• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 I: Administrative personnel
 II: Reports
 III: Program of studies
 IV: Pupil activity
 V: Library service
 VI: Guidance
 VII: School plant
 VIII: School staff and adminis...
 IX: Guidance
 X: Health
 XI: Pupil activities
 XII: General information for...
 XIII: Schedules
 Personnel






Group Title: Florida A and M University High School: Evaluation handbook
Title: Evaluation handbook, 1958-59
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000196/00001
 Material Information
Title: Evaluation handbook, 1958-59
Alternate Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University High School Evaluation handbook, 1958-59
Physical Description: Serial
Publisher: s.n.
Publication Date: 1959
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000196
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: AAB7886

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page iii
    Dedication
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    I: Administrative personnel
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    II: Reports
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    III: Program of studies
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    IV: Pupil activity
        Page 50
    V: Library service
        Page 51
    VI: Guidance
        Page 52
        Page 53
    VII: School plant
        Page 54
    VIII: School staff and administration
        Page 55
    IX: Guidance
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    X: Health
        Page 65
    XI: Pupil activities
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    XII: General information for teachers
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    XIII: Schedules
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Personnel
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
Full Text
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EVALUATION HANDBOOK















FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL
1958 1959








TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA












FOREWORD

It is our hope that this handbook will present
a clear, comprehensive picture of the administration,
organization, procedures, philosophies, and objectives
of the Florida A and M University High School.
We feel that the information on these pages will do
much to insure that all the members of the school
family will be working toward goals.
The contents of this handbook represent the
thinking and efforts of all who are a part of this school.





/












A Tribute to the Teacher


The teacher is a prophet; He lays the founda-
tions of tomorrow.
The teacher is an artist; He works with the
precious clay of -nfo~Ting personality.
The teacher is a friend; His heart responds
to the faith and devotion of his students.
The teacher is a citizen; He is selected
and licensed for the-improvement of society,
The teacher is an interpreter; Out of his
maturer and wider life he seeks to guide
the young.
The teacher is a builder; He works with the
higher and finer values of civilization.
The teacher is a culture-bearer; He leads
the way toward worthler tastes, saner
attitudes, more gracious manners, higher
intelligence.
The teacher is a planner: He sees the young
lives before him as a part of a great system
which shall grow stronger in the light of
truth.
The teacher is a pioneer; He is always
attempting the impossible and winning out.
The teacher is a reformer; He seeks to
remove the handicaps that weaken and
destroy life.
The teacher is a believer; He has abiding
faith in the improvability of the race.

_Joy Elmer Morgan











TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
I. ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL

State Board of Education . . 1
Florida A and M University and
Florida A and M University High School . 2
Organization Chart ... .... 3
Chart of Floor Plan . . .. 4

II. REPORTS

Pupil Population and School Community .. 5
Educational Needs of Youth . . 27

III. PROGRAM OF STUDIES . .. . 33

Art . . . . . .. 34
Business Education . . . 35
English . . . . .. 37
Foreign Language . . ... 39
Health and Safety . . . .. 40
Homemaking . . . 41
Industrial Arts . . .. 42
Mathematics ..... . .. 43
Music . . . . 45
Physical Education ............. .. 46
Science .. . . .. 47
Social Studies . . ... 49

IV. PUPIL ACTIVITY. . . . .. 50

V. LIBRARY SERVICE . . .. 51

VI. GUIDANCE. . . . .. 52

VII. SCHOOL PLANT. . . . .. 54

VIII. SCHOOL STAFF AND ADMINISTRATION .. .. 55

IX. GUIDANCE

General Statement . . 56
Organization Chart . . . 56a
Description of Organization . .. 57
Functions of Personnel . . .. 58
Testing . . . .. 62











TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED)
Page

X. HEALTH . . . . 64

XI. PUPIL ACTIVITIES . . . 65

Interscholastic Athletics . .. 66
Assemblies . . . . 67
The Homeroom .......... .. 68
GietetL Outline for Orientation . .. 70
Referrals . . . . 72

XII. GENERAL INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS . .

Ethics for Teachers . ... .. 73
Program of Studies . 75
Requirements for Graduation . .. 76
Pupil Accounting . . .... 77
Marking and Appraising . . 79
Code of Behavior for Pupils . .. 80
Style Manual . . . 83
Administrative Policies . . .. 85
Activities . . . 86
Purchases, Visitors, Custodial Service 87
Travel, Field Trips .. ..... .. 88
Personnel Requests and Professional
Requirements .. ... .. 89
Professional Growth ..... . .. 90

XIII. SCHEDULES

Calendar of Events .. ..... 91
Class Schedule . . .. 92
Homerooms . . .. . .. 93
Club . . . . 94
Morning Devotions . .. .. 95
Assembly . . . . 96

XIV. PERSONNEL

Directory . . . .. 98
Extra-Class Duties . . ... 99
Standing Committees . .. 101
Evaluative Criteria Committees . 103
Self-Evaluation Study Committees . 105












STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


Leroy Collins, Chairman
Governor

R. A. Gray
Secretary of State

Richard W. Ervin, Jr.
Attorney General

J. Edwin Larson
State Treasurer

Thomas D. Bailey, Secretary
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

STATE BOARD OF CONTROL

James J. Love, Chairman
Quincy

J. J. Daniel, Vice-Chairman
Jacksonville

James D. Camp, Sr.
Ft. Lauderdale

William C. Gaither
Miami

S. Kendrick Guernsey
Jacksonville

Joe K. Hays
Winter Haven

Ralph L. Miller
Orlando

J. B. Culpepper, Executive Director
Tallahassee










2

FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY


George W. Gore, Jr., President

J. R. E. Lee, Jr., Vice-President

H. Manning Efferson, Dean of Administration

Melvin O. Alston, Dean
School of Education

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL

Matthew H. Estaras, Principal

Evelyn W. Gary, Office Manager







PJ A SENT





DEAN





PRINCIPAL




S HEALTH LUNCHROON
CUSTODIAN SECRETARY GUIDANCE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES





TEACHERS





PUPILS








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PUPIL POPULATION AND SCHOOL COMMUNITY

Tallahassee, which is situated in the Northwest part
of the State, is the capital city of Florida. It is
located on one of seven hills, one hundred and sixty-
nine miles west of Jacksonville, Florida and two hundred
miles east of Pensacola, Florida, the two principal cities
nearest Tallahassee. It is about twenty miles north of

the Gulf of Mexico.

A large number of our state agencies are located in
Tallahassee. There are also two universities of higher
education, the Florida A and M University and the Florida
State University. Three U.S. Highways lead to and from

Tallahassee. They are U.S. 27, U.S. 90, and U.S. 319.
Tallahassee is serviced by two airlines: National
and Eastern; two bus lines: Greyhound and Trailway, and
one Railway: Seaboard Railway.
According to the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce the
population of the city of Tallahassee is 47,021. The

total population of Leon County is 66,530. Approximately

thirty eight per. cent of the total population are Negroes.

Tallahassee's population is increasing rapidly. Job
opportunities in the community are increasing with the
community's growth. Even though we have a favorable


1( 7








6

situation, there is still a moderate amount of unemploy-

ment in unskilled occupations. At the present time,

there is no request for workers in skilled and profession-

al occupations; therefore, the supply is commensurate

with the demand.

The principal industries are farming and manufacturing.

Manufacturing industries produce the following: fruit

and vegetable baskets, wooden boxes and crates, lumber,

concrete blocks, tung oil, turpentine, honey and syrup.

We have had two industries added to Tallahassee in

recent years, namely: Dale Mabry Field Boat Factory and

Tallahassee Park and Shop area. Approximately four to

six Negroes are employed at the boat factory and one

Negro at the park and shop area. The Elberta Crate

Factory, an old industry, employs approximately 500 to

510 Negroes out of 600 employees.

Many persons earn their livelihood from construction

work, service occupations, private businesses, professional,

skilled and unskilled occupations.

The rate of pay for skilled workers at the Elberta

Crate Factory is from $1.27 to $2.05 per hour. For

semi-skilled workers from $1.02 to $1.87 per hour.

The average weekly salary for clerical and sales

occupations is from $41.86 per week to $67.32 per week.

The average for unskilled workers is $1.00 per hour. The






7


average wage for domestic workers is $65.00 per month.

The average working hours per week is from 40.8

hours to 43.3.

The trend in Tallahassee is moving fast toward home-

ownership by individual families; however, there are still

large numbers of homes owned by individual families

which are below minimum standards. About 75 per cent of

the streets are paved and construction of modern homes

continue. There is still the need for more side walks.

Cities Transit Company operates a local bus service

daily from 6:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Two taxi companies

and privately owned cars furnish the rest of the trans-

portation. The majority of our students live in walking

distance of our school; others are transported by cars.

The physical education department has a program of

intramurals for recreation after school which we believe

supplements other forms of recreation carried on in

Tallahassee, such as, those conducted at the Robinson-

Trueblood Swimming Pool from May through September 1 by

the City of Tallahassee Recreation Board.

There are two hospitals, one of which is a state

tuberculosis hospital, and the other is the Florida

A and M University Hospital. There are also a County

health clinic and an out patient clinic connected with

the Florida A and M University Hospital. We have five

Negro physicians andt- dentists. The principal causes

of death in our community are: (1) heart conditions (2)

cancer and (3) accidents.






8



In order to meet the primary needs of the pupils,

it is our belief that the school must know its pupils,

their parents, and the people of the community which it

serves.

The Florida A and M University High School is

located in Tallahassee, on the Florida A and M University

campus, in Leon County in the Northwest section of the

state.

The total secondary school population in this

community is 1,767.

The total enrollment for Florida A and M University

High School was 270 as of October 1, 1958.




