• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Copyright
 State boards
 Staff
 Historical statement
 Courses
 Colleges and departments
 Information for negro teachers
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Extension Division Catalog-Bulletin Supplement High School, Normaland College. Series 22. Number 3.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000118/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Extension Division Catalog-Bulletin Supplement High School, Normaland College. Series 22. Number 3.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1930
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000118
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB0062

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    State boards
        Page 3
    Staff
        Page 4
    Historical statement
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Courses
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Colleges and departments
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Information for negro teachers
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text





^r Xl0rt:l a Xrio11ttral ma
Series 22 October, 1930 Number 3
Extension Division
Catalog-Bulletin Supplement
High School, Normal and College
J. R E. LEE, President
ENTERED AS SECOND CLASS MATTER, AUGUST 24, 1912AT THE POST
OFFICE, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA, UNDER ACT OF AUGU 24, 1912.
Published quarterly by the Florida Agricultural and Medanical College.





*
FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE PRESS
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
/
L-//





APPROVED BY STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
GOVERNOR DOYLE E. CARLTON, Chairman
HON. R. A. GRAY, Secretary of State
HON. W. S. CAWTHON, Superintendent
HON. F. H. DAVIS, Attorney General
HON. W. V. KNOTT, State Treasurer
Pres. J. R. E. Lee,
Florida A. & M. College,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I was glad to recieve your outline and proposed course for exten-
sion work in the College. The same has the approval of this office.
Trusting that great good will come from the inauguration of
this work, I am,
Yours sincerely,
W. S. CAWTHON, Superintendent.
SUPPORTED BY BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING
HON. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary (Tallahassee)
HON. P. K. YONGE, Chairman (Pensacola)
HON. F. J. WIDEMAN (West Palm Beach)
HON. A. H. BLANDING (Bartow)
HON. W. B. DAVIS (Perry)
HON. R. F. McGunuR (Orlando)
President J. R. E. Lee,
Florida A. & M. College,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
The Board of Control approved your plans for giving Extension
Course to the Public School Teachers of the State with the under-
standing that no College Funds be used in paying the expenses of
this course.
The Board requested me to inform you that the reason it objects
to College Funds being used to pay the expenses for this course is
due to the fact the College needs all available funds for its own work.
The Board desires to let you have the addition to the Science
Building erected by the Mechanic Arts Department of the College.
I will see you within a few days and give you more detailed informa-
tion regarding this work.
Yours very truly,
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Board of Control.
[3]





4 FLORIDA A. dE M. COLLEGE
ADMINISTRATION STAFF
J. R. E. LEE, A.B., A.M., LL.D., President
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.B., A.M., Dean
:'G. THURSTON WIGGINS, A.B., Director
A. L. KmD, A.B., A.M., Acting Director (for the year, 1930-1931)
year, 1930- 1931)
H. M. EFFERSON, A.B., A.M.
E. P. SOUTHALL, A.B., A.M.
G. DECougRSEY, B.S., Recording Secretary
'SusIE KELKER, Secretary
J. R. E. LEE JR., B.S., Treasurer
J. H. BLOW, Bookkeeper
L. M. FLEMING, A.B., Registrar
Instruction
G. THURSTON WIGGINS, A.B., Director_...- Social Sciences, Mathematics
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.B., A.M., Dean-..........- ------.-------........Education
A. L. KIDD, A.B., A.M., Acting Director .....-.- Political, Social Sciences
H. M. EFFERSON, A.B., A.M..... ........------- .-......----..--Mathematics
J. L. LANGHORNE, A.B.----- --------------- ----------------English
RALPH H. LEE, A.B.. ...-------------__.__-___ English
(Miss) EVELYN F. MANCE, B.S. .....----,. High School Mathematics
(Mrs.) J. R. PHILLIPS, A.B ....- .....--- --------------------- High School English
(Miss) MALISSA SYDES, B.S ... ....--------------- -Education, Social Sciences
E. P. SOUTHALL, A.B., A.M ..--------------------------History, Social Sciences
F. SMITH, A.B., A.M ..----------.-------------- -----.---------Languages, Education
L. A. MARSHALL, B.S., M.S...-.Teacher Training, Vocational Education
EMORY BIRCH, A.B ------------.. ---- ---- -- ---------- Biology
CULLEN S. HOLMES, A.B., M.S ...----------------.------------------------._Chemistry
A. P. SCOTT, B.S .---------------------------Vocational Education, Mathematics
G. DECOURSEY, B.S...---------------------.- ----------Economics, Social Sciences
(Miss) E. E. MATTHEWS, A.B., A.M .----.------.Practice Teaching, Lesson
Planning
(Miss) M. J. ANDERSON, B.S.-----------------------------High School Sciences
Cooperating Instructors
C. S. LONG, JR., A.B. ...---------------------__.-------. (Pensacola)
T. D. DANSBY, B.S .----------------...- ..------- ---- (Ocala)
C. G, WALKER, A.M .--------------.......- --__. --.-----(West Palm Beach)
J. ESPY, B.S ------ ----- ------------------------ --. (Miami)
*Year leave-of-absence, University of Chicago-General Education Board Scholar-
ship.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 5
HISTORICAL STATEMENT
Extension work was informally started at the A. & M. College in
the fall of 1925 with the consent of the State Department of Educa-
tion. R. O'Hara Lanier was the first director. Teachers for the
A. & M. College served as instructors without pay.
It was the sympathetic counsel of President Lee, the real father
of this type of work for Negroes in Florida, and his plea with the
Board of Control to recognize the same that gained the sanction of
the State.
It has been entirely self-supporting by the fees which have been
paid by the various students taking the work.
Growth of the Extension Division
1925-26 _--. .. -_. --- -2______ ---- _.. 229
1926-27 ------------------ 210
1927-28 -2------ -- .--- ------- --- 216
1928-29 .------------------ ---- --------- 263
.1929-30 --..__------- __----- ------_310 310
By the above table one may clearly see that the Extension Divi-
sion has grown year. by year. It is hoped that the year 1930-31 will
bring the enrollment up to at least 500. Witi the active coopera-
tion of all concerned, this coveted goal may easily be reached.
Progress in the Extension Division thus far may be attributed to
the following:
1. The interest and cooperation of the A. & M. College teachers
in offering their services free, of charge to the teachers.
2. The sympathetic cooperation of the County Superintendents
and other school officials.
3. The practical help which can be secured from the majority
of the courses given.
4. The credit given for Extension' Work toward graduation
from the regular departments of the school, High School, Normal and
College.
CHIEF OBJECTIVES OF EXTENSION WORK
1. The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is offering
to' the Negro teachers and citizens of Florida a chance to use the State
School and its equipment, corps of teachers and facilities for general
continued growth along educational and civic lines. This is the gen-
eral purpose.
2. To give the teachers of Florida a chance to shorten their
time in college, by building up credits for themselves.
3.' To allow' teachers of Florida to earn a livelihood while
studying.- .::'. '
*a r-pi-ofessional! improvement,





