• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendar of events
 Personnel
 Hospital staff
 General information
 Admission of students
 Student organizations and...
 Division of summer study
 Division of graduate study
 Back Cover






Title: Summer Semester Issue 1948, v.1, no.2 May 1948
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000138/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summer Semester Issue 1948, v.1, no.2 May 1948
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1948
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000138
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2651

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Calendar of events
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Personnel
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Hospital staff
        Page 22
        Page 23
    General information
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Admission of students
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Student organizations and activities
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Division of summer study
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Division of graduate study
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text




'Bulletin

FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL AND


MECHANICAL


COLLEGE


APRIL
FAMU LibRARY,

SUMMER SEMESTER
JUNE 14 to AUGUST 16, 1948


'allahassee


. . orida


U.,


- 111-1 111-









Bulletin

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL

and MECHANICAL

COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




SUMMER SEMESTER ISSUE
1948









Issued Quarterly and entered as second-class matter, June 24, 1947, at the
Post Office, Tallahassee, Florida, Under the Act of August 24, 1912.

Volume 1 May, 1948 No. 2


L















CONTENTS

Calendar of events, the ...................................... .................. .......... 3
Personnel
State officials .................................................................... 5
Officers of administration .......... ...................................... 5
Instructional faculty ........................................... 7
Adm inistrative assistants .................... ........ .................... .. 18
Hospital staff ........................... .............. ............. 22
General inform ation .................................... .......... ....................... 24
Expenses and fees ........................................................ ..................... 30
Adm mission of students .................................... ............................ 34
Student organizations and activities ................................................ 39
Student aid ........................................... .......................... 42
Division of Summer Study .................................... .................... 45
Registration and attendance ................................... .........45
Workshops for in-service teachers .......................................... 47
Off-campus workshops ......................... ...... .......................- 48
Courses offered in the 1948 semester ..................... .................. 49
Division of Graduate Study ................................ ... ........... ....... 53
Master of Science in Education Degree ....................................... 53
Post Graduate Certificate ...................... ..... .................... .. 53
Plan I and Plan II ..................................... ....................... 54
Graduate majors .-.....................-.. .................... 60
Week-end graduate program ......................... .... ........... 63













THE CALENDAR OF EVENTS


1948
JANUARY
4 Sunday, 4:00 P. M.................................. Christmas Recess Ends
11-16 Sunday-Friday............................................Religious Emphasis Week
27-30 Tuesday-Friday ................................................Final Examinations
31 Saturday. .........................................................First Semester Ends

SPRING SEMESTER
FEBRUARY
2 Monday................................Registration, Second Semester Begins
4 Wednesday...................................... Late Registration Fee Effective
Instruction Begins
11 Wednesday..................................Last Day for Change of Program
12 Thursday................Last Day for Late Registration for Full Credit
3,4, 5 Tues.-Wed.-Thurs.........Fla. A. & M. College Annual Clinical Assn.
MARCH
10 Wednesday...................................................Student Government Day
14 Sunday...................... ... ...................Founders' Day
MAY
1 Saturday............................ ...... Annual Orange & Green Day
17 Monday.......................................... ........... Senior Examinations
18-21 Tuesday-Friday.................................................... Final Examinations
22 Saturday.... ................... ....... .....................................Alumni Day
23 Sunday......................................................... Baccalaureate Services
24 Monday................... ............ ............Senior Class Day
25 Tuesday, 10:00 A. M............................Commencement Exercises


SUMMER SEMESTER
JUNE
12 Saturday, 8:00 P. M................................................Faculty Meeting
13 Sunday, 12:00 Noon................................................Dormitories Open
14 Monday................................................Registration for All Classes
15 Tuesday..................................... Late Registration Fee Effective
16 Wednesday............Instruction begins. Last Day for Registration
for Full Credit
JULY
5 Monday........................................Observance of Independence Day
3










4 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


AUGUST
13, 14, to 16 Friday, Saturday and Monday........Final Examinations
15 Sunday, 10:30 A. M............................................Senior Consecration
4:30 P. M..................................................... Baccalaureate Services
17 Tuesday, 10:00 A. M................................Commencement Exercises


FALL SEMESTER

SEPTEMBER
13-14 Monday-Tuesday........Freshman Registration and Orientation
14 Tuesday.............................................Veterans' Registration
15 Wednesday....................................................Upperclass Registration
Graduate Registration
16 Thursday...........................................Late Registration Fee Effective
Instruction Begins
24 Friday............................................Last Day for Change of Program












PERSONNEL


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
HON. MILLARD F. CALDWELL.....................................................Governor
HON. R. A. GRAY...-................................................... Secretary of State
HON. J. TOM WATSON.......................................................... Attorney General
HON. J. EDWIN LARSON..........................................................State Treasurer
HON. COLIN ENGLISH........... .........Superintendent of Public Instruction


STATE BOARD OF CONTROL

HON. J. THOMAS GURNEY, Chairman
HON. THOMAS W. BRYANT HON. N. B. JORDAN
HON. HOLLIS RINEHART HON. J. H. MARKHAM

HON. W. F. POWERS, Secretary
HON. J. W. BLANDING, Supervising Auditor



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
WILLIAM H. GRAY, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D...............................................................President
B.S., Bluefleld State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Penn-
sylvania.
MELVIN O. ALSTON, B.S., M.S., Ed.D.................................Acting Registrar
B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Ed.D., Columbia University.
Professor of Mathematics.
A. C. BRIGGS, B.S........................................................Secretary to the President
Diploma, Wilberforce University; Special Study, Miami Univer-
sity (Oxford, Ohio); B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further
study, New York University.
MARY E. LANCASTER CARNEGIE, A.B., R.N.........................Dean, Division of
Nursing Education
Diploma, Lincoln School for Nurses; A.B., West Virginia State
College. Further Study, Columbia University; Certificate
(equivalent to U. S. Master's Degree), University of Toronto,
Canada.
H. MANNING EFFERSON, A.B., M.A.................Administrative Assistant, and
Director of Workshops
A.B., Atlanta University; MA., Columbia University. Further
Study, University of Iowa; Columbia University.
5










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


L. H. B. FOOTE, B.S., M.D....................................Medical Director, Hospital
B.S., M.D., Howard University, Medical Director of College
Hospital.
W. ANTHONY GAINES, A.B., M.A...................irector of Extension Services
A.B., M.A., University of Pennsylvania, Further Study, Fisk
University, University of Pennsylvania.
I. L. HOLLINS, B.S., M.S....................Dean, Division of Home Economics
B.S., Michigan State College; M.S., Cornell University.
JAMES HUDSON, A.B., B.D., A.M., Ph.D.................................College Chaplain
A.B., Morehouse College: Further Study, Oberlin College;
B.D., Colgate-Rochester Divinity School; A.M., Ph.D., Bos-
ton University.
ULYSSES JONES, B.S.. ...................................................Dean of Men
B.S., Southern University.
J. R. E. LEE, JR., A.B.......................... ................... Business Manager
A.B., Lincoln University (Pa.)
MOSES GENERAL MILES, A.B., M.A.......Asst. Director of Student Activities
A.B., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Ohio State University.
OLLIE BUTLER MOORE, A.B., M.A.............................................Dean of Women
A.B., Dillard University; M.A., Fisk University.
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, A.B........................................................Commandant
Springfield College; State University of Iowa; A.B., Florida A.
and M. College.
LEO B. PAUL, B.S., M.S.................. ............ Director of Maintenance
B.S., Southern University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania.
C. L. SPELLMAN, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.................Acting Dean, Division of Arts
and Sciences, and Acting Director,
Division of Graduate Study
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Oregon State College; Ph.D.,
Cornell University. Further Study, Iowa State College.
J. T. TAYLOR, B.S., M.A.....................Coordinator of Veterans' Training,
Director of Personnel Division,
Faculty Counselor of Athletics
B.S., M.A., University of Illinois; Further Study, Indiana Uni-
versity.
J. LUTHER THOMAS, B.S., M.A., B.L.S............................Head Librarian
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Ohio State University;
BL.S., Atlanta University.
M. S. THOMAS, B.S., M.Ed.......Acting Dean of Division of Mechanic Arts
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.Ed., Colorado State College.
C. C. WEIL, B.S.,.............................................Superintendent of Hospital
B.S., Southern University. Further Study, Northwestern Uni-
versity School of Hospital Administration.
GARRETT T. WIGGINS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D .........................Dean, Division of
Teacher-Education
A.B., Syracuse University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D.,
Ohio State University.










BULLETIN, 1948


INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY
MELVIN O. ALSTON, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. M ...................................Mathematics
B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Ed.D., Columbia University.
Professor of Mathematics.
R. L. ANDERSON, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D.......................................Biology
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.D., Howard Uni-
versity, Professor of Biology.
JOHN H. CARTER, A.B., A.M ., Ph.D .........................................................French
A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois. Professor of French.
Head of Department of Languages.
S. RANDOLPH EDMONDS, AB., M.A.............................Drama and Fine Arts
A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Columbia University; Further
Study, Dublin University; The London School of Speech and
Dramatic Arts. Professor of Drama and Fine Arts.
H. MANNING EFFERSON, AB., M.A...............................................Mathematics
A.B., Atlanta University; M.A., Columbia University. Further
Study, University of Iowa; Columbia University. Professor of
Mathematics.
VICTOR H. FIELDS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D............................................... Chemistry
A.B., M.A., Pisk University; Ph.D., Marquette University. Pro-
fessor of Chemistry.
L. H. B. FOOTE, B.S., M.D........ ---.....................................-Surgical Specialties
B.S., M.D., Howard University. Professor of Surgical Special-
ties.
JAMES HUDSON, A.B., B.D., AM., Ph.D.........................Religion, Philosophy
A.B., Morehouse College; Further Study, Oberlin College; B.D.,
Colgate-Rochester Divinity School; A.M., Ph.D., Boston Uni-
versity. Professor of Philosophy.
C. L. SPELLMAN, B.S., M.S., Ph.D ...................................... Rural Education
B.S., A. & T. College; M.S., Oregon State College; Ph.D., Cor-
nell University. Further Study, Iowa State College. Professor
of Education.
J. LUTHER THOMAS, B.S., M.A., B.L.S................................... Library Science
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Ohio State University;
B.L.S., Atlanta University. Professor of Library Science.
GARRETT T. WIGGINS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.....------................................ Education
A.B., Syracuse University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D.,
Ohio State University. Professor of Education.
CHARLES WINTER WOOD, A.B., M.A., B.D., M.A................................... English
A.B., Beloit College; M.A., B.D., Chicago Theological Seminary;
M.A., University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus.

MARY E. LANCASTER CARNEGIE, A.B., R.N...........-.............Nursing Education
Diploma, Lincoln School for Nurses; A.B., West Virginia State
College. Further Study, Columbia University; Certificate
(equivalent to U. S. Master's Degree), University of Toronto,
Canada. Associate Professior of Nursing Education.










8 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


DWIGHT L. FOSTER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.................................................Agronomy
B.S., Ph.D., Cornell University. Associate Professor of agronomy.
W ANTHONY GAINES, A.B., M .A........................................................ Sociology
A.B., M.A., University of Pennsylvania. Further Study, Fisk
University, University of Pennsylvania. Associate Professor of
Sociology.
ALONZO SMITH GAITHER, A.B., M.A...................................Physical Education
A.B., Knoxville College; M.A., Ohio State University. Further
Study, Minnesota, Northwestern, Yale, and Illinois Univer-
sities. Associate Professor of Physical Education: Head, De-
partment of Physical Education and Coach of Football.
IRMA L. HOLLINS, B.S., M.S.-..............................Home Economics Education
Diploma, Spelman College; B.S., Michigan State College; M.S.,
Cornell University. Associate Professor of Home Economics.
MARY BERTHA JOHNSON, A.B., M.A.......................................................English
A.B., M.A., Indiana University. Further Study, University of
Indiana, The University of Chicago, Harvard University. Asso-
ciate Professor of English and Acting Head of Department of
English.
OSCAR A. MOORE, B.S., M.S................................................. Physical Education
B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Springfield College. Further
Study, Springfield College. Associate Professor of Physical
Education.
ALBERT STANLEY PARKS, B.S., M.Ph.....................................................History
B.S., Indiana State College; M.Ph., University of Wisconsin.
Further Study, Hampton Institute, University of Southern
California, University of Indiana. Associate Professor of His-
tory; Acting Head, Social Science Department.
JOSEPH THOMAS TAYLOR, B.S., M.A...................................................Sociology
B.S., M.A., University of Illinois; Further Study, Indiana Uni-
versity. Associate Professor of Sociology.
JOHN CLEMENT TINNER, B.S., M.S....................................................Physics
B.S., Howard University; M.S., University of Chicago. Further
Study, University of Chicago. Associate Professor of Physics.
GENEVIEVE J. WHEELER, B.S., M.A.....................-Home Economics Education
B.S., Spelman College; M.A., Columbia University. Further
Study, University of Chicago. Associate Professor and Resident
Teacher-Trainer of Home Economics Education.
JOSEPH A. WILTSHIRE, B.S., M.D ..........................................Student Health
B.S., Fisk University; M.D., Meharry Medical College. Asso-
ciate Professor of Nursing Education, Director of Student
Health Services.
ARON WESENDOLPH WRIGHT, B.S., M.Ed.......-.............-...---....-....Education
B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. Further Study, Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh. Associate Professor of Education.

JOHN V. ANDERSON, B.S., M.A.................Business and Commercial Science
B.S., M.A., University of Pittsburgh. Further Study, University
of Chicago. Assistant Professor of Business and Commercial
Science; Head, Department of Business.










BULLETIN, 1948


SYLVESTER L. BEASLEY, B.S......................................................Auto Mechanics
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant Professor of Auto
Mechanics.
THOMAS W BOND, A.B., M.A................. .. .............. ..................History
A.B., M.A., University of Iowa. Further Study, Loyola Univer-
sity, Northwestern University and the University of Wisconsin.
Assistant Professor of History.
CARLYLE H. CHAPMAN, B.S., M.S..............................-...-....--- Horticulture
B.S., Southern University; M.S., Michigan State College. As-
sistant Professor of Horticulture. Acting Director, Division of
Agriculture.
L. BEATRICE FLEMING CLARKE, B.S., A.M.....................................Mathematics
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; A. M., University of Michigan.
Further Study, Brown University, University of Chicago. As-
sistant Professor of Mathematics.
J. P. COLEMAN, B.S., M .S ...................................................................Printing
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Wayne University. Assistant
Professor of Printing.

LUCILLE G. COLEMAN, B.S., M.A.*...................................-Social Sciences
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., University of Iowa. As-
sistant Professor of History.
G. W. CONOLY, B.S., M.S.........................................Agricultural Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Hampton
Institute; M.S., Ohio State University. Assistant Professor of
Agricultural Education.
EVETTA JONES CROMER, B.S......--.......----------....................Cosmetology
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant Professor of Cos-
metology.
IRENE R. DECOURSEY, B.S., M.A............................................................. English
B.S., Wilberforce University; M.A., Columbia University.
Further Study, University of Chicago. Assistant Professor of
English.
ROBERT P. GRIFFIN, B.S., M.A.........................................Physical Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Ohio State University.
Further Study, Ohio State University, University of Illinois,
Tennessee A. & I. State College. Assistant Professor of Physical
Education.
CHARLES C. HAYLING, B.S............ ...-----.....................--.....-- Tailoring
Mitchell Designing School; Vincent School of Designing, Lon-
don, England; B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Tailoring.
ARTHUR M. JOHNSON, B.A., M.A..........-- --- ...--........................Economics
B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania.
Assistant Professor of Economics.
E. L. KING, B.S., M.S........ .-- .. --------..............................Economics
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.S., Michigan State College.
Further Study, Cornell University. Assistant Professor of
Economics.
*Summer only.










