• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 Board members
 Calendar
 Faculty
 Admission
 Credits
 General regulations
 Teaching facilities
 Summer session features
 Curriculum outlines
 Description of courses
 High school department
 Graduates






Title: Catalog of the summer session, 15th session, 1933
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Title: Catalog of the summer session, 15th session, 1933
Physical Description: Book
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Bibliographic ID: AM00000122
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Holding Location: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Board members
        Page 4
    Calendar
        Page 5
    Faculty
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11-12
    Admission
        Page 13
    Credits
        Page 14
        Page 15
    General regulations
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Teaching facilities
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Summer session features
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Curriculum outlines
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Description of courses
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    High school department
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Graduates
        Page 50
        Page 51
Full Text




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A BULLETIN OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE - FLORIDA















CATALOG OF THE
SUMMER SESSION
FIFTEENTH
SESSION

1933






TABLE OF CONTENTS



College

Admission ..... .--- .. ...--------------- 13 Sciences (Social) ---------------- 41
State Board of Control ---------- 4 Enrollments --------------------------- 5
State Board of Education ------- 4 Extension of Certificate --,---------- -- 17
Calendar -------------------...-------------- 5 Extension Work .------- ---------------- 16
Credits -------------------------...--- 14 Faculty --... ------------------------ 6-10
Curriculum Outlines ---- ----- 24-27 Features -------------------------- 21
Fees and Expenses .------------------- 18
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES- General Information ----------------.20
Division of Agriculture ------- 28 General Regulations _---------------- 16
Division of Home Economics----. 30 Graduates (Summer School, 1932) .- 50
Applied Art and Design ----- 30 Training School ------------------------ 19
Foods and Nutrition .------ 30 Teaching Facilities .---.--.----- ------- 19
Home Economics Education----- 31 Teacher Placement Service .----------19
Household Economics 3------ 31
Textiles and Clothing ------- 30 PURPOSE OF Cou-sEs-
Division of Liberal Arts, Science 32 Agriculture------------------ 25
Art -----------------32 Home Economics ------------ 25
Graphic and Plastic 32 Liberal Arts and Science ------- 26
Industrial---- ----------- 32 Teacher-Training (Two-Year) 27
Education -- ------------- 34
English -- --------------- 35 REQUIREMENTS-
Foreign Languages ---------36 Practice Teaching ---------- 14
Library Course--- ---------- 36 Residence ......----------------- ------- 16
Mathematics --------- 38 SHORT COURSES-
Music ----- ------- ------- 9 Home Economics (Special Course) 22
Psychology ------- ---- --- 9 Farm-Makers' Clubs ---------24
Physical Education -------- 40 Home-Makers' Clubs ----------24
Sciences (Biological, Physical) ---41 Vocational Agriculture -- ------24



High School

Certificate Credit -------------46 Geography ---------------------------- 48
Curriculum Outline------------ 46 Mathematics .----------------------- 48
Sciences ----- --------- 49
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES- Home Economics .-------------------. 49
Academic ---------- -----------47
Education ......------------------------ 47 REQUIREMENTS-
English 47 Gna ...------------- --------47
(A general - -- ------ 46
Foreign Languages ----------47 Geral
History -------------.------------- 48 Graduation .---------------------------- 45
Civics _------------------------ --48 Residence .-----------......--------- ----- 45





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ADMINISTRATION BI DI
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THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND

MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FOR NEGROES
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

Supported by the STATE OF FLORIDA

Authorized by the

BOARD OF CONTROL



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

HON. DAVID SHOLTZ, Governor, President.
HON. R. A. GRAY, Secretary of State.
HON. W.S.CAWTHON, Secretary, Superintendent of Public Instruction
HON. CARY D. LANDIS, Attorney-General.
HON. W. V. KNOTT, State Treasurer.



STATE BOARD OF CONTROL

HON. P. K. YONGE, Chairman (Pensacola). (Resigned April 1, 1933).
HON. A. W. WAGG (West Palm Beach).
HON. A. H. BLENDING (Bartow).
HoN. G. H. BALDWIN (Jacksonville).
HON. R. F. MAGUIRE (Orlando).
HON. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary (Tallahassee).


J. R. E. LEE, President.





SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR, 1933
New Farmers' of Florida Judging Meet and Conference
Thursday and Friday ------------------June 1 and 2
Smith-Hughes Teachers' of Vocational Agriculture Con-
ference, Gainesville, Florida -- ------------June 12 to 17
Smith-Lever Home and Farm Agents Conference and 4-H
Club Conference -- ------------------June 7- 8 -9
Registration -------------------------Monday, June 12
Special Course in Agriculture, Dr. H. O. Sargent ------ June 5
Special Course for Home Economics Teachers--- ------June 5
Classes Begin --..- ------------------- Tuesday, June 13
Opening Assembly ----------------- Wednesday, June 14
Last Date for Entrance for credit toward graduation
Friday --- -----------------------------June 16
Last Date for Change of Schedule -----------Saturday, June 17
Last Date for entrance for credit toward Extension of
Certificates -------------------- Monday, June 19
Date of Filing of Certificates for Extension ----------Saturday, July 1
Holiday ---------------------------- -Tuesday, July 4
Mid-Summer Examination ---------------Saturday, July 8
Examination for all Candidates for Graduation--Saturday, July 22
Final Examinations------------------Thursday, July 27
Summer School Commencement ------------Friday, July 28

SEVEN YEARS TABULATION OF SUMMER SCHOOL
ENROLLMENTS
1925 ------ ------------------ 123
1926 ------------------------------ 310
1927------------------------------327
1928 ------------------------------ 63
1929 ------ ------------------------419
1930------------------------- 504
1931 -----------------------715
1932 ------------------- ---------- 1035






OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

J. R. E. LEE, A.B., A.M., LL.D., President.
J. B. BRAGG, A.B., Dean of Men, Acting Vice President.
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.B., A.M., Director of Summer School.
DR. L. H. B. FOOTE, Medical Director.
J. R. E. LEE JR., A.B., Business Manager.
A. L. KIDD, A.B., A.M., Registrar, Publicity Director.
L. R. DAWSON, A.B., A.M., Dean of Division of Education.
E. M. GRIGGS, B.S., M.S., Dean of Division of Home Economics.
N. L. MERRIFIELD, B.Mus.ED., M.Sc.ED., Dean of Division of Music.
WM. T. REED, B.S., Dean of Division of Mechanic Arts.
B. L. PERRY, B.S., Dean of Division of Agriculture.
A. P. TURNER, A.B., Chaplain.
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant.
L. M. FLEMING, B.S., Assistant to Registrar.


SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY, 1933

J. R. E. LEE, A.B., A.M., LL.D
President

R. O'HARA LANIER, A.B., A.M.
Director



INSTRUCTION
Division of Liberal Arts and Science
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.B., A.M.
Education and Vocational Guidance

J. B. BRAGG, A.B.
Physical Education
GEORGE DECOURSEY, B.S.
Economics
H. MANNING EFFERSON, A.B., A.M.
Mathematics
F. IRENE FORD, B.S.
Physical Education
[6]





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 7


CHAS C. FRAZIER, A.B., A.M.
English

KATHERINE I. HEWITT, A.B., A.M.
English
CULLEN S. HOLMES, B.S., M.S.
Chemistry
A. L. KIDD, A.B., A.M.
Government

A. L. KIRKSEY, B.S.
Science

M. R. KYLER, A.B.
Mathematics and Science

T. I. LANG
Mathematics and English

J. L. LANGHORNE, A.B.
English

A. J. McCAMPBELL, A.B.
Languages

C. B. NASBY
Art, Graphic and Applied

C. B. NELSON
Physical Education

J. R. PHILLIPS, A.B.
English

E. P. SOUTHALL, A.B., A.M.
History

A. P. TURNER, A.B.
English and Dramatics

E. E. WARE, B.S.
Biology

L. A. WHITFIELD, B.S., M.S.
Biology

G. T. WIGGINS, A.B., A.M.
Language and Education

T. A. WRIGHT, A.B.
Physical Education





8 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933


Division of Education

L. R. DAWSON, A.B., A.M.
Education-Teacher Training

R. T. BATES, B.S.
Demonstration Elementary School, First and Second Grades

A. M. BOND, B.S.
Demonstration Elementary School, Fifth Grade

E. P. JONES
Demonstration Elementary School, Sixth Grade

E. E. ROBINSON, A.B.
Demonstration Elementary School, Fourth Grade

MALISSA M. SYDES, B.S.
Education

LILLIE M. WHITE
Demonstration Elementary School, First Grade


Division of Agriculture

B. L. PERRY, B.S.
Horticulture

J. C. BALDWIN, B.S.
Agronomy

CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Animal Husbandry and Dairying

GEORGE CONOLY, B.Sc. A.
General Agriculture and School Gardening

R. L. REYNOLDS, B.S.
Agricultural Education

J. E. SANFORD
Nature Study and Poultry Husbandry


Division of Home Economics

ETHEL M. GRIGGS, B.S., M.S.
Home Economics Education

IRMA L. COLEMAN, B.S.
Household Economics





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 9

MARIE F. McMILLAN, B.S.
Clothing and Textiles
E. RENFROW, B.S.
Foods and Nutrition

ESTHER JOHNSON, B.S.
Applied Art and Design

Nurse Training and Health Division

L. H. B. FOOTE, M.D.
Anatomy, Physiology, and Health Education

W. H. BAKER, M.D.
Interne
LULA R. HALL, R.N.
Superintendent of Nurses
GEORGIA HILL, R.N.
Night Supervisor
A. B. ROBINSON, R.N.
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses

Division of Mechanic Arts

THEODORE BRIGGS, B.S.
Industrial Arts
J. W. CAULDER, A.B., B.S.
Mathematics and Physics
B. F. HOLMES, B.S.
Industrial Arts

Division of Music
N. L. MERRIFIELD, B.Mus.ED., M.Sc.ED.
Public School Music


LIBRARY

J. E. BAKER, B.S.
Librarian
R. B. STEWART, B.S.
Assistant Librarian
M. L. WATKINS, A.B.
Assistant Librarian and Children's Literature





10 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INSTITUTIONAL
MANAGEMENT
J. R. E. LEE JR., A.B.
Business Manager

JAMES H. BLOW
Cashier

A. R. HOFFMAN, B.S.
In Charge of Administration Building

S. B. KELKER
Bookkeeper

M. M. POWELL, A.B.
Secretary to the Business Manager

EUGENE SMITH, B.S.
Steward, Dining Hall

GEORGIA U. WILLIAMS
Postmistress and in Charge of Book Room

L. M. FLEMING, B.S.
Assistant in Registrar's Office

C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to the Director

SYLVIA R. THOMAS
Dietitian




WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT

N. S. McGUINN
Dean of Women, Matron College Women's Hall

L. F. CURRY
Matron, Tucker Hall

M. ARMAND JONES
Matron, Men's Union and College Men's Hall

E. 0. PAIGE
Matron, Clark Hall

L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Hall






Pages
11-12
Missing
From
Original





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 13

of courses designed to meet the needs of their profession and selected
with a view to present the most recent progress in educational achieve-
ment.
Work in the Summer Session meets fully the requirements of the
State Department of Education.

DURATION OF SESSION
The Summer Session consists of but one term of seven weeks.
The summer program is a very intensive one. With few excep-
tions classes operate daily on a six-day-week program for the entire
seven weeks.

DEGREES
Summer session courses carry the same amount of collegiate
credit as regular session courses. For detailed statement of the credit
requirements for the various degrees, see the regular catalog for 1932-
1933.
The College requires one year of residence for any degree; and
if the term of residence is only one year, that must be the senior year.

GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATE

Along with the A.B. degree and the B.S. degree in the Division
of Liberal Arts and Science, the B.S. degree in the Divisions of Agri-
culture, Home Economics and Mechanic Arts, the student may secure
a graduate state certificate provided eighteen semester hours of educa-
tion have been completed.
A graduate state certificate is good for five years in the public
schools of Florida.
Students in the two-year Teacher-Training course may also earn
a graduate state certificate but they are only permitted to teach
through the eighth grade, and through the ninth grade in the subjects
in which they have specialized.
Students apply directly to the State Superintendent of Public
Instruction for this certificate. Application blanks are furnished
through the Registrar of the Florida A. and M. College.

ADMISSION
The rules governing admission to the Summer Session are the
same as those of the regular session. Any graduate of an accredited
high school, who plans to teach may enroll in any department in which
he is prepared to carry work. Admission of special students to any
department or class requires the approval of the Director and the
consent of the instructor.





14 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

ADVANCED STANDING
Summer session students entering the College for the first time
who have credits for work done elsewhere which they wish to transfer
for advanced standing toward a degree at the College, should have
complete official transcripts of records, including a letter of honora-
ble dismissal from the institution last attended, and a certificate of
their high-school credits sent to the Registrar before the opening
of the session, in order that proper evaluation of their credits may
be made and their standing determined in time for matriculation.

UNIT OF CREDIT
The unit of credit is the "semester hour." One semester hour
of credit is granted for the successful completion of one hour daily
of lecture or recitation, or of two hours daily of laboratory work for
the Summer Session. In those laboratory courses in which but little
outside preparation or report work is required, one hour of credit is
given for three hours of laboratory work.
Except by special permission no student in the Summer Session
may carry more than nine (9) semester hours of work.

CREDIT AND REQUIREMENTS

Credit is administered on the following basis:
Any course meeting six (6) times per week with at least six (6)
conferences through a period of seven (7) weeks will carry with it,
providing a grade of "D" or higher is made, three (3) semester hours'
credit. No person will be allowed credit for any science course which
does not include manual, notebook and double periods for laboratory
work. Double periods, that is, two (2) hours will be required in
the following subjects: Domestic Science, Domestic Art, Manual
Training, Drawing, Demonstration, and all courses in the curriculum
which are directly or indirectly supervised by the Department of
Biology and Chemistry.
No credit is granted for attendance in a class until registration
has been completed and proper fees paid.
No credit is granted students absent from the regular class meet-
ing of any course in excess of 10 per cent of the total number of such
meetings for the session unless the student presents to the instructor
satisfactory evidence that the work missed has been made up. Stu-
dents absent for any cause in excess of 25 per cent of the total
number of scheduled meetings of the course may not be granted the
privilege of completing the work and may not receive credit in that
course.











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16 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

GENERAL REGULATIONS
SYSTEM OF GRADING
Grades are recorded by use of the letters A, B, C, D, F, in order
of excellence. D is the lowest passing grade; F is failure. Other
special grades are: I, incomplete; X, missed examination.

HONOR POINTS
Each semester hour with grade A gives three honor points; each
semester hour with grade B gives two honor points; each semester
hour with grade C gives one honor point; each semester hour grade
F gives a minus one honor point.