I. BASIC DATA REGARDING PUPILS
A. Enrollments and Graduates


LASSIFICATIO .1953-954 1954-1955 155-1956 1956-1957 1957-1958 1958-1959
jBoy GirlsTota Boy Girl Tota BoysGirl Tota Boy Girl Tota Boy Girl Tota BoyGirl Tota

Enrollment:
Regular
Twelfth Gr. 14 23 37 13 29 42 33 38 71 17 10 27 21 221 43 18 191 37
Eleventh Gr. 18 33 51 29 42 71 19 23 42 28 25 53 25 23 4824 28 52
11 9 1 i 56
Tenth Gr. 29 43 72 17 17 34 39 28 67 26' 30 56 29 27 56 19 27 46

Ninth Gr. 12 9 21 20 24 44 20 17 37 33 30 63 27 30 57 29 251 54
------_______ __-_ I_ ----__- -- L
Eighth Gr. 12 20 132 19 14 33 17 17 34 16 17 33 17 14 31 17 15 32




Unclassified 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0

Post graduate I
Full time 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Post graduate
Part time 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
---J4 -4 & -- I I
TOTAL 199 142 241 115 142 257 144 137 281 136 128 264 1341 1331 261 132 138 270
GRADUATES: NC 14- 21 35 12 28 0 1 27 34 610 2 I c0 0
T .,






10

The enrollment has fluctuated as follows in the last
six years:






2

YEAR BOYS GIRLS TOTALS

1953 1954 99 142 241

1954 1955 115 142 257

1955 1956 144 137 281

1956 1957 136 128 264

1957 1958 134 133 267

1958 1959 132 138 270





11


The fluctuation in enrollment has been due to the

fact that more pupils have been admitted to our school

from other schools of the county.




3

YEAR GRADE BOYS GIRLS TOTAL

1953 1954 7th 14 14 28


1954 1955 8th 19 14 33

:1955 1956 9th 20 17 37
I

1956 1957 10th 26 30 56

1957 1958 llth 25 23 48

1958 1959 12th 18 19 37





12

The average age of pupils at entrance into high
school for the Fall 1958 is shown by the age-distribution

chart.


B. AGE-GRADE DISTRIBUTION


AGE 101 i 21
ori 1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 and
GRADE Less O Qvez

Postgraduate


Twelfth 6 17 9 4 1

Eleventh i 11 25 8 6

Tenth 1 18 20 6 0 1

Ninth 1 17 25 11 0 1

Eighth 1 11 13 3 2 1 1

Seventh 18 24 4 2 1



The ages of pupils in this school range from 11 to 20
years. This situation-can be attributed to the following

causes:

1. Acceleration in elementary school
2. Retardation in elementary school
3. Summer school attendance outside of the county
for credit.





13

Provisions that are bin.g mrnde for pupils w;ho
deviate from normal grade levels are as follo;3s:
1. Pupils who are retarded are advised to
attend summer school.
2. The program of studios has been oxpandcd to meot
more adequately the needs of pupils.


C. :-'"TALT ABILITY


(I ,~ j 1 I ---- _f i
I 7 I i i i
T.0 P .C i E I
Sj | I I ,

Over O-r I i
II 124 | 94 3 1

117-124 5-94 9 3 1

jj -- -_.. ___^ --__- ..-- l._ J _
109-116 70-84 10 4 1 1 1 |
S ,_ J 1 l i i
92-108 31-69 91 21 12 18 19 14i 7


S 4-91 16-30 63 9 5 12 14 1 3 i 10
i j i i"I!

i; I i

S3e low elow 34 10 8 8

Total 267 32 4 7 7----
Ii Total i267 f47 32 I54 j 47 | ;7 ,
,ji j I I I i
^ -,,-^^, .^ .-. -..~~~__ ^.,. ,. _^-, -. ^ .^ .t -. _.- .. .,.. -. .-.... -_,^.,





14

There are 15 pupils or 40.5 per cent of the senior

class who have attended this school for 6 years. Only
one member of the senior class has been in attendance
less than 1 year.

D. STABILITY


NUMBER OF YEARS SENIORS
IN THIS SCOLGIRL TOTAL
(INCLUDING BOYS GIRL TOTAL
PRESENT NUM- PERCE
YVAR). BER

1 0 1 1 2.7

2 1 1 2 5.4

3 2 6 8 21.6

4 3 3 6 16.2

5 4 1 5 13.5

6 8 7 15 40.5

7 or more 0 0 0 00.0

TOTAL 18 19 37 99.9





15

In grades 7 through 12 there were 18 withdrawals
during the 12 months preceding the opening of the

1958-1959 term. The main reasons for the withdrawals
and the percentages of the totals were:


E. WITHDRAWALS


TOTAL
REASON FOR WITHDRAWAL BOYS GIRLS TO
U__ -PER -

Disciplinary difficulties 0 0 0 00.0

Entered military service 1 0 1 5.5

Financial reasons 1 0 1 5.5

Illness of pupil 0 0 0 00.0

Lack of interest in school
work 2 1 3 16.6

Marriage 0 1 1 5.5

Obtained work 0 0 0 00.0

Poor scholarship 1 0 1 5.5

Pupil's help needed at home 0 0 0 00.0

Transferred to another school 6 1 7 38.3

Unclassified 1 3 4 22.2

Unknown 0 0 0 00.0

TOTAL 12 6 18 99.1





16

The educational intentions of the present senior

class show 64.8 per cent plan to attend 4-year colleges
or universities; 2.7 per cent plan to attend junior

colleges; 13.5 per cent plan to attend post secondary;

3.1 per cent plan to continue their education but are
undecided on the type of school; 10.8 per cent are
undecided about further education.

F. EDUCATIONAL INTENTIONS


TOTAL
INTENTIONS BOYS GIRL! N

BER CENT
Attend 4-year college oz
university 7 17 24 64.8
Attend junior college 1 0 1 2.7
Attend other post-sec- -
ondary school, e.g.,
business college or 3 2 5 13.5
technical institute
Continue education but
undecided on type of 3 0 3 8.1
school
Stop formal education
upon graduation 0 0 0 00.0
Undecided about further
education 4 0 4 10.8

Unknown 0 0 0 00.0

TOTAL MEMBERS OF
SENIOR CLASS 18 19 37 99.9





17


The educational intentions of our seniors compare

favorably with the educational opportunities afforded.

The occupational intentions of the present senior

class according to categories and the corresponding

percentages are:

G. OCCUPATIONAL INTENTIONS

TOTAL
CATEGORIES BOYS GIRLS NUM- PER
BER CENT

Professional, technical
and managerial work 10 19 29 78.

Clerical and sales work 0 0 0 00.

Service work 6 0 6 16.

Agriculture, marine,
and forestry work 0 0 0 00.C

Mechanical work 0 0 0 00.C

Manual work 0 0 0 00.C

Undecided 2 0 2 5.

Unknown 0 0 0 00.(

TOTAL 18 19 37 100.(






18

In the class of 1958 there were 40 graduates and
twenty eight or 70 per cent of them are enrolled in

schools leading to a bachelor's degree' 2.5 per cent are

in other schools beyond the secondary school; 2.5 per cent

are in the armed forces;n20 per cent in manual work; 5 per

cent are married.

H. FOLLOW-UP DATA OF GRADUATES

TOTAL
CATEGORIES BOYS GIRLS NU-
BER CENT
Schools leading to a
bachelor's degree 12 16 28 70.0

Other schools beyond the
secondary school 1 0 1 2.5

Professional, technical,
and managerial work 0 0 0 00.0

Clerical and sales work 0 0 0 00.0

Service work (Armed Forces 1 0 1 2.5

Agriculture, marine, and
forestry work 0 0 0 00.0

Mechanical work 0 0 0 00.0
Manual work 7 1 8 20.0

Unemployed 0 0 0 00.0

Unknown 0 0 0 00.0

SMarr_ 0 2 2 5.0
TOTAL 19 .40 Q. 0
IQ-





19

From the occupational survey of the parents of the

pupils enrolled in this school we find the following
percentages:

II. BASIC DATA REGARDING THE COMMUNITY

B. OCCUPATIONAL STATUS OF ADULTS


SMEN WOMEN TC TAL
OCCUPATIONS JM- P-FER- NM P- NUM- PEH-
SB ER CENT BER CENT BER CENT
lProfessional and semi-
iprofessional workers 54 29.3 66 30.4 120 29.9
rFarmers and farm managers 1.6 0 00.0 3 0.7
, Proprietors, managers,1
and officials, except
farm 4 2.2 0 0 4 1.01
Clerical and kindred I
workers 13 7.1 8 3.6 21 5.3
Salesmen and saleswomen 4 2.2 1 0.5 5 1.2
Craftsmen, foremen, and
kindred workers 24 13.0 3 1.4 27 6.7
Operatives and kindred
workers 7 3.7 7 3.2 14 3.5
Domestic service workers 3 1.6 44 20.3 47 11.7
Service workers, except
domestic 18 9.8 29 13.6 47 11.7
Farm laborers and
foremen 0 00.0 3 1.4 3 0.7
Laborers, except farm
and mine 44 23.9 0 00.0 44 11.0
Homemakers 0 00.0 55 25.3 55 13.7
Unemployed or on relief 10 5.4 1 00.5 11 2.7
Unknown 0 00.0 0 00.0 0 00.0

TOTAL 184 99.9 217 100.0 401 99.8






20

From the educational survey of the parents of the

pupils enrolled in this school we find the following

percentages:

C. EDUCATIONAL STATUS OF ADULTS


MEN i 1AOMEN TOTAL
EDUCATIONAL STATUS NUMT PER- _NUM- P ER- NUM PER-
8__________ BER CENTI BER CENT B ER CENT
Attended but did not
complete elementary
school 15 8.2 14 6.5 29 7.2
Completed elementary
school 15 8.2 9 4.1 24 6.0
Attended but did not
complete high school 48 26.1 55 25.3 103 25.7

school 28 15.2 40 18.4 68 17.0
Attended but did not
graduate from post-
secondary-school 10 5.4 13 6.0 23 5.7
Completed a two-year
college or post-
secondary-school
course 3 1.6 3 1.4 6 1.5

Graduated from four-
year college (or
equivalent course 19 10.3 26 12.0 45 11.2
Completed and engaged
in graduate study 37 20.1 52 24.0 89 22.2
Trade School 9 4.9 5 2.3 14 3.5

TOTAL 184 100.0 217 100.0 401 100.0
.,..'T" 64-





21


G. Agencies Affecting Education

1. OTHER SCHOOLS (FOR YOUTH OF SECONDARY-SCHOOL AGE)

There is one other Negro high school in our

community. This high school is located in the North-

west section of Tallahassee, and it serves the majority

of high school pupils in our community. The high school

pupils, who enter the Florida A and M University High

School, come from Bond Junior High School and Griffin

Junior High School.