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


TIMOTHY T. LEWIS, B.S., M.S..........................................................Horticulture
B.S., M.S., Iowa State College. Further Study, Iowa State Col-
lege. Assistant Professor of Horticulture..

LONNIE A. MARSHALL, B.S., M.S................................Agricultural Education
B.S., Prairie View State College; M.S., Iowa State College.
Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education; State Itinerant
Teacher-Trainer in Vocational Agriculture.

MOSES GENERAL MILES, A.B., M.A............................................ .Mathematics
A.B., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Ohio State University.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics.

OLLIE BUTLER MOORE, A.B., M.A......................................................... Sociology
A.B., Dillard University; M.A., Fisk University. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Sociology.

LOWELL T. PIERRO, B.S., M.A...................................................................Drama
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., University of Michigan. Assist-
ant Professor of Drama.

RUTH B. ORR, B.S., M .A........................ ........... ........................... Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Columbia University.
Assistant Professor of Education; Critic Teacher, Sixth Grade,
Lucy Moten Demonstration School.

LEO B. PAUL, B.S., M .S.................................................Building Construction
B.S., Southern University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania.
Assistant Professor of Building Construction.

M M OTON PAUL, A.B., M .A................-............................................Education
A.B., Southern University; M.A., Columbia University. Assis-
tant Professor of Education.

ALLIE B. SEABROOKS, B.S., M.A-..................-.................................--..Education
B.S., Knoxville College; M.A., Columbia University. Assistant
Professor of Education; Critic Teacher Second Grade, Lucy
Moten Demonstration School.
WILLIAM H. SMITH, B.S., M.A.**...........................................Mathematics
B.S., Howard University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania.
Further Study, University of Chicago. Assistant Professor of
Mathematics.
LEON STEELE, B.S., M .S ................................................................ Education
B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., New York University.
Further Study, New York University. Assistant Professor of
Education.
SOPHRONIA S. STEELE, B.S., M.A..--.....................................Physical Education
B.S., Southern University; M.A., Colorado State College.
Further Study, Columbia University. Assistant Professor of
Physical Education.
MAXWELL S. THOMAS, B.S., M.Ed.............Trade and Industrial Education
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.Ed., Colorado State College. State
Itinerant Teacher-Trainer of Trade and Industrial Education.

**On Leave.










BULLETIN, 1948 11


DORSEY E. W ALKER, A.B., M .A...............................................................History
A.B., Wayne University; M.A., Atlanta University. Further
Study, University of Michigan. Assistant Professor of His-
tory.
DOLLIE M. MACK WILLIAMS, B.S., R.N.................................Nursing Service
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Wayne
University. Assistant Professor of Nursing Education; Director
of Nursing Service.

Roy L. BAILEY, B.S...............................................Machine Shop Practice
B.S., Prairie View University. Instructor of Machine Shop
Practice.
JOHN W. BAKER, A.B., M.S.......................................................Mathematics
A.B., M.S., Fisk University. Instructor and Acting Principal,
Demonstration High School.
LEONARD BALLOU, A.B.............. ................................ ..............................Organ
A.B., Fisk University. Instructor of Organ.

W ILBUR L. BATE, B.S ..........................................................................Poultry
B.S., Tennessee A. and I. State College. Further Study, Iowa
State College. Instructor of Poultry.
CLAUDIA L. BATEY, B.S., M.S.......................................Clothing and Textiles
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Columbia University. Instruc-
tor of Clothing and Textiles.
EMMA BLAKE, B.S.....................................................................................English
B.S., Benedict College. Further Study, Atlanta University. In-
structor of English. Demonstration High School.
EVERETT P. BLAKE, B.S...............................................Mechanical Drawing
B.S., South Carolina State College. Certificates, Aviation
Cadet Engineering, Yale University; Radio Mechanic Training,
Tuskegee Institute; Pre-Technical Training, Seymour-Johnson
Air Field. Instructor of Mechanical Drawing.
BARBARA BOARDLEY, B.S.............................................Nursery School
B.S., Hampton Institute. Instructor in Nursery School.

JOHN W BOARDLEY, B.S .................................. ..............................Electricity
B.S., Hampton Institute. Instructor of Electricity

E. TIPTON BROOKS, B.S...................................Agronomy and Field Crops
B.S., Tuskegee Institute. Instructor of Agronomy and Field
Crops.

FANNIE C. BROOKS, B.S.................- ....--..--- -- ....... ..-.----- --...............History
B.S., Bluefield State College. Further Study, Ohio State Uni-
versity. Instructor of History.

CHLORICE BROWN, B.S ...................................-------.......... .....-----Biology
B.S., West Virginia State College. Instructor of Biology.

MAURICE Y. BROWN, A.B., M.A ..........-- ------..------------------....English
A.B., Virginia State College. Further Study, Hampton Insti-
tute. M.A., University of Michigan. Instructor of English.










12 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


REBECCA WALKER BROWN, B.S., M.A...................................................m.Music
B.S., Alabama State Teachers College, M.A., Columbia Uni-
versity. Instructor of Music.
JAMES L. BRUTON, B.S......................... --......-........-....---.......................---Printing
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Printing.
CORNELIA I. CARTER, A.B--.............................................................. --Education
A.B., Livingston College. Further Study, Cornell University.
Instructor of Basic Skills, Veterans' Program.
DAVID C. CARTER, B.S-................................Dairying and Animal Husbandry
B. S., Tuskegee Institute. Instructor of Dairying and Animal
Husbandry.
GLORIA Dix CHAPMAN, A.B..............................--- ..................................... English
A.B., Bennett College. Further Study, Howard University.
Instructor of English.
E. J. CROSSWRIGHT, B.S., M.A.---.....----....--...---....- .Architectural Drawing
B.S., Lincoln University; M.A., Wayne University. Instructor
of Architectural Drawing.
THELMA L. CUNNINGHAM, B.S., B.S. in L.S. -...............- Assistant Librarian
B.S., North Carolina A. and T. College; B.S. in L.S., Hamp-
ton Institute. Instructor of Library Science; Assistant
Librarian.
GRACE CURRY, B.S., M.B.A.....--..........--.....-......Business Administration
B.S., M.B.A., University of Kansas. Instructor of Business Ad-
ministration.

GUY L. DARNELL, JR., B.S..................................................................Business
B.S., Morehouse College. Further Study, University of Chicago.
Instructor of Business and Commerce.

MODESTE B. DUNCAN, B.S., M.A.........Assistant Resident Teacher Trainer
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M. A., Columbia University.
Further Study, Columbia University. Instructor of Home Eco-
-nomics Education.

IRENE EDMONDS, A.B..----............ ................................. ......-English
A.B., Syracuse University. Instructor of English.

DOTHAL EDWARDS.................................................. .................Carpentry
Trade Diploma, Tuskegee Institute. Instructor of Carpentry.

RUTH E. EVERETT, B.A., M.A...........................................................French
B.A., Bennett College; M.A., University of Michigan. Further
Study, Middlebury College Language Schools. Instructor of
French.

ERNEST D. FEARS, B.S-----....................... .----------------------.....I...... Industrial Arts
B.S., Hampton Institute. Instructor of Industrial Arts.
Fiscal Agent, Division of Mechanic Arts.

POLLIE E. FEARS, B.S.......................-...........................-Commercial Education
Certificate, Florida A. and M. College; B.S., Hampton Institute,
Further Study, New York University. Instructor of Commercial
Education.










BULLETIN, 1948 13


ERNESTINE M. FORD, B.S.....................................................................Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Columbia Uni-
versity. Instructor and Critic Teacher First Grade, Lucy Moten
Demonstration School.
W ILLIAM P. FOSTER, B.M .E..................-...............- --................................-M music
B.M.E., University of Kansas. Further Study, University of
Kansas. Instructor and Director of Band.
SEDALIA GAINES B.S., M.S............................................................ Education
B.S:, Tillotson College; M.S., Temple University. Head Teacher,
Nursery Education, Director of Nursery School.
SADIE ROBINSON GAITHER, A.B., M.A.................................................Education
A.B., Knoxville College; M.A., Atlanta University. Instructor of
Basic Skills, Veterans' Program.
CARRIE M. GARNES, B.S., M.A.............Foods and Institutional Management
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Columbia University.
Further Study, Columbia University. Instructor of Foods and
Institutional Management.
W ILLIE BLANCHE GAVIN, B.S.............................................................Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor, Nursery School.
JUANITA GRAVES, A.B., M.S.................................................................. English
A.B., M.S., Indiana University. Instructor of English.
GRACE GRAY, B.M US.....................................................................................M music
B.Mus., Howard University. Instructor of Music.
CHARLOTTE D. GRIFFIN, B.S......---......---..- .....---..---..................Education
B.S., Ohio State University. Further Study, Ohio State Uni-
versity. Instructor of English, Demonstration High School.
SARAH M. HARPER, B.S., M.S...-...............................Foods and Nutrition
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Columbia University. Further
Study, Columbia University. Instructor of Foods and Nutrition.
F. A. HARRIS, B.S., M.S......................................................Industrial Arts
B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.S., Iowa State College.
Instructor of Industrial Arts.
ZELLA HARRIS, A.B., M.S.............................................Music and History
A.B., Hiram College; M.S., Iowa State College. Instructor of
Music and History, Demonstration High School.
JOSEPH A. HILL, B.S...............................................Plumbing and Heating
B.S., Tuskegee Institute. Instructor of Plumbing and Heating.
RUTH HALL HODGES, B.A .............................................................................. Art
B.A., Clark College. Instructor of Art.
VALERIA SUPEARL HOWARD, A.B., B.L.S..................Assistant Librarian
A.B., Talladega College; B.L.S., University of Chicago. Instruc-
tor and Assistant Librarian.
HARRIET A. HUBERT**-........----.......--... ---..-.........-.......-...-Nursing Education
Diploma, Mercy Hospital School of Nurses. Further Study, New
York University. Instructor Nursing Education.
**On leave.










14 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


HERMAN HUDSON, A.B., M.A..................................... ............... Language
A.B., MA., University of Michigan. Further Study, University
of Mexico. Instructor of Spanish.

HAROLD JENKINS, B.S............................. Tailoring and Dry Cleaning
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Hampton In-
stitute, Pennsylvania State College. Instructor of Tailoring
and Dry Cleaning.
EUNICE 0. JOHSON, B.S., R.N.......................................... Nursing Service
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Cook
County School of Nursing; University of Chicago; New York
University. Instructor and Supervisor of Student Clinic.
JAMES JOHNSON, B.S.................................. ...................... Laundering
B.S., Prairie View State College; Further Study, University of
Pennsylvania. Instructor of Laundering.
PEARL O. JOHNSON, B.S......................................State Itinerant Teacher
Trainer of Home Economics
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Home Economics
Education.

CATHERINE EUDORA JONES, BA., M.S..............................Physical Education
B.A., Talladega College; M.S., New York University. Instructor
of Physical Education.
EDWARD JONES.........................................................Painting and Decorating
Certificate, Hampton Institute; Carnegie Institute of Tech-
nology. Instructor of Painting and Decorating.
ULYSSES JONES, B.S......................................................Physical Education
B.S., Southern University. Instructor of Physical Education
and Coach of Basketball.
AZILEE KIMBREW, A.B...............................................................................French
A.B., Indiana University. Further Study, Indiana University.
Instructor of French.
MARIE MCMILLAN KING, B.S.........................................................Clothing
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Pratt Institute;
Columbia University. Instructor of Clothing.
IRMA T. KYLER, B.S................................................... Commercial Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, University
of Chicago; North Carolina State College and Hampton In-
stitute. Instructor of Commercial Education and Critic
Teacher, Demonstration High School.
MELVIN R. KYLER, A.B.............................................................Mathematics
A.., Lincoln University; Further Study, University of Chicago.
Instructor of Mathematics and Director of Public Relations.
OSWALD LAMPKINS, B.A., M.A.............................................................English
B.A., MA., Fisk University. Instructor of English.
THERESA I. LANG, A.B .................................................................... Education
A.B., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Social Science,
Demonstration High School.
**On Leave.










BULLETIN, 1948 15


JOHNNIE V. LEE, A.B., MUS.B............................................................Piano
A.B., Bishop College; Mus.B., New England Conservatory of
Music. Instructor of Piano.
GEORGIA LINCOLN, B.S., R.N................................................. -Nursing Service
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; Diploma, Grady School of
Nursing. Further Study, Tuskegee Institute; Atlanta Univer-
sity. Instructor of Nursing Education.
ADELE J. LUCAS, B.S., R.N.............................................Nursing Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Cook
County Hospital. Instructor of Nursing Education and Operat-
ing Room Supervisor.
E. ROBENA LUCK, S.B., M.S.....-- ---.......................... .. ...........Botany
S.B., Howard University; M.S., University of Iowa. Further
Study, University of Illinois, University of Iowa. Instructor
of Botany.
JOSEPH L. MACK, B.S.................................. ....... ...... ........... .... Art
B.S., Hampton Institute. Further Study, Advertising and
Graphic Arts at the Army University Center at Schofield Bar-
racks, Hawaii; Pennsylvania State College. Instructor of Art.
HENRIETTA MAYS, A.B., B.L.S..............................................Library Science
A.B., Hunter College; B.L.S., Columbia University School of
Library Science. Instructor and Assistant Librarian.

WILLIE M. DANFORD MILES, A ...................................................Education
A.B., Morris Brown College. Further Study, Ohio State Uni-
versity. Instructor and Critic Teacher, Third Grade, Lucy
Moten Demonstration School.

EDWARD O. OGLESBY, B.S..............................................Physical Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Ohio State Uni-
versity, University of Illinois. Instructor of Physical Education,
Demonstration High School.

DOROTHY HOOD OLIVER, B.S., M.S.,..............................................Chemistry
B.S., M.S., Atlanta University. Instructor of Chemistry.
ARLINGTON I. PATTON, B.S................................................ Chemistry
B.S., Prairie View State College; Further Study, Tennessee
State College; University of Colorado. Instructor of Chemistry.
MARTHA G. PENNYMON, A.B..................................................................History
A.B., Indiana University. Further Study, Indiana University.
Instructor of History.
DORIS A. PETERS, A.B., R.N.......................................:....Clinical Assistant
A.B., St. Augustine College; Diploma, Lincoln Hospital Training
School. Instructor of Nursing Education.

L. ALLEN PYKE, II, B.S.M., M.M.......... ........... ... ..........Music
B.S.M., Howard University; M.M., University of Michigan.
Instructor of Music.

ROBERT E. RANDOLPH B.E., M.S...........................................Social Studies
B.E., M.S., New York State College for Teachers. Instructor of
Social Science.










16 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


DAVID ROBINSON, B.S..... ......................................... ...... ...............Barbering
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Barbering.
ULIS SHELTON, B.S....................................................... Physical Education
B.S., Southern University. Instructor of Physical Education.
DAVID L. SHEPPARD.....................................................................................Radio
Special Work in Radio and Electricity, Temple University.
Instructor of Radio.
LOWELL L. SIMMoNS, A.B..................... ......................--- .............English
A.B., Morgan State College. Further Study, Western Reserve
University; New York University. Instructor of English.
EDDIE LOU SMALL, B.S.**..............................................................Cosmetology
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Cosmetology.

