<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The board of control
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Illustrations
 The scope of the study
 The available instructional...
 The use of instructional space
 Interpretation of the data
 Rates of utilization and instructional...
 Conclusion


PALMM FAMU



The utilization of instructional space in the State University System
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000208/00002
 Material Information
Title: The utilization of instructional space in the State University System
Physical Description: 3 v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1960
Publication Date: [1958-63]
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Classroom utilization   ( lcsh )
College buildings -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Fall 1958-Fall 1962.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18581635
System ID: AM00000208:00002

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    The board of control
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    List of Tables
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    List of Illustrations
        Page viii
    The scope of the study
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The available instructional space
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The use of instructional space
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Interpretation of the data
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Rates of utilization and instructional space needs
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Conclusion
        Page 62
        Page 63
Full Text













































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UT- LJ ATi JO

OF


J]ST -RUC ]JOi\AL

IN THE


erjI
W-~AWS


State


u


university


S system


F7L


THE BOARD OF
TALLAHASSEE


CONTROL


FLORIDA


THE















THE BOARD OF CONTROL


J. J. DANIEL
Chairman
Jacksonville


JAMES J. LOVE
Quincy


RALPH L. MILLER
Orlando


S. KENDRICK GUERNSEY
Jacksonville


FRANK M. BUCHANAN
Miami


BAYA M. HARRISON, JR.
St. Petersburg


CHARLES R. FORMAN
Ft. Lauderdale


J. B. CULPEPPER
Executive Director
Tallahassee












The Office of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida
June 1, 1961



This is an analytical report on the use, during the fall semester
1960, of the space that was then dedicated to instruction in the
State University System of Florida. Institution by institution,
as well as for the system as a whole, account is taken of (1) the
amount and type of instructional space available, (2) the extent
to which that space was used for regularly scheduled instruction-
al activities, and (3) the patterns of that use by the hour of the
day and by the day of the week.

While the report gives an accounting of the use made of instruc-
tional space during a given term, it also suggests ways of attain-
ing, up to a point, the more intensive utilization being required
by the fact that instructional loads are increasing more rapidly
than instructional space is being added.

This volume summarizes the studies which were made in each of the
institutions, viz., the University of Florida, the Florida State
University, the University of South Florida, and the Florida Agri-
cultural and Mechanical University. The institutional studies
were made on the basis of directions, definitions,and forms which
were adapted by the staff of the Board of Control from the Manual
for Studies of Space Utilization in Colleges and Universities by
John Dale Russell and James I. Doi (published by the American Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Athens,
Ohio, 1957). The full reports of the institutional studies are
available in the respective universities and in the Office of the
Board of Control.

The compilation of this report has been a responsibility of Robert
N. Willis, Assistant Educational and Research Officer. The first
report in this series was based on the fall semester 1958, and the
next one will be made for the fall semester 1962. In the meantime,
the Board of Control expects to publish an inventory of all avail-
able space in the State University System showing the use to which
it is being put in providing housing for programs of research and
extension as well as instruction.

Myron R. Blee
Educational and Research Officer
















TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

LIST OF TABLES . . . . v


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS . . . viii


Part

I. THE SCOPE OF THE STUDY . . 1


II. THE AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE . 3


III. THE USE OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE . .. .12


IV. INTERPRETATION OF THE DATA . ... 33


V. RATES OF UTILIZATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
NEEDS . . . . .55


VI. CONCLUSIONS . . . ... .62














LIST OF TABLES


Table

I. Available Instructional Space, By Type of
Space and By Institution, Fall 1960 . .

II. Characteristics of Instructional Space,
By Type of Space and By Institution,
Fall 1960 . . . . .

III. Instructional Space in Temporary Buildings,
By Type of Space and By Institution, Fall 1960.

IV. Instructional Load Related to the Number of
Student Stations and to the Floor Area in
All Types of Instructional Space, By
Institution, Fall 1960 . . .


Page


IV-A. Average Number of Student Stations Occupied
Per Week by a Full-Time-Equivalent Student, By
Type of Space and By Institution, Fall 1960 10

V. Utilization of All Types of Instructional Space,
By Institution, Fall 1960 . . ... 13

V-A. Distribution of Instructional Rooms By the
Number of Periods Used Per Week, All Types
of Instructional Space, Fall 1960 . 15

V-B. Extent of the Variation in the Utilization of
Instructional Space Among Buildings, By
Institution, Fall 1960 . . .. 16

VI. Average Number of Periods Rooms and Student
Stations Are Used Per Week, By Type of
Instructional Space and By Institution,
Fall 1960 . . . . . 18

VII. Average Number of Periods Rooms and Student
Stations Are Used Per Week, By Hour of the
Day and By Institution, All Types of
Instructional Space, Fall 1960 . ... .19












Table


VII-A. Variation By Period of the Day in the Use
of Student Stations, All Types of
Instructional Space, Fall 1960 . .

VIII. Average Number of Periods Rooms and Student
Stations Are Used Each Day of the Week, All
Types of Instructional Space, Fall 1960 .

VIII-A. Variation by Day of the Week in the Use of
Student Stations, All Types of
Instructional Space, Fall 1960 . .

IX. Average Number of Periods Rooms and Student
Stations Are Used Per Week By the Capacity
of the Rooms and By Institution, All Types
of Instructional Space, Fall 1960 . .

X. Percentage of Student Stations Actually Used
During Periods Rooms Are Assigned, By Type
of Instructional Space and By Institution,
Fall 1960 . . . . .

XI. Entire System, Class Size in Relation to
-Room Capacity, All Types of Instructional
Space, Fall 1960 . . . .

XII. Relation of Class Size to Capacity of Rooms
Used, All Types of Instructional Space,
Fall 1960 . . . ..

XIII. Extent to Which Instruction Is Carried On In
Rooms Not Regularly Available for Class
Activities, Fall 1960 . . .

XIV. Comparison With Earlier Years of the Rate of
Utilization of Rooms and Student Stations,
All Types of Instructional Space, By
Institution . . . .


. 21



S. 22



. 23




S. 26




S. 27



. 28



* 30



S 31


XIV-A. Total Number of Student Semester Hours of
Instruction Produced During the First
Semester, Second Semester, Summer Session,
For the Years 1956-57 Through 1959-60,
By Institution . . . .


Page












Table


Page


XV. Variations in the Student Capacity of All
Instructional Rooms Available in the
State University System, Fall 1960,
Associated With Each of Several Percentages
of Student Stations Occupied When
Rooms Are in Use . . . .. 51

XVI. Amount of Floor Space in Instructional Rooms
That Would Be Required in the State
University System for 63,200 Full-Time-
Equivalent Students at Each of Several
Designated Levels of Utilization . ... .56















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


Figure Page

I. Distribution of Instructional Space,
By Type and By Institution, Fall 1960 .. 5

II. Average Number of Periods Rooms and
Student Stations Are Used Per Day,
All Types of Space, Fall 1960 . .. 24

III. A Comparison of Room-Period Utilization
in Florida Universities With That of
Other Institutions, Fall 1960 . .. 36

IV. A Comparison of Average Number of Periods
Per Week That Student Stations Are
Used in Florida Institutions With
Utilization in Other Institutions,
Fall 1960 . . . . 39

V. A Comparison of the Percentage of Student
Stations Used When Rooms Are Actually
in Use in Florida Universities With
That of Other Institutions, Fall 1960 . 40

VI. A Comparison of the Square Feet of Assign-
able Floor Space Per 100 Hours of
Student Occupancy Per Week in Florida
Universities With That of Other
Institutions, Fall 1960 . . 41


viii













PART I

THE SCOPE OF THE STUDY


The Problem The study on which this report is based has been set up (1) to

identify the amount of instructional space available in the State University

System and (2) to determine the extent to which the available instructional

space is used. Plans have been made for these studies to be conducted during

the second year of the biennium, using the fall semester data in each case,

in order that this summary report covering the entire State University System

may be completed and issued just prior to the convening of the Legislature.

This present report is based on the 1960 fall semester.


Definition of Instructional Space Instructional space is defined as com-

prising those rooms which are available throughout the day to house regular-

ly scheduled class activities.


Under this definition the occasional use of such space as faculty offices

or research laboratories to house regularly scheduled class activities has

not been treated as instructional space for those times when used as such.

Neither does the occasional use of classrooms for nonclass activities exclude

rooms from consideration so long as they are available for assignment and for

class use throughout the day.


The following three measures are used to express the amount of instructional

space available:

Rooms Instructional space as defined above has been classified into

four broad categories according to the functions the various rooms

serve. These four types of instructional rooms are (1) general class-













rooms, (2) seminar rooms, (3) teaching laboratories (including shops),

and (4) teaching auditoriums.


Student Stations A student station is defined as an identifiable

accommodation for one student in an instructional room. A student

station may be a seat in a classroom or a work space in a laboratory.


Square Feet of Floor Area The floor area included is the net usable

floor space in instructional rooms.


The Use of Instructional Space In this study instructional space is con-

sidered to be in use during the time that it is assigned to house regularly

scheduled class activities. Such additional use as is made of instructional

space for other instructional activities and services and for noninstruc-

tional activities is not counted. All of the regularly scheduled class acti-

vities are counted regardless of the time of the day or evening at which the

use occurred.


The basic unit of time for reporting use is a period of approximately fifty

minutes.


A room-period of use is defined as the use of one room by a class for one

period. Similarly, a student-station-period of use is defined as the use by

a student of one student station for a single period. These two measures

are used to express the magnitude of instructional operations housed in in-

structional space.


The Extent of Use of Instructional Space The average number of periods per

week (and per day) that rooms and student stations are used has been employed
to express the extent to which instructional space is used.