6 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
WHO MAY TAKE COURSES
Any person interested in Education, Teacher Training or Pro-
fessional Improvement may take the courses. It is not restricted
to teachers in service but to prospective, teachers and all interested
in education and professional improvement.
HOW TO START AN EXTENSION CLASS
Persons desiring to take Extension work should follow the recom-
mendations herein given.
1. Organize a group of ten interested persons into an extension
club; elect a secretary who will do all correspondence.
2. Write for information and explain details of organization.
5. Arrange a date when $5.00 fee should be paid to secretary
and application blanks filled out. Fees are to be sent directly to the
A. & M. College.
4. Select some date when all can be present when a representa-
tive from the College will be present to organize the class.
5. All notices, outlines and other information will be sent to
secretary of extension club.
6. Have the list of teachers and persons interested approved by
local County Superintendent.
7. Arrange for a place of meeting, preferably a school room.
CREDIT DEFINED
When an individual completes a course of study in a school cur-
riculum, he is then given recognition for the work done. This recog-
nition is explained in terms of Credits, Whether for High School,
Normal.or College,
High School Credit is Called the Unit.
Normal and College Credit is Called the Semester Hour.
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT
THE UNIT
In High School, credit is given in the form of units. To earn a
unit, one must study a high school subject a minimum of 32 weeks, S
five periods (45 minutes each) per week.
Sixteen such units are required for high school graduation. To
graduate from the Florida A. & M. College, High School Department,
one must earn 16 units in the following manner:





EXTENSION BULLETIN 7
REQUIRED UNITS
English ....-... -.- 4 Composed of:
A. History of American Literature and Readings.
B. English Literature and Readings.
C. High School Rhetoric and Composition.
D. Grammar.
E. Selected Classics.
Science .... ...... 2 Biology-Physics-General Science or Chemistry.
History .. ...... 2 World or European-Americal History and Civics.
Home Economics ---- 2
or Manual Arts
Foreign Language.... 2
or Education
Geography _---...._ 1 Commercial /,, Physical 2.
Mathematics _- 3 Algebra I and 2, Plane Geometry.
Elective .-....... 1 General Science, Chemistry.
Trigonometry,' Solid Geometry, History, Education.
THE SEMESTER HOUR
The unit of College Credit is the Semester Hour. Any subject
taken once per week for 16 or 18 weeks carries 1 semester hour of
credit. Laboratory, Art, Home Economics, Industries and ;Physical
Education, Military Science, Agricultural Field and Laboratory- courses
must operate two hours per week or 1 double period for one semester
hour College Credit.
One hundred twenty-four hours are required for college grade
uation. Four of which may be in-Physical Ediuation aid Military
Science.
GET A HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE FIRST, THEN TAKE
NORMAL AND COLLEGE WORK
COLLEGE GRADUATION
One.hundred and twenty-four semester hours are required for
college graduation. Complete description of itemized requirements
may be found by getting regular school catalogue, which will be furn-
ished upon request.
Four semester hours of Physical Education.
Two semester hours of Home Economics, Domestic Science, Man-
ual Art, Agriculture or Genetics.
Twelve hours of a foreign language-French, Spanish.
Twelve hours of English.
Eight hours of Physics.
Three hours of Economics.
Three hours of College Biology, Zoology or Botany.
Three hours of Sociolgy.
Six hours of College Algebra, Trigonometry.
.,Eighteen hours of Education, Psychology.
Six hours of U. S. History and U. S. Government.





