• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 University calendar
 State Board of Education ; Board...
 Officers of administration
 General information
 Financial information
 General regulations regarding and...
 Information about Florida teacher...
 Information about Florida teacher...
 Curiculums ; course descriptio...
 Enrollment, 1966-67
 Graduates, April 16, 1966
 Instructional faculty
 Related services staff
 Retirees
 Retirees
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Annual catalog issue, 1966-1967; Announcements 1967-1968
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000203/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual catalog issue, 1966-1967; Announcements 1967-1968
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida A&M University
Publisher: Florida A&M University
Publication Date: 1967
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000203
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB6001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    University calendar
        Page v
        Page vi
    State Board of Education ; Board of Regents
        Page vii
    Officers of administration
        Page viii
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Financial information
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    General regulations regarding and affecting the programs of studies and advancement
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Information about Florida teacher certificate
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Information about Florida teacher certificate
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Curiculums ; course descriptions
        Page 51
        School of Agriculture and Home Economics
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
        College of Arts and Sciences
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
        School of Education
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
        Graduate school
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
        College of Law
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
        The Military Science Division
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
        School of Nursing
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
        School of Pharmacy
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
        The Vocational-Technical Institute
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
    Enrollment, 1966-67
        Page 294
    Graduates, April 16, 1966
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
    Instructional faculty
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
    Related services staff
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
    Retirees
        Page 317
    Retirees
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
    Back Cover
        Page 321
    Spine
        Page 322
Full Text








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\ FIELD


Bulletin

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL

and MECHANICAL

UNIVERSITY


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

*

ANNUAL CATALOG ISSUE
1966-67
ANNOUNCEMENTS
1967-68

*

ISSUED QUARTERLY, MARCH, JUNE, SEPTEMBER, AND DECEMBER OF EACH
YEAR. SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


VOLUME 20 SEPTEMBER, 1967 NUMBER 3






















































I *







/
/


/












II
















FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY PRINT

TALLAHASSEE






CONTENTS


CALENDAR, THE

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

GENERAL INFORMATION-

H historical Statem ent ................ .................................. ................... 1

L location ............................... ....................... ..................... ........................ .... 3

Government of the University ..................................................... 3

Institutional O objectives ..................................................... ......................... 3

Professional Membership and Accreditation ......................................... 4

Physical Plant, The ........................................................... ..................... 4

Organization of Residence Instruction ...................................................... 10

Organization of Non-Residence Instruction ......................................... 11

Sessions of the Year ........................................................ ....................... 11

Student Personnel Services ..................................................................... 12

Student Financial Aid ............................................... ................... 16

Student O organizations .............................................................. ............. 23

Student Activities .................... ................. ................................. 23

H health ................. .................................................................. 24

A athletics ............................................... ................................................ 26

Placem ent Bureau ..................................... .. ...................................... 27

Publications .................................................................................................. 27

FINANCIAL INFORMATION ............................................................................ 29

GENERAL REGULATIONS REGARDING AND AFFECTING
THE PROGRAMS OF STUDIES AND ADVANCEMENT ..................................... 36

INFORMATION ABOUT FLORIDA CERTIFICATES ........................................... ..... 44


111






SCHOOL AND DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS OF
STUDY AND COURSE OUTLINES ................... ...................... ............. .. 48

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS ........................................ 52

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ...................................................................... 86

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION .................................................................................. 165

GRADUATE SCHOOL ............................................................................................ 198

C OLLEGE OF LAW .............................................................................................. 234

DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE ...................................................................... 237

SCHOOL OF NURSING ......................................................................................... 243

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY ..................................................................................... 249

VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL INSTITUTE ................................. .............................. 259

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT ............................................................................ 294

DEGREES CONFERRED--

Graduates, December, 1965 and April, 1966 ....................................... 295

Graduates, August, 1966 ........................................ .......................... 300

INSTITUTIONAL PERSONNEL--
Instructional Faculty ............................................................................. .. 301
Related Services Staff ............................... .......... .................................... 309

[INDEX .................................................................. ....... .......................................... 318














iv






UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
FALL QUARTER, 1967-68
AUGUST-
15 Tuesday-Last day to make application for admission to the Fall
Quarter.
SEPTEMBER-
16-18 Saturday and Monday-Faculty Conferences.
17 Sunday, 12:00 noon-Dormitories open for new students
18-19 Monday and Tuesday-Faculty Conferences.
18-24 Monday through Sunday-Orientation period for freshmen and new
students.
20 Wednesday-Registration of freshmen and new students.
20 Wednesday-Dormitories open for returning students.
21-22 Thursday and Friday-Registration for returning students.
-23 Saturday-Registration for Graduate students.
25 Monday-First meeting of classes.
30 Saturday-Last day to apply for December graduation.
30 Saturday-Last day to register or to add courses
OCTOBER-
16 Monday-5:00 p.m.-Last day to drop courses.
NOVEMBER-
6 Monday-Mid-Quarter unsatisfactory reports due in Office of Ad-
missions and Records.
20 Monday-Last day to withdraw from the university without re-
ceiving failing grades.
23-26 Thursday through Sunday-Thanksgiving Holidays.
DECEMBER-
9 Saturday, 8:00 a.m.-Florida State-wide Twelfth Grade Test.
11-15 Monday through Friday-Final examinations.
15 Friday-Last day for students to make applications for admission
to the Winter Quarter.
16 Monday, 9:00 a.m.-All grades due in Office of Admissions and
Records.
WINTER QUARTER, 1967-68
JANUARY-
2 Tuesday, 12:00 noon-Dormitories open for all students.
3-4 Wednesday and Thursday-Registration for the Winter Quarter.
5 Friday-First meeting of classes.
11 Thursday-Last day to apply for March graduation.
11 Thursday-Last day to register or to add courses
27 Saturday-Last day to drop courses.
FEBRUARY-
14 Wednesday-Mid-Quarter unsatisfactory reports due in Office of
Admissions and Records.
26 Monday-Last day to withdraw from the university without re-
ceiving failing grades.
MARCH-
8-10 Friday, Saturday and Sunday-Founders' Weekend.
16 Saturday-Last day for students to make application for admission
to the Spring Quarter.
18-22 Monday through Friday-Final Examinations.
V






23 Saturday, 9:00 a.m.-All grades due in the Office of Admissions
and Records.
SPRING QUARTER, 1967-68
MARCH-
25-26 Monday and Tuesday-Registration for Spring Quarter.
L27 Wednesday-First meeting of classes.
APRIL-
2 Tuesday-Last day to register or to add courses.
2 Tuesday-Last day to apply for June graduation.
16 Tuesday-Last day to drop courses.
26 Friday-Mid-Quarter unsatisfactory reports due in Office of Ad-
missions and Records.
MAY-
9 Thursday-Last day to withdraw from the university without re-
ceiving failing grades.
JUNE-
1 Saturday-Last day to make application for admission to the Sum-
mer Quarter.
4-8 Tuesday through Saturday-Final examinations.
7 Friday-Senior Class Day.
8 Saturday-Alumni Day.
9 Sunday-Graduation
10 Monday, 5:00 p.m.-All grades due in the Office of Admissions and
Records.
SUMMER QUARTER, 1967-68
JUNE-
13-15 Thursday through Saturday morning-Registration.
17 Monday-First meeting of classes.
24 Monday-Last day to apply for August graduation.
24 Monday-Last day to register or to add courses.
29 Saturday-Regular class day.
JULY-
4-7 Thursday through Sunday-Independence holidays.
8 Monday-Last day to drop courses.
13 Saturday-Regular class day.
27 Saturday-Regular class day.
AUGUST-
1 Thursday, 8:00 a.m.-Florida State-wide Twelfth Grade Test.
3 Saturday-Regular class day.
15 Thursday-Last day to apply for admission to the Fall Quarter.
17 Saturday-Regular class day.
21-24 Wednesday through Saturday p.m.-Final examinations.
27 Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.-All grades due in Office of Admissions and
Records.
1968-69
SEPTEMBER-
15 Dormitories open for beginning students.
16-17 Faculty Conferences.
16-22 Orientation and Registration for Fall Quarter
23 First meeting of classes.

vi





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

CLAUDE R. KIRK, JR., Chairman
Governor
TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State
EARL FAIRCLOTH
Attorney General
BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer
FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN, Secretary
State Superintendent of Public Instruction



BOARD OF REGENTS

CHESTER H. FURGERSON, Chairman
Tampa
WAYNE C. McCALL, D.D.S., Vice Chairman
Ocala
MRS. JOHN C. BEHRINGER
Fort Lauderdale
HENRY KRAMER
Jacksonville
CLARENCE L. MENSER
Vero Beach
LOUIS C. MURRAY, M.D.
Orlando
JOHN C. PACE
Pensacola
MRS. E. D. PEARCE
Miami



J. BROWARD CULPEPPER
Chancellor


'vii








OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


GEORGE W. GORE, JR., Ed.M., Ph.D., LL.D., President
J. R. E. LEE, JR., A.B., Vice President in Charge of University Affairs
H. MANNING EFFERSON, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the University

MELVIN O. ALSTON, M.S., Ed.D., Dean, School of Education
LEANDER L. BOYKIN, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of Academic Affairs
EUNICE J. BURGESS, M.A., Dean, School of Nursing
DAVID C. COLLINGTON, A.B., Acting Director of Public Relations
ANNIE L. COOPER, M.S., Associate Dean of Students in Charge of Women
CLINTON C. CUNNINGHAM, M.S., Director of Placement
MATTHEW H. ESTARAS, M.A., Principal, Demonstration School
WILLIAM P. FOSTER, M.A., Ed.D., Director of Bands
A. S. GAITHER, M.A., LL.D., Director of Athletics
ROBERT H. HALL, B.S., Comptroller
JAMES HUDSON, A.M., Ph.D., Chaplain
HAROLD JENKINS, M.A., Acting Director of Continuing University Studies
HURD M. JONES, JR., M.S., Acting Dean, School of Pharmacy
A. L. KIDD, M.A., Director of Institutional Studies
CHARLIE MANNING, M.Ed., Director of Student Activities
M. G. MILES, M.A., Dean of Students
ERNEST L. O'ROURKE, B.S., Director of Food Services
H. R. PARTRIDGE, M.S., Business Manager
B. L. PERRY, JR., M.S., Ph.D., Director of Research and Grants
MAHLON C. RHANEY, M.S., Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
THEODORE M. ROSE, M.B.A., Director of Financial Aid
LT. COL. SAMUEL F. SAMPSON, A.B., Professor of Military Science
LEANDER J. SHAW, M.A., Ed.D., Dean, Graduate School
W. H. SHIRLEY, M.S., Associate Dean of Students in Charge of Men
I. LUTHER THOMAS, M.A., B.S., in L.S., Director of Libraries
M. S. THOMAS, M.Ed., Director, Vocational-Technical Institute
EDWIN M. THORPE, M.S., Director of Admissions and Records
C E. WALKER, M.S., Ph.D., Dean, School of Agriculture and Home
Economics
ROBERT L. WILLIAMS, LL.B., LL.M., Acting Dean, College of Law





viii






GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORICAL STATEMENT
Founded by constitutional provision and legislative enactment in 1887
as the Colored Normal School, the institution, now known as the Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical University, has displayed remarkable growth and
commendable accomplishment since its establishment.
Provision for physical expansion was first effected in 1891 when the
present site "College Hill" on the outskirts of Tallahassee was acquired and the
school moved from its original Copeland Street location. After 1901 more
land was acquired, cleared for the campus and farm use, and additional build-
ings were erected. During the period 1925-1939 State and Federal appro-
priations, made possible the addition of eight buildings, the renovation and
enlargement of three and the construction of Bragg Memorial Athletic Field.
The eight buildings are; the J. R. E. Lee Hall, Lucy Moten Demonstration
School, Dairy Barn, President's Residence, and four dormitories, two are for
women, Jackson Davis and McGuinn Halls, and two for men, N. B. Young
and Sampson Halls, rebuilt and increased in size were Science Hall, the
Mechanic Arts Building (renamed the Benjamin Banneker Engineering Build-
ing in 1953), and the Dining Hall. An accelerated building program was
revived during the mid-forties to meet the post-war demands. Salvaged
surplus war supplies provided the materials for five buildings, namely, Band
Hall, College Inn, the Reserve Officers Training Corps Quonset, completed
in 1947, the College Community Gymnasium, opened for use in January,
1948, and Polkinghorne Village. The latter, the largest project constructed
from war surplus materials, converted seventeen barracks into one hundred
and sixteen apartment units. The first permanent building completed in this
post-war period was the S. H. Coleman Library which was opened for
occupancy in September, 1947. A Heating Plant went into operation in the
fall of 1948 and in the same year, three dormitories for women, Lula Cropper,
Phyllis Wheatley, and Diamond Halls. A laundry equipped with the most
modern machines replaced the outmoded, inadequate plant in use up to January,
1950. Extensive paving of drives and walks was done during this period.
The physical facilities of the institution have been greatly increased since
1950. The following major additions have been made: Completion and fully
equipping of the Hospital and Health Center; Dairy Barn, Faculty Duplex,
Building Construction Laboratory, Law Wing of Coleman Library, ROTC
Building, addition to Nurses Home in Jacksonville, Maintenance Office Building,
Guest House; Jones Hall, Gibbs Hall, Tucker Hall; addition to Dining Hall,
Perry-Paige Building, Student Union Building, University High School Building,
Bragg Stadium, Truth Hall and the University High School Cafetorium, Ad-
dition to the Student Union Building, and the Health and Physical Education
Building at a cost, including furnishings, of some twelve million dollars.
Another major facility includes the four-manual Estey Pipe Organ valued
at $70,000.
-1-






2 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

The validity of the investment in physical expansion and development has
been justified by a significant record of educational growth reflected in the
development of the educational program, the increase in student enrollment,
and a corresponding increase in staff. The necessity to expand the offerings of
the institution has generally coincided with the physical expansion. This is
evidenced by the fact that, four years after the teacher training program was
made available to the original fifteen students enrolled on October 1, 1887,
the curriculum had to be enlarged to include many new departments.
The direct management of the institution was transferred from the State
Board of Education to the State Board of Control in 1905 signifying that
thereafter it would be considered as one of the institutions of higher learning.
The name was changed to The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College
by special act of the Legislaure in 1909, and in 1910, one year later, it became
one of the State's institution of higher learning, the first degree was conferred.
The college program grew in size, strength and complexity during the
next two decades. During this period, effective Summer School and extension
programs were set up to meet the educational demands. Graduate courses were
introduced in 1945.
In 1949 the State Board of Control authorized the establishment of courses
in Law, Pharmacy, Engineering and graduate courses in Agriculture.
Military Training was one of the articles stated in the statutes governing
Land-Grant colleges and was implemented in 1901 with the initiation of a
high school level cadet drill organization. In September 1924, the cadet organi-
zation was incorporated into the college department. After the high school
became an autonomous body and was separated from the college, military training
was conducted only on the college level. On July 1, 1948 the Senior Division
of the Army ROTC Unit at Florida A. and M. University was activated as
a Coast Artillery Corps (Anti-Aircraft Artillery) Unit. The Corps was redesignated
a General Military Science Unit in 1953.
By Act of the Florida Legislature, the institution became a state university,
September 1, 1953. As a university, it was reorganized into schools and colleges
with the deans in charge as their executive officers. The eight subdivisions are:
College of Arts and Sciences, College of Law, School of Agriculture and
Home Economics, School of Education, School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy,
Vocational-Technical Institute and the Graduate School. With the establishment
of these schools and colleges, the institution met the technical requirements
for classification as University.
In December, 1957, this university was in the first group of institutions
operated for Negroes to be admitted to full membership in the Southern
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
In October 1958, the Playmakers, upon invitation by President Eisenhower's
Special International Program Committee for Cultural Presentations, toured
West, Central, East and North Africa.
In 1959, the University was admitted to membership in the American
Association of University Women: In 1962 (January-December) celebrated its






GENERAL INFORMATION 3

Diamond Anniversary: In 1962, began operation under the trimester system:
In 1963, Playmakers toured military installations in Great Britain, France, Ger-
many, and Italy. The tour was sponsored by the United Service Organization and
the American Educational Theatre Association: In 1964, Robert "Bob" Hayes
won two gold medals for the United States at the 1964 Olympic Games in
Tokyo, Japan.
The institution has had five presidents: T. D. Tucker (1887-1901); N. B.
Young (1901-1923); J. R. E. Lee, Sr. (1924-1944); W. H. Gray (1944-1949);
and George W. Gore, Jr. (April 1, 1950 to the present time). It has had
three acting presidents: W. H. A. Howard (1923-1924); J. B. Bragg (April 4,
1944-September 1, 1944); and H. Manning Efferson (July 7, 1949-April 1, 1950).

LOCATION
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University is located in Tallahassee,
Florida approximately one hundred and seventy miles west of Jacksonville, near
the northern boundary of the State. Tallahassee is the capital of the State,
and educational and industrial center with an interesting historical background.
The University campus is situated on the highest of the seven hills of
the city, and approximately a mile from the center of the city.

GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University is under the direct
supervision of the Board of Regents, a body composed of nine citizens, appointed
by the Governor. The State Board of Education, composed of the Governor,
the Secretary of State, the Treasurer, the Attorney General, and the Superin-
tendent of Public Instruction, has final reference and approval authority over
the policies and affairs of the institution through the Board or Regents.
The President is appointed by the Board of Regents and administers the
affairs of the University with the assistance of the Administrative officers.

INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVES
Realizing that education in its broadest sense is designed to improve
the quality of individual and social living, the Florida Agricultural and Mechani-
cal University assumes as its function the development of men and women
for productive citizenship, effective service, and responsible leadership.
In seeking to carry out the above functions, the University has organized
its program to assist the student to develop positive attitudes relative to personal
and community health; to become more effective in the understanding and
ute of the methods and symbols of communication; to understand and ap-
preciate the social heritage and the importance of individual integrity and
respect for personality in its development; to develop appreciation of and
devotion to higher ideals of moral and spiritual life, as well as appreciation
of the finer expressions of the human mind; to develop habits of critical
thinking that may be applied to the solution of individual and social problems;







4 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

to develop those understandings and skills that are necessary to the business
of making a living; and to contribute to greater human welfare through creative
and interpretative research.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS AND ACCREDITATION
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University holds full member-
ship in the following educational associations; the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools; the American Council on Education, the American Associ-
ation of Colleges for Teacher Education, the Association of Colleges and Sec-
ondary Schools, the Department of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs
of the National League of Nursing. The University is fully accredited by the
following agencies; the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education,
the Department of Education of the State of Florida, the Florida State Board
of Nursing, the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education.
The Department of Education of the State of Florida accepts Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical University courses for teacher certification.
The Veterans Administration has approved the University for training
under Public Laws No. 346, 16, 550, and 894.

THE PHYSICAL PLANT
N. B. The dates in parentheses designates the year construction' was completed
and the building turned over to the institution for occupancy.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SHOP-Contains equipment to perform those
farm shop operations on motors, trucks, tractors, machinery, and other agri-
cultural implements and facilities necessary for maximum efficiency in the
operation of an agricultural area. The abandoned dairy barn was renovated
and constructed to provide this facility. (1928) 1951)
BAND HALL-Practice rooms for musical organizations and temporary
classroom space. Constructed out of army barracks. (1947)
BENJAMIN BANNEKER ENGINEERING BUILDING-Provides classroom, labora-
tory, and shop facilities for trade activities and the industrial program of the
College. A one-story brick annex has been added to accommodate the expanding
vocational offerings of the institution. The annex was originally utilized as a
training center for War Production workers under provision of the United
States Office of Education. (1913) (1950)
CARNEGIE ART CENTER-Contains offices and studios for the Art Depart-
ment. The building was erected by a grant from the Carnegie Foundation as
the Carnegie Library. (1908)
COLEMAN LIBRARY-Facilities include rooms designed and utilized specifi-
cally for reading, browsing, periodical, reference, reserve, cataloging, and special
collections, as well as space for work in Library Science. The library now
contains over 64,000 volumes. Construction cost, $580,300. (1947)
LAW BUILDING-The Law Building is a $400,000 addition to the Coleman
Library. This building contains lecture rooms, seminar rooms, library reading






GENERAL INFORMATION 5

room, library stacks, office of the dean, office of the secretary professor's of-
fices and studies, student lounge, and Moot Court Room. The library portion
of this modern structure is air conditioned, as is Moot Court Room; and
containing 20,000 volumes. (1953)
UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL-A group of modernistic red brick buildings
consisting of seven units. UNIT "A" houses the administrative offices and clinic.
UNIT "B" the Library, and UNIT "C," the Homemaking Classes. Commercial
Art, and science rooms are located in the two-story building known as UNIT
"D." Both floors have clerestory windows facing the south. The second floor
rooms are entered from an aluminum closed concrete walkway. The band room
is in the air conditioned UNIT "F," and the Industrial Arts Shop is located
in UNIT "G." It was built in 1957.
The Cafetorium is UNIT "E." It has a stage, dressing rooms, a well
equipped kitchen and a central area which may be used as an auditorium or
cafeteria. Total cost $506,000.
COMMUNITY GYMNASIUM-This temporary gymnasium was converted to
its present use from an aeroplane hanger. It was remodeled during the school
year 1952-53 at a cost of $25,000 Total construction, $178,079. It is now
used by University High. (1948) (1953)
CROPPER HALL-A dormitory for junior women with housing capacity
for 145 students. Construction cost approximately $350,000. Renamed in
1953 for the former A and M teacher and Dean of Women, Lula Cropper, who
served the College for a number of years. 1948
DAIRY BARN-Designed to meet the specifications of the State Department
of Agriculture and State Health Department, this building contains the
following facilities: a milk room, processing room, walk-in ice box, bottle room,
locker and shower room, and an office. Completed at a cost of $83,000. (1951)
DIAMOND HALL-Accommodates 110 students and is equipped with such
modern features as a social room, kitchenette, laundry, communication system,
and elevator. Completed at a cost of $260,000. (1948)
FACULTY CAMPUS HOMES-At several locations about the campus are
several homes owned by the institution and occupied by faculty personnel.
GIBBS HALL-This six-floor fire-resistant, brick structure contains housing
facilities for 313 students; a spacious general lounge; a study lounge; a recreation
room with kitchen; an apartment for counselor and an information and message
center. Construction was begun in 1953 at an approximate cost of $800,000.
This building was named for the late Jonathan C. Gibbs, one of the Founders
of the University.
GREENHOUSE-A small three-sectioned, steam heated structure serving as
a laboratory for general horticulture, floriculture, and botany culture. Con-
structed at a cost of $5,000. (1935)
HEATING PLANT-Installed at a cost of $429,000 with three boilers
capable of generating 61,000 pounds of steam per hour. In 1952-53, $16,00
was spent extending the lines to the temporary housing facilities for male






6 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

students in Freshman Manor and the Maintenance Department area. (1949)
(1953)
Addition to Heating Plant-An additional boiler house, storage and the
installation of a new additional boiler was completed in January, 1965 at a cost
of $130,100.
THE GUEST HOUSE-Built (1954) at a cost of $54,244 and has the fol-
lowing facilities: Rooms to accommodate twelve guests. Faculty party, meet-
ing or recreation room. Faculty recreation room which includes Dining Room
and Kitchen.
HOSPITAL-Available for service to the University and community, this
modern facility is a five story, fire-resistant structure with a total bed capacity
of 105 which includes 24 youth beds and pediatric cribs. Each floor is divided
into semi-private and two four-bed wards, private one-bed rooms and isolation
units. An X-ray department, laboratories for various testing purposes, pharma-
cy, out-patient service with six examining and treatment rooms, an office for
the student health physician, an emergency operating room, minor and major
operating suites, the latter equipped with observation platform and loud speaker
for procedural instruction, a dental department, central sterilizing room, delivery
rooms, assembly and lecture room, stations on each floor for supervisors and
nurses, an autopsy room, provisions for nurses, interns, and other adjunct per-
sonnel training, staff offices, main and diet kitchens, dining rooms and cafe-
teria, and workshop for maintenance engineer. Constructed at a cost of
$2,014,308. (1950)
HOWARD HALL-(1954-55) was built at a cost of $250,000. It con-
trins the following facilities: five class rooms, an indoor rifle range, a library,
an assembly hall, supply rooms for clothing and arms respectively, and five
Administrative Offices.
JACKSON DAVIS HALL-This four-story structure was built as a dormitory
for women. It was remodeled to afford classroom and office space for the School
of Education. Completed at a cost of $84,000. (1926) (1948)
JONES HALL-Was completed (1955) at a cost of $1,000,000, and has the
following facilities: Pharmacy Area: Consisting of five laboratories-Pharmacog-
nosy, Pharmacology, Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Dispensing-four
Administrative Offices. Chemistry Area: Consisting of one research laboratory
and five undergraduate laboratories, namely: General, Analytic, Organic, Physical
and Bio-Chemistry; and four Administrative Offices. Biology Area: Consisting
of a General Amphi-Theatre, and five laboratories, namely: Botany, Embrology-
Histology, General Laboratory, Bacteriology, Meterology, Research and Anatomy.
All classrooms in the five story building are used jointly. This building was
named and dedicated on March 9, 1956 in honor of Dr. Everette Booker Jones,
distinguished graduate of the institution and an outstanding educator.
LEE HALL-Contains administrative offices, music rooms, and an audi-
torium with a seating capacity of 1,700. The stage of the auditorium accommo-
dates 150 persons and is equipped with two motion picture projectors. Erected
in 1927-28 at a cost of $250,000 with the State providing $150,000 by legis-