PART II

THE AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE


The Total Available Instructional Space As of the fall semester 1960, in

the four State universities now in operation, there are 33,845 student sta-

tions using 706,570 square feet of floor space in 859 rooms which are avail-

able throughout the day for regularly scheduled class activities. The number

of student stations and the amount of floor space has increased by approxi-

mately 20% over 1958, whereas the number of instructional rooms increased by

15%.


Table I reports (1) the number of rooms, (2) the number of student stations,

and (3) the number of square feet of floor area, all distributed by type of

instructional space for each of the institutions and for the system as a

whole.


Figure I shows the total floor area (706,570 square feet) distributed by in-

stitution and by type of space.


Table II shows (1) the number of square feet of floor area per student sta-

tion for each type of instructional space in each institution. The figures

are especially important inasmuch as the number of student stations in each

room is determined by counting the number of accommodations rather than by

using an optimum amount of space per station to determine room capacity.

Hence, the figures shown in Part 1 of Table II reveal the extent to which the

four institutions differ in the average amount of space used per student sta-

tion in each type of instructional room.








TABLE I


AVAILABLE INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Type of Space and By Institution
Fall 1960


All Types
General Teaching Teaching Instruc-
Institution Class- Seminar Labora- Audi- tional
rooms Rooms stories toriums Space

I. Number of Rooms

University of Florida 250 13 167 12 442
Florida State University 124 13 84 6 227
Florida A. & M. University 75 2 67 1 145
University of South Florida 34 0 9 2 45

Entire System 483 28 327 21 859


2. Number of Student Stations

University of Florida 10,527 214 4,258 2,601 17,600
Florida State University 5,121 216 2,057 1,262 8,656
Florida A. & M. University 3,183 42 1,376 680 5,281
University of South Florida 1,472 0 410 426 2,308

Entire System 20,303 472 8,101 4,969 33,845
............ ................ ..... .......... . ........ . . . ..... . ...................... ......................... ...................... ..... .......................... I ....................................


3. Square Feet of Floor Area

University of Florida 163,084 4,217 180,367 26,701 374,369
Florida State University 79,646 4,475 64,462 12,371 160,954
Florida A. & M. University 46,375 494 71,178 9,164 127,211
University of South Florida 17,582 0 9,586 16,868 44,036
Entire System 306,687 9,186 325,593 65,104 706,570











Figure I


DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Type and By Institution
Fall 1960


UNIVERSITY; OF FLORIDA

374,369 square feet


General Classrooms
43.6%


Teaching Laboratories
48.2%


Cr2


01


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
160,954 square feet


General Classrooms
49.5%


STeaching Laboratories
S40.0o
o: M


FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY
127,211 square feet

General Classrooms Teaching Laboratories
36.5% d 56.0% .

a: 00
.. . .. : P .

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA (44,036 square feet)
General Teaching Teaching
Classrooms 39.9% Labs 21.8 Auditoriums 38.3%


ENTIRE SYSTEM 706,570 SQUARE FEET


01





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TABLE II


CHARACTERISTICS OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Type of Space and By Institution
Fall 1960


All Types
General Teaching Teaching Instruc-
Institution Class- Seminar Labora- Auditori- tional
Rooms Rooms stories ums Space


1. Average Number of Square Feet
Per Student-Station

University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of South Florida

Entire System


2. Average Number of Student-
Stations Per Room

University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of South Florida
Entire System

3. Average Number of Square Feet
of Floor Area Per Room
University-of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of South Florida
Entire System


15.5
15.6
14.6
11.9


19.7
20.7
11.8
0


15.1 19.5


42
41
42
43
42




652
642
618
517
635


16
17
21
0

17




324
344
247
0
328


42.4
31.3
51.7
23.4

40.2





25
24
21
46


10.3
9.8
13.5
39.6


21.3
18.6
24.2
19.1


13.1 20.9
.... .... ................................ ...


217
210
680
213


25 237 39
............. I........................ I .............................................. I ..........................................


1,080
767
1,062
1,065
996


2,225
2,062
9,164
8,434
3,100


847
709
877
979
823


__ __ I I i _ _













Table II also shows (2) the average number of student stations per room,

and (3) the average number of square feet of floor area per room for each

type of space.


Space in Temporary Buildings For the entire system there are 2,425 stu-

dent stations using 69,382 square feet of floor area in 84 rooms housed in

temporary buildings, i.e., in buildings deemed to be unsuited for indefinite

use in the future.


Table III shows (1) the number of rooms, (2) the number of student stations,

and (3) the floor area in temporary facilities used for instructional space.

Also shown in Table III is (4) the floor area in the 84 rooms in temporary

buildings expressed as a percentage of the total floor area of all the in-

structional rooms in each type of space.


Instructional Space Related to Instructional Load The total instructional

load in the State University System for the fall semester 1960 is 25,980

full-time-equivalent students, which represents an increase of 16% over the

fall semester 1958, when the instructional load was 22,440.


Table IV shows the relationship between the number of full-time-equivalent

students and (1) the number of student stations in each institution and

(2) the number of square feet of floor space occupied by those stations in

both permanent space and permanent and temporary space combined.


Table IV-A reports the average number of student-station-periods occupied

per week by a full-time-equivalent student. Utilization data for each type









INSTRUCTIONAL
By Type of


TABLE III
SPACE IN TEMPORARY BUILDINGS
Space and By Institution
Fall 1960


All Types
General Teaching Teaching Instruc-
Institution Class- Seminar Labora- Auditori- tional
rooms Rooms stories ums Space


1. Number of Rooms
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So.Florida
Entire System

2. No. of Student-Stations
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So.Florida
Entire System

3. Area in Square Feet of Floor
Space
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M University
University of So.Florida
Entire System

4. Percent of Total Instructional
Space in Temporary Buildings
University of Florida
Florida State University
Florida A & M.University
University of So.Florida
Entire System


31
5
8
0
44


1,135
247
296
0
1,678



21,404
2,905
4,244
0
28,553



13.1
3.8
9.2
0
9.4


0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0



0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0


36
o
4
0
40


715
o
32
0
747



38,089
0
2,740
0
40,829


21.1
0
3.8
0
12.5


0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0


0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0




0

0
0


__ __ __ __ 2. 1 __ _


67.
5
12
0
84


1,850
247
328
0
2,425



59,493
2,905
6,984
0
69,382


15.9
1.8
5.5
0
9.9








TABLE IV


INSTRUCTIONAL LOAD RELATED TO THE NUMBER OF STUDENT STATIONS AND TO THE FLOOR AREA
IN ALL TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Institution
Fall 1960


All Available Space Permanent Space
Student Stations Floor Area Student Stations Floor Area
Institution No. FTE Total No. FTE Total No. Sq.Ft.of Total No.FTE Total No. Sq.Ft.of
Students No. Students q. F FT Stuld No. Students Sq. Ft. FTE Stud.


oUniversiy 13,229 17,600 1.33 374,369 28.3 15,750 1.19 314,876 23.8
of Florida

Florida
State
University 8,503 8,656 1.02 160,954 18.9 8,409 0.99 158,049 18.6

Florida
A & M
University 2,847 5,281 1.85 127,211 44.7 4,953 1.73 120,227 42.2

University of
South
Florida 1,401 2,308 1.65 44,036 31.4 2,308 1.65 44,036 31.4


Entire
System 25,980 33,845 1.30 706,570 27.2 31,420 1.21 637,188 24.5










TABLE IV-A
AVERAGE NUMBER OF STUDENT STATIONS OCCUPIED PER WEEK
BY A FULL-TIME-EQUIVALENT STUDENT
By Institution and Type of Space
Fall 1960

General Seminar Teaching Teaching All Instruc-
Institution Classrooms Rooms Laboratories Auditoriums tional Space


University of 11.42 0.10 4.18 2.30 18.00
Florida

Florida State 11.05 0.15 3.05 1.62 15.87
University

Florida A & M
University 13.86 0.13 3.48 0.29 17.75

University of
South Florida 14.26 ---- 3.38 3.37 21.01

Entire System 11.72 0.11 3.69 1.92 17.44


* None available at present.











of room and for all institutions are given. It can be noted that the use

of seminar rooms is similar for all institutions, whereas there is a good

deal more variation among the institutions in the use of teaching audi-

toriums as an instructional facility.












PART III

THE USE OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE


Several measures have been developed to indicate the use of instructional

space. While it is possible to derive one or two figures to express the ex-

tent to which instructional space is used in any given institution it is

necessary to develop a set of figures if the data are to be very useful in

comprehending the scope of the utilization of instructional space and in

making recommendations for changes which would bring about more efficient

use of such space.


The figures which are given in the first section of this part, therefore,

must be considered in relation to the other figures which show utilization

for (1) each type of space, (2) each hour of the day, (3) each day of the

week, and (4) rooms of different student capacities.


Data are also included to show the relationship between (1) the size of the

class groups which are housed and (2) the capacity of the instructional rooms

to which they are assigned.


Finally, note is taken of the extent to which regularly scheduled class acti-

vities are accommodated in rooms not available throughout the day for such

use, and hence, are not included as instructional space in this study.