8 FLORIDA A. FS M. COLLEGE
Others may be electives which must cover a major subject and a
minor. Thirty-Thirty-six hours in one group.
One hundred and twenty-four. Semester Hours required.
- Seventy-seven Specific required-semi-electives.
Forty-seven of Electives.
Specific information concerning graduation will be furnished up-
on request. '
TIME OF COLLEGE GRADUATION --
No person will be graduated in less than six summers, regardless
of previous credit. This must be in residence at the A. 8&M. College
with terms of not lest than eight weeks' each;. :Full residence of one
continued school year will be required of 'a applicants'after 192'.
(Those who register before this time will be exempted for 3,6-week
continued residence requirement.) This does'rit apply to A. & M.
College former students -o graduates who have spent one year here,
doing-College work or work of College grade. High school residence
requirement not accepted. i ,. ,,: "
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
, GROU SYSTEM OF GRADUATION
The group system of graduation sinmplyinieans that the work..of
the regular school year is subdivided into sections of- requirements'
which can be met by-summer school work 'and extension work.
. REGULATIONS A,-, -.: ,
1. Not more -thah one-third of the work can be done by Ex-
tension and Correspondence. No exceptions. '
2. The other two-thirds of the work offered for graduation
must be done in actual residence at the Florida A. & M. College.
3. Records from other summer schools, and other extension
courses will be considered a part of the work which may b' done by
extension, correspondence or elsewhere (one-third).
RESIDENCE REQLUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
All students who expect to finish the two-year NORMAL
COURSE by attending summer school alone may do so by spending
FOUR SUMMERS of EIGHT WEEKS each in residence at the Flor-
ida A. & M. College. This is a' IINIMUM requirement and will
be STRICTLY CARRIED OUT.' "
A MINIMUM OF Two SUMMERS FO R.H.IGH SCHOOL GRADUATION
To earn the A.B. or B.S. degree by college graduation,"one MUST
SPEND A MINIMUM OF EQRTY-EIGHT WEEKS IN RESI-
DENCE AT THE FLORIDA A.' 8'Xt. COLLEGE, above Normal
Graduation.
NOTE: These requirements are effective beginning with Sum-
mer School of 1930.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 9
NORMAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM OUTLINE
Two-Year Teacher-Training Course
PURPOSE
Elementary Schools Grades 1-8. In case there are persons who
desire to specialize in grades 1-3, Kindergarten, grades 4-8, Intermed-
iate or grades 7-9 may do so by devoting two-thirds of the time to
practice teaching in the grades of selection. One-third of the time
must be devoted to general practice teaching.
It is to be noted that all of the BASIC content subjects are taught
in the first year. Each person is required to take 2 years of some
ONE SUBJECT, for instance, History, Geography, Mathematics,
Science, Art, Public School Music or some other subject of specializa-
tion. This course is based on graduation from an accredited high
school.
Sixty-four (64) semester hours are required for graduation from
this course. Seventy (70) to seventy-five (75) hours constitutes the
minimum hours actually completed.
EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES BY EXTENSION ALONE
There will positively be no extension of certificates by Extension
Work Alone. Teachers MUST NOT TAKE THIS WORK EXPECT-
ING TO HAVE THEIR CERTIFICATES EXTENDED AT THE
CLOSE OF THE EXTENSION YEAR.
Extension Credits go toward graduation alone and not for the
extension of certificates.
TYPES OF EXTENSION WORK
Regular Extension Work:
1. Saturday and Evening Classes for credit toward graduation.
2. Reading Circle, Club Study, and Short Courses for Profes-
sional improvement only.
3. Bulletins of General Information and Educational Circulars.
4. Correspondence Division.
SELECTION OF INSTRUCTORS
The teachers are those who will be selected by President Lee and
the school to do this work. Only graduates of accredited schools
will be used. Minimum preparation of college degree required.
NO CREDIT FOR COURSES TAKEN UNDER PRIVATE
INSTRUCTION
Positively no credit will be allowed for any course taken under
some other instructor other than those operated directly by the
A. & M. College or the University of Florida.





10 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
NO CREDIT FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES BY
EXTENSION
English 100, 101, 102.
Laboratory Sciences.
Foreign Languages (French or Spanish) 100, 101, 102.
Mathematics 100, 101, 102.
These must be done in residence.
AMOUNT OF WORK ALLOWED AN INDIVIDUAL DURING
THE EXTENSION YEAR
COLLEGE CREDIT
No person will be allowed more than six (6) semester hours of
extension work during the extension year 1930-1931. This applies
to Normal and College work. No matter where taken, only six sem-
ester hours of credit will be accepted for the Extension year.
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT
One (1) High School unit, (Equivalent to six semester hours in
time only of Normal and College work) will be allowed the individual
during the Extension year 1930-1931. This work must be earned in
high school courses offered by the Florida Agricultural and Mechan-
ical College.
MEETINGS
There must be a minimum of 12 meetings 2 hours in length, or
24 meetings 1 hour in length with the Instructor in charge. Twelve
written assignments and a final examination are required before credit
is given. The Instructor in charge will suggest extra work as he sees
fit to make up hours to be added to bring the total to the minimum
requirement of 48 semester hours per subject. This requirement holds
for High School work as well as for Normal and College.
Full Extension Credit May Be Earned Without Extra Summer
School Work Providing the Above Requirement is Met.
LIBRARY READINGS AND NOTE-BOOKS
Library reading is a part of the Extension work. Every person
taking extension work will be asked to do a certain amount of work
of this type along with the regular Extension work. Where there are
localities without libraries, books may be.obtained from the Library
at the Florida A. & M. College.
A well-kept notebook will be asked of each person taking Ex-
tension work. No course will be complete without a good notebook
in keeping with the work as offered by the Instructor in charge.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 11
PRACTICE TEACHING REQUIREMENT OF INEXPERIENCED
AND EXPERIENCED TEACHERS
Practice Teaching will be required of all teachers until all have
demonstrated their ability to plan a lesson, manage a class, teach a
class, show efficiency in general methods in all of the subjects taught
in the elementary school. This cannot be satisfied by examination but
must be satisfied by supervised teaching in the demonstration school.
It is the desire that a teacher taking the Normal course, select
some one subject and specialize in that one subject for two years.
EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN
AGRICULTURE
The Agricultural Department of the Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical College is offering for the first time correspondence and
extension courses to the teachers of agriculture, county agents, and
others who are interested in professional and technical training.
A.- PURPOSES OF THE COURSES:
1. To give the teachers and agricultural workers of the state an
opportunity to use or make use of the state school, its equip-
.ment and teachers.
2. To train teachers in service by offering such courses that they
are in specific need of, and other general courses for related in-
formation and credit toward a Bachelor of Science Degree in
Agriculture.
3. To increase the educational efficiency of the teachers and to
encourage the teachers to investigate their immediate surround-
ing; activities, and be able to note improvements in other
communities.
B. PROPOSED METHODS FOR HANDLING THESE COURSES:
The following Methods will be used in carrying on this work:
1. Assigned reading in approved text books, and other material
will be made by the instructor in charge.
2. Monthly or weekly reports in form of discussions or outlines
will be required of each student.
3. Visitation: At least one visit by the instructor in charge to
some central point or points to interview, to hold a conference
or give final examination on work carried during the semester.
The final arrangements for the second semester's work can be
made during the Annual Vocational Conference of the teachers
or at the beginning of summer school.