GENERAL INFORMATION 7

lative allocation and the General Education Board providing a grant of $100,000.
This building was named and dedicated on November 10, 1944 in memory of
Dr. J. R. E. Lee, President of the College from 1924 to 1944. A central
telephone exchange costing $18,000 was installed in this building in the school
year 1952-53 and the Four-Manual Esty Pipe Organ valued at $70,000 was
installed in 1953 which replaced a two manual organ.
Lee Hall was completely renovated and central air-conditioning was in-
stalled during the Academic year 1961-62, at a cost of more than a half million
dollars. A section was added at the east end to house music department offices
and to provide storage for scenery and other stage equipment.
LAUNDRY-A one-story brick structure containing latest laundry and dry
cleaning machines. This facility was completed at a cost of $102, 411. This
unit serves the institutional needs of the hospital, dormitories, guest houses,
student body, and staff. (1920) (1947)
LucY MOTEN DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL-A one-story brick building with
classrooms, shops, and auditorium for elementary school training and practice
teaching purposes. Completed at a cost of $50,000. (1932)
MAINTENANCE BUILDING-A modernistic red brick building providing
office space for the Director and Assistant Director of Maintenance, the
Assistant to the Business Manager and Inventory Control, and an Architect.
It contains a Drafting Room suitably equipped with necessary facilities and
cabinet storage space for drawing of all campus buildings and utility lines.
Ample space is afforded for a receptionist and a secretarial pool. (1953)
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT SHoPs-Facilities for work space and storage
of supplies and materials necessary for the upkeep and maintenance of campus
buildings and grounds are provided. Four army barracks containing 2240 square
feet of floor space were converted to this pupose at a cost of approximately
$20,000. (1953)
McGuINN HALL-Originally known as South Hall for Women, it is a
four-story brick, fire-resistent structure with housing capacity for 200 students.
Accessory features are a social room, laundry, and a Little Theatre. Erected
with the aid of a federal grant at a cost of $175,000. Named in honor of Mrs.
N. S. McGuinn, Dean of Women for many years.
N. B. YOUNG HALL-Is now in the process of being completely renovated
at a cost of approximately $75,000. This renovation will partially consist of
adequate plumbing facilities, the provision for more efficiency in the heating
of the building, installation of additional drinking fountains, installation of
new tile flooring, repairing and replacement of starways to the boiler room,
the installation of new bathroom features, replastering and repainting through-
out the building, the placement of new hardware throughout the building and
many other desirable features where needed.
NEW RESIDENCE HALL COMPLEX-A co-educational dormitory complex com-
posed of four independent units; two of the units accommodate 208 women
students and two units provide housing for 236 men students. The units are
centrally air conditioned with a pavilion that provides a communication center







8 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

for the complex. The buildings were completed at a cost of $1,456,000. (1967)
NURSES' HOME-A one-story frame building, located in Jacksonville, Florida,
was renovated and enlarged to fourteen rooms at a cost of $12,000. Nursing
students reside in this dormitory while gaining nursing experience at Duval
Medical Center.
PERRY-PAIGE BUILDING-This building is designed to accommodate activi-
ties in the area of Agriculture and Home Economics. The paige Unit was con-
structed in 1954 at a cost of approximately $300,000 and is used for activi-
ties in Home Economics Education, Clothing and Retailing, Home and
Family Life and Institutional Management. The $1,000,000 Perry unit con-
structed in 1956, provides for instruction in Crops, Soils, Horticulture, Food
Technology, Landscape Design, Agricultural Chemistry, Foods and Nutrition,
and Arts and Crafts.
The second floor embraces an auditorium seating five hundred persons.
This unit also houses the divisional offices, classrooms, laboratories, graduate
studies, and State Department of Education and State Extension Services.
THE VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL BUILDINGS-A complex of four new building
units (A, B, C, and D) and the Benjamin Banneker Annex (Temporary struc-
ture) providing approximately 90,000 square feet of shop, laboratory, class
room and office space to accommodate the expanding program of Vocational
Technical Education. These new structures are completely air conditioned
and modern in every way. The original state appropriation of $1,750,000, and
supplemented Federal grants for equipment, together with facilities already on
hand, makes the total value of this complex in access of $2,000,000, (1966)
HOWARD MANAGEMENT HOUSE-A one-story four-bedroom cottage; with
library, Florida room and laundry, remodeled into a laboratory for Home
Management courses.
PHILLIS WHEATLEY HALL-A dormitory for sophomore women with a
housing capacity of 154 students. Construction cost approximately $352,000.
Referred to as Unit B, Women's Dormitories, until present name was approved
by the Board of Control in 1953. (1947)
POLKINGHORNE VILLAGE-This facility located at the northwest corner of
the campus, contains one-hundred and nine housing units accommodating more
than six hundred married students. Originally a government-owned project, pro-
viding for the housing of army personnel, it was acquired by the State to take
care of the housing needs of an increased school population and faculty per-
sonnel. It is named in memory of a student of this institution who as a
member of the Air Corps was killed in action in 1943, Lt. James Polkinghorne
of Pensacola, Florida. A new 69 unit section of modern brick and glass con-
struction was completed in 1966 at a cost of $676,513.00 (1948) (1966)
SUNSHINE MANOR-Constructed as a project of the Mechanics Arts Di-
vision, this well constructed home provides accommodations for the Presi-
dent's family. It is centrally located and the cost of construction estimated at
$18,000.
SAMPSON HALL-Originally known as South Hall for Men, it is a four-






GENERAL INFORMATION 9

story brick, fire-resistant structure with a housing capacity for 187 students.
Completed at a cost of $155,000. (1938)
TEACHERS COTTAGE-A one-story frame building erected at a cost of
$12,000 for elementary school purposes. It has been converted into a residence
for women staff members. (1934)
TRUTH HALL-The newest addition to the women's quadrangle-accom-
modates 82 women students. Completely modem in every respect. Includes
such special features as study lounges, kitchenette with serving facilities, modern
recreational rooms, walled terrace, modernly equipped laundry room with
automatic washers. This structure was built at a cost of $400,000.00.
TUCKER HALL-Tucker Hall is a four-story modernistic brick building
housing the Arts and Sciences Division and the Graduate Division. It provides
offices, classrooms, lecture rooms, a faculty lounge and an auditorium seating
700 people. Tucker Hall was constructed in 1956, at a cost of $1,000,000.
STUDENT UNION-The first unit of the Student Union Building is a
lounge and recreational center with cafeteria and snack bar accommodations
and a housekeeper apartment. It was constructed in 1956.
The second unit of the Student Union built in 1957, increased the recrea-
tional facilities and provided space for the campus bookstore, post office,
offices and committee rooms for student activities, at a cost of $250,000.
The third unit of the Student Union Building was erected in 1964 at
a cost of $800,000. It consists of an Artcraft Shop, Alumni headquarters, Student
offices, a music listening room, an art gallery, several conference rooms, a
recreational area which includes a bowling alley and billiard room, and a
grand ballroom.
UNIVERSITY DINING HALL-A combination cafeteria and banquet hall
capable of seating approximately 800 in the cafeteria and 175 in the banquet
section. Erected at an original cost of $48,000. It was expanded and remodeled
at a cost of $325,000.
ADDITION TO DINING HALL-The new wing of the Dining Hall, (1955)
will accommodate 500 persons bringing the seating capacity of the Dining Hall to
1,000. In addition, the wing will provide: (1) a lounge for students; (2) a
lounge for faculty members; (3) a faculty dining room; and (4) a conference
room. The cost of the addition is $250,000.
NEW BRAGG MEMORIAL STADIUM-Provides seating for 11,000 spectators,
a regulation size athletic field and a track with 220 yard straight-a-way. In
addition, it is equipped with a press box, radio booths, and a clock scoreboard.
Named in honor of Eugene J. Bragg, alumnus and pioneer coach of the foot-
ball team. Built in 1957 at a cost of $500,000.
THE NEW ATHLETIC FIELD, located in the western section of the campus
involved the moving, filling, grading, and grassing of more than 200,000 cubic
yards of dirt on an area of more than 118,000 square yards. This field includes
a baseball diamond and three practice football fields.
Plans are being made to complete the stadium with steam heated class-
rooms, lecture rooms, dormitory facilities and offices, concession and telephone
services. Lighting has been provided for night games.






10 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

JAKE GAITHER ATHLETIC CENTER-The center is divided into three units.
The first unit consists of the main gymnasium-auditorium section having one main
basketball court and two cross courts with seating capacity for about 4,500
people. This building contains 22,500 square feet.
The second unit is two stories in height and consists of classrooms, offices
and locker rooms. This wing joins the main building and contains 9,600 feet.
The third unit is an outdoor swimming pool which measures 82 1/2 feet
by 45 feet, and a swimming pool equipment room measuring 32 by 17 feet.
The pool is equipped for heating the water when needed.
The cost of the entire facility, including furniture and equipment, totals
approximately one million dollars.



EXPANSION-The continuing growth of the University necessitated the
extending and improving the campus utilities and other facilities. Completed
during 1957 were concrete walks, curbed and guttered asphalt streets and
parking areas and the extension of the electrical, sewage and underground
drainage system.
LAND
The University possesses four hundred and four (404) acres of land. The
larger portion, approximately two hundred and seventy-five (275) acres, is
assigned to the Agricultural Division for use in agricultural production and
pasturage. The wooded portion of this area is being claimed as needed by
the division in their program of extending and expanding agricultural projects.
The remaining portion, one hundred and forty-three and two-tenths (143.2)
acres, constitutes the main campus. The University also owns three-tenths
(.3) of an acre, the site of the Nursing Unit in Jacksonville, Florida.


ORGANIZATION OF RESIDENCE INSTRUCTION
The University is organized for residence undergraduate, professional, and
graduate instruction on a school-departmental basis. The Schools now operative
are: Agriculture and Home Economics, Arts and Sciences, Education, Graduate,
Law, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Vocational-Technical Institute. The departmental
structure follows with one or two exceptions the development of the major
fields of concentration in the eight schools. The organizational structure of the
University indicating the schools and departments (fields of concentration)
follows:

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
Vocational Agriculture and Technology Agricultural Science
Home Economics






GENERAL INFORMATION 11

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Art and Ceramics Library Service
Biology Mathematics
Business Education and Music
Administration Philosophy and Religion
Chemistry and Physics Pre-Engineering
Drama and Speech Pre-Medicine and Pre-Dentistry
Economics Political Science
English Psychology
Foreign Languages Sociology
History and Geography

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Elementary Education Physical Education and Health
Industrial Education Secondary Education

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Administration and Supervision Secondary Education (Teaching
Elementary Education of Subject-matter fields)

COLLEGE OF LAW

MILITARY SCIENCE

SCHOOL OF NURSING

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL INSTITUTE


ORGANIZATION OF
NON-RESIDENT INSTRUCTION

The Division of Continuing Education organizes and supervises the offerings
the University makes available to teachers-in-service, high school graduates, and
other interested and qualified persons who because of employment or other
valid and administratively acceptable reasons are unable to be in residence
during the regular school sessions. The work of the Division of Continuing
Education carries non-resident credit and the enrollees work is supervised as
rigorously and the standards are equivalent to those in resident instruction.

SESSIONS OF THE YEAR
The regular school year is divided into four quarters of about twelve
weeks each. Undergraduate classes normally are scheduled to meet on Mondays






12 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

through Fridays; graduate classes on Saturdays and evenings during the week.
The number of class periods during the day are determined and distributed by
the type of instructional activity required for class lecture or laboratory.

THE FOURTH QUARTER
The fourth quarter consists of a full term with a special five-weeks
session for in-service teachers. Courses offered during the five-weeks term
are organized to make them equivalent in content, method and credit to those
of a full quarter.
During the second five-weeks of the fourth quarter the university sup-
plements the regular five-weeks instructional program with credit and no-credit
activities such as institutes, workshops, conferences, etc.


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The Division of Student Welfare of Florida A. and M. University is
organized and dedicated to facilitating the attainment of the objectives of
the university. Its main emphasis is centered on the principles of student
well-roundedness which engulf the student's intellectual, spiritual and emotional
development. To assist the students in their personal adjustments, the uni-
versity provides several services. The coordination of these student personnel
services is the responsibility of the Dean of Students.
The Women's and Men's Department under the direction of the Dean
of Women and Dean of Men, respectively; the Office of the Director of Student
Health, University Chaplain, Director of Financial Aid and the Director of
Housing devote much time, energy and resourcefulness toward assisting the
individual students in achieving maximum motivation and optimum growth
and development. Aspects of the departmental program includes provisions
for social education and cooperative living, health, student government, co-
curricula activities and counseling.

HOUSING
Facilities-The University provides 8 modern permanent residence halls
for undergraduate students and, a new co-educational residence complex.
Women students are housed in McGuinn, Diamond, Cropper, Wheatley, Truth
Halls and Units C and D of the new co-educational complex. Men students
are housed in Young, Sampson, Gibbs Halls and Units A and B of the new
co-educational complex.
The residence halls are equipped with reception rooms, recreational and
laundry facilities. Bedrooms are equipped with basic items of furniture however,
personal items (such as study lamps, bedding and pillows) are not supplied
and are the responsibility of the student. The installations and removal of
any and all items of equipment and furnishings must be approved by the
Director of Housing.








GENERAL INFORMATION 13

HOUSING PROCEDURE
A. Residence Halls
1. Application for residence halls are to be made to the Director of
Housing and are to be accompanied by a $10.00 room reservation fee.
(DO NOT SEND CASH) Make check or money order payable to
Florida A. and M. University.
2. The applicant will be immediately informed of the availability of
space and mailed either an assignment or a listing of approved off-campus
facilities.
3. Each applicant accepted for occupancy in the residence halls will be
required to negotiate a Room Assignment Agreement (contract).
4. Applications for residence halls are to be received in the office of
the Director of Housing by the dates indicated below:
First Quarter ......................................... ... Not later than August 10
Second Quarter ........................................ Not later than November 1
Third Quarter .............................................. Not later than M arch 1
Fourth Quarter ........................................... Not later than May 20
5. Residence Hall assignments will be made in the order in which both
the application and $10.00 reservations deposit are received in the
office of the Director of Housing.
6. Residence Hall assignment may be cancelled and the $10.00 reser-
vation deposit refunded provided the applicant is
a. Denied admission to the university
b. Denied permission to re-register
c. Enter military service prior to the opening date of the period for
application is made.
d. Withdrew from university because of unusual personal circumstances
acceptable to the Director of Housing.
e. Notify the Director of Housing in writing by the dates given
below that you will not enroll for the period for which your ap-
plication is accepted:
1. August 20th on assignment for the First Quarter
2. December 1st on assignment for the Second Quarter
3. March 15th on assignment for the Third Quarter
4. June 1st on assignment for the Fourth Quarter
f. No room reservation refunds will be made for forced withdrawals or
suspensions.
NOTE: Residence Hall applications should be made early and, are to be
accompanied by a $10.00 room reservation deposit. (DO NOT SEND
CASH). Make checks or money orders payable to Florida A. and M.
University.
B. Off-Campus
1. Students eligible to reside off-campus are required to make appli-
cation for such accommodations in the office of the Director of Housing.






14 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

2. Off-campus permits will be issued to students meeting the following
qualifications
a. Legal residents of Leon County
b. Commuters living within reasonable distance
c. Special students (1 to 4 hours)
d. Graduate students
e. Other undergraduate students only when residence hall accommo-
dations are not available.
3. Off-campus students are not to change residence without obtaining
prior permission from the Director of Housing.
4. Single undergraduate students are not permitted to rent apartments
and/or houses. Married couples may rent apartments or houses but
are not permitted to sublet space to single students.
NOTE: The University does not assume the responsibility for placing students
in off-campus accommodations but, it does assist the student in making
contacts with landlords of university approved housing facilities. The
University assumes no control over off-campus rental rates but, solicits
the cooperation of the landlords in keeping rates reasonable.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. All students who are not legal residents of Leon County are required to
live in the residence halls.
2. Students who are not legal residents of Leon County and who live with-
in commuting distance are expected to live in the residence halls unless
given permission to live elsewhere by the Director of Housing.
3. Students who are unable to secure accommodations in the residence
halls are required to obtain off-campus permits and live in University ap-
proved facilities.
4. The assigning of married, special, graduate and other students over 21
years of age in university residence halls will be determined by the avail-
ability of residence hall space.
5. Students assigned to and occupying rooms in the residence halls are ex-
pected to continue to live in the residence halls unless authorized by the
Director of Housing to live elsewhere.
6. Residence hall occupants and all visitors are required to observe high
standards of social conduct in all activities and relationships with others.
7. Residence hall housing will not be available prior to the opening dates
listed in the University Calendar.
8. All students are required to vacate the residence halls within 24 hours
after the (1) official university vacation periods (2) end of the fourth
quarter (3) students withdrawal or suspension (4) student ends matri-
culation unless authorized otherwise by the Director of Housing.







GENERAL INFORMATION 15

RELIGIOUS LIFE
Religious activities constitute a part of the total program of the institution.
These activities are planned mainly in the interest of the moral and spiritual
life of the academic community. The making of a contribution to the welfare
of the general community is also considered in the formulation of programs.
Efforts are made to cooperate with local churches. The Christian Federation,
YMCA, YWCA, and denominational clubs are the chief student organizations
functioning in the religious area. The campus hospital has a well-developed
program of religious activities for staff and patients. Mid-Week Meditation
Hour provides opportunities for worship and leadership in planning services.
The religious fellowship of student and staff members known as the Unm
versity Church is open for the participation of all without respect to de
nominations.

COUNSELING
Personal and Social-Counseling is provided by the Personnel Deans-
the Dean of Students, Dean of Women, Dean of Men, Director of Student
Activities and the Counselors for men and women in the various residence
halls. These counselors along with other personnel are responsible for providing
dormitory programs for the development of the student.
The counseling personnel recognize the individuality of the counselee and
utilize such tools and techniques as are essential to assist the student in
solving problems and to assure the full development of the counselee's
potentialities.
Academic-The University has a faculty advisory program which is co-
ordinated by the Coordinator of Counseling. Each school has a coordinator of
academic counselors and faculty advisers whose primary responsibility is to
assist freshman students in their academic adjustment. All deans of schools
and departmental heads serve as academic advisers to upperclassmen. Students
are encouraged to take advantage of this academic counseling in order that
they may be assisted in wisely choosing a curriculum and preparing for a
suitable vocation.
Students are urged to consult freely with their advisors and to discuss the
vocational possibilities of the several offerings of the University. To promote
individualization of programs of study, the University provides a pre-registration
period.
Orientation-At the beginning of each quarter a period is devoted to
the orientation of new students. During this period, the university provides a
setting for the students to become acquainted with the staff, facilities and
course offerings of the university and also it provides an opportunity for the
university to become acquainted with the students. Activities include a welcome
by the administrative and resident staff, introduction of personnel services and
staff, a testing program, social activities, and pre-registration information.

DISCIPLINE
Residence in the University community carries with it certain moral and
social obligations. The student is expected to live within the pattern of policies






16 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

prescribed for students in a college community and to exemplify that conduct
which characterizes a good citizen. (Students are advised to become familiar
with the "Student Handbook.")
Whenever a student fails to make proper adjustment to college life in
observing general standards of conduct (any specific one that may be adopted
by the University authorities) or acts in such a manner as to make it apparent
that he may not be a desirable member of the University, he can be coun-
seled, disciplined or referred to the University Discipline Committee for sus-
pension or expulsion.
All students are required to abide by the rules, regulations and principles
of Florida A. and M. University as stated in the catalog, student handbook
and the constitution of the Student Government Association and the faculty
Conduct prejudicial to the interest of the University may lead to dismissal
from the University.
Automobiles-Freshman and Sophomore students are not permitted to
operate vehicles on the campus unless they have been in attendance one
quarter, acquired a "B" average and meet all requirements of the university
as specified by campus police and the Personnel Deans.


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
The University maintains a Financial Aid Office to work with needy stu-
dents and to give them financial assistance in offering an opportunity to
help them help themselves.
This office seeks through analysis of student environment and family back-
ground to give financial assistance to those students who can best benefit
from scholarships, loans and student employment directly administered by
the Director of Financial Aid. He coordinates grant-in-aid also. This office
is located in the Student Union Building, Section A, Room 112. All question-
naires, reports, and requests pertaining to student financial aid should be sent
directly to the Director of the Office of Financial Aid.
1. Scholarships, Awards and Prizes-The scholarships and loans pro-
vided by interested friends and agencies for students of the University are
administered through the Office of Financial Aid.
The 1953 session of the Florida Legislature changed the State Scholar-
ship laws, so that all scholarships awarded during the 1953-55 biennium will
be of one type and have the same value-$400. Twice during the year usually
in April and October, the State Department of Education conducts competitive
examinations of applicants for this scholarship.
High school graduates and college students in good health are eligible
if they have been residents of Florida for at least one year and intend to teach
in a public elementary or secondary school in this state following graduation
from college. Scholarships are good for undergraduate work only.
A winner of a General Scholarship must promise to teach immediately
following graduation, in a public elementary or secondary school in Florida for








GENERAL INFORMATION 17

at least the number of years that the scholarship is used.
Interested students should consult their County Superintendent of Public
Instruction or they may write or see the Dean of the School in which they
plan to enroll at Florida A. and M. University for information about available
scholarships in each county.
2. Employment-Student employment is coordinated by the Director of
Financial Aid. All applications for work should be submitted to the Office of
Financial Aid. Work appointments are determined by the financial need and
the ability of the student to perform specific tasks. With the increased enroll-
ment, the University finds it impossible to honor all requests for work, as
the opportunities for placement both at the University and in the City of Talla-
hassee are limited.
Each student who works for the University must maintain the minimum
scholastic requirements. In many cases, reduced academic loads are required
when the work schedule of the student hinders his classroom efforts.
3. Loan Funds-A limited amount of National Defense Education Act
(NDEA), Florida Student Scholarship (FSS), Florida Student Guaranteed
Loan and United Student Aid loan funds is available to qualified students.
The several revolving loan funds are administered by the Financial Aid
Board. This committee approves applicants who prove the need and urgency
for financial assistance to continue or complete their educational objectives.
All short term loans are payable in 30-90 days. Students assuming financial
responsibilities are expected to comply with loan procedure and policies.
4. The Rehabilitation Section of the State Department of Public In-
struction provides some assistance to persons who are physically handicapped.
Requirements for eligibility for assistance are as follows The applicant must
be sixteen years old; must have a good scholastic record; and, must take
courses that will prepare him for some vocation with which he can earn
a living.
Application for this assistance should be made prior to July 1, for the
following year, to the State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Depart-
ment of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida
5. Two year scholarships are available to selected ROTC students who
are strongly motivated toward a career in the Army. Each scholarship pays
for tuition, books and laboratory expenses, and, in addition, pays $50.00 a
month for the duration of the award, except during the Advance Course sum-
mer training at the end of the junior year when the pay is increased. Only
students who participate in the four-year ROTC Program are eligible. Ap-
plication may be made at the end of the Sophomore year to the Professor
of Military Science.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD OF $150.00-Delta
Kappa Omega graduate chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority presents an
award of $150.00 to a freshman girl achieving one of the highest scholastic






18 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

averages at the end of the first quarter and meeting other criteria set up by
the chapter's scholarship committee.
ALPHA PHI ALPHA AWARD OF $275-The sum of $25 is awarded
annually by the undergraduate chapter (Beta Nu) to the student in attendance
whose performance determined by standards which meet the approval of the
administration of the University is recognized as being the most well-rounded.
The student cannot be affiliated with the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity in any way.
The sum of $25 is awarded annually by the undergraduate chapter (Beta
Nu) to the student with 60 or more quarter hours in attendance with the
highest cumulative average.
The sums of $100, $75, and $50 will be given annually by the graduate
chapter of this fraternity (Gamma Mu Lambda) to the three highest fresh-
men male students respectively.
AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCA-
TION AWARD-The Board of Grants of the American Foundation for Phar-
maceutical Education provides a fund of $400 annually to be awarded to
highly deserving students who are in need of financial aid. Third, fourth and
fifth year students in the upper quarter of their class and who maintain a
3.00 average or higher are eligible. Individuals who are receiving veterans
benefits are not eligible for this scholarship.
THE ANNUAL DEAN'S AWARD-This is a Revolutionary War Mortar
and Pestle made available by the Johnson and Johnson Company as an annual
Dean's Award. The award is based upon the highest average in the area of
Pharmacy Administration.
THE BRISTOL AWARD-A Copy of Howard's Modern Drug Encyclo-
pedia is made available by Bristol Laboratories, Inc., to be awarded to the
graduating senior with the highest scholastic average in courses in Chemistry
and Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
THE JOHN W. DARGAVEL SCHOLASHIP-The sum of $200 is
awarded as an unconditional scholarship to a Pharmacy student in the last three
years of Pharmaceutical Eduction. This scholarship is awarded through the
School of Pharmacy.
THE DELTA SIGMA THETA AWARD OF $275.00-The graduate
chapter (Tallahassee Alumnae) of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority divides this
award as follows: (a) Highest average Delta Sigma Theta Soror of the Junior
Class, $125; (b) Most well-rounded Freshman girl, $100. The undergraduate
chapter (Beta Alpha) makes two awards of $25 each to the highest average
young lady from each of Tallahassee's high schools.
DEPENDENT CHILDREN OF DECEASED WAR VETERANS-"Sec-
tion I. It is hereby declared to be the policy of the State of Florida to provide
educational opportunities at State expense for Dependent Children either of
whose parents entered the Army, Navy, Marine or Nurse Corps of the United
States from the State of Florida and died in that service or from injuries








GENERAL INFORMATION 19

sustained or diseases contracted therein between the 6th day of April 1917,
and the 2nd day of July, 1921, or who have died since or may hereafter die
from diseases or disabilities resulting from such war service; and also the
dependent children either of whose parents served in any of the military
or naval services of the United States from the State of Florida during the
period from December 7, 1941, to the close of World War II, September
2, 1945, where the parents of such children have been bona fide residents of
the State of Florida for five years preceding their application for the benefits
hereof, and subject to the rules, restrictions and limitations hereof."
For further information and application forms, write Department Adjutant,
The American Legion, P.O. Box 726, Tallahassee, Florida.
THE FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY CLINICAL ASSOCIATION
AWARD OF $50-This award is made annually to a junior Nursing Student
for excellence in nursing and academic performance.
THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA A. AND
M. UNIVERSITY, has set up a Scholarship Fund which began operation at the
beginning of the 1960-61 school year.
In order to receive the Alumni Scholarship a student must be approved
by the Dean of Students and the Dean of the University and must have a
2.50 average or better. In case of a freshman, his high school record should
indicate that he is capable of maintaining a 2.5 average in college.
One $100 scholarship is to be awarded each year.
The Alumni Association places the money in the Business Office when
the student is certified by the deans mentioned above.
THE GADSDEN COUNTY FAMU ALUMNI CHAPTER-Awards
two $100 scholarships to two students from Gadsden County, Florida, entering
Florida A. and M. University as freshmen. Fifty dollars ($50) is allowed each
student at the beginning of each quarter.
The county alumni group sets up the criteria for these scholarships, and
names the students to receive them.
The money is sent through the General Alumni Association.
The awards are made annually.
THE CHARLES S. LASSITER AWARD-Each year a $25.00 Savings
Bond is made available by Charles S. Lassiter, Class of '59 to the graduating
senior who, after having had two trimesters of General Pharmacology, makes
the highest score on a comprehensive examination in General Pharmacology.
THE LEHN AND FINK GOLD MEDAL AWARD-Presented annually
to a graduating senior chosen by the faculty for having maintained the highest
scholastic average during his tenure in the School of Pharmacy. This award
is maintained by the Lehn and Fink Product Corp. of New York.
THE MACMILLIAN SCHOLARSHIP OF $50-Mr. J. C. MacMillian
of California awards this scholarship to the most worthy vocational agricultural
student.