CHARLES U. SMITH, B.S., M.A-..........................................------...Sociology
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.A., Fisk University. Instructor
of Sociology.
.EMMIE L. F. SMITH, A.B ---......................-- ............ ........................... -Education
Diploma, Miner Teachers College; A.B., Howard University.
Further Study, Howard University. Instructor. Library Demon-
stration School.
PRISCILLA K. SPELLMAN, B.S., M.S...................................Home Economics
B.S., Hampton Institute. Further Study, Fisk University, Uni-
versity of Chicago. M.S., A. and T. College. Instructor of Home
Economics, Critic Teacher, Demonstration High School.
ANITA S. P. STEWART, B.S.-......---.....................................Physical Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, University of
Pennsylvania and Columbia University. Instructor of Physical
Education.
SARAMAE STEWART, B.S., M.A................................................Mathematics
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.A., Columbia University.
Instructor of Mathematics.
CLARA BETTY STRONG, A.B., R.N.....................................Nursing Education
Diploma, Homer G. Phillips School of Nursing; A.B., West
Virginia State College. Further Study, University of Chicago.
Instructor of Clinical Methods.
J. HARRISON THOMAS, B. Mus. Ed............................School Music and Voice
B. Mus. Ed., University of Kansas. Further Study, University
of Kansas; Kansas State Teachers College; Kansas City Con-
servatory of Music and Columbia University. Instructor of
Music and Voice and Head of Department of Music.
HANSEL E. TOOKES, B.S.....-----------......................--........................--Physical Education
Certificate, American Gentleman's School of Design (S. Regal
System) New York; Further Study, University of Illinois; B.S.,
Florida A. and M. College. Instructor of Physical Education.
EMORY A. WADLOWE, A.B., B.D., S.T.M.........................Religious Education
A.B., Paine College; B.D., Howard University; S.T.M., Oberlin
College. Instructor of English and Religious Education.

**On Leave.










BULLETIN, 1948 17


MAROLYN C. WARNER, A.B............................................Physical Education
A.B., Talladega College. Further Study, Atlanta University
School of Social Work, New York University. Instructor of
Physical Education.
FALEDA LANE WEBBER, A.B ...................... .................................... Education
A.B., Spelman College. Further Study, Columbia University.
Instructor and Critic Teacher, Fourth Grade, Demonstration
School.
GEORGIA ULEASE WIGGINS, A.B.............................................................Education
A.B., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Ohio State Uni-
versity. Instructor, Nursery School.
JUANITA VALDERINE WILEY, MUS.B...................................................... muSi
Mus.B., Talladega College. Instructor of Music.
ALONZO K. WILLIAMS, B.S.................................................................Electricity
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; Certificate: Theory of Combustion and
Automotive and Electric Controls, Tuskegee Army Air Field,
Instructor of Electricity.
HOPE WILLIAMS, A.B., M.A .................................................................English
A.B., New York University; M.A., Columbia University. In-
structor of English.
ELOISE J. WRIGHT, A.B........................................................................Education
A.B., Atlanta University. Further Study, Atlanta University.
Instructor and Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade, Demonstration
School.
ELEANOR YOUNG, A.B., B.L.S..........................................Assistant Librarian
A.B., Kentucky State College; B.L.S., Atlanta University
Instructor.

JUANITA BATE, R.N.................................................................Nursing Service
Diploma Homer G. Phillips School of Nursing. Further Study,
New York University. Assistant, Hospital.
C. L. BOLDEN, B.S...........................................................Assistant Librarian
B.S., Bennett College. Assistant, Assistant Librarian.
VAUNETTA BRISCO, B.S..........................................................................Tailoring
B.S., Tuskegee Institute. Assistant in Tailoring.
CHLORICE BROWN, B.S.................................................Laboratory Assistant
B.S., Virginia State College. Assistant.
LILLIAN C. DAVIS, B.S., B.L.S.....................................Assistant Librarian
B.S., Fisk University; B.L.S., Atlanta University. Assistant, As-
sistant Librarian.
LULA D. FIGGERS, B.S.............................................................. Nursing Service
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant, Hospital.
MARY L. KING HENRY, R.N..............................................Nursing Service
Diploma, Columbus City Hospital Training School. Assistant,
Hospital.
ELOISE HOOKS, B.S...................................................Nursing Service
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant, Hospital.










18 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


THELMA B. JACKSON, A.B., B.S.L.S.................................Assistant Librarian
A.B., Wilberforce University; B.S.L.S., Catholic University of
America. Assistant, Assistant Librarian.
RUTH A. MATHERSON, B.S., B.L.S...................................Assistant Librarian
B.S., Bennett College; B.L.S. North Carolina College for
Negroes. Assistant, Assistant Librarian.
SHIRLEY PYKE..............................................................Dental Technician
Fisk University. Certificate in Dental Hygiene, University of
Michigan. Assistant, Hospital.
WILHELMINA SEGUE, B.S ............................................ Laboratory Assistant
B.S., Howard University. Assistant, Laboratory.
VICTORIA SIMPSON, B.S..-.................................... Home Economics Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant, Division of Home
Economics.
LEONARD SPEARMAN, B.S................................................Laboratory Assistant
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Assistant, Laboratory.
ANNIE P. WILSON.....................................................................Nursing Service
Diploma, Meharry Medical College. Assistant, Hospital.




ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS
RUTH LEE ABRAHAM, B.S...-............-....-........ -- ...- ..................-.........--- Cashier
B.S., South Carolina State College.

JAMES C. ANDERSON, B.S.............................................Maintenance Supervisor
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Hampton
Institute.
ELSIE FRANCES ARCHIE, B.S.......---..........................Assistant, Business Office
B.S., Wilberforce University.
FREDERICK ARMSTEAD, B.S....... .....................................Clerk, Business Office
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
ELIZABETH T. BREWER...... .......................................Hostess, McGuinn Hall
Diploma, St. Augustine College. Further Study, Fisk University,
Hampton Institute.
A. C. BRIGGS, B.S.............................................Secretary to the President
Diploma, Wilberforce University. Special Study, Miami Uni-
versity (Oxford, Ohio). B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further
Study, New York University.

BELLE BReOOKS, B.S........................-. A---ssista.nt Dieitian
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
PATTERSON P. BROWN, B.S.................................Assistant, Business Office
B.S., Hampton Institute. Certificate, U. S. Army Administra-
tion and Supply School, Enysham Oxon, England. Further
Study, U. S. Army Administration Schools, Verdun, France,
and Bonn, Germany.










BULLETIN, 1948


BESSIE J. CANTY, B.S .................................................. ...................Dietitian
B.S., Florida A. and M. College, Dietitian Jacksonville Nursing
Center.
ESTHER CLARK..................................................Hostess, Jackson Davis Hall
Fessenden Academy.
ELSIE COGMAN, B.S......................... ................... Assistant Dietitian
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
CLEMENTINE B. DANIELS, B.S................................................... Head Dietitian
B.S., Wilberforce University.
MELBA ELSE, B.S.....................................................Secretary-Clerk, Hospital
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
LouIE G. EVANS............................................................................ Supply Clerk
Certificate, Southern University.
ALERINE FALANA, B.S.............................Secretary, Division of Maintenance
B.S., Florida Normal College.
LOLLIE M. FLEMING, B.S., M.S..........................Recorder, Registrar's Office
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; M.S., Columbia University.
MIRIAM POLKINGHORNE FORD, B.S.....Secretary, Division of Mechanic Arts
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
ANN FOSTER........................- ....... ---................. .....Secretary, Hospital
Certificate, Kansas City General Hospital.
LOUISE FREEMAN, B.S.................................Secretary, Division of Personnel
B.S., Virginia State College.
HELEN GLOVER, A ....................................Counselor and Dormitory Hostess
A.B., Talladega College.
HAZEL HALES, B.S.................Assistant Payroll Clerk, Student Accounts
B.S., Hampton Institute.
ROBERT H. HALL, B.S................................................Chief, Student Accounts
B.S., Hampton Institute.
ARMESIA HARPER, B.S....................................Assistant Dietitian, College Inn
B.S., Tuskegee Institute.
MARY E. HARRIS, B.S...................Secretary, Division of Extension Services
B.S., Bluefield State College.
CLEO HAYLING................................Dieitian, N.B. Young Nursery School
Certificate, New Orleans University.
GLORIA Y. HUGHES, B.S.................Secretary, Division of Graduate Study
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
ALDONIA W. JENKINS...............................................Cashier, College Laundry
Certificate, Florida A. and M. College.
BIRDIE L. JONES..... ...-..............-..... ..... ...........Campus Hostess
Certificate, Spelman College.
EsSIE R. JONES, B.S....................................Hostess, Jackson Davis Hall
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Hampton In-
stitute, Columbia University (Teachers College).










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


LOLA JONES, B.S ..................... .........................................Hospital Dietitian
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
CORNELIUS A. KING....................... ................................ Assistant Bookkeeper
Certificate Howard University, Lincoln University.
BERTHA MANGRAM ......................................................... Hostess, McGuinn Hall
OLIVER MANGRAM ................................................................ Chef, College Inn
LUELLA W. MCBRIDE, B.S...................................Ass't. Dietitian, College Inn
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

SYBIL L. MOBLEY, A.B...........................................................Voucher Clerk
A.B., Bishop College.

VIVIAN MOORE, A.B............................................... ................. Voucher Clerk
A.B., Morris Brown College.
AUGUSTA FORD NIMS, B.S...............................Secretary, Registrar's Office
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
BEATRICE S. L. NORWOOD, B.S.. .............. Asst. Supervisor Veterans'
Housing Project
Diploma, Spelman College; B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
MARGUERITE SMITH OGLESBY, B.S.................................Manager, College Inn
B.S., Spelman College.
SALLIE Lou OWENS, B.S.**........................Assistant Dietitian, Dining Hall
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
REBECCA BRAGG ROBINSON, B.S.....-.....................................Bookstore Clerk
B.S., Florida A. and M. College. Further Study, Boston Uni-
versity.

SUSIE K. RUSSELL, B.S.............................................Clerk, Student Accounts
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

EUGENE J. SMITH, B.S.................................... Storeroom Clerk, Dining Hall
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

RoSA LEE SNELL, B.S ........................................Secretary, Business Office
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

E. W. SPEARMAN, AB.......................................Clerk, College Post Office
Diploma, Talledega College. A.B., Florida A. and M. College.
Further Study, Chicago University, Deering Community
Center.

FRANCES M. STARKES............................................... Hostess, McGuinn Hall
Florida A. and M. College Normal Department; Hampton
Institute; Dennison Art School.
HERTHA TAYLOR, A.B.....................Supervisor, Veterans' Housing Project
A.B., University of Pittsburgh.
KATHRYN THOMAS, A.B.....................................Secretary, Registrar's Office
A.B., Florida A. and M. College.

**On leave.










BULLETIN, 1948 21


GRACE THOMPSON, B.S.......................-...... .Secretary, Demonstration School
B.S., Bluefield State College.

HORTENSE THOMPSON, B.S........................... Bookkeeper and Head Cashier
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

H. BEATRICE THWEATT, B.S.......Secretary, Division of Nursing Education
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

JAMES A. WALKER, B.S.............................................................Bookkeeper
B.S., Wilberforce University.

KATHERINE L. WALKER.......................................... Clerk, Registrar's Office
Certificate Wayne University.

OCYBELLE WARD, B.S................................Secretary, Division of Personnel
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

LILLIE H. WASHINGTON ..................----........................--.Hostess, Clark Hall
Diploma, Claflin University.

JOSIE WATTS, B.S.....................................Assistant Dietitian, Dining Hall
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS, B.S......................................... Maintenance Plumber
B.S., Tuskegee Institute.

MAE OLLIE WILLIAMS, B.S..................................Teletypist and Operator
Western Union Agency
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.

MAUDE LERITA WILLIAMS, B.S-........................... ...... Secretary, Division of
Arts and Sciences
B.S., Southern University.

VIRGINIA LYONS WILLIAMS, B.S ....................................Assistant Dietitian,
Dining Hall
B.S., Florida A. and M. College.
MYRA ANNA WOODSON, B.S.....................Secretary, Division of Agriculture
B.S., Virginia State College.










22 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


HOSPITAL STAFF

ACTIVE STAFF PHYSICIANS

R. L. ANDERSON, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D.
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.D., Howard
University.
W. H. BAKER, B.S., M.D.
B.S., Wilberforce University; M.D., Meharry Medical College.
J. R. BATE, B.S., M.D.
B.S., Roger Williams, College; M.D., Meharry Medical College.
A. O. CAMPBELL, M.D.
M.D., College of Physicians and Surgeons (Boston, Mass.)
W. A. CAMPBELL, B.S., D.D.S.
B.S., Morehouse College; D.D.S., Meharry Medical College.
L. H. B. FOOTE, B.S., M.D.
B.S., M.D., Howard University.
J. E. MATTHEWS, B.S., D.D.S.
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; D.D.S., Howard University.



CONSULTING STAFF PHYSICIANS

OTIS BRITT, MD.
Pre-Med, Alabama Polytechnic; M.D., Tulane University.
G. W. BRowN, M.D.
Pre-Med, University of Florida; M. D., University of Georgia.
F. O. CONRAD, D.D.S.
Mt. Pleasant College; D.D.S., Emory University.
J. E. DAVIs, B.A., MD.
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.D., Emory University.
E. W. EKERMEYER, M.D.
M.D., University of Cincinnati.
CHARLES JAMES, P.H.G., M.D.
P.H.G., M.D., Medical College of Virginia.
0. G. KENDRICK, SR., M.D.
MD., Loyola University (Chicago)
O. G. KENDRICK, JR., B.S., M.D.
B.S., MD., Emory University.
J. H. POUND, M.D.
Louis Institute (Chicago); M.D., Emory University.











BULLETIN, 1948


COURTESY STAFF PHYSICIANS

E. J. ANDREWS, B.S., M.D.
B.S., Haverford College; M.D., Northwestern University.

M. R. CLEMENTS, B.S., M.D.
M.D., Emory University.

P. COUGHLIN, B.S., M.D.
B.S. Boston College; M.D., Tufts College.

L. L. DOZIER, M.D.,
M.D., University of Georgia.

J. H. GRIFFIN, M.D.
M.D., Meharry Medical College.

G. H. GARMANY, M.D.
M.D., University of Tennessee.

G. H. GWYNN, JR., B.S., M.D.
B.S., Marston College, M.D., University of Maryland.

H. O. HALLSTRAND, B.S., B.M., M.D.
B.S., B.M., M.D., Northwestern University. Further Study in
Surgery, Cook County Hospital.

F. T. HOLLAND, M.D.
M.D., Emory University.

LLOYD MASSEY, B.S., M.D.
B.S., University of Florida; M.D., Tulane University.

B. M. RHODES, M.D.
M.D., University of Maryland.

J. W. SAPP, B.S., M.D.
B.S., M.D., Emory University.

B. A. WILKINSON, M.D.
M.D., University of Georgia.

J. L. WILLIAMS, M.D.
M.D.;,-Emory -University.












GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORY
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes is
a Land Grant college operated by the State of Florida under direction
of the State Board of Control and the State Board of Education. In
addition to its support by State and Federal appropriations, it has
received assistance from the General Education Board, Julius Rosen-
wald Fund, Carnegie Foundation, and other philanthropic sources.
This institution, originally called the Colored Normal School, was
established in 1887 by constitutional provision and legislative enact-
ment. It was opened during the fall of the same year with an en-
rollment of fifteen students. Serving respectively as principal and
assistant principal were T. D. Tucker and T. V. Gibbs.
In 1891, the founders were instrumental in having the school re-
moved from its original location on Copeland Street, "College Hill,"
to its present site in the suburbs of Tallahassee. In the same year,
the offerings of the school were expanded to include departments of
normal training, manual training, agriculture, and music.
The year 1892 was an important one to several of our first students;
for in June of that year, the first commencement exercises were held
with a graduating class of five students.
In 1901, Nathan B. Young was elected president and served through
June, 1923. During his administration additional land was acquired
and cleared for campus and farm; new buildings were erected, and
many well-trained teachers were added to the instructional staff. The
institution began to receive a higher degree of academic recognition
and respect in college circles.
In 1909, by a special act of the State Legislature, the institution
was named the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for
Negroes. W. H. A. Howard became president in July of 1923 and con-
tinued in that capacity for one year.
J. R. E. Lee was appointed president in 1924 at a very critical
time in the history of the institution. As a result of great tact, per-
sistence, patience, and faith in the friends of humanity, he was able
to get increased support for the institution from the State and to
bring to the college large grants of money from out-of-state agencies.
Among those who gave very generously at this time where the
General Education Board, the Rosenwald Fund, and the Carnegie
Foundation. Their gifts resulted in the erection of Jackson Davis Hall,
the Administration Building (now J. R. E. Lee Hall), N. B. Young
Hall, Lucy Moten Training School, and the purchase of library and
science equipment. The untiring efforts of President Lee culminated
also in the installations of a central sewage system, the hard surfacing
of the walks and streets through the campus, the rebuilding of the
dining hall, Science Hall, and the Mechanic Arts Building, the erection
of the dairy barn, McGwinn Hall, formerly South Hall for Women,
Sampson Hall, formerly South Hall for Men, the President's home,
and the construction of Sampson-Bragg Athletic Field.
At the death of President Lee, April 5, 1944, Vice-President J. B.
Bragg took charge and acted until September 1, when Dr. William H.









BULLETIN, 1948 25


Gray, Jr., who was then president of Florida Normal and Industrial
College at Saint Augustine, was elected to the presidency on July 3,
1944. He took office as the fifth president of the institution.
Under the present administration, the college has continued its
development. An extensive building program is now in process which
will contribute to the expansion of the college in many areas. Teaching
personnel, facilities, and teachers' salaries have been substantially in-
creased, making for a more effective community program.
Since Dr. Gray's incumbency, the college has secured grants
amounting to more than $50,000.00 from a Rockefeller Foundation
Subsidiary to aid its nursing education program; while the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has given $20,000.00
for faculty research; a $10,000.00 grant has been made to aid faculty
members pursuing graduate training. The Sloan Foundation has also
made a grant to the college for a project in applied economics, and
the Hollingsworth Student Loan Fund of $1,000.00 has been established.
Since 1945, Florida Negro graduate students have received more than
$100,000.00 to pursue professional and advanced graduate courses of
study in out-of-state institutions.
During the past twelve months, substantial appropriations have
been made by the state for expanding the physical facilities of the
college. More than three million dollars have been allotted for build-
ings, renovation, installation, and other additions to the college plant.
New buildings in the process of construction or to be erected are:
a hospital, physical education building, two dormitories for women,
student activity building and laundry. Structures to be renovated are
the old hospital and the dining hall. One hundred seventy units have
been erected to house married veterans and eleven barracks have been
provided to house two hundred fifty single veterans. A central heating
plant for the college is now under construction. The new library which
faces Lee Hall and a dormitory for girls were opened for use and oc-
cupancy in September, 1947.

LOCATION
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is located in
Tallahassee, which is near the northern boundary of the State.
Situated on one of the seven hills of the city, it affords a most im-
posing view of the State Capitol, located on another of the hills.

PURPOSE
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is a standard
college offering courses of study leading.to the A.B., B.S., and M.S. de-
grees. It aims to prepare men and women for larger usefulness in life.
The student is led to a realization of the highest ideals of scholarship
and character through the diversified training which he may obtain
through the seven divisions of the institution.

ACCREDITATION
The institution was accredited in 1931 as a class "B" college by
the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern
States. In 1935, it was given class "A" rating. During this year, it was
admitted to membership in the Association of American Colleges and
Universities and the American Council on Education.









26 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS
The college property occupies 396.6 acres. The central campus of
74.6 acres, overlooking the city of Tallahassee, includes the main
buildings, the athletic field, and other playgrounds and parking areas.
There are conveniently located cement walks which connect the cen-
trally located buildings. The buildings are located amidst beautiful trees
covered with Spanish moss and are surrounded by evergreen shrubbery.
The barn lots, reached by hard-surfaced roads extending through
the campus, occupy 16 acres. Pasture for the livestock and the wood-
land surrounding the campus embrace 148 acres.
THE AGRICULTURAL BUILDING constructed in 1911 at a
cost of $12,000, contains administrative offices, -classrooms, and the
offices of Agricultural Extension Division on the first and second
floors and workshops and experimental laboratories on the basement
floor.
BAND HALL was constructed in 1947 out of former army barracks.
It contains 5 classrooms for general class purposes, a band practice
room and 6 individual practice rooms for members of the band.
THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, built by a special grant from the
Carnegie Foundation, contains 19,050 volumes. It is provided with a
periodical room, a reference room, and general reading rooms.
CLARK HALL, a former residence hall for girls, is now used for
the college post office and book store. The second floor,4as been con-
verted into temporary apartments for teachers.
THE SAMUEL H. COLEMAN LIBRARY, which faces Lee Hall
was constructed in 1947 at a cost of $453,000. It was one of the first
units begun in the college expansion program. It will contain a spa-
cious reading room, reserve room, browsing room, a Negro collection
room, periodical room, cataloging room and reference room. It will
also provide space for the Art Department and for the Resource-Use
Education Materials Bureau.
COLLEGE INN is the new campus cafeteria. It was constructed
in 1947 out of former army barracks and equipped with surplus war
materials. It combines a desirable lounge and recreational place, with
a center in which students can find meals, soft drinks, and other
sundries.
THE DAIRY BARN contains housing stanchions for milking, feed-
ing stalls for calves, dairy laboratories, and milk rooms equipped with
power separators and churns. The second floor contains accommoda
tions for the dairy workers on the front and a large storage space in
the rear. Connected with the barn are two 65-ton capacity silos.
THE GREENHOUSE is a small steam-heated structure divided into
three sections to serve as a laboratory for instruction in general horti-
culture, floriculture, and botany. It was constructed in 1935 at a cost
of $5,000.
THE GYMNASIUM, converted from the old college chapel, con-
tains floor space to accommodate approximately 125 students at a
time. It seats about 400 persons.
THE HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING was constructed in 1918 at
a cost of $10,000. It is a ten-room frame structure with two food
laboratories, two clothing laboratories, a suite of rooms for practice
in housekeeping, recitation rooms, and an office.









BULLETIN, 1948 27


THE HOSPITAL AND HEALTH CENTER is equipped with beds
an X-ray unit, and other modern equipment. In its dual capacity,
it serves as the headquarters for nursing education and provides
facilities for the health needs of the student body and community.
LEE HALL was erected in 1927-1928 as a result of a legislative
grant of $150,000 and a grant of $100,000 by the General Education
Board. It contains administrative offices, classrooms, music rooms,
and an auditorium, having seating capacity of 1,600. The auditorium is
\ equipped with a stage having a capacity for seating a 150 voice choir,
a Western Electric motion picture machine, and a two-manual Wurlit-
zer pipe organ and chimes. This building was named and dedicated
on November 10, 1944 in memory of the late Dr. J. R. E. Lee.
THE LUCY MOTEN LABORATORY TRAINING SCHOOL is a
one-story brick building which contains classrooms, playroom and shop
for elementary school purposes. It is the center of the practice teach-
ing work of the Division of Education.
THE LUCY MOTEN ANNEX is a temporary frame building erected
in 1947 to be used for the Demonstration High School.
THE MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING AND ANNEX provide facili-
ties for work in the fourteen trades and the industrial program of the
College. The original Mechanic Arts Building was constructed in 1913
at a cost of $19,000. It is a brick veneer structure. The Annex is a
temporary one-story frame structure. It was provided by the United
States Office of Education as a training center for War Production
Workers. Shops in both buildings are well ventilated and lighted for
safe and efficient trade activity.
PAIGE HOME MANAGEMENT HOUSE is a remodeled building
used as a laboratory for home management courses. The second floor
contains four bedrooms and a bath. On the first floor are the living
room, dining room, recreation room and kitchen. The basement con-
tains a well-equipped laundry and heating plant.
SCIENCE HALL, erected in 1924, provides rooms for lectures and
laboratories in the laboratory sciences. It was remodeled in 1946 at
a cost of $35,000.
TUCKER HALL is a two-story frame building. It contains the
classrooms and laboratories for the Barbering Department and the
Cosmetology Department.
RESIDENCE HALLS
GWYNN COTTAGE is a one-story frame structure which is used
as a residence hall for men teachers.
JACKSON DAVIS HALL is a residence hall for senior women with
rooms for 70 students. The building is a four story, fire-resistant
structure. Showers and lavatories are provided at the ends of halls
on all floors. This building was constructed in 1926 at a cost of $84,000.
JONES HALL is a two-story frame building which is used as a
residence hall for faculty men and campus guests.
MELVIN LODGE is a two-story frame structure which is used
as a residence hall for women teachers.
McGUINN HALL (formerly South Hall for Women) is the largest
residence hall on the campus. It was erected in 1938 out of a federal
grant. It is a four-story, fire-resistant structure, which has the










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


capacity for housing 200 students. It contains a social room, a laundry,
and a Little Theatre. A new wing to house senior women, was occupied
September 1947.
SAMPSON HALL, (formerly South Hall for Men) having residence
space for 187 men, is the newest, most modern of the dormitories for
men. It is four stories high and has showers and lavatories at the ends
of halls on each floor. On the first floor is a recreation room for the
use of students. This building was completed in the summer of 1938
at a cost of $155,000.
TEACHERS' COTTAGE is a one-story frame building which is
used as a residence hall for women teachers.
NATHAN B. YOUNG HALL, with capacity for housing 76 male
students, is equipped with modern conveniences and facilities. The
building is a four story, fire-resistant structure. Separate showers and
lavatories are located at the ends of the hall on each floor. Each
room is furnished with institutional beds, mattresses, a dresser, study
table, and chairs. The building was constructed in 1928 at a cost of
$90,000.

COLLEGE EXPANSION PROGRAM
Recent appropriations for the college provide for a four million
dollar building expansion program and an operating budget of ap-
proximately a million dollars per year. The following units in the
building program are now in use: a housing unit for single veterans,
and a housing unit for married veterans, the library, the new wing add-
ed to McGuinn Hall, College Inn, Band Hall, Lucy Moten Annex, and
a general storage house.
An enlargement to the College Commons, the central heating plant,
two girls' dormitories, and a hangar for physical education activities
are now under construction.
The following buildings have been approved by the State Legis-
lature and will be constructed as soon as materials become available: a
100 bed hospital, physical education building, student activity building,
and a laundry.


HEALTH SERVICE
The college hospital provides facilities in laboratories equipped
with modem apparatus. A full time physician, intern, and registered
nurses are on hand to care for patients.
The staff of the hospital is available as medical counselors during
daily office hours and clinics or for emergencies.
All students registering for the first time are required as a part of
their registration requirements to take a complete physical examination.
The staff of the hospital is responsible for these examinations which are
repeated annually thereafter, Parents are asked to respect and follow
the individualized recommendations based on the findings at entrance
and subsequent physical examinations with respect to corrective sug-
gestions. The administration of the college may assume the right and
responsibility, acting upon the findings of the hospital staff, to protect
all students by isolation of the sick, by appropriate vaccination, by
periodic or special examinations and observations.










S BULLETIN, 1948 29


Without assuming any financial responsibility the college reserves
the right to recommend such medical attention and care as may be
deemed advisable in case of a student's illness or accident. This may
even extend to actual or advisory assistance from outside sources. How-
ever, except in the event of great emergency, items of extra expense
will not be contracted until the family of the patient has been notified.

RELIGIOUS LIFE
The Florida A. and M. College is definitely interested in the
religious life and welfare of the students. The college church and the
religious organizations discussed below, in which all students may par-
ticipate, are features offered the students to assist in the attainment
of religious experiences.
CHRISTIAN FEDERATION. The planning of religious activities is
under the general sponsorship of the Christian Federation and the
committee on religious activities and daily chapel. The Christian Fed-
eration is a union of the Sunday School, Youth Temperance Council,
the Young Women's and the Young Men's Christian Associations. These
organizations promote social service and recreational activities. They
relate their work to larger groups having regional, national, and inter-
national significance. Membership in the various religious organiza-
tions is voluntary.
THE COLLEGE CHURCH. The College Church is a regularly
organized institution without denominational affiliations. The college
chaplain acts as pastor. Services are held in the college auditorium
every Sunday morning. On Sunday evening a more informal service is
conducted, featuring the music of one of the college choruses and stu-
dent body. A short talk is given by the president of the college, or
other designated person. There is a mid-week prayer service which is
under the direction of the chaplain and a student committee. In gen-
eral, attendance at assembly services is required of students. The re-
ligious program of the institution includes a variety of events accord-
ing to their appropriateness in the school year.

DORMITORY RESIDENCE
All students are required to live in the college dormitories unless
permitted by the Dean of Women or Dean of Men to live elsewhere.
Dormitories for Freshmen will be open for occupancy at noon on
the day proceeding the Freshman Orientation Period. Dormitories for
upper-classmen will be open for occupancy at noon on the day pre-
ceeding the upperclass registration.
All dormitories are furnished with the following room furniture:
study table, chairs, dresser, single beds and mattresses. No other fur-
niture may be installed in the rooms without permission of the Dean of
Women or Dean of Men.
PERSONAL NECESSITIES
Students should provide themselves with the proper clothing and
other personal items to take them through a year away from home.
Among their personal property should be included:
Young ladies:
1 Tailored navy blue coat suit (required)









30 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


2 Plain tailored white blouses with long sleeves (required)
1 Pair black low heel shoes (required)
1 Black or Navy Blue full length coat (required)
Shoes for general wear
Hose
1 Prom or evening dress
1 Umbrella, rain coat, a pair of galoshes
Soap, towels, bath cloths
2 Small rugs (not absolutely necessary)
4 Single-bed sheets
1 Single-bed mattress protector
1 Pillow
4 Pillow cases
2 Blankets or quilts
2 Single-bed spreads
Dresser scarfs
2 pairs of window curtains
Besides the above, you might as you wish, include pastel or varied
colored skirts, sweaters, suits, plain, woolen or silk street dresses, one
dressy street dress, saddle oxfords, loafers, bedroom shoes, one winter
robe, one summer housecoat, etc.
You should not bring too expensive jewelry. Bring at least one
hat, matching pocketbook, and gloves of a neutral color to be worn
with most of your Sunday wardrobe, at teas, receptions, and to church.
Young men:
1 Navy blue suit
1 Regulation college uniform
2 White shirts
Dress shirts as needed
1 Pair black shoes
Shoes for general wear
1 Rain coat, over shoes
4 Single-bed sheets
1 Single-bed mattress protector
4 Pillow cases
2 Single-bed spreads
Soap, towels, bath cloths
2 Pajama suits
Rough clothes for work or play
Your trunk may be late arriving so it will be wise to bring along
bed linen and the most necessary personal items in your handbag.

PERSONAL PROPERTY LOSS
The College does not assume any responsibility for the loss of any
student's personal property, either on the college campus or while
it is in transit.
EXPENSES AND FEES
PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable on or before the 5th of each month. Persons
having accounts which have not been paid on or before the 10th of










BULLETIN, 1948 31


each month will not be admitted to classes unless satisfactory arrange-
ments with reference to their accounts are made with the Business
Office.

All persons who send money to the institution in payment of fees
or services are cautioned that they send cash at their own risk. For
safety, money should be sent in the form of Post Office Money Order.
Postal Note, Cashier's Check or Certified Check.

Total amount to be paid at the time of registering:
Tuition fall and spring semesters:
Florida students: Free.
Out-of-State students: $150.00.


ENTRANCE FEES:


Fall Semester


Health Fee ............................................
Lectures and Artists Fee ...................
Activities and Publications Fee............
Athletic Fee .............................................
Library Fee .........................................
Physical Education Fee .....................
Incidental Fee .......................................
Board (12 month of Sept. and
month of Oct.) ...........................
Laundry (/2 month of Sept. and
month of Oct.) ................................
Room Rent (1 month of Sept. and
month of Oct.) .............................

Total ..............................