12 FLORIDA A. I M. COLLEGE
4. Credit for surveys, or community studies, experiments or any
type of research work will be granted any student of senior
college rank. Suggestive subjects, outlines, forms, and score
cards, etc., for some of the subjects can be secured from the
instructor in charge.
REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION:
1. Standard classification sheets listing the subjects in which the
student is to be classified are signed in triplicate by the in-
structor in charge of Extension and Correspondence Courses
and the Dean of the Agricultural Department, then one of the'
sheets are forwarded to the Registrar, one filed in the Dean's
office, the other filed by the instructor in charge.
COLLEGIATE CREDIT:
All courses are of college grade and can be applied toward a
B.S. Degree in Agriculture. Each student will be limited to
a maximum of six credits per semester. (Exception to this
rule must have the specific approval of the Dean.) A total
of twelve credits can be made during the regular school term.
Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri-
culture. See the regular school catalogue.
2. Residence: At least sixteen weeks of residence work will be
required for graduation. This residence work may be done
during the regular term or during the Summer Sessions.
NOTE: Two-thirds of any course may be completed by extension or
correspondence work, and one-third must be finished during summer
school; that is, two hours of a three-hour course may be completed
away from the Florida A. & M. College, the third hour must be com-
pleted at the college.
FEES AND COSTS
The Extension Work as offered by the Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical College is entirely self-supporting. All operation of the
work is supported financially by the fees paid in by the persons taking
the work.
REGISTRATION FEE
Registration fee is Five ($5.00) Dollars, payable in advance.
INCIDENTAL FEES
The amount of incidental fees paid by the individual taking the
work depends upon the cost of operation. This is a uniform fee for
all, and covers the cost of traveling of the Instructors, the paying of
Resident Instructors and such materials as may be needed by the De-
partment from time to time.
Prompt Payments of All Fees is Urged to Make the Work A
Success.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 13
COURSES IN LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Suggested Two-year Curriculum for Training Teachers for
Elementary Schools
PURPOSE
The general purpose of courses in liberal arts and sciences is
to furnish a cultural education, prepare teachers of high school sub-
jects and provide the group with leaders in the religious, social and
educational fields. The aim is to provide the State of Florida with
college prepared men and women, who have the vision of service for
their country, state and community..
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
English 101 .--....... 3......... 3 3 English -.3.........--......-.. 3
(a) Grammar Composition
(b) Composition Rhetoric
Principles of College Geography_.3 3 Human Geography -.-...__.3........ 3
Biology 101 _----..._-... -------. --5 3 History (American)_ .-.. -3... __.. 3 3
Music (double hours) ..________ 2 1 Art' or Mus., Arith., or
Drawing (double hours) ......-..- 2 1 Writing (double) ---_-.-- 2 1
Physical Edu. (double hours) ..--.2 1 Educational Psychology......--.._-_3 3
Education 101 .....__- -......--- 3 1 Biology (continued) or
United States History 101.___..3 3 Nature Study._..---...... --.--...5 3
Arithmetic -_..... --._.__3........ 3 Physical Education -.........----- 2 1
TOTAL.. -.-----............ 19 TOTAL _......._....-...... 17
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
English Literature .-... __3..... 3 English Literature for Children..._3 3
Education 103 ........- ___....._.. 3 3 Electives:
U. S. Government Constitution Art 2 --...........2..... or 3 2 or 3
and Adv. Civics and Music 2 --......._- 2 or 3 2 or 3
Citizenship .-...3.. ...----.....3.3 3 Writing 2 --.------.. 2 or 3 2 or 3
Practice Teaching --.._.......- 10 3 1. History
Education-Methods of Teaching 2. Biology
in Elem. School Subjects.. ... 3 3 3. Geography of Europe
Physical Education ......-/2..... -._. 4. Mathematics
Continued Electives: Practice Teaching -.........-.. 10 3
1. History Oral and Silent Reading -. --_-.... -2 2
2. Geography of N. America Educational Psychology or
3. Advanced Algebra ....-_.... 3 3 Child Psychology ......... __.. 3 3
4. Art, Music, Writing, Biology Health Education, Educational
Hygiene and Phy. Ed.___... 2 2
Manual Training, and Industrial
Arts .-..........._.- ---------- 2 1
Outline of the Normal Course of Study By Extension and
Summers
A person taking this course may transfer to the four-year course
leading to Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education without loss
of time and graduate in the required four years.