2. CHURCHES

We have 44 churches in our community of which

a large number of our students are members. These

pupils are members of each faith represented below:

There are 20 Baptist churches
There are 7 Methodist churches
There are 9 Holiness churches
There is .__ __ Tr.iunph, The Church and
Kingdom of God in Christ
There are 2 Catholic churches
There is 1 Episcopal church
There is 1 Presbyterian church
There is 1 Apostolic Faith
There is 1 Jehovah Witness
There is 1 Seven Day Adventist

The Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance is an

organization composed of ministers representing a number

of the faiths of the churches in our city. This

organization extends a positive influence in our

community in developing good will among the faiths

represented in our school. Each year the organization

contributes a cash award to a graduating boy and girl

in our senior and junior high schools for outstanding

achievements.





22


3. LIBRARIES

There are six libraries to serve the pupils in

our community, These libraries, with the exception

of Griffin Library, are opened year-round. They are:

Florida A and M University Library, Florida A and M

University High School Library, Lincoln High School

Library, Griffin Junior High School Library, Bond

Junior High School Library, and the Leon County Public

Library.

In the summer, Leon County Board of Education

provides a full time educational and recreational

program which includes library services. A full time

librarian at the Lincoln High School Center and a

full time librarian at the Bond Junior High School

center provide library experiences and service

for any pupil between the ages of five and eighteen.

During the summer, the public library which is

located on Adams Street tries to stimulate reading

in pupils of all ages by a club known as the Bookworm

Club. Florida A and M University library provides

services for students, in-service teachers, and

personnel of the University.

The Florida State Library located in the Supreme

Court Building is at our disposal also.





23

4. MUSEUMS, ART GALLERIES, PLANETARIUMS, BOTANICAL
GARDENS AND ZOOS

There are no art galleries or planetariums in our

community. We do however, have an opportunity to

visit art exhibits sponsored by teachers and students

from the Florida A and M University Art Department,

There are art exhibits placed in the Lewis State

Bank each year, and our pupils are permitted to visit

them as class observations, or they may make

individual observations.

The Junior Museum, located on the corner of

Madison and Adams Streets, provides educational

experience in that it shows the early types of dress,

household furnishings, agricultural equipment, and

some of the agricultural products of this area. Some

live animals can also be seen at the Junior Museum.

The Texaco Zoo which is located at the end of the

Apalachee Parkway is very small; however, it provides

rich educational experiences for our pupils who are

interested in various types of animals.

5. FORUMS, LYCEUMS, OPERAS, PLAYS, AND MUSICAL
P PERFORMANCES

Florida A and M University High School is

located on the Florida A and M University campus which

sponsors yearly a number of forums and musical

performances, and our faculty and most of our students





24


attend; but facilities for the general public are

limited. During certain seasons, especially the

Easter and Christmas Seasons, many of our pupils

participate in musical performances and forums in

Church-Sunday School sponsored programs.

6. ORGANIZED SERVICE GROUPS

In this community there are several organized

service groups such as the Chamber of Commerce, the

American Legion, The Civic League, The N.A.A.C.P.,

The Frontiers of America, The Quarterback Club, The

Lions Club, The Kiwanis Club, The Down Town Employees

Club, and the Greek Letter Organizations. All of

these contribute to the total development of our pupils.

7. HEALTH CENTERS, CLINICS

In our community we have two hospitals, one health

department and one out-patient clinic connected with

Florida A and M University Hospital.

8. RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

The following recreational facilities are found

in our community:

1. Jake Gaither Park-Golf Course
2. Robinson-Trueblood Swimming Pool
3. Lee Park
4. J. B. Bragg Stadium
5. Centennial Field
6. West Park
7. College Park





25


The city of Tallahassee sponsors a recreational

program at each of the city's parks. These parks

are opened from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. This program

is under the auspices of playground supervisors

during the summer months.

The County Board of Education sponsors a program

at three schools, Griffin Junior High School, Lincoln

High School, and Bond Junior High School. The

program starts in June and ends in early August. Arts

and crafts, photography, driver education, music, and

supervised play which involves soft ball, dodge

ball, horse show, quiet games (Chinese Checkers,

checkers, dominoes), basketball, social dances, movies,

field trips and excursions are the sponsored activities.

9. MOTION PICTURE THEATERS

There is only one public motion picture theater

in the city of Tallahassee to serve the pupils in our

community the year round. The Lincoln Drive-in

Theater is open from early spring to late fall.

A movie is shown each Friday night during the

school term for pupils and adults on the University

campus; however, a number of the pupils from our

community attend.





26

10. COMMERCIALIZED ENTERTAINMENT

Three poolrooms and a dance hall are located in

the Northwest section of the city. There are several

restaurants and cafes located in the Northwest and

Southeast sections where dancing is carried on.

Bert's, Smitty's, The Smoke Shop, Deluxe Cafe, Orange

Blossom Cafe, El-Chico Grill, Orange and Green Cafe

and Abner's Cafe are some of these establishments.





27


Educational Needs of Youth

The members of the faculty of the Florida A and M

University School agree with the generally accepted

view-point that the responsibility of meeting the

educational needs of all youth of secondary age is the

primary function of secondary education in America. In

the light of this view-point the students, faculty, and

parents studied and reacted to the eight common needs of

youth as presented in "Section C" of the Evaluative

Criteria./

As a means of arriving at a common understanding of

these eight needs, the faculty discussed each need at

length, emphasizing the strengths and weaknesses of this

school.

Members of the faculty indicated on duplicated

checklists the extent to which they accepted meeting the

eight needs as a responsibility of the school. The

attitude of the professional staff concerning these needs

is "Complete Acceptance."

Faculty members, students, and parents indicated on

checklists the extent to which they felt that this school

meets each need. Graphical summaries of the evaluation

of students and parents were presented to the faculty
for consideration in planning to improve the total program






28


of the school. Faculty reactions were tallied as a means

of arriving at a composite opinion.
The following is a report of the attitude of the

staff members concerning the extent to which the school is

meeting these needs.

A. They need to learn to live with other human beings.
The consensus is that the school is meeting this

need between moderately and moderately extensively.

B. They need to achieve and maintain sound mental and
physical health.
The consensus is that the school is meeting

this need between moderately and moderately extensively.

C. They need to learn to live in their natural and
scientific environment.

The consensus is that the school is meeting this

need between moderately and moderately extensively.

D. They need sound guidance.
The consensus is that the school is meeting this

need between moderately and moderately extensively.

E. They need to learn to think logically and express

themselves clearly.

The consensus is that the school is meeting this

need between moderately and moderately extensively.

F. They need to prepare for work for further education,

or for both.






29

The consensus is that the school is meeting this
need between moderately and moderately extensively.

G. They need to learn to use their leisure well.

The consensus is that the school is meeting this
need between moderately and moderately extensively.

H. They need to learn to live aesthetically.

The consensus is that the school is meeting this
need between moderately and moderately extensively.






30

PHILOSOPHY OF FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY SCHOOL


GENERAL STATEMENT

The Florida A and M University School includes

grades one through twelve. Any pupil who meets the

requirements as set forth in the school laws of the State

of Florida may enroll.

Opportunities are provided for pupils to take courses

that will meet requirements for college entrance and to

develop some occupational skills.

The basic functions of the school are to serve as an

educational institution for boys and girls and as a

laboratory school for the School of Education of Florida

A and M University.

The functions of the school in serving the teacher-

education program are: (1) to furnish professional

laboratory experiences preceding and following student

teaching, (2) to serve as a student teaching center, when

necessary, (3) to provide opportunities for directed

observation and participation as inherent aspects of pro-

fessional courses, and (4) to provide opportunities for

experimentation and research.

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that the primary task of this school is to

prepare students to function effectively in a democratic

society and thereby to influence social progress and sustain





31


the American way of life.
We further believe that it is the obligation of this

school to promote the development of sound health habits,

socially desirable attitudes and values, social and
economic competencies, critical thinking and academic

literacy, and understandings of and appreciations for

democratic living.
Therefore, we purpose to provide pupils with

experiences which will achieve the following objectives:

1. To foster intelligent participation in the home
and community.

2. "To establish understandings of and appreciations
for American ideals and principles.

3. To develop understandings of human relationships.

4. To develop abilities to share ideas and solve
common problems.

5. To promote appreciations of high ideals and
ethical values.

6. To develop sound, effective physical and mental
health habits and practices.

7. To develop appreciations for the environment,
in relation to everyday living.

8. To develop skills necessary for the intelligent
consumption of goods and services.

9. To foster the acquisition of knowledge and skills
which promote economic sufficiency.

10. To encourage a maximum development of skills,
interests and talents.

11. To promote independent, critical, and logical
thinking.






32


12. To develop skills necessary for effective
communication.

13. To promote creativeness by encouraging self-expression.

14. To develop skills and appreciations which foster
wholesome recreational and leisure time activities.

15. To promote aesthetic living.





333



Program of Studies

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that the basic function of the Program

of 'Studies of Florida A and M University High School

is to provide experiences which will help meet the

common and individual educational needs of its pupils.

Therefore, our objectives are as follows:

1. To provide activities that will develop
the general abilities of the pupils.
2. To provide activities that will develop
habits, attitudes, and ideals for present
and future living in a democracy.

3. To provide experiences which will prepare
pupils for higher education.

4. To provide activities which will
develop skills and interests for after
school use.






34


Art


PHILOSOPHY

We at the Florida A and M University High School

believe that education is designed to develop the whole

child and that all experiences in the school should

lend themselves to the execution of this belief.

Therefore, art education is designed primarily to develop

aesthetic values, to provide opportunity for individual

expression, and to develop artistic skills for

avocational and vocational pursuits.

OBJECTIVES

In light of this philosophy the following objectives

are proposed:

1. To acquaint the pupil with the contributions
of art in the development of past and
present cultures.

2. To provide creative experiences with a
variety of art media.

3. To provide opportunity to apply basic
principles of design in functional situations.

4. To provide talented pupils with the
orientation necessary for selection of
specialized art offerings.





35


Business Education

We believe that the primary function of business

education is to provide the basic skills, knowledge,

habits, attitudes, ideals and appreciations for

successful living in the business framework of one's

environment.

We believe that business education classes should

be conducted in such a way that pupils learn to work

cooperatively, to think critically and logically, to

accept criticism thoughtfully and appreciatively, and

to observe the rules of courtesy.

We believe that the pupils in business education

should foster the development of an inquiring mind.

We believe that the pupils should be prepared

intelligently to cope with economic conditions.

We further believe that the pupils should develop

skills necessary for the intelligent consumption of

goods and services.

OBJB3TIVES

1. To establish understandings of and
appreciations for American ideals and
principles.

2. To foster intelligent participation in
the home and community.

3. To provide skills necessary for the
intelligent consumption of goods and services.





36


4. To use effectively all the personal
skills, business services, and facilities
necessary in conducting the business
activities of the consumer.