20 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

THE MCKESSON AND ROBBINS SCHOLASHIP-Each year the
McKesson and Robbins Company makes available of $300.00 scholarship to be
awarded to a Pharmacy student who meets the following requirements:
1. He must be classified as a Second year student or above.
2. He must be a resident of the State of Florida.
3. He must have a 3.0 average or better.
THE NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY FAMU ALUMNI CHAPTER -
Awards a $300 scholarship annually to a student at Florida A. and M. Uni-
versity.
ELIGIBILITY:
1. The student must either be from the New York-New Jersey area or
from the State of Florida.
2. The student must maintain a "B" average or better
3. The student must be in good physical health
4. The student must be of excellent character and possess the ability
to lead
5. The student must demonstrate his need for financial assistance
6. The student must be recommended by the Dean of Students and the
Dean of the University.
7. The award is made through the Dean of Student's Office
8. The money is sent through the General Alumni Association who in
turn places the money in the Business Office when the name of
the recipient is revealed
REXALL MORTAR AND PESTLE TROPHY-A reproduction of a
Spanish Mortar and Pestle, Cicra 1500 is awarded the outstanding member
of the graduating class who has distiugunshed himself by achieving the highest
scholastic average in the area of pharmacy. This award is maintained by the
Rexall Drug Company of Los Angeles, California.
THE SARAH LEVY SCHOLARSHIP OF $150-This scholarship was
established by Mrs. Sarah Levy of Tallahassee, Florida, in the late nineteen
twenties to be awarded to a student of Leon County who is worthy and
desires to pursue a four-year college course.
STATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP-The State Department of Edu-
cation offers annually to students in the School of Nursing, scholarships of
$500 per year. The Scholarships are awarded by a competitive examination.
THE U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH LOANS AND SCHOLARSHIPS-Loans
and scholarships are available to students in the School of Pharmacy from the
U.S. Department of H.E.W. The scholarships are available to students who
do not qualify for loans and they are restricted to students in the third, fourth,
and fifth year.
REVOLVING LOAN FUNDS
The several revolving loan funds listed below are administered by the
Committee on University Loans. This committee approves applicants who








GENERAL INFORMATION 21

prove the need and urgency for financial assistance to continue or complete
their educational objectives. All short term loans are payable in 30-90 days.
Students assuming financial responsibilities are expected to comply with loan
procedure and policies.
The Alumni Loan Fund-This fund is designed to assist students who
need a small loan during the school year to satisfy their financial obligations.
The Millard Caldwell Loan Fund-This fund, amounting to $25,000,
was established in 1950 by Ex-Governor Millard Caldwell. Its main purpose
is to assist needy, promising students in securing higher education at the
Florida A. and M. University. The University Loan Committee shall supervise
the fund and set up machinery for repayment of loans. This loan is finally
approved by the State Board of Regents.
The Johnny Clair Memorial Loan Fund-This fund was established by
the graduating class of 1952 in memory of their classmate, who died during
their sophomore year in 1950, for students needing emergency financial
assistance.
The Ruby Diamond Loan Fund-This fund, in the amount of $500,
was established by Miss Ruby Diamond, a citizen of Tallahassee, Florida.
Short-term loans will be made in amounts not to exceed $55, if the student
can establish need for continuing his or her educational program and can
convince the committee of the nature of the emergency.
The John and Ida English Loan Fund-This fund was established by Hon.
Colin English, in memory of his father and mother, for worthy students
needing financial assistance. Students who wish to borrow from the fund
should make application to the University Loan Committee.
The Gilmore Loan Fund-This loan fund was established by the late
R. T. Gilmore and his wife, Mrs. Salena Gilmore of Marianna, Florida. It
was established to provide small, short-term loans to help students who have
emergency needs. Recipients must be in good standing with the institution.
The Loan Committee of the University will be responsible for administering
this fund.
The George William Gore, Jr. Loan Fund-This loan fund was established
by the faculty and staff of the University commemorating the anniversary of
ten years of progressive leadership by Dr. George W. Gore, Jr., president of
the University. The stipulations are that this fund be used to give small
short-term loans to worthy, needy students who are in good standing with the
university.
The Hollingsworth Loan Fund-The Hollingsworth Loan Fund consists
of a grant of $1,500, donated by Mr. and Mrs. James E. Hollingsworth of
West Palm Beach, to provide loans at the Florida A. and M. University
to worthy students who major in the Social Sciences, Nursing or Nutrition,
and who expect to become teachers in one of these fields.





22 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

hassee have established a loan fund under their names to be used to "help
worthy, needy students" of the institution who find themselves in financial
difficulty and who need small loans for short periods. Loans should be granted
to only those students who are maintaining good scholastic records and who
show definite efforts towards trying to become industrious, useful citizens. The
fund shall be administered by the University Loan Committee.
The Philadelphia Alumni Chapter Student Loan Fund-This revolving
fund, amounting to $300, is designed to aid deserving students who find it
difficult to meet expenses.
The Reynolds Tobacco Loan Fund-Established by the R. J. Reynolds
Tobacco Company through its Florida A. and M. University student and faculty
representatives for needy students. Students must be in good standing with
the institution and show need for financial assistance.
Ralph N. Walker Loan-This fund was granted by Mr. Ralph N. Walker,
who has been informed by a student of the University of how much a
student loan had assisted her in continuing her education. A loan of $2,000
was established to assist other students needing financial assistance.
The N. B. Young Loan Fund-This fund was begun in 1932. The pur-
pose of this fund at the beginning was to aid seniors in meeting their
graduation expenses. For a long time this fund was available to seniors only.
A few years ago some adjustments were made so that students in other
classes may now receive temporary help on a short loan basis. Persons may
now receive help from this fund at the discretion of the Loan Committee.
The National Defense Student Loan Fund-This loan fund was established
under Title II of Public Law 85-864 designated as the "National Defense
Education Act of 1958." The purpose is to provide low interest loans to
students who can establish need of the amount of the loan to pursue course
of study at the institution; who are capable of maintaining a good academic
standing or whose superior academic background or capacity elicits special
consideration. Deadline dates for filing completed applications for loans for
registration are as follows: July 1 for first quarter, October 1 for second quarter,
February 1 for third quarter and May 1 for fourth quarter.
Pickett and Hatcher Education Loan Fund-The late Mrs. Claude A.
Hatcher of Columbus, Georgia, created an educational fund for the purpose
of aiding worthy students in securing courses in broad liberal college training.
Loans are available for students of all classes including graduate students.
Limitations prevent loans being granted to students of law, medicine, and
the ministry. Application and requests for additional information should be
addressed to Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund, 215 First National Bank
Building, Columbus, Georgia.
The School of Pharmacy IStudent Loan Fund-This fund was established
by the- Florida State Pharmaceutical Association and is intended to provide
short-term loans for students in the School of Pharmacy. The amount and
term of the loan will depend upon the students' needs and availability of
funds. The fund is administered by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy.







GENERAL INFORMATION 23


STUDENT ACTIVITIES
The Student Activities program at the University is coordinated to give
all assistance possible to student groups in the Herculean task of complementing
the efforts of student organizations to enrich university life.
Social and Recreational Programs-The University officially recognizes the
activities of a large number of organizations in caring for the social and recre-
ational needs of students, developing their cultural and religious interests,
broadening their contacts with the public, with fellow students, and with the
educational world. The University encourages the widest possible participation
consistent with scholarship requirements, because it is within this area that
qualities of leadership are developed.
Each student organization must have the approval of the University and
remains subject to its jurisdiction. Although the University issues regulations
to govern student activities, a large portion of authority has been delegated to
student organizations.
A committee known as the Student Activity Committee and composed of
student and faculty personnel is concerned with the conduct of student or-
ganizations and activities and with the University policy relative to student
organizations.

THE STUDENT UNION
The Student Union is the campus center of student activities. It has as
its objective the fulfillment of the cultural, educational, and recreational desires
of the students of Florida A. and M. University.
A variety of programs and activities are planned and supervised by a
group of student leaders and the Student Union staff to round-out and broaden
the experiences of each student. The services and facilities of the Student Union
are open for the convenience of the students and the FAMU family.
The Student Union is under the direct management of the Student Union
Board of Management which is composed of students and faculty members.
Other committees of the Student Union are the Student Union Social Board,
Public Relations Committee, Dance Committee, Fine Arts Committee, Photo-
graphy Club Committee, Host and Hostess Committee, Film and Forum
Committee and the Great Ideas Committee.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student Organizations at Florida A. and M. University contribute greatly
toward the enrichment of the University's total program of growth and morales:
GENERAL RELIGIOUS
Student Government Association Baptist Student Union
NAACP Canterbury Club
Men's Senate Methodist Student Organization
Women's Congress Newman Club
City Women's Council YWCA





24 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

RELIGIOUS (Cont'd) DEPARTMENTAL
YMCA Art Club
United Campus Christian Agricultural and Home Economics
Fellowship Alpha Beta Alpha Library
Council on Religious Activities Fraternity
Pentecostal Student Council America Pharmaceutical Association
Biology Club
HONORARY AND SCHOLASTIC Chemistry Club
Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society Elementary Education Majors
Beta Kappa Chi French Club
Kappa Delta Pi-Theta Iota Industrial Technical Society
Pi Gamma Mu Mathematics Club
White and Gold Honor Society Masonry Club
NEA
MUSICAL Orchesis Dance Club
Tau Beta Sigma Sorority Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA)
(Beta Phi) Playmakers Guild
Kappa Kappa Psi Fraternity Pre-Medicine Science Club
Delta Iota Chapter Psychology Club
University Choral Society Political Science Club
University Band Pre-Legal Society
Student Nurses Association
LITERARY Varsity "F" Club
FAMUAN Student Bar Association
Rattler Spanish Club
Sigma Tau Mu Debating Society
Sigma Tau Mu Debating Society SOCIAL GREEK LETTER ORGANIZATIONS
MILITARY Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Scabbard and Blade Military Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
Fraternity Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
National Society of Pershing Rifles Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
SERVICE Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
Alpha Phi Omega Service Fraternity Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority
Collegiate Chapter of United Zeta Phi Beta Sorority
Nations Pan Hellenic Society

HEALTH
Each new student or any student who has not been enrolled in the Uni-
versity during the preceding year must provide a health certificate from a
licensed physician. This certificate must be mailed in by the physician directly
to the Director of Student Health Service, Florida A. and M. University,
Tallahassee, Florida. The medical blank is included in the material sent by the
Director of Admissions and Records to the prospective student. The certificate
should be in the office of the Director of Student Health at least four weeks
before registration. The Student will not be permitted to register until his
health record is cleared.







GENERAL INFORMATION 25

Effective immediately all students must have certification from a licensed
physician or from a health department that they have had tetanus immunization
within one year of entrance to the university, smallpox vaccination within five
years, and certification that they have had a full course of oral polio immuni-
zations.
The Health Service, under the Director of Student Health is maintained
for the care of all students who pay full fees per quarter. The clinic, located
in the hospital on the campus is open daily Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; 1:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.; and on Saturday from 9:00-12.00
p.m. to provide all students in need of medical care with consultation and
treatment. An emergency service is available to students who become acutely
ill or are injured when the clinic is closed; Students needing emergency
service may obtain treatment at any time by reporting to the Emergency Room
of the hospital. The hospital provides the student in need of hospitalization
with twenty-four hour general nursing care. Student patients entering the hos-
pital are under the observation of the physicians of Student Health.
The student Health Service Staff is organized for treating the minor
illnesses and injuries which commonly occur while the student is in residence
at the University. It does not assume the responsibility of providing care for
students suffering from chronic or prolonged illnesses or severe injuries.
Students with such diseases or injuries may receive emergency treatment in
the clinic, but they must arrange for the continuation of their medical care
outside of the Student Health Service. The Director of Student Health may
determine whether or not a disease or injury falls within this category.
Students are urged to have defects of vision and teeth corrected before
coming to the University, as there are no facilities for dental work or eye
refractions in the Student Clinic.
All new students are required to have an annual chest x-ray. This is
usually provided by the State Health Department. Any student failing to take
the x-ray during the date scheduled is subject to suspension from classes
until provision for the test is made. A fee for late x-ray will be made.
No student is allowed to remain in the dormitory because of illness for
a period longer than twenty-four hours. The University reserves the right to
request a student to submit to a physical examination at any time it is deemed
advisable. The University also reserves the right to ask any student to with-
draw from the University for medical reasons.
Whenever a student is found to be in need of a consultant the Director
of Student Health will arrange for such consultation. The Health Service
will pay for the first consultation fee; any other consultations or charges may
be at the student's expense. Students requesting the professional attention of
a physician of their choice may do so at their expense and by the approval of
the Director of Student Health.
The Health Fee does not include hospitalization fees, surgery, consultation
and special drugs; but special rates on the hospital bills are given to eligible
students. Health service is available only to those students currently enrolled in






26 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

the University who have paid the full registration fee. The Student Health Ser-
ice and Hospital assume, no responsibility for obtaining blood for students unless
credit has been established in the Blood Bank for such use.
Parents are asked to respect and follow the individual recommendations
based on the findings at entrance and/or subsequent physical examinations with
respect to corrective suggestions. Without assuming any financial responsibility,
the administration reserves the right to recommend such medical attention and
care as may be deemed advisable. In the event that the treatment or services
while in attendance entails extraordinary expense they will not be incurred
without the knowledge and approval of the family or guardian of the student
patient except in case of extreme emergency.
The University administration has made available a health and accident
insurance plan for students. This insurance will cover services not included in
the registration fee paid by students. This insurance is not compulsory but
students are -urged to take advantage of this valuable health and accident plan.
Details are available in a special brochure. This brochure may be obtained at
the Office of the Dean of Students.
The University is not responsible for the medical care of students during
vacation. The Student Clinic will be closed during official University vacation
periods.
Students anticipating exemption from basic ROTC or required Physical Edu-
cation courses due to medical reasons must obtain Medical Certificates to that
effect from the Director of Student Health Service. Any student who is a
patient in the hospital and leaves without proper discharge from the physician
will be disciplined severely.

ATHLETICS
The Universtiy is a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic
Association (SIAC), the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA),
and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), and all of
the athletic activities of the University are conducted under the rules and
regulations of these organizations. The eligibility of players for competition
is determined by the rules and regulations of the SIAC, the NCAA, and the
NAIA.
The University participates in the following intercollegiate sports: Football,
Basketball, Baseball, Track, Tennis, Golf, and Swimming.
Letters are awarded on these conditions in the following sports: Football-
participation in one-half of the total number of quarters of season play and
upon the recommendation of the Coaching Staff. Basketball-participation in
one-half of the total halves of season play and upon the recommendation of
the Coaching Staff. Baseball-participation in one-half of the total games on
schedule and upon recommendation of the Coach. Track-a player must earn
at least one point in the SIAC meet and be recommended by the Coach.
Tennis-the player must be a participant in the Conference tournament and
upon the recommendation of the Coach. Golf-participation in the Conference







GENERAL INFORMATION 27

meet and upon the recommendation of the Coach. Swimming must earn
at least one point in the Conference meet and upon the recommendation of
the Coach.

PLACEMENT BUREAU
The Florida A. and M. University Placement Bureau is an agency of the
University which is created primarily to assist graduates in the various depart-
ments, schools, and colleges in solving the problem of post-graduate employment,
as well as to assist alumni in making suitable changes in employment status.
The University Placement Bureau serves as a cleaning house, bringing
together students, faculty members, and representatives of organizations that are
seeking trained personnel for permanent employment. Assistance is given to
students in preparing and making desired contact for placement upon graduation
by supplying information on job opportunities, arranging interviews between
employer and applicant, and helping students gather and present their creden-
tials to prospective employers. Representatives from schools, business enterprises
industrial and governmental concerns are encouraged to visit the campus or
to write to the Placement Office and take the opportunity to engage the services
of qualified FAMU graduates.


PUBLICATIONS
The BULLETIN of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University is
a general title given to the official publications which appear annually and are
entered in the United States Post Office as periodical literature. The series
includes the General Catalog and Announcements combined, the Bulletin of the
Graduate School, the Bulletin of the College of Law, the Summer Session
issue, and the Bulletin of the Extension Service, Announcements of the edu-
cational program of the University are made in the BULLETIN.
THE RESEARCH BULLETIN (formerly the Quarterly Journal) is a faculty
publication which affords the university staff and others, by invitation, the
opportunity to publish the results of significant research or creative writing.
THE STUDENT HANDBOOK is an official institutional publication which gives
attention to a great variety of important activities and services which are avail-
able to the student once he has enrolled and started his class work. A copy is
given each student at registration time.
THE FAMUAN is the student publication of the University. It is published
nine times yearly.
THE FAM-U ALUMNI NEWs which began publication in January of 1953
is designed to serve as a vital communication link between the University and
the Alumni, as well as others who are interested in its welfare, by disseminating
information by and about the University and the Alumni.
THE FLORIDA PHARMACIST is the official journal of the Student Branch






28 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

of the American Pharmaceutical Association, Florida A. and M. University
School of Pharmacy, Tallahassee, Florida. It is published semi-annually.
THE YEARBOOK entitled "The Rattler" is an annual publication of students
containing information about students, faculty and general items of interest
in the program of the current year.
THE FAMU ROTC NEWSLETTER is a monthly Student Cadet Publication
containing information by and for all ROTC Cadets, ROTC Alumni and other
interested persons. The First Edition was published in September 1962.
MISCELLANEOUS The President's Biennial Report to the Board of Regents,
booklets and folders from various divisions, departments, and organizations
giving information on activities of special significance during the current year
are released by the University.








FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ADVANCED ROOM DEPOSIT
An advanced room deposit of $10.00 is required of all boarding students
and will be applied to the student's account at registration for the second
quarter. This deposit must be paid before August 1, 1967 for the first quarter,
December 1, 1967 for the second quarter, March 1, 1968 for the third quarter,
and June 1, 1968 for the fourth quarter. This amount is not refundable if
student fails to register, or fails to request a refund 15 days prior to the first
day of registration for the quarter.

APPLICATION FEE
An application fee of $10.00 must accompany the applications of all
students who are applying at the University for the first time. This fee is
not refundable.

PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable on or before the first of each month. Students are
expected to meet their payments promptly and without notice from the
Business Office. It is their personal responsibility to inform their parents or
guardians of all financial obligations to the University.
All persons who send money to the institution in payment of fees or
services should not send cash. For safety, money should be sent in the form
of a Post Office Money Order, Postal Note, Cashier's Check or Certified
Check made payable to Florida A. and M. University and addressed to the
Business Manager.

PERSONAL CHECKS
Personal Checks are acceptable if they are made for the exact amount of
the fees. If the amount of the check exceeds the bill the excess amount will
be applied to the student's account. NO CHANGE WILL BE GIVEN THE
STUDENT IF THE AMOUNT OF THE CHECK EXCEEDS THE AS-
SESSED FEES.

OUT-OF-STATE FEE
Students who are residents of states other than Florida, must pay an out-
of-state fee of $200.00 per quarter in addition to the regular fees as listed on
the following pages. This fee must be paid at registration.

CITY STUDENTS
City students, those who do not reside in university residences, pay only
the registration fee of $90.00 per quarter. This amount is payable at registration.
Other additional fees. Payable at registration, include ROTC fee, all
laboratory fees, music lessons, etc. See section entitled "special fees."

PART-TIME STUDENTS
All students who register for four semester hours, or less pay a registration
fee of $10.00 per quarter. All students registering for five hours or above pay

-29-







30 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

the full time fee of $115.00. Out-of-state fee for part-time students, is $14.00
per quarter hour. The out-of-state fee for full-time students is $200.00 per
quarter. Students who pay the part-time fee are not eligible for students' activities
or hospital privileges.

SPECIAL FEES
GRADUATION FEES:
Undergraduate Students .................................................................... $ 15.00
Graduate and Law Students ............................... ............................ 25.00
Art Fee (Per Course) ............................................................................ 3.00
Duplicate Registration Cards ........................................................... .50
HOME ECONOMICS FEES:
103 Principles of Art Fee ................................................................ $ 3.00
420 Craft D esign Fee ........................................................................ 3.00
Home Management Fee (Non-Residents Only) ............................ 85.00
All students enrolled in Home Economics 410 are required to spend six
weeks in the Home Management House. All city students who are required
to take this course must pay a room rent and board charge of $85.00 in
addition to the registration fee at the time of registration.
Late Registration Fee: Persons registering after the close of the designated
registration period will be required to pay a late registration fee of $5.00.
Music FEES: One (1) Per Week Two (2) Per Week
Piano Lessons $ 7.50 $15.00
Voice Lessons 7.50 15.00
Pipe Organ Lessons 10.00 20.00
String Instrument Lessons 7.50 15.00
Woodwind Lessons 7.50 15.00
Brasswind Lessons 7.50 15.00
Percussion Lessons 7.50 15.00
Music Rental Fee 2.00 2.00
NURSING FEES:
Uniform including cape
(Payable at registration, 1st Quarter, Sophomore year) ................ $87.00
Nursing School Pin (Payable 2nd quarter, Senior year) ................... 15.00
Jacksonville Unit Expenses ........................................ ........................
OTHER FEES:
ROTC Fee (per year) ......................................................................... $ 1.00
ROTC Uniform Deposit .................................................................... 20.00
Science Fee (per quarter, per lab course) ........................................ 3.00
Science Locker Key Deposit ................................................................ 1.00
Special Examination Fee ........................................................................ 1.00

"*Nursing students in the University Dormitory in Jacksonville, Florida will
pay the same fees as those in the Schedule of Fees for boarding students.