14 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
SUMMER ONE SUMMER FOUR
Credit Credit
Education 101 _-....... -----..------ --_.3 Literature for Teachers ---_3........ --... 3
Biology 101 _----........... .. 3... .... Government and Citizenship ._... -3..... 3
English 101a ....... --.--_ -----3 Physical Education ---_ ..............-_ 2
Art 101 ......- --.............. ___.._2 Education (Hygiene-Health Ed.) --.---- 3
Music 101 .-...... -- --......- 2 -
Physical Education 101 ..__ .......-_ -2 TOTAL ...-.................- _--11
TOTAL .---_----- ---15
SUMMER TWO SUMMER FIVE
Education _.... ...__... __---------......3.....3
American History -.---.. --.._.... -3 Oral and Silent Reading .. --...._ --------.3
Educational Psychology -..............---..3 Biology or Nature Study --....2...... .. .2
Principles of Geography --...... ---.... 3 Elective ..--............ ----- --_3...3
Advanced Arithmetic .__..-----_------ 3 Writing -_ _...._ -- _-_ --- 0....
English 101b _---.. ...................- -3 Physical Education .. .-----._........ .1
TOTAL (hours) ---_...... _-..... 15 TOTAL ......--.__...._.._....._ 12
SUMMER THREE SUMMER SIX
Education 103 _---_.---........... .3-- --3 Theory and Practice of Teaching ...._6
Elective ---.....-......---3..-- Physical Education .-__ ........... 2
Manual Training and Ind. Arts __... 2 English- ----- __3
English -. -.. .---------------- ------- 3 Industrial Arts, Manual Training........ 3
Physical Education -...-..............--_ Elective
TOTAL ._ ...._.....-- .... 11 TOTAL _-............__--_.._.. 14
See regular catalog for four-year course outlines and descriptions.
The hours are distributed as follows:
I. Academic
Credit Industrial Arts --_...--..._..-. ._..1_
English .---.....9---........._.- -9 Drawing -. _--....--_......-_ .... --. 2
Science .-..-_ -_.............. -_ 6 Music ...2....--.....-.........-..-- 2
Geography ......-.........---- --- -6 Physical Education ---..._-_.. ..... .'4
Social ..--...--_.......--__.... _9 Reading --...... ....2..........
TOTAL --..._-.......... .....30 TOTAL --- ..._......- ..---... 12
II. Semi-Acadamic and Semi-Professional III. Professional
Arithmetic _------_- ------ ------....3 Educational Psychology ....-----------_3
C. Lit. ._ .3--._-.. ..-__.........- 3 Introduction to Education _.......-. _3
N. Study -_-.....-...........-- 2--- -- 2 Classroom Management ---..3-----------------. 3
Health .---..-. .....------------_ ..2 Practice Teaching --_.._...... .....----- 6
TOTAL__ ..............-...10 TOTAL .-_..... ....-...... 15
*IV. Electives
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Students deficient in spelling will be required to take spelling un-
til proficient.
Students deficient in oral expression will be required to take such
courses as may be required to build up this deficiency.
Students deficient in writing will be required to make a certain
grade in writing by standard scale.
The final judgment of the ability to teach and conduct a class
will determine final graduation.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 15
AGRICULTURAL COURSES
PURPOSE
The Agricultural courses offered by extension and summers are
planned to meet the needs of the teachers engaged in giving instruc-
tion to the pupils of the rural communities and to persons who are
located where agricultural interests will prove beneficial. The work
is also organized to give credits toward high school graduation as well
as college credits leading to the B.Sc. degree in Agriculture.
Outlint of the Agricultural Course of Study By Extension and
Summers
SUMMER ONE SUMMER TWO
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Agronomy 101 --.....-....... 4 3 Educational Psychology ---------.... 3 3
English 101a --....3........----------.3 3 Landscape Gardening ......-..... --4 3
Poultry 101 .......-...-......... -- 4 3 Dairying 101 -..4............_._.- 4 3
Rural Economics -............. .3--- 3 Vocational Education 101.. .--.4.. 3
Horticulture 101 .-..............--. _4 3 Agricultural Engineering 201 ....-4 3
TOTAL...----.......-..... ..18 15 TOTAL ............-..... 18 15
SUMMER THREE SUMMER FOUR
General Botany 101 .....--4... 3 General Chemistry 102 .-..-..... 7 5
Agronomy 102 --.....-. --...- _4... 3 Rural Sociology 204--- ......_ 3.... 3 3
Horticulture 202: ..........._--. ---4 3 Education 214 ........--_........... 3 3
English -- ..--.............------ 3 3 Elective .....-.--......... --.... --. 2 2
TOTAL-. _1................. 15 12 TOTAL -..._.............15 13
SUMMER FIVE SUMMER SIX
General Chemistry 101 ..--..7...... 7 5 Agricultural Chemistry 105_ .-. -7 5
Farm Mathematics 101 ....-- 2 2 Agricultural Education 205__.__ _3 3
Agricultural Education 204 _.._. -2 3 History of Agriculture .------... --3 3
Elective .-...................2....... 2 Elective .......-..--..---- ....-3 3
TOTAL .--.....--..-__. 14 12 TOTAL .._ ..-......... .16 14
DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
PURPOSE
The courses are planned to meet the needs of three types of stu-
dents:
1. Those who expect to be special leaders in this field of work.
2. Those preparing to teach.
3. Those wishing a general knowledge in home-making.
Advanced students are permitted to major in subjects of greater
interest to them. A major consists of not less than thirty hours of
work.
Outline of Normal Home Economics Course of Study By
Extension and Summers
FIRST YEAR
- FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Nutrition------........ 2-... 2 Foods and Nutrition...------ ---.. .--. -2
Textiles and Clothing --.... --........ 2 Textiles and Clothing .............. -- 2
Education 101 ...-. --_.._..------3 English -...--..--------...... 3
English ..---....._._ ... .......3.. 3 Household Chemistry .----3...---.......- 3
Chemistry _---............3 General Science ........--.....---..... 3
General Science or Biology _.. ...-...... 3 Methods of Teaching H.E.........----3
Physical Education .-__......-..-- 1 Physical Education ..-----------..... ... 1





16 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Dietetics ....-_. ..... 2 Foods and Dietetics .._ ..3............. .3
Textiles and Clothing ...3......... __ 3.. Textiles and Clothing ...-._-- _..._.. --3.
English .._....____ ......-....--___3 English ..._ .....__--.......-..... .3..
Educational Psychology ._ ..3-------.3 Practice Teaching and Observation.__..3
Home Management .--__ .._..--2..........2 Child Care and Training ......-__. ___.. -3
Handicraft ....._- ...... ......--._ 2 Rural Economics ... ......_._. _._.
Physical Education ...---.-- __1 Physical Training _--......._.......-.. -1
Constitution -.._...._.--.. .. .........2