5. To provide exploratory experiences that
will help pupils to discover their
interests, aptitudes and abilities for
business education.





37


English


We believe that the high school student is

entitled to a confident command of the resources of the

English language. He will be called upon to use language

in many varying situations, and he can do so intelligently

only if he receives a sound foundation. Hence, the

activities of the English program are centered around the

major forms of language, reading, writing, speaking, and

listening. Through careful organization, these activities

are fused into a workable program, and students move

progressively from one desired skill to another.

The English program is functional, and it is con-

cerned with the individual pupil's learning problems

both in the classroom and in life outside of the school.

The following objectives in language and literature

have been established as goals:

1. To develop the ability to read with understanding
materials within the comprehension and emotional
range of the high school pupil.

2. To develop an understanding of and appreciation
for correctness in written and spoken language.

3. To develop the ability to think clearly and
express ideas in a concise orderly way in
oral and written communication.









38


4. To build an appreciation for and interest in
literature, past and present, with emphasis on
Aerican litafatuif which stresses the American
literary heritage.
5. To promote social sensitivity.








39


Foreign Language
(Spanish)


We believe that with the shifting events in our

rapidly shrinking modern work, now as never before,

there is need to understand other peoples and to

evaluate their way of thinking. We also believe that

a language study provides an answer for that need. We

further believe that a student studying a foreign

language should be able to use it as a method of

communication of thoughts, ideas, and emotions. Therefore,

we subscribe to the following objectives:

That a student studying the language should:

1. Develop the ability to read and write in
the foreign language.

2. Speak it an understand it when it is spoken.

3. Develop cosmopolitan sympathies and eliminate
provincial attitudes.

4. Appreciate in a larger measure the way of life
of all foreign people.

5. Develop the ability to think logically.

6. Have an increased ability in English grammar
and vocabulary.









40

Health and Safety

PHILOSOPHY

The health of the whole child in his total

environment involves the school wurKing cooperatively

with the home and the community in providing experiences

which are conducive to desirable health and safety

behavior.

A well organized and progressive program in health

and safety is essential for every high school student

in order to provide these experiences.

OBJB;TIVES

1. To understand the "wholeness" of an individual
and to realize that any part of living affects
all parts of living.

2. To enable the pupil to identify himself
whole-heartedly and constructively with the
social and community life around him.

3. To help the pupil to develop and maintain a
wholesome and happy home relationship.

4. To encourage healthful living through the
formation of basic health skills, good
health habits, and wholesome attitudes.




41


Homemaking


PHILOSOPHY

We believe that homemaking education should help

pupils to assume responsibility, to achieve a wholesome

and effective family life, and to develop attitudes,

appreciations and values which are compatible with democratic

principles.

We also believe that homemaking should help pupils

to recognize and to solve problems that affect home,

community, and family life critically and logically.

We further believe that homemaking should contribute

to the development of integrated personalities and gracious

living standards.

OBJECTIVES

1. To develop the ability to use wisely available
human and material resources such as time,
energy, health, and money.

2. To develop the ability to use effectively methods
and procedures leading to the development of
skills in homemaking.

3. To develop an appreciation for the the importance
of homemaking as a vocation.

4. To develop an appreciation for and competence in
the skills of homemaking.

5. To develop the ability to create an attractive
and pleasing environment in the home by
recognizing and using actual and potential
resources.

6. To develop an understanding of one's responsibilitL'
as a member of the family, the school and the
community groups in a democratic society and to
develop the ability to participate as a member
of such groups.






42


Industrial Arts


PHILOSOPHY

We believe that industrial arts courses play a

vital role in helping boys and girls to understand the

modern machine age. We also believe that a chance should

be given the students to investigate their interests and

abilities in the various vocational areas. We further

believe that such courses should emphasize consumer

values.

Therefore we subscribe to the following objectives:

1. To develop the ability to plan and complete
projects using a variety of tools and con-
struction materials in a workman like manner.

2. To give experiences that will increase under-
standing of modern industry ahd that will lay
the foundation for ard help to determine
vocational interest.

3. To develop the ability to read and to make work-
able drawings, charts and graphs.

4. To develop the ability to recognize quality
and design in the products of industry.

5. To develop the ability to maintain and to
service in a safe and efficient manner the common
products of industry.

6. To provide an objective medium for expression in
mathematics, science, language, arts, and social
sciences.

7. To develop an interest in crafts as a valuable
medium for creative expression in leisure time.

8. To give experiences that will develop social
understanding and ability to work effectively
with others, either as a leader or as a
member of the group.









43


Mathematics

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that mathematical concepts and

principles form the foundations for common and specialized

mathematical needs of high school pupils who are to

function in a useful, practical, and satisfactory manner

in a democracy.

We further believe that each new principle, when first
presented, is carefully tied in with other principles

upon which it depends. We subscribe to the point of view

that this procedure is to enrich the principles that have

been previously used and to give the pupils a correct and

thorough understanding of the meaning of the new

principles being introduced.

We believe that learning is primarily an interaction
of the personality of an individual with his environment;

therefore, provisions are made for students to acquire

an appreciation and an understanding of quantitative

relationships in everyday life.

OBJECTIVES

1. To acquire a rich mathematical background for
further mathematical and scientific training.

2. To develop the ability to think independently
and to discover mathematical truths and
relationships for themselves.








44


3. To develop the ability to transfer training in
mathematics to the solution of present and
future problems.

4. To develop the ability to think critically and
analytically in mathematical situations as
well as in non-mathematical situations.

5. To individually attain that level of mathematical
competency which is needed.

6. To develop a sense of appreciation for the
importance of mathematics to an individual and
its contribution to the development of
civilization.

7. To develop an understanding of the basic
mathematical concepts through repetition and
application in new situations.

8. To make the mathematical processes meaningful.

9. To develop a workable understanding of
mathematics.








45

Music

PHILOSOPHY
We feel that music in our school and in any school

should consist basically of music appreciation, a

knowledge of basic music notation, sight-singing, and a

high regard for fundamentals and principles of musical
knowledge. In a modern world, where aesthetic values

are ever on the increase, music and its corresponding

arts will prove invaluable in coping with the world of

tomorrow.

OBJ ETIVES

1. To develop an appreciation of music through
listening and actual experiences.

2. To aid students in becoming familiar with
basic notation.

3. To provide opportunities for students to learn
about musical instruments and opportunities for
talented students to become adept in instru-
mental music.

4. To provide for creative ability in musical
experiences, whether instrumental or vocal.

5. To discover special talent in any area of music
and to develop that talent for the pupil's
best use.







46


Physical Education

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that physical education is an

essential factor in the complete education of youth today.

It is designed to help meet the needs of the individual

and the needs of society.

It is further believed that activities should be

selected on the basis of their educational value and

conducted in such a manner as to achieve the greatest

possible educational results.

OBJECTIVES

1. To promote organic growth through participation
in activities which will contribute to the
physical well-being of the individual.

2. To promote mental and emotional growth by
providing opportunities for creativeness and
personality development.

3. To promote social-behavior>. growth through
the development of such traits as self-
discipline, loyalty, respect for the rights
of others, ipcdership, honesty and good
sportsmanship.

4. To contribute toward the worthy use of leisure
time, both in school and adult life.









47


Science

PHILOSOPHY

Science is the tool by which man controls his

environment. It is the instrument used in promoting
man's welfare and advancement. We believe, therefore,

that science is a vital part of our school's curriculum

in as much as it provides opportunities for our pupils

to develop an appreciation for and an understanding of the

basic scientific concepts of life. We believe that

science should alter false conceptions and attitudes to-

ward life and influence man to depend upon truths and

rational processes of thinking.

We further believe that the methods of science are

bases of social progress and are even more important

than the purely material products of science. We believe

that science should equip all pupils with information,

understandings and certain abilities which will contribute

to the healthful, intellectual, spiritual, and physical
aspects of living.

OBJECTIVES:

1. To develop within the student scientific
attitudes so that he may be better prepared
to live in a democratic society.

2. To present factual information so that super-
stitions and ignorance will be minimized.








48

3. To stimulate intellectual curiosity about the
world in which we live.

4. To help develop an appreciation of ethical
values which shall undergird all life in a
democratic society.

5. To create interest for science and the
appreciation of scientific principles as applied
to everyday living.

6. To give practice in the expression of scientific
ideas in clear and correct English.

7. To acquaint each student with the part that
science plays in the development and the
prosperity of his environment.

8. To help the pupil recognize his needs, interests
and abilities.

9. To aid the pupil in selecting future science
courses.

10. To present functional concepts, facts, and
understandings of scientific principles.

11. To endeavor to make pupils aware of themselves
and of their surroundings by providing real
life experiences in the classroom.

12. To satisfy the natural curiosity of the pupils
regarding the normal development of the body
and mind.








49

Social Studies

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that the social studies program of any

school should acquaint the pupil with the historical

background from which our present society has evolved.

We also believe that pupils should understand the

problems related to the production, consumption, and

distribution of goods and services and that they should

be academically equipped to be constructively and logically

critical of contemporary political, social, and economic

problems.

We further believe that the social studies program

should inspire students to be functional and responsible

American citizens.

OBJECTIVES

1. To develop all pupils as functional citizens
of their community.

2. To inspire all pupils to improve their environment.

3. To stimulate all pupils to know themselves and
their responsibilities.

4. To encourage all pupils to take an active
part in citizenship duties.

5. To encourage all pupils to conserve our human
and natural resources effectively.

6. To encourage all pupils to evaluate propaganda
and truth in terms of facts rather than emotions.








50


Pupil Activity Program

GENERAL STATEMENT:

The pupil activity program of the Florida A and M

University High School is an integral part of school

life. The activities are planned to supplement and

enrich the program of studies.

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that the pupil activity program should

be based upon pupil needs and interests and that it

should provide opportunities for the development of

democratic practices through cooperative living and working.

We further believe that these experiences should

provide opportunities for pupils to pursue interests, to

develop creative talents, to acquire abilities to lead and

to follow, and to improve social competencies.

OBJECTIVES

1. To discover and develop special interests,
skills, and talents.

2. To provide for the exploration of a variety
of interests.

3. To foster the development of attitudes and
abilities necessary for effective democratic
living.

4. To promote the development of desirable
social and personal traits.

5. To provide opportunities for self-expression
and creativity.

6. To foster the development of school spirit.








51

Library

PHILOSOPHY

The school library functions to further the over-

all objectives of the school. It is a service agency

providing materials for all subjects and interests of

pupils and teachers. As a teaching agency it teaches

the use of books and libraries, suggests the reading of

books which might otherwise be unknown or neglected,

supplies all types of materials for developing and

expanding interest, and stimulates new interests. The

library is also a reading center for enjoying books,

investigating problems, studying and using all types of

library materials.

OBJECTIVES

1. To provide our clientele with library materials
and services most appropriate and meaningful in
their growth and development.

2. To stimulate and guide pupils in all phases of
their reading so that they may find increased
enjoyment and satisfaction and may grow in
critical judgment and appreciation.

3. To help children and young people to become
skillful and discriminating users of libraries
and library materials.

4. To provide an opportunity through library
experiences for boys and girls to develop help-
ful interests, to make satisfactory personal
adjustments, and to acquire desirable social
attitudes.









52

Guidance

GENERAL STATEMENT.

The guidance services of the Florida A and M
University High School permeate each phase of the school

program and provide organized assistance to all pupils

in making adjustments necessary for successful, satisfactory

living. The program emphasizes self-understanding, self-

adjustment, and the prevention of maladjustment.

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that the guidance services should provide
assistance for all pupils in acquiring self-understanding,
making adequate social and personal adjustments, evaluating

choices, modifying plans, selecting courses of action, and

achieving reasonable goals.

We further believe that these services should be
directed toward helping pupils to become progressively

more able to help themselves.
OBJECTIVES

1. To help pupils to know and to accept themselves-
their abilities, aptitudes, interests, and needs.
2. To aid 4up4is. in making adjustments to
school life.

3. To acquaint pupils with occupational and
educational information.

4. To help pupils select reasonable goals, both
immediate and long-range, in terms of their
interests, abilities, and opportunities.









53


To assist pup 1 i .i hn (tci11 ) IId

6. To assist pupils with problems of social and
personal adjustment.

7. To help pupils plan to solve their own problems.
8. To help pupils acquire socially desirable
attitudes, values, and habits.

9. To provide information about pupils and their
needs for the use of the staff in evaluating the
curriculum and improving instructional techniques.









54


School Plant


We believe that the school plant makes a major

contribution to the functioning of the total school

program and is, in a large measure, a determining factor

in how much or how little is achieved by pupils.

We further believe that the school plant should provide

an environment of such beauty and organization that it

will engender in the pupil an appreciation of and a

desire for healthful and attractive surroundings.

OBJECTIVES

1. To provide physical facilities that meet the
needs of the program.

2. To develop a desire for more healthful and
attractive home surroundings.

3. To stimulate members of the community to use its
facilities to the maximum extent.









55

School Staff and Administration

It is the belief of the school staff and administration

of the Florida A and M University High School that the

coordination and fusion of all school experiences and

services for the optimum development of pupils are the

primary goals of the school. We believe that harmonious

cooperation of staff members a discerning leadership

can provide direction for the accomplishment of these

goals.

We further believe that the resources of the school,

both human and physical, should be constantly at the

disposal of the community for a cooperative approach

to the solution of the problems of education.

We are vitally concerned with realizing the following

objectives:

1. To create a wholesome environment which will
enable pupils to develop physically, mentally,
socially and emotionally.

2. To provide an adequate program of studies and
experiences which will meet the needs of pupils
in an everchanging society.

3. To develop within boys and girls the desire for
adequate training in order to become active
participants in and contributors to the
development of American democracy.

4. To encourage and to assist staff members with
in-service growth.









56


GUIDANCE SERVICE


The guidance program is concerned with a careful study

of the pupil and with helping him to understand himself so

that he may live, grow, and develop as much as possible in

his environment.
The guidance program tends to learn about the interests,

abilities, problems and other information relating to the

plans of students, and to make this information available to
other members of the school staff.
The school guidance program concerns itself, not only

with the maladjusted and the trouble makers, but with every

student in the school. It is concerned with supplying

informational services, counseling services, placement and

follow-up and with assisting the school staff, and working

toward a better home, school and community relationship.

The school counselor is interested in having personal

interviews, meeting with groups of students for different

guidance purposes upon request, and in conferring with staff

members, parents and other persons or groups who may be

concerned about improving the guidance program.




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57

Description of Organization

The guidance service include pupil inventory,

information, counseling, health, placement, and

follow-up. The principal assumes administrative

responsibility and makes provisions for the effective

functioning of the program which is coordinated by

two counselors. One counselor works directly with

boys and the senior high homeroom program; the other

works directly with girls and the junior high homeroom

program.

All teachers assist in appropriate phases of the

guidance program, with homeroom sponsors being directly

responsible for group guidance activities.

The librarian assumes the responsibility for storing

,3terials and making them available to pupils and teachers.

The health services are coordinated by the school

nurse.







58


Guidance Functions of School Personnel

THE PRINCIPAL
1. Establishes a continuing process of taking
inventory of students' needs, interests, and
abilitic3.

2. Supervises the evaluation and revision of the
curriculum and co-curriculum in the light of
such inventories.

3. Arrn-oes the school schedule so that the student
and special resource personnel can have time
in vhich to meet.

4. Plans, promotes, and assists with the in-service
training of the faculty.

5. M'a'os adequate budget requests to implement the
program.

6. Provides for the continuous evaluation and
rcvision of the guidance program.

7. F-los to define the administrative structure,
to clarify line and staff operations, and to
defirn job descriptions.

8. Provides an educational setting in which
co:mptent counselors can operate effectively.

9. Acts -s a public relations agent to staff,
cthor edrinistrative heads, and community.

THE COT'SELORS
1. C"Q. i7Dni o and provide leadership for the
rui'-Zce services.

2. Supervise the testing program

3. Do-velcp methods of recording information about
Sst :, fc 3 .

4. Serve as resource persons for teachers and
azc.inistration.

5. D -olop and maintain a system of placement
a. fol2owN-up.

6. Initiate a research program.






59


7. Secure and disseminate occupational and
educational information.

o. Accumulate and organize basic data about pupils
for staff use.

9. Utilize community referral resources,

10. Help teachers develop instructional activities
more closely related to guidance needs of
pupils.

11. Help staff gather, organize, and use educational
and occupational information.

12. Help staff conduct research and evaluation
studies.

13. Interpret test results to pupils.

14. Provide for orientation of new pupils.

15. Help pupils make long range plans in terms of
abilities and limitations.

16. Assist pupils in choice of courses.

17. Analyze reasons for student failure and suggest
remedial procedures.

18. Assist pupils in making choices of educational
institutions for further training.

19. Provide counseling service for pupils.

20. Coordinate the guidance activities of the
homerooms.

21. Assist pupils who have adjustment problems.

C. THE GUIDANCE COMMITTEE
Interprets gudancEe program to staff.
2. Makes recommendations regarding guidance policies.

3. Studies needs, purposes, and procedures
essential to the development of guidance services.

4, Helps evaluate guidance services.

5. Helps plan in-service professional development
activities.







60


D. THE H3OMROOM TEACHERS
1. Prepare and maintain personal records of pupils.

2. Help disseminate information.

3. Recognize and screen emotional problems.

4. Refer deviant behavior cases to the counselor.

5. Observe daily relationships of pupils.

8. Assist in placement of pupils in the school
program.

9. Help pupils make appropriate plans in terms of
their abilities and limitations.

10. Inform teachers of significant facts about
students enrolled in their classes.

11. Handle group guidance activities.

12. Assist in the orientation of new pupils.

13. Use cumulative records and other informational
data in assisting pupils with individual
problems.

E. TEACHERS
T. 7Provide instruction based on subject matter out-
comes and needs of pupils.

2. Create desirable emotional climates in classrooms.

3. Encourage pupils to work to their capacity.

4. Acquire information and insights about pupils
and their experiences.

5. Make information about pupils available to
counselors (anecdotal records, case studies,
sociometric studies).

6. Detect emerging maladjustments.

7. Refer deviant behavior to counselor.

8. Help disseminate occupational information.

9. Provide group activities in citizenship,
leadership, and personality development.







61


10. Implement decisions made as a result of pupils'
contacts with counselors.

11. Develop effective contacts with parents and
community agencies.

12. Promote the development of effective study habits.

13. Use tests to identify pupils with special
talents or weaknesses4

14. Adjust class procedures to meet individual needs
of pupils.
15. Use pupil cumulative records in understanding
individual pupils.

16. Cooperate with counselors in helping pupils elect
course offerings to meet individual pupil needs.

F. THE LIBRARIAN
1. Assists counselor and teachers in building
guidance library.

2. Files unbound occupational and educational
information.

3. Maintains an "occupational shelf' for bound
materials.

4. Displays informational materials.

5. Provides for the storage of guidance materials
and makes them available to both pupils and teachers.

6. Helps secure occupational and educational materials.

7. Acquaints counselors and teachers with new
guidance materials reaching the library.

G. THE SCHOOL NURSE
1. Determines physical fitness of pupils for
school work.

2. Secures and maintains health records.

3. Identifies pupils who need medical or dental service.

4. Refers pupils to doctor or dentist.

5. Reports medical or dental needs to parents.
6. Follows up recommendations of doctors and dentists.







62


Testing

The testing program of the Demonstration Schools is

designed to meet the needs of the school. Cur program is

designed so that each pupil is exposed to standardized

testing from the time he enters until he completes his

work here.

The main purposes of our testing program are: (1) to

provide guidance for individual pupils; (2) to help the

teacher in planning and carrying out needed guidance for

her pupils. Teachers are encouraged to make use of test

results in attempting to help students. However, it must

be remembered that tests don't tell every thing about an

individual, but that the results are to supplement other

information gathered by teachers.

Test results will be made available to teachers upon

request. These results are to be kept confidential and are

not to be given out indiscriminately to students. Students

should be given information as to their relative positions

in terms of the areas measured rather than exact scores.

Adequate explanation of what they measure should always

precede the presentation of information about test scores

to students and parents. Because of the degree of maturity

of secondary school pupils, more information can be given

them than elementary pupils. However, elementary school..

pupils might be told how they performed on a test relative

to previous testing.







63


Standardized tests at the Florida A and M University

Schools are usually administered by the principal and

counselor and scored either by machine or teachers of the

respective homerooms. This method is employed so that the

testing program will be looked upon as a achoolwwide program

rather than the work of one department of the school.