FINANCIAL INFORMATION 31

Transcript Fee ................................................... .................................... 1.00
Additional copies 50c each if multiple copies are requested)
Typewriting Fee (per course, per quarter) ......................................... 3.00

FEES FOR THE FIRST QUARTER, 1967-68
BOARDING STUDENTS
Registration Fee .......................... .............. ............................................... $115.00
Room Rent ............................................................................................ 80.00**
Laundry .................................................................................................... 14.00
B board ...................................................................................................... 119.00

Total Amount for the Entire Quarter .......................................... $328.00
Payment of Fees:
At Registration .............................................................. $262.00
Registration Fee ............................................ 115.00
Room Rent ..................................................... 80.00**
Laundry ...................................................... 14.00
Board, September and October ................ 53.00

Total .................................................. $262.00

November 1, 1967 ....................................................... $43.00
Board ......................... ...... ......................................... 43.00

December 1, 1967 ......................................................... $23.00
Board .... ................... o .... o .................................. 23.00-

T otal ....................................................................... $23.00
Out-of-State Tuition .............................................................................. $200.00

FEES FOR THE SECOND QUARTER, 1967-68
BOARDING STUDENTS
Registration Fee .............................................................................. $115.00
Room Rent .......................................................... .... ..................... 80.00**
Laundry .................................................................................................. 14.00
B board ....................................................................................................... 112.00

Total amount for the Entire Quarter ......................................... $321.00
NOTICE: All financial information in this catalog or bulletin is subject to
change without notice.

"**IMPORTANT: Room rent for air conditioned dormitories is $90.00 per
quarter.







32 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Payment of Fees:
At Registration .............................................................. $247.00
Registration Fee ........................................ $115.00
Room Rent ......................................................... 80.00**
Laundry .................................................... 14.00
Board ........................................................... 38.00

"Total ............................................. .............. $247.00
February 1, 1968 ........................................................... $43.00
Board ............................................................ $43.00

Total ...........................................................* $43.00
"March 1, 1968 ............................................................... $31.00
Board ............................................................ $31.00

Total ............................................................ $31.00



FEES FOR THE THIRD QUARTER, 1967-68
BOARDING STUDENTS
Registration Fee ...................................................................................... $115.00
Room Rent ............................................................................................ 80.00**
Laundry .................................................................................................. 14.00
B board ........................................................................................................ 108.00

Total amount for the Entire Quarter ............................................ 317.00
Payment of Fees:
At Registration .............. ..................................... $260.00
Registration Fee .......................................... $115.00
Room Rent ................................... ........... 80.00**
Laundry ................................................... 14.00
Board, March and April ............................ 51.00

Total .......................................................... $260.00
May 1, 1968 .................................................................. $57.00
Board, May and June ..................................... $57.00

Total .......................................................... $57.00
Out-of-State Tuition ........................... $200.00
NOTICE: All financial information in this catalog or bulletin is subject to
change without notice.

"**IMPORTANT: Room rent for air conditioned dormitories is $90.00 per
quarter.







FINANCIAL INFORMATION 33

FEES FOR THE FOURTH QUARTER, 1967-68
BOARDING STUDENTS
Registration Fee ......................................................................... $115.00
R oom R ent ... .................... ....................................................................... 80.00**
Laundry .............................................................................. ................... 14.00
B oard ............ ............................. .................. ..................................... 100.00

Total Amount for the Entire Quarter ............................................ $309.00
Payment of Fees:
A t R registration .............................................................. 309.00
Registration Fee ............................................ $115.00
Room Rent ................................................ 80.00**
Laundry ...................................................... 14.00
Board ........................................ ........... 100.00

T otal .................................................... $309.00
O ut-of-State T uition .............................................. .......................... $200.00


SUMMARY OF FEES
(FLORIDA RESIDENTS)
Total fees, including Room and Board, First Quarter ..................... $ 328.00*
Total fees, including Room and Board, Second Quarter .................... 321.00
Total fees, including Room and Board, Third Quarter ........................ 317.00
Total fees, including Room and Board, Fourth Quarter ..................... 309.00
Total fees, for City Students (Per Quarter) ........................................ 115.00

(OUT-OF-STATE)
Total fees, including Room and Board, First Quarter .................... $ 528.00*
Total fees, including Room and Board, Second Quarter ...................... 521.00*'
Total fees, including Room and Board, Third Quarter ........................ 517.00*
Total fees, including Room and Board, Fourth Quarter ...................... 509.00*
Total fees, for City Students (per quarter) .......................................... 315.00

NOTICE: All financial information in this catalog or bulletin is subject to
change without notice.
IMPORTANT: Information regarding "City Students," "Additional Fees Pay-
able at Registration," and "Part-Time Students," as previously stated under
First Quarter, also applies to Second Quarter.

"IMPORTANT: Room rent for Air Condition Halls will be $90.00 per
quarter. Room rent figures in this schedule are tentative and subject to
change.






34 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

SCIENCE LOCKER
This fee is charged those students enrolled in science courses requiring in
dividual locker assignments for the safe keeping of equipment and materials
This deposit is refundable at the cashier's office upon return of the locker keys

REFUNDS
BOARD REDUCTIONS
Boarding students must be absent from the campus or hospitalized more
than ten days before a board reduction will be granted. No reduction will b(
given for less than a ten day absence. For each day after the initial ten da3
period of absence an amount equal to board charges per day may be deducted
from the board for that month.
THE UNIVERSITY WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST
MEAL BOOKS NOR FOR MONEY FAILING TO ARRIVE ON TIME
FOR THEIR PURCHASE.

ROOM RENT AND LAUNDRY
First, ISecond and Third Quarters
No refund of room rent or laundry will be made after five (5) weeks
following the official opening date of the residence halls, for any one Quarter.
Up to five (5) weeks in residence, refunds will be made as follows: From one
to 16 days, 80%; 17 to 23 days, 60%; 24 to 30 days, 40%; and from 31 to
37 days, 20%.
IF THE STUDENT DOES NOT SURRENDER HIS LAUNDRY
CARD, NO REFUND OF THIS FEE WILL BE MADE.

I. D. CARDS
If the student does not surrender his I. D. Card, no refund of fees will
be made.
Students who have deliquent accounts with the University will be dropped
from school immediately, through the Office of Admissions and Records, if
these accounts are not paid.

Music FEES
There will be no refund on music lessons which are discontinued after the
last day for changing schedules unless judged an emergency by the Head of
the Music Department. Lessons missed due to illness or other valid causes are
to be made up before the end of the term.
THERE WILL BE NO REFUND IF SPECIAL FEES AFTER THE
LAST DAY TO REGISTER AS LISTED IN THE UNIVERSITY CAL-
ENDAR.
ANY STUDENT ENTITLED TO A ROOM DEPOSIT REFUND
WILL RECEIVE SAME UPON WRITTEN REQUEST 15 DAYS PRIOR
TO THE FIRST DAY OF REGISTRATION FOR THE QUARTER.







FINANCIAL INFORMATION 35

GENERAL REGULATIONS
Board Payments-All persons assigned rooms in the university dormitories
will be required to pay the monthly board charge, by the first day of the month.
Exemptions-A student exempted from any fees indicated above shall
not be entitled to any of the privileges which the payment of such fees gives.
REGISTRATION-EACH STUDENT MUST BE PREPARED TO
MAKE FULL PAYMENT OF FEES FOR EACH QUARTER. NO
STUDENT WILL BE PERMITTED TO REGISTER UNTIL ALL UN-
PAID UNIVERSITY ACCOUNTS AND FEES HAVE BEEN SATISFIED.
THIS INCLUDES DELINQUENT LOANS, LIBRARY FINES, HOSPI-
TAL BILLS, AND ANY OTHER CHARGABLE FEES.
STUDENTS WHO HAVE DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS WITH THE
UNIVERSITY WILL BE DROPPED FROM SCHOOL IMMEDIATELY
IF THESE ACCOUNTS ARE NOT SATISFIED.
THE INSTITUTION RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE THE
MONTHLY RATE FOR BOARD WHENEVER IT IS DEEMED NECES-
SARY.
WHEN A STUDENT HAS BEEN SUSPENDED BY THE UNIVER-
SITY HE WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REFUND OF THE
REGISTRATION FEE.
Cashier and Student Accounts Office Hours: 9:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m., Mon-
day' through Friday; 1:00 p.m.-4-00 p.m.
NO PERSONAL CHECKS WILL BE ACCEPTED AS PAYMENT
FOR STUDENT TRANSCRIPTS.


REFUND POLICY

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION AND REGISTRATION FEES
Refunds of out-of-state tuition and registration fees for students paying
full fees who do not complete the term for which enrolled on campus shall be
made as follows:
1. Full refund prior to the first day of classes.
2. Full refund less $30.00 of the registration fee from the first day of
classes through the last day to register for the quarter.
3. Commensurate refunds will be made to part-time students;
4. No refund after close of registration period for the quarter, except:
(a) Involuntary call to active military service
(full refund less $30.00)
(b) Death of student (full refund less $30.00)
NO REFUND OF FEES WILL BE MADE EXCEPT UNDER WRITTEN
APPLICATION.







GENERAL REGULATIONS REGARDING AND
AFFECTING THE PROGRAMS OF STUDIES
AND ADVANCEMENT

GENERAL STATEMENT
Students planning to enter the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Uni-
versity for the first time will be considered for admission, if:
1. The student has graduated from high school, earned sixteen units of
credit, and has made a satisfactory score on the Florida State-wide
High School Test.
2. The student is transferring from another college or university, has
cumulative average of "C" or above, and makes a satisfactory score on
a general ability test.
3. The student has graduated from an accredited college or university,
wishes to pursue work in the Graduate School, and has made a
satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examinations.
4. An application fee of $10.00 must accompany all first-time applications.
This fee is not refundable.

ADMISSION REGULATIONS
1, A student from an accredited Florida secondary school who
(a) has a satisfactory high school record, including a "C" average in all
academic subjects and
(b) attains a score on the Florida State-wide Twelfth Grade Testing Pro-
gram tests among the highest 40 per cent of the high school seniors
in the state is academically eligible to any of the State Universities
In so far as practicable, these students shall be given priority in admissions
and in the assignment of university housing over students with lower
scores. Prior to the availability of F.S.T.G.T.P. scores, the university
may admit students on the basis of scores on other tests judged to be
equivalent to those prescribed above, or on the basis of a "B" average
in all academic work completed in high school.
2 A student from an accredited Florida secondary school who is otherwise
eligible but whose score of the F.S.T.G.T.P. tests is below the top 40
per cent but above the lowest 40 per cent of the high school seniors may
be admitted if it is determined from all appropriate evidence that he can
be expected to do successful academic work in the institution to which he
applies.
3. A student from an accredited Florida secondary school who is otherwise
eligible but whose F.S.T.G.T.P. test score is among those attained by the
lowest 40 per cent of the high school seniors shall not be admitted unless
an appropriate faculty committee judges that he should have an opportunity
to demonstrate ability to do successful work in the college classroom.

-36-







GENERAL REGULATIONS 37

CREDIT FOR WORK DONE ELSEWHERE
Students transferring from other colleges with advance standing may have
substantially equivalent credit accepted in lieu of the courses required at
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University as follows:
1. Credit in which the student earned "C" or above will be accepted
for full value, if the institution is accredited by its regional accrediting
agency.
.2 Only work taken in an institution which is accredited by its State
Department of Education may be used for transfer credit.
3. All students must complete their last thirty semester hours in residence
at Florida A. and M. University.
4. The maximum allowance for work taken in Junior Colleges is two
years of credit (96 quarter hours). In addition, credit will not be
accepted for work taken in a Junior College after a student has earned
at least 96 hours in a Junior and/or Senior College.
5. Once matriculated at FAMU, a student may not pursue courses of any
type at another institution for transfer credit toward a degree from
FAMU without obtaining in advance of registration for such courses
written permission from the dean of the unit in which the student is
registered at FAMU. Work taken without such permission will not
be accepted by the University.
6. No grade below "C" will be accepted for transfer credit or will be
validated.
Deans or committees of their faculties will determine the acceptability of
transfer credit.

FILING CREDENTIALS
All applicants who expect to enter the Florida A. and M. University should
file all credentials as early as possible, preferably three months prior to the
beginning of the period of enrollment. Because of the unprecedented number
of students seeking admission to the University each year, it is advisable to
send all credentials early in order to be assured of acceptance.
All new students (freshman and transfer) must file application for ad-
mission. An application fee of $10.00 must accompany all first-time applications.
This fee is not refundable. Applications for new students will not be accepted
after August 1 for the first quarter, December 1 for the second quarter, February
1 for the third quarter, and May 1 for the fourth quarter.
Students who have previously attended the institution must file appli-
cation for readmission if they have remained out at least one quarter.

REGISTRATION
Registration dates are listed in this catalog in the calendar. Students are
responsible for complying with all regulations governing registration, change of
program, tuition payment, and other registration requirements described either






38 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

in this bulletin or advised by the administration otherwise. Every registrant must
arrange a class program in person with a faculty advisor at the time and place
designated.
Failure to file a complete program of study and pay all fees by the close
of the formal registration period will result in the assessment of a LATE
REGISTRATION FEE. No student will be permitted to register or pay fees
after "the last day to register" as listed in the calendar.
Registration is not considered complete until the student has submitted to
a complete health examination approved by the staff of the University Hospital
and Health Center.
The payment of all expenses and fees is a part of registration. A student
is not enrolled or registered until all necessary fees are paid. A student who
fills out his registration cards and/or attends classes, but does not pay required
fees, is not enrolled or registered in the university.
Registration is not complete until all cards are turned in to the Office of
Admissions and Records.

INFORMATION TO VETERANS
Any veteran who (A) served on active duty for a period of more than
180 days any part of which occurred after January 31, 1955, and who was
discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable or
(B) was discharged or released from active duty after such date for a service-
connected disability, is eligible to study under P.L. 358.
Veterans should plan to bring to the university on the day of registration
enough cash to last at least two and one-half months, as they are required to pay
their fees just as any other student enrolled at the University. In order to expedite
time in receiving subsistence allowed, veterans are advised to contact their
local Veterans Administration Office at the earliest possible date after discharge
to apply for educational benefits under the P.L. 358.
Under no circumstances should veterans contact the University to make
application for benefits.
Veterans are required by the Veterans Administration to attend classes
regularly. When a veteran is absent three days in any thirty-day period without
notice to the Office of Admissions and Records, the Veterans Administration
will be notified that the training period has been interrupted or discontinued.
The Veterans Administration will then discontinue the Veterans subsistence
allowance. Veterans' training conduct, and progress must at all times conform
to the University standards.
Veterans with less than 6 months service will not receive credit or be
exempted from Basic ROTC Training. Veterans who have served 6 to 12 months
may receive credit for Military Science I (1st Year-Basic Course). Veterans
who have served 12 months or more may receive credit for Military Science
I and II (1st and 2nd Year-Basic Course). All veterans, as applicable, will
present their statement of service and obtain an ROTC Exemption Certificate
from the Professor of Military Science upon initial enrollment.







GENERAL REGULATIONS 39

A student is not disqualified for enrollment because of receiving compen-
sation from the Veterans Administration for a temporary or limited physical
disability. Such student is eilgible for enrollment, if otherwise qualified, and to
receive concurrently compensation from Veterans Administration and allowances
authorized ROTC students.
P.L. 634, War Orphan Educational Assistance Act of 1956. This law
applies to those children whose father or step-father died or is disabled as a
result of a service connected disability. You should contact your local Veterans
Administration Office in order to make application to train under Public
Law. 634.
Physical Education. Veterans who have had basic training in the regular
Armed Service may receive credit for Physical Education as a required course.
Application must be made to the Director of Admissions and Records. Sufficient
evidence of having served in a branch of the service must be shown.

RECORD OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADING SYSTEM
The quality of work done by students is indicated by the letter of the
alphabet as follows: A grade of "A," exceptional; "B," superior; "C," average;
"D," passing but poor; "I," incomplete; "F," failure; "W," withdrawal;
"WP," passing at time of withdrawal; "WF," failing at time of withdrawal;
"P," passing.
A grade of "A" earns four grade points for each hour of credit; "B"
earns three grade points; "C" earns two grade points; "D" earns one grade
point; and, "F" earns no grade points.

UNIT OF CREDIT
The unit of university credit is the quarter hour. A quarter hour is the
amount of credit earned for the satisfactory completion of one hour a week
lecture or recitation or two hours a week laboratory practice throughout one
quarter. One quarter hour is equal in value to two-thirds of one semester hour.
ALL INCOMPLETE GRADES MUST BE REMOVED BY THE
CLOSE OF THE NEXT QUARTER IN WHICH THE STUDENT IS EN-
ROLLED OR THEY REVERT TO FAILURES.

PROBATION
Students who fail to earn a 2.00 grade point average for any quarter are
placed on academic probation and permitted to carry a limited load of twelve
quarter hours the following quarter. Those who fail to earn a "C" average
during the third quarter in which they are on probation are subject to suspension
at the close of that quarter.
All students who return to the University after having been dropped for
poor scholarship will be dropped permanently when they fail to earn a "C"
average for two consecutive quarters.
To remove probation status, a student must be enrolled in at least eleven
quarter hours each quarter.






40 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

A student on probation who withdraws within the last three weeks of the
quarter is not eligible for readmission during the following quarter.
A grade of "I" turned in for a student who is subject to suspension, will
be computed as an "F."

CLASS LOADS AND ATTENDANCE
The normal load for a regular student is shown in his particular curriculum
in the catalog or the program as outlined by the respective departments. The
normal load for a special student is fifteen quarter hours.
Students who make a "B" average during the previous quarter may make
application to take extra hours of work. Such applications should be made to
the Dean concerned.
No student may take less than 12 quarter hours of work without per-
mission of the Dean of the School.
Regular class attendance is considered a student obligation.
In order to remove probation status, students must carry at least eleven
hours per quarter.
Students are permitted without penalty the same number of absences
from a class as the number of quarter hours of credit that the course carries.
The instructor will keep a daily record of attendance in all classes and will
warn any student who has accumulated this number of unexcused absences.
One or two additional absences gives the teacher the right to drop the stu-
dent. However, when student has accumulated more than three, four, five, or
seven unexcused absences in a one-credit-hour, two-credit-hour, three-credit-
credit-hour, four-credit-hour or five-credit-hour course, respectively, he will
be automatically dropped from that course and assigned a grade of "F."
During any short term, such as a workshop, the number of unexcused
absences allowed will be one less than the number of quarter hours of the course.
Absences from class for cause (a) participation in recognized university
activities, (b) personal illness properly certified, or (c) emergencies caused by
circumstances over which the student has no immediate control-will be ex-
cused by the dean or director of the unit in which the student is enrolled.
Students are accountable for all work that is missed due to absences from
class, whether the absence is excused or not.

PROGRAM CHANGES
Changes in class programs may be made only with the consent of the
Dean of the School in which the student is registered. Changes in sections are
usually approved by Department Heads.
No changes in class programs may be made after the date stipulated in,
the calendar for making changes.
No course may be dropped without the written permission of the Dean
of the School. The time limit for dropping a course expires four weeks after
the opening of the quarter (See University Calendar).







GENERAL REGULATIONS 41

Students may transfer from one department to another or from one School
to another with the written approval of the Deans concerned.
All changes in programs must be reported to the Director of Admissions
and Records on forms provided by the Dean.
No student will receive credit for any course or courses for which he is
not properly registered, even though he attends class and a grade is reported
to the Director of Admissions and Records.

CURRICULUM CHANGES
In response to changes in education and in order to keep in line with
occasional changes in certification requirements, the curriculum of one or
several divisions or departments may change. But, such changes may extend
the normal time or former course requirements for a degree. A student who
has been in regular attendance and has taken and passed the prescribed program
of work each quarter may expect to obtain a degree in twelve quarters. Any
other student may be required to spend a longer period of time, and must
meet any added requirements introduced in the curriculum, including grade
point average required, total number of quarter hours required, etc.
The curriculum in the catalog of the year in which the student enters the
University is the one under which he normally should obtain his degree.

MAJOR AND MINOR FIELDS OF STUDY
Every student fulfilling the requiemrents for the degree of Bachelor of
Science or for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is required to earn a "major."
The "major" must meet the approval of the head of the department in which
it is earned. Subjects to be counted for the major must be approved by the
Department Head and the Dean of the School.

WITHDRAWAL
If a student wishes to withdraw at any time other than the end of a
term, a formal withdrawal, which is prerequisite to honorable dismissal or
re-entrance to the institution, must be executed. Such a withdrawal will be
approved only after a full investigation of the circumstances.
A student who desires to withdraw must report to the Associate Deans
in Charge of Men or Women and explain the circumstances. If the Personnel
Dean approves, the withdrawal card will be completed and signed by the
dean and student. The student must turn in identification card, laundry card
and meal book.
The person withdrawing must then present the card to the Business
Manager for his signature. Men students are, in addition required to secure
the signature of the Military Property Custodian. When the above signatures
have been placed on the Withdrawal Card, the card is then filed with the
Director of Admissions and Records. This procedure is to be followed by
the boarding and city students. No student will be permitted to file a with-
drawal notice within the last three weeks of the quarter without receiving
failing grades.






42 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Any student who withdraws from the University during the registration
or late registration period will receive no grades at the close of the quarter.
Those who officially withdraw after "the last day to register" but during the
first five weeks will receive "W" at the close of the quarter. Those who with-
draw during the sixth and seventh weeks will receive "WP" or "WF." A
grade of "F" for each course will be given to any student who withdraws with-
out filing a Withdrawal Card with the Director of Admissions and Records.
No refund is made for tuition fees, but refunds and adjustments may
be made on board and room rent paid in advance.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Undergraduate students, not enrolled as special students, are grouped in
four classes according to total credits in quarter hours on their record in the
Office of Admissions and Records as follows:
FRESHMEN-those having less than 45 quarter hours.
SOPHOMORES-those having 45 to 89 quarter hours, inclusive.
JUNIORs-those having 90 to 134 quarter hours, inclusive.
SENIORS-those having 135 or more quarter hours.
Graduate students, not enrolled as special students, are those who meet
the specific qualifications indicated in the Bulletin of the Graduate School
for admission to the department under guidance of which he intends to
study.
HONOR ROLL
Students who carry a quarter load of at least twelve quarter hours and
earn an average of 3.30 or more, will be placed on the Univesity Honor Roll.

GRADUATION INFORMATION
The University requires at least three quarters of residence for any degree
If the term of residence is only three quarters, that period must be the student's
senior year. This regulation can be satisfied by in-service teachers by their
attending summer school provided at least 45 quarter hours are earned in
this manner.
The following other conditions for graduation must be met: (1) all
college expenses must be adjusted; (2) the required number of quarter
hours must be earned in courses which are substantially equivalent to the
courses in the present curriculum in which the degree is granted; (3) the
student must have a cumulative average of "C" (2.00) in all work attempted.
(This means that in calculating grade points, hours for all failing grades on the
transcript must be counted).
Not more than one-fourth of the hours presented for graduation may
be earned in correspondence, workshops, clinics, institutes, extension courses,
or any combination of the same. All extension credits offered in fulfilling the
requirements for graduation must have been earned in work conducted by
a Florida institution.







GENERAL REGULATIONS 43

General and specific requirements for graduation from the professional
divisions (Law and Pharmacy) and the Graduate School are stated in detail
in the bulletins of these divisions.
Requirements for graduation will include moral and personal qualifi-
cations, as well as educational. Completion of the formal requirements in courses,
hours, grades, grade points, and the like, does not necessarily entitle a candidate
to a degree from the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. The
faculty will base its necessary recommendations on other considerations as
well; such as, character, ability, attainment, growth, and worthiness in general.

GRADUATION HONORS
Eligibility for graduation with honors by students of this institution requires
the completion of 180 quarter hours of work with cumulative averages as
listed below:
"With Greatest Distinction"-A general average of 3.70.
"With Greater Distinction"-A general average of 3.30.
"With Distinction"-A general average of 3.00.
Transfer students must earn a minimum of 60 semester hours at Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical University in order to be eligible for honors.
Eligible students who desire to have their distinction indicated on the
graduation program should make application for this to be inscribed at the
time application for graduation is made.

TEST SERVICE BUREAU
The Test Service Bureau contributes to the total educational program of
the University by rendering: (1) consultative service; (2) informational service;
(3) interpretative service; (4) test scoring service; and (5) interdepartmental
testing service.
As a part of the testing service, the Test Service Bureau participates in
the administration of several national and local testing programs. In coopera-
tion with Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, the Bureau
auministers the Graduate Record Examinations for the benefit of students
who must present resutls to graduate schools, agencies and foundations. The
National Teachers Examinations are also given for the benefit of those who
rrimst present scores as a part of their credentials for employment. Other agencies
assisted by the Test Service Bureau are the Psychological Cooperation of New
Sork, the National Association for Educational Sercetaries, Chicago, Illinois,
the Florida State Department of Education, and local schools. Dates for the
administration of some of the examinations will be found in the University
Calendar. Other dates will be announced during the year.

RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY
The University reserves the right to dismiss any student or students who
do not abide by the rules of the Board of Regents and the University.






INFORMATION ABOUT FLORIDA TEACHER

CERTIFICATE

The issuance of certificates to teach in the public schools of Florida is
the exclusive function of the State Department of Education and the sole
authority for exercising this function is vested in the State Superintendent of
Public Instruction.
Minimum qualifications and requirements for certification are compiled
and published by the State Department of Education. The administration of
the University has instructed all schools of the University that their programs
are to be organized and arranged so that any student, who wishes to do so,
moay satisfy the requirements for certification of the State Department of Edu-
cation. It should be understood that such arrangements be possible to achieve
without imparing the student's regular program of studies within the regularly
prescribed residence period, providing the student subscribes to all program
arrangements and other institutional requirements according to the regulations
of the University.
Listed in the table which follows are approved courses offered by the
University for prospective secondary teachers, which are designed to meet the
standard certification requirements in General and Professional Education.


TABLE
APPROVED LIST OF COURSES IN GENERAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
ACCORDING To TEACHER CERTIFICATION CATEGORIES
AND GRADE LEVELS OF TEACHING


Certification Certification Grade Level
Category Grades 7 -12 *Grades 1 12

I. General Preparation
(A minimum of 68
quarter hours required
with a minimum of
9 in each area)
A. Arts of Communi-
cation: Eng. 101,
102, 103, and
201', or Speech Eng. 101, 102, 103 and
103 Eng. 201 or Speech 103 SAME
B. Human Adjust- Activity Physical Educa-
ment tion-6 qtr. hrs.
Psy. 211 and 212, General
Psy.-6 qtr. hrs. SAME

---44-








FLORIDA CERTIFICATION 45

C. Biological and Bio. 100, 110 or 120
Physical Sciences Science 100
and Mathematics Mathematics 101-102;
(Credit must be 103-104 SAME
distributed over
at least two
fields)

D. Social Studies History 100, American
History; P.S. 200, U. S.
Government; Geography
101,Principles of Geogra- SAME
phy; Geography 200, Re-
source Use Ed.

E. Humanities and Eng. 204, World Litera-
Applied Art ture-Humanitie 300
(Credit must be Art 200, Art Appreciation
earned in each H.E. 420, Craft Design SAME
area) Art 305, Ceramics
B.A. 101, Typewriting

II. Professional Prepara- Ed. 310, Social Founda-
tion tions of Education-3
A. Foundations of qtr. hrs.
Education Ed. 313, History and Phi-
9 quarter hours losophy of Education-
3 qtr. hrs.
Psy. 302, Human Growth A M E
and Development-3
qtr. hrs.
Psy. 320, Educational Psy-
chology (Required)-3
qtr. hrs.

B. Curriculum and Ed. 307, Secondary School Ed. 301, Theory and Prac-
Instruction Program-3 qtr. hrs. tice Teaching in Ele-
9 qtr. hrs. (Prerequisites: Psy. 302 mentary School-3 qtr.
and Psy. 320) hrs.
Ed. 308, Teaching in the Ed. 302, Theory and Prac-
Secondary School tice Teaching in Ele-
3 qtr. hrs. (Prerequisite: mentary School-3 qtr.
Ed. 307 or 301 and hrs.
302) Ed. 307, Secondary School
Ed. 312, Measurement Program-3 qtr. hrs.
and Evaluation of Edu- Ed. 308, Teaching in the
national Growth-3 qtr. Secondary School 3
hrs. qtr. hrs.
Optional
Ed. 312, Measurement
and Evaluation of Edu-
cational Growth 3
qtr. hrs.







46 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Certification Certification Grade Level
Category Grades 7 -12 *Grades 1 -12
C. Special Methods Special Methods in Area Six (6) quarter hours of
3 quarter hours of Specialization-3 qtr. Methods of Teaching
or hrs. the Subject or Field,
6 quarter hours with 3 quarter hours
each covering elemen-
tary and secondary levels
for the following fields:
(1) Art
(2) Music
(3) Physical Education

D. Practical Exper- Student Teaching Student Teaching
ience -15 qtr. hrs. -15 qtr. hrs.
9 quarter hours

III. Specialization See Chairman of Department of Major Field

"*Prospective Candidates In Art, Music, Physical Education And Library
Science Must Satisfy Requirements Indicated For Grades 1-12.


INFORMATION ABOUT CERTIFICATION
Graduate Certificate (Rank III)-The Graduate Certificate is Florida's basic
teaching credential. It is valid for five (5) years and may be extended.
Post Graduate Certificate (Rank II)-The Post Graduate Certificate, Rank II
is valid for ten (10) years and may be extended: It may be issued to an
applicant who meets the following requirements:
1. Holds a *Master's degree awarded by an institution approved or
accredited by a regional accrediting agency. The National Council of
Accreditation of Teacher Education, or The National Association of
Schools of Music (for music only); or hold the Bachelor of Science
in Library Science degree which requires a Bachelor's degree as a
prerequisite.
2. Has met fully the requirements for the Graduate Certificate.
3. Has completed at least eighteen (18) quarter hours in any subject
area to be placed on the Rank II certificate, above the minimum
requirements for the Graduate Certificate, Rank III.
Junior College Academic-This type of certification is needed for academic
teachers, administrators, counselors, deans, and supervisors of the Junior College
program.
Plan 1. The applicant must:
a. Meet the requirements for a Post Graduate Certificate or an
Advanced Post Graduate Certificate in one or more secondary
school subjects.







FLORIDA CERTIFICATION 47

b. Have at least 18 quarter hours of graduate work in the secon-
dary school subject.
Plan 2. The applicant must:
a. Hold a Master's degree or higher from an accredited insti-
tution.
b. Present credit in educational psychology, sociology (educa-
tional or community), and curriculum dealing with the junior
college totaling at least 15 quarter hours.
c. Present an internship carrying credits of at least 9 quarter
hours, or present three years of successful teaching experience.
d. Present 45 quarter hours in the subject area in which certi-
fication is sought, with at least 2 quarter hours at the graduate
level.
NOTE: Certification at the junior college is not given in the broad fields of
Science and Social Studies but is given in the separate subjects.


FORMAL OFFICIAL ADMISSION REQUIRED To ALL
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Acceptance for admission to the University is not tantamount to accep-
tance for admission to teacher education. Students, therefore, who plan to
teach are required to apply for official admission to teacher education pro-
grams during the quarter in which they are accumulating the first ninety
quarter hours of prescribed credit.
Holders of the Associate of Arts degree from junior colleges and other
transfer students, who have earned, at least ninety quarter hours, should
apply for official admission to a teacher education program, during the second
week of their first quarter in residence.
Prospective elementary and secondary school teachers may enroll in
teacher education programs within the following Schools and Colleges: Edu-
cation, Arts and Sciences, Agriculture and Home Economics. All students
entering the University who plan to teach are advised to consult the sections
of this catalogue which pertain to the policies and procedures governing all
teacher education curricula.






SCHOOL AND DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS

OF STUDY AND COURSE OUTLINES

ALL SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY

INSTITUTIONAL UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Program leading to the degree Bachelor of Arts are offered in some
departments of the College of Arts and Sciences.
A. ENGLISH. One year of grammar and composition. Required in the
Freshman year.
B. HUMANITIES. 1. Humanities I, II, III, and
2. Nine quarter hours chosen from any of the following:
a. Art or Music
b. Philosophy
c. Religion
d. Literature
C. FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Two years of some one modern foreign language.
D. SCIENCE. One year of science and one year of mathematics.
E. SOCIAL SCIENCE. Six quarter courses, not more than three in any
one department. Courses may be chosen from any of these departments:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Government, History, Political Sci-
ence, or Sociology.
F. MAJOR SEQUENCE. A minimum of 36 quarter hours in one department.
G. MINOR SEQUENCE. (Cognates)1 A minimum of 27 quarter hours in
some departments) other than that in which the major sequence is done..
H. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Activity). Six quarter courses. Required
of Freshmen and Sophomores.
I. ROTC or ELECTIVE.2 Two years of ROTC (Freshman and Sopho-
more men) or six quarter hours of electives (women and ROTC exempt
men).
J. FREE ELECTIVES.3 To make a total of at least 180 quarter hours

BASIC CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE
BACHELOR OF ARTS
FRESHMEN
IST. QR. 2ND. QR 3RD. QR
Composition (Eng. 101-2-3) .......................................... 3 3 3
M them atics ..................................... ..................... 3 3 3
-48-







DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 49

Foreign Language ...................................... .. ................ 3 3 3
R O T C .............................................................................. 1 1 1
Physical Education (Elective) ........................................ 1 1 1
N natural Science ................................................................ 3(5) 4(5) 4(0)
SOPHOMORES
Social Science ........... ............. ............................................ 3 3 3
Electives ...... ........................ ........................................ 6-7 6-7 6-7
Foreign Language ................ ........................ ................ 3 3 3
H um anities ............................................................................. 3 3 3
ROTC or Elective ......................... ............ .......... 1 1 1
Physical Education ................................ ........................... 1 1 1

JUNIORS
H um anities ........................................................................ 3 3 3
Electives ............................................................................ 9 9 9
Social Science .................................................. 3 3 3
SENIORS
E lectives .......................................................................... 15 15 15
No division or department should approve programs with credit-hours or
course loads in excess of the maximum indicated in the curriculum above
without approval of the Dean.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
Programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered by all
schools of the University.
A. ENGLISH. One year of grammar and composition. Required in Freshman
year.
B. HUMANITIES. A minimum of six quarter hours. Optional.
C. FOREIGN LANGUAGE. (A division or department may require a
foreign language as a cognate if it so desires).
D. SCIENCE. 1 One course in introductory biological science.'
2. One course in introductory physical science.'
3. Nine quarter hours in mathematics.
E. SOCIAL SCIENCE. Three quarter courses in one department or one
quarter course in each of any two of the following: Anthropology, Eco-
nomics, Geography, History, Political Science, or Sociology.
F. MAJOR SEQUENCE. A minimum of 36 quarter hours in some one di-
vision or department.
G. MINOR SEQUENCE. (Cognates) A minimum of 36 quarter hours to
be elected in consultation with an authorized representative of the division






50 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

or department in which the major sequence is done.
H. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Activity). Six quarter courses. Required of
Freshmen and Sophomores.
I. ROTC or ELECTIVES." Two years of ROTC (Freshman and Sophomore
men) or six quarter hours of electives (women and men exempt from
ROTC).
J. FREE ELECTIVES.3 To make a total of at least 180 quarter hours.

BASIC CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
FRESHMEN
C om position ...................................................................... 3 3 3
M them atics ........ ..... ............ ......... .............................. 3 3 3
N natural Science ..... ......... ...... ....... ............. .. ............. 4 (5) 4 ( 5) 4 (0)
ROTC or Elective ................ ................ ....................... 1 1 1
Health and Physical Education ....................................... 1 1 1
Electives ........................................... .......................... 3 3 3
SOPHOMORES
H um anities ....................................................................... 3 3 3
Social Science .................................................................. 3 3 3
Electives (2) .................................................................. 6-7 6-7 6-7
ROTC or Elective .......................................................... 1 1 1
Physical Education ................................. ......................... 1 1 1
JUNIORS
E lectives ................................................................... 15 15 15
SENIORS
E lectives ........................................................................... 15 15 15
No school or department should approve programs with credit-hours or
course loads in excess of the maximum indicated in the curriculum above
without approval of the Dean.


\. This includes courses in departments that are related or complementary to
the major field or course that anticipate some requirement for employment
or for advanced work in the major field.
"2. All Freshman and Sophomore men will be required to enroll in Military Science
Courses or obtain an appropriate Exemption Certificate from the Professor
of Military Science.
"s. Electives in this instance cannot be counted toward satisfying the course or
hour requirements for the major or minor sequence.
*. No Freshman will be permitted to continue a course during the second or
third quarter for which he fails a prerequisite in the first or second quarter.














CUR-
RICULUMS






COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS







SCHOOL OF

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS

The School of Agriculture and Home Economics offers programs of
study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the fields of Agriculture
and Home Economics. In the philosophy of the land-grant college it seeks
to serve the educational needs of a wide range of students. Flexibility is
provided in the programs offered to meet the needs of individual students.
The curriculum in Agriculture and Home Economics provides for broad
training in general education, including the humanities, the social sciences,
and the basic sciences during the freshman and sophomore years. The junior
and senior years are largely devoted to study in the student's area of speciali-
zation.
All undergraduate programs in the School of Agriculture and Home
Economics cover a period of four years and lead to the Degree of Bachelor of
Science. Graduate study programs leading to the Master of Education Degree
in Agricultural Education, and in Home Economics Education are offered through
the graduate school. Shorter non-degree programs designed for specific groups
are also available.

PURPOSE
The programs of study offered in agriculture and home economics are
organized to achieve the following general objectives.
1. To help the student develop to his maximum capacity as an educated
person by providing opportunities for a broad general education.
2. To provide the technical education required for successful careers
in agriculture and related occupations where advanced skills and know-
ledge will aid students to become competent in their chosen areas
of work.
3. To provide a sound educational program for students interested in
home economics as individuals, as homemakers, and as professional
workers.
4. To prepare students for prospective positions in the teaching of
vocational agriculture, and vocational home economics in the secon-
dary schools of Florida.
5. To prepare students for prospective employment in state, federal,
and private agricultural organizations and agencies.
6. To provide leadership and counsel for adult rural people, and to
assist them to full realization of the benefits of American Society.


ORGANIZATION
For administrative purposes the School of Agriculture and Home Economics
is organized into the following departments: Department of Animal Science

-52-







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 53

and Business, Department of Earth and Plant Sciences, Department of Home
Economics. The curriculum and the administering department are shown below:

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Curriculums Administrative Departments
Agricultural Education ............................................ Animal Science and Business
Agricultural Economics ............................................ Animal Science and Business
Animal Science ......................................... ......... Animal Science and Business
Soil Science ...................... .................. ...................... Earth and Plant Sciences
Horticulture ..................................... ......................... Earth and Plant Sciences
Home Economics Education .................................................... Home Economics
Clothing and Retailing .............................................................. Home Economics
Foods, Nutrition and Institution Management ........................ Home Economics

NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bacteriology .............................................................. Animal Science and Business
Botany .......................................................................... Earth and Plant Sciences
Earth Science .......................................... ................ .. Earth and Plant Sciences
Entomology .......................................................... Animal Science and Business
Iarm Mechanics .................................................... Animal Science and Business
Genetics .................................................................... Animal Science and Business
Pre-Veterinary Medicine ........................................ Animal Science and Business
Satisfactory completion of one of the programs shown above according to
the regulations of the University entitles the student to recommendation by the
department concerned for the Bachelor of Science degree. Degrees are con-
ferred and diplomas are issued at the regular commencement periods.

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
The School of Agriculture and Home Economics has the facilities and
equipment needed to support the educational programs and objectives set
forth above. The equipment and facilities are constantly being added to in
order to keep the latest developments on hand for use and instruction of
students.
The Perry-Paige Building, recently constructed, is modern in every respect
and provides adequate space for the modern classrooms and laboratories re-
quired. The demonstration farm of approximately two hundred seventy-five
(275) acres provides outdoor laboratories and field plots for practical in-
struction in the production of livestock and crops.

LABORATORY WORK AND FIELD TRIPS
Formal instruction in the laboratory is required for most courses in
Agriculture. The primary pupose of such wok is to make it possible for
sttidents to apply theoretical concepts to practical situations. In addition to
laboratory instruction on the campus, field trips are arranged so that students






54 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

may have the opportunity to visit and study public and commercial enterprises
in the state. Exercises of this sort provide a source of both practical and
technical information of considerable value to the student. Field trips are
organized and conducted under the supervision of the department and instructor
concerned.


CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS, SHORTCOURSES
AND INSTITUTES
The School of Agriculture and Home Economics seeks to provide a
variety of special services needed by farmers, housewives, education, business,
professional, and civic agencies of the state. Each summer, and at other periods
during the year, it conducts conferences, workshops, and shortcourses designed
to meet the needs of these groups.

FARMERS AND HOMEMAKERS CONFERENCE
This conference is sponsored jointly by the University, farmers of the
state and other state agricultural agencies. Its purpose is to assist farmers and
homemakers by keeping them up to date with new developments in the
field of Agriculture and Home Economics. This conference is held during the
fall quarter at the University each year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Students entering as freshmen who desire to pursue study in Agriculture
or Home Economics are admitted under the general admission policies of the
University. These requirements are shown elsewhere in the bulletin. On
being admitted the student should make known his area of interest, after
which an adviser will be assigned to help plan his program and make the
necessary adjustments to university life.
Students transferring from other institutions are admitted under the general
regulations which apply to all transfer students. Acceptance of transfer credits
will depend upon an evaluation of the student's transcript. Only such credits as
may be used to satisfy the requirements of the curriculum in which the student
desires to enroll will be accepted toward graduation.

SELECTION OF A MAJOR FIELD
The Basic Agricultural Curriculum covers the freshman and sophomore
years and applies to all students who enroll in agriculture. Students are re-
quired to choose a major field of study from those available prior to the be-
ginning of the junior year. When the selection of major has been made in
writing, he will be assigned an adviser and a program of study for the junior
and senior years worked out to meet graduation requirements. Changes in the
program of study must carry the approval of the department head concerned,
and the dean.







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 55

The minimum quarter hours required for a major in Agriculture is 204.
Approximately 100 quarter hours should be taken during the freshman and
sophomore years. The sequence of courses for the first two years is shown in
the schedule for the Basic Curriculum in Agriculture. Schedule for the
junior and senior years are shown in the curriculum for each major.
Students enrolling in the Department of Home Economics should declare
their preference of a major on entering as freshmen. Faculty advisers are then
assigned to assist the students in planning their program according to the
major selected.
The minimum quarter hour requirement for graduation in home economics
is shown in the schedules according to each major option.

THE CURRICULUM FOR AGRICULTURE
All students registering at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
and studying for the degree, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, will include
in their program of study the following minimum course requirements. The
program for the freshman and sophomore years is the same for all students
and is shown in the schedule for the basic curriculum for agriculture. Require-
ments for the junior and senior years are shown in the schedules for the
different curricula. The sequence and selection of courses are indicated in
the schedules for each major option. A minimum of 202 quarter hours is
required for graduation, of which 98 quarter hours should be taken during
the freshman and sophomore years.
Freshman Junior Total
Subject Area and Courses Sophomore Senior Credits
Communications Eng. 101, 102, 103; Sp. 103 12
(Journalism, Public Speaking) 6 18
Mathematics Math. 105, 106, 107 9
(Statistics Ag. Econ. 300) 3 12
Biological Science Biol. 105, Botany 106 8
(Entomology, Genetics, Biology, Botany) 11 21
Humanities Hum. 201, Eng. 203 6
(Art 301) 3 9
Physical Science Chem. 101, 104, 105 12
(Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science) 8 20
Social Science Geog. 101, Hist. 100, P.S. 200, Soc. 200 12
6 18
Human Adjustment Psy. 210-211, Physical Education 12 12
Military Science M.S. 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203 6 6
Agriculture-Major Field 3 39 42
Supporting Courses 15 21 36
Electives 3 7 10
Non-Credit Ag. Ed. 99 A B C
Total Credits in Quarter Hours 98 104 202
BASIC CURRICULUM FOR AGRICULTURE
The basic agricultural curriculum contains the courses required during
the freshman and sophomore years in all curicula in agriculture. The schedules
below serve as a guide which students should follow as closely as possible.






56 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

FRESHMAN YEAR
Quarter and
Credit Hours
I II III
Botany 106 Elementary Botany ..................... ................. 4
Eng. 101, 102, 103 Communications ....................................... 3 3 3
Math. 105, 106, 107 Algebra and Trigonometry ............................ 3 3 3
Biol. 105 Zoology ........................................... ....... ...................... 4
Sp. 103 Foundations of Speech ................................................... 3
H ist. 100 U .S. H history ....................... .................................... ....... 3
A agriculture* .................................................. ........................... 3 3 3
M.S. 101, 102, 103 Military Science .......................................... 1 1 1
P.E. 101, 102 Elective ................................................ ...... 1 2 1
Ag Ed. 99 A B C Orientation in Agriculture ....................... R R R

15 16 17
SOPHOMORE YEAR
H um 201 H um anities ............... ........................ ...... ..... 3
Chem 101 General Chemistry ......................................................... 4
Chem. 104, 105 Qualitative Analysis .............................................. 4 4
Psy. 210-211 General Psychology ................. .............. ........... 3 3
Soc. 200 Introduction to Sociology .............................................. 3
P.S. 200 American National Government ...................................... 3
Geog. 101 World Geography .......................................................... 3
Eng. 203 W orld Literature ........................................ ....................... 3
Agriculture* .......... ................................. o...........***..... .... ........... ........ 3 3 3
M.S. 201, 202, 203 Military Science .......................................... 1 1 1
P.E. Elective Activity .. ................................................................ 2
Electives .................... ...................... .......... .............. ................. 3

17 17 16
*Eighteen quarter hours in agriculture required during the freshman and sopho-
more years are as follows: Agron. 101, Agr. Ec. 200, A.S. 101, 102, A.M. 200,
Hort. 200.

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE AND BUSINESS
The Department of Animal Science and Business is designed to prepare
students for employment in various areas of Agriculture and related fields.
The department offers three major curricula, namely: Agricultural Economics,
Agricultural Education, and Animal Science. Each curriculum is designed to
give the student sufficient training in humanities, social science, biological
and physical science, and his major area of concentration to meet the present
and future requirements for educators in these areas.
The department also offers courses in Entomology and Agricultural Me-
chanics which serve as service or supporting courses for students in agriculture
and other areas of the university.
Pre-veterinarian students may meet the requirements to enter Veterinary
Medicine by either of the following methods.
1. Meet the minimum requirements by completing the curriculum for
the freshman and sophomore years plus twelve quarter hours of Physics.
2. Completing the regular four year program in Animal Science plus four







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 57

quarter hours of Physics. Upon completion of this program, the student
will graduate from Florida A. and M. University with a bachelor's
degree in Animal Science.

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
The agricultural economics program is offered for students interested in
becoming educated as agricultural economist for prospective employment in
public agencies and private business organizations. The program also prepares
students for post-graduate study in specialized areas of agricultural economics,
and also for teaching on the college level.
Students who enroll in this option should take the basic economic courses
during the sophomore year.
A minimum of 204 quarter hours are required for the Bachelor of Science
degree in Agricultural Economics.

CORE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
Ag. Ec. 300 Introduction to Statistics ............................................ 3
B.A. 211-212 Principles of Accounting ........................................... 3 3
Ag. Ec. 301 Farm Records and Accounting .................................. 3
Ag. Ec. 302 Farm Management .................................................. 3
Ag. Ec. 303 Marketing Agr. Products .................................... ........ 3
Ag. Ec. 305 Land Economics ....................................... 3
Ag. Ec. 306 Agricultural Finance ................................................ 3
Agron. 301 The Nature & Properties of Soils ................................ 4
Ag. Ec. 304 Agricultural Prices ..................................... ............... 3
Electives, Social Science .......................................................... 3 3
SENIOR YEAR
I II III
Ag. Ec. 401 Agricultural Statistics ........................................... 3
Ag. Ec. 402 Agricultural Cooperation ............................................ 3
Ag. Ec. 403 Farm Business Analysis ............................................. 3
Agron. 403 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers .......................................... 3
Ag. Ec. 404 Agricultural Policy ..................................................... 3
Ag. Ec. 410 Special Problems in Ag. Econ. .................................. 3
Ec. 401 Money and Banking ........................................... ......... 3
Electives .............................................................................. ..... 3-4 3
In addition to the courses listed in the schedules, students majoring in
agricultural economics must complete the following courses to satisfy graduation
requirements:
All students majoring in agricultural economics should take Economics 201
202 during the sophomore year.
Ec. 201-201 Principles of Economics
Sp. 201 Public Speaking
Bact. 212 General Bacteriology







58 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Biol. 302 Molecular Biology and Genetics
Art 301 Art History I
Ent. 305 Economic Entomology
Jour. 400 Technical Writing
B.A. 401 Business Law
Botany 404 Plant Pathology
Ec. 405 Labor Relations and Problems
A.S. 406 Animal Nutrition

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
The curriculum in agricultural education is designed to prepare undergrad-
uate students for careers as teachers of vocational agriculture, for positions
in agricultural business, industry, and in agricultural agencies of the State and
Federal Government. Students who complete this program are also prepared
for graduate study in Agricultural Education.
A minimum of 204 quarter hours are required for the B.S. degree in
Agricultural Education. The teacher education program is administered in
cooperation with the School of Education.
CORE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
Sp. 201 Fundamentals of -Public Speaking ...................................... 3
Jour. 302 News Reporting ............................................................... 3
Ed. 307 The Secondary School Program ........................................ 3
Ed. 310 Social Foundations of Education ..................................... 3
Phy. 201 General Physics ............................................................... 4
Ag. Ed. 301 Vocational Education .................................................. 3
Ag. Ed. 304 General Methods of Teaching
Vocational Agriculture ..... .......... **...................... .................. 3
Psy. 301 Human Growth and Development .................................. 3
Psy. 320 Educational Psychology .................................................... 3
Art. 301 H history of Art ............................................ ............ 3
E lectives ..................................,.... ............ ............................ 3 3
SFNIOR YEAR
I II III
Ag. Ed. 400 Methods of Teaching Agricultural Mechanics ........ 3
Ag. Ed. 402 Adult and Yourig Farmers Classes .............................. 3
Ag. Ed. 404 Organization of Vocatioiial Agriculture Programs .... 3
I.A. 308 or I.A. 310 Art Metal ...... ........... ..................... 3
Ed. .308 Teaching in the Secondary Schools .................................. 3
Ed. 312 Measurement and Evaluation of Educational Growth .... 3
Ed. 495 Directed Observation and Participation in Secondary Ed. 3
Ag. Ed. 405 Student Teaching of Voc. Agr. ................................. 9
E lectives .............................. ............................ ........................ 3 3
In addition to the courses listed in the above schedules, students majoring
in Agricultural Education are required to complete the following courses:
Hort. 300 General Forestry
Hort. 303 Landscape Plants







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 59

Hort. 401 Landscape Design
Ag. Ec. 302 Farm Management
Agron. 301 Nature and Properties of Soil
Agron. 495 Principles of Geology
A.S. 402 Poultry Management
Ent. 305 Economic Entomology
A.M. 201 Agricultural Mechanics
A.M. 202 Farm Engines, Tractors, and Machinery
Recommended electives: Hort. 201, 204, 301, 302, 402, 404; A.M. 401,
402; Agron. 306, 402; A.S. 308, 309.