Dormitory
Residents
$ 3.50
2.50
3.50
5.00
2.50
4.00


41.25

4.50

9.75

$76.50


ENTRANCE FEES: Spring Semester
Dormitory
Residents
Health Fee ............................................ $ 3.00
Lectures and Artists Fee .................. 2.00
Activities and Publications Fee.......... 3.50
Athletic Fee .......................................... 3.00
Library Fee ............................................ 2.50
Physical Education Fee ...................... 4.00
Incidental Fee ........................................ ....
Board (month of February) ................ 27.50
Laundry ................................................ 3.00
Room Rent .............................................. 6.50

Total ........................................ $55.00


Non-Dormitory
Residents
$ 3.50
2.50
3.50
5.00
2.50
4.00
5.00


$26.00


Non-Dormitory
Residents
$ 3.00
2.00
3.50
3.00
2.50
4.00
5.00



$23.00










32 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


Monthly expenses for Dormitory Residents Itemized:
Board .................................................................... $27.50*
Room Rent .................................................................. 6.50
Laundry ..................................................................... 3.00
Total due first of each month
except September and February......................$37.00
Total expenses for Fall and Spring Semesters
for Non-Dormitory Residents................................$49.00
Total yearly expenses (covering registration, room rent, fees, board and
laundry) for the Fall and Spring Semesters for Dormitory
Residents ................ ............................$353.50
Summer Semester
The expenses of the summer semester, payable in advance are:
Tuition:
Florida students: Free.
Out-of-state students: $75.00.
Registration for the nine weeks session:
Under-graduate .................................... ...................$16.00
Graduate ................................... .......... ....... 20.00
Registration for five weeks workshops:
Under-graduate ..................................... .......$10.00
Graduate ......................................... ......................... 15.00
Room and board per week................................. $ 9.25*
*The College Dining Hall is how in process of being remodeled.
When the work has been completed, food service will be placed on the
cafeteria plan. It will then be impossible to accurately estimate the
cost of board for students. It is felt, however, that a thoughtful, eco-
nomical student will be able to obtain meals at about the same price
level as now paid for board.
The Dining Hall expects to open on the cafeteria plan on June 1,
1948. Students will then purchase books of meal tickets from the Busi-
ness Office as needed to satisfy their board requirements.
On account of the uncertain conditions prevailing with respect to
the costs of foods and services, the College reserves the right to change
the rates for room and board at any time during the school year.
ADVANCED RESERVATION FOR SUMMER SEMESTER
Advanced reservation for the summer semester or for any work-
shop will consist of the registration fee and two-weeks room and
board in advance.
EXTENSION SERVICE AND WEEK-END GRADUATE COURSES
Persons taking courses through the Division of Extension Services
or the week-end Graduate Program will pay as follows:
Under-graduate courses................$5.00 per semester hour of credit.
Graduate courses...---....................$6.00 per semester hour of credit.
In-service teachers working full time will not be permitted to take
more than one course for three or four semester hours of credit during
any semester, while working for the Post Graduate Certificate.
SPECIAL STUDENT FEES
Cadet Uniform: All male students are required to have the official
uniform of the college. The uniform consists of a navy 'blue coat and
trousers, and a garrison cap. Officers of the battalion and members
of the college band wear a cap different from that worn by other
students. The uniform is worn at dress parades on Sundays and
Wednesday. The cost of the uniform is:









BULLETIN, 1948 33


Coat ........................................ .......................... .. $19.00
Trousers ........................................................................ 12.50
Cap ................................................................................. 3.50

Total ...................................................................... ....$35.00
Cap for officers of the battalion
and members of the band....................................$ 4.50
Graduation Fee: Graduation fees are charged as follow:
Under-graduate students............................................$10.00
Graduate students........................................................ 20.00
Late Registration Fee: Persons registering after the close of the desig-
nated registration period will be required to pay late registration fees
as follows: 1st day, $2.00; 2nd day, $4.00; 3rd day, $6.00; 4th day and
thereafter, $7.00.
Music Fees: Persons majoring in music pay fees as follows:
These fees are payable at the time of registration.
Piano lessons ................................................................$12.00
Violin lessons ................................ ...... 12.00
Pipe organ lessons ........................................................ 18.00
Vocal lessons ..........-.......... .............................. 12.00
M usic rental fee ............................................................ 2.00
Persons not majoring in music pay fees as follows:
These fees are payable in advance.
Piano lessons (two per week) ......------................................$4.00
Violin lessons (two per week) .....------......................... 4.00
Pipe organ lessons (two per week) .....................-----....... 6.00
Music rental fee (per semester)................................ ------2.00
Nursing Education Fees: Students majoring in Nursing Education pay
the same fees as other students for the first year. Beginning with
the second year, student nurses receive scholarship aid covering room,
board, and laundry.
At the beginning of the first year, nursing students pay $30.00
for the uniform, which is worn on duty in the hospital. At the begin-
ning of the second semester, they pay $16.00 for the cape. Uniform
replacements are made at the expense of the college thereafter.
During the nine months affiliation period in Jacksonville, student
nurses pay $15.00 per month. During the three months period in
Tuskegee, $10.00 per month is paid for maintenance. The cost of
transportation to and from places of affiliation is borne by the students.
Nursing students pay the science fees for all science courses in
their curriculum.
Radio Use Fee: A fee of 25c per month is charged for use of each radio
installed in the college living quarters. No radio may be installed
without permission of the Dean of Women or Dean of Men.
Science Fee: A laboratory fee of $3.00 per semester per course is
charged to cover cost of materials and breakage in all science courses.
Special Examination Fee: A fee of $1.00 is charged for the administra-
tion of all general examinations required by a student after they have
been given.











ADMISSION OF STUDENTS
GENERAL STATEMENT
The general requirements for admission are: (1) Evidences of men-
tal ability and a record of good scholarship. This will be ascertained
by the certificate of high school or college credit which each new stu-
dent is required to furnish the registrar. (2) Each applicant must
furnish evidences of high moral standing. This is to be shown by the
recommendation of the persons furnished as references. (3) Students
whose condition of health would in any way endanger the health of
others are not granted admission to the institution.
Each student must submit to a health examination conducted by
the Medical Director of the college before registration can be completed.

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
All candidates for admission to the freshman class must present
sixteen units of high school work, exclusive of Physical Education, for
an unconditional admission. Of the sixteen units required for admission,
seven are specified as follows:
English ...................... .......................... 3 units
Mathematics ......................... ..... ..........1 unit
Social Science..................... ...------ ............- -3 units
(At least one unit of the Social Science shall be in
American History and Civics or Government)
UNIT OF CREDIT
The unit of college credit is the semester hour. Any course meeting
for one hour of lecture or recitation work per week for seventeen weeks
counts as a semester hour. All laboratory courses must operate a
minimum of two hours per week for one semester hour.
METHODS OF ADMISSION
Students may be admitted to the institution through the following
ways: (1) by presentation of a certificate of graduation from an ac-
credited high school; (2) by submitting evidences of studies success-
fully pursued in another institution of higher learning; (3) by passing
an entrance examination; (4) by qualifying as a special adult student.
ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS
Under exceptional circumstances, persons who are more advanced
'in years than ordinary college students who have not met the specific
entrance requirements, but who give evidence of ability, may be
admitted as special students. Such students may not become candidates
for degrees or Teachers Certificates until all entrance deficiencies have
been removed.
FILING APPLICATION
A candidate for admission must file with the registrar a written
application. Application for admission must be made on forms which
the Registrar will furnish upon request.
NOTE: Applicants seeking admission to the Division of Graduate
Study or the Division of Nursing Education will specify the same when
requesting application blanks.









BULLETIN, 1948 35


Within due time after the application has been considered and
approved by the Committee on Admissions, the applicant will be mailed
a permit to register, which must be presented at time of registration.

Registration Information
The registration days of each semester are designated in the
calendar of this bulletin. Persons registering after the designated
days are required to pay late registration fees.
Every student is required to register in person, at the place desig-
nated by the Registrar.
The payment of all expenses and fees is a part of the registration
activity.
SELECTION OF MAJORS AND MINORS
Every student fulfilling the requirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Science or for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is required to
earn a "major." The "major" must meet the approval of the head of
the department in which it is earned; subjects to be counted for the
major must be approved by him and the Dean of the Division.
MAJOR FIELDS
I. AGRICULTURE
A. Animal Husbandry
B. Horticulture
C. Teacher-Education
II. EDUCATION
A. Elementary Education
B. Secondary Education
I. HOME ECONOMICS
A. Clothing and Textiles
B. Foods and Nutrition
C. Teacher-Education
IV. ARTS AND SCIENCES
A. Biology
B. Business
1. Administration and Accounting
2. Secretarial Course
C. Chemistry and Physics
D. Drama and Fine Arts
E. English
F. Foreign Language
French and Spanish
G. History
H. Mathematics
L Music
J. Physical Education
K. Religious Education
L. Sociology
V. MECHANIC ARTS
A. Building Construction
B. Industrial Education










36 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


VI. NURSING EDUCATION
Minor Fields ONLY:
I. Journalism
II. Library Science
III. Physics

CHANGE OF PROGRAM
Changes in class programs may be made only with the consent of
the Dean of the Division in which the student is registered.
No change in class programs may be made after the date stipulated
in the calendar for making changes.
No course may be dropped without the written permission of the
Dean of the Division. A course dropped without such permission will
be entered in the record as a failure.
Students may transfer from one department to another or from
one Division to another only with the written permission of the Dean
or Deans of the Division or Divisions concerned.
At the designated time all changes in programs must be reported
to the Registrar on forms provided by the Deans.
STUDENT LOAD
The normal load for a regular student is the semester requirement
shown in his particular curriculum in the catalog. The normal load
for a special student is 15 semester hours.
Students who made an "A" average during their last semester of
work here may make application to take extra hours of work. No
student will be permitted to take over 21 hours work during a semester.
No classified student may take less than 12 semester hours of
work without special permission of the Dean of the Division in which
he is registered.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Regular attendance upon meetings of classes is considered a stu-
dent obligation. The responsibility for attendance is placed in the
hands of the instructors in the various courses.
Students are permitted, without penalty, the same number of
unexcused absences as the number of'semester hours of credit which
the course carries. Instructors are expected to warn the student when
he has been absent this number of times. Further absence gives in-
structors the right to drop the student from the course and assign the
grade of "WD". This action of the instructor should be reported in
writing to the Dean of the Division and to the Registrar, and will
become final unless the Dean of the Division submits evidence showing
valid reasons why the student should not be dropped.
Absences from class attendance for cause may be excused. Such
absences are those due (a) to participation in recognized college activi-
ties, as those of the Glee Club, debating groups, music groups, athletic
teams and the Dramatic Club, when occurring away from Tallahassee;
(b) those due to actual illness, certified to by the physician who at-
tended the student in person during illness; and (c) those due to









BULLETIN, 1947-1948 37


emergencies caused by extraordinary circumstances, when excused by
the Dean of the Division concerned.
Departments may require students who have been absent, whether
the absences are excused or not, to make up work covered during the
periods of absence.
The grade of a student who quits a course without the permission
of the Dean of his Division is recorded officially as "E".

RECORD OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADING SYSTEM
The quality of work done by students is indicated by letters of the
alphabet as follows: A grade of "A", exceptional; "B", superior; "C"
average; "D", passing but poor; "I", Incomplete; "E", Failure; "WP",
passing at time of withdrawal; "WE", Failing at time of withdrawal;
"WD", Dropped for excessive unexcused absences.
A grade of "A" earns three grade points for each hour of credit:
"B" earns two grade points; "C" earns one grade point; "D" and "E"
earn no grade points.
Students who fail to earn a 1.0 quality point average for a semester
are placed on probation, and permitted to carry only a limited load
the following semester. Students who remain on probation two con-
secutive semesters are dropped from the institution.
Students who do not pass in fifty per cent or more of the work
for which they are registered are dropped from the institution.
All incomplete grades must be removed during the following semes-
ter or they revert to failures.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Matriculated students, whose record as to entrance requirements
and the completion of prescribed work is satisfactory, are classified as
follows:
Students are classified as FRESHMEN when they have less than
one-fourth of the semester hours required for graduation in their
respective curricula; as SOPHOMORES when they have one-fourth
to one-half of the semester hours required in their respective
curricula; JUNIORS when they have one-half to three-fourths
of the semester hours required in their respective curricula;
SENIORS when they have three-fourths or above of the semester
hours required in their curricula.

Graduation Information
Requirements for graduation will include moral and personal quali-
fications, as well as education. Completion of the formal requirements in
courses, hours, grades, grade points, and the like, does not necessarily
entitle a candidate to a degree from the Florida A. and M. College. The
faculty will base its necessary recommendations on considerations of
character and ability, attainments, growth and worthiness in general,
as well as upon the completion of the required number of hours and
subjects in the course.
The College requires at least two semesters residence for any de-
gree. If the term of residence is only two semesters, that must be the









38 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


senior year. This regulation can be satisfied by summer teachers by
attending the three summers prior to graduation, provided at least
twenty-seven semester hours are earned during that period.
The following conditions for graduation must be met: (1) All col-
lege expenses must be adjusted, (2) The required number of semester
hours (which does not include more than 30 semester hours of credit
earned through extension) with an equal number of "quality points"
must be earned, (3) At least two semesters of work, or the equivalent,
preferably the last two semesters, must have been earned in regular
attendance at the college.
Beginning September 1, 1947, all extension work offered in ful-
filling the requirements for graduation must have been earned in
work conducted by a Florida institution. After this date, no credits
earned in work considered by this institution as "extension work",
given in Florida by an out-of-State institution, will be accepted in
meeting the graduation requirement.
GRADUATION HONORS
Students making an average grade point of 2.7 or above during the
four years of their college work, will have degrees conferred upon them
"With Greatest Distinction"; those making a grade point of 2.3, "With
Greater Distinction"; those with 2.0, with "Great Distinction."

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE
If a student wishes to withdraw at any time other than the end
of a term, a formal withdrawal, which is prerequisite to honorable
dismissal or re-entrance to this institution, must be executed. Such a
withdrawal will be approved only after full investigation of the cir-
cumstances. The withdrawal form after approval by the officers stated
below must be filed promptly with the Registrar.
If a student withdraws after the mid-term and is reported as
below passing in two or more courses, that term will be counted as a
term in residence in all computations of his requirements for re-
admission. If a student withdraws before mid-term, it will be left to
the discretion of the Dean as to whether or not that term is to be
counted as a term in residence. The Dean's verdict will be indicated
specifically on the form used for withdrawal.
Students withdrawing from the institution, except when suspended
or expelled are required to obtain from the Dean of Women or Dean
of Men a permit to withdraw. This permit must be approved by the
Personnel Director and signed by the Registrar and Business Manager
before it is considered official. No refund is made for tuition fees,
but refunds and adjustments may be made on board and room rent
paid in advance.











STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND

ACTIVITIES

The purposes of the student organizations are to afford students
the best opportunities to learn wholesome attitudes, genuine appre-
ciations, and intelligent modes of behavior; to awaken students to the
needs, desires, and rights of others; to get students to work cooperatively
for the common good; and to create the ability in students to lead
without dominating.
These various broadening-experience activities (extra-class activ-
ities) aid the students greatly to evaluate themselves fully as they
interact in their environment toward obtaining the durable satisfac-
tions of life.
For practical purposes, the student organizations are classified as
follows:
INSTITUTIONAL ASSISTANTS-Student Council, Military Staff,
Women's Senate, Student Government Faculty, House of Commons.
NATIONAL HONORARY-Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society.
RELIGIOUS-Christian Federation, Sunday School, Y.M.C.A.,
Youth Temperance Council, Y.W.C.A.
DIVISIONAL AND DEPARTMENTAL-Agricultural Club, Business
Guild, Home Economics Club, Mathematics Club, Mechanic Arts Club,
Education Club, Famcee Radio Club, Social Science Club, The Scien-
tific Club, The Spanish Club, The Nurses Club, The Tanner-Savage
Art Society.
SCHOLASTIC AND LITERARY-The Footlight Guild, FAMCEAN
Staff, Sigma Tau Mu Debating Society.
GREEK LETTER FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES-Alpha
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Iota Phi Lambda,
Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Sigma Gamma Rho,
Zeta Phi Beta.
MUSIC-College Choir, Military and Concert Band, Men's Glee
Club, Women's Glee Club.

THE STUDENT COUNCIL
The Student Council is an organization composed of college stu-
dents who put forth every effort to assist the administration in what-
ever way possible for the welfare of the college.
It has the following representation from the college department:
Three seniors, two juniors, two sophomores, two freshmen, president of
Women's Senate, and president of House of Commons.
Student Government Day is an annual feature directed by the
Student Council.









40 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


THE WOMEN'S SENATE
The Women's Senate is composed of women students elected by
the college women. The officers are: the president, who is elected at
large by the women students in their regular April Women's Assembly;
the vice-president, who is the House President of Senior Hall; the
treasurer, who is the House President of McGuinn Hall. In addition
to these officers, there are representatives elected by classification
from the dormitories.
The primary objective of the Women's Senate is to consider mat-
ters affecting the activities of the college women and to make campus
life for them and for the entire school family more purposeful, pleasant,
and wholesome.
ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY
The Florida A. and M. College was admitted to membership in the
Kappa Iota Chapter of Alpha Kappa Mu, National honor society,
in the spring of 1944. The scholastic requirement is a grade point
average of not less than 2.3, under the system where A equals 3, B
equals 2, C equals 1, and D equals 0. The active membership in any
given chapter during any one year is restricted to not exceed three
percent of the regular college enrollment (exclusive of summer school).
The purpose of this organization is the stimulation of scholarship
and guidance in the fostering of ideals for service through knowledge.
MILITARY ORGANIZATION
All young men of the college are under military discipline, and
as such are members of the College Battalion. The battalion is com-
manded by a Commandant who has faculty rank. Officers of the
Battalion are drawn from the student group. They are promoted to
the various ranks as they demonstrate ability to perform in the
positions.
The objectives of this organization are:
1. To instill into young men respect for law and order
2. To promote respect for authority wherever authority is vested
3. To improve the posture of young men
EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES
The college provides a broad program of extra-curricular activities
designed to appeal to the whole student body. The extra curricular
program includes: the band, choral groups, the debating club, dramatic
groups, intramurals and intercollegiate athletics. These activities are
conducted both on and off the campus.
Students who represent the college, in any extra-curricular ac-
tivity are required to maintain a minimum average of one grade
point.
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The intercollegiate athletic program is under the management and
control of the department of health and physical education and the
Athletic Committee. The program includes competition for boys in foot-
ball, basketball, baseball, track and tennis; for girls in basketball,
tennis and track.
The college, as a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference, is subject to the rules and regulations of that body.









BULLETIN, 1948 41

Some of the most important athletic regulations are listed below:
1. A student must be a regularly enrolled student of the college
in order to participate in varsity athletics.
2. A student transferring to this college from another must have
been enrolled here one year before he becomes eligible for athletic
participation. Exceptions-This rule does not apply to graduates of
Junior Colleges. Veterans are immediately eligible if they are transfer
students, provided they do not transfer from member schools of the
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and have not enrolled
in another school since being discharged from the armed services.
3. No student may wear on the campus the letter or insignia of
another college.
4. Only students who have earned the varsity F may wear that
letter on a sweater or jacket.
5. The varsity F will be awarded by the Athletic Committee upon
recommendation of the coaching staff to members of football and bas-
ketball teams who have participated in a minimum of one half of the
total number of periods played in intercollegiate competition. Any por-
tion of a period shall be counted as a whole period. To be awarded a
letter in track one must win one point in any sectional meet or Southern
Conference Meet or take part with credit in a sufficient number of other
meets. To earn an award in baseball one must participate in one half
of the total number of games played or become eligible upon the recom-
mendation of the baseball coach. To earn an award in tennis one
must represent the college in one or more tennis meets.
USE OF AUTOMOBILES ON CAMPUS
All students who have automobiles which they expect to operate
on the campus for ten days or more at any given time are required
to register their automobiles with the Campus Traffic Committee and
obtain a campus use and parking permit.


PUBLICATIONS

The BULLETIN of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College
is a general title given to those official publications which appear
annually and are entered in the United States Post Office as periodical
literature. The series includes the General Catalogue and Announce-
ments combined, the Summer Bulletin, and the Extension Division
Bulletin.
The RESEARCH BULLETIN (formerly The Quarterly Journal) is a
faculty publication which affords the members of the staff and others,
by invitation, the opportunity of publishing the results of significant
research or creative writing.
The FAMCEAN is a monthly news-sheet published by a staff of
students at the college. It carries current news of interest to the stu-
dents about affairs of the student body, the faculty, and the alumni. It
features editorials, sports, and general news columns.












STUDENT AID

THROUGH COLLEGE FUNDS
The Personnel Division of the college maintains an employment
bureau which places needy students in employment, both on and off
the campus. Students are helped to secure jobs in line with their
interests, abilities, and courses of study pursued.
The institution provides much employment for students. They
are employed on the campus to work as: dining hall and cafeteria
waiters, janitors, library assistants, building maintenance assistants,
farm, dairy, greenhouse and poultry yard helpers, secretaries, and
teacher assistants.
REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE
The Rehabilitation Section of the State Department of Public
Instruction provides some assistance to persons who are physically
handicapped. Requirements for eligibility for this assistance are as
follows: The applicant must have a permanent major physical disabil-
ity; he must be sixteen years old, must have a good scholastic record
and must take courses that will prepare him for some vocation at which
he can earn a living.
Application for this assistance should be made'prior to July 1 for
the following school year. Students who wish to apply should write the
State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Public
Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida.
SCHOLARSHIPS
SHouse of Representatives Scholarships*-These scholarship are
available through competitive examination. The scholarships are worth
$200 per year.
Lewis State Scholarships*-These scholarships are available through
competitive examination. The scholarships are worth $400 per year.
Lewis State Scholarships may be maintained by the student upon the
condition of maintaining a good record in college, for the duration of
the entire college career, including graduate work.
The Sarah Levy Scholarship of $150.00. This scholarship is awarded
by Mrs. Sarah Levy of Tallahassee, Florida, to a student of Leon County
who is worthy and desires to pursue a four-year college course.
The McMillan Scholarship of $50.00. Mr. J. C. McMillan of Cali-
fornia is the donor of this scholarship. It is awarded to the most worthy
vocational agriculture student.
The Olney Inns Scholarships of $1,000.00. Mrs. Clara Mary Downey
of Miami, Florida, offers the sum of one thousand dollars annually in
two scholarships of five hundred dollars each to be awarded to a girl
and a boy who have graduated from the Negro high school in Miami,
where they established a record in leadership, character, service and
scholarship. Mrs. Downey, a Southern woman, offers these awards in
"appreciation of the loyalty, faithfulness, and kindness to her by Negro
* Lewis Scholarships, House of Representatives and Senatorial Scholarships are all
obtained by passing a competitive examination given annually. Information concern-
ing dates of the examination may be obtained from the State Department of Edu-
cation, County Superintendents, high school principals, and this college.
42










BULLETIN, 1947-1948 43


employees" in the Olney Inns, owned and operated by her in the states
of Maryland and Florida.
Senatorial Scholarships-These scholarships are available through
competitive examination. The scholarships are worth $200 per year.
PRIZES
The Agricultural Extension Workers Prize of $10.00 is divided in
a manner to award $5.00 to the former 4-H Club girl registered in the
Division of Home Economics and $5.00 to the former 4-H Club boy
registered in the Division of Agriculture who have maintained the
highest scholastic average.
The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize of $5.00 is awarded to the
most well-rounded student of the college.
The Alumni Key. This prize is awarded to the highest ranking
member of the graduating class.
The Florida A. and M. College Clinical Association Prize of $35 is
awarded to a student nurse for excellence in practical nursing and aca-
demic performance.
The College Faculty Oratorical Prize of $30.00 is awarded to win-
ners in the annual oratorical contest-$15.00 first prize, $10.00 second
prize and $5 third prize.
The Colored World War Veterans Auxiliary Award of $5.00 is
awarded to the student showing the best spirit of Americanism.
Commercial Prize of $10.00 is given by Mrs. Ruth Delaney Foxx,
a graduate of the Florida A. and M. College in the Class of 1941, now
a resident of Tuskegee, Alabama. The recipient is the highest ranking
student in the commercial department.
The Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Prize of $5.00. Members of the
local chapter of that organization award this prize to the young woman
with the highest average in the graduating class of the Division of
Arts and Sciences.
The Gibbs Scholarship Award of $25.00 is given by the Gibbs family
and is awarded the student who rendered the most service to the college
during the school term.
The Priscilla E. Jones Physical Education Award of $5.00 is given
the girl who is most outstanding in the Physical Education Department.
The Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Prize of $10.00. This prize was estab-
lished by Mrs. Ola Mae Wiley Goodman for the Zeta pledge who main-
tains the highest scholastic average for the first semester of the school
year.
LOANS
The Alumni Loan Fund. The Alumni Loan Fund is designed to
assist seniors who need a small loan during their last semester in
order to complete their financial obligations. They are expected to be-










44 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


gin repayment of loan within eight months after graduation. Inter-
est at six per cent per annum is charged on the loan from date of note.
The Hollingsworth Loan Fund. The Hollingsworth Loan Fund
consists of a grant of $1,000.00 donated by Mr. and Mrs. James
E. Hollingsworth, of Palm Beach, to provide loans at the Florida A.
and M. College to worthy senior students who major in the social
sciences, nursing or nutrition, and who expect to become teachers in
one of these fields. Qualifications for recipients:
1. Senior students with a "B" average or better are eligible for a
loan. Under exceptional circumstances, seniors with a "C" aver-
age may be considered.
2. Students must provide ample proof of "need" of such a loan.
They must prove to the satisfaction of the members of the
"Loan Committee" that they cannot borrow the money else-
where.
3. Students must be of good moral character and must have.
demonstrated their loyalty to Florida A. and M. College, and to
the principles for which our country stands.
4. Written recommendations as to the candidate's worthiness shall
be submitted to the committee by the pastor of his local church
and by two members of the Florida A. and M. College Faculty.
5. To be eligible for a loan, the candidate must signify his inten-
tion to teach in one of the following fields: the social sciences,
nursing, or home economics with a major in foods and nutrition.
6. In order that the money can be used over and over again by
worthy and needy students, the following system has been
worked out for payment to Florida A. and M. College:
(a) One year after the student has left the college, one-
third of the principal shall be repaid in monthly
installments.
(b) Interest on the principal at the rate of five per cent per
annum shall begin six months after the loan is made,
and shall continue until the principal is retired.
(c) The remaining two-thirds of the principal shall be
repaid in monthly installments within two calendar
years of the date the loan is made.
(d) No loan shall exceed $75.00 to any single individual.
The Women's Senate Loan Fund. The Women's Senate operates
a fund from which deserving young women may secure small loans
to meet emergency financial obligations. Loans are made upon the
approval of the Senate Loan Fund Committee.












DIVISION OF SUMMER STUDY.

General Statement
The location of the College at the Capital of the State affords
excellent opportunities for students to get first-hand acquaintances with
the officials and the activities of the State government.
The Summer Semester is a regularly established division in the
program of the institution. A large part of the work done during the
fall and the spring semesters is carried during the summer semester.
Various features of interest and enrichment which are of particular
value to veterans and to teachers in service are included in the summer
program. In particular, the courses offered in the summer are planned
for:
1. Teachers who do not hold any degree as yet but who, for some
reason, are unable to take leaves of absence during the fall or
spring semester, but must meet their residence requirements
during the summer.
2. Teachers and other persons who seek to meet the State certifi-
cate requirements.
3. Persons desiring to do graduate work in the field of Education.
4. World War Veterans.
5. Regular students who meet the requirements for summer study.
6. Principals, supervisors, teachers, and others who want to do work
in certain specialized fields for professional improvement or for
accumulated credit toward an advanced degree.
In each of the divisions of instruction, definite efforts are made
to put into practice the most modern materials and methods of in-
struction so as to bring the teachers up to date with current procedures
in their fields.

Registration and Attendance
The first day, Monday, June 14, will be devoted to the scheduling
of programs. The hours of registration will be from 8:00 a.m. to
12:00 N. and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Students registering after the
time designated above will be subject to a late registration fee.
ATTENDANCE AT THE BACCALAUREATE AND COMMENCE-
MENT EXERCISES IS REQUIRED OF STUDENTS WHO REGISTER
FOR CREDIT.
All students are advised to follow the outlined registration pro-
cedure which will be, made available to them on registration days.
REGISTRATION MUST BE MADE IN PERSON; IT IS NOT COM-
PLETE UNTIL THE STUDENT'S ENTIRE PROGRAM SCHEDULE IS
MADE OUT AND APPROVED BY THE DEAN OR ADVISER.

Maximum and Minimum Subject Allowance
The normal load for the nine weeks session will be nine semester
hours. Students who maintained an average of 2.0 or above during their
last semester in residence may make application to take additional
hours, not to exceed eleven. The normal load for workshop participants
will be six semester hours.









46 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


Students registering in courses to which they have not been prop-
erly assigned will not receive credit for same. Students dropping courses
without giving proper notice after the time permitted by the college
calendar will receive a grade of "E" in such courses.
The student is held responsible for a correct schedule of class
activities as well as for full and complete information of a personal
nature.
Residence
The College requires at least two semesters' residence for any
degree. If the term of residence is only two semesters, that must be the
senior year. For summer teachers this regulation can be satisfied by
attending the three summers prior to graduation, provided at least
twenty-seven semester hours are earned during that period.

Curriculum Revisions and Attendance
If students do not attend the Summer Session in consecutive years,
they forfeit the right to complete the course requirements they were
prosecuting under.the curriculum effective during their last attendance,
in the event that it has been revised in the interim.
Recreational Activities
The recreational program of the summer session is organized to fit
the needs of all students. Tennis, volley ball, basketball, and croquet
on the campus and bathing and swimming made possible by beautiful
lakes in reach of the college afford wholesome play and recreational
activities for a large part of the student body. Tours, hikes, and picnics
to scenic centers may be arranged by special request.
Students interested in dramatics and music will find an outlet for
their talents in concerts, recitals, and plays arranged for by the depart-
ments of the school.
Lectures, reading, motion pictures, and other forms of group and
community entertainment are scheduled for the summer session by the
Entertainment Bureau of the College.
College Choir
The College Choir is open to persons who have had experience in
choral singing or who desire to become familiar with choral methods.
The choir sings for Sunday morning services and renders special pro-
grams at other times during the session.
An invitation is extended to all persons enrolled in the summer
session to participate in this feature of the college program.
Practice Teaching
Practice teaching is required. All prospective graduates from the
four-year course of the college are required to earn six semester hours
in practice teaching. Students are advised to obtain their assignments
in the field of their major during their senior year.

Lecture and Forum Discussion Series
The administration of the college makes a definite effort to bring
to the institution outstanding leaders in various fields to participate in
its lecture series. In addition to speakers from the outside, several
persons from our regular staff and from the immediate community
make reports on important studies or projects which may be of par-
ticular interest and value to students enrolled in the Summer School.