EXTENSION BULLETIN 17
THE COLLEGE
DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Description of Courses
EDUCATION
The courses in Education are intended to provide professional
training, experience and content in the Science of Education to pro-
duce master teachers.
E 101 Introduction to the Study of Education and Teaching. Re-
quired of all Normal graduates.
Texts (Suggested) (Optional): Cubberley-Introduction to
Education.
Clapp-Chase-Merriman-Introduction to Education.
Frazier f Armentrout-Introduction to Education.
Judd-Introduction to Education.
Rugg iS Shumaker-The Child Centered School.
Avent-Beginning Teaching.
Almack es The Beginning Teacher.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 102 Principles of Education. Required of all normal and col-
lege graduates who have had high school work in education.
Texts (Suggested) (Optional): Bachman-Principles of Ele-
mentary Education.
Chapman rf Counts-Principles of Education.
Gates d Thorndike-Principles of Elementary Edu-
cation.
Thomas-Principles and Technique of Teaching.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 419 History of Education. A first course developing the history
of education from the earliest times to the present. A re-
quired course for all persons who elect education for high
school requirements. Two (2) units maximum credit in
lieu of two advanced units of mathematics, trigonometry,
advanced algebra and solid geometry.
Text: Boyer-History of Education.
Credit, / unit. (High School Course.)
E 299 Sex Education and Social Hygiene. This is a special course
in the study of the whole problem of sex education and social
hygiene, fostered by the American Social Hygiene Associa-





18 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
tion of New York. Special attention will be given to the
adolescent phase of hygiene.
Texts: Galloway-Sex and Social Health,
Galloway-Biology of Sex,
Gruenberg-Sex Education for parents.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 300 The Principalship. This course is designed to be of assist-
ance to the principal in his work and is directly under the
supervision of the State Department of Education. It is
divided into four parts. Part I--Organization; Part II-
Administration; Part III-Social Activities (a) Extra-cur-
ricula activities and Part IV-Supervision.
Texts: Cubberley-The Principal and His School,
Kyte-How to Supervise,
Robert Hill Love-A Work Book for Principals and
Supervisors.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 311 Principles of Secondary Education and Psychology of High
School Subjects. This course is intended for high school
teachers and principals who are candidates for the B.S. in
education specializing in secondary education.
Texts (Optional): Judd-Psychology of High School Sub-
jects,
Douglas-Secondary Education,
Proctor-The Junior High School.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 108 Vocational and Educational Guidance. A special course de-
signed to help the student find his of her place in the scheme
of economic participation.
Texts: Proctor-Principles of Vocational Guidance,
Cohen-Principles and Practices of Vocational Guid-
ance.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 416 Lesson Planning. This is a course in the development of
lesson plans in all of the school subjects. It is intended
for persons not majoring in Education but who need to have
the general principles well before them. Notebook required.
Credit, 1 semester hour.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 19
E 109 Principles of Aesthetics. A course in the valuation of pic-
tures for school work.
Text: (To be selected.)
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 210 Educational Sociology. A first course in the application of
the principles of sociology to education.
Texts: Smith-Principles of Educational Sociology,
Peters-Educational Sociology (rev. ed).
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 110 The Parent-Teacher Association. A special course introduc-
ing the various phases of parent-teacher work. (This course
will be offered in co-operation with the National Congress
of Parent-Teacher Associations and local branches.)
Text: Mason-The Parent-Teacher Association.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
ECONOMICS
The general aim of the courses in Economics is to give the stu-
dents some knowledge of the essential details of American economic
development; the advance of agriculture; the expansion of manufac-
tures consequent on the substitution of machinery and factory organ-
ization for the domestic handicrafts; the service rendered to commerce
by steam, the telegraph, electricity, trade unions and their develop-
ments, etc.
E 101 Introductory Economics. This course is a study of wealth
and the fundamental principles underlying all business with
reference to the industrial development of the United States.
This is an introductory course required of all candidates for
degress, and majors in Political and Social Sciences.
Texts: Williamson-Introduction to the Study of Education,
Sager-Economics,
Taylor-Economics.
E 102 Labor Problems. A study of the social philosophy, the eco-
nomic program and the political platform of organized labor
in the United States.
E 103 Fundamentals of Real Estate. A study of the influences
which determine real-estate operations, and a discussion of the
fluctuations in real-estate values from the point of view of
the practical realtor.
ENGLISH
The general aim of the courses in.English is to give the students





20 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
command of the art of communication in speech and writing. Spe-
cifically, the student should be taught (1) to write clear and gramat-
ically correct sentences and paragraphs; (2) to present his ideas dis-
tinctly and effectively in formal and in informal discussions.
E 201 History of English Literature. The aim of the course is to
give the student a general knowledge of the development
of English Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period until the
present time.
Text: Cunliffe, Pyre & Young-Century Readings in English
Literature,
Reference: Neilson e4 Thorndike-History of English Litera-
ture.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 202 American Literature. This course is a study of American
prose and poetry, with the aim of tracing chronologically
the development of the literature.
Text: Patte-Century Readings in American Literature.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 203 Children's Literature. A course designed to acquaint pros-
pective teachers with the literature of the primary grades
and to familiarize them with the telling of children's stories.
Text: Clippinger-Children's Literature.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 301 Journalism. The course in journalism is designated to give
the student instruction and practice in newspaper writing
and editing.
Text: (To be selected.)
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 305 American Negro Literature. This course offers a study of
the works of the foremost American Negro poets, novelists,
and essayists. Special study is given to the works of con-
temporary American Negro writers.
Text: Calverton, V. F., (ed.)-Anthology of American
Negro Literature.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Description of Courses
1. PROFESSIONAL:
(a) Agricultural Education E 204. Methods of teaching Agri-
culture. Credit, 3 hours.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 21
(b) Agricultural Education E 101. Introduction to Vocational
Education. Credit, 3 hours.
(c) Agricultural Economics E 201. Farm Management and
Farm Organization. Credits, 3 hours.
(d) Rural Sociology E 204. Leadership. Credit, 3 hours.
(e) Rural Education E 204. Community Problems, and Research.
Credits, 3-6 hours.
(f) Rural Sociology E 205. Community Organization. Credit,
3 hours.
2. TECHNICAL:
(a) Agronomy E 101. Field Crops. Credit, 3 hours.
(b) Horticulture E 201. Truck Crops. Credit, 3 hours.
(c) Chemistry E 105. Soils and Fertilizers, Experimental or Re-
search. Credits, 3-6 hours.
3. LIST OF SUGGESTIVE RESEARCH PROBLEMS:
(a) A study of the rural schools of some county in Florida.
(b) The effect of Sodium Nitrate or Fertilizers on the Yield of
crops.
(c) Cooperative marketing among Negroes in Florida.
(d) The cost of establishing and operating a county training
school in Florida.
THE DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
Description of Courses
E 301 Nutrition. Nutritive value of foods in relation to body re-
quirements and varying incomes. A study of digestion un-
der certain conditions of health diets for all ages.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
E 302 Home Management. A study of the efficient use of time
and money in conducting the affairs of the home. Care,
furnishing, budgeting, standards of living and social relation-
ships of family.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
E 404 Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A study of meth-
ods in home economics instruction, making lesson plans,
organization of courses of study, equipment and teaching
problems.
Credit, 2 semester hours.