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE
The curriculum in the Animal Science Program is offered for students
who are interested in preparing themselves for various positions in the animal
industry. These include such positions as herd managers, meat and poultry
inspectors, extension service and feed consultants. It also prepares students for
employment in Agricultural Agencies of the State and Federal Government.
Students who complete this program are also prepared to do graduate study
in specialized areas of Animal Science.
A minimum of 204 quarter hours are required for the Bachelor of Science
degree in Animal Science.
CORE CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE
JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
Ag. Ec. 302 Farm Management ...................................................... 3
Eng. 201 Public Speaking ................................................ ................ 3
Jour. 400 Technical Writing for Non-English Majors ................ 3
Ag. Ec. 300 Introduction to Statistics ............................................ 3
A.S. 302 Beef Cattle Production .................................................... 3
A. S. 303 Swine Production ..................................................... 3
Phy. 201 General Physics ........................................ ................... 4
Electives ..................................... ............ ........................................ 3

SENIOR YEAR
I II III
Phy. 202 General Physics ............................................................. 4
A.S. 305 Feeds and Feeding ...................................... .................. 3
A.S. 308 Collegiate Livestock Judging ............................................ 3
A.S. 409 Sem niar ..................... .................. ....... ...................... 3
Electives ............................................................................................ 3
In addition to the courses listed above, a student will be required to com-
plete the following courses.
Chem. 301 Organic Chemistry ......................................................... 4
Bact. 210 General Bacteriology ..................................................... 5
Ent. 305 Economic Entomology .................................................... 3
Ed. 313 History of Education .......................................................... .3
Soc. 410 Sociology ............................................... ........ ..................... 3
A.S. 300 Poultry Production ............................................................. 3
A.S. 301 Dairy Herd Operation and Milk Production .................... 3







60 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

A .S. 304 M eats ................................................................................. 3
A.S. 306 Advanced Poultry Production ........................................ 3
A.S. 406 Animal N nutrition ................................................................ 3
Gen. 401 Animal Breeding ............................................................. 3
A .S. 409 Sem inar .............................................................................. 3
A.S. 410 Psysiology of Domestic Animals ........................................ 3
A.M. 201 Farm Mechanics ....................** ........................***......... 3
Chem 403 Biochem istry ....................................................... 4
H ort. 300 G general Forestry ............................................ .. ............. 3
A.S. 407 Animal Sanitation and Disease Control ............................ 3
Ag. Ec. 401 Agricultural Statistics ............................................... 3
Chem. 302 Organic Chemistry ........................................................ 4
Students who plan to enter Veterinary Medicine are required to take
Physics 203.
Recommended electives: Ag. Ec. 301, 306, A.S. 309, 402.

CURRICULUM IN EARTH AND PLANT SCIENCES
The Department of Earth and Plant Sciences offers a major in both Soil
Science and Horticulture. All students are required to take the basic courses
during the first two years of enrollment. At the beginning of the junior year,
students electing to major in either Soil Science or Horticulture in consultation
with their advisors are expected to begin taking courses in their major area of
interest.
The curriculum in Soil Science is designed to accomplish the following
objectives:
1. To provide the student with a knowledge of the important physical,
chemical, and biological properties of soils. This knowledge is essential
for success in all areas of agriculture.
2. To help the student relate his knowledge of soils to the production
of plants.
3. To prepare students for responsible positions in all phases of agri-
culture.
5. Since a knowledge of soils is becoming increasingly important in many
fields, to provide a program of study for students in non-agricultural
disciplines.
SOIL SCIENCE
JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
igron. 301 Nature and Properties of Soil ...................................... 4
Chem. 301 Organic Chemistry .................................................... 4
Psy. 302 Human Growth and Development .................................. 3
Art. 301 Art History: Ancient and Early Medieval ........................ 3
Ent. 304 Introduction to Entomology ........................................... 4
Jour. 302 News Reporting and Journalisting Writing .................... 3
Agron. 303 Soil Morphology and Classification .............................. 3
Agron. 305 Pastures ......................................................................... 3
Agron. 306 Soil Conservation and Erosion Control ....................... 3
F lective ......................................................... ......... ................. 3








SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 61

SENIOR YEAR
Agron. 401 Soil and Plant Analysis .................................................. 3
Agron. 403 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers ........................................ 3
Botany 404 Plant Pathology ...................................................... 4
Elective in Sociology ........................................................................ 3
Genetics 411 Plant Breeding ............................................................ 3
Agron. 412 Soil Survey ....................... ......................................... 3
Agron. 490 Techniques of Research .............................................. 3
E. Sci. 495 Earth Science ................................................................ 3
E. Sci. 496 Physical Geology ................ ................. ............ 3
Botany 409 Plant Physiology ............................................................ 4
E lectives ............................................................................................ 3 3
In addition to the above scheduled courses the student must complete
the courses listed below:
Sp. 201 Public Speaking
Phys. 201 General Physics
Bact. 212 General Bacteriology
Ag. Ec. 300 Introduction to Statistics
Ag. Ec. 302 Agricultural Economics
Ag. Sci. 305 Applied Livestock Feeding and Nutrition
Genetics 308 Introduction to Genetics
Ed. 313 History and Philosophy of Education
Agron. 402 Soil Management
Agron 407 Plant Ecology
E. Sci. 494 Elements of Earth and Plant Science

HORTICULTURE
Horticulture is a specialized plant science that deals with the various
problems related to the production of plants for economic and aesthetic uses.
Fruit, vegetable and ornamental crops are included.
There is a continuous demand for graduates to operate fruit and vegetable
farms and nurseries of landscape plants. Unusual opportunities are developing
for graduates interested in becoming landscape-nurserymen, managers of garden
supply centers, or operators of landscape development and maintenance firms.
Graduates are prepared for superintendency of parks and other public gardens.
Chemical companies, fertilizer manufacturers and other industries hire horti-
culturists as sales representatives and research workers.
Horticulture majors may elect an option in either Ornamental Horticulture
or General Horticulture. The programs in horticulture are designed to achieve
the following objectives:
1. Train students in the scientific concepts on which horticulture is
based.
2. To involve students with the techniques of producing, processing and
marketing of horticultural crops.
3. Provide students with the basic concepts of landscape design and
the identification and use of ornamental plants.
4. Prepare students for responsible positions in various areas of horti-
cultural production.
5. Prepare students for advanced study and career positions in horticulture.
6. Prepare students for business opportunities in horticulture.







62 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

OPTION I-ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
Agron. 301 Nature and Properties of Soils ...................................... 4
IHort. 300 General Forestry ...........................3..........................****** 3..
Hort. 301 Fruit Production ...................................................... 3
Hort. 302 Vegetable Production ..................................................... 3
Short. 303 Landscape Plants I ............................................ .......... 3
Ag. Ec. 300 Introduction to Statistics ............................................ 3
Ent. 304 Introduction to Entomology .................. .................. 4
Ent. 305 Economic Entomology .................................................... 3
Genetics 308 Introduction to Genetics ..........................*.............. 3
Chem. 301 Organic Chemistry ........................................................ 4
Phys. 201 General Physics ................................................................ 4
E elective ........................................... .............................................. 3-4
SENIOR YEAR
F&L 401 Landscape Design I .................................... ......... ........ 3
Agron. 403 Fertilizer and Soil Fertility .......................................... 3
Botany 404 Plant Pathology ..................................... 4
Botany 409 Plant Physiology ............................................. ........ 4
Short. 402 Landscape Engineering .................................................. 3
Hort. 404 Turf Management .............................. .................. ...... 3
Hort. 406 Garden Center Management .......................................... 3
Hort. 408 Nursery Management ...................... .................. .... 3
lHort. 409 Commercial Floriculture ........................................ ........ 3
HIort. 411 Arboriculture ....................................................... ...... 3
E lective .............................................................................................. 3
In addition to the courses listed above the following requirements are
necessary for completion of the option in ornamental horticulture:
Hort. 201, 304, Art 101 102, 103; F&L 204; A.M. 201, 202; Sp. 201;
Jour. 302; Ag.Ec. 301.
Electives:
Art 201, 202, 203; B.A. 105, 316; Hort. 304, 407; Agron. 306, 401;
E Sci. 495; Biol. 210; Ag.Ec. 302.

OPTION II-GENERAL HORTICULTURE

JUNIOR YEAR
I II III
Agron. 301 Nature and Properties of Soils .................................... 4
Short 300 General Forestry .............................................................. 3
Short. 301 Fruit Production ......................................... ............... 3
Hort. 302 Vegetable Production .................................................... 3
HIort. 303 Landscape Plants I ........................................................ 3
Ag.Ec. 300 Introduction to Statistics .......................................... 3
Ent. 304 Introduction to Entomology ............................................ 4
Ent. 305 Economic Entomology .................................................. 3
Genetics 308 Introduction to Genetics .......................................... 3
Chem. 301 Organic Chemistry ...................................................... 4
Phys. 201 General Physics .............................................................. 4
E elective .................. ............... ....................................................... ..... 3-4







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 63

SENIOR YEAR
Agron. 401 Soil and Plant Analysis .......................................... 3
Agron. 402 Soil M management ........................................................ 3
Agron 403 Fertilizer and Soil Fertility ........................................ 3
Botany 404 Plant Pathology ............................................................ 4
Botany 409 Plant Physiology .......................................................... 3
Genetics 411 Plant Breeding ........................................................ 3
Ilort. 403 Food Technology ............ ................................................. 3
Botany 409 Commercial Floriculture ............................................ 4
Short. 410 Advanced Pomology ....................................................... 3
F lectives ............................................................................................ 3 3
In addition to the courses listed above the following requirements are nec-
essary for completion of the option in General Horticulture:
Hort. 201, 305; A.M. 201, 202; Sp. F&L 204; Jour. 302; Ag.Ec. 301; Ag.Ec.
303; Hort. 404.
Suggested Electives:
A.M. 401, 402; A.S. 300,302; Biol. 210; Ent. 306; Ag.Ec. 302, 401, 404;
Hort. 411; E. Sci. 495; Agron. 306, 407.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
200. Economics of Agriculture. (3) An introductory course to the field of
agricultural economics. Study of Agriculture in the economy of the state and
nation. Agriculture and economic growth. Consideration of economic principles
as applied to farm production, marketing, demand, and finance, farm prices
and income farm resource allocation; study of the economic problems of Ameri-
can Agriculture.
300. Introduction to Statistics. (3) Development of the fundamental concepts
and principles and their relationship to the physical and social sciences; frequency
distribution, mean, measures of variability, normal distribution elements of
statistical inference, correlation, regression, analysis of varience, interpretation
of statistical data. Prerequisite: Math. 107.
301. Farm Records and Accounts. (3) Farm records and accounts and their
use in organizing and operating the farm business. Types of record systems adapted
to farming; methods and techniques of taking inventories and preparing financial
records; valuation of farm assets; enetrprise records; budgeting; analysis of farm
records and accounts. Laboratory work required. Prerequisite: Agr. Econ. 200.
302. Farm Management. (3) Study of the application of economic and business
principles to the organization and operation of a farm. Acquisition and organi-
zing the farm resources; farm types; size of the farm business; the production
program; budgeting and linear programming; farm tenure arrangements; use
of records in farm planning laboratory and field trip required. Prerequisite:
Agr. Econ. 200.
303. Marketing Farm Products. (3) A study of the American system of
marketing farm products. Organization of the marketing system; marketing
functions and services; demand and supply; role of the consumer in agricultural







64 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

marketing; marketing price determination; commodity marketing. Consideration
of current problems in marketing farm products. Field trips required. Pre-
requisite: Agr. Econ. 200.
304. Agricultural Prices. (3) A comprehensive study of the factors determining
the prices of farm products. Price determination under competition and monopoly
conditions; sources of price information in forecasting future price trends and
outlook. Prerequisite: Agr. Econ. 303.
305. Land Economics. (3) A study of the problems and policies involved in
land use, development, conservation, taxation and tenure. Population growth
and the demand for land; theories of rent, property, and income; land valuation.
Prerequisite: Agr. Econ. 200.
306. Agricultural Finance. (3) Economic problems involved in financing
Agriculture; kind and sources of credit for farmers; credit policies of lending
institutions; kind and use of legal credit instruments; insurance and taxation.
Detailed consideration of federal credit agencies for farmers.
401. Agricultural Economic Statistics. (3) The principles and practices in-
volved in the collection, tabulation and analysis of agricultural statistical data.
Methods of presentation of statistical data. Laboratory work required. Pre-
requisites: Agri. Econ. 200 and one course in elementary statistics.
402. Agricultural Cooperation. (3) A general survey of agricultural cooperative
activities in the United States. Kinds of cooperatives; methods of organization
and operation; legal requirements for cooperatives; basic principles of cooperation;
economic possibilities and limitations of cooperatives.
403. Farm Business Analysis. (3) Farm planning based on the analysis of
specific farming situations; the farm survey; methods of analysis of farm records;
alternative farming systems; adjustments in the farming program; measures of
success in farming. Prerequisite: Agri. Econ. 301.
404. Agricultural Policy. (3) Policies relating to the development of agriculture
in the United States; relationship of farm groups to public policy; relationship
between problems in agriculture and public policy; types of agricultural policy;
appraisal of the effect of agricultural policies; current policy problems. Pre-
requisite: Agri. Econ. 200.
410. Problems in Agricultural Economics. (3) Selected problems in agricultural
economics for research and study. A supervised laboratory course in methods
of collecting analyzing data and in writing scientific reports. Independent study
is encouraged. For majors only. Prerequisite: Agri. Econ. 200.

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
301. Vocational Education. (3) A study of the history of vocational edu-
cation, underlying philosophies and purposes. A study of the administration of
federally supported state and local programs, and their effectiveness in the
preparation of youths and adults for gainful employment.








SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 65

ment of concepts of good teaching that may be applied to vocational agriculture
classes. A study of good methods of planning and presenting agricultural. sub-
ject matter: methods of teaching manipulative skills, and good management
practices in conducting agricultural occupations. Prerequisites: Psy. 301 and 310.
"400. Methods of Teaching Agricultural Mechanics. (3) Objectives and organi-
zation of instruction in agricultural mechanics. Methods of teaching skills for
mechanized agriculture, the facilities and instructional equipment required,
and management of shop classes. Prerequisites: Agri. M. 202 and Agri.. Ed. 304.
402. Adult and Young Farmer Classes. (3) The organization and use of agri-
cultural advisory committees, conducting community agricultural surveys; methods
in organizing and conducting classes for adults and other out-of-school agri-
cultural groups. Prerequisite: Agri. Ed. 304.
404., Organization of Vocational Agriculture Programs. (3) The development
of program objectives, curriculum planning, course organization, instructional
facilities, conducting F.F.A. activities, and the evaluation of vocational agri-
culture programs. Prerequisite: Agri. Ed. 304.
405. Student Teaching of Vocational Agriculture. (9) Practical experience in
planning lessons, teaching classes, and conducting activities of a local agriculture
program. One quarter is spent at an internship center under the supervision of
the regular teacher of vocational agriculture, and the resident- teacher-educator.
Prerequisites: Agri. Ed. 400, 402 and 404.
99. A-B-C. Pro-Seminar in Agriculture. (0) A detailed presentation of many
varieties of topics and problems. Required of all.agricultural freshmen.

AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS
200. Mechanical Drawing. (3) Principles of sketching, mechanical drawing,
and the interpretation of plans and blueprints. Practice in the use of drawing
instruments; the preparation of multiview projections, pictorial illustrations,
dimensions, section, and auxiliary views.
201. Farm Shop Practice. (3) Selection, use and maintenance of shop
tools, the operation and use of power tools and machinery, farm carpentry,
metal work, and electric arc and oxacetylene welding fundamentals.
202. Farm Engines, Tractors, and Machinery. (3) Principles of operation and
construction of internal combustion engines and other tractor components.
A study of mechanisms and machinery parts. The selection and operation of
farm tractors and mechanized implements.
401, Farm Buildings and Equipment. (3) A study of farm building types,
structural requirements, construction practices, and the types of building
material and their uses. Farm-stead planning is also emphasized. Practical work
includes the design and construction of farm service buildings and equipment.
Prerequisite. Agri. M. 200. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate
students.
402. Farm Electricity. (3) A study of the principles of electricity, basic wiring






66 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

systems, and electric power requirements of farms. Emphasis is placed on the
efficient use of electric power in the home and in farm equipment, and the
selection, installation, protection, and maintenance of electrical equipment.

ANIMAL SCIENCE
101. Introductory Animal Science. (3) A general survey and introduction
to animal science, including a study of the history, development and classes
of beef cattle, swine, and sheep. Discussion of individual and breed selection
as they apply to showing, herd maintenance, and market classes for slaughtering.
The role of livestock in the economy. There will be a limited discussion of the
horse. Field trips will include livestock farms, ranches, slaughter houses, meat
packaging and processing plants, and Florida State Livestock Sanitary Board.
102. Introductory Animal Science. (3) A general survey and introductory
course which includes a study of the history, development, and classes of
dairy cattle and poultry. Discussion of individual and breed selection as they
apply to showing, herd and flock maintenance, marketing, etc. The role of
dairy and poultry in the economy. Field trips will include dairy and poultry
farms, processing plants, and Florida State Livestock Board.
300. Poultry Production. (3) The role of poultry in the agricultural economy.
Special emphasis is given to the system of poultry breeding. The principles of
incubation and brooding are discussed. The types of feeds and feeding practices
plus the formulating of poultry ration shall come under the scope of this course.
The production of poultry meats and eggs is included.
301. Dairy Herd Operation and Milk Production. (3) A study of milk pro-
duction and management, including dehorning, tatooing and vaccination of
calves. Shelter, feeding, and breeding as related to milk production. Feeding
and care of pregnant cows, care after parturition. Handling and care of
milking machines which include the actual milking process, cleaning and
sanitation of milking animals and equipment. Pasteurization, cream separation,
and butter making. Two field trips to milk production centers are required.
302. Beef Cattle Production. (3) This course provides training and experience
in the care and management of beef cattle. A detailed analysis of breed adaptation
to the southeastern region is discussed. Special emphasis is given to the in-
creasing role of beef cattle in national economy and outstanding growth of
beef cattle in number and value in the State of Florida. Prerequisite: A. S. 101.
303. Swine Production. (3) A study of the place of swine on the farm and
the modern methods and trends in selecting, breeding, feeding and managing
swine for increased profit. Attention is given to the judging and fitting of swine
for exhibits and markets. Special emphasis is given to the integration of swine
into the modern system of grassland farming. Prerequisite: A. S. 101.
30 1. Meats. (3) A practical course in the slaughtering of hogs and cattle
and the cutting, curing, preparation of retail cuts of meats. Prerequisite: A. S. 101.
305. Feeds and Feeding. (3) The various t.,pes of feeds and their value in
the feeding of livestock, practice in formulating r:'i'ins for the various types
of livestock, and the cost of rations. Prereauisites: A. S. 101 and 102.







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 67

306. Advanced Poultry Production. (3) The main principles of anatomy,
physiology and body covering, the skeletal system, muscular system, digestive
system, respiratory system, circulatory system, urinary system, reproductive system,
nervous and regulatory systems. Diseases, their prevention and control. Prerequiite:
A.S. 101.
307. Marketing of Poultry Products. (3) Technological problems of procure-
ment, processing, and market distribution of poultry and eggs products in-
cluding quality factors, quality maintenance, grading, storage, news market
legislation and cooperative marketing; produces adjustments to changing market
demands and technological improvements. Trips to nearby processing plants.
308. Collegiate Livestock Judging and Competition. (3) A study of the physical
characteristics of live animals and their correlation with productive traits. Train-
ing is given in the judging of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, swine, horses,
and poultry.
309. Milk Processing and Marketing. (3) A comprehensive study of the
market milk industry in relation to pasteurization, bottling, grading, distribution,
transportation, milk ordinances, and city milk supply. The producer-distributor
relationship, base supply, prices, sales state and federal control will also be
discussed. A visit to processing plants is required. Prerequisite: A.S. 101.
310. Ice Cream and Related Products. (3) A practical course which includes
selection of ingredients, calculating ice cream formula, and the actual making
of ice cream, cottage cheese, ices, ice milk and related products. The use and
handling of ice cream equipment. One field trip to an ice cream plant is re-
quired. Prerequisite: A.S. 101.
400. Incubation and Brooding. (3) Principles and practices on incubation
as related to hatchery operation and management, practical chick embryology,
flock selection, and pullorium testing, brooding requirement of chicks. Trips
will be made to near-by hatchery.
402. Economics of Poultry Management. (3) This is a study of the business
aspects of commercial poultry farming. The purpose of this course is to describe
the functioning of poultry industry and to analyze the successful management
of a poultry farm. Prices, receipts and purchasing power of eggs, and the overall
trends in the development of the poultry industry are discussed. Trips to near-by
commercial poultry farms. Prerequisite: A.S. 101.
403. Applied Poultry Feeding. (3) Nutrient requirement for different classes
of poultry. Various feed ingredients as sources of nutrients, factors affecting
digestion and utilization of feed, formulation of practical poultry feeds. Nu-
tritional problems in connection with manufacture, storage, distribution, and use
of commercial and farm mixed feeds.
406. Animal Nutrition. (3) The process of metabolism, growth, reproduction,
lactation, and aging in relationship to nutrition and feeding principles. The
value of food is demonstrated by various test methods, including the vitamin
assay actual feeding practices with swine, cattle, and poultry. Prerequisites:
Chemistry 101, 104, 105 and A.S. 101 and 102.






68 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

407. Animal Sanitation and Disease Control. (3) A study of the more
economically important diseases and parasites of livestock and poultry, such
as respiratory, nutritional, bloat, tuberculosis, brucollosis, pneumonia, scours,
cholera, and other diseases common to livestock. They will be discussed from
the point of causes, spread, protection, and treatment.
408. Analyzing Dairy Products. (3) A discussion of the chemical and physical
characteristics of dairy products. Standardization and products control as applied
to dairy plants. The testing and analysis of milk and milk products for butter
fats, specific quantity, bacteria count, solid not fat, and total solids. The stand-
ard Babcock tester, quevenne lactometer, microscope, and colony counter will
be used.
409. Seminar. (3) A study of current research in the field of Animal Science.
There are discussions of current problems in production, development and
management in the area of Animal Agriculture. The students become familiar
with the location and specific work carried out at various experiment stations
throughout the country. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.
410. Physiology of Domestic Animals. (3) A study of the various systems of
the animals body 'and their interrelationship to the health and well being of the
animal. Special emphasis is given to digestion, absorption and metabolism.
Both small and large animals are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites: A.S.
101 and Biol. 110.

BACTERIOLOGY
212. General Bacteriology. (4) An introduction to the study of micro-organisms.
Lectures are devoted to the morphology, taxonomy, and physiology of bacteria,
yeast, mold, viruses, and rickettsiae, and their significance to the general welfare
of man. Laboratory work provides disciplines aimed toward a critical apprecia-
tion of micro-organisms, studies of pure cultures, and the identification of
unknowns. Prerequisite: Biol. 100 or Botany 120.
300. Bacterial Scology. (4) A comprehensive study of the properties and inter-
relationship of bacteria in our natural environment, including air, water, soil, and
on plants. Special emphasis will be given to soil forms beneficial and harmful
to agricultural and marine bacteria. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 212.
310. Sanitary Bacteriology. (4) Discussion of bacteriological problems in sani-
tation of water supplies, sewage, swimming pools, restaurants, and air, with
emphasis on water and sewage. Laboratory exercises will include detection and
identification of typical bacterial contaminants. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 212.

ENTOMOLOGY
304. Introduction to Entomology. (4) A general survey of major groups of
insects including their external and internal morphology, life histories, and habits.
305. Economic Entomology. (3) A general consideration of applied theory
and a survey of insects of major economic importance. Prerequisite: Ent. 304.






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 69

306. Systematic Entomology. (3) A survey of all major families of insects.
Prerequisite: Ent. 304.
308. Special Problems in Entomology. (3) Individual research or study pro-
jects centering around the students' interest. Prerequisite: Ent. 304, and 305 or
306, or consent of instructor.

GENETICS
308. Introduction to Genetics. (3) Consideration of the general principles
of Genetics; the mechanism of inheritance and variation, including application
of genetic principles in the development of animals and plants.
401. Animal Breeding. (3) A study of the physical and genetical principles
of breeding farm animals. The systems of livestock breeding are discussed to
determine the specific advantages and disadvantages of each for greatest improve-
ment of the herd and flock. Methods and techniques of natural and artificial
insemination are discussed. Prerequisites: A. S. 101 and Genetics 308.
411. Plant Breeding. (3) A study of the inheritance of plants, including the
genetics of sterility and disease resistance, linkage, mutations, and other quanti-
tative characteristics of inheritance. A basic discussion of the principles of hybrid
production. Students will be expected to perform in laboratory demonstration
plots. Prerequisite: Genetics 308.

HORTICULTURE
200. Horticulture Science. (3) A study of the scientific concepts on which
horticulture is based. For the beginning horticultural student, part I introduces
the biology of horticulture; part II deals with techniques of horticulture; and
part III surveys the industry, emphasizing its distinguishing characteristics and
special problems. The esthetic aspects of horticulture are included. Laboratory
periods will cover such practices as pruning, propagation, plant classification,
etc.
201. Plant Propagation. (3) Sexual and asexual reproduction of plants, including
propagation by seed, cutting, grafts and other methods. Construction and
management of cold frames, hot beds and other structures.
300. General Forestry. (3) An introduction course covering the scope and
importance of forestry and the role of forest conservation in the economy of
the state and nation.
301. Fruit Production. (3) Production, harvesting, and preparation of fruit
for home and market use. Discussion will also include selection of site, planting,
and pruning. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
302. Vegetable Production. (3) Production, harvesting and preparation of
vegetable for home and market use. Special consideration given to crops grown
in Florida. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
303. Landscape Plants I. (3) An introduction to the identification, character-
istics and landscape use of woody plants commonly grown in nurseries and used





70 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

in landscape plants. Mostly temperate zone plants. Elementary principles of
taxonomy will be included. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
304. Landscape Plants II. (3) A continuation of Horticulture 303 emphasizing
identification, characteristics and use of unusual and rare ornamental plants,
including both woody and herbaceous types. Subtropical and tropical species in-
cluded in addition to temperate zone plants. Prerequisite: Hort. 303.
305. Citrus Culture. (3) Citrus production and marketing. This includes
such practices as propagation, planting, pruning, cultivating, fertilizing, spraying,
irrigating, harvesting, grading, storing and marketing.
402. Landscape Engineering. (3) Design and construction of drives, walks, walls,
and other concrete structures, grading and water control, irrigation system, and
out door lighting. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
403. Food Technology. (3) A study of all phases of the processing of fruits
and vegetables by canning, freezing, and dehydrating. Consideration is also given
to the by-products of these processes. Required of all seniors majoring in general
horticulture. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
404. Turf Management. (3) The size and scope of the turf industry, character-
istics, adaptations of the grasses and turf plants. Basic concepts of planting,
establishing, and maintenance. The care operation of turf machinery and equip-
ment. Prerequisite: Agron. 301.
406. Garden Center Management. (3) A study of the opportunities and
problems of merchandising landscape plants and garden supplies. Involves
location and layout of building and sales grounds, display practices, types of
merchandise and special services, purchasing advertising, sales techniques and
other business procedures. Field trips to be included.
407. Tropical Foliage Plants. (3) An intensive study of the rare and exotic
plants of tropical and subtropical regions of the world including the identification,
adaptation, culture requirements, propagation and economic importance. Specific
problems in taxonomy, physiology and anatomy of these plants.
408. Nursery Management. (3) The application of scientific developments
to the principles and practices involved in the production, harvesting, grading,
and distribution of plants grown in modern nurseries. Prerequisite: Hort. 200.
409. Commercial Floriculture. (3) Construction and management of glass
and plastic structures. Production of cut flowers, foliage and flowering pot
plants, storage and transportation and distribution practices.
410. Advanced Pomology. (3) Physiological principles underlying the produc-
tion of fruit crops. A comprehensive survey of t!:e latest scientific findings and
the changing economic trends in relation to cities grove operation and manage
ment. Prerequisite: Hort. 301.
411. Arboriculture. (3) Advanced training in the diagnosis of tree and shrub
troubles. Theory and practice in pruning, .;i;splanting, and fertilizing. Tree
climbing with the use of rope is included. f'r requisites: Botany, Entomology,
and Plant Pathology.






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 71

FLORAL AND LANDSCAPE ART
204. Landscape Art. (3) The principles of landscape design adapted to modem
home grounds and community projects. Laboratories will include the study of
oranmental plant materials, original landscape problems, and exercises on culture
and maintenance of plants used in landscape compositions.
401. Landscape Design. (3) A laboratory course for majors involving typical
problems encountered by the commercial landscape nurseryman. Design prob-
lems and inspection trips to be included. Prerequisites: F. & L. 204, Hort 303.
402. Landscape Design II. (3) An advanced laboratory course for majors
involving typical problems encountered by the commercial landscape nursery-
man. Design problems and inspection trips to be included. Prerequisites: F. &
L. 401, Hort. 304.
490. Floral Art. (3) Basic principles and practices of design with flowers em-
phasizing for home and church use. Included is a study of modem customs in
regard to floal decoration for weddings, banquets, funerals and other public
activities. Laboratories will consist of exercises in flower arrangement for the
home.
SOIL SCIENCE
101. Field Crop IScience. (3) This course is designed to provide the agriculture
student with background materials, concepts, theories, principles, and practices of
field crop production. Special attention is given to Southern and Florida field
crops as related to the national economy.
301. The Nature and Properties of Soil. (4) Fundamental principles of soil
science; the origin, formation, composition, and classification of soil, and their
properties as related to the growth of higher plants. Prerequisites: Chem. 101,
103. Required of all students.
303. Soil Morphology and Classification. (3) A study of the factors of soil
formation, soil morphology and soil classification. Prerequisite: Agron. 301.
304. Weed Taxonomy and Ecology. (3) This course will introduce students
to most of the common weeds found in the Southeastern United States and
especially Florida, and the distribution of weeds with respect to environmental
conditions. Some emphasis will be given to the economic importance of weeds
in plant growth and soil conservation.
305. Pasture and Range Management. (3) The establishment of permanent
pastures-their fertilization and management; temporary and rotation pastures.
306. Soil and Water Management. (3) A study of land measurement, contours
and contour running, planning, designing, laying out, and constructing terraces
and draining ditches, designing and laying out farm ponds, and the designing
and operation of farm irrigation systems. Prerequisites: F.M. 200 and F.M.
201 or by special permission from the Department Head.
401. Soil and Plant Analysis. (3) This course is designed to acquaint students
with the methods and techniques used in the analysis of soils and plants.






72 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Techniques in this course involves both qualitative and quantitative determi-
nations. Prerequisites: Agron. 301, Chem. 101, 104, 105 and 301.
402. Soil Management. (3) A study of cropping systems, fertilization, tilage,
and drainage-their relationship to the productive capactiy of soils. Prerequisites:
Agron. 101, 301, and Biol. 120.
403. Soil Fertility and Fertilizers. (3) The principles underlying the maintenance
and improvement of soil productivity and fertility relationships of the major
nutrient elements in the soil collodial system. The sources, manufacture, and
properties of fertilizer materials; formulation and preparation of mixed fertilizers;
and the principles of fertilizer application. Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 104, 105
and 301.
407. Plant Ecology. (3) A consideration of the environmental conditions con-
trolling plant growth. A study of nature's principles and methods as regards the
processes of plant succession, stabilization; stabilization of climax vegetation,
and use of plant communities as indicators of what happened in the past and
what can happen in the future.
412. Soil Survey. (3) Classification of soils, use of soil survey equipment and
preparation of soil survey maps will be included. Several extended field trips will
be required. Prerequisites: Agron. 407, 301.
490. Techniques in Research. (3) An undergraduate research course that in-
volves laboratory and/or field analysis of problems in an area that will stimulate
the imagination of the student and advance the cause of science for junior
and senior students. Permission of instructor is required. Prerequisites: Agron.
301, Chem. 101, 105, 301, and Phys. 201.
BOTANY
106. Elementary Botany. (4) The fundamental facts of plant life together
with the relation of plants to man and other forms of life.
404. Plant Pathology. (4) Diseases of plants with special reference to fungus
diseases. Principles of wide application are taught by the study of a relatively
small number of typical diseases. The laboratory work provides illustrative ma-
terial and gives elementary training in diagnosis and control. Prerequisite: Biol.
120.
409. Plant Physiology. (4) A survey of physiological processes occurring in
economic plants and the conditions which effect these processes. Prerequisites:
Agron. 101, Biol. 120, and Chem. 101 and 103.
EARTH SCIENCE
494. Elements of Earth and Plant Science. (3) Designed for elementary and
secondary school teachers. A study of the fundamentals of physical geology.
Nature and origin of minerals and rocks. Agents of erosion, development of
land forms, sedimentation, volcanism, metamorphism and origin of mountains.
Basic studies of plant life employing a variety of plant materials and emphasizing
the relationship of structures and processes to the welfare of man. Includes basic






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 73

studies of weather patterns of the U.S. and the world, including winds, hurri-
canes, tornadoes, cyclones and other types of weather disturbances.
495. Principles of Geology. (3) Fundamentals of physical and historical geology,
including origin and composition of the primary earth materials, agents of erosion,
sedimentation, metamorphism, modes of occurrence of the common materials,
and analysis of the common crustal structures. Historical principles, including
floral, faunal, and bio-graphic. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate
students.
496. Physical Geology. (3) A study of the physical properties, identification
and origin of minerals, classification and origin of rocks, physical weathering,
deformation and mountain building. Open to advanced undergraduate and
graduate students.


HOME ECONOMICS
The Department of Home Economics has three major objectives: (1) to
educate the student for personal and social development, (2) to educate the
student for family living, and (3) to educate the student for professional speciali-
zation.
The field of home economics includes those phases of learning that relate to
home and family life. Its concern is the family group; the manner of living and
working together; the guidance and care of children; the nutritional needs of
individuals; the clothing of the family-buying, selection, and construction; the
housing of the family for health, comfort, and beauty; and the use and adequacy
of its income. It is based upon the understanding of the social, biological and
physical sciences, and the humanities.
It is the purpose of the Home Economics Department to provide a sound
educational program for the development of each student as an individual,
as a homemaker, as a member of society, and as a professional worker, increas-
ingly able in each to cope with rapidly changing conditions.
TheDepartment of Home Economics is organized into three areas: Clothing
and Retailing; Foods, Nutrition and Institutional Management; and Home
Economics Education. Effort is made to relate and integrate the work of the
three areas so that students think of them as different aspects of the total
program of Home Economics.
The curriculum in Clothing and Retailing combines a broad general
education and an understanding of family life in today's society with a basic
knowledge of consumers' needs, merchandising principles, and commodity
evaluation to prepare students who are interested in careers in the clothing and
retailing industry. This program will provide an opportunity fo students to
prepare themselves for such positions as invoice personnel, demonstrators and/or
lecturers for pattern companies, salespeople in department stores and specialty
shops and apprentices to department store buyers.
The curriculum in Foods, Nutrition, and Institution Management is
designed to prepare the student for advanced work in foods and nutrition, in






74 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

dietetics and administration for hospitals, college food service, school lunch
programs, or other large food service units. Basic courses in foods, nutrition,
chemistry, and physiology are required. A year of advanced training in an ap-
proved hospital or institution (food service unit) is required for the professional
ranking of the dietitian. A student may qualify as a teacher by electing such
courses necessary to meet the requirements of the State Department of
Education for certification.
The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed to prepare the
student for teaching all phases of homemaking in the secondary schools of
Florida. Upon completion of the curriculum and recommendation of the Depart-
ment, the student receives a State Graduate Certificate to teach either general
or vocational home economics on the secondary level. The student who majors
in home economics education may secure a minor in textile and clothing by elec-
ting eighteen additional hours in textile and clothing courses.

COURSES OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
The Department of Home Economics offers a variety of general courses
for both men and women from other schools and colleges in the University who
are interested in home and family education as well as in certain technical phases
of the field. Courses in which non-majors may enroll are listed below.
Courses Quarter Hours
H .E. 101 & 102- Textiles .................................................................. 3
H.E. 103 & 104-Introduction to Clothing ................................... 3
H.E. 105 & 106-Introduction to Foods & Nutrition .................... 3
H.E. 107-Art as Applied to Personal & Family Living .................... 3
H.E. 200- Nutrition and Health ........................................................ 3
H .E. 201- H ealthful Living .............................................................. 3
H.E. 205-Home Nursing and Infant Care ........................................ 3
H.E. 210-Consumer Education ................................................... 3
H.E. 213-Marriage and Family Relationships .............................. 3
H.E. 308- Child and His Family ........................................................ 3
H .E. 310- Recreational Crafts .......................................................... 3
H.E. 311-Household Equipment ......................................... 3
MAJOR FIELDS AND DEGREE
During the fifth quarter, each student majoring in home economics, must
file a Declaration of Major with the Department Head as to area of specialization.
A change of major within the department must be approved by the Department
Head.
A major in the area that comprises the Home Economics Department leads
to the Bachelor of Science degree. Detailed requirements for each major are
given in this Bulletin.

GRADUATE STUDY IN HOME ECONOMICS
Graduate study programs leading to the Master of Education degree
are available with a major in Home Economics. For further information refer






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 75

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
The School of Agriculture and Home Economics seeks to assist, through
work scholarships and other types of aid, deserving students who desire a
college education, but who do not have sufficient financial resources to remain
in school. Application for such aid should be made through the Office of
the Head of Department.

SEARS ROEBUCK AND COMPANY
HOME ECONOMICS SCHOLARSHIP
Each school year Sears Roebuck and Company makes available to the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University a Home Economics Scholarship
Fund which provides two $150 scholarships to freshman students enrolled
in Home Economics. The primary objective of the fund is to make it possible
for superior, but financially handicapped, girls to get a start of one year m
Home Economics. The award will be made to eligible girls on the basis of
scholarship, desire to study Home Economics, character, and record of activities.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORKERS AWARD
An award of $25.00 is made available by the Florida State Association
of County and Home Demonstration Agents to a worthy girl majoring in
Home Economics. This fund is stipulated for the purpose of purchasing books
needed to study.

CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS AND SHORTCOURSES
The Department of Home Economics seeks to provide a variety of special
services needed by housewives and educational, business, professional, and civil
agencies of the state. Each summer, and at other periods during the year, it
conducts conferences, workshops and shortcourses designed to meet the needs
of these groups. The following special features will be offered during the 1967
summer session.

TRAINING PROGRAM FOR SCHOOL LUNCH PERSONNEL
In cooperation with the State Department of Education, school lunch
section, the Department of Home Economics offers each year during the summer
quarter, a training program for school lunch personnel.
The two-week course is offered in seven parts:
1. Foundations of Quantity food 4. Organization and Management
preparation and service. 5. Equipment Use and Care
2. Quantity Cookery 6. Record-keeping
3. Nutrition. 7. Purchasing

FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
This is a college credit program consisting of 30-45 hours of selected
courses designed for persons who are engaged in food service work and who
have a high school diploma. The program is approved by the School Lunch






76 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

Section of the State Department of Education for school lunch managers.
Specific courses are selected with approval of the department head.

HOME NURSING AND INFANT CARE WORKSHOP
Designed to provide opportunity for the development of basic nursing
skills involved in home care of the sick. Attention given to the area of
mother-baby care. Successful completion of the course entitles one to a Red
Cross Certificate. Also, it is an approval course for those teachers required
to have college training in this area.

GENERAL RULES GOVERNING ALL HOME
ECONOMICS CURRICULA
1. Students entering as freshmen should enroll in at least one quarter hour
of physical education and one quarter hour of military science during each
of the first six quarters. Only the former applies to women students.
2. Normally courses in each classification should be taken in numerical sequence.
3. A maximum course load shall be eighteen (18) quarter hours, including
advanced military science.
4. Normally a course in which one has received a failing grade, should be
repeated the following quarter or the earliest quarter the course is offered
again.
CLOTHING AND RETAILING
FRESHMAN YEAR
I II III
H .E. 099 Pro-Sem inar .......................... ... .................... ................... O 0 0
Eng. 101, 102, 103 Composition ,................................................. 3 3 3
Eng. 201 Techniques of Reading and Writing or ....................
Sp. 103 Foundations of Speech .............................................. 3
H-.E. 103, 104 Introduction to Clothing ........................................ 3 3
H.E. 101 & 102 Textiles I & II ...................................................... 3 3
Math. 101, 102, 103 Introduction to College Math ...................... 3 3 3
P.E. 101 Fundamental Movements ............................................. 1
P.E. 102 Health for Modern Living ................................................. 2
Hist. 100 U.S. History 1492 to Present ........................................ 3
H.E. 107 Art as Applied to Home & Family Living .................... 3
Econ. 200 Introduction to Economics ............................................ 3
Biol. 100 Biological Science ............................................ ... 4
16 17 16
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Chem. 101, 102 General Chemistry ............................................. 4 4
Phys. 211 & 212 General Psychology ............................................ 3 3
Soc. 200 Introduction to Sociology ................................................ 3
B.A. 104 Business Mathematics ............................. 3
I-.E. 301, 302 Clothing Construction I & II ................................. 3 3
P.S. 201 American Government ............,................................ 3
Electives in Physical Education ..................................................... 1 1 1
Econ. 201, 202, 203 Principles of Economics ............................. 3 3 3
Eng. 203, 204 World Literature ............................................. 3 3







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 77

I II III
Ed. 201 Orientation to the Teaching Profession ............................ 3

17 17 16
JUNIOR YEAR
H.E. 203 Fashion Illustration ...................................................... 3
1H.E. 319 Socio-Economics of Clothing ..................................... 3
B.A. 204 Business English ................... .......................... ......... .. 3
H.E. 305 Family Clothing ............... 4
H.E. 213 Marriage and Family Relationships ................................ 3
Soc. 350 Social Stratification .......................... ......................... 3
Econ. 305, 306 Principles of Marketing ..................................... 3 3
B.A. 311 Salesmanship ............. ............ ............................... 3
Jour. 201, 301 Introduction to Journalism ..................................... 3 3
H.E. 314 Management and Its Contribution to Family Living .... 3
H.E. 306 Historic Costume ........................................................ 3
H.E. 307 Costume Design .............................................................. 3
H.E. 318 Pattern Study .............................. ........................... 3
H.E. 403 Advanced Textile ....................................................... 3

16 18 15
SENIOR YEAR
H.E. 416 Clothing and Retailing Seminar ...................................... 3
H.E. 406, 407 Home Furnishing .................................................... 3 3
IH.E. 413 Fashion Merchandising I ...................................... 3
HIE. 414 Fashion Merchandising II ................................................ 9
H.E. 105, 106 Introduction to Foods and Nutrition I & II .......... 3 3
Electives ............................................ ....................... 3 6
H.E. 319 Draping and Dress Design .............................................. 3
HI.E. 428 Window Display ............................................ ......... 3
Art 405 Textile Design .................................................................. 3

15 18 12
Total Hours: 193
SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR CLOTHING AND RETAILING CURRICULUM
I. Home Economics courses not in Clothing and Retailing Curriculum.
II. Non-departmental courses based on necessary preparation for retailing
and merchandizing experiences with approval of department head.

FOODS, NUTRITION, AND INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT
FRESHMAN YEAR
H .E. 099 Pro-Sem inar ........................................... .. ........... ...... 0 0 0
Eng. 101, 102, 103 Composition .................................................. 3 3 3
Math. 101, 102, 103 Introduction to College Math ...................... 3 3 3
Chem. 101, 102, 103 General Chemistry ...................................... 4 4 4
H.E. 105, 106 Introduction to Foods and Nutrition ...................... 3 3
Hist. 100 U.S. 1492 to Present ...................................................... 3
Biol. 110 Principles of Zoology".................................................... 4
P.E. 101 Fundamental Movements ............................. ... ...... 1
I health for Moderm Living .................. .............................. ......... 2
M.S. Military Science ..................e...........................e*s.......e..... ....... 1. 1

"-Women 14 15 17
Men 15. :16 .18






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 79

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION
FRESHMAN YEAR
I II III
H.E. 099 Pro-Seminar ...................................................................... 0 0 0
Eng. 101, 102, 103 Composition ................................................ 3 3 3
Math. 101, 102, 103 Introduction to College Math ..................... 3 3 3
Biol. 100 Biological Science ............................................................ 4
Hist. 100 U.S. 1492 to Present ...................................................... 3 3
II.E. 101, 102 Textiles .................................................... ............ 3 3
H.E. 103 Introduction to Clothing ............................................. 3
P.E. 100 Fundamental Movements ............................................. 1
P.E. 102 Health for Modem Living .............................................. 2
H.E. 105, 106 Introduction to Foods and Nutrition ...................... 3 3
H.E. 107 Art as Applied to Home and Family Living .................. 4

16 16 18
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Electives in Physical Education .................................................. 1 1 1
H.E. 104 Introduction to Clothing ....... ..................................
Sp. 103 Foundations of Speech ...................................................... 3
Psy. 211 & 212 General Psychology .............................................. 3 3
Chem. 101, 102, 103 General Chemistry ................................... 44 4
Soc. 200 Introduction to Sociology ............................................... 3
P.S. 201 American Government .............. ................................... 3
Ed. 201 Orientation to Teaching Profession ................................ 3
H.E. 108 Meal Management .......................................................... 4
H.E. 213 Marriage and Family Relationships ..................................... 3
rsy. 301 Human Growth and Development ................................ 3
Econ. 200 Introduction to Economics ............................................. 3
Elective ........................................... ................................................. 3

17 18 17
JUNIOR YEAR
Psy. 320 Educational Psychology ..................... ................... 3
Biol. 212 Bacteriology ......... .................... ................................ 5
H.E. 316 Housing ....................................................................... 3
H.E. 311 Household Equipment ................................................... 3
H.E. 303 Normal Nutrition ........................... .............. .... 3
L.E. 305 Family Clothing ............................................................ 4
H.E. 308 Child and His Family ................................................... 3
H.E. 309 Observation & Experience in Pre-School Programs .... 6
II.E. 314 Management and Its Contribution to Family Living .... 3
IH.E. 315 Family Economics ............................ ........ ....... ....... 3
Ed. 307 Secondary School Program ............................................. 3
Ed. 308 Teaching in Secondary School .......................................... 3
Eng. 203, 204 World Literature .......................................... 3 3

18 15 15
SENIOR YEAR
I.E. 406, 407 Home Furnishing ........................................ 3 3
HI.E. 410 Home Management Residence ............ ...................... 4
HI.E. 326 Teaching of Home Economics ........................................ (4) 4 (4)
H. E. 405 Adult Home Economics Education .............................. 3





78 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

SOPHOMORE YEAR
I II III
Ed. 201 Orientation to Teaching Profession ............................... 3
Hfum. 201 Humanities (women) .................................................. 3
H.E. 101 Textiles ......................... .......................................... 3
B.A. 104 Business Mathematics .................................................... 3
Eng. 201 Techniques in Reading & Writing or
Sp. 103 Foundations of Speech ............................................ 3
B.A. 204 Business English .............................................................. 3
B.A. 205 Principles of Accounting ............................................... 3
II.E. 107 Art as Applied to Home and Family Living .................... 3
Cihem. 301, 302, 303 Organic Chemistry ........................................ 4 4 4
I.E. 108 Meal Management ...................................................... 3
Biol. 200 Anatomy and Physiology ............................................ 4
II.E. 103 Introduction to Clothing ................................................ 3
M.S. Military Science ............................................................................. 1 1 1

Women 16 16 15
Men 15 18 16

JUNIOR YEAR
Electives in Physical Education ...................................................... 1 1 1
H.E. 300 Experimental Foods ..................................................... 3
H.E. 303 Normal Nutrition ...................................................... 3
1I.E. 329 Organization and Management ...................................... 3
Chem. 403 Biochemistry ................................................................. 4
Chem. 405 Biochemistry Lab ........................................................ 3
Bact. 212 Bacteriology .................................................................... 4
H.E. 213 Marriage and Family Relationships ................................ 3
H.E. 314 Management and Its Contribution to Family Living .... 3
H.E. 311 Household Equipment .................................................... 3
Soc. 201 Introduction to Sociology .................................................. 3
HI.E. 320 Food and Tissue Analysis ............................................. 4
Psy. 211, 212 General Psychology ........................................ ..3 3

14 15 16

SENIOR YEAR
Ihum. Humanities (Men) ............................................................. 3
Psy. 320 Educational Psychology .................................................... 3
II.E. 409 Personnel Management ........................................ ..... 3
i I.E. 408 Demonstration Cookery ................................................... 4
H.E. 410 Home Management Residence (Women only) .......... 4
H.E. 304 Advanced Nutrition ........................................................ 3
II.E. 404 Nutrition in Disease ...................................................... 3
I (.E. 411 Quantity Cookery .......................................................... 4
II.E. 438 Advanced Food Management ........................................ 4
HI.E. 418 Seminar ................................................... ................... 3
II.E. 412 Food Technology ......................................................... 4
Jour. 201 Introduction to Journalism ............................................. 3
Electives ........... ...................... ....... ..... ........... .... ...................... 6 6

Women 17 17 16
Men 16
Total Hours: Men 196; Women 194







SC11HOL OF AGRICULTURE &l HOME ECONOMICS 81

plastic elements and design principles as related to the field of Home Economics.
Discussion and laboratory experiences designed to develop an awareness and
importance of :u't to every-day living. Laboratory fee: $3.00. Open to Non-
Majors.
108. M\Icl fM agenient. () Principles of sound nutrition and good cookery
are applied in planning. purchasing and preparing foods for family-size meals
and meals for special occasions. Prerequisites: H.E. 105 and 106.
200. Nutritin : ad Ilcalth. (3) A course designed to meet the needs of non-
majors in understanding the relationship of nutrition to health and to pro-
mote goo!d food habits fundamental to health. A study of the nutritive re-
quirements for growth. development, and maintenance of health. Attention is
given to methods of interpreting nutrition to children in all grades. Open to
Non-Majors. Offered on demand.
201. Healthful Li-ing. (3) The science and art of food and nutrition and
their implications for better living. Emphasis is placed upon food selection,
Meal management and social graces associated with food service. Open to Non-
Majors.
203. Fashion Illustration. (3) An introduction to figure sketching. Designed to
give students training in observation and proportion. Methods used will involve
the quick, detail. memory, and fashion figure techniques of sketching. Pre-
requisite: H.E. 103.
205. Home Nursing and Infant Care. (3) A study of sick in the home, mother-
baby care and pre-school age children. Successful completion of course entitles
one to a Red Cross Certificate. Minimum cost of supplies: $5.00.
210. Consumer Problems. (3) Everyday problems facing the individual and
the family as purchasing agents. Consumer decision-making with respect to
market goods and services; evaluation of information sources for consumer
buyers; consumer practices affecting costs; analysis of programs for consumer
protection. Open to Non-Majors.
213. Marriage and Family Relationships. (3) Study of the family in processes;
the courtship process; marriage roles; parental roles; family rituals and patterns
of interaction. Open to Non-Majors.
300. Experimental Foods. (3) The application of experimental methods to
problems involved in food preparation. Prerequisites: H.E. 105, 106 and 108.
301. Advanced Clothing Construction. (3) Understanding and skills in ad-
vanced clothing construction. Opportunities for students to learn elementary
fundamentals of tailoring. Minimum cost of materials $25.00. Open to
Non-Majors. Prerequisites: II.E. 103 and 104.
302. Fashion Exhibition'. (3) Planning and presentation of a professional
fashion show. Modeling techniques, props and stage settings, script writing,
selection and cIrA ,trrct:ion of appropriate fashions. Prerequisites: H.E. 103, 104,
107, 301; lE;. 101, 102, and 103.





80 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

H .E. 401 Internship Teaching ........................................................ (9) (9) 9
Ed. 495 Observation and Participation .......................................... (3) (3) 3
Ed. 312 Measurement and Evaluation ............................................ 3
H .E. 205 H om e N ursing .................................................................. 3
Electives ........... .................. 3 6

16 16 12
Total Hours: 194
Students desiring the clothing minor must take at least 34 quarter hours
in the area. Sixteen hours of this requirement have already been included in
the home economics education curriculum. An additional 18 hours in Clothing
and Textiles may be elected from the following list.
H.E. 301-Clothing Construction
H.E. 302-Fashion Exhibition
H.E. 306-Historic Costume
H.E. 307-Costume Design
H.E. 318-Pattern Study
H.E. 319-Draping and Dress Design
H.E. 317-Tailoring
H.E. 403-Advanced Textiles


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
HOME ECONOMICS
099. Pro-Seminar in Home Economics. (0) A detailed presentation of many
varieties of topics and problems. Two quarters required of all Home Economics
students.
101. Textiles I. (3) A consumer-oriented study of textiles, emphasizing fibers,
yarns, fabric constructions, finishes and color in relation to use, serviceability, and
care of apparel and household. fabrics,
102. Textiles II. (3) A continuation of 101, with emphasis on the natural
and man-made fibers,, mixtures and blended fabrics, wash and wear or minimum
care fabrics, and recent textile developments.
103. Introduction to Clothing I. (3) Principles 'of clothing selection and pur-
chase with emphasis on individual personal appearance. Open to Non-Majors.
104. Introduction to Clothing II. (3) Basic techniques and problems of gar-
ment construction. Minimum cost of materials $25.00. Open to Non-Majors.
Prerequisite: HE. 103 or permission of instructor.
105. Introduction to Foods and Nutrition I. (3) Fundamentals involved in
food and nutrition for optimum health. Open to Non-Majors by permission of
instructor.
106. Introduction to Food and Nutrition II.- (3) Basic principles and tech-
niques involved in food preparation. Prerequisite 105.
107. :Art as Applied to Personal. and Family Living. (3) A. study of :the







SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 83

315. Family Economics. (3) Management of family income and resources.
316. Housing. (3) Housing requirements of families. Social problems of
housing; housing regulations and restrictions; site selection and neighborhood
development; financing procedures. Reading and judging house plans; effective
use of space; maintenance problems. Prerequisite or parallel: H.E. 315.
317. Tailoring. (3) Basic tailoring techniques in the construction of a suit
or coat from commercial pattern. Prerequisites. H.E. 103, 104 and 301.
318. Pattern Study. (3) The Principles of fitting and pattern making based
on the use of modern block system. At least two designs are developed beyond
the pattern stage to a finished garment. Minimum cost of materials: $25.00.
Prerequisites: H.E. 101, 102, 305.
319. Draping and Dress Design. (3) Creative intrepretation of dress design.
Garments developed through the media of draping. Prerequisite: H.E. 318.
320. Food and Tissue Analysis. (4) A laboratory course designed mainly
for Food and Nutrition majors. Analysis of foods and tissues for moisture, fat,
protein, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins. Prerequisites: Chem. 301, 302,
303; Biol. 200 and H.E. 300.
326. The Teaching of Home Economics. (3) Responsibilities of the home-
making teacher in applying principles of learning and of adolescent development
to instruction. Philosophy of home and family education; techniques, and ma-
terials; relation to school program and community. Prerequisites: Ed. 307 and
308 and all major courses through the 300 level.
329. Organization and Management. (3) Organization of institutions such
as hospitals, college dining halls, school lunch programs, cafeterias, restaurants
and residence halls. Professional ethics, qualification of managers, personnel
management, and financial control. Prerequisite: H.E. 108.
401. Internship Teaching. (9) Provisions are made for the senior to receive
as many varied professional experiences in a selected secondary school as possible.
Prerequisites: See section on Internship Teaching.
403. Advanced Textiles. (3) The properties of fiber and fabric which affect
satisfactory use. Laboratory problems include chemical analysis of fibers, per-
formance tests, study of stain removals, soaps, detergents, and other laundering
aids. Prerequisite: HE. 101, 102.
404. Nutrition in Disease. (3) A study of the principles upon which a normal
adequate diet is based and how these principles can be applied to satisfy changed
nutritional requirements associated with different diseases. Practical experience
in the hospital in Theraputic Nutrition. Prerequisites: H.E. 108, 303 and 304.
405. Adult Home Economics Education. (3) Selection and use of methods
and materials consistent with the psychology of adult learning. Opportunity for
observation and participation in planning experiences for adult groups. Pre-
requisites: Completion of all major courses through the 300 level.
406. Home Furnishing I. (3) Deals with the problems involved in furnishing





82 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

303. Normal Nutrition. (3) The essentials of an adequate diet; requirements
at different stages of growth and development, and the nutritive value of common
food materials. Animal experiments. Prerequisites: H.E. 105, 106; Chem. 101.
304. Advanced Nutrition. (3) Chemistry of nutrition with emphasis on di-
gestion, energy metabolism, and the metabolic pathways of proteins, minerals,
and vitamins. An introduction of methods of nutrition research with a review
of recent literature focused on the experimental data on which the principles
of human nutrition are based. Prerequisites: Biol. 200; H.E. 303; Chem. 301,
302, and 303, or concurrent.
305. Family Clothing. (3) A course designed to give students experience in
dealing with clothing problems of families in relation to their budgets. Special
emphasis is placed on skill in using fabrics, purchasing, remodeling, conservation,
fitting and construction of garments for the family. Speed and self-reliance are
developed. Prerequisites: H.E. 103, 104.
306. Historic Costume. (3) Development of costumes from primitive to modern
times with consideration of historic, social and economic settings. Open to
Non-Majors with consent of instructor.
307. Costume Design. (3) A study of design with emphasis on line and color
in relation to the individual. The application of the art principles are stressed
in the creation of designs. Prerequisites: H.E. 107, 203, and 306. Open to
Non-Majors with consent of instructor.
308. The Child and His Family. (3) Growth and development of the child;
interrelations of the child and his family through the stages of the family
life cycle. Prerequisite or parallel: Psy. 211 and 212. Open to Non-Majors.
309. Observation and Experiences in Pre-School Programs. (6) Observation;
guidance of children in nursery school; planning and participating in activities
appropriate for young children outside the nursery school under direction of
head teachers. Prerequisites; Psy. 211, 212 and H.E. 308. (2 hrs. lec. and 3
lab., 4 hrs.each).
310. Recreational Crafts. (3) The possibilities and limitations of crafts in
recreation, and understanding the educational and social values derived from
craft experiences. Designing and executing craft projects using a variety of in-
expensive materials and tools. No prerequisite. Open to Non-Majors. Lab fee
$3.00.
311. Household Equipment. (3) A study of the principles involved in the
selection, construction, operation and care of household equipment and its
relation to the well being of the family. Open to Non-Majors with consent of
instructor.
314. Management and Its Contribution to Family Living. (3) Management
related to functions of the family in our society; decision and choice making
processes; principles of organization from implementing decisions; evaluation
procedures; factors affecting the management process and application of manage-
ment principles to common problems.






SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE & HOME ECONOMICS 85

economics force. Prerequisites: Soc. 200; Econ. 201, 202, 203 or permission
of instructor. Open to Non-Majors.
428. Window Display. (3) Basic techniques in designing and executing win-
dow displays. Individual and group participation on displays. Prerequisites: H.E
107, 406, 407 or with consent of instructor.
436. New Perspectives in Teaching Clothing and Retailing. (3) A course
designed for seniors and graduate students with emphasis on recent developments
in the field of Clothing and Retailing. Attention is given to materials, methods
and equipment in teaching and individual problems based on students' professional
needs. Prerequisite: Training and experience acceptable to staff. Offered on
demand.
438. Advanced Food Management. (3) Production of quality foods for parties,
dinners, and teas. Historic background of sectional foods in the United States
and foreign countries. Laboratory preparation of these foods.






84 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

a home for wholesome family living. Emphasis is placed on the application of
the design principles and elements with consideration of aesthetic, economics
and social factors affecting choice. Prerequisites: H.E. 107, 315, and 316.
407. Home Furnishing II. (3) A continuation of 406. Designed to give stu-
dents experiences in the construction of draperies and slip covers and the re-
finishing of furniture. The economic factors, trends, materials, constructions
and finishes will be stressed. Prerequisites: H.E. 103, 104, 107 and 406.
408. Demonstration Cookery. (3) The practice of demonstration as a tech-
nique of education in the classroom, commercial work, and adult education.
The student develops skill and ability by organizing and presenting a series
of food demonstrations. Prerequisites: H.E. 108, 303; Sp. 103 desirable.
409. Personal Managebent. (3) Investigation of job analysis, specifications,
and evaluations; labor policies and organizations; personnel problems and train-
ing; and financial control. Prerequisites: H.E. 329; Psy. 211, 212; Soc. 200.
410. Home Management Residence. (3) A six week residence course during
which time the student has practical experience in many aspects of family
living. Activities include food selection, preparation and service, and the en-
tertainment of guests. Students enrolled in the course meet three hours a week
to plan activities and discuss problems related to cooperative group living and for
study and discussion of home management problems and family relationships.
Room and board will be charged at regular rates. Non-resident students will
include the residence fee in their budgets for the six-weeks' period. Advanced
reservation with the Head of Home Economics Department required. City
student fee: $85.00. Prerequisites: H.E. 108, 303, 314; 407 desirable.
411. Quantity Cookery. (3) Training in the preparation of food in quantity
for institutions. A study of menu making, food standards, and food service is
included. Attention is given to the basic factors involved in the selection,
operation and care of equipment for quality food service. Prerequisites: H.E.
108, 303; Chem. 101, 102; Biol. 210.
412. Food Technology. (3) Physical and chemical changes which take place
during processing and storage of foods. Various principles and practices used in
the area of food preservation by thermal processing, refrigeration, freezing and
freeze-drying of foods. Prerequisites: Chem. 301, 302, 303; Biol. 200; H.E. 300.
413. Fashion Merchandising I. (3) A detailed analysis of fashion, the ready-
to-wear industry, and current developments in the textile and clothing retail
industries. Open to clothing mapors only.
414. Fashion Merchandising II. (9) Student participation in work of businesses
which are related to clothing and textiles. Open to clothing majors only.
416. Seminar in Clothing and Retailing. (3) Special reports and readings in
clothing and retailing which contribute to the students' professional effectiveness
in this field of specialization. Open to clothing majors only.
419. Socio-Economics of Clothing. (3) The study of clothing as a social and






COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES 87

BASIC CURRICULUM OUTLINES FOR FIRST TWO YEARS

FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
FIRST YEAR
Course Credit
English 101, 102, 103 .......................................................................... 9
Mathematics 101, 102, 103 or
Mathematics 105, 106, 107 ...................................................... ........ 9
Natural Science ................................................................... ................... 8-12
Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 ................................................. ....... 9
Military Science 101, 102, 103 ................... .................................. 3
Physical Education (Activity Electives) ............................................. 3

43-45
SECOND YEAR
Humanities .............................................................................................. 9
Social Science ........................ ....................................................... 9
Foreign Language 201, 202, 203 ............................................................ 9
E lectives (6) .......................................................................................... 18-21
Military Science 201, 202, 203 ........ ...................................................... 3
Physical Education (Activity Electives) ............................................ 3

51-54

FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
FIRST YEAR
Course Credit
English 101, 102, 103 ............. ....................................... ................ 9
Mathematics 101, 102, 103 or
Mathematics 105, 106, 107 ............................................................. 9
Natural Science ......................................................... 8-12
Electives ............ .. ...................................... .................................... 12-1 5
Military Science 101,. 102, 103 ................................. ...... .......... ..... 3
Physical Education (Activity Electives) ............................................. 3

45-51
SECOND YEAR
Humanities ..................................... ....... ...... 9
Social Science .......................................................................................... 9
Electives .................................................................................................. 21-27
Military Science 201, 202, 203 ..... .................................... ......... 3
Physical Education (Activity Electives) ................................................ 3

45-51







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The program of the College of Arts and Sciences is designed to provide
opportunities for qualified persons (1) to acquire the fundamentals of a liberal
education; (2) to concentrate in several fields in the humanities, the natural
sciences, the social sciences, and in library service and business; and (3) to obtain
sound preparation for professional and graduate study.
Students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences are not limited
in their selection of courses to those listed in the several curricula offered by
the College of Arts and Sciences. There are open to them many courses
offered in other colleges and schools of the University, which with the ap-
proval of the Dean, may be included in a degree program or may be taken
without credit toward a degree.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The attention of prospective applicants for admission to the College of
Arts and Sciences is directed to the admission requirements of the University
as stated elsewhere in this Bulletin.


REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
1. Completion of a minimum of 180 quarter hours, including the following:
a. Eng. 101, 102 103 ...................................................................... 9 Q r. H rs.
b. Math. 101, 102, 103 or 105, 106, 107 ................................ 9 Qr. Hrs.
c. N natural Science ............................................ ..................... 8-12 Q r. H rs.
d. H um anities .............................................................................. 18 Q r. H rs.
e. Foreign Language ........................................ ....................... 18 Q r. H rs.
f. Social Science .......................................................................... 18 Q r. H rs.
g. Physical Education .................................................................... 6 Qr. Hrs.
h. M military Science (M en) ........................................................ 6 Qr. Hrs.
2. Completion of a major and a minor ........................................ 60-75 Qr.Hrs.


REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
1. Completion of a minimum of 180 quarter hours, including the following:
a. E ng. 101, 102, 103 .................................................................. 9 Q r. H rs.
b. Math. 101, 102, 103 or 105, 106, 107 .................................... 9 Qr. Hrs.
c. N natural Science .................................................................. 8-12 Q r. H rs.
d. H um anities ................................................................................ 9 Q r. H rs.
e. Social Science ............................ ................................ ............ 9 Q r. H rs.
f. Physical Education ................................................................. 6 Q r. H rs.
g. M military Science (M en) .......................................................... 6 Qr. H rs.
2. Completion of a major and minor ............................................ 60-75 Qr. Hrs.
3. Requirements of a foreign language is optional with the major department.


-86-







COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES 89

Students should consult with their departmental advisors or with the
advisor on teacher education in the School of Education.

DEPARTMENT OF ART
OBJECTIVES
The program of the Art Department is designed to educate and train
students to become creative, versatile persons who are capable of functioning
as productive members of their profession and who may take their rightful
place in the cultural life of a given community. This program attempts to
develop the following:
(1) Aesthetic understanding to the end of personal creative competence.
(2) Understanding the role of the visual language with which the stu-
dent works so as to become sensitive to new challenges and oppor-
tunities being afforded by the humanities, education and the sciences.
(3) Satisfactory qualifications for entrance to graduate and professional
schools.
(4) Highly qualified teacher-artists for public school systems.
(5) A meaningful tie with the community at large by means of art activi-
ties for children and adults, art exhibitions, and consultation services.

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS MAJORING IN FINE ARTS
The fine arts program is designed to provide the student with a sound
general background for further study in graduate and professional art schools
in the areas of painting, sculpture, graphics, and ceramics.
The major in fine arts leads to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree
or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Persons working toward these degrees
must satisfactorily complete a minimum of forty-eight (48) quarter hours in art.
B.S. degree candidates are required to complete nine quarter hours of foreign
language study.
Upper division courses taken in the Department must be preceded by
the satisfactory completion of the following course sequences: Art 101, 102, 103;
Art 201, 202, 203; Art 206, 207, 208. Transfer students must present evi-
dence of the satisfactory completion of comparable courses elsewhere. The
following upper-division courses must be satisfactorily completed: Art 300,
301-2-3, 305, 314, 401, 409, and 430.
All fine arts majors must declare a minor field of study outside of the Art
Department. Seniors are required to have a formal exhibition of creative work
during their last quarter in residence. It is anticipated that they will work
closely with their advisors and the Coordinator of Exhibitions in fulfilling
this requirement.

REQUIREMENTS FOT STUDENTS MAJORING IN ART EDUCATION
The art education program prepares students to teach art on the
elementary and secondary school levels. It will also prepare them for graduate
study in art education.






88 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
Each candidate for the A.B. or B.S. degree must complete a major
(thirty-six to forty-eight quarter hours) in one of the following departments:
ART HISTORY (AND GEOGRAPHY)
BIOLOGY LIBRARY SERVICE
BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
Accounting Music
Administration PHILOSOPHY (AND RELIGION)
Education PHYSICS
Secretarial Science POLITICAL SCIENCE
CHEMISTRY PSYCHOLOGY
ECONOMICS SOCIOLOGY
ENGLISH SPEECH
FOREIGN LANGUAGES Speech Correction
French Speech and Drama
Spanish

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Each candidate for the A.B. or B.S. degree must complete a minor (eighteen
to twenty-seven quarter hours) in one of the departmental fields listed above.
With proper approval, a student may minor in education.
With the exception of students in the departments of Foreign Languages,
History and Geography, Philosophy and Religion, Sociology and Speech, a
student will not be permitted to do a major and a minor in the same department.
PRE-LAW
Students who plan to enter law upon graduation or who plan to satisfy
minimum requirements for admission to a particular law school should con-
sult with the Head of the Department of Political Science or with the Dean.

PRE-MEDICINE OR PRE-DENTISTRY
Students who plan to study dentistry or medicine after graduation or
who plan to satisfy specific requirements for admission to a particular dental
or medical school should consult with the Adviser to Pre-Medical and Pre-
Dental Students (Jones Hall).
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
Students who plan to enter theological school after graduation should
consult with the Head of the Department of Philosophy and Religion.
GRADUATE CERTIFICATE
Formal admission to Teacher Education and completion of specified general,
special and professional requirements qualifies a student at the time of graduation
from the College of Arts and Sciences to apply for the Graduate Certificate,
one of the teaching certificates issued by the Florida State Department of
Education.







COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES 91

CERTIFICATION IN ART
Persons desiring to be certified by the Florida State Department of Edu-
cation through the Art Department should consult the Department Head
prior to initiating a program of study. A program of advisement is available
to those persons pursuing this objective.

ELECTIVES IN ART
Persons who are interested in broadening their background, satisfying specific
requirements, or solving special interest problems in art are encouraged to
elect art. Attention is directed to the broad range of art courses which do not
require specific prerequisites.

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS MINORING IN ART
The minor in art shall include the following foundation courses: Art 101,
102, 103; 201-2; 206 (207 or 208). Art 300 supplements this sequence. A
further concentration of at least ten (10) quarter hours may be selected from
one of the following areas: (1) art history, (2) drawing, (3) painting, (4)
ceramics, and (5) design in materials. Upon completion of the foundation
art, the student should report to the Head of the Department for advisement.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
ART
(FOUNDATION COURSES)
101-2-3. Drawing Practice. (1) Basic problems in drawing and composition.
111. Design I: Fundamentals of Design-Introduction to Visual Elements. (2)
An introductory course which directs attention to the principles of visual
organization. Primarily two-dimensional experiences.
112. Design II: Fundamentals of Design-Elementary Form Organization. (2)
A continuation of Design I. An introduction to the three-dimensional aspects
of surface development and structure. Prerequisite: Art 101.
113. Design III: Fundamentals of Design-Intermediate Form Organization.
(2) A continuation of Design II. Emphasis upon the innovate use of materials
and techniques appropriate to the development of three-dimensional structures.
Prerequisite: Art 102.
201. Drawing I: Basic Drawing and Composition-Introduction to Represen-
tation. (2) Use of various drawing media. An introduction to representative
drawing. Primarily a study of still-life.
202. Drawing II: Basic Drawing and Composition-Representation and Spa-
tial Description. (2) A continuation of Drawing I. Spatial description through
use of perspective and other means. Primarily a study of still-life and landscape.
Prerequisite: Art 201.
203. Drawing III: Basic Drawing and Composition-Interpretation, Pic-






90 FLORIDA A. & M. BULLETIN, 1967-68

The major in art education leads to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree
with certification. A minimum of forty-eight (48) quarter hours must be satis-
factorily completed in art. In addition, nine quarter hours of foreign language
study are required. Enrollment in upper-division courses must be preceded by
the satisfactory completion of the following course sequences: Art 101, 102,
103; Art 201, 202; Art 206, 208. Transfer students must present evidence.
of the satisfactory completion of comparable courses.
The following upper-division courses must be satisfactorily completed:
Art 301-2-3, 305, 314, 323, 331 (or 332), 339, 340 (or 341), 360, 409, 419 (or
420 or 421), 426. Certain supporting courses are required: Psychology 211, 301-2,
320; Education 201, 300, 307, 309, 310, 313, 400 (or 401), (or 495). Political
Science 200 is required of art education majors. Art education majors are
expected to initiate a minor problem during the first quarter of the senior year.

FOUNDATION COURSES
A sequence of foundation art courses forms the basis for art study during
the freshman and sophomore years. It consists of the following courses: Art
101, 102, 103; 201, 202, 203; 206, 207, 208. Fine arts majors are expected
to complete the entire sequence; art education majors may exclude Art 203
and Art 207.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS MAJORING IN ART
1. Art majors should earn at least a grade of "C" in courses taken in
the department, otherwise the courses in question must be repeated.
2. Art majors will be required to repeat any of the supporting courses
which a grade of "D" has been received.
3. Art majors who evidence a fundamental weakness in an area of study
may be requested by the Head of the Department to take additional
course work in the area.
4. All transfer students are expected to present a comprehensive portfolio
of work prior to initiating an organized program of study.
5. Art majors are expected to present a comprehensive portfolio of work
(1) upon successful completion of the Foundation Courses, and
(2) during the last quarter in residence.
6. Senior art majors are expected to successfully complete the depart-
mental comprehensive examination in their area of specialization.
7. The department reserves the right to retain at least one example of
a student's creative work in a given course.
8. All persons pursuing an organized program of study in the department
are required to participate in the program of the Art Club.
9. Art majors must make at least two museum and gallery tours under
the auspices of the Art Club.
10. Freshmen who plan to major in art should report to the Head of
the Art Department before attempting to register for any classes.





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