Test scores are to be recorded in the student's

cumulative record. The date the test was given, name of

test, form used, total scores, and I.Q., percentile rank'

results should be recorded. It is important that test

results be passed on from grade to grade in the cumulative

record.

Listed below are tests which are usually given. Upon

request by teachers, retesting and special testing will be

administered by the principal, counselor or the university

testing bureau. Tests are administered during the

beginning and closing periods of the academic year.

INTELLIGENCE TESTS

Grade 1 Detroit First Grade
Grade 3 S.R.A. Primary. Mental Abilities
Grade 5 Otis Quick Scoring
Grade 7 Kuhlmann-Anderson Intelligence Testsr
Grade 9 S.R.A. Primary Mental Abilities
Grade 11 Otis Quick Scoring
Grade 12 American Council on Education

ACHIEVEMENT

Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 Metropolitan Achievement Tests
Grade 10 Iowa High School Content
Grade 12 Florida 12th Grade Testing Program (A.C.E.)

ADJUSTMENT AND INTEREST
Bell-Adjustment Inventory
Kuder Preference Record







64


Health

Health is a basic objective of the school program.

Certain health services.help personnel become acquainted

with the health problems of children and provide a means

of helping secure solutions to their problems. To

learn effectively, children need good health.

The following school health services are provided:

1. Health Appraisal: The information secured
through this procedure helps the teachers
to understand their pupils and to select
those needing a modified education program.

2. Health Counseling and Follow-Through: An
effort is made to aid the parent an child in
learning how to meet and solve health problems.

3. Emergenc Care: We provide prompt emergency
care for those who become injured or ill
while at school. Our first aid procedures are
based on the assumption that arrangements
will be made to secure medical aid promptly
whenever it is needed.

4. Communicable Disease Control: In an effort to
control communicable diseases, we include
education of the pupils, encouragement of
immunizations, blood tests and efforts to
have sick children stay at home.

5. School Sanitation: We attempt to provide a
sa~e, pleasant and healthful environment at
all times.










65

Pupil Activities

In addition to the regular course of study, the

pupil activity program offers opportunities to develop

special abilities and interests. A description of the

program follows:

Publications
T- The Billett, Newspaper
2. The Baby Rattler, Yearbook

Music Pro ram
SI Ban Concert
2. Band, Marching
3. Chorus

Student Council
1. Two representatives from each homeroom in grades
seven through twelve, with presidents of classes
as ex-officio members.
2. In order to be eligible for an elective or
appointed office in the Student Council, an
academic average of "C" or better is expected.

The Club Program
1. General Purposes
a. To provide opportunities for working
and living together.
b. To provide for individual differences.
c. To contribute enriching materials and
activities.
2. Each semester pupils are issued registration
forms listing the names of former clubs.
Each person selects a first and second
choice club and may write in the name of
any other club desired.
The organization of a club is determined
by indicated pupil interest (ten or more)
and availability of resources.
3. Each club meets twice per week (Wednesdays
and Thursdays) during the Activity Period.









66


Interscholastic Athletics

The interscholastic athletics is a desirable part

of the general program of physical education as it

plays a very important part in developing those mental,

physical, and social characteristics which are

essential in our democratic society.
The athletic program is designed to meet the needs

of the participants, through experiences which come

from participation in interscholastic competition.

However, the opportunity to participate in interscholastic

athletics will be considered as a privilege which the

school enables the athletes to enjoy rather than as a

service which the athlete renders to the school,

Each student is required to do passing work in all

classes in order to be eligible to participate in inter-

scholastic athletics.









67


ASS EBLIES

OBJECTIVES:

1. To unify the total school program.

a. To acquaint students with school policies.
b. To encourage school spirit.

2. To motivate and supplement classroom work.

3. To widen and deepen student interests.

4. To inspire wholesome use of leisure.

5. To develop the aesthetic sense of the pupil.

6. To instill commonly desired ideals and virtues.

7. To develop self-expression.

8. To emphasize correct audience habits.

9. To recognize publicly worth-while achievements.

10. To promote an intelligent patroitism.

11. To correlate school and community interests.







68


The Homeroom

Since the homeroom is the center of the guidance

program in Florida A and M University High School, it is

essential that it be organized as to lend itself easily to

that activity. In our school as in most schools, only

students of the same grade are placed in the same homeroom.

In order to maintain a normal, wholesome balance in membership

it is advisable to have in each homeroom both boys and girls,

so far as possible, with a rather wide distribution of

abilities.

Since the homeroom is the administrative unit of the

school where the guidance phase of work centers, the number

of students in the group cannot be too large. The

necessity forfkeeping the homeroom at a practical number

is clarified when it is realized that effective guidance

work involved requires visiting each home represented, having

personal interviews with each member of the homeroom, con-

ferring with each pupil, other teachers, etc.

A large part of the success of the homeroom depends

on the selection of committees. In many cases, the careful

selection of committees is more important than the

selection of officers, for much of the actual work of the

homeroom is done by committees. The useful and usual home-

room committees are:







69


1. Standing committees which serve for a year or
semester. They are to be concerned with program,
room beautification, welfare, school and
scholarship, etc.

2. Temporary committees which serve for a special
occasion, often relating to a special event, a
cooperative literary tournament, a joint or all
school music program, programs and problems of
control.

OBJECTIVES OF THE HOMEROOM TEACHER

1. To reflect training in school unity and spirit.

2. To build better pupil-pupil relations.

3. To build better pupil-teacher relations.

4. To give guidance as to vocational choices,
interests, and selections.

5. To develop well-rounded personalities.

Role of the Homeroom Teacher

The homeroom teacher, because of her closer contacts

with pupils, is frequently in a better position to provide

conditions needed for effective counseling than other

members of the staff. It is true that the guidance program

should be under the direction of one who has specialized

training, but these specialists can succeed only if they have

the full and active cooperation of the teachers.

Teachers in the homeroom will contact students both in

groups and privately in order to study and determine the

students' interests, abilities, health, home background and

vocational problems- the line of work they are interested

in and their future plans.








70


General Outline for Orientation
First Six Weeks

1. Getting Acquainted
Pupils -- Pupils)
(Teachers Pupils)
2. Knowing Your School
a. Courses (Subjects)
b. Extra Curricular Activities
c. Homeroom Assembly

Teachers should explain the difference between high

school and elementary school showing the greater freedom

and self- reliance in the high school.

3. School rules and regulations (Handbook). These should

be discussed showing the wisdom and reason for them also

penalties for breaking them.

4. Purposes and general organization of the homeroom
discussions:

a. Duties and qualifications of the homeroom officers
prior to holding of election.
b. Guide the pupils in wise and careful selection of
homeroom officers. (This will begin to develop
their sense of evaluation).
c. Homeroom committees needed.
d. How to make your homeroom a success.
e. The place of the homeroom teacher in the life of
her class.

NOTE: Appoint or select temporary homeroom officers until
a permanent organization is formed.
Homeroom Group Guidance Activities

Homeroom sponsors carry on a variety of group guidance

activities in their homerooms. Listed below are some of the

most common group guidance activities that may be used to

supplement your own ideas.








71

1. Topics which need to be explained by the homeroom
sponsor:

a. The regulation of the school
b. The purposes of the homeroom
c. Graduation procedures
d. The proper use of the school plant

2. Topics for general discussion:

a. Study habits (filmstrips available)
b. Vocational education
c. Further education
d. Personality traits
e. Personal appearance
f. Safety education
g. Hobbies (books in the library)
h. Health problems
i. Community responsibilities
j. Leisure time interests
k. Leisure time reading
1. Problems of Thrift (Saving Bonds and other saving
systems)

3. Other areas of guidance for homeroom sponsors:

a. Meeting parents of students
b. Having outside speakers on different vocations
c. Conducting citizenship contests
To aid in the discussions, the homeroom teacher may use

filmstrips, movies and tape recordings. Movies on various

guidance subjects may be secured upon request. Our library

is equipped with the following filmstrips which will add

greatly to our group guidance activities.

I. MANNERS MAKE A DIFFERENCE

1. Why Have Manners?
2. Manners At Home
3. Table Manners
4. Manners At School
5. Manners On The Streets and Public Conveyances
6. Manners When Visiting
7. Manners When Playing
8. Manners at the Movies
9. Do's and Don'ts of Good Manners








72


II. TEEN-AGE SOCIAL RELATION SERIES

1. Boy Meets Girls
2. Boy Dates Girl
3. Boy Marries Girl
4. Being Sensible About Sex
5. Boy Meets Girl
6. Boy Dates Girl
7. Boy Marries Girl
8. Being Sensible About Sex
9. The Story of Growing Up

III. NATIONAL FORUM SERIES

1, Give Your Friends a Break
2. Last Minute Date
3. Little Big Shot

REFERRALS


Determining the point at which a student should be

referred by the teacher to the principal or counselor is

important. Those pupils whose problems can be solved by

the teacher should be so handled. Whenever a teacher feels

that ha ihas put forth his best efforts and without any

favorable response, then the case should be referred to

either the counselor or the principal.

Before any outside referrals are made the case should
first be brought to the attention of principal and

counselor,
4> .








73

ETHICS FOR TEACHERS

A condensed statement of
The Code of the National Education Association

The teacher should be courteous, just, and professional in
all relationships.

Desirable ethical standards require cordial relations
between teacher and pupil, home and school.

The conduct of the teacher should conform to the accepted
patterns of behavior of the most wholesome members of the
community.

The teacher should strive to improve educational practice
thru study, travel, and experimentation.

Unfavorable criticism of associates should be avoided except
when made to proper officials.

Testimonials regarding the teacher should be truthful and
confidential.

Membership and active participation in local, state, and
national professional associations are expected.

The teacher should avoid endorsement of all educational
materials for personal gain.

Great care should be taken by the teacher to avoid inter-
ference between other teachers and pupils.

Fair salary schedules should be sought and when established
carefully upheld by all professionals.

No teacher should knowingly underbid a rival for a position.

No teacher should accept compensation for helping another
teacher to get a position or a promotion.

Honorable contracts when signed should be respected by
both parties and dissolved only by mutual consent.

Official business should be transacted only thru properly
designated officials.
The responsibility for reporting all matters harmful to the
welfare of the school rests upon each teacher.









74



Professional growth should be stimulated thru suitable
recognition and promotion within the ranks.

Unethical practices should be reported to local, state or
national commissions on ethics.

The term "Teacher" as used here includes all persons
-directly engaged in educational work.







75

FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

PROGRAM OF STUDIES
1958 1959
GRADE 7 GRADE 8
1. Mathematics 1. Science
2. Physical Education 2. Physical Education
3. Language Arts 3. Language Arts
4. Social Studies 4. Mathematics
5. Enrichment (Art, Music, 5. Social Studies
Ind. Arts) 6. Enrichment (Homemaking, Ind.
6. Science-Health Arts, Art, Music)

GRADE 9 GRADE 10
1. Homemaking (Girls) R 1. WorTis"istory E
2. Industrial Arts (Boys) R 2. English R
3. Mathematics 3. Homemaking E
(Gen. Math or Alg.I) R 4. Industrial Arts E
4. Civics R 5. Biology R
5. Physical Education R 6. Physical Education R
6. English R 7. Typing I E
7. Vocal Music E 8. Foreign Language E
8. Inst. Music E 9. Algebra II E
9. Art E 10. Art E
10. General Science E 11. Vocal Music E
12. Inst. Music E
GRADE 11
1. American Hist. & Gov't R GRADE 12
2. English R 1. nFglsh (Differentiated) E
3. Health and Safety R 2. Chemistry or Physics
4. Physical Education E (Alt. Yrs.) E
5. Homemaking E 3. Shorthand E
6. Physics or Chemistry 4. Physical Education E
(Alt. Yrs.) E 5. *Mathematics E
7. Typing II E 6. *Social Problems E
8. Physical Science E 7. Art E
9. Foreign Language E 8. Vocal Music E
10. Art E 9. Inst. Music E
11. Vocal Music E
12. Inst. Music E *AT LEAST TWO SHOULD BE SELECTED.


R = REQUIRED
E = ELECTIVE







76


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Each student who graduates from the Florida A and M

University High School must earn a minimum of twenty (20)
units or a maximum of twenty-four (24) units of which the

following must be included.
SUBJECT UNITS REQUIRED
English 3
Social Studies 2
Mathematics 1
Science 1
Homemaking (Girls) 1
Physical Education 2
Industrial Arts (Boys) 1
Health and Safety 1
Electives 8

Basis for Grade Classification

After the ninth year, grade classification is

determined as follows: grade 10, 4 units; grade 11,

9 units; grade 12, 14 units.
Pupils in grades 7 and 8 must make passing grades in
at least three of the four content courses to be promoted.





77


Pupil Accounting

In the office are several forms used in accounting
for pupils during the school day.

A. Each teacher should have on hand each of the

following:

1. Teacher's Daily Report of Absentees: On this
form should be placed the names ofpupils
absent from each period, one through six.
The spaces numbered seven and eight should be
used for A.M. Homeroom and the Activity
Period, respectively. If all pupils are
present the words "No Absenteer or'None"
should be written in the appropriate space.
This form is left in the office at the end
of the day.

The names of persons absent from the A.M.
Homeroom should be sent to the office
immediately following the roll call.
2. Daily Absentee Report: During the first
period each teacher will receive a form listing
the names of pupils absent during the A.M.
Homeroom Period. Persons whose names appear
thereon must present a permit from the office
to be admitted to any class throughout the
day.

3. Corridor Pass: Pupils excused from class
during any period must have a pass signed
by the teacher.
4. Library Reading Permit: Pupils desiring to
use the library must present to the
librarian this form bearing the signature of
the subject area teacher (if necessary) and
the teacher granting the excuse.

5. Pass: This form may be used for admitting
persons to or excusing persons from the
following areas: auditorium, classroom,
library, and office.
6. Special Excuse: This form is used for pupils
desiring to be excused from the study hall.
It is divided into three sections, one to be
retained by the special teacher, and one to
be retained by the study hall supervisor.






78

B. A tardy pupil or one absent the previous day
should present to the office a written excuse
signed by a parent. The pupil, in turn, will be
issued one of the following permits to class:

1. Admittance Permit
2. Admittance Pass
3. Admission Slip
4. Admission Slip (Un-Excused)
5. Admission Slip (Excused)
NOTE:

1. Pupils falling in the following categories
must present one of the above named permits
to be admitted to any class.

a. Pupils absent the previous day
b. Pupils tardy to class
c. Pupils whose names appear on the daily
absentee report from the office.
2. An excused absence indicates that acceptable
excuse has been presented. Such persons
should be given make-up work.

3. An unexcused absence indicates that no
satisfactory excuse has been given.
C. Pupils desiring to leave the school grounds for any
reason must secure one of the following forms
from the office:

1. Excuse to Leave School Grounds
2. Early Dismissal Permit
3. Passport
4. Special Excuse
The permit must be shown to the teacher of any
class to be missed.
D. A slip labeled Office Permission may be issued to
grant any permission, whether covered or not'by the
other permits.
E. During the day a detention notice will be issued to
those persons who have received unexcused admit
slips. Persons receiving same must report to the
detention hall after school.

The major factor in insuring the effectiveness of this
accounting system is the individual teacher. It is vitally
necessary that each teacher adhere to this system and
enforce each provision religiously and consistently.





79


Marking and Appraising


Because of the many factors involved in pupil

growth, appraisal is a complex task. Each mark given

represents the achievement of the individual student

in relation to the specific objectives of the course

concerned. Hence, both teachers and students profit by

having a list of specific items which pupils are expected

to understand and to be able to do at a high level of

mastery.

The mark of a student is based on his achievement

in relation to others in the class. The following is

an outline of the method of evaluation:

I. Testing
A. Informal
B. Formal
1. Six-weeks
2. Semester 25% final grade

II. Performance Over and above theoretical
aspect of subject

Since teachers are interested in the total

development of each student, a mark in citizenship is

given for each six-weeks period.

Marking Code

A uniform marking code will be used. It shall be

the same in both academic and citizenship marking.

Code

HIGH SCHOOL AND INTERMEDIATE GRADES PRIMARY GRADES
A Excellent) 4 Points S Satisfactory
B Good) 3 Points N Needs Improvement
C Average) 2 Points U Unsatisfactory
D Poor but passing) 1 Point
E Failure) 0 Points





80


Code of Behavior

I. General Behavior
A. Be conscious of the need for the cleanliness of
our surroundings and accept a personal
responsibility for maintaining it.

B. Respect for authority and fellow students.

C. Demonstrate at all times the behavior which
reflects moral and ethical values.

II. The Hall
A. Keep to the right when passing.

B. Pass as quickly and quietly as possible.

C. Maintain neat orderly lockers, and use them with
a minimum of noise at designated periods.

D. Place all waste materials in waste receptacles.

III. The Classrooms
A, Remove chewing gum before entering.
B. Take proper care of materials and equipment.
C. Show consideration of the rights and privileges
of others.

D. Take pride and contribute to the attractiveness
of the room.

E. Listen attentively to discussions.

IV. The Library
A. Report to the library at each vacant period.

B. Enter the library quietly and maintain silence
unless requesting help from the librarian or
library helper.

C. Take proper care of all library materials and
equipment .

D. Place reference materials and periodicals
neatly in their proper places after using them

E. Return borrowed materials promptly .

V. Assembly
A. Attend all programs on time.

B. Enter quietly and occupy the seat assigned.






81

C. Listen attentively and participate willingly
when asked

D. Be reverent during devotional periods, responsive
throughout the program and demonstrate sincere
appreciation for the performance when it is over

E. Leave quietly and in an orderly manner

"VI. Social Activities
A. Join in and plan for the general entertainment
with enthusiasm

B. Dress appropriately for each occasion

C. If a program is presented, sit or stand quietly
and express cordial appreciation at its
conclusion

D. Mingle with others who are not particularly
members of your immediate group

VII. Athletic Activities
A. Present activity card when entering

B. If indoors and you're a young man, remove hat
upon entering

C. Remain in seat until event is ended, unless
emergency arises

D. Respect official's decisions

E. Support the cheerleaders and team

F. Display sportsmanship toward the opposing
team whether we win or lose

G. Place waste materials in places provided

H. Leave in an orderly manner when the activity
is over.

Study Hall
The teacher in charge of the study hall is not expected

to direct the study of pupils not in his own class.

However, he is expected to enforce the simple rules listed

here below:






82


1. Pupils late to study hall will bring admission
slips from the office just as when they are late
to class.

2. Absences from study hall are regarded and treated
exactly as are absences from class.

3. Students leaving the study hall must have a
corridor pass signed by the teacher in charge.
The time of leaving and returning should be
noted to prevent extended absence.

4. The behavior in the study hall should be such
that work is not disturbed. Conversations
(brief) in connection with work may be permitted.
Every pupil is expected to study and make it
possible for others to work without distraction.

Library

1. The library is to be used only for reading and
research. Conversation should be limited to
asking for and receiving information concerning
books, periodicals and other library materials.

2. Each teacher will consult library holdings before
making class assignments in specific areas.

3. Audio-Visual materials may be previewed in the
library, if desired.

4. Feel free to consult with the librarian at any
time on more materials for class projects etc.

5. Classes will be accompanied to the library by
their instructors.

Audio-Visual Equipment

The following audio-visual equipment is available :

16MM Projectors
Phonographs
Filmstrip Projectors
Radio
Television
Tape Recorders
Daylight Folding Screen
Screen

Filmstrips and Records are available.






83

A MANUAL OF STYLE

FLORIDA A AND M UNIVERSITY HIGH

1. Paper used should be standard size 8 x 11 inches.

Ruled paper is appropriate for elementary pupils.

High school pupils may use ruled paper for general
work, plain paper for special compositions.

2. Margins should be approximately as follows: two inches
deep at the top, one inch wide at the left and bottom
of the page, and one-half inch wide on the right.
(Margins are clearly marked on the ruled paper except
at the right.)
3, All papers should be neat and legible.

At the high school level papers, except math and s
science computations, should be written in black or
in dark blue ink or typed.

4. Use one side of the paper only.

5. Pages should be numbered consecutively in the top
right corner. The first page of the paper should not
be numbered. No punctuation mark is placed after the
number in this instance.

6. When the paper consists of more than one page, use a
paper clip to hold the pages together. The pages may
also be stapled.

7. In grades 3 through 12, place your name, the subject or
lesson, and the date in the upper right hand corner of
the first page approximately an inch below the top of
the page.

Grades 1 and 2 will use name and the subject.