RESIDENCE
A minimum residence requirement of 4 summers of 7 weeks each
will be demanded and required of all students who expect to finish
the regular two-year Normal course. This is exclusive of the high
school residence requirements or 4 summers in addition to the work
done to fulfill high school requirements. This must be in residence
at the Florida A. and M. College with terms of not less than seven
weeks each. Full residence of one continuous school year will be
required of all applicants who intend to finish the B.A. or B.S. course
after 1929. (Those who registered before this time were exempted
from 36-week continued residence requirement.) This does not
apply to A. and M. College former students or graduates who have
spent one year here, doing College work or work of College grade.
High school residence requirement not accepted in lieu of above.
Records from other summer schools and other extension courses
will be considered a part of the one-half which can be done out of
residence.
By residence is meant, work at the Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical College in Tallahassee.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
By "extension" is meant work taken either by correspondence or
in extension classes. No person shall be allowed to take by extension
more than 48 semester hours for credit toward a degree. No person
shall be allowed to take by extension more than 12 semester hours of
the last 36 semester hours necessary for a bachelor's degree. No per-
son shall be allowed to take by correspondence more than 9 semester
hours work during the summer session period. A student will not
be permitted to take work by correspondence while he is in residence
without the consent of the dean of the college in which he is regis-





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 17

tered. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. In the case of
candidates for the Normal Diploma, the student may not take by
extension more than 24 semester hours.
Not more than fifty per cent of a major (or group) and not more
than twelve semester hours may be taken by extension in any depart-
ment for credit.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM SUBJECT ALLOWANCE
The State Department of Education has decreed that no person
will be allowed to take more than three (3) subjects for credit
(exclusive of industries) and not more than one of these, in addition,
may be taken. Nine (9) credit hours is the limit unless the students
have maintained a previous record of A as an average.
No person will be allowed to take less than two content or pro-
fessional courses or not more than four professional courses.
Credit will not be granted for less than the above or more than
the above without permission. College credit will not be given for
High School Work and no College Work carries High School Credit.


CHANGE OF SCHEDULE
There will be no changes in the schedule after 2 days of date
of registration. Record in office must be changed officially by the
Registrar upon approval of Director. Positively no credit will be
given for unassigned classes. Where course is dropped without giving
proper notice, a grade of "F" is recorded; where a course is taken
without proper assignment, the grade of "I" or incomplete is recorded.


CLASS ATTENDANCE
High school students may not take College courses for credit.
The reverse is true for college students.
General courses for all, regardless of classification, will be listed
as such.
Certain special pre-requisites may be required of students who
become candidates for graduation.


EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATE
Credit for an extension of certificate is granted for 6 weeks'
attendance and two-third credit is allowed provided it is the last 6
weeks of the summer session and not the first six weeks. No credit
toward graduation is given for those who only attend the first six
weeks of the summer session. This will be strictly enforced.
















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FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 19

TEACHING FACILITIES

THE OBSERVATION SCHOOL
One of the definite objects of the Summer Session is to exemplify
the best educational practice in the country, not only in the teaching
of all grades and subjects but in the general organized activities of
the school as a social institution. To this end, a School of Observa-
tion with kindergarten and grades from the first to sixth will be in
session in a building devoted to this particular work five days each
week for the full period of the summer session term. Work in the
Observation School will be open to observation daily from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. Systematic observation for which credit is given, will
be directed by instructors on the staff of the college. Privileges of
observation shall be open without payment of additional fees.
The Observation School constitutes the laboratory for the courses
in principles of teaching and special methods. Classes in these courses
may, if desirable, use half or the whole of the class period in observa-
tion of actual work in the elementary grades. Visiting students
should be present in the demonstration classroom at the opening of
the period and remain until the close of the half-hour.

PRACTICE TEACHING
Practice Teaching will be required of all teachers until they have
demonstrated their ability to plan a lesson, manage a class, teach a
class, show efficiency in general methods in all of the subjects taught
in the elementary school. This cannot be satisfied by examination
but mut be satisfied by supervised teaching in the demonstration school.

TEACHER PLACEMENT SERVICE
The Agricultural and Mechanical College maintains a Teacher
Placement Bureau as a part of its service to this State. Its purpose
is two-fold: (1) to aid its teachers in securing desirable positions and
(2) to aid Superintendents and Principals in finding well-qualified
teachers. Teachers desiring to change employment are asked to make
out applications on entering summer school or the first part of June,
so that proper credentials may be provided.
All correspondence should be directed to the President of the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College. No fee is charged.

THE LIBRARY
The Carnegie Library contains over 10,000 volumes catalogued
and classified and a large amount of uncatalogued material. The
library subscribes to the majority of the current magazines and- papers.





20 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

It has been enlarged and now contains two reading rooms, reference,
magazine and children's rooms.
The library is centrally located and Offords the teachers with
conveniences for reference and research. Books may be withdrawn
subject to the library regulations.

LABORATORIES
Laboratory courses are provided with ample room, modern equip-
men and efficient supervision.

EXPENSES FOR SUMMER SCHOOL
Registration (not refundable) ----------- -- $ 3.00
Board and Room (per week) ---------------------- 3.75
Total Amount for Room and Board for 7 weeks session ---- $29.25
Books (estimated cost) ---------------$10.00 or $15.00
Science Fee (for all persons taking Science) ------------- 2.00
Art Fee (for all persons taking Public School Art) ------- 1.00
Late Entrance Fee ------------------------------------- 1.00
Audit Course Fee (per course) --------------------- 1.00
TUITION free to all residents of the State.

ROOM RESERVATION
Every modern sanitary convenience is provided in the several
dormitories. Rooms in all dormitories may be reserved at any time
by application of the student to the Dean of Women and payment of
$10.00.
ROOM NECESSITIES
All bedrooms are comfortably furnished with single bedsteads
and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, washstand and chairs.
Students are required to provide themselves with pillows, bed linen,
towels and other things that they may wish for their own special
comfort and convenience.

TEXTBOOKS
Since textbooks are subject to change without notice, students
are not advised to purchase them until told to do so by the instructor
in charge of the class. The College Book Store carries a full line of
all textbooks used in the Summer Session sold at list prices. The
Book Store also handles necessary stationery and other supplies. Stu-
dents should bring English dictionaries and other useful books of
reference. Students in Education courses should bring with them





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 21

professional books and textbooks related to the courses they plan to
take. The cost of books for the Summer Session is about $12.00.

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian. In
addition to the daily devotion, mid-week prayer service, Sunday
School, Sunday preaching, vesper services and Bible study courses,
there are active Young Men's Christian Association and Young
Women's Christian Association. The Chaplain of the College
preaches every Sunday morning at 11:00 o'clock.

RECREATION
Musical programs, lectures, readings, recitals, moving pictures,
plays, hikes, and picnics are some of the recreational opportunities
of the College during the Summer Session. The Department of
Physical Education, the Department of Music, the Department of
Dramatics and the Entertainment Bureau each summer make valuable
contributions to the summer's entertainment.
The athletic staff offers opportunities for wholesome play and
has facilities for practically all forms of indoor exercise. The ath-
letic field, tennis courts, baseball diamond and track are always ready
for use without expense to the students.
There will be a series of musical attractions. This will include
weekly and Sunday afternoon programs by the college band and
orchestra, partly composed of summer session students.
The college now has the advantage of Western Electric sound equip-
ment, and motion pictures of a very high grade will be shown each
Thursday and Saturday nights in the Auditorium.
Dormitory life presents as far as possible the freedom which char-
acterizes a home of refinement. Informal gatherings, parties, social
clubs and other miscellaneous organizations give opportunity to
increase the pleasures of the Summer Session and extend acquaintance
by social intercourse in a wholesome manner.


SUMMER SESSION FEATURES
*:-EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

Any certificate holder desiring certificate extension must, within
one year from the date on which the required college attendance or
reading circle course is completed, file a valid Florida certificate or
certificates with formal application for extension.
New regulations passed by the State Board of Education, February 3, 1932.