The Over-all Utilization of Instructional Space Table V reports, for each

institution and for the system as a whole, (1) the number of rooms and student

stations within each type of instructional space, (2) the gross number of

times per week the rooms and student stations are used, and (3) the average







TABLE V
UTILIZATION OF ALL TYPES OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
By Institution
Fall 1960


of Florida


General Classrooms
Seminar Rooms
Teaching Laboratories
Teaching Auditoriums
All Instructional Space
Florida State University
General Classrooms
Seminar Rooms
Teaching Laboratories
Teaching Auditoriums
All Instructional Space

Florida A & M University
General Classrooms
Seminar Rooms
Teaching Laboratories
Teaching Auditoriums
All Instructional Space

University of South Florida
General Classrooms
Seminar Rooms
Teaching Laboratories
Teaching Auditoriums
All Instructional Space

Entire System
General Classrooms
Seminar Rooms
Teaching Laboratories
Teaching Auditoriums
All Instructional Space


No. of
Rooms


250
13
167
12
442


124
13
84
6
227


75
2
67
1
145


34
o
9
2
45


483
28
327
21
859


Ro Usudent P n TT' s
r I. -- f


- -- ---- --- 4


Room-Periods
Used During Week


5,496
151
2,608
237
8,492


3,337
136
1,234
140
4,847


1,496
40
751
6
2,293


774
0
203
42
1,019


11,103
327
4,796
425
16,651


Average No. of
Periods Rooms
TTUs Per Uoeer


22.0
11.6
15.6
19.8
19.2


26.9
10.5
14.7
23.3
21.4


19.9
20.0
11.2
6.0
15.8


22.8
0.0
22.6
21.0
22.6


23.0
11.7
14.7
20.2
19.4


No. of
Student
St.+.tinn


10,527
214
4,258
2,601
17,600


5,121
216
2,057
1,262
8,656


3,183
42
1,376
680
5,281


1,472
0
410
426
2,308


20,303
472
8,101
4,969
33,845


Student-Station-
Periods Used
Per Week


151,120
1,259
55,270
30,441
238,090


93,943
1,254
25,905
13,816
134,918


39,463
359
9,905
816
50,543


19,980
0
4,742
4,720
29,442


304,506
2,872
95,822
49,793
452,993


Average No. of
Periods Stations
Used Per Week


14.4
5.9
13.0
11.7
13.5


18.5
5.8
12.6
10.9
15.6


12.4
8.5
7.2
1.2
9.6


13.6
0.0
11.6
11.1
12.8


15.0
6.1
11.8
10.0
13.4


U- ______ ___________ __________


Institution


University


---


J~a_ e.


_ -- "- -


TABE V
UTLZTO 0FAL TYPE OF INSTRUCIONALSPAC


Room Use


Student Station U












number of times the rooms and student stations are used. These averages

represent basic indexes of the extent of the utilization of each type of

instructional space. Table V shows, for the system as a whole, that all

instructional rooms are used on the average of 19.4 periods per week

whereas general classrooms are used 23.0 periods per week. The table also

shows that the average occupancy of student stations throughout the system

and in all types of instructional space is 13.4 periods per week. Further

comparisonscan be made within each of the four institutions and for each

type of instructional space. By doing so, differences can be noted among

the institutions with respect to the varying amounts of each of the types

of instructional facilities.

Other bases on which the extent of utilization attained can be evaluated

are presented in Table V-A and V-B. Table V-A reports the number of

periods that instructional rooms are used per week. These room-periods of

use are grouped in convenient intervals of 4, as shown in the extreme left

column of Table V-A. It can be seen that intervals of room-period use

range from 0-3 to 48-52. The actual number of periods which rooms are used

varies from 0 to 50, however. For the entire system about 25% of the rooms

are used less than 11 periods per week, about 25% are used more than 28

periods per week, while 50% of the rooms are used between approximately 11

and 28 periods per week. Nearly 12% of all instructional rooms are used

3 or less periods per week. It is interesting to note, however, that over

3% of the rooms are being used 40 or more periods per week. The median

number of periods the rooms are used each week is 19.5. Of the 99 in-

structional rooms presently being used throughout the system 3 or less

periods per week, 62 of these are used not more than 1 period per week,







TABLE V-A
DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS BY THE NUMBER OF PERIODS
USED PER WEEK
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Univ.of Fla.State Fla.A-&,M Univ.of Entire System
No. of Florida Univ. Univ. So. Florida
Periods No-of Per Cent No.of Per Cent No.of Per Cent No.of Per Cent No.of Per Cent Cumulative
Per Week Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Rooms of Total Per Cent

48 52 2 0.5 2 0.8 0 0 10 0 4 0.5 100.00

44 47 4 0.9 2 0.8 2 1.4 1 2.2 9 1.0 99.5

4o 43 9 2.0 4 1.8 2 1.4 1 2.2 16 1.9 98.5

36 39 26 5.9 20 8.8 3 2.1 2 4.4 51 5.9 96.6

32 35 36 8.1 21 9.3 9 6.2 4 8.9 70 8.1 90.7

28 31 40 9.0 28 12.3 12 8.3 10 22.2 90 10.5 82.6

24 27 51 11.5 28 12.3 12 8.3 1 2.2 92 10.7 72.1

20 23 54 12.2 20 8.8 14 9.7 9 20.0 97 11.3 61.4

16 19 54 12.2 23 10.1 15 10.3 4 8.9 96 11.2 50.1

12 15 43 9.7 29 12.8 16 11.0 7 15.6 95 11.1 38.9

8 11 31 7.0 18 7.9 16 11.0 4 8.9 69 8.0 27.8

4 7 30 6.8 18 7.9 21 14.5 2 4.4 71 8.3 19.8

0 3 62 14.0 14 6.2 23 15.9 0 0 99 11.5 11.5
442 100.0 227 100.0 145 100.0 45 00o.o 859 100.0







TABLE V-B
EXTENT OF THE VARIATION IN THE
OF INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE AMONG
By Institution
Fall 1960


UTILIZATION
BUILDINGS


All Buildings Buildings With 10 or More Instruct. Rooms*
Lowest Ave. No. of Highest Ave. No. Lowest Ave. No. Highest Ave. No.
Periods Per Room of Periods Per of Periods Per of Periods Per
Institution
Per Week Room Per Week Room Per Week Room Per Week

University of
University of 3.0 36.8 7.8 36.8
Florida

Florida State 8.1 32.7 10.3 32.2
University

Florida A & M 2.5 26.8 9.8 26.8
University

University of
So.Florida 17.5 29.0 17.5 29.0


* The following information shows these
(1) the number of instructional rooms
per week;


buildings by institution. The name of each building is given followed by
(10 or over), and (2) the average number of periods those rooms were used


University of Florida
Temp.Bldg.I 12
McCarty 40
Floyd 12
Physics 19
Benton 18
Military 13
Med.Sci.Bldg. 15
Temp.Bldg.E 16
Norman 24
o Leigh 20
Matherly 35
Engineering 40
Walker 14


7.8
9.9
16.4
17.2
17.2
19.2
19.5
20.9
21.2
22.1
23.5
24.1
27.2


Peabody 21
Anderson 18


27.8
36.8


Florida State University
Geology 11 10,3
Home Economics 21 13.5
Science 15 18.8
Conradi 16 19.7
Education 32 20.4
Business 29 24.1
Bldg. A 13 27.7
History 29 32.2


Florida A & M University
Jones 23
Benneker 10
Perry-Paige 24
Benneker Annex 14
Tucker 35


9.8
12.9
13.0
13.8
26.8


University of South Florida
Science 19 187
Univ. Center l4 21.9
Administration 12 29.8












whereas 2 of the 859 instructional rooms available throughout the entire

system are being used as much as 50 periods per week.


The wide range in the extent to which the utilization of instructional

space varies among the buildings is apparent in Table V-B. This variation

ranges from 2.5 to 36.8 periods per week. When only the buildings with 10

or more instructional rooms are considered, the range is from 7.8 to 36.8

periods per week.


Utilization by Type of Instructional Space Table VI presents in a more

accessible form than does Table V the average number of periods per week

that the rooms and student stations in each type of instructional space are

used.

Inasmuch as the figures show the average number of periods used, it is un-

necessary to make any allowances for the fact that laboratories are frequently

used on a double-period basis whereas general classrooms are usually used for

one period at a time.


Utilization by Period of the Day The average number of periods per week

that rooms and student stations are used during each period of the day is

shown in Table VII.


From that table it can be observed that for the system as a whole the heaviest

use of rooms is made from 9 to 10 o'clock and 10 to 11:00 in the morning. During

those two periods the average use of all rooms is 2.8 times per week.

Similarly, the table shows that for the entire system, during the period of

highest use, student stations are used on the average of 2.1 periods

per week. Treatment of the noon hour as well as morning and afternoon









TABLE VI
AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS ROOMS AND
ARE USED PER WEEK*


STUDENT STATIONS


By Type of Instructional Space and By Institution

Fall 1960


Room Use Student Station Use
Type of Room Univ. Florida Florida Univ.of Univ. Florida Florida Univ.of
of State A. & M. South Entire of State A. & M. South Entire
Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System

General
Classrooms 22.0 26.9 19.9 22.8 23.0 14.4 18.5 12.4 13.6 15.0

Seminar
Rooms 11.6 10.5 20.0 11.7 5.9 5.8 8.5 6.1

Teaching
Laboratories 15.6 14.7 11.2 22.6 14.7 13.0 12.6 7.2 11.6 11.8

Teaching
Auditoriums 19.8 23.3 6.0 21.0 20.2 11.7 10.9 1.2 11.1 10.0

All Instructional
Space 19.2 21.4 15.8 22.6 19.4 13.5 15.6 9.6 12.8 13.4


*Percentages of use on a 44-period week can be approximated by dividing each of these averages by 44.







TABLE VII
AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS
ARE USED PER WEEK
By the Hour of the Day and By Institution
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Room Use _Student Station Use
Hour Univ. Florida Florida Univ.of Univ. Florida Florida Univ.of
of the of State A & M South Entire of State A & M South Entire
Day* Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System Florida Univ. Univ. Florida System
8 9 AM 1.1 2.3 1.8 2.4 1.6 0.9 1.9 1.3 1.5 1.3
9 10 2.6 3.1 2.5 3.1 2.8 j 2.0 2.4 1.6 1.9 2.1
10 11 2.7 3.2 2.8 1.9 28 2.0 2.4 1.7 1.2 2.0
11 12 2.6 3.0 2.4 2.2 2.0 2.1 1.5 1.4 1.9
2.7
12 1 PM 2.2 1.3 0.1 2.1 1.6 1.1 0.02 1.3 1.2
1 2 1.4 2.1 1.2 2.1 1.6 1.1 1.6 0.7 1.1 1.1
2 3 2.1 2.5 2.3 2.0 2.2 1.4 1.7 1.3 1.2 1.5
3- 4 1.7 1.8 1.7 2.3 1.8 1.1 1.1 0.9 1.3 1.1
4 5 1.3 1.0 0.6 0.8 1. 0.6 0.6 0.2 0.5 0.6
5 6 0.7 0.1 0.1 .1 0.4 0.3 0.1 0.01 0.1 0.2
6 7 0.1 0.1 0.1 1.3 0.2 0.1 .1 0.1 0.5 0.1
7 8 0.2 0.4 0.1 1.4 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.04 0.6 0.2
8 9 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.7 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.02 0.3 0.1
9 10 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.04 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.01 0.1


*Where class periods have not begun exactly on the hour,
of beginning.


the nearest hour has been shown as the time












scheduling of instructional space by the various institutions can also be

noted.


In the first section of Table VII-A, the actual number of student-station-

periods of use is shown for each institution and for the system as a whole.


For each institution, the index number of 100 is assigned to the period of

the day in which the heaviest use is made of student stations. An index num-

ber for each of the other periods is derived by expressing the number of

student-station-periods used as a percentage of the number used during the

base (peak) period. The index numbers for each of the institutions are shown

in the second section of Table VII-A.


That table shows, for example, that, for the entire system, the load placed

upon student stations during the period from 4 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon

is 27% of that carried during the period in which the load is heaviest, i.e.,

from 9 to 10 in the morning when student stations are used on the average of

2.1 periods per week.


Utilization by the Day of the Week Tables VIII and VIII-A show similar

variations in the extent of use of instructional space by the day of the week.


From Table VIII it can be observed that, for the entire system, student sta-

tions are used on the average of 3.1 periods on Monday and 3.0 periods on

Wednesday; and from Table VIII-A it can be seen that the student-station-

period use on Thursday is 71% of the load on Monday.


In Figure II a graphic presentation is made of the data which show the average

number of periods that rooms and student stations are used during each day of









TABLE VII-A


VARIATION BY PERIOD OF THE DAY IN THE USE OF STUDENT STATIONS
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Period of Univ. of Fla.State Fla.A & M Univ. of Entire
the Day Florida Univ. Univ. So.Florida System

1. Number of Student-Station-
Periods Used Per Week


9 AM
10
11
12
1 PM
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


15,531
35,665
35,942
35,962
27,443
18,729
24,722
18,679
11,304
5,868
1,000
2,457
2,439
2,349


16,606
20,836
21,149
17,776
9,813
13,443
14,805
9,264
5,614
848
532
1,928
1,668
636


7,078
8,547
9,185
7,835
84
3,862
7,097
4,938
983
37
584
199
114
0


3,469
4,480
2,754
3,248
2,908
2,465
2,808
2,974
1,103
162
1,113
1,300
625
33


42,684
69,528
69,030
64,821
40,248
38,499
49,432
35,855
19,004
6,915
3,229
5,884
4,846
3,018


2. Index of Use*


8 9 AM
9 10
10 11
11 12
12 1 PM
1 2
2-3
3-4
4 5
5-6
6-7
7-8
8-9
9 10


43
99
99
100
76
52
69
52
31
16
03
07
07
07


99
l00
84
46
64
70
44
27
04
03
09
08
03


93
100
85
01
42
77
54
11
0.4
06
02
01
0


77
100
~6T
72
65
55
63
66
25
04
25
29
14
0.7


61
100
99
93
58
55
71
52
27
10
05
08
07
04


*The index number for each institution for each hour of the day is the per-
centage that the number of student-station-periods used that hour is of the
highest number of student-station-periods used in that institution for any
hour of the day.








TABLE VIII
AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS ROCMS AND STUDENT STATIONS
ARE USED EACH DAY OF THE WEEK
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Room Use Student Station Use

Day of Univ. of Fla.State Fla.A & M Univ.of Entire Univ.of Fla.State Fla.A & M Univ.of Entire
The Week Florida Univ. Univ. So.Florida System Florida Univ. Univ. So.Fla. System

Monday 4.5 4.6 3.2 4.4 4.3 3.2 3.5 2.1 2.9 3.1

Tuesday 3.6 4.2 2.7 4.5 3.7 2.5 2.9 1.5 2.6 2.5

Wednesday 4.4 4.6 3.2 4.9 4.3 3.1 3.5 2.1 2.6 3.0

Thursday 3.2 3.9 2.7 5.0 3.4 2.1 2.6 1.5 2.5 2.2

Friday 3.5 3.9 2.8 3.8 3.5 2.5 3.0 1.9 2.1 2.5

Saturday 0.10 0.08 1.04 0.13 0.25 0.07 0.03 0.58 0.06 0.14
Morning










TABLE VIII-A
VARIATION BY DAY OF THE WEEK IN THE USE OF STUDENT STATIONS
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Day of Univ.of Fla.State Fla.A.&M. Univ.of Entire
the Week Florida Univ. Univ. So. Fla. System

1. Number of Student-Station-
Periods Used Per Week
Monday 56,663 30,140 10,870 6,579 104,252

Tuesday 43,888 25,200 7,989 5,901 82,978

Wednesday 54,846 30,365 10,790 6,099 102,100

Thursday 37,122 22,471 8,078 5,834 73,505

Friday 44,265 26,473 9,774 4,885 85,397

Saturday 1,306 269 3,043 144 4,762



2. Index of Use

Monday 100 99 100 100 100

Tuesday 77 83 73 90 80

Wednesday 97 100 99 93 98

Thursday 66 74 74 87 71

Friday 78 87 90 74 82

Saturday 02 01 28 02 05









Figure II


AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS
ARE USED PER DAY

All Types of Space

Fall 1960


University of.
Florida


M T W T F S

Days of the Week


Florida State
University


3


M T W T F


Florida A & M
University


MT WT F S


University of
South Florida


0
M T W T F S


Rooms


S student Stations


Hours

of

the

Day












the week for each of the institutions.


Utilization by Capacity of the Rooms Table IX shows the average number of

periods per week that rooms of different capacities are used. It can be ob-

served, for example, that, for the system as a whole, rooms with capacities

for accommodating 31 or more students tend to be used more frequently than

rooms capable of accommodating fewer than 31 students. In some cases the use

is as much as 2 to 3 times greater. The most frequently used rooms in terms

of size are the rooms in which there are 51 to 60 student stations. The least

frequently used are those containing 10 or fewer student stations.


The Relationship Between the Size of Classes and the Capacity of the Rooms to

Which They Are Assigned It may be noted that student stations are used less

frequently on the average than are the rooms.


Table X shows the extent to which all student stations are occupied during the

periods in which the rooms are assigned. It may be observed that at Florida

State University, during the periods in which rooms are in use, an average of

65% of the stations are occupied. Similar data by type of instructional space

are shown for each of the institutions.


Closely related data are shown in Table XI which reports, for the entire sys-

tem, the relationship between (1) the number of class meetings* per week for

each of several sizes of class groups and (2) the room capacities in which the

classes meet.


The figure 21 underscored in the table indicates that this number of class


Here a class meeting is considered to be of one period's duration.








TABLE IX
AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS
ARE USED PER WEEK
By the Capacity of the Rooms and By Institution
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


University Florida State Florida A & M University of Entire
of Florida University Universityv South Florida ystem
Capacity Room Student Room Student Room Student Room Student Room Student
Station Station Station __Station Satio

1-10 6.5 9.0 7.9 5.2 9.5 9.7 0.0 0.0 7.6 8.5

11-20 13.6 11.6 12.1 9.3 10.8 6.9 22.0 8.9 12.7 9.9

21-30 18.4 13.9 18.0 15.7 16.1 10.1 18.3 16.0 18.0 13.9

31-40 22.6 14.9 25.7 18.0 17.7 11.3 25.1 15.6 22.6 15.5

41-50 23.7 15.6 25.6 16.8 21.4 13.4 24.3 13.3 23.9 15-3

51-60 29.4 15.9 29.7 17.2 25.2 12.8 26.3 13.5 28.8 15.7

61-80 22.3 11.9 32.5 17.9 22.0 10.3 20.3 9.8 24.4 12.8

81-100 25.5 13.0 24.5 10.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 25.4 12.6

101-150 15.9 7.5 23.3 18.7 25.3 9.8 0.0 0.0 19.1 10.1

151-250 19.8 9.2 29.2 16.6 29.0 12.9 21.0 11.1 22.6 11.3

250 + 33.5 17.5 19.5 1-3 6.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 23.1 9.0

All 19.2 13.5 21.4 15.6 15.8 9.6 22.6 12.8 19.4 13.4








TABLE X


PERCENTAGE OF STUDENT STATIONS ACTUALLY USED
DURING PERIODS ROOMS ARE ASSIGNED

By Type of Instructional Space and By Institution

Fall 1960


General Teaching Teaching All Types
Class- Seminar Labora- Auditor- Instruc-
Institution rooms Rooms stories iums tional Space


University of Florida 63% 45% 68% 52% 62%


Florida State University 66 57 76 47 65


Florida A & M University 55 43 64 20 55


University of South 58 52 53 56
Florida

Entire System 62 49 68 49 62







Table XI
Entire System
CLASS SIZE IN RELATION TO ROOM CAPACITY
All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960
Number of Class-Period Meetings Per Week
Room For Classes of Each Group Cumu-
Capa- lative
city 1 11 21 i 31 41 51 61 81 101 151 201 251 Per- Per-
to to to to to to to to to to to and ITotal cent- cent-
10 20 30 40 50 60 80 100 150 200 250 Over age age

1 to 10 298 1oo 8 3 409 2.4 2.4


11 to 20 855 1114 204 13 12 2 2200 13.2 15.6


21 to 30 504 1110 938 248 57 52 2909 17.5 33.1


31 to 40 534 1016 1574 884 153 21 37 4 4223 25.4 58.5


41 to 50 247 708 963 964 445 48 65 3440 20.7 79.2


51 to 60 124 226 354 338 250 69 19 1380 8.3 87.5


61 to 80 96 162 216 250 289 143 103 6 2 1267 7.6 95.1


81 to 100 3 6 31 32 48 35 10 13 178 1.1 96.2


lOltol50 24 25 17 48 31 25 51 25 36 17 6 305 1.8 98.0


151to 200 51 0 5 9 11 9 16 18 44 126 0.8 98.8

201 to 250 6 5 5 3 2 9 6 7 38 31 10_ 122 0.7 99.5


251- Over 5 7 6 2 3 2 2 6 9 10 14 26 92 0.5 100.0


Total 2701 4479 4321 2794 1301 363 361 79 129 67 30 26 16,651
Per-
centage 16.2 26.9 25.9 16.8 7.8 2.2 2.2 0.5 0.8 0.4 0.2 0.1 100.

Cum.
Percent- 16.2 43.1 69.0 85.8 93.6 95.8 98.0 98.5 99.3 99.7 99.9 100.
age .- I ___ ________












meetings occur each week with class groups ranging in size from 51 to 60

students and meeting in rooms having a capacity of from 31 to 40 student

stations. The figures in the columns above and below the figure 21 show

the number of meetings of groups of from 51 to 60 students which meet each

week in each of the other categories of room capacities.


Figures appearing in Table XI below and to the left of the heavy diagonal

line show the number of class meetings in rooms in which the capacity of the

rooms exceeds the enrollment. Figures in the cells immediately above and to

the right of the heavy diagonal line show the number of class meetings being

held in rooms in which the capacity approximates the enrollment. The other

figures to the right and above the heavy diagonal line indicate the number of

meetings being held in rooms in which the enrollment exceeds the number of

student stations.


These same relationships are seen in still another way in Table XII. For

example, for the entire system 16.2% of the class meetings are composed of

groups not in excess of 10 students, although only 2.4% of all the meetings

are being held in rooms with 10 or fewer students.


From the data shown in Table XII it can also be determined that 69.0% of all

the class meetings are held with fewer than 31 students enrolled, whereas only

33.1% of all class meetings are held in class rooms which do not exceed 30

student stations.


Extent to Which Instruction Is Carried On In Rooms Not Regularly Available

for Class Activities The limited extent to which rooms that are not regularly









RELATION OF CLASS


Table XII
SIZE TO CAPACITY OF ROOMS USED


All Types of Instructional Space
Fall 1960


Univ. of Florida Fla. State Univ. Fla. A & M Univ. Univ. of So. Fla. Entire System
W o W- 0 W 0 ca- 0 ) W b0 ra)
W 4-H F1 D M 4-) M M4-O
Size of ro L o r ) o oq H t o o ~ -H 0 w
Sd i W d 01 C *) H d tC 09 Id 0 0 UH d -H OP r d 0 0 U rd m 0 0 0 0 -H m P O u
Class & o r0 ) M oo P.i-i dO C o M H co a ) o o r.o od-0 co M 0 P o
Capacity 0"4C i 0 r- 0 q" 0- o 0 "4 C 0
Sd O k O ) Ui o" 3 0O Q H o
of Rooms -40 o A 4P __ u P, Flp-- 1M a4 u "Z!u n- -c u

1-10 13.1 2.3 16.1 1.5 31.3 6.2 8.5 0 16.2 2.4

11-20 31.8 13.9 22.9 11.2 21.2 18.8 17.6 4.3 26.9 13.2

21-30 23.2 18.4 27.4 16.0 22.2 17.6 50.9 16.2 25.9 17.5

31-40 16.6 22.1 19.0 34.5 14.9 21.7 11.5 17.3 16.8 25.4

41-50 7.9 20.6 9.2 18.5 5.9 18.6 4.9 35.8 7.8 20.7

51-60 2.5 9.7 1.8 6.8 2.0 5.5 2.1 10.3 2.2 8.3

61-80 2.6 7.1 1.8 8.0 1.5 6.7 2.0 12.0 2.2 7.6

81-100 0.7 1.8 0.3 0.5 0.3 o 0.3 o 0.5 1.1

101-150 0.9 1.9 0.7 1.4 0.6 3.3 0.8 0 0.8 1.8

151-200 0.3 0.9 0.6 o o 1.3 1.0 2.1 0.4 0.8

201-250 0.1 0.5 0.2 1.2 0.1 0 0.4 2.0 0.2 0.7

250 + 0.3 0.8 o 0.4 0 3.0 0 0 0.1 0.5
.3 ii .3.











TABLE XIII


EXTENT TO WHICH INSTRUCTION IS CARRIED ON
IN ROOMS NOT REGULARLY AVAILABLE FOR
CLASS ACTIVITIES


Student Semester Hours of
Student-Station-Periods of Oc- Studt S r H s
Credit Produced Without Regular
Student-Station- cupancy in Rooms Nct Regularly C
Class Meetings
Periods in Rooms --ailaable Class
Which Are Regu- of Student-
Institution larly Available Number % of Number in Number Station-Periods
for Classes Rooms Regularly in Rooms Regularly
Available Available

University of
Florida 238,090 9,551 4.0

Florida State 134,918 284 0.2 3,527 2.6
University

Florida A & M 50,543 308 0.6 9 0.02
University

University of 29,442 36 0.1 0 0.0
South Florida


Entire System 452,993 628 0.3** 13,087 2.9






wj *No data available from the University of Florida.
**Does not include University of Florida.










available to house class activities shown in Table XIII. Faculty offices

and research laboratories are examples of the types of space referred to

here. Table XIII also shows the extent to which instruction is given

without the use of any rooms to house oragnized class activities.









PART IV

INTERPRETATION OF THE DATA


Part III has been devoted to the reporting of data which show (1) the

magnitude of regularly scheduled class activities in terms of the number

of room-periods and student-station-periods used and (2) the average

number of periods that instructional rooms and student stations are used

to house these activities.


In Part IV some bases for interpreting the data will be suggested. At least

two comparisons with the fall semester 1960 data can be made: (1) com-

parison of present space utilization with previous utilization and

(2) comparison of space utilization in Florida with utilization in insti-

tutions outside Florida and throughout the nation.


Comparison With Earlier Years At the present time space utilization data

are available for 1953, 1958, and, with the issuing of this report, 1960.

Under the auspices of the Council for the Study of Higher Education in

Florida, the State universities developed data for the fall semester 1953

which are, in general, comparable to the data for 1958 and 1960. The fall

semester 1958 report was compiled by the Board of Control from data also fur-

nished by the State universities. This present fall semester 1960 report

is comparable in both scope and content to the 1958 report.


Table XIV reports the average number of periods that both rooms and student

stations were used during the fall semesters of 1953, 1958, and 1960. Sev-

eral trends can be noted in the data. For example, both rooms and student










Table XIV
COMPARISON WITH EARLIER YEARS OF THE RATE OF UTILIZATION
OF ROOMS AND STUDENT STATIONS

All Types of Instructional Space


Average No. of Average No.of Periods
Periods Rooms Student Stations
Institution Used Per Week Used Per Week
Used Per Week Used Per Week


University of Florida

Fall 1953

Fall 1958

Fall 1960


Florida State University

Fall 1953

Fall 1958

Fall 1960


Florida A & M University

Fall 1953

Fall 1958

Fall 1960


University of South Florida*

Fall 1960

Entire System
Fall 1953
Fall 1958

Fall 1960


25.4

22.6

19.2




25.0

19.8

21.4




25.7

15.8

15.8


14.1

14.8

.13.5




15.9

13.2

15.6



16.5

9.2


9.6


22.6 12.8


25.3
20.3

19.4


14.9

13.3
13.4


*Formally opened for classes Fall 1960.











stations were utilized at a higher rate in 1953 for the system as a whole.

It can also be observed that rather significant changes in room use have

taken place since 1953, whereas most of the changes since 1958 have been

relatively slight.


Comparison With Other Institutions The Russell and Doi manual* published

in 1957 included normative data based on 90 institutions of higher learning.

These norms were subsequently used in the analysis of space utilization in

the 1958 study referred to earlier. Since that time, Doi and Scott** have

prepared normative data based on 217 colleges and universities, including

junior colleges and public and private degree-granting institutions broken

into three groups on the basis of the number of student-credit-hours pro-

duced. Separate norms are presented for each category of institution and

for all institutions combined. The tables presented in this report are

based on the norms for all institutions combined.


Figure III shows the Doi and Scott norms, presented in percentile units,

for room-period utilization of both general classrooms and teaching labora-

tories. Immediately to the right of each percentile rank is the average num-

ber of room-periods of use which corresponds to the various percentile

positions. Percentiles show the percentage of the group falling below a




*John Dale Russell and James I. Doi, Manual for Studies of Space
Utilization in Colleges and Universities, American Association of
Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, 1957-

**James I. Doi and Keith L. Scott, Normative Data on the Utilization
of Instructional Space in Colleges and Universities, American Association
of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, 1960.








Figure III
A COMPARISON OF ROOM-PERIOD UTILIZATION IN FLORIDA
UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS*
Fall 1960


General Classrooms


Teaching Laboratories


Percentile
Rank


(N=216)


Ave. No. of Periods
Student Stations Used
Per Week


Percentile
Rank
(N-205) 99


99 -r 45.0


90 27.3
F.S.U.-26.9
80 -25.0
Entire System-23.0
70 ----22.8----U.S.F.-22.8
<-U.F.-22.0
60-- 20.5


50-

40-


30--

20--

10--


1 -I


F.A.M.U.-19.9
- 19.1


90 -22.4


Ave. No. of Periods
Student Stations Used
Per Week


-- 39.0


U.S.F.-22.6


80 19.0

70- 16.7


E_ U.F.-15.6
- 15.4
<-sF.S.U.-14.7
S, CEntire System-14.7


40j- 12.3
40 12.3


18.0

16.9

15.8

13.5

9.3


30-

20-

10-

1-


1. F.A.M.U.-11.2
L 11.1

- 10.0

- 8.3

- 3.0


*Ibid.,pp. 4-5.


6o-

0-n












given score or, in this case, a given average number of room-periods of

use for general classrooms and teaching laboratories. For example, it can

be seen in Figure III that 99% of all institutions on which the norms are

based* use their general classrooms on the average of less than 45.0 periods

per week and their teaching laboratories on an average of less than 39.0

periods per week. In 50% of the institutions, general classrooms were used

on an average of fewer than 19.1 periods per week, whereas for teaching

laboratories the rate was 14.1 periods per week. Only in 1% of the institu-

tions was the average use of general classrooms and teaching laboratories

less than 9.3 and 3.0 room-periods per week respectively.

The standings of the Florida institutions with respect to the "national"

norms are indicated by the horizontal arrows.


It can be observed that all 4 Florida institutions are utilizing their gen-

eral classrooms at rates exceeding the 50th percentile, i.e., exceeding 50%

of the 216 institutions on which the norms are based. More than 85% of the

216 norming institutions fall below Florida State University in the rate of

utilization of general classroom space.


From Figure III it can also be noted that the Florida institutions differ

more with respect to the rate of use of teaching laboratories than they

differ with respect to the rate of use of general classrooms. Whereas

Florida A & M University exceeds only about 30% of the institutions in the




*The number of institutions on which the several norms are based varies
from comparison to comparison; the exact number for each comparison
is given below the percentile rank heading.












average number of teaching laboratory room-periods utilized per week, the

University of South Florida exceeds over 90% of the same institutions.


Three other basic comparisons are presented: (1) Figure IV gives a comparison

of the average number of student stations used per week for general class-

rooms and teaching laboratories, (2) Figure V gives similar data showing

the percentage of student stations in use when rooms are actually assigned,

and (3) Figure VI shows the square feet of assignable floor space per 100

hours of student occupancy per week. The standings of the Florida institu-

tions on these figures are read in exactly the same way as in Figure III.


In Figure VI the number of square feet of assignable floor space per 100

hours of student occupancy takes into account (1) the amount of space avail-

able per student station and (2) the frequency of use of that space. The

more the instructional space is used, the less will be the amount of space in

relation to the hours of student occupancy.


An examination of Figure VI will reveal that all Florida institutions have

less general classroom space per 100 hours of student occupancy than over

60% of the institutions reported in the Doi and Scott manual.


With regard to teaching laboratories, however, the same conclusion does not

hold for all the Florida institutions. While the University of South Florida

and Florida State University have less than 250 square feet of assignable

floor space for each 100 hours of student occupancy, an amount smaller than

exists in over 80% of the institutions, Florida A & M University, on the

other hand, has more than 700 square feet, an amount smaller than exists in

only about 15% of the institutions.








Figure IV
A COMPARISON OF AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERIODS PER WEEK THAT STUDENT STATIONS ARE USED
IN FLORIDA UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS*
Fall 1960


General Classrooms


Teaching Laboratories


(N=197)


Percentile
Rank


Ave. No. of Periods
Student Stations Used
Per Week


Percentile
Rank


(N=186)


99 -- 42.7


90 --18.9
F.S.U.-18.3
80 --15.5
0 Entire System-15.0
U.F.-14.4
U.S.F.-13.6
70 -13.0
SF.A.M.U.-12.5
60 --12.0


50 -


30 -


- 10.8

9.9

- 9.0


20 8.1


6.5


1 1 1.0


10 -


80 -



70 -


Ave. No. of Periods
Student Stations Used
Per Week


-13.7
<- U.F.-13.0
F.S.U.-12.6
---Entire System-ll.8
i-11.6-- U.S.F.-11.6


60 --10.6

50 -- 9.1

4o -- 7.8


30 -


__ F .A.M.U.-7.2
- 6.9


- 4.3


1 1.0


* Ibid., pp.6-7.


20 -- 5.6


99 -35.1

90 -16.3








Figure V
A COMPARISON OF THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENT STATIONS USED
WHEN ROOMS ARE ACTUALLY IN USE IN FLORIDA UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS*
Fall 1960


General Classrooms


Teaching Laboratories


Percentile
(N=180) Rank


Percentage of Student
Stations Used When Rooms
Were Actually in Use


99 82.0
F.S.U.-66.3
90- 65.3
.--... -U.F.-63.4
80 --6. -----Entire System-62.5

70-- 59.0
U.S.F.-57.8
60-- 57.1

50--. 55.0
F.A.M.U.-54.8
o4- 52.5


30- 51.0

20- 47.5


-43.7

- 14.5


Percentile
(N=170) Rank
99

90


Percentage of Student
StatioinsUsed When Rooms
Were Actually in Use


99.1

-80.9


80 -,_-.7

70- 72.0
E


60o


.S.U.-75.6


entire System-68.0


..66 -U.F.-67.5
F.A.M.U.-63.9


40o 59.3


30o 54.0
20 49.4 U.S.F.-51.7
20-~- 49.4


10 41.3

1- 25.6


* Ibid., pp.8-9.


u -F -3.f-7








Figure VI
A COMPARISON OF THE SQUARE FEET OF ASSIGNABLE FLOOR SPACE PER 100 HOURS OF STUDENT
OCCUPANCY PER WEEK IN FLORIDA UNIVERSITIES WITH THAT OF OTHER INSTITUTIONS *

Fall 1960


General Classrooms


Teaching Laboratories


Percentile
(N=166) Rank


Square Feet of Assignable Floor
Space Per 100 Hours of Student
Occupancy Per Week


Percentile
(N=157) Rank


Square Feet of Assignable Floor
Space Per 100 Hours of Student
Occupancy Per Week


99 T- 39.0


99 44.0

90 --188.7


81.7 F.S.U.-84.8
U.S.F.-88.0
Entire System-101.1
102.0
U.F.-107.9
-----119F.A.M.U.-117.5
119.7


80-


-U.S.F.-202.2
F.S.U.-248.8


-259.8


70 --297.9
< U.F.-326.3
60 -339.8----Entire System-339.8

50- 397.0


60--132.2

50--147.2

40--160.4

30-- 183.9

20--218.8

10--267.8

1- 406.2


40- 466.0

30- 524.3


20--616.3
E -F.A.M.U.-718.6
10--845.9

1-1893.0


* Ibid., pp.12-14.


I 5 .










In general, it may be concluded from the data shown in Figures III through VI

that the Florida institutions compare very favorably with the 217 institutions

reported in the Doi and Scott manual with respect to the extent to which use is

currently being made of instructional space.


If the present rate of space utilization is maintained, however, the amount of

additional instructional space that will be necessary in order to serve all of

the qualified youth who will be seeking admission by 1970 to institutions within

the State University System of Florida would be equivalent to roughly 3 times

the instructional space at the University of Florida or as much as 27 times

that now available at the University of South Florida (See Part V).


Aside from the practical problem of obtaining the capital funds that would be

required to provide this amount of space, and aside from the question of the

time required for such a massive construction program and of the attendant

disruption of normal campus activities, it would be uneconomical and would

most likely retard the development of programs of high quality to use scarce

funds for the operation and maintenance of more instructional space than the

amount that is essential to facilitate those programs.


In consideration of these factors, it is widely recognized that it will be

necessary for colleges and universities to attain significantly higher rates

of utilization of instructional space in the very near future. Some of the

approaches to the more intensive use of space are listed below.


Possible Approaches to the Increased Use of Instructional Space


Several approaches to the attainment of fuller utilization of instructional

space in the institutions of the State University System are suggested by

the data summarized in the preceding parts of this report. While these










approaches may have already occurred to the careful reader of this report,

they will be enumerated here, and some indication of the extent to which

each of them might be useful will be given.


1. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly

over the hours of the day.


The Findings Table VII indicates the extent to which this approach is

possible as a means of accommodating increased enrollments without the

necessity of increasing the amount of instructional space. It was

shown in Table VII that the use of instructional facilities is concen-

trated around the prime morning hours; that it decreases during the

afternoon; and that it is almost negligible during the evening hours.

It was also observed that the utilization of rooms and student stations

during the period from 4 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon is approximately

one-fourth of the utilization during the peak morning hours.


The Observation Assuming that utilization of instructional space

during the period of fullest use is not restrictive of the educational

program, it appears reasonable that the instructional load carried in

1960 during the peak periods might be extended more uniformly through-

out the day.


If the number of student-station-periods used throughout the entire

system during the period from 9 to 10 o'clock in the morning (69,528)

were to be maintained for each of seven periods and if 15% of the

load for those seven periods were to be carried after 4 o'clock in the

afternoon, the total number of student-station-periods per week would










be increased from 452,993 actually used to 559,700.* This increase

of 23.6% would represent the use made of instructional space by 6,119

full-time-equivalent students.


Without contending that the institutions should be expected to spread

their instructional load over the hours of the day in the exact pattern

used in this illustration, it seems reasonable to judge the needs for

additional instructional space for each type of space in terms of the

capacity of existing facilities if used more uniformly throughout the

hours of the day.


2. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly over

the days of the week.


The Findings It has been shown in Table VIII that the use of instruc-

tional facilities is unevenly distributed throughout the days of the

week. It was observed that, for the entire system, the use varies

from an average of 4.3 room-periods of use on Monday and Wednesday to

negligible use on Saturday. Student-station use varies from an average

of 3.1 periods on Monday to negligible use on Saturday. Use of these

facilities on Tuesdays and Thursdays averages very near one period less

than on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.


* The calculations on which this is based are shown below:
7 periods before 4:00 p.m. 410,097 = 90.5% 69,528 x 7 = 486,696
After 4:00 p.m. 42,896 = 9.5% Plus 15% = 73,004
452,993 =lo0.o0 559,700

** Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student occupies an average of
17.44 student-station-periods per week.










The Observation If the same assumption is made for the utilization

of instructional space by days of the week as was made for such use

by hours of the day, namely, that the utilization of instructional

space on the days of fullest attained use is not restrictive of the

educational program, and if the further assumption is made that neither

(1) special instructional activities such as military drill and in-

struction nor (2) other activities in which large groups of students

need to engage must of necessity preclude the fuller utilization of

instructional space on any one or more days of the week, it would

appear to be reasonable to expect that the instructional load carried

on the peak.day in 1960 could be extended more evenly throughout the

week.


If the number of student station-periods used throughout the entire sys-

tem on Monday (104,252) were to be used on each of the other days through

Friday, and if 25% of that daily load were to be carried on Saturday

morning, the total number of student-station-periods per week would in-

crease from 452,993 actually used to 547,323.* This increase of 20.8%

would represent the use made of instructional facilities by 5,409 full-

time-equivalent students.**



-----------------------------
*The calculations on which this is based are shown below:
Monday-Friday 104,252 x 5 = 521,260
Saturday 104,252 x.25 = 26,063
547,323

**Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student occupies an average of
17.44 student-station-periods per week.











Without suggesting that the distribution of the instructional load

used in this illustration is an exact pattern which should be followed,

it is concluded that the total capacity of the instructional rooms

existing at any one time should be appraised in the light of a more

uniform distribution of the instructional load throughout the week.


3. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly among

the several buildings on campus.


The Findings It has been shown in Table V-B that instructional rooms

in the most heavily utilized buildings are used about four times as

much as instructional rooms in buildings with the lowest average room-

periods of use per week.


The Observation While there are many factors which influence the extent

to which rooms in any building will be used, it is not unreasonable to

consider the possible use that might be made of each type of instruc-

tional facility in a building if each type were used to the extent that

the same type is actually used elsewhere on the same campus.


At the University of Florida, the 40 instructional rooms in McCarty

Hall are being used at the rate of 9.9 periods per week. If each type

of instructional space in that building were used at the rate being

attained by the respective types of space across the entire campus,

McCarty Hall would be accommodating 1,029 full-time-equivalent students

rather than the 435 it is presently serving. Further, if each type of

space in McCarty Hall were used to the extent attained by Anderson Hall,












McCarty Hall would be serving 1,581 full-time-equivalent students.*

Hence, it appears possible that McCarty Hall could serve from 2 to 4

times as many students as it presently does without exceeding the rates

actually being attained in buildings elsewhere on the campus of the Uni-

versity of Florida.


At the Florida State University, the Geology Building, the building with

the least used instructional rooms, could serve almost twice as many stu-

dents (471 instead of the 262 full-time-equivalent students presently

being served) if each type of room in that building were utilized to the

extent that similar facilities are being used in the History Building on

that same campus. The number of full-time-equivalent students served in

the Home Economics Building could be increased by 78% (from 314 to 559)

if similar conditions prevailed in that building.


At the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University the rooms in

Jones Hall are used, on the average, a smaller number of periods per

week (9.8) than are the rooms in any other major building on that campus.

If each type of instructional room in Jones Hall were used at the respec-

tive rate being attained in Tucker Hall, the number of students served




*These full-time-equivalent figures are derived from the numbers of
student stations occupied in each type of space, assuming that a full-
time-equivalent student occupies 17.44 student stations per week. The
estimate of the number of full-time-equivalent students a building
could be serving is made by multiplying the average number of student
stations occupied in the building whose rate of utilization is being
compared by the number of student stations in the building for which
projection is being made and then dividing by 17.44.











could be increased from 396 to 760.


If the nineteen rooms in the Science Building at the University of

South Florida were being used at the same rate as the twelve rooms in

the Administration Building, the number of students served would in-

crease from 776 to 1,228. About 1,203 full-time-equivalent students

could be served if the rate for the Science Building were the same as

the rate for the University Center.


While it would be unwise to assume that each type of instructional room

will be used to the same extent in every building across the campus,

there are ways in which the extreme variations among the buildings can

be reduced. It is concluded that it is necessary to take space in each

and every usable building into account at a reasonable rate of use when

the total capacity of instructional rooms is being determined.


4. Extending the load on instructional facilities more uniformly through-

out the year.


While this study of the use of instructional space is limited to the

first semester, other data can be used to indicate to what extent the

instructional load has been distributed uniformly throughout the entire

year, including the summer session.


Table XIV-A shows that, for the entire system, during the last four years

the instructional loads carried during the second semester and the sum-

mer sessions were 91.8% and 20.4% respectively of the instructional load








Table XIV-A


TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENT SEMESTER HOURS OF INSTRUCTION PRODUCED
DURING THE FIRST SEMESTER, SECOND SEMESTER, SUMMER SESSION
FOR THE YEARS 1956-57 THROUGH 1959-60

By Institution


First Semester Second Semester Summer Session
Institution % of First Semester % of First Semester


University of Florida 714,114 645,469 90.4 119,294 16.7


Florida State University 426,504 400,407 93.9 84,582 19.8


Florida A & M University 149,446 137,949 92.3 59,291 39.7



Entire System 1,290,064 1,183,825 91.8 263,167 20.4












which was housed during the first semester.


If three full semesters had been operated during each of the four

years, and if as many students had registered during both the second

semester and the summer session as registered for the first semester,

the instructional load would have been 41.4% higher than that which

actually materialized.*


While the success of a plan to provide a full academic program through-

out the entire calendar year depends upon many factors, it appears that

the implications of such a plan for the fuller utilization of the

physical plant warrant a careful study to determine when and under what

conditions it would be successful in the State University System of

Florida.


5. Matching the size of class groups to the number of accommodations

in the instructional rooms to which they are assigned.

The Findings It has been shown in Table X that an average of 62%

of student stations are occupied during the periods that instructional

rooms are in use. Also, it was shown in Figure V that in the Florida

institutions a greater percentage of student stations, on an average,

are occupied when the rooms are actually in use than is the case in

the majority of the institutions on which the Doi and Scott norms

were based.


*This figure was calculated as follows:
The product of 3 x 1,290,064 (3,870,192) student semester hours is
41.4% larger than the actual total for 3 terms (2,737,056 student
semester hours of credit).











The Observation Although more than half of the institutions from

which similar data were available did less well than the Florida univer-

sities, about two-thirds of the institutions clearly appear to have been

more successful than were the Florida institutions with respect to the

number of student stations occupied once the rooms had been assigned.


There are significant advantages to be gained from the more careful match-

ing of the size of classes to the size of the rooms. Table XV shows the


TABLE XV
VARIATIONS IN THE STUDENT CAPACITY OF ALL INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS
AVAILABLE IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM, FALL 1960, ASSOCIATED
WITH EACH OF SEVERAL PERCENTAGES OF STUDENT STATIONS OCCUPIED
WHEN ROOMS ARE IN USE


Percentage of Student No. of Student-Station- Increased Capacity
Stations Occupied When Periods Accommodated in Full-Time-Equiva-
Rooms Are in Use lent Students*

62** 452,993
-------------------------------------------------------

65 478,050 1,474

70 514,800 3,636

75 551,600 5,800

80 588,350 7,962

85 625,150 10,127

90 661,900 12,289


*Assuming that a full-time-equivalent student requires approximately
17 student-station-periods per week.

**Actually attained in the system as a whole during the fall semester
1960













number of student-station-periods that would have been possible for the

system as a whole if each of the percentages showing the extent to which

the rooms were filled had been attained. If the student stations could have

been filled to the percentages shown, the increases in capacity would have

been possible without increasing the number of hours that the rooms were

in use.

It is concluded in the management of existing space and in the planning

of additional instructional space, careful attention should be given to

the matter of matching class size to room size.


6. Administering the academic program so as (a) to eliminate unnecessary

duplicate and repeat sections of courses which are essential to serve the

purposes of the institution and (b) to reduce the number of courses that

are not necessary to accomplish those purposes.


Unnecessary Duplicate and Repeat Sections Ineffective use of both

teaching personnel and instructional space results when more sections are

given in any course than are actually required to accommodate the total

number of students enrolled in that course.

For the year 1953-54 the Council for the Study of Higher Education in

Florida reported that, among the three State universities then in opera-

tion, from 2 to 14 percent of the student semester hours of instruction

was given in small duplicate sections, i.e., in sections during one

semester that would not have been required if the average size of sec-

tions in courses with multiple sections had been 25 students.












The Council reported also that in the same institutions from 0.5 to

5 percent of the student semester hours of instruction was given in

small repeat sections, i.e., in sections during the two semesters

that would not have been required if courses had been offered only

once during the academic year except when the total enrollment exceeded

20 students.


While there are no current data to show conditions which now prevail

with respect to small duplicate and repeat sections, it is clear that

the giving of unneeded sections places an unnecessary load on instruc-

tional space.


Unnecessary Course Offerings No data are available for the State Uni-

versity System of Florida to indicate the number of courses, among the

total offerings of the institutions, which could be eliminated without

sacrifice to the effectiveness with which the institutions meet their

objectives. As new courses are developed to meet new and changing needs,

other courses may become obsolete. Still other courses may have come

into being without having succeeded in attracting many students or filling

any necessary place in established instructional programs.


It is generally agreed that there is a certain amount of "deadwood"

among the course offerings in many institutions, although there may be

difficulty in making positive identification of it.


To the extent that there are such courses which are given from time to

time, such "deadwood" places an unnecessary load on instructional space.












While it is not possible with the data at hand to appraise the extent

of the load that may have come from unnecessary duplicate and repeat

sections and from the giving of unnecessary courses, it is clear that

the careful management of this aspect of the instructional program

permits more effective use of instructional space as well as of teach-

ing personnel.












PART V

RATES OF UTILIZATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE NEEDS


The best information that is currently available indicates that 158,000

students will be enrolled in colleges and universities in Florida during

the fall semester of 1970, and it has been judged that 63,200 of these stu-

dents will be enrolled in the institutions which will then comprise the State

University System.


In order to provide a basis for projecting the amount of space in instruc-

tional rooms that will be needed in the State University System by 1970, it

has been assumed that (1) accommodations in instructional rooms will be

needed for 63,200 full-time-equivalent students,* (2) the amount per student

will be 20.9 square feet (the amount found to be available in 1960), (3) each

full-time-equivalent student will continue to use exactly 17.44** student-

station-periods per week, and (4) the 84 rooms now in temporary buildings

will be replaced with space in permanent structures.


On the basis of these assumptions the amount of space in instructional rooms

that will be required in 1970 has been calculated for each of several rates of

use. The results of these calculations are reported in Table XVI. A similar

table was also reported in the 1958 space utilization study. The projections




*There are presently 25,980 full-time-equivalent students being accommodated
in the State University System of Florida.

**Two-place decimals are used to establish a more precise index in order to
give projections a closer relationship to present rates of use.







Table XVI
AMOUNT OF FLOOR SPACE IN INSTRUCTIONAL ROOMS THAT WOULD
BE REQUIRED IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM FOR
63,200 FULL-TIME-EQUIVALENT STUDENTS AT EACH
OF SEVERAL DESIGNATED LEVELS OF UTILIZATION


Requirements for 63,200 FTE Students in 1970
No. Sq. Ft. at Present Rate of Use
Ave. No. of No. of Stu- of Space in No. Sq. Ft. No. of Addi-
Periods Stu- dent Stations Instructional No. of Floor Space No. of In- tional Instruc-
dent Stations Per FTE Rooms Per FTE Student in Instruc- structional tional Rooms
Used Per Week Student Student Stations tional Rms* Rooms** above 1960***


13.38**** 1.30
----------_ ---- _I -------.-----------


15.0

17.44*****

20.0

22.5

25.0

30.0

34.88


1.16

1.00

0.87

0.78

0.70

0.58

0.50


24.2

20.9

18.2

16.3

14.6

12.1

10.4


82,377


73,481

63,200

55,110

48,987

44,088


1,721,679


1,535,753

1,320,880

1,151,799

1,023,828

921,439

767,866

660,440


1,866

1,605

1,400

1,244

1,120

933

802


1,317

1,091

830

625

469

345

158

27


*Based on the 1960 average of 20.9 square feet of floor space in instructional rooms per student
station.
**Based on the 1960 average of 823 square feet per room.
***Includes replacement of 84 temporary rooms now in use.
****The top line is based on the rate of use attained in 1960 for the system as a whole.
*****The present number of student-station-periods occupied by one FTE student per week.


27.2


2,092











of the 1960 data yield slightly different estimates of the needs for 1970,

however, which are attributable to the changes in the rate of utilization

from 1958 to 1960.


The top line in Table XVI shows the projection of space needs on the basis

of the rate of use of student stations found in 1960, i.e., an average of

13.38 periods per week. Reading from left to right across the top line,

one can observe that at this rate of use, there would continue to be 1.30

student stations using 27.2 square feet of floor area in instructional rooms

for each full-time-equivalent student. Continuing across the top line, the

table shows that, for 63,200 full-time-equivalent students, 82,377 student

stations using 1,721,679 square feet of floor space in instructional rooms

would be required. In the last two columns the top line shows (1) that

this floor area could be represented by 2,092 rooms of the average size found

during the fall semester 1960, and (2) that 1,317 of these rooms would be in

addition to the 775 instructional rooms found in permanent buildings at the

present time.


Each of the other lines in Table XVI shows similar data for the indicated

rates of use which are given in the left-hand column. The extent to which

the higher rates of use would decrease the number of additional rooms needed

to accommodate a total of 63,200 full-time-equivalent students can be deter-

mined from the right-hand column.


For the use of student stations at the rate of 17.44 periods per week, it

can be observed that one student station would be required for each full-

time equivalent student; thus, it would be theoretically possible to "station"












the entire student body during any one period. Similarly, the bottom line,

showing the most extreme rate for which calculations were made, i.e., when

the average use of student stations is 34.88 periods per week, outlines the

theoretical need for 63,200 full-time-equivalent students when there are two

full-time-equivalent students for every student station.


Since during a five-and-one-half-day week, each full-time-equivalent student

is presently occupying 3.2 student-station-periods per day, these statistics

might lead to the conclusion that the use of student stations on the average

of 34.88 periods per week would be possible. While there is no evidence to

demonstrate that this could not be done, present practices make it clear that

several difficulties would be encountered if institutions were required to

operate at that level in the immediate future.


In the years between now and 1970, it appears more reasonable to expect that

the rate at which student stations are used will move into the middle range

shown in Table XVI, i.e., from 15.0 to 25.0 periods per week. Even at this

rate, adjustments in the administration of the instructional programs will

be required that will vary from minor to major proportions, depending upon

the extent to which the rate of utilization approaches the higher of these two

figures.


Even so, it should be possible to achieve a significantly higher rate of

utilization without impairing the quality of instructional services. Further-

more, if at least a portion of the economies that could be thus effected were

to be dedicated to the support of more adequate faculty salaries, advances in











the rate of use of instructional space might very well constitute an impor-

tant step in the qualitative improvements of instructional services.


Limitations The calculations given in the preceding section are subject

to certain limitations which should be expressed.


In the first place, only a small portion of the total amount of space that

would be required for 63,200 full-time-equivalent students is involved in

those calculations. Space necessary for the following type accommodations,

activities, or services is not included:


(1) Residential space, i.e., space for student housing, food services,
health services, and other student services.

(2) Research and service activities in which universities engage.

(3) Administrative services and plant and grounds operations.

(4) Library services (except as instructional rooms may be located in
library buildings).

(5) Gymnasiums, auditoriums other than teaching auditoriums, indoor
physical education facilities, or music practice rooms.

(6) Faculty offices, hallways, service facilities, and other such space
necessary to house the total of the instructional services.

Only that space which is in rooms regularly available throughout the days

of the week to house scheduled class activities is included, viz., general

classrooms, seminar rooms, teaching laboratories, and teaching auditoriums.


Space inventories of all physical plant operations are currently underway

and will provide a basis on which to determine the percentage of the total

space that falls within the consideration of this report. It is noted, how-

ever, that even in buildings which are devoted almost entirely to instruction,












only one-third to one-half of the total net floor area is included in in-

structional rooms of the type considered in this report.


Secondly, the calculations were devised for the system as a whole. This

means that careful planning will be necessary if additional instructional

space is to be developed where, and in such a way that, it can be fully

utilized.


Thirdly, there is no good reason to believe that the instructional programs

will always be organized in such a way as to require 17.44 student-station-

periods per week. For example, the reported consideration by the faculty of

one of the universities of a plan under which a combination of directed in-

dividual study and attendance in a seminar during two periods per week to

earn three hours of credit would make a significant contribution to the re-

duction of the amount of space required per full-time-equivalent student.

The extent to which open-circuit telecasts will influence this figure will

depend in part on the way in which students are grouped for instruction

given with that media. Any marked change in the number of student-station-

periods required per full-time-equivalent student would, of course, modify

the calculations shown in the preceding section.


Fourthly, the calculations have to be interpreted without the benefit of

objective evidence concerning the relationship between the rate of use of

instructional facilities and the quality of instructional programs. Al-

though there is no evidence to demonstrate that the higher rates of utiliza-

tion which were suggested would impair the quality of instructional ser-












vices, neither is there adequate evidence to determine just how much

higher the rate can go without jeopardizing the quality of instruction.












PART VI

CONCLUSIONS


While there are differing points of view concerning the level of utiliza-

tion of instructional rooms that is considered to be optimum, it is now

more generally recognized that colleges and universities will have to find

ways of making fuller use of instructional space than has been common up

to this point.


It is being seen that enrollment increases will undoubtedly outdistance our

successful efforts to provide additional building space for instructional

programs. Furthermore, it is being observed that the level to which faculty

salaries must be advanced if colleges and universities are to be properly

staffed requires that no more resources be invested in the construction,

operation, and maintenance of the physical plant than is required for the

adequate housing of the programs to be provided.


Institutions of higher learning across the nation are now seeking ways by

which to make more effective use of all of their resources, including the

physical plants. In Florida, where the enrollments are increasing even more

rapidly than is generally true throughout the nation, and where faculty

salaries need to be advanced to levels more competitive with those of lead-

ing universities in the search for and retention of faculty talent, it is

especially important that the faculties and administration of each institu-

tion demonstrate the ingenuity and self-discipline necessary to achieve a

significantly higher rate of utilization of the instructional space available.












While the data developed in this study do not provide a ready answer as

to the extent to which instructional rooms ought to be used, they have

suggested ways in which increased use will undoubtedly be obtained in the

future as the State University System of Florida undertakes to provide

even higher quality services to rapidly growing numbers of students.