9. Do not fold papers.

10. Capitalize the first word, last word, and all other
words except prepositions, articles, and conjunctions.








84

11. No abbreviations should be used in the body of any
papers.

Exception: Spell out titles preceding personal names,
with the exception of Mr., Messrs., Mrs.,
Dr., St., Rev., and Hon.
12. Spell out in ordinary writing every number between one
and one hundred and all round numbers, (that is,
numbers that are even hundreds, or even thousands).

Exceptions:

Use figures for dates, page numbers, and percentages
but spell out the words per cent.

Spell out all numbers when beginning a sentence. If
this is impracticable reconstruct the sentence.

Spell out the time of day, except when A.M. or P.M.
is used.

Use figures in charts and tables.

13. Provide a bibliography, in alphabetical order, by
author, of all materials used in the preparation of
the paper.

14. Edit every paper before you turn it in to your
instructor.





85

Administrative Policies

SCHOOL DAY

The school day begins at 8:20 A.M. and ends at 3:30 P.M.

Believing that teachers are conscientious professionals,

no definite time for arriving before school or remaining

after school is stipulated. These intervals will vary

with need. The good teacher realizes that he must of

necessity precede his children into the room and see that

they leave after school.

No deviation from the regular schedule is to be made

without permission of the principal.

Each teacher is to remain in the classroom or area of

assignment throughout the day.

MANAGEMENT

All teachers are responsible for the conduct of all

pupils. This pertains especially to conduct in the

corridors, lunchroom, and on the grounds.

All teachers are required to stand at doorsof classroom

when classes are passing.

Pupils are not to be retained after the class hour ends

if they are to report to another class.

A pupil who is misbehaving may be instructed to leave

a class provided he is sent to the office with a misconduct

slip. Do not send pupils out of class to loiter around

the buildings.

Pupils are not to be sent on errands off-campus without
written permission from the office.







86

Activities

No activity, except athletics, may be held earlier

in the week than Thursday.

Activities on-campus must end by 10:30 P.M.

All teachers are requested to attend all all-school

sponsored activities and to assist as needed.

All after school activities must be scheduled by the

first day of the six-weeks period.

Activities for the first six-weeks period must be

submitted by September 21.

Home Visitations

Home visitation is one of the most effective procedures

for gathering information concerning the individual pupil.
It is also fruitful in fostering better home-school

relations.

Teachers should be very discrete in discussing
children with parents and should do more listening than
talking.

Teachers are urged to make at least one visit to each

homeroom.pupil's home and make a written report which will

be included in the pupil's folder.

Other teachers are urged to visit the homes of pupils

who pose special problems in their classes.






87


Purchases

All materials, supplies and equipment must be

requisitioned through the business office. Any purchase

made without a purchase order is made at your own risk.

TO ORDER:
1. Check your budget to determine if money
is available.
2. Submit list of items needed including
proper nomenclature, price, and
supplier's name.

Visitors

Visitors are always welcome to observe our work.

However, in order to regulate the flow of visitors so that

there will be a minimum of disruption it is necessary

that all visitors secure a permit from the office.

Custodial Service

Custodians are integral parts of the school staff and

can do much to enhance the school's program. Cooperation

between teachers and custodians is very necessary.

Teachers can cooperate by instructing pupils

regarding the importance and work of the custodian and

should train them to help by keeping the classroom, halls,

and grounds in good order.

Requests for custodial help should be requisitioned
for on a 'Service Request' form at least one day prior to

the day it is needed.







88

Travel

Teachers planning to attend meetings should

fill out a request for absence and submit it to the

office.


Field Trips

Field trips are valuable in that they vitalize

learning and serve public relation purposes. It is

expected that field trips will result from cooperative

pupil-teacher planning and a felt need. In order that

these trips might be educationally sound, they should

only come after careful preparation and be followed by

follow-up activities.

Teachers planning trips should:

1. Notify the office one week in advance
of trip.

2. If transportation is involved, fill
out a request for use of School Bus.

3. If other classes are affected, secure
approval of teachers of these classes
and see that pupils get assignments
for classes missed.







89

Personnel Requests and Professional Requirements

All teachers will be entitled to ten days sick leave

with full pay during any one fiscal year.

Any class missed by a teacher without proper excuse

will be regarded as a day on sick leave.

Responsibility for Notification of Absence

A teacher absent from duty is expected to notify the

principal as early as possible (Not later than 7:00 A.M.)

on the morning of the absence). If the absence is for

more than one day, the teacher is asked to report daily to

the principal so that the substitute may know in advance

whether or not he is expected to continue his duties.

If the teacher fails to notify the office that he expects
to return, and the substitute reports, the substitute
(not the teacher) is entitled to the day's salary.

Substitutes may reasonably expect from teachers the

following:

A. Lesson Plans

B. A brief summary giving rules of procedure
desired

C. Roll Book

D. Time Schedule

E. Keys







90


Professional Growth

Teachers are urged to stimulate professional growth

by:

1. Subscribing to periodicals which deal with
the solution of problems in their areas of
interest.

2. Writing on topics on which they are qualified
by experience, research, or both.

3, Attending meetings in fields of specialization.

4. Taking an active part in in-service training.

5. Taking memberships in appropriate professional
organizations.

6. Reading widely, especially in the school's
professional library,

Organization in Area of Specialization

In 1958-1959 the percentage of staff members holding

memberships were as follows:

FSTA-------------------------------- 100%

NEA------------------------ -------- 54%

ATA ------------------ ...---------- 03%

LCTA ... ...-------------------------- 79%

DISTRICT II-------------------------- 80%

AREA OF SPBCIALIZATION---------- ----- 08%







91

Calendar of Events


Pre-School Conference--------------------- August 25

Labor Day-------------------------------- September 1

School Opens------------------------------ September 2

Back-to-School Party---------------------- September 5

Coronation of MISS FAMU HIGH-------------- October 14

Homecoming------------------------------- October 16

Veterans Day Holiday---------------------- November 11

Thanksgiving Holidays--------------------- November 27-28

Christmas Party--------------------------- December 19

Christmas Holidays------------------------ December 19
January 5

Valentine Party--------------------------- February 13

Student Government Day-------------------- March 18

Spring Vacation--------------------------- March 19-20

Easter Vacation--------------------------- March 27

Junior-Senior Prom------------------------ May 15

Club Night-------------------------------- May 18

Student Council Elections----------------- May 19

Baccalaureate------------------------- May 31

Class Play-------------------------------- June 1

Class Night------------------------------- June 2

Commencement ---------------------------- June 3






SCHEDULE -1958 1959
o- ART BUS. ED. ENGLISH ENG-SP. ENG-S.S. SEN MUS HEALTH H.MAKING IND.ARTS NST.MUS MATH 'SOC.ST. CC.ST P.E. P.E. SCIENCE E
O' GLENN KYLER GRIFFIN McGHEE 'kdOURKE AcKINNIS CRAWFORD jADISON INHITE JOHNSON CAMPBELL MITCHELL (YER ILANG SORE EORNEGAY
ART ENG.III STUDY 30C.ST I PEN MUC CLINIC H.MAKINGi ND.ARTS[NST.MUSI JWLD.HIST PE PE SC.IV
10-12 SEC.I 1(6) SEC II -12 SEC. I I I 7 7-8 CHEM
(17)! (27) (29) (18) (16) (17) 7) (22) (' i (38) (27)
Rm 1 Rm 7 Rm 3 Am 8 LT. IH.M.Rm. Shop 3and Rm Rm 4 Field Pie ld Rm 6
ART STUDY ENG.IV ENG II ENG 8 EN MUS HEALTH IH.MAKINGI ND ARTS NST.MUS MATH I AM HIST o !1 I. II
AR SD 7 I III
7-12 BC I 7 SEC II S EC.II SEC II SEC I SEC I IOL.
(26) (10) (20) 18) (32) (12) (24) 4) (12) 4) (30) (24) 2 E I
Rim 1 Rm 12 Rm 7 Rm 3 m 8 L.T. iRm 9 H.M.Rm Shop and Rm Rm 2 RM 4 24) Rm

A I C IT I V I T 1 2

STUDY TYPING !ENG 7 n SPANISH SOC ST.8 CLINIC AH7 MATHATH 12 AMW -ST 1 iPE E hCI II
I 1 SEC II 9 ? 3IOL
(13) (20) (23) 21 (32) 24) I(27) (23) 0 (27) 27) 24)
(13) (20) 1(23) 1(21) 3) I 27 0 Rm2
Rm 1 Rm 12 Rm 7 Rm 3 Rm 8 m 10 Rm Rm 4 Fld Fd m 6


L U N C i H I

ART "S'HAND ENGII ENG 7 STUDY MATH 7 INST MJSMATH..II ENG I SCC.ST P PE
12,8 11-12 0 SC II CLINIC 12,8 10-11 SEC I I 11-1 1142
(24) (11) z I(30) 1(24) (21) (23) (19) (12) (25) (30) (18) 15)
Rm 1 Rm 12 Rm 3 Rm 8 H.M.Rm Rm 10 Bd.Rm Rm 2 Rm 4 -Rm11 Fd Fl
12 IsECl 11 1 I S(18)
TYPING II E NGIII S.S. HEALTH H.MAKING STUDY MATH ENG I S.S.7 P.E. E. SCI. 8
12 SEC II 7 SEC I 11-12 SS C II SC I 10 10
(15) (26) (24) (26) (11) i(8) (27) (30) (23) (20) (24) (32)
Rm 12 H Rm 3 Rm 8 Rm 7 H.M.Rm Rm 11 Rm 2 Rm 4 Rm 0 Fld IFld m 6
AW- TYPING 1 V iMUS HEALTH- STUDY IIND ART1 INSTMUS MATH -8 STUDEALT SCI I
r I- 1 -12 SCI 7 I 11 PROb SCI. GEN.SC1.
12 l 9) I23 5 .) 8 m ,2 -f-7 (47) 9'7 ,) '







93



HOMEROOMS

GRADE TEACHER NO. PUPILS ROOM NO.

SEVEN (A) MRS. L. J? MOORE 24 9

SEVEN (B) ZINERVA WHITE 23 10

EIGHT JAMES J. MITCHELL 32 4
NINE (A) MRS. W. P. O'ROURKE 27 8

NINE (B) WILLIAM F. KORNEGAY 27 6

TEN (A) MRS. D. G. McGHEE 23 3

TEN (B) MRS. D. R. MADISON 23 H. BC.
ELEVEN (A) MRS. F. L. CAMPBELL 25 2

ELEVEN (B) ROGERS GLENN 27 1

TWELVE MRS. I. T. KYLER 36 11




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