22 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

Grades given on each course accepted for extension must be not
less than the average grade required for graduation from the institu-
tion giving the course.
Not more than two extensions on any one certificate will be
granted in any one year.
For extension of certificates, courses in education and other
courses which definitely apply toward meeting the requirements for
a diploma or a degree may be counted as professional subjects.
The minimum attendance required is six weeks. The minimum
credit required is six semester hours with at least one-third of this
in professional subjects.

SPECIAL COURSE FOR HOME ECONOMICS TEACHERS
A special course listed as "The State Program for Home Eco-
nomics and Special Problems" dealing with the curricula in home
economics for the Negro high schools in Florida, with some con-
sideration of the methods of teaching and special problems, will be
offered from June 7 through June 10, i.e, five days before the regular
summer session opens and closes out at noon of the fourth day of
the special home economics session.
The course will be taught by Miss Bolita Frojen, Supervisor of
Home Economics Education for the state of Florida, Capitol Building,
Tallahassee, Florida.
The course requires three and one half days, a total of eighteen
and one-half (18 /2) hours. The course will operate between
the hours of 8:30 and 12:00 a.m. and 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. daily with
the exception of one-half day of operation on Saturday, June 10.
Students will register as they do for regular summer work. No
credit will be given for this course. The specific aim of the course
is professional advancement.
Miss Frojen, has requested that every teacher now teaching in a
vocational school who wishes to better prepare herself to teach and
who wishes to gain an adequate understanding of the new state course
of study for home economics, to take this special course. Miss Frojen
also urges every teacher of home economics in a day school in the
State or engaged in an evening school program to take this course.
The new State Plan for Vocational Education requires that the
teacher of a vocational program be a graduate of a four-year curri-
culum in an approved teacher-training institution. Those who are
now in a vocational school, who have not completed a four-year
course, must attend summer sessions or regular school until she has
completed the four-year course.
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College at Tallahassee,
is the only teacher-training institution in Florida approved for voca-
tional home economics for Negroes.





















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24 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

SPECIAL COURSES
ANNUAL SMITH-HUGHES SUMMER CONFERENCE
The Annual Summer Conference of Vocational Agricultural
Teachers of Florida will be held during the week of June 6 to 11.
All teachers of vocational agricultural departments in the State will
attend this meeting, which will be conducted by Mr. J. F. Williams,
State Supervisor of Vocational Agricultural Education, Mr. H. E.
Wood, Assistant State Supervisor, and Dr. H. O. Sargent, Regional
Agent for Negro Smith-Hughes work in the South.
ANNUAL MEETING AND CONFERENCE, ;OF NEW FARMERS OF FLORIDA
AND FARM AND HOME MAKERS CLUB MEMBERS
The New Farmers of Florida, an organization made up of voca-
tional agricultural students of the State, and members of the Farm
and Home Makers Club, sponsored by the Farm and Home Demon-
stration Agents of the State, will hold their annual meeting and con-
ference on June 2 and 3. These organizations, known respectively
as New Farmers of Florida and 4-H Clubs, will carry out their usual
programs of judging contests and agricultural programs, as well as
receive instructions and attend lectur-s relating to firm -nd rural life.

"OUTLINES OF CURRICULA
The following curricula in the Division of Agriculture, the Divi-
sion of Hcme Economics, the Division of Liberal Arts and Science,
the Division of Education, and th. Division cf Music, are described
in this Bulletin for the convenience of summer session students. For
a fuller st tement of the work under each division of the College
and the entrance requirements, see the catalogue. Students interested
in outlining their work with reference to a degree should ask the
Dean concerned how to outline their work. Regulations in the general
catalogue govern all students of the Florida Agricultural and Mechani-
cal College.
Information with reference to entrance, degrees, credits, facilities and costs not
given in this Bulletin will be afforded on request to the Director of the Summer
Session or the Registrar, Administration Building, Florida Agricultural and Mechani-
cal College, Tallahassee, Florida.








DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE

PURPOSE

The Agricultural courses offered during the summer sessions are
planned to meet the needs of the teachers engaged in giving instruc-
tion to the pupils of the rural communities and to persons who are
located where agricultural interests will prove beneficial. The work
is also organized to give credits toward high school graduation' as well
as college credits leading to the B.Sc. degree in Agriculture.

AGRICULTURAL CURRICULUM
SUMMER ONE SUMMER FOUR
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Agronomy 101 ------------- 4 3 General Chemistry 101 __ 7 5
English 101a ..----------- 3 3 Farm Mathematics 101 2 2
Poultry 101 ---------4 3 Agricultural Edu. 204 2 3
Rural Economics 3 3 Horticulture 101 .---. 4 2

TOTAL --------------. 14 12 TOTAL ---------- 14 12
SUMMER TWO SUMMER FIVE
Educational Psychology 3 3 General Chemistry 102 7 5
Dairying 101 4 3 Rural Sociology 204 3 3
Vocational Edu. 101 3 3 Agricultural Eng. ------ 3 3

TOTAL ---10 9 TOTAL ---- 13 11
SUMMER THREE
General Botany 101 4 3 SUMMER SIX
Agronomy 102 ---- 4 3 Agricultural Chem. 105 7 5
Horticulture 202 ------ 4 3 Agricultural Edu. 205_ 3 3
Landscape Gardening-- 3 3 History of Agriculture 3 3

TOTAL--------------- 15 12 TOTAL- ----------- 13 11



DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS

PURPOSE

There exists a need for properly qualified and well trained home
economics teachers and workers. The courses in home economics are
planned to meet these needs; to provide training for the home maker
and for persons wishing to enter fields closely associated with and
growing out of home economics.
A four year curriculum leading to the B.S. degree is offered.
Persons registered for the two year curriculum as given in the past

[ 25





26 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

may be allowed to complete the same. Consult the regular catalogue
for the curriculum outline by years.

HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM
FIRST YEAR THIRD YEAR
Credit Credit
English 101 .-...-.... --_ 3 English .-.-----.. 2
Education 101 ---.--....--, -....- 3 Social Science 301 ....--------...-- 3
Chemistry 101 ---....._............. 5 Clothing 301 3
Foods or Clothing 101 ------...----- 3 Design 201' .*.------. 3
Applied Design -------. -----...--..-.. 3 Physiology 201----- 3
Physical Education ..------------- Electives -----------.- .....----- 3
English 102 --------- ----------. ---- 3 Physical Education -----.-
Educational Psychology ...----------.. 3 Foods Chemistry 301 -...... 3
Biology ..---------- ----..-------------- ..3 Foods 301 ..---- --------.--------... 3
Clothing or Foods 101 ------.--.. 3 Physics* .--------..--------- 3
Dairying, Gardening, Poultry--- 3 Design 301 ---------..------- 3
Physical Education ..------ ... Negro History 401 -------..-. 3
Electives (4-year) 3
SECOND YEAR Physical Education .....
English 201 -----.- ... 3
History 203 -....-----.. ----------- 3 FOURTH YEAR
Organic Chemistry 201 .....------ 4 English ---------........... .... 2
Clothing 201 -------------...... -- 3 Phy. of Child Adol. -.- ----. 3
Design 201 (4-year) ---------------- 3 Household Econ. 401 .--.-- 3
Home Eco. Edu. (Meths., 2-yr.) 3 Home Economics Educe
Household Econ. (Home Mgt. 401 (Methods) 3
and Child Care) ...---.-------- 2 Foods 401 --------------... 3
Physical Education -.--.---. -- .. -- Electives ---------------__...--....------ 3
English 202 .----.-...------ ------- 3 Physical Education -----..---------
Government 201 --.. 3 English .---. -------.------------2 2
Foods 201 ---------.----------- 3 Child Devel. & Training 401.__.-. 3
Physics 201 (4-year) ------------ 3 Home Economics Educ.
Home Econ. Educ. (Practice (Practice Teaching) 402 ----.. 3
Teaching) 202 (-year)------ 3 Household Econ. (Practice
Household Econ. Practice House) 402 -----.---.....-- 3
House 202 (2-year)--.. 3 Vocational Education- 2
Physical Education ...- Electives .------------------------..... 3
Physical Education ..------------ V2

For two-year students who return to complete the two-year curriculum.
Electives: French or Spanish; Economics, School Lunch or Cafeteria Management.


*DIVISION OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE
PURPOSE
This division offers work that is pre-eminently cultural. It at-
tempts to lay the broad foundation of general scholarship; to develop
the powers of the mind; to broaden the views; to strengthen the char-
acter and implant a desire for continued study and research. It also

For courses of study for A.B. and B.S. in this division see regular catalog.





FiLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 27

gives the students such specific information as will help them not
only to become proficient, but to become better citizens and students
of public affairs. Most of the studies are prescribed, being rightly
considered important and fundamental, and essential factors of a com-
plete liberal education,.

TWO-YEAR TEACHER-TRAINING COURSE
The aim of the Teacher-Training Course is to train teachers for
the public elementary schools of the state of Florida. The course
covers a period of two years and must therefore be chiefly professional
in nature, placing its major emphasis upon principles, methods, and
materials of instruction.
It is important, therefore, that those seeking admission to this
course be already well grounded in the subject matter necessary for
successful teaching in elementary schools, for such subject matter
courses as are selected to supplement the professional equipment of
the student are chosen chiefly to broaden and enrich the academic
and cultural background of the prospective teacher and shall be as
nearly as possible so conducted,

SUMMER ONE SUMMER FOUR
Education 10 ~ (with observ.tioj ) Children's Literature
English 1012 United States History and Government
Biology Teaching Elementary School Subjects
Physical Edcation Public Schlool Att

SUMMER TWO SUMMER FIVE
English 102 practice
Principles of Geography United S.rates History and Governmeni
Arithmetic American Literature
Physical Education aodost~ial Arts

SUMMER THREE SUMMER SIX
English Practice
Educational Psychology (with ob- Health Education
!servation) English Literature
World Geography School Gardening
Public School Music

J







DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE
S. 102 Agronomy (Pasture and Forage Crops). A study of the
fundamental principles of crop production, soil management,
adaptability, distribution and use, seed selection, seed testing,
preparation of soil, planting, cultivation, harvesting, and
other factors affecting the growth, development and matur-
ity of plant life.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 103 General Agriculture (School Gardening). A special course
in planning gardens for schools or individual class work,
especially designed for teachers. The course is combined
with Nature Study. The State Course will be used.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 206 Agricultural Chemistry (Soils and Fertilizers). Chemistry
Department. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the
student with the facts pertaining to plant and animal nutri-
tion, effective feeding of farm animals, compounds of feeds,
etc. The course deals only with organic compounds, and
their relation to agricultural subjects and work.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 101-102.
Credit, 4 semester hours.

S. 202 Horticulture (Fruit Crop Production). This course in-
cludes the general principles of fruit growing, and the study
of various fruit crops adapted to the State. In this course
the student learns the kinds of sprays and dusts, and other
materials used in successful fruit production. Special em-
phasis is placed on citrus fruits.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. Nature Study. This course will be in the form of simple
botanical studies, entomology, and ornothology. Students
will be taught to differentiate between common plants,
insects, birds and animals, and learn of their economic im-
portance to him. Collections will be made, and a school
garden conducted.
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30 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS

APPLIED ART AND DESIGN
S. 101 Applied Design I. Planned to teach the elements of good
taste; to show how the individual, the home and the objects
of every day life can be improved in keeping with the
principles of design.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 201 Applied Design II (Costume Design). A study of human
proportions, materials and the elements of design in relation
to the individual and her personal problems of dress.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 301 Applied Design III (House Furnishings). This course is
planned to develop appreciation for the furniture problems
in the average home; how to take what one has and make
the most of it in the matter of house furnishings; to develop
a desire for simplicity and genuineness rather than ornate
display in regard to the selection of furniture for the home.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING
S. 101 Clothing I (Construction and Selection). A study of per-
sonal clothing problems and those of the family; the selec-
tion of materials for construction and the fundamental pro-
cesses as applied to the making of simple garments.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 202 Clothing II (Dressmaking and Textiles). A continuation
of the more difficult processes of garment construction; how
to become more efficient in fitting garments. A study of
textile fibers and fabrics and the social and economic aspects
of textiles in relation to the consumer.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 301 Clothing III (Designing and Draping). This course is
planned to develop creative ability and efficiency in the use
of the foundation pattern and in designing modern styles.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

FOODS AND NUTRITION
S. 101 Foods I (Methods and Skill in Cookery). A study of scien-
tific methods and principles of cookery; the qualities of
well cooked food. A study of production and marketing
of the foods we eat.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 31

S. 201 Foods II (Meal Planning and Service). A study of whole-
some food combinations, menu costs and correct forms of
table service in relation to the environment and the occasion.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 301 Foods III (Nutrition). A study of body needs, types of
food materials and diets for normal individuals.
Credit, 3 semester hours.


HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS

S. 301 Household Economics (Home Management). This course
is planned to develop a high regard for home-making as a
profession. A study is made of the proper care of the house,
the use of time and money and the management of the
average household.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 401 Household Economics (Home Finances and Equipment).
A study of the cost of living in the average family, a con-
sideration of types of equipment, labor saving devices and
the minimum equipment necessary for comfort in the home.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 402 Household Economics (Practice House). This course pro-
vides actual practice in a furnished cottage, in the use of
good methods and standards in the management of a home.
Students will live in for a period of six weeks.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 301 Child Development and Training. To give information re-
garding parent education in order that the home may form
a better background for the child. To aid students gain
knowledge of and develop appreciation for the proper physi-
cal care and training of the child in the home.
Credit, to be arranged.


HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

S. 401 Home Economics Education (Methods of Teaching). The
aims of this course are to study good methods of teaching
home economics in terms of environmental needs. To under-
stand the Vocational home economics movement, good
organization and suitable equipment for home economics
departments.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





32 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

S. 402 Home Economics Education (Practice Teaching). Aims
to provide experience in the use of good methods of teach-
ing home economics in the all-day vocational school and
in the non-vocational public schools.
Credit, to be arranged.


DIVISION OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF GRAPHIC AND PLASTIC ART

S. 101 Primary Art. Covers the organization of materials for use
in the first, second, third and fourth grades; such as, pencil
sketching, wax crayon drawing, paper construction, sand
table projects and clay moulding. Notebook required.
Credit, 2 semester hours.

S. 103 Problems in Art Education. Covers specific problems to be
worked out. Border designing or friezes, letter and figure
making (posters), etc.
Prerequisite: Course 101.
Credit, 2 semester hours.

S. 100 Applied Design. Includes designing, lamp shade painting,
glowing glass pictures, cut felt work, velvet or linen wall
tapestry painting, pottery painting, etc.
Credit, 2 semester hours.


INDUSTRIAL ARTS

S. 201 Industrial Arts. This course covers the organization of
materials used in teaching Industrial Arts in the elementary
school, including the proper selection and use of hand tools.
Special emphasis is placed on simple hand activities, such as
basketry, weaving, clay modeling, and toy making. Four
hours shop.
Credit, 2 semester hours.

S. 202 Industrial Art. This course is designed to train students in
the art of using tools and making articles out of wood.
Special emphasis is placed on general home and school repair
projects. Four hours shop.
Credit, 2 semester hours.


































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34 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

EDUCATION
S. 100 Introduction to the Study of Education and Teaching. This
is a general survey course covering the following topics:
Teacher-Training, Development of Types of Schools, Curri-
culum, Modern Changes in School Organization.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 200 Rural School Management. This course seeks to analyze and
to suggest approaches to the solution of certain problems
of rural education. Especial attention is given to the insti-
tutional and community responsibilities of the rural teacher.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 203 Educational and Vocational Guidance. This is planned as a
fundamental course for principals, social workers and others
desiring an acquaintance with recent developments in guid-
ance of individuals in school systems, industrial establish-
ments and private agencies.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 204 Methods of Teaching in Elementary' Schools. A theory
course in method for four-year education students giving
more attention to curriculum, course of study and methods.
The principles of method are also developed.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 207 Practice Teaching and Conference. Actual participation
with conference which includes method and unit organiza-
tion. The rotation plan is used. Ten hours classroom prac-
tice and conference.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 209 Literature for Teachers. The name carries the meaning of
the subject. Story Telling, Analysis of Myths, Rhymes and
Selections suitable for children.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 301 High School Education or Principles of Secondary Education.
History, development, curricula, growth and organization
of the modern high school.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 312 High School Education Methods of Teaching. The theory
of teaching in the High School. Method and technique
along with High School Problems.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 35

ENGLISH*:
S. 101 Freshman Composition. Required of all first year college
students. This course affords training in the theory and
practice of composition. Stress is placed upon the writing
of expository themes, the construction of good sentences and
paragraphs, and the general principles of correct usage.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 102 Freshman Composition. A continuation of English 101.
Further instruction is given in the practice of clear and
accurate expression. Emphasis is put upon the study of the
forms of discourse, and the analysis of prose models.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 202 Introduction to the Study of Prose. This course aims to
train the student in the analysis and in the fullest enjoyment
of prose writings. Prose selections, illustrative of types,
theme, purpose, etc., are chosen for analysis. Required of
English majors; elective to others.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 203 Introduction to the Study of Drama. This course is de-
signed to fit the English specialist for more advanced work
in the field of the drama. It considers the history of the
English drama, dramatic technique, types of drama, etc.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 204 Public Speaking. Required of all Sophomores who do not
major in English, and of all Senior Normals. The course
considers the essentials of the forms of Public Address.
Practice is given in the delivery and interpretation of
speeches.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 205 Survey of English Literature. This course offers a chrono-
logical outline of the history of English Literature from its
beginning to 1800. The major literary figures are studied
intensively.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 206 Survey of English Literature. A continuation of English
205. English Literature from 1800 to the present. The
principal writers of the Romantic and Victorian eras are
studied in some detail.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Courses in this department are rotated from summer to summer, depending:
upon the demand for them by English specialists, and by students in other depart-
ments who must take the subject.





36 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

S. 208 Advanced Composition. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and
Seniors. The course covers the writing of themes of an
advanced nature, reading reports, and conference.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 209 Survey of American Literature. An outline course of the
masterpieces of American Literature from its beginning to
the present.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 300 Debating. For students who are interested in debating prac-
tical application of the theories of argumentation is offered
in this course. There are discussed the analysis of a propo-
sition, the construction of briefs, and the presentation of
logical questions.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 302 English Literature from 1577 to 1600. A study of the
chief writers of the Elizabethan period exclusive of the
dramatists.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES
FRENCH

S. 101 Elementary Course. The elements of French grammar with
abundant oral and written exercises. Special attention to
oral practice and ear training. No prerequisite.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 102 Elementary Course. A continuation of the above course.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 201 Intermediate Course. A review of the essentials of French
Grammar and Composition. The reading of literary texts
of intermediate difficulty.
Prerequisite: French 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 202 Intermediate French. A continuation of French 201.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

LIBRARY COURSE
S. 200 Library Course. Designed to deal with classification, cata-
loguing, marking, charge system and reference work books
for the elementary school.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
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38 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

MATHEMATICS
S. 100a Advanced Arithmetic with Methods. The course includes
a complete review of the content material in arithmetic.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 100b Advanced Arithmetic with Methods. This is a continua-
tion of S. 100a. In addition to that, it comprises a study
of the most modern methods of presenting the subject.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 101 College Algebra. This course includes a brief review of such
high school topics as variations, progressions, mathematical
induction and the first two orders of the determinant.
Special attention is given, following this preliminary review,
to pure college algebra. This portion of the course covers
such topics as the determinants of higher order, permutation,
combination, theory of equations, mathematics of invest-
ments. etc.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 102 College Trigonometry. This is required of all students who
are working for the A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of
Liberal Arts or majoring in Mechanic Arts. The course
will consist, in the main, of problems involving practical
applications of trigonometry. Much attention will be given
also to trigonometric equations and identities.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 201a Analytic Geometry. This course embraces a complete study
of different types of equations and their loci, polar coor-
dinates and transformation of coordinates.
Prerequisites: Mathematics S 101 and S. 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 201b Analytic Geometry. This course is a continuation of
S. 201a. Special effort is made to give the student ample
drill on the topics needed for a continued study of advanced
mathematics.
Prerequisite: Mathematics S. 201a.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 301 Differential Calculus. This course is open to those who have
completed Mathematics 106 and is required of those major-
ing in Mathematics or Mechanic Arts. The work covers a
study of function, limits, differentiation of algebraic and
transcendental functions, mechanical application, curve
tracing.
Prerequisite: S. 201b.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 39

S. 302 Astronomy. An extensive study of the Constellation and
the Solar System, giving special attention to the earth and
its relation to the other members. The course is open to
students of Sophomore classification or above.
Prerequisites: S. 101 and S. 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.


MUSIC

S. 101 Public School Music. This course offers a study of methods
and materials in music. A special effort is made to inte-
grate present educational trends in the teaching of music
in grammar grades with emphasis upon adapting materials
to the child in the lower grammar grades.
Credit, 2 semester hours.

S. 102 Public School Music. Special emphasis is placed upon adapt-
ing music materials and methods to the upper grammar
grades and junior high school music. Care of the child
voice, part singing, and a study of the physiological and
psychological developments of the child and their relation
to the music work is a necessary part of the work.
Prerequisite: S. 101.
Credit, 2 semester hours.

S. 100 Band. This course is offered to those students who are inter-
ested in developing their technique upon a particular instru-
ment. The band offers an opportunity to become acquaint-
ed with a great deal of new materials and methods. Band
routine and concerts are as much a part of the work as
breathing, tone quality, etc.
Prerequisite: Ability to sight read upon at least one instru-
ment.
Credit, to be arranged.


PSYCHOLOGY

S. 101 General Psychology. A study of the mental life of human
beings, instincts, learning, sensory discrimination, individual
differences, responses and the relation of the mind to the
nervous system.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





40 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

S.201 Educational Psychology. This is purely an introductory
course for teachers. Learning and the application of its
laws to teaching the fundamentals and special school sub-
jects is the central topic. Attention is given to Remedial
work, Individual Differences, Transfer of Training, Tests
and Measurements, Intelligence and the relative significance
of each to education. No attempt is made in this course
to develop method.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 304 Child and Adolescent Psychology. Extensive readings, class
discussions and actual observations of the mental life and
conduct of children. Work and fatigue in adolescents and
the relative effects of curricula and extra-curricula activities
in the development of the child.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
S. 101 Physical Education. This is a practical course in Physical
Education which will include marching tactics, gymnastics,
dancing, stunts and games. Special emphasis will be placed
upon posture.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
S. 103 Elementary Physical Education. This course aims to present
types of Physical Education activities that are suited to the
needs of the elementary school.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
S. 205 Principles of Health Education. Theoretical discussion.
This course is designed for all teachers and considers the
various topics concerned in the maintenance of the health
of school children and their environment.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 404 Administration of Physical and Health Education. This
course includes a study of the aims of physical education
program making, and the problems involved in the organiza-
tion and administration of a physical education program in
schools and colleges.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 204 Principles of Physical Education. Biological, social and edu-
cational aspects of physical education, comparative value of
various activities, activities suitable to different sexes, ages
and varying conditions.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 41

S. 405 Intramural Athletics (X Practice). Organization and par-
ticipation in the intramural games from the standpoint of
methods and units of competition as related to the summer
program of sports.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 304 Theory of Coaching. Lectures demonstrations, and actual
practice in the handling of teams and in the playing of
various positions.

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
BIOLOGY
S. 100 Educational Biology. A general study of Animal and Plant
Biology emphasizing the principles underlying structure,
function, development, heredity, and the adaptation of
organisms to their environment.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 101-102 General Biology. A general course designed to acquaint
the student with the fundamental principles and theories of
biology, based upon practical studies of the structure, func-
tion, development, and interrelationship of plant and animal
life.
Credit, 3 semester hours for each course.
S. 105 Evolution. A study of the history and principles of Evo-
lution, Genetics, and Eugenics, with an application of these
principles to man.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 302 Physiology. A study of the anatomy and functions of the
organic systems of the human body.
Prerequisites: 101-102; 201-202.
Credit, 4 semester hours.

CHEMISTRY
S. 101 General Inorganic Chemistry. To ascertain the nature of
chemical reactions, study of the laws and theories. Special
emphasis on non-metallic elements and familiar compounds.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
S. 102 General Chemistry. A continuation of Chemistry 101.
Emphasizing inorganic acids, salts, and bases; their reaction,
solutions, methods of preparation, uses in industry. Brief
review of carbon, its oxides, and place in industry. Con-
cluding with a brief review of the metals.
Credit, 4 semester hours.





42 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

S. 202 Qualitative Analysis. A continuation of 201. A second
course for chemistry majors, minors, premedical students,
etc. Analysis of known and unknown mixtures of some
of the common metals and acid radicals.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
S. 302 Organic Chemistry. This is a continuation of S. 301. The
cyclic and polycyclic carbon compounds are studied usually
known as the Aromatic Compounds. The preparation,
properties and industrial importance will be discussed.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
S. 400 Teaching of Sciences. A course in methods for high school
science teachers. Selection and use of equipment, labora-
tory management, preparation of objective test. Available
test material, visual aids such as slides, moving pictures and
other modern developments.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

PHYSICS
S. 201 Physics. This course includes Mechanics, Molecular Physics
and Heat. Credit, 4 semester hours.
S. 202 Physics. This course includes magnetism, electricity, sound
and light. Prerequisites: College Algebra and Trigonometry.
Credit, 4 semester hours.

SOCIAL SCIENCES
ECONOMICS
S. 100 Typing. A typing course for beginners; arranged to meet
the needs of the elementary or high school teacher. Fee for
use of typewriter, $1.50.
Credit, 1 V2 semester hours.
S. 407 Commercial Education. A study of commercial curricula
and subjects offered in the junior and senior high school;
methods of subject presentation, textbooks, references; pres-
ent trends in commercial education. Required of all B.S.
majors in Commercial Education.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 201 Economics. An elementary course in economics covering a
survey of the present economic organization; the medium of
exchange, the institutions handling money and credit, and
domestic exchange. Adapted to meet divisional and depart-
mental requirements. A prerequisite to more advanced
courses in economics.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 43

S. 202 Economics. A sequel of Economics 201 dealing with the
distribution of wealth and income among persons and among
productive factors; problems of industry and governmental
control; reforms of the economic system.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 205 Organization and Management of Small Businesses. A course
designed to give a general survey of modern business organ-
ization and management problems. Discussion confined
largely to small businesses and factors influencing the launch-
ing of such businesses, their location, equipment, merchan-
dise stock or service, etc.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 300 Problems of the Negro Wage Earner. A study of the shift-
ing demand for wage earners and the occupational prob-
lems confronted in the primary and secondary industries,
the trades, in the transportation field, professional, personal
and domestic services.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

GEOGRAPHY

S. 101 Principles of Geography. This course is designed to famil-
iarize the student with the influence of geographical environ-
ment upon man's occupations, activities and biological char-
acteristics. This course is offered to all Normal students
and to students majoring in History.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

S. 102 World Geography. This course has for its purpose the help-
ing of students to understand that the destiny of the world
is effected by geographic laws, and that the nations of the
world are inter-dependent one upon the other. Special
attention will be given to the study of maps, globes and
graphs. A Work Book on World Geography and Standard
School Atlas will be used as aids to the study of World
Geography.
Credit, 3 semester hours.

GOVERNMENT

S. 200 American Government. This is an introductory course
developing the organization of our government and its struc-
ture by topical assignments.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





44 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

HISTORY
S. 101 History of Civilization. This is an introductory course to
the study of history. It traces the development of insti-
tutional and cultural life from prehistoric and primitive
civilization to modern times.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 207 Recent European History. A study of the situation that
led to the World War and of the political economic and
social reactions following the great conflict.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 301 History of England. Survey of the social, economic, polit-
ical and constitutional growth of the English nation.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 303 History of the United States to 1829. This course empha-
sizes the European background of United States History,
giving special attention to the transition phases of the polit-
ical, economic and social development of the colonies and
the rise of nationalism.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 304 History of the United States (1829-1930). This course
emphasizes the social and industrial movements. Due con-
sideration is given to the political and constitutional growth
of this country.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 401 The Negro in American History. A study of the Negro in
relation to Slavery, Abolition, the Civil War, and Recon-
struction.
Prerequisites: 303 and 304.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
PHILOSOPHY
S. 101 Introductory to Philosophy. A brief survey of Ancient,
Medieval and Modern Theories of the universe, cosmos,
knowledge, mind and soul.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
S. 102 Contemporary Philosophy. A study of present philosophi-
cal movements with especial attention to realism, evolution-
ary naturalism and instrumentalism.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
SOCIOLOGY
S. 200 Introduction to Sociology. A study of social evolution as
found for social, institution and group behavior.
Credit, 3 semester hours.








HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT

The high school department for the 1933 summer school session
will cover work of the four-year Standard High School. All appli-
cants will be admitted who have completed eight grades in a Standard
Elementary School.
The high school department for the summer session of 1933 will
be completely separate in operation from the college department.

A MINIMUM OF 16 UNITS REQUIRED FOR
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION
Sixteen high school units shall be required for high school gradua-
tion earned in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12, as follows:
English --------------------- Four Units
Mathematics ----------------- One Unit
Social Science -----------------One Unit
U. S. History and Civics ---------One Unit
Science ------ --------------One Unit
Home Economics-------- (girls) One Unit
Shop Work -------------(boys) One Unit
Electives ------------------ Seven Units
TOTAL -- ------------------ Sixteen Units


RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
Two summers in residence will be the minimum residence require-
ment for all persons who expect to finish the Agricultural and Mechan-
ical College High School.


DEFINITION OF A HIGH SCHOOL UNIT
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary
school, so planned as to constitute approximately one-fourth of a full
year of work for a pupil of normal ability. To count as a unit, the
recitation periods shall aggregate approximately 120 sixty-minute
hours. Time occupied by shop or laboratory work counts one-half
as much as time in recitation. Fractional parts of a unit of work
may be organized either by counting a course through a portion of a
year or by having recitations less frequently than five times a week,
provided that not less than half a unit in any subject shall be counted
as credit toward graduation.
[ 45





46 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933


GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Mathematics and Foreign language will be required of those who
plan taking the four-year college course, while those who only plan
taking the two-year Teacher-Training course will be allowed to take
Education instead.
There will be a minimum requirement of four units of English
for graduation from the High School Department.
Physical Education will be required of all students.


COURSES OFFERED
NINTH GRADE ELEVENTH GRADE
1. English 1. English
2. Mathematics (Algebra) 2. Mathematics (Geometry)
3. Commercial Geography 3. Chemistry or Physics
4. Physical Geography 4. Spanish
5. Ancient History 5. English History
6. Industrial Geography 6. Fine Arts
7. General Science 7. Applied Arts
8. Latin I 8. Physical Education
9. Fine Arts
10. Applied Arts TWELFTH GRADE
11. Physical Education 1. English
2. Mathematics (Trig., Alg., or Arith.)
TENTH GRADE 3. American History
1. English 4. Civics
2. Mathematics (Algebra) 5. Problems of Democracy
3. Biology 6. Physics or Chemistry
4. Latin II 7. Spanish
5. World History S. Fine Arts
6. Fine Arts 9. Applied Arts
7. Applied Arts 10. Physical Education
8. Physical Education

CREDIT GIVEN ON EXAMINATION
CERTIFICATES IF VALID

One year of High School credit is allowed for any Second Grade
Certificate. Two years of High School credit is allowed for any
First Grade Certificate. None of the work accepted may go toward
credit in the Eleventh and Twelfth Grades of required work for High
School graduation. The equivalent to finishing Elementary School
is allowed for a Third Grade Certificate in lieu of possession of a
Certification of Graduation from some Elementary School of eight
grades.

No student shall become candidate for High School Graduation unless he or
she has done a minimum of sixteen units selected from the above list of courses.
No person will be graduated who does not take some form of Extension work
during the winter previous to application for graduation.




FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 47

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

ACADEMIC
EDUCATION
S. 1-2 Education. Offered as a requirement for those of the 12th
grade and those who plan to finish high school. A special
study of the History of Education and Elementary Psy-
chology.
ENGLISH
S. la English. An English course for the Ninth Grade, and
offered to those who have not had any high school English
at all. Much emphasis will be placed on introducing the
student to the study of High School English.
S. lb English. A course in English Literature for the Ninth
Grade.
S. 2a English. This course is for students in the Tenth Grade.
Much emphasis will be placed on grammar and composition
which will be very helpful to teachers of the State.
S. 2b English. This is a course in English Literature for the
Tenth Grade. Classics and selected Literature will be the
main objective.
S. 3a English Composition for the Eleventh Grade. Sentence in-
terpretation, paragraph construction and theme development.
S. 3b English Literature and Assigned Classics for the Eleventh
Grade.
S. 4a English. For beginners of Twelfth Grade English Compo-
sition and Rhetoric.
S. 4b English. English Literature and assigned classics for the
Twelfth Grade.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES
LATIN
S. 1 Latin. Fundamentals of Latin Grammar and composition.
S. 2 Latin. A second course in Latin composition and transla-
tion.
SPANISH
S. 1 Spanish. A beginner's course in Spanish. Fundamentals of
Grammar and Composition.





48 SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN, 1933

S. 2 Spanish. A continuation of Spanish S. 1 for those who have
already earned /2 unit in Spanish.


HISTORY
S. 1 Ancient History. A course in Ancient History for the
Ninth Grade. Other grades will be admitted.
S. 2 World History. Offered to students of the Tenth Grade.
S. 3 English History. For the Eleventh Grade.
S. 4 American History. Required of all persons before the com-
pletion of high school.
S. 5 History. A study of problems in American Democracy.

CIVICS
S. 6 Civics. A course required of all persons who hope to finish
high school and must be studied some time during the four
years of high school work.

GEOGRAPHY
S. 1 Commercial Geography. Offered the first half of the sum-
mer session. A course for the Ninth Grade. A study of
the underlying causes of economic distribution.
S. 2 Industrial Geography. A continuation of Geography S. 1
and offered the second half of the summer session. A course
in Industrial Geography.
S. 3 Physical Geography. A course in physical geography.


MATHEMATICS
S. la Mathematics. For beginners of Ninth Grade Algebra. The
main emphasis will be placed on algebraic operations with
special attention given to principles involving positive and
negative numbers, solution of equations and fundamentals
in general.
S. lb Mathematics. Continuation of Mathematics S. la and
offered to those students of algebra who have had only a
beginning in algebra.
S. 3a Mathematics. First half of plane geometry.




FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 49

S. 3b Mathematics. Second half of plane geometry.
S. 4 Solid Geometry. To be studied in the twelfth grade.
S. 5 Review Arithmetic. Designed to help those preparing for
Teachers' Examination. A complete review of 7th and 8th
Grade Arithmetic.


SCIENCES
The Summer High School Science includes General Science, Biol-
ogy, Physical Geography, Chemistry and Physics. These courses are
so reorganized that they will meet the demand of the students, prepar-
ing them particularly for higher courses whereby they may become
teachers of science, pre-medical students, etc.

GENERAL SCIENCE
A course for the Ninth Grade. Especially designed to acquaint
the pupil with principles and general laws of mechanics, light, heat,
sound, electricity and magnetism.

BIOLOGY
An introductory course to the study of plant and animal life,
giving the fundamental principles and phenomena of the living
world.
CHEMISTRY
A course designed to deal with those facts which figure most
conspicuously in daily life. Elements and their compounds, the
chemical laws and chemical processes are carefully studied from the
practical point of view.
PHYSICS
Open to 12th Grade and special students. An introductory
course leading to College Physics.


HOME ECONOMICS
The Home Economics Department will be open to 12th grade
students. Other high school students will be allowed to take instruc-
tions in this department only by special permission.
I. CLOTHING AND DESIGN.
II. FOODS AND NUTRITION.
III. ESSENTIALS OF GENERAL HOMEMAKING










GRADUATES


SUMMER SESSION, 1932

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Thornton Wesley Everett Janie Jackson Poe
Maudeste Thomas James Sadye Elizabeth Pryor
Martha Boyd McLendon William Wright Weatherspool

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Ruth Thomasina Bates Madelyn Enith Roberts
Callie Mae Colston Florence Carter Williams
Mattie Williams McPherson (Home Economics)

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Education)

Earl Alston Thelma Blake Price
Corinne Curry Alexander Clemmie Louise Ross
Thelma Elneta Collins Rosa Lee Rutland
Annie Lee Cooper Helena Lamont Sifontes
Mildred Ellerbe Carrie Bell Sims
Bertha Swift Fields Essie Gaffney Smith
Willie Ruth Harris Willie Speed
Ethel Beatrice Harris Maude Lever Stone
Eliza Powell Jones (revised Emily Corene Thomas
as of 1902) Lee Etta Thomas
Florida Louise Joyner Linnie Irene West
Rubiana Lillian Kirklin Annie Dennis Wheeler
Inez Peppers Lovett Sara Olie White (revised
Lillian Stirrup Mazon as of 1907)
Sylvia Mungen Elnora Elizabeth Williams
Ruth Bartley McLaughlin Emma Lula Williams
Norma Cleo Pinkney Geraldine Wilfort Young

HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE

Elmira Ashley Gertrude Beatrice Kinder
Rosa Asia Hulat Mitchell
Minnie Lee Brown Mality Mitchell
Mae Bell Carter Blanche Pierce
Pearl Crump Effiie Wells Pouncy
Georgia Gardner Sarah Smith
Dorothy Gillens Evelyn Stephens
Gladys Hamilton Hannah Taylor
Elzora Hunt Eddie Walton
Blanche Kennedy Lillie Young






[ 50 ]










































PRESS OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




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