22 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION
Description of Courses
This division is open for those who have not as yet finished
their high school work, but desire to do so by extension and summer
work. It is also open to those who are doing Normal work but have
never met the requirements for high school graduation.
GENERAL AGRICULTURE
1 General Agriculture. A general course in animal and plant
production for the student not specializing in agriculture, but
who wishes a general knowledge of the subject.
Text: (To be selected.)
Credit, 3 semester hours.
MATHEMATICS
The Mathematics division for High School will attempt to offer
a wide variety of courses through the extension department this fall
so as to meet as far as possible the needs of the teachers in service. No
course in mathematics will be offered unless ten (10) or more desire
to take the work.
1-10 Seventh and Eighth Grade Arithmetic. A thorough study of
Junior High School Arithmetic as taught in the 7th and 8th
Grades.
Text: Hamilton-Essentials of Arithmetic For Higher Grades.
20 Beginners Algebra for the Ninth Grade. It is a complete study
of positive and negative, numbers, parenthesis, simple problems
requiring the use of equations and the like. Prerequisite:
Mathematics 1 and 10.
Text: Wells LS Hart-Modern First Course in Algebra (Revised,
1928).
30 Tenth Grade Algebra. A continuation of the algebra for 9th
grade.
Text:Wells Hart-Modern Second Course in Algebra (Re-
vised, 1929).
40 Geometry for Tenth or Eleventh Grades. For those who are
beginning Plane Geometry, and may be taken either in the 10th
or 11th Grades.
Text: Clark e Otis-Modern Plane Geometry (1929).
50 Beginners Trigonometry for Twelfth Grade. Those who hope
to major in mathematics upon entering college take this course.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 23
Text: Wentworth d Smith-Plane Trigonometry and Tables
(1914).
51 Solid Geometry. To be studied in the 12th Grade.
Text: Clark d; Otis-Modern Solid Geometry (1928).
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL GEOGRAPHY
This course offers an inductive approach to principles of world
wide interest, treating them broadly in terms of their ways of affecting
man and his manner of living. Physical features of the United States
are carefully reviewed, together with a careful study of the plant and
animal life thereof, showing how the one influences the other.
Text: Albert P. Brigham-Commercial Geography.
ENGLISH
E 1 English. Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Composition.
Seventh Grade.
Text: Elson-Good Engilsh (Book II).
E 10 English. Readings from. selected materials. Spelling,
Grammar and Composition. Eighth Grade.
Text: Elson-Good English (Book IV).
E 20 English. Grammar, Composition and selected readings.
Ninth Grade.
Text (for Composition Work):Denny d Skinner-Our Eng-
lish (1926).
Text (for Literature): Greenlaw, Elson LS Keck-Literature
and Life (Book I).
30 English. Grammar reviews and composition. Literature and
selected readings. Tenth Grade.
Text( for Grammar and Composition): Tanner-Correct Eng-
ligh (1928).
Text (for Literature): Greenlaw, Miles & Stratton-Literature
and Life (Book II).
40 English. Grammar, Composition and Literature. Eleventh
Grade.
Texts: Tanner-Composition and Rhetoric.
Greenlaw dq Miles-Literature and Life (Book III).
50 English. Twelfth Grade. Composition and Literature.
Texts: Tanner-Composition and Rhetoric,
Greenlaw s Miles-Literature and Life (Book IV).
51 English. For High School Commercial students in the Twelfth
Grade.
Text: John B. Vandyke-The English of Commerce (1928).





24 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
FOREIGN LANGUAGES
French for High School beginners will be offered in the Eleventh
Grade to those who wish to offer it as their Foreign language require-
ment.
40 French. Fundamentals of French grammar and composition.
Text: W. H. Grosjean-The New Chardenal (1929).
1 Latin. Fundamentals of French grammar and composition.
Text: Ullman d Henry-New Elementary Latin.
10 Latin. A second course in Latin composition and translation.
Text: Ullman Henry-Second Latin Book (Revised, 1929).
40 Spanish. A beginner's course in Spanish. Fundamentals of
grammar and composition.
Text: L. A. Wilkins-Ne First Spanish Book (1925).
50 Spanish. A continuation of Spanish 40 for those who have al-
ready earned one unit in Spanish.
Text: L. A. Wilkins-New Second Spanish Book (1926).
HISTORY
21 Ancient History. For the Ninth Grade. A study of the
Ancient World.
Text: McKinley, Howland d Dann-World History in the
Making.
30 World History. Offered to students of the Tenth Grade.
Text: Barnard f Roorbach-Epoch of World Progress.
40 European History. For the Eleventh Grade.
SCIENCES
20 General Science. To give the student an appreciation of science
and familiarize him with scientific laboratory work, which
will be principally demonstrated. Discussion of common prac-
tical problems. For Ninth Grade.
Text: Wood & Carpenter-Our Environment, How We Use
and Control It.
Manual: Wood &i Carpenter.
1 Hygiene. Training in the fundamental laws and the rules of
health. Very practical course conducted by trained nurse.
Seventh Grade.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 25
2 Physiology. Devoted to a theoretical and pictorial study of
cells, tissues, and organs of the human anatomy. A detailed
study is made of bone and osseous tissue. The relation be-
tween Physiology and Hygiene and the care of organs, special
senses and their functions are dealt with in the latter portion
of this course.
1 Nature Study. For High School Students. This course will
be in the nature of simple botanical studies, entomology, and
ornothology. Students will be taught to differentiate between
common plants, insects, birds and animals, and learn of their
economic importance to man.
4 < *