BULLETIN, 1948 47


Several of the leaders in the State Department of Education give
scheduled talks on special phases of the work in that department.
Educational Resources of American Junior Red Cross
The educational resources of American Junior Red Cross will be
presented to teachers in attendance at the summer session. This work
will be available to teachers and others interested in Junior Red Cross
work and to those who want to use the abudantly rich educational
resources of American Red Cross. It will include a presentation of the
purposes, history, development, organization, procedures, educational
resources, and evaluation of American Junior Red Cross. Junior Red
Cross literature, exhibit of art work, craft materials, posters, and
audio-visual aid materials will be used to emphasize important points.
WORKSHOPS FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College will operate two
three-weeks workshops to meet the needs of teachers who, for any rea-
son, find it impossible to enter at the opening of the regular nine
weeks summer session which begins on June 14. The first of the three-
weeks terms will extend from Monday, July 5 through Saturday, July
24; the second will extend from Monday, July 26 through Saturday,
August 14.
Areas of Operation
The emphasis in the first three-weeks term will be in two areas:
a. Administration
b. Resource Use Education
The emphasis during the second three-weeks term will be in three
other areas:
a. Supervision
b. Materials and Methods
c. Guidance
Credit
Each area of concentration listed above will yield three semester
hours credit. A minimum of ninety (90) hours of class participation
will be required for three semester hours credit. Each subject area will
operate six hours per day five days per week. A particular student may
register for work in one area only during three-weeks term. This
makes it possible for a student to earn a total of six hours by remain-
ing through the two terms. Graduate or undergraduate credit may be
earned.
Creative and Practical Arts Institute
Three Weeks: June 21-July 10.
The aim of this Creative and Practical Arts Institute is to offer a
short intensive course in the Arts for the cultural and practical benefit
of students, community workers, and interested persons who cannot
afford to spend the regular length of time for summer courses.
The institute is open to undergraduate or graduate students. Stu-
dents eligible for graduate standing will receive work at the graduate
level.
A student load is limited to two subjects. Each subject is held three
hours a day for six days for three weeks. The three hours may be
divided between lectures, laboratory work, and supervised study at
the discretion of the teacher. Each student is required to do a project
as a part of the course. The quality of execution of the project will









FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


decide whether credit is given for the course or not. Special students
may take these courses without credit for their cultural advantage.
A special fee of $5.00 will be charged for materials and laboratory
necessities.
COURSE OFFERINGS
ART
Arts and Crafts
Oil Painting
Mural Painting for Elementary and Secondary Schools
DRAMA
Acting
Creative Dramatics for Children
Play Production
Play Writing
The Negro in the Western World Theatre
MUSIC
Band Organization and Directing
Music History and Appreciation
Choral Conducting
Musical Composition
Vocal Pedagogy and Repertoire
LITERATURE
The Appreciation of Literature as Types
Creative Writing
Writing the Research Paper
PRACTICAL ARTS
Floriculture
Floral Decoration and Arrangement
Needle Arts
Interior Decoration
DANCING
Creative Dance
Credit for each course: 3 semester hours.
Students in the drama courses will be required to work with the
summer theatre productions. Students in the art courses will assume
responsibility for the painting of the scenery. All students registered
in the institute will be assigned to some responsibility connected with
the public programs.
Coaching Clinic
The coaching clinic will begin Monday, June 21, and run through
Saturday, June 26.
Class sessions will be held from 8:00 A. M. to 12:00 M.; 2:00 to
4:00 P. M.; 7:00 to 10:00 P. M.
The clinic will cover the skills and technique of football and bas-
ketball coaching, including the care and treatment of injuries, as well
as furnishing information relative to athletic equipment.
Credit: 2 semester hours.
OFF-CAMPUS WORKSHOPS
During the 1948 Summer Session, county workshops will be op-
erated as listed below:










BULLETIN, 1948 49


1. St. Lucie with Martin, Okeechobee and Indian River June
9-June 30
2. Manatee, June 14-June 30
3. Duval, July 26-August 9
4. Monroe, August 16-September 3
5. Hillsborough (date to be announced)
These workshops will be sponsored jointly by the county and the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for teachers in the re-
spective county. They will be conducted in accordance with the special
regulations governing off-campus workshops.

COURSES TO BE OFFERED IN THE 1948
SUMMER SEMESTER

N. B. Any course requested by five or more students will be
arranged by the Division in which it falls, provided qualified teaching
personnel is available.

Division of Agriculture
1. Ag. Econ.-202-Principles of Agricultural Economics
2. Ag. Econ.-302-Farm Management
3. Ag. Ed.-301-Vocational Education
4. Ag. Engr.-400-Agricultural Engineering
5. Agron.-101-Field Crops
6. Agron.-301-Nature and Properties of Soils
7. A. H.-201-Types and Breeds of Animals
8. A. H.-202-Swine Husbandry
9. A. H.-401-Feeds and Feeding
10. Hort.-202-Vegetable Production
11. Hort.-401-Landscape Design
12. Hort.-404-General Floriculture
13. Poul.-102-Poultry Husbandry
Division of Arts and Sciences
Art
1. Art-101-Freehand Drawing
2. Art-102-Freehand Drawing
3. Art-201-202-Public School Art (2 hours each)
4. Art-304-Art Appreciation
Biology (All Courses Four Hours)
1. Biol.-101-Zoology
2. Biol.-102-Botany
3. Biol.-201-Comparative Anatomy
4. Biol.-202-Anatomy and Physiology
5. Biol.-301-Bacteriology
Business Administration
1. B. A.-101-102-Typewriting, Beginning
2. B. A.-201-202-Typewriting, Advanced
3. B. A.-203-204-Economics, Principles of
4. B. A.-205-206-Accounting Principles
5. B. A.-207-208-Shorthand, Beginning










50 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


6. B. A.-303-Business Organization and Management
7. B. A.-305-306-Marketing, Principles of
8. B. A.-401-402-Business Law
9. B. A.-407-Economics for Consumers
10. B. A.-408-Life Insurance
Chemistry (All courses 4 hrs.)
1. Chem.-101-102-Inorganic Chemistry
2. Chem.-201-202-Organic Chemistry
3. Chem.-301-302-Quantitative Analysis
English
1. Eng.-101-102-Composition
2. Eng.-201-Technique in Reading and Writing
3. Eng.-202-American Literature
4. Eng.-203-World Literature
5. Eng.-301-English Literature
6. Eng.-402-Shakespeare
7. Eng.-410-College Grammar and Composition
French
1. Fr.-101-102-Elementary French
2. Fr.-201-202-Intermediate French
Geography
1. Geog.-101-Principles of Geography
2. Geog.-102-World Geography
3. Geog.-202-Commercial Geography
History
1. Hist.-101-102-American History
2. Hist.-200-American Government
3. Hist.-201-Ancient History
4. Hist.-301-302-European History
5. Hist.-303-State and Local Government
6. Hist.-401-Background of World War I
7. Hist.-402-Contemporary Problems
8. Hist.-404-Latin American History
Mathematics
1. Math.-101-102-Introduction to College Mathematics
2. Math.-201-Algebra and Trigonometry
3. Math.-204-Analytic Geometry
4. Math.-301-Differential Calculus
5. Math.-302-Integral Calculus
6. Math.-403-Statistics
Music
1. Mus.-101-102-Fundamental Elements of Applied Music
2. Mus.-303-304-Intermediate Elements of Applied Music
3. Mus.-305-306-Public School Music
4. Mus.-403-404-Advanced Elements of Applied Music
5. Mus.-405-406--Conducting and Arranging
Physical Education
1. P. E.-101-102-Health and Physical Education
2. P. E.-201-202-Physical Education
3. P. E.-206-Play and Community Recreation
4. P. E.-207-Principles of Health Education
5. P. E.-301-Principles of Physical Education
6. P. E.-307-Theory and Practice of the Dance









BULLETIN, 1948 51


7. P. E.-308-Folk and Tap Dancing
8. P. E.-403-Methods and Materials of Physical Education
9. P. E.-405-Health Diagnosis and Individual Physical Education
10. P. E.-408-Organization and Administration of Health and
Physical Education
11. P. E.-404-Recreational Games and Sports
Physics (All courses 4 hours)
1. Phys.-201-202-General Physics
Religious Education
1. Rel.-301-History of Religion
2. Phil.-301-History of Philosophy
3. Rel.-304-History of Christian Church
4. Phil.-302-Problems of Philosophy
5. Phil.-402-Ethics
6. Rel.-402-Life and Teachings of Jesus
Sociology
1. Soc.-200-Introduction to Sociology
2. Soc.-306-Juvenile Delinquency
3. Soc.-401-The Family
4. Soc.-402-Public Opinion
Spanish
1. Span.-101-102-Elementary Spanish
2. Span.-201-202-Intermediate Spanish
Division of Education
Education
1. Ed.-201-Introduction to Education
2. Ed.-220-General Psychology
3. Ed.-301-Methods in Teaching Arithmetic
4. Ed.-302-Methods in Teaching Social Studies
5. Ed.-303-Methods in Teaching Science
6. Ed.-307-High School Methods
7. Ed.-308-Reading Methods
8. Ed.-309-Elementary School Curriculum
9. Ed.-311-Children's Literature
10. Ed.-312-Educational Tests and Measurements
11. Ed.-314-Penmanship
12. Ed.-318-Principles of Secondary Education
13. Ed.-320-Educational Psychology
14. Ed.-321-Adolescent Psychology
15. Ed.-324-Child Psychology
16. Ed.-400-Practice Teaching
17. Ed.-401-Elementary School Administration
18. Ed.-402-Elementary School Supervision
19. Ed.-403-Secondary School Administration
20. Ed.-404-Secondary School Supervision
21. Ed.-410-Rural Education
22. Ed.-420-Secondary School Curriculum
Division of Home Economics
Home Economics
1. H. E.-102-Clothing Problems
2. H. E.-103-Principles of Art
3. H. E.-104-Principles of Cookery
4. H. E.-202-Clothing and Textiles
5. H. E.-203-Meal Planning and Serving










52 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


6. H. E.-206-Home Furnishings
7. H. E.-301-Pattern Study
8. H. E.-303-Nutrition
9. H. E.-404-Advanced Nutrition in Health and Disease
Division of Mechanic Arts
Mechanic Arts
1. A. M.-101-102-Trade Theory and Practice
2. Bar.-101-102-Trade Theory and Practice
3. Car.-201-Trade Theory and Practice
4. Cos.-101-102-Trade Theory and Practice
5. Elec.-101-201-Trade Theory and Practice
6. M. S.-101-Essentials of Bench Work and Machine Tool
Operation
7. M. S.-201-Machine Tool Operations
8. Mas.-101-201-Trade Theory and Practice
9. Pa.-201-Trade Theory and Practice
10. Pl.-101-201-Trade Theory and Practice
11. Ra.-201-Trade Theory and Practice
12. Sh. R.-101-201-Trade Theory and Practice
13. Tail.-101-201-202-Trade Theory and Practice
14. DCL-101-102-Trade Theory and Practice
15. I. Ed.-100-Trade Practice
Division of Nursing Education
Nursing Education
1. Nurs.-105-Introduction to Medical Science
2. Nurs.-210-Diet Therapy Practice
3. Nurs.-312-Psychiatric Nursing*
4. Nurs.-314-Psychiatric Nursing Practice*
Division of Graduate Study
Graduate
1. Ed.-501-Principles of Education
2. Ed.-502-Principles of School Administration
3. Ed.-503-Materials and Methods of Teaching in Elementary
School
4. Ed.-504-The Elementary School Curriculum
5. Ed.-505-Materials and Methods of Teaching in Secondary School
6. Ed.-506-The Secondary School Curriculum
7. Ed.-507-Principles and Techniques in Educational Research
8. Ed.-508-Principles and Methods of Guidance
9. Ed.-509-History of Education
10. Ed.-511-Adolescent Psychology
11. Ed.-513-Curriculum Construction
12. Ed.-515-Techniques of Supervision in Elementary School
13. Ed.-517-Techniques of Supervision in Secondary School
14. Ed.-519-Testing and Evaluating
15. Ed.-521-Conservation Education
16. Ed.-523-Theory and Practice of Teaching English
17. Ed.-525-Reading Diagnosis and Improvement
18. Ed.527-Audio-Visual Education
19. Soc.-502-Problems in Community Organization
20. Soc.-503-Human Ecology
21. Soc.-504-Readings in the Family
22. Eng.-502-The Modern Novel
23. Eng.-503-Elizabethan Drama
24. Eng.-504-History of the English Language
25. Eng.-505-American Literature Since 1870
26. Hist.-501-Contemporary World Problems
*Affiliation with the Veterans' Hospital, Tuskegee, Alabama











DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDY

GRADUATE FACULTY
Dr. Gray, President, Education; Dr. Spellman, Acting Director, Ed-
ucation; Dr. Alston, Mathematics, Education; Dr. Hudson, Philosophy,
Education; Dr. Wiggins, Education; Mr. Gaines, Sociology; Mr. Parks,
History; Mr. Walker, History, Education; Mr. Edmonds, English; Dr.
Carter, English; Mr. Kyler, Education; Mr. Steele, Education.

Introductory Statement
A graduate program designed especially to meet the needs of Negro
school principals, supervisors and teachers in Florida was inaugurated
at the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College in the summer ses-
sion, 1945. This work is being offered as a result of the interest and
demands of teachers in the area for genuine opportunities for further
in-service training of a professional status.
In the 1946-47 winter session, the Division of Graduate Study in-
augurated a winter program of graduate work, thus, making it possible
for students to pursue graduate work on a year round basis.
As an aid to in-service teachers, a week-end program has been
established. Where five or more students desire work, a class or classes
will be organized on the campus. Work will be given on Friday nights
and Saturday mornings.

Objectives of the Program
The Division of Graduate Study will offer special training oppor-
tunities to teachers and administrative officers in elementary and sec-
ondary schools planned to (a) insure reasonable mastery of a chosen
subject-matter area; (b) provide training in the nature of educational
problems and methodology, with particular emphasis on the student's
field of service; and (c) provide an understanding of the relationship
existing between community institutions and the skills and techniques
that might be utilized to render the school an effective agency for re-
directing community life.

The Master of Science in Education Degree
A course of study will be worked out for each student on an individ-
ual basis and patterned in terms of individual needs. Most students
who do their work in summer school will probably find that they will
need five summers to complete the Master's degree. Students with ex-
ceptional ability may be able to fulfill this requirement in four summer
sessions. Ordinarily, otherwise, a school year and a summer will be
needed. It should be distinctly understood, however, that fulfillment of
requirements for the Master's degree is not only based upon course and
time prerequisites; but in addition to this, primary emphasis will be
placed upon the calibre of the student's work, and the student's com-
prehension of the objectives sought, as evidenced through evaluative
techniques.

The Post Graduate Certificate
The Post Graduate Certificate is granted by the State Department
of Education on the basis of. completion of a prescribed amount of










54 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


formal study beyond the Bachelor's Degree. The Division of Graduate
Study offers two programs of work leading to this Post Graduate Cer-
tificate. These programs are referred to as Plan I and Plan II.
Plan I, With the Master's Degree
Students who complete the requirements for the Master of Science
in Education Degree here will be recommended for the Post Graduate
Certificate.
Plan II, Without the Master's Degree
Students who complete a planned program consisting of 36 semester
hours of work significantly related to their needs and interests will be
recommended for the Post Graduate Certificate.
PROGRAM LEADING TO THE POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE
WITHOUT THE MASTER'S DEGREE
PLAN II
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College has set the fol-
lowing requirements for the program leading to the Post Graduate
Certificate without the Master's Degree.
1. Requirements for admission, counseling, guidance, research pro-
jects, quality of work, and final examinations are the same as
those for the Master of Science in Education Degree.
2. This program differs from that followed in qualifying for the
degree of Master of Science in Education as follows: (a) of
the 36 hours required, 18 hours of credit and residence may be
earned in other institutions; (b) the student is not required to
write the two Graduate Papers required of candidates for the
degree.
The general purpose of this plan is to provide a more flexible work
program for students than is possible when working for the degree.
This plat enables a student to secure needed courses in other universi-
ties or colleges and to avail himself of the services of outstanding
faculty members in more than one institution of higher learning. The
quality of professional attainment expected is equal to that normally
asked of the graduate student. While this program does not necessarily
lead to the Master's Degree, work completed in the program may be
applied toward meeting degree requirements. When such work is
applied toward meeting degree requirements, however, the normal regu-
lations of the Division of Graduate Study respecting residence, transfer
of credits, etc., will prevail.
Admission.
A student working on this program must be eligible for and ad-
mitted to the Division of Graduate Study.
Extension and County Workshop Credit.
18 of the 36 hours required under this program must be earned
in the Florida A and M College. Six of these 18 hours may be earned
in graduate extension courses or graduate workshops. No credit is
allowed for correspondence work.
Evaluation of Transferred Credits.
Credits earned at other colleges and universities prior to admission
to the Florida A and M College, or subsequently, may be accepted up
to a maximum of 18 hours. Acceptance of these credits is dependent










BULLETIN, 1948


upon the quality of work and upon whether or not such credits fit
into the student's plan of work. No transferred credit will be accepted
unless it is acceptable for graduate credit in the institution in which
the work has been completed. Decision on the acceptability of such
credits is made by the Graduate Committee. If the student wishes to
include such work in his 36 hours, he must accept the responsibility of
having a transcript of the credits sent to the Registrar of the Florida
A and M College, and he must request the Registrar's Office to send
a photostatic copy thereof to the office of the Director of the Division
of Graduate Study.
Guidance and Counseling.
Upon enrolling in this program, the student reports to the Director
of the Division of Graduate Study. The Director assembles the same
types of personnel information concerning students working for the
Post Graduate Certificate under Plan II as are assembled for students
working on Master's Degree programs. Each student is required to take
such examinations as are necessary for evaluative purposes in connec-
tion with counseling.
After ascertaining the student's needs and objectives, the Graduate
Committee appoints a committee of three for each student. This com-
mittee is selected in fields of the student's major interest. This com-
mittee works with the student in formulating his program. In planning
this program of work all pertinent facts concerning the student, his
needs and desires and professional preparation, are taken into con-
sideration. There is no fixed pattern of courses for this program
except that a minimum of 12 hours of credit must be earned in courses
numbered 500 and above. Ordinarily, students will include in the pro-
grams more than 12 hours of work at the graduate level.
Work to be taken at other colleges and universities may be in-
cluded in this plan of work up to a maximum of 18 hours when it
appears that such work may be advantageous to the student. When the
plan of work is completed, it is approved by the Director of the Division
of Graduate Study and filed with the State Department of Education.
Any deviation from the program must be planned in advance with the
committee, which must report such change in writing to the office of
the Director of the Division of Graduate Study.
Examination.
During the session in which the student expects to complete his
plan of work, he will be examined by The Graduate Committee, and
upon the satisfactory completion of the examination and the plan of
work, the candidate will be recommended to the State Department of
Education for the Post Graduate Certificate. The examination will
be part written and part oral.
Teaching Experience.
The candidate must have at least one year of teaching experience
prior to completing his program.

General Instructions
Graduate students should note carefully the following rules and
regulations governing procedures in the Division of Graduate Study.
The Summer Session registration will be June 14, 1948.
Students for the summer session must be registered on or before the










56 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


fifth class session. Absence from class will be noted from the first class
meeting of the summer session.
The 1948-1949 winter term registration will be September 13, 1948.
Each student should thoroughly study the Graduate Bulletin and
become familiar with requirements to be met. It is the responsibility of
the student to meet the requirements of the Division of Graduate Study
at the proper time.
Eligibility
All students who are college graduates, or students who, because of
age or experience, can benefit from advanced study in pursuing special
objective, may register in the Division of Graduate Study.
All candidates for admission in the Division of Graduate Study
must have official transcripts of their work (from all colleges attended)
sent to the Division of Graduate Study for evaluation. Transcripts
must be sent directly from the colleges concerned. This must be done
by them before they can be accepted in full standing.
All applicants for admission to the Division of Graduate Study
who are not Education Majors will be required to present an under-
graduate major in Education.
Fees
Graduate students should be prepared to meet the usual fees and
expenses that all students of the college meet, plus certain graduate
fees as prescribed in the section on fees.

Lewis Scholarships
Graduate students are eligible to receive Lewis Scholarships. De-
tails of the operation of Lewis Scholarships can be obtained from the
Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences of Florida A. and M. College,
County Superintendents, or the State Department of Education.

Special Students
Students may register in the Division of Graduate Study as regu-
lar students or special students. Credits earned by special students
will not be counted toward the requirement for the Master's degree.

Majors
The Division of Graduate Study offers work in the field of Educa-
tion with emphasis on Secondary Education and Elementary Education.
In the SECONDARY EDUCATION area, concentrations are offered
in:
a. Administration and Supervision
b. Teaching Methods and Procedures
Biology
Chemistry
English
History
Mathematics
*The Social Science major carries with it a prerequisite of six hours
of Introductory Sociology or the equivalent.
In the ELEMENTARY EDUCATION area, concentrations are
offered in:










BULLETIN, 1948 57


Administration and Supervision
Students who have taken the prescribed courses In their proper
sequence should select and begin their majors at the beginning of their
second semester.

Graduate Fellowships
The Division of Graduate Study offers a number of fellowships to
promising students. Graduate Fellows will serve as office, teacher,
or research assistants. They will carry approximately a half student
load while holding the fellowship and will earn approximately $40.00
per month.
Applications for Graduate Fellowships should be made to the Act-
ing Director of the Division of Graduate Study.
Scholarship Standard
Graduate students must maintain an average of "C." Students
who fail to maintain such an average will be asked to withdraw from
the Division for a period of one semester.
Scholastic Load
Graduate students may register for a maximum of nine semester
hours per summer semester. Winter students may register for fifteen
semester hours per semester.
The first semester should be used by the student as an orientation
period. During this time, he should demonstrate the ability to do work
for the Master's Degree.

Graduate Courses
The regular courses listed in this Bulletin are designed especially
for students seeking the Master's degree. However, they are also open
to other students who have satisfactory scholastic averages and back-
grounds. For students interested in Graduate work for professional
improvement or certification purposes, a number of workshops, carrying
graduate credit, are offered. During the summer of 1948, workshops
may be conducted in the following areas. Each carries three semester
hours graduate credit.
Elementary or Secondary School Curriculum
Problems of Supervision
Public School Administration
Resource-Use Education
Other workshops will be arranged in areas where there is sufficient
demand.
Graduate credit obtained in summer workshops cannot be offered
in fulfilling the requirement for the Master's degree except upon recom-
mendation of the major professor and acceptance by the Graduate
Committee.
Advisers
After the student has decided upon the major field of study, the
Graduate Committee will assign him or her to a staff member who
will act as official adviser to help with the development of Graduate
Paners and other details of Graduate work.







58 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


Recognition of Credit From Other Institutions
The Florida A. and M. College will accept bona fide graduate
credit, not in excess of six (6) semester hours, from other recognized
institutions, providing the credits can be properly applied to the degree
sought here. Credits over six years old will not be accepted.
The Florida A. and M. College may, under certain conditions, permit
students registered in the Division of Graduate Study to take special
work elsewhere in partial fulfillment of their requirement here.
In any case, to get credit for work taken in other institutions, the
student must file with the Graduate Committee "A Request for Ac-
ceptance of Graduate Credits Received at Other Institutions." Action
of the Graduate Committee upon this request will be final.

Residence Requirement
All credits accepted in fulfillment of the requirement for the Mas-
ter's degree must be earned in residence in this or other recognized insti-
tutions with the exception that a maximum of six semester hours of
credit earned in extension work at the graduate level may be accepted.
A minimum of two semesters in residence at this institution is required.

Requirement for Graduation
1. A. Passing a preliminary reading placement examination. This
examination and other background examinations, are given during the
early part of the student's first term of work.
B. Passing background tests in general education, English
mechanics, and spelling. The student must satisfy any English re-
quirement growing out of these tests before proceeding with graduate
papers mentioned in Item 3 below.
2. A minimum of 36 semester hours of credit in required course
work.
3. Presentation of two (2) acceptable graduate papers. Each stu-
dent is required to present to the Graduate Committee two scholarly
papers in partial fulfillment of the requirement for graduation.
The first graduate paper may be presented after the student has
taken the required research work. The second paper must be accepted
not later than three weeks before the end of the semester in which he
proposes to graduate. Only one paper may be presented during any
single semester of the school year.
The order of subject-matter content of the graduate papers shall
be: The first paper shall be on some general, but important problem in
the broad field of Education; the second paper shall be in the area of
the student's major concentration, unless his adviser finds it desirable
to have both papers in the general field of Education.
Before each of the graduate papers is started, the student must file
with the Graduate Committee a "Request for Approval of Graduate
Paper Subject and Outline." After approval is granted, the student is
authorized to write the paper.
Summer school graduate students eligible to write papers may work
on them in absentia. This may be done through correspondence with
the Acting Director of the Division of Graduate Study.









BULLETIN, 1948


No paper may be presented to the Graduate Committee until it
bears the signature of approval of the official adviser. The adviser will
show his approval of the paper by signing his name and filling in the
date on a sheet which is to be inserted in the paper following the cover
page.
Two copies of each graduate paper must be filed with the Graduate
Committee. The original copy, on 20 pound bond paper, and the first
carbon copy will be accepted.
After the second graduate paper has been accepted, the student
will pay to the Business Office a publication fee of not less than $25.00
and not more than $50.00 as a nominal contribution to the cost of
publication of the papers. A receipt, signed by the Business Office,
showing that this fee has been paid must be filed with the Acting Di-
rector of the Division of Graduate Study.
4. Examination Requirements.
A. Comprehensive written examination.
After a student has completed twenty-four (24) or more semester
hours of course work, he may make application to take the written com-
prehensive examination. The application should be filed with the Acting
Director of the Division of Graduate Study, on the official blank, not
less than one week before the student is ready to be examined.
For summer semester graduate students, the examination must be
taken on or about the fourth week of the student's last summer
semester. For winter session graduate students, the examination must
be taken on or about the ninth week of the student's last semester.
The written examination will cover general educational background
material as:

(1) Outstanding educators
Past
Contemporary
(2) Significant educational movements and trends
(3) Knowledge of contemporary national and international affairs
(4) Knowledge of good school management and procedure
(5) Comprehensive survey of all courses taken
(6) Demonstration of the ability to write a short paper of three
or more paragraphs that is logical and coherent
B. Oral examination on the two graduate papers.
The student may make application to take the oral examination
after the acceptance of the second graduate paper. All oral examina-
tions must be completed not less than 3 weeks before the end of the
term in which he proposes to graduate.
The oral examination will be based upon the content of the grad-
uate papers presented by the student. It may be waived at the option
of the Graduate Committee.
The examining committee will be constituted from the Faculty of
the Division of Graduate Study.

The student should obtain from the Acting Director of the Division
of Graduate Study instructions for the preparation of graduate papers,
and all blanks and forms used in the Division of Graduate Study.










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


Candidacy for Degree
Registration in the Division of Graduate Study does not constitute
candidacy for the Master's degree. Candidacy is determined and granted
by the Graduate Committee after evaluation of the results of the
student's preliminary examinations, transcripts, and other objective
evidence.
Students who do not become candidates for the degree may con-
tinue to study in the Division of Graduate Study as special students
for professional improvement or for certification purposes.
Graduation
The student must complete the work for the Master's Degree by
the end of the sixth (6) year after the first registration in the Division
of Graduate Study. The Master of Science in Education Degree will
be conferred at the convocation following the summer semester and
at the end of the regular school term.
When the student is notified by the Graduate Office that all
requirements for graduation have been satisfied, he shall pay to the
Business Office a graduation fee of $20.00 which will cover the cost of
the diploma and rental fee for cap, gown and hood.


CURRICULA FOR GRADUATE MAJORS
Elementary School Administration and Supervision


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education 3
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching .............................. 3
Ed. 507, Elementary School Cur-
riculum .................................... 3

9
Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3
Ed. 515, Techniques of Super-
vision in Elementary School. 3
Ed. 527, Audio-Visual Education 3


Second Summer
Ed. 502, Principles of School Ad-
ministration ................................ 3
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research ....................----- 3
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ........................----- 3

9
Fourth Summer
Ed. 508, Principles and Methods
of Guidance .---------.............................. 3
Ed. 518, Testing and Evaluating 3
Ed. 524, Reading Diagnosis and
Improvement ............................. 3









BULLETIN, 1948 61



Secondary School Administration, Supervision and Guidance


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education 3
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching ................................ 3
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur-
riculum ........................................ 3

9
Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3
Ed. 511, Adolescent Psychology.. 3
Ed. 517, Techniques of Supervi-
sion in Secondary School ...... 3


Second Summer
Ed. 502, Principles of School Ad-
ministration ................---...
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research ................
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ...................


Fourth Summer
Ed. 508, Principles and Methods
of Guidance ..-...... ..........
Ed. 514, Curriculum Construc-
tion ..-----............. ----
Ed. 518, Testing and Evaluating


9
The Teaching of Biology


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching .............................
Biol. 501, Advanced Physiology..



Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education...
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur-
riculum ..................................
Biol. 503, Morphology ..................


Second Summer
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research ....................
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization .........--....---
Biol. 502, Advanced Anatomy.....


Fourth Summer
Ed. 512, Adolescent Psychology..
Biol. 504, Taxonomy ..........-....
Biol. 506, Genetics ..--.............


The Teaching of Chemistry


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education 3
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching ................................ 3
Chem. 501, Advanced Inorganic
Chemistry ................----.................... 3

9
Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur-
riculum ...............- ...........-..... 3
Chem. 503, Special Topics in Or-
ganic Chemistry .................... 3
9


Second Summer
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research ................
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ...................
Chem. 502, Metallurgy and In-
dustrial Preparations ................


Fourth Summer
Ed. 512, Adolescent Psychology..
Chem. 506, Carbohydrates .......
Chem. 508, Advanced Qualita-
tive Analysis ..................










FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE


The Teaching of English


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education 3
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching ................................ 3
Eng. 501, The Modern Novel ...... 3


9
Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur-
riculum ........................................ 3
Eng. 503, Elizabethan Drama-..... 3


9


Second Summer
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research .................... 3
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ........................ 3
Eng. 502, History of the English
Language ................................. 3
9
Fourth Summer
Ed. 512, Adolescent Psychology.. 3
Eng. 504, American Literature
Since 1870 .................................. 3
Eng. 506, Theory and Practice
of Teaching English ................ 3
9


The Teaching of History


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching ..........................
Hist. 501, Contemporary World
Problem s ....................................


Second Summer
Ed. 504, Principles and tech-
niques of Research ....................
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ........................
Hist. 502, American Constitu-
tional History .......................


Third Summer Fourth Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3 Ed. 512, Adolescent Psychology..
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur- Hist. 504, History of Europe ......
riculum ........................................ 3 Hist. 506, History of the British
Hist. 503, Seminar in American Commonwealth ...................
History and Government ........ 3

9
The Teaching of Mathematics


First Summer
Ed. 501, Principles of Education 3
Ed. 505, Materials and Methods
of Teaching ........................... 3
Math. 501, Topics in Pure and
Applied Mathematics ................ 3

9
Third Summer
Ed. 509, History of Education.... 3
Ed. 519, Secondary School Cur-
riculum ............. ........................ 3
Math. 503, Seminar in Algebra.. 3

9


Second Summer
Ed. 504, Principles and Tech-
niques of Research .................... 3
Soc. 502, Problems in Commun-
ity Organization ............. ......... 3
Math. 502, Advanced Calculus.... 3

9
Fourth Sumier
Ed. 512, Adolescent Psychology.. 3
Math. 504, Differential Equa-
tions in Mathematical Physics 3
Math. 506, Higher Geometry...... 3
9









BULLETIN, 1948 63


Week-End Graduate Program
A program of winter Graduate Week-End Work will be conducted
on the college campus. Classes will be arranged when numbers justify
the organization of courses. The cost of such work will be $6.00 per
semester hour of credit.






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