figure 200 underscored in Table XI-A indicates that this number of class

meetings occurred each week with class groups ranging in size from 21 to 30

students and meeting in rooms having a capacity of from 51 to 60 student

stations. The figures in the columns above and below the figure 200 show

the numbers of meetings of groups of from 21 to 30 students which meet each

week in each of the other categories of room capacities.


Here a class meeting is considered to be of one period's duration.










TABLE X
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENT STATIONS ACTUALLY USED
DURING PERIODS ROOMS ARE ASSIGNED
By Type of Instructional Space and By Institution

Fall 1962


General Seminar Teaching Teaching All Instruc-
Institution Classrooms Rooms Laboratories Auditoriums tional Space



University of
Florida 66% 49% 71% 51% 64%


Florida State
University 62 52 70 70 66


Florida A & IM
University 48 32 70 -- 56


University of
CSuth Florida 63 103* 39 52 54



Entire Cystem 62% 49% 68% 49% 62%


* Percentages greater than 100 generally indicate that the class
room at this time of the last instructional space inventory.


size exceeds the number of stations present in a





TABLE XI-A
CLASS SIZE IN RELATION TO ROOM CAPACITY

All Types of Instructional Space
University of Florida
Fall 1962

ROOM Number of Class-Period Meetings Per Week
CPACITY for Classes of Each Group
(io. of 1 11 21 .31 41 51 61 81 101 151 201 251 Per Cum.
studentt to to to to to to to to to to to and Total cent- Percent-
S nations) 10 21 30 40 50 60 80 100 150 200 250 Over age age

1 to 10 95 73 24 6 3 201 2.6 2.5

11 to 20 204 549 58 9 3 2 15 840 10.7 13.3

21 to 30 301 592 518 113 39 1,563 19.9 33.2

31 to 40 135 434 671 336 51 7 6 1,640 20.8 54.0

41 to 50 140 282 420 570 170 9 10 1,601 20.3 74.3

51 to 60 61 165 200 257 106 15 9 2 815 10.4 84.7

61 to 80 21 75 65 167 113 99 64 28 14 2 648 8.2 92.9

81 to 100 5 7 37 69 19 17 34 18 206 2.6 95.5

101 to 150 9 10 13 43 10 8 34 20 147 1.9 97.4

151 to 200 3 6 9 5 11 36 9 79 1.0 98.4

201 to 250 1 1 3 4 3 6 3 5 2 14 3 45 .6 99.0

251 and Over 3 2 13 11 9 40 78 1.0 100.0

Total 963 2,190 2,009 1,555 550 174 156 98 85 34 14 40 7,868

Percentage 12.2 27.9 25.5 19.8 7.0 2.2 2.0 1.2 1.1 .4 .2 .5 100.0


Cumulative


Percent


ge


12.2


40.1


65.6


85.4


92.4


94.6


96.6 97.8


98.9


99.3


99.5


_____ _____I __ __ ____ __ ____ __ _


100.0













CAPACITY
(:-. of
S t ;ent
S t;t-ions)


CLASS SIZE IN RELATION TO ROOM CAPACITY

All Types of Instructional Space
Florida State University
Fall 1962


Number of Class Period Meetings Per Week
for Classes of Each Group
.. .. .. '


41
to
50


51
to
60


61
to
80


81
to
100


101
to
150


201
to
250


251
and
Over


Total


Per-
cent
age


Cum.
Percent
a


L to 10 62 16 8 86 1.6 1.6

11 to 20 178 248 118 5 549 10.4 12.0

21 to 30 137 298 428 86 62 6 1,017 19.3

31 to 40 171 328 426 328 64 18 2 1,337 25.3

41 to 50 158 297 372 405 216 9 9 1,466 27.8 8 .

51 to 60 25 47 70 71 32 29 16 290 5.5 89.9

61 to 80 6 53 85 55 20 20 20 3 262 5.0 94.9

81 to 100 15 3 22 24 6 15 6 91 1.7 96.6

101 to 150 3 2 10 6 8 4 17 11 33 8 102 1.9 98.5

151 to 200

201 to 250 2 1 5 1 2 3 5 10 30 20 79 1.5 100.0

250 anc Over 100.0

Total 757 1,293 1,544 981 408 103 73 19 43 38 20 5,279

Percentage 14.3 24.5 29.2 18.6 7.7 2.0 1.4 .4 .8 .7 .4 1 00.0

Cumilat've
Percentage 14.3 38.8 68.0 86.6 94.3 96.3 97.7 98.1 98.9 99.6 100.0 100.0
C2 8"---- i..- ^ .0 1___ 1 F <. X1^ '





CLASS SIZE IN RELATION TO ROOM CAPACITY

All Types of Instructional Space
Florida A & M University
Fall 1962


Number of Class-Period Meetings Per Week
____ __for Classes of Each Group ....


81
to
100


101
to
150


201
to
250


251
and
Over


rotal


Per-
cent-
age


Cum.
Percent-
age


Sto 10 67 6 73 3.5 3.5

11 to 20 201 139 57 27 3 427 20.4 23.9

21 to 30 139 124 88 17 6 374 17.8 41.7

31 to 40 105 115 86 142 8 6 462 22.1 63.8

41 to 50 49 117 102 113 19 15 415 19.9 83.7

51 to 60 24 27 22 19 8 9 3 112 5.4 89.1

61 to 80 17 21 46 24 3 6 6 123 5.9 95.0

81 to 100


3.8


98.8


00 3 2 8 9 3 25 1.2 100.0

30ver

Qver 1000


413


26


1 1"1 1I-- +


28.9


26.5


19.8


18.1


1.8


S1.2


- 44 3.1 .3 1. .3 J 3. .3 i


Cumula: .ve
Percent ge


28.9


55.4


75.2


93.3


96.0


97.8


99.0


99.7


100.0


100.0


2,091

100.0


7-3


7


-- .1 4 .I--I.L-.--..--..-'


'OM
C( PACITY
0o. of
studentt
nations s


550


101 to 1

151 to 2

201 to i

251 and

Total

Percent


~1






TABLE XI-D
CLASS SIZE IN RELATION TO ROOM CAPACITY


All Types of Instructional Space
University of South Florida
Fall 1962
*1 T 1


Number of


11
to
20


21
to
30


Class-Period Meetings Per Week
for Classes of Each Group


81
to
100


151
to
200


201
to
250


251
and
Over


Total


Per-
cent-
age


+~~- + I t t t


Cum.
Percent-
age


1 to 10

12 to 20 18 9 27 3 57 3.4 3.4


115


10.3


1 to 40 27 72 109 148 12 2 370 22.3 32.6

1 to 50 61 96 177 301 95 10 740 44.7 77.3
_________ ______I____ ____ ,____ i~ -- =- _____ ______ ____


39


111


84.0


) 4 22 82 52 14 3 10 1 1 189 11.4 95.4

)0

j30 ""


+--- +_ 4-~ 4 4 4. I 4.4


98.3


0 3 6 4 3 1 2 19 1.2 99.5

er 7 8 .5 100.0

128 256 476 559 169 21 16 11 6 4 4 7 1,657

e 7.7 15.5 28.7 33.7 10.2 1.3 1.0 .7 .4 .2 .2 .4 100.0


a 7.7 23.2 51.9 85.6 95.8 97.1 98.1 98.8 99.2 99.4 99.6 100.0


/-------
)OM
_,PACITY
.o. of
:udent
nations )


21 to 30


3

4


I0


51 to 6C

61 to 8(

81 to 1(

10o to 1E


51 to 20

01 to Z5

51 and Ov

'''tal

P centac

C mulatiU
Percentac
C atiu


?










-39-

Figures appearing in Table XI below and to the left of the heavy diagonal

line show the number of class meetings in rooms in which the capacity of the

rooms exceeded the enrollment. Figures appearing within the cells enclosed by

the heavy diagonal line show the number of class meetings held in rooms in

which the capacity approximated the enrollment. The other figures to the right

and above the heavy diagonal line indicate the number of meetings held in

rooms in which the enrollment exceeded the number of student stations.


These same relationships are seen in still another way in Table XII. For

example, for the entire system 14.5% of the class meetings were composed of

groups not in excess of 10 students, although only 2.1% of all the meetings

were held in rooms with 10 or fewer student stations.


From the data shown in Table XII it can also be determined that 56.2% of all

the class meetings are held with fewer than 31 students enrolled, whereas only

31.6% of all class meetings are held in class rooms which do not exceed 30

student stations.


Extent to Which Instruction is Carried on in Rooms not Regularly Available for

Class Activities.--The limited use of rooms not regularly available to house

class activities is reflected in Table XIII. Faculty offices and research

laboratories are examples of the types of space referred to here as rooms

"not regularly available' for classes. Music practice studios and indoor

physical education areas such as gymnasiums are examples of specialized

instructional space. Table XIII also shows the extent to which instruction

was given without the use of any rooms to house organized class activities.

Dissertation, thesis and directed individual study constitutes the bulk of


such instruction.








TABLE XII
RELATION OF CLASS SIZE TO CAPACITY OF ROOMS USED

All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1962

Univ. of Florida Fla. State Univ. Fla. A & 11 Univ. Univ. of So. Fla. Entire System
"O T> ,- a 4-i ,, i -)

ize of ( Q 0 0 .4 a 0 0 0 -4 Z 0 0 -4 o4 n to 0 0 0 -) ) -%o 0 0 C)
C 0 No r:4cn0 0 0 N C 0o 0 Q Vn eC4o0 Q *Ho a C4 Moo 0 N0 0 o 0
os t 4 8 0> o co a j oH 0 o 4 o M o M 1o 4 .u
L O 0 r" 4-0 (. 0 4 O4 0C L -0 0 -1 O O d c '44 0 r- '4- 0 -1 4 40 0 '440 En0 4-4 0 co
capacityy 0 .H r- 0 -H C ,1 3 0 -,A U -0 -H 0 -H >% c o 0 >. o .,4 U o .. U o .r- -
-,f Rooms 0OM = Z-.au Q) M u6. 0E6-e Q 03EY b'oz 0 a -8- 0ot
A P r4i' P- P- 1.|'-' pr4


1 10 12.2 2.3 14.3 1.6 20.9 3.5 7.7 0.0 14.5 2.1

11 20 27.9 10.7 24.5 10.4 26.5 20.4 15.5 3.4 25.4 11.1

21 30 25.5 19.9 29.2 19.3 19.0 17.8 28.7 6.9 26.3 18.4

31 40 19.8 20.8 10.6 25.3 18.1 22.1 33.7 22.3 20.6 22.3

41 50 7.0 20.3 7.7 27.8 2.7 19.9 10.2 44.7 7.0 25.0

51 )0 2.2 10.4 2.0 5.5 1.8 5.4 1.3 6.7 2.0 7.9

61 -30 2.0 8.2 1.4 5.0 1.2 5.9 1.0 11.4 1.6 7.0

81 0 1.2 2.6 0.4 1.7 0.7 0.0 0.7 0.0 0.8 1.8

101 -.50 1.1 1.9 0.8 1.9 0.3 3.8 0.4 0.0 0.8 2.2


151 j0 0.4 1.0 0.7 0.0 0.0 1.2 0.2 2.9 0.5 0.9

201 0 0.2 0.6 0.4 1.5 0.0 0.0 0.2 1.2 0.2 0.8

250 -: 0.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.5 0.3 0.5








TABLE XIV


EXTENT TO WHICH INSTRUCTION IS CARRIED ON IN SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTIONAL
AREAS AND IN ROOMS NOT REGULARLY AVAILABLE FOR
CLASS ACTIVITIES*

Fall 1962


Institution


University of
Florida


Florida State
University


Florida A & M
University


University of
South Florida


Entire System


Student-Station-
Periods in Rooms
Which are Regu-
larly Available
for Classes


242,914



150,686



43,622



52,529


489,751


Student-Station-Periods of Occupancy in
Specialized Instructional Areas and in
Rooms not Regularlv Available for Classes


Number


**



17,103



1,139



1,247


19,489***


% of Number in
Rooms Regularly
Available


Student Semester Hours of
Credit Produced Without
Regular Class Meetings


4 -


Number


7 of Student-Station-
Periods in Rooms
Regularly Available


I__ + ___________


**



11.4%



2.6



2.4


4.0.***


23,229



2,411



9



359


26,008


Heretofore this table has not reflected indoor physical education areas and music practice rooms.
** Data not tabulated by the University of Florida.
A** Does not include University of Florida.


9.6%



1.6



0.02



0.7


5.3








PART IV

INTERPRETATION OF THE DATA


Part III has been devoted to the reporting of data which show (1) the

magnitude of regularly scheduled class activities in terms of the number

of room-periods and student-station-periods used and (2) the average

number of periods that instructional rooms and student stations are used

to house these activities.


In Part IV some bases for interpreting the data will be suggested. At least

two comparisons with the fall trimester 1962 data can be made: (1) com-

parison of present space utilization with previous utilization and (2)

comparison of space utilization in Florida with utilization in institutions

outside Florida and throughout the nation.


Comparison With Earlier Years.--At the present time space utilization data

are available for 1953, 1958, 1960 and, with the issuing of this report, 1962.

Under the auspices of the Council for the Study of Higher Education in

Florida, the State universities developed data for the fall semester 1953'

which are, in general, comparable to the data for 1958, 1960, and 1962. The

fall semester 1958 and 1960 reports were compiled by the Board of Control from

data also furnished by the State universities. This present fall trimester

1962 report is generally comparable both in scope and in content to the

.earlier reports. The notable difference which the trimester system has brought

about has been the lengthening of the class period from 50 minutes to 55

minutes and the shortening of the term from 16 weeks to 15 weeks. In terms

of annual patterns of operation, the trimester system as set up in Florida

requires approximately 20 more days of classroom usage than were required


-42-








-43-

under the old system of two semesters and one summer school. For example,

during 1962-63 at the Florida State University, classrooms were available and

scheduled for use (including examination periods and excluding holidays)

222 days. During 1960-61 these rooms were available and scheduled for use

204 days. Similar patterns exist at the other universities.


Table XV reports the average number of periods that both rooms and student

stations were used during the fall semesters of 1953, 1958, 1960, and the

fall trimester of 1962. Several trends can be noted in the data. For example,

both rooms and student stations were utilized at a higher rate in 1953 for

the system as a whole. It can also be observed that rather significant changes

in room use have taken place since 1953, whereas most of the changes since

1958 have been relatively slight except at the Florida State University.


ComparisonWith Other Institutions.--The Russell and Doi manual* published in

1957 included normative data based on 90 institutions of higher learning.

These norms were subsequently used in the analysis of space utilization in

the 1958 study referred to earlier. Since that time, Doi and Scott** have

prepared normative data based on 217 colleges and universities, including

junior colleges and public and private degree-granting institutions broken

into three groups on the basis of the number of student-credit-hours produced.

Separate norms are presented for each category of institution and for all

institutions combined. The tables presented in this report are based on

the norms for all institutions combined.



*John Dale Russell and James I. Doi, Manual for Studies of Space
Utilization in Colleges and Universities, American Association of
Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, 1957.

**James I. Doi and Keith L. Scott, Normative Data on the Utilization
of Instructional Space in Colleges and Universities, American Association
of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, 1960.








TABLE XV


COMPARISON


WITH EARLIER YEARS OF THE RATE OF
OF ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS

All Types of Instructional Space


UTILIZATION


Institution


University of Florida

Fall 1953
Fall 1958
Fall 1960
Fall 1962


Average No. of
Periods Rooms
Used Per Week


I I


25.4
22.6
19.2
20.4


Average No. of Periods
Student Stations
Used Per Week


14.1
14.8
13.5
14.1


--------------------------- I ----------- ------------------------


Florida State University

Fall 1953
Fall 1958
Fall 1960
Fall 1962


25.0
19.8
21.4
23.8


15.9
13.2
15.6
17.7


-------------------------- ------------- ---------U---------n--

Florida A & M University


Fall 1953
Fall 1958
Fall 1960
Fall 1962


25.7
15.8
15.8
15.5


16.5
9.2
9.6
8.6


-------- --------------- --------------------------- ------------------------- L.


University of South Florida*

Fall 1960
Fall 1962


Entire System


Fall
Fall
Fall
Fall


1953
1958
1960
1962


22.6
24.4


12.8
13.2


------. ...... .._ ...........---------- ...... ----------------..


25.3
20.3
19.4
20.9


14.9
13.3
13.4
14.1


*Formally opened for classes Fall 1960.


-44-


I











-45-

Figure II shows the Doi and Scott norms, presented in percentile units,

for room-period utilization of both general classrooms and teaching labora-

tories. Immediately to the right of each percentile rank is the average

number of room-periods of use which corresponds to the various percentile

positions. Percentiles show the percentage of the group falling below a

given score or, in this case, a given average number of room-periods of

use for general classrooms and teaching laboratories. For example, it can

be seen in Figure II that 99% of all institutions on which the norms are

based* use their general classrooms on the average of less than 45.0 periods

per week and their teaching laboratories on an average of less than 39.0

periods per week. In 50% of the institutions, general classrooms were used

on an average of fewer than 19.1 periods per week, whereas for teaching

laboratories the rate was 14.1 periods per week. Only in 1% of the institu-

tions was the average use of general classrooms and teaching laboratories

less than 9.3 and 3.0 room-periods per week respectively.


The standings of the Florida institutions with respect to the "national"

norms are indicated by the horizontal arrows.


It can be observed that all 4 Florida institutions are utilizing their general

classrooms at rates exceeding the 50th percentile, i.e., exceeding 50% of

the 216 institutions on which the norms are based. More than 90% of the 216

norming institutions fall below Florida State University in the rate of

utilization of general classroom space.



*The number of institutions on which the several norms are based varies
from comparison to comparison; the exact number for each comparison
is given below the percentile rank heading.







Figure II


A COMPARISON OF ROOM PERIODD UTILIZATION IN FLORIDA
UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS*

Fall 1962


General Classrooms

Ave. No. of
Percentile Periods Rooms
Rank Used Per Week

99 45.0

90 -9 --27.3 -- F.S.U.-28.2
U.S.F.-26.2
80 -- 25.0
Entire System-24.0
70 22.8.F.-22.1
.F.-22.1
60 20A -- F.A.M.U. -20.4

50 -- 19.1

40-- 18.0

30 -- 16.9

20 -- 15.0

10 -- 13.5

1 -- 9.3


Teaching Laboratories

Ave. No. of
Percentile Periods Rooms
Rank Used Per Week
(N :205)
99 -r 39.0


90 -

00 -

70-

60-

50 -

40 -

30 -

20 -

10 -

1 -


- 22.4

- 19.0 SU.F. -17.5
-_L7----_ F.S.U.-16.6
-15.4 Entire System-15.7


14.1

12.3

11.1

-10-F.A.M.U.-10.3

8.3

3.0


* Ibid.,pp. 4-5.


(N=216)








-47-

From Figure II it can also be noted that the Florida institutions differ

more with respect to the rate of use of teaching laboratories than they

differ with respect to the rate of use of general classrooms. Whereas

Florida A & M University exceeds only about 22% of the institutions in the

average number of teaching laboratory room-periods utilized per week, the

University of South Florida exceeds 80% of the same institutions.


Two other basic comparisons are presented: (1) Figure III gives a comparison

of the average number of student stations used per week for general class-

rooms and teaching laboratories, and (2) Figure IV gives similar data showing

the percentage of student stations in use when rooms are actually assigned.

The standings of the Florida institutions on these figures are read in exactly

the same way as in Figure II.


In general, it may be concluded from the data shown in Figures II through IV

that the Florida institutions compare very favorably with the 217 institutions

reported in the Doi and Scott manual with respect to the extent to which use

is being. made of the space currently classified as instructional space.


If the present rate of space utilization is maintained, however, the amount of

additional instructional space that will be necessary in order to serve all of

the qualified youth who will be seeking admission by 1975 to institutions within

the State University System of Florida would be equivalent to roughly 7 times

the space at the University of Florida presently classified as instructional

space or as much as 46 times that now in use at the University of South

Florida (See Part V).







Figure III


A COMPARISON OF AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS PER WEEK THAT STUDENT STATIONS ARE USED
IN FLORIDA UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS*

Fall 1962


General Classrooms

Ave. No. of Periods
:ile Student Stations
Lank Used Per Wleek

99- 42.7


90-

80-


18.9 F.S.U.-18.2
U.S.F.-17.8
--15.5 ------- Entire System-15.5
U.F.-14.9


70- 13.0

60- 12.0

50-' 10.8

401 9.9

30-- 9.0

20- 8.1

10- 6.5

1i- 1.0


Teaching Laboratories


Percentile
Rank

(N=186) 99-

90-

80-


F.A.M.U.-10.9


10

1--


Ave. No. of Periods
Student Stations
Used Per Week

-35.1

- 16.3
U.F. -14.4
13.7
- F.S.U.-13.3
Entire System-12.4

-11.6

-10.6

9.1

S7.8 A -75
F. A.M.U.-7.5


-U.S.F.-7.4


6.9

5.6

4.3

1.0


* Ibid., pp.6-7.


Percent


.97)


(N=-


--------~









Figure IV

A COMPARISON OF THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENT STATIONS USED
THEN ROOMS ARE ACTUALLY IN USE IN FLORIDA UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS
Fall 1962


General Classrooms


Teaching Laboratories


Percentile
Rank


Percentage of Student
Stations Used When Rooms
Were Actually in Use


Percentage of
Percentile Stations Used
Rank Were Actually


Student
When Rooms
in Use


99 -- 82.0


90 -

80 -


(N=170)


L-65.3 U.F.-66.0
U.S.F.-63.3
-61.---- F.S.U.-62. 4


70 59.0

60 -- 57.1

50 -- 55.0

40 52.5


30 -

20 -


99-- 99.1

90-- 80.9
F.S.U.-78.4
80-- 75.7

70 72.0 U.F. -71.1
F.A.M.U.-70.0
60-- 67.6


63.7


40+- 59.3


- 51.0


30--


L---47.5 F.A.M.U.-48.1


10 43.7

1 14.5


54.0


201- 49.4


10- 41.3 U.S.F.-39.1

1 25.6


* Ibid.,pp.8-9.


(N=180)










-50-

Aside from the practical problem of obtaining the capital funds that would be

required to provide this amount of space, and aside from the question of the

time required for such a massive construction program and of the attendant

disruption of normal campus activities, it would be uneconomical and would

most likely retard the development of programs of high quality to use scarce

funds for the operation and maintenance of more instructional space than the

amount that is essential to facilitate those programs.


In consideration of these factors, it is widely recognized that it will be

necessary for colleges and universities to attain significantly higher rates

of utilization of instructional space in the very near future. Some of the

approaches to the more intensive use of space are listed below.


Possible Approaches to the Increased Use of Instructional Space


Several approaches to the attainment of fuller utilization of instructional

space in the institutions of the State University System are suggested by

the data summarized in the preceding parts of this report. While these

approaches may have already occurred to the careful reader of this report,

they will be enumerated here, and some indication of the extent to which

each of them might be useful will be given.

1. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly

over the hours of the day.


The Findings.--Table VII indicates the extent to which this approach is

possible as a means of accommodating increased enrollments without the

necessity of increasing the amount of instructional space. It is evident

in Table VII that the use of instructional facilities is concentrated











-51-

around the prime morning hours; that it decreases during the afternoon;

and that it is almost negligible during the evening hours. It can be

observed that the utilization of rooms and student stations during the

period from 4 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon for example, is less than one-

third of the utilization during the peak morning hours. The Florida

State University and the University of South Florida scheduled several

courses during evening hours in addition to regular evening session courses.


The Observation.--Assuming that utilization of instructional space during

the period of fullest use does not hamper the educational program, it

appears reasonable that the instructional load carried in 1962 during

the peak periods might be extended more uniformly throughout the day.

Emphasis on evening classes should be continued and encouraged.


If the number of student-station-periods used throughout the entire

system during the period from 10 to 11 o'clock in the morning (76,563)

were to be maintained for each of eight periods and if 15% of the load

for those eight periods were to be carried after 4 o'clock in the

afternoon, the total number of student-station-periods per week would

be increased from 489,751 actually used to 704,380*. This increase

of 43.8% would represent the use made of instructional space by 12,625

full time-equivalent students.**

------------------------------

The calculation on which this is based are shown below:
7 periods before 4:00 p.m. 452,230 = 92.3% 76,563 x 8 = 612,504
After 4:00 p.m. 37,521 = 7.7% Plus 15% = 91,876
489,751 =100.0% 704,380

** Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student occupies an average of
17 student-station-periods per week.









-52-

Without contending that the institutions should be expected to spread their

instructional load over the hours of the day in the exact pattern used in

this illustration, it seems reasonable to judge the needs for additional

instructional space for each type of space in terms of the capacity of exist-

ing facilities if used more uniformly throughout the hours of the day.

2. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly over the

days of the week.


The Findings.--It has been shown in Table VIII that the use of instructional

facilities is unevenly distributed throughout the days of the week. It was

observed that, for the entire system, the use varies from an average of 4.6

room-periods of use on Monday and Wednesday to negligible use on Saturday.

Student-station use varies from an average of 3.1 periods on Monday to

negligible use on Saturday. Use of these facilities on Tuesdays and Thursdays

averages very near three-fourths of one period less than onMondays, Wednesdays,

and Fridays. The Florida A & M University alone schedules regular Saturday

classes.


The Observation.--If the same assumption is made for the utilization of

instructional space by days of the week as was made for such use by hours

of the day, namely, that the utilization of instructional space on the days

of fullest attained use is not restrictive of the educational program, and

if the further assumption is made that neither (1) special instructional activ-

ities such as military drill and instruction nor (2) other activities in which

large groups of students need to engage must of necessity preclude the fuller

utilization of instructional space on any one or more days of the week, it

would appear to be reasonable to expect that the instructional load carried

on the peak day in 1962 could be extended more evenly throughout the week.









-53-

If the number of student station-periods used throughout the entire sys-

tem on Monday (108,518) were to be used on each of the other days through

Friday, and if 25% of that daily load were to be carried on Saturday

morning, the total number of student-station-periods per week would in-

crease from 489,751 actually used to 569,720*. This increase of 16.3%

would represent the use made of instructional facilities by 4,706 full-

time-equivalent students'.**


Without suggesting that the distribution of the instructional load

used in this illustration is an exact pattern which should be followed,

it is concluded that the total capacity of the instructional rooms

existing at any one time should be appraised in the light of a more

uniform distribution of the instructional load throughout the week.


3. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly among

the several buildings on campus.


The Findings.--It has been shown in Table VI-B that instructional rooms

in the most heavily utilized buildings are used almost four times as

much as instructional rooms in buildings with the lowest average room-

periods of use per week.***


The Observation.--While there are many factors which influence the extent

to which rooms in any building will be used, it is not unreasonable to

consider the possible use that might be made of each type of instructional


The calculations on which this is based are shown below:
Monday-Friday 108,518 x 5 = 542,590
Saturday 108,518 x .25 = 27,130
569,720
** Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student occupies an average of 17
student-station-periods per week.
*** This comparison refers to buildings with 10 or more instructional rooms.









-54

facility in a building if each type were used to the extent that

the same type is actually used elsewhere on the same campus.


At the University of Florida, the 29 instructional rooms in McCarty

Hall* were used at the rate of 15.5 periods per week during the Fall

of 1962. If each type of instructional space in that building were

used at the rate being attained by the respective types of space across

the entire campus, McCarty Hall would be accommodating 863 full-time

equivalent students rather than the 727 it is presently serving.

Further, if each type of space in McCarty Hall were used to the extent

attained by Building U, a temporary building, McCarty Hall would be

serving 1,725 full-time-equivalent students.** Hence, it appears

possible that McCarty Hall could serve over twice as many students

as it presently does without exceeding the rates actually being

attained in buildings elsewhere on the campus of the University of

Florida.


At the Florida State University, the Math-Meteorology Building, having

17 instructional rooms used an average of 19.1 times per week during

the Fall of 1962, could serve 36.4% more students (981 instead of

the 719 full-time-equivalent students presently being served) if each

type of room in that building were utilized to the extent that similar

facilities are being used in the History Building on that same campus. The

--------------------------------
A total of 40 rooms were classified as instructional space in the Fall of
1960.
** These full-time-equivalent figures are derived from the numbers of student
stations occupied in each type of space, assuming that a full-time-equiva-
lent student occupies 17 student stations per week. The estimate of the
number of full-time-equivalent students a building could be serving is
made by multiplying the average number of student stations occupied in
the building whose rate of utilization is being compared by the number of
student stations in the building for which projection is being made and
then dividing by 17.









-55-

number of full-time-equivalent students served in the Home Economics Building

could be increased by 69% (from 432 to 731) if similar conditions prevailed

in that building.


At the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University the rooms in Jones Hall

are used, on the average, a smaller number of periods per week (9.6) than are

the rooms in any other major building on that campus. If each type of instruc-

tional room in Jones Hall were used at the respective rate being attained in

Tucker Hall, the number of students served could be increased from 401 to 558.

Tucker Hall, however, is only 51% utilized (student stations) when rooms are

assigned. If Tucker Hall were used at the same rate as the Geology Building

at the Florida State University, the number of students served could be increased

from 1,248 to 3,118--an increase of 150%!


If the fourteen rooms in the Science Building at the University of South Florida

were being used at the same rate as the fifteen rooms in the Administration

Building, the number of students served would increase from 594 to 1,144.

About 803 full-time-equivalent students could be served if the rate for the

Science Building were the same as the rate for the University Center.


While it would be unwise to assume that each type of instructional room will

be used to the same extent in every building across the campus, there are

ways in which the extreme variations among the buildings can be reduced. It

is concluded that it is necessary to take space in each and every usable

building into account at a reasonable rate of use when the total capacity of

instructional rooms is being determined.









-56-

4. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly through-

out the year.


While this study of the use of instructional space is limited to the

first trimester, other data can be used to indicate, to what extent the

instructional load has been distributed uniformly throughout the entire

year, including the summer session(trimester).


Table XV shows that, for the entire system, during the last five years

the instructional loads carried during the second semester and the summer

sessions were 91.9% and 18.8% respectively of the instructional load which

was housed during the first semester.


If three full trimesters had been operated during each of the four years,

and if as many students had registered during both the second trimester

and the summer trimester as registered for the first trimester the

instructional load would have been 42.3% higher than that which actually

materialized.*


The Trimester plan of operation, to which the entire State University

System of Florida converted beginning with the fall of 1962, has not

as yet been in effect long enough to determine the success with which


*This figure was calculated as follows:
The product of 3 x 1,483,741 (4,451,223) student semester hours
is 42.3% larger than the actual total for 3 terms (3,128,484
student semester hours of credit).








TABLE XVI

TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENT SEMESTER HOURS OF INSTRUCTION PRODUCED
DURING THE FIRST SEMESTER, SECOND SEMESTER, SUMMER SESSION
FOR THE YEARS 1958-59 THROUGH 1961-62

By Institution



% of % of
First Second First Summer First
Institution Semester Semester Semester Session Semester


University of Florida 781,182. 703,558 90.1% 120,082 15.4%


Florida State University 482,956 456,934 94.6 93,640 19.4


Florida A & M University 159,535 148,563 93.1 56,089 35.2


University of South Florida 60,068 54,769 91.2 11,108 18.5


Entire System 1,483,741 1,363,824 91.9% 280,919 18.8%


* Classes began Fall 1960








-58-

student loads will be distributed more evenly over the years*. It

is estimated, however, that student loads initially will be approximately

15% greater over a three trimester period than over a period of two

semesters and one summer school. As the pressure of enrollments continues

to mount, it will be possible to accommodate much larger student loads

without additional instructional space, particularly if classroom

utilization is distributed more evenly over the day, the week, and

among buildings.


5. Matching the size of class groups to the number of accommodations

in the instructional rooms to which they are assigned.


The Findings.--It has been shown in Table X that an average of 62%

of student stations are occupied during the periods that instructional

rooms are in use. Also, it was shown in Figure IV that in the Florida

institutions a greater percentage of student stations, on an average,

are occupied when the rooms are actually in use than is the case in

the majority of the institutions on which the Doi and Scott norms

were based.



* Preliminary reports indicate that the student loads during the second
and third trimesters of the 1962-63 academic year were as follows in
each of the institutions:

SSH First SSH Second % of SSH Third % of
Trimester Trimester First Trimester First
Fall 1962 Winter 1963 Trimester Summer 1963 Trimester


University
of Florida
Florida State
University
Florida A & M
University
University of
South Florida
Entire System


201,111

141,418

41,236

48,361
432,126


181,536

128,437


37,474

45,088
392,535


90.3%

90.8

90.9

93.2
90.8%


75,254

61,858


23,290

24,647
185,049


37.4%

43.7


56.5

51.0
42.8%








-59-

The Observation.--Although more than half of the institutions from

which similar data were available did less well than the Florida univer-

sities, about twenty per cent of the institutions clearly appear to have

been more successful than were the Florida institutions with respect

to the number of student stations occupied once the rooms had been

assigned.


There are significant advantages to be gained from the more careful

matching of the size of classes to the size of the rooms. Table XVII

shows the number of student-station-periods that would have been possible

TABLE XVII

VARIATIONS IN THE STUDENT CAPACITY OF ALL INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS
AVAILABLE IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM, FALL 1962, ASSOCIATED
WITH EACH OF SEVERAL PERCENTAGES OF STUDENT STATIONS OCCUPIED
WHEN ROOMS ARE IN USE


Percentage of Student Increased Capacity
Stations Occupied When No. of Student-Station- in Full-Time-Equiva-
Rooms are in Use Periods Accommodated lent Students*

62** 489,751
m.mm------emm.....--.m .mm m.m..- wn--------------------mm--Wmn-----N-w-mm wmm---

65 513,449 1,394

70 552,945 3,717

75 592,441 6,041

80 631,937 8,364

85 671,433 10,687

90 710,929 13,010



*Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student requires approximately
17 student-station-periods per week.

**Actually attained in the system as a whole during the fall trimester 1962.










-60-

for the system as a whole if each of the percentages showing the extent

to which the rooms were filled had been attained. If the student stations

could have been filled to the percentages shown, the increases in capacity

would have been possible without increasing the number of hours that

the rooms were in use.


It is concluded in the management of existing space and in the planning

of additional instructional space, careful attention should be given to

the matter of matching class size to room size.


6. Making a greater percentage of the total plant space available for

instructional purposes.


The Findings.--It was shown in Table V that less than 50% of the room

space in non-residential buildings was allocated to the instruction function.

This percentage includes faculty offices, secretarial space, storage, closets,

etc., in addition to classroom space. The space classified as teaching

facility space as treated in this report, is only 18% of the total room

space in all non-resident buildings throughout the system.


Observations.--Assuming that a greater percentage of the total plant space

could be made available for instructional purposes without affecting the basic

objectives of the institution, significantly larger numbers of students can

be accommodated in presently existing buildings. Table XVII-A illustrates

the extent to which increased student loads may be absorbed within present

building facilities as varying amounts of building space is reassigned and/or

adapted to instructional uses.









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TABLE XVII-A


VARIATIONS IN THE STUDENT CAPACITY OF INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS
IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM, FALL 1962, ASSOCIATED
WITH EACH OF SEVERAL PERCENTAGES OF TOTAL NON-RESIDENTIAL
BUILDING SPACE MADE AVAILABLE FOR CLASSROOM USE


Percentage of Room Space in
Non-Residential Bldgs. Classi-
fied as Instructicnal Space


Area in
Square Feet


No. of Addi-
tional Instruc-
tional Rooms


Increased
Capacity in
FTE Students*


18.0%** 687,743**


20.0%


22.0


24.0


26.0


28.0


764,007


840,408


916,803


993,209


1,069,610


1,146,010


1,222,411


1,298,812


30.0


32.0


34.0


180


270


360


450


540


630


3,210


6,420


9,630


12,840


16,050


19,260


22,470


25,680


** Actual for Fall 1962.


* Assuming that the average number of student stations per room would be the current
average of 43, used on an average of 14.1 periods per week, and that each student.
would continue to occupy 17 student stations per week.










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If the amount of non-residential building space classified as instructional

space were correctly represented by each of the percentages in Table

XVII-A, it is estimated that the increased capacity in the student load

shown for each of the percentages could be accommodated without additional

new construction.


Inasmuch as no data are currently on file to indicate how much of the

total non-residential plant space may be devoted 100% to instructional

uses, several institutions over the country are presently being sampled

for such data in order to determine if the amount of space made available

for classroom use in the State University System in Florida is comparable.

The desirable ratio of instructional space to total space is, and in all

probability will remain, a subjective issue.












PART V

RATES OF UTILIZATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE NEEDS


The best information that is currently available indicates that 309,007

students will be enrolled in colleges and universities in Florida during the

fall semester of 1975, and it has been judged that 135,439 of these students

will be enrolled in the institutions which will then comprise the State

University System.*


In order to provide a basis for projecting the amount of space in instructional

rooms that will be needed in the State University System by 1975, it has been

assumed that (1) accommodations in instructional rooms will be needed for

135,439 full-time-equivalent students,** (2) the amount per student will be

20.9 square feet (the amount found to be available in 1960), (3) each full-

time-equivalent student will continue to use approximately 17 student-station-

periods per week, and (4) the 69 rooms now in temporary buildings will be

replaced with space in permanent structures.


On the basis of these assumptions the amount of space in instructional rooms

that will be required in 1975 has been calculated for each of several rates

of use. The results of these calculations are reported in Table XVIII. A

similar table was also reported in the 1958 and 1960 space utilization study

based on a different projection up to 1970. The projections of the 1962 data

-------------------------------------

*Charles M. Grigg and William A. Stacey, Projection of Total Undergraduate
Enrollment for State of Florida 1962 to 1975, Institute for Social Research,
The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. January, 1963.

**There were 29,191 full-time-equivalent students being accommodated in the
State University System of Florida during the fall of 1962.


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TABLE XVIII
AMOUNT OF FLOOR SPACE IN INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS THAT WOULD
BE REQUIRED IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM FOR
135,439 FULL-TIME-EQUIVALENT STUDENTS AT EACH
OF SEVERAL DESIGNATED LEVELS OF UTILIZATION


Requirements for 135,439 FTE Students in 1975
at Present Rate of Use
No. Sq. Ft.
Ave. No. of No. of Stu- of Space in No. Sq. Ft. No. of Addi-
Periods Stu- dent Stations Instructional No. of Floor Space No. of In- tional Instruc-
dent Stations Per FTE Rooms Per FTE Student in Instruc- structional tional Rooms
Used Per Teek Student Student Stations tional Rms* Rooms** above 1962***

14.1**** 1.19 23.6 161,172 3,175,088 3,740 2,999
-------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

15.00 1.12 22.1 151,692 2,988,332 3,520 2,779

16.8***** 1.00 19.7 135,439 2,668,148 3,143 2,402

17.5 0.96 19.0 130,021 2,561,414 3,017 2,276

20.00 0.84 16.6 113,769 2,241,249 2,640 1,899

22.50 0.75 14.8 101,579 2,001,106 2,357 1,616

'25.00 0.67 13.3 90,744 1,787,657 2,016 1,275

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------

27.5 0.61 12.1 82,618 1,627,575 1,917 1,176

30.0 0.56 11.1 75,846 1,494,166 1,760 1,019

32.5 0.52 10.2 70,428 1,387,432 1,634 893

*Based on the 1962 average of 19.7 square feet of floor space in instructional rooms per student station.
S**Based on the 1961 average of 849 square feet per room.
***Includes replacement of 69 temporary rooms now in use.
****The top line is based on the rate of use attained in 1962 for the system as a whole.
**!**The present number of student-station-periods occupied by one FTE student per week.









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yield different estimates of the needs, however, which are attributable to the

changes in utilization patterns and to the additional years encompassed as

well as different estimates of student loads over the same periods.


The top line in Table XVIII shows the projection of space needs on the basis

of the rate of use of student stations found in 1962, i.e., an average of

14.1 periods per week. Reading from left to right across the top line,

one can observe that at this rate of use, there would be 1.19 student stations

using 23.6 square feet of floor area in instructional rooms for each full-time-

equivalent student. Continuing across the top line, the table shows that,

for 135,439 full-time-equivalent students, 161,172 student stations using

3,175,088 square feet of floor space in instructional rooms would be required.

In the last two columns the top line shows (1) that this floor area could be

represented by 3,740 rooms of the average size found during the fall of 1962,

and (2) that 2,999 of these rooms would be in addition to the 741 instructional

rooms found in permanent buildings at the present time.


Each of the other lines in Table XVIII shows similar data for the indicated

rates of use which are given in the left-hand column. The extent to which

the higher rates of use would decrease the number of additional rooms needed

to accommodate a total of 135,439 full-time-equivalent students can be deter-

mined from the right-hand column.


For the use of student stations at the rate of 17 periods per week, it can

be observed that one student station would be required for each full-time-

equivalent student; thus, it would be theoretically possible to "station'









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the entire student body during any one period. Similarly, the bottom line,

showing the most extreme rate for which calculations were made, i.e., when

the average use of student stations is 32.5 periods per week, outlines the

theoretical need for 135,439 full-time-equivalent students when there are

approximately two full-time-equivalent students for every student station.


Since during a five-and-one-half-day week, each full-time-equivalent student

is presently occupying 3.2 student-station-periods per day, these statistics

might lead to the conclusion that the use of student stations on the average

of 32.5 periods per week would be possible. While there is no evidence to

demonstrate that thiscould not be done, present practices make it clear that

several difficulties would be encountered if institutions were required to

operate at that level in the immediate future.


In the years between now and 1975, it appears more reasonable to expect that

the rate at which student stations are used will move into the middle range

shown in Table XVIII, i.e., from 15.0 to 25.0 periods per week. Even at this

rate, adjustments in the administration of the instructional programs will

be required that will vary from minor to major proportions, depending upon

the extent to which the rate of utilization approaches the higher of these

two figures.


Even so, it should be possible to achieve a significantly higher rate of

utilization without impairing the quality of instructional services. Further-

more, if at least a portion of the economies that could be thus effected

were to be dedicated to the support of faculty salaries, and to greater

advances in expenditures for instructional materials, equipment, etc.,









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the rate of use of instructional space might very well constitute an

important step in the qualitative improvements of instructional services.


Limitations.--The calculations given in the preceding section are subject

to certain limitations which should be expressed.


In the first place, only a small portion of the total amount of space

that would be required for 135,439 full-time-equivalent students is

involved in those calculations. Space necessary for the following type

accommodations, activities, or services is not included:


(1) Residential space, i.e., space for student housing, food
services, health services, and other student services.

(2) Research and service activities in which universities engage.

(3) Administrative services and plant and grounds operations.

(4) Library services (except as instructional rooms may be
located in library buildings).

(5) Gymnasiums, auditoriums other than teaching auditoriums,
indoor physical education facilities, or music practice rooms.

(6) Faculty offices, hallways, service facilities, and other such
space necessary to house the total of the instructional services.


Only that space which is in rooms regularly available throughout the

days of the week to house scheduled class activities is included, viz.,

general classrooms, seminar rooms, teaching laboratories, and teaching

auditoriums.


Space inventories of all physical plant operations are now maintained

on a perpetual inventory basis and provide data with which to determine









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the percentage of the total space that falls within the consideration of

this report. Using such information, it has been found that even in buildings

which are devoted almost entirely to instruction, only one-fourth to one-half

of the total net floor area is included in instructional rooms of the type

considered in this report. For example, the School of Business Building at

the Florida State University contains 57,022 net square feet of floor area

(all measureable floor space), of which only 20,498 square feet are reported

in this report as instructional space (35.9%). McCarty Hall at the University

of Florida contains 144,337 net square feet of floor space; however, only

20,999 (14.5%) was reported by the university as instructional space, although

it is primarily a classroom building.


Secondly, the calculations were devised for the system as a whole. This

means that careful planning will be necessary if additional instructional

space is to be developed where, and in such a way that, it can be fully

utilized.


Thirdly, there is no good reason to believe that the instructional programs

will always be organized in such a way as to require 17 student-station-

periods per week per FTE student. For example, a pattern of instruction

such as planned for the Florida Atlantic University no doubt will make a

significant contribution to the reduction of the amount of formal instructional

space required per full-time-equivalent student. The extent to which educational

television will influence this figure will depend in part on the way in which

students are grouped for instruction given with that medium. Any marked

change in the number of student-station-periods required per full-time-equivalent

student would, of course, modify the calculations shown in the preceding section.












Fourthly, the calculations have to be interpreted without the benefit of

objective evidence concerning the relationship between the rate of use of

instructional facilities and the quality of instructional programs. Although

there is no evidence to demonstrate that the higher rates of utilization

which were suggested would impair the quality of instructional services,

neither is there adequate evidence to determine just how much higher the

rate can go without jeopardizing the quality of instruction. There is need

for experimental research in this area.










PART VI

CONCLUSIONS


While there exists differing points of view concerning the level of utilization

of instructional rooms that is considered to be optimum, the urgent need for

colleges and universities to find ways of making fuller use of instructional

space stills remains very critical.


Based upon recent enrollment projections it seems apparent that enrollment

increases will continue to out-distance our successful efforts to provide all

building space desired for university programs.


Institutions of higher learning across the nation now more than ever are seeking

ways by which to make more efficient and effective use of all of their

resources, including the physical plants. In Florida enrollments are increas-

ing even more rapidly than is generally true throughout the nation; in fact

the enrollment within the State University System is expected to more than

double by 1968 and nearly quintuple by 1975.


Further, the level to which current operating support must be lifted if the

institutions within the system are to be adequately staffed and equipped requires

that no more resources be invested in the development of the physical plant

than is essential for the adequate housing of the programs to be provided. It

is especially important that the faculties and administration of each insti-

tution demonstrate the ingenuity and self-discipline necessary to make available

larger amounts and achieve significantly greater use of instructional space.

In order to compete with leading universities in providing quality academic

programs for Florida youth, as may be evidenced by the range of faculty talent

and the general level of financial support, the institutions simply cannot afford


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to permit scarce funds to be drained away into non-essential building construction,

operation, and maintenance.


While this study does not attempt to provide a ready answer as to the extent

to which instructional rooms ought to be used, ways have been suggested in

which increased use will undoubtedly be obtained as the State University System

of Florida encounters within the next few years a college-age population explosion.