26 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
MISCELLANEOUS EXTENSION COURSES
EDUCATION
E 105 a Education. Elementary School Teaching. Concepts in the
elementary grades, the place of drill, kind and amount of for-
mal standardized tests and scales. Formulating the curricu-
lum on the basis of social conditions and needs.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 208 Education. Child Study and Psychology. The application
of psychology to child life. The learning process and per-
sonality adjustment, learning and living effectively. Intend-
ed primarily for those interested in Primary Education.
Recommended to Parent-Teachers Associations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
310 Education. Test and Measurements. A scientific study of
tests and measurements as applied to school subjects and
intelligence. Class room problems involving measurements
will be used as laboratory work.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
PHILOSOPHY
E 301 Philosophy. Principles of Ethics. Study of the standards
of human conduct treating of such subjects as goodness,
happiness, virture, duty, freedom, civilization and progress.
A study is also made of social and economic problems as they
affect private and public morals.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
E 201 Philosophy. Introduction to Philosophy. An approcah to
the study of Philosophy through its historical presentation in
Greece and its consequent development.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
ENGLISH
101 Freshman Composition. Required of all first-year college
students. The aim of this course is to train the student to
express himself in clear and concise language. Special em-
phasis is placed upon the writing of expository themes,, the
construction of sentences and paragraphs, correct usage, the
taking of notes, letter writing, spelling, punctuation, etc.
Credit, semester hours.
Texts: Wooley-New Handbook of Composition,
Slater-Freshman Composition.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 27
206 Business English. A thorough and intensive review of gram-
mar. Introduction to form and mechanical routine of letter
writing. Theory and practice in business letter writing,
informal inquiries and reports.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
304 The American Short Story. A study of the development of
the American short story from its origin to the present is
offered in this course. The reading of numerous short stories
from each of the principal American short story writers is
required.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
HISTORY
101 History of Civilization. This is an introductory course to
the study of History. It traces the development of institu-
tional and cultural life from prehistoric and primitive civil-
ization to the period of Medievalism.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Thorndikes-Short History of Civilization.
203 History of the United States, 1492-1828. A study of the
development of the American Colonies, and of the rise of
Nationalism.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Bassett-History of the United States.
204 History of the United States, 1829-1930. This course is a
continuation of History 203. Due consideration is given to
the political and constitutional growth of the nation. Pre-
requisite: History 203.
Credit, 3 semester hours.,
SOCIOLOGY
102 Sociology-Community Organization. A study of the na-
ture and structure of the community and the development of
community ideals and development. Especially designed for
Parent-Teachers Associations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
203 Sociology. Child Welfare. A study of environmental con-
ditions which promote the interest of all children in the com-
Credit, 3 semester hours.





28 FLORIDA A. g M. COLLEGE
INFORMATION FOR NEGRO TEACHERS
Courtesy: State Department of Education-Mrs. W. S. Cawthon and Miss Lois Stuckey
Everyone who teaches in Florida must hold a valid Florida certificate covering at
least the subjects which he or she teaches.
Certificates issued in other states cannot be transferred to Florida.
Teachers of other states desiring to teach in Florida should send their applications
to County Superintendents. This Department does not conduct a placement bureau.
We have no voice in the employment of teachers.
Schools usually open about September 1, while some smaller schools and rural
districts have shorter terms. Salaries and length of term are fixed by County School
Boards and therefore vary in different counties.
CERTIFICATES BY EXAMINATION
Three Uniform examinations are held each year in each county seat in the State,
beginning on the first Thursday of February and June, and on the third Thursday of
September. We issue the following grades of certificates upon examination: Primary,
Third Grade, Second Grade, First Grade, Professional and S-ecial.
Subjects required for Primary Certificate are: Reading, Arithmetic, English Gram-
mar, Composition, Geography and United States History, including the Constitution of
the United States, Nature Study, Drawing, Manual Arts, School Singing and the ele-
ments of Psychology. The average grade required for the certificate is 80, minimum,
60. A Primary Certificate is valid for teaching only the first, second and third grades of
a regular graded school of not less than four teachers. Life of certificate is four years.
Examination fee, $2.00.
The subjects for a Third Grade Certificate are: Orthography, Reading, Arithmetic,
English Grammar, Composition, Geography, United States History, including Consti-
tution of U. S.; Physiology and Theory and Practice of Teaching; average required, 70,
minimum, 50; valid for one year. Examination fee, $1.00.
Subjects for Second Grade are those required for a Third and also Agriculture,
Civil Government; the average grade required is 80, the minimum, 60. A Third
or Second Grade Certificate is valid for teaching in the first eight grades only. Life
of certificate, three years.. Examination fee, $1.50.
The subjects included in a First Grade are those required for a Second Grade,
also Biology, Psychology, General History, Rhetoric and Algebra; average grade re-
quired, 85, minimum, 60; valid for five years and for teaching in the first ten grades.
Examination fee, $2.00.
Subjects required for a Professional Certificate are those included in a First Grade
and also English Literature, Plane Geometry, a foreign language, History and Principles
of Education, School Admin:stration and the school laws of Florida. Average grade
received, 85; minimum,60. This certificate is valid for teaching in all grades of the
High School only those subjects named herein. Applicants must give satisfactory evi-
dence of having completed four years of High School work unless they have held a
Florida certificate prior to July 1, 1924. Life of certificate, five years. Examination
fee, $2.00.
Special certificates are issued upon examination in groups of subjects as follows:
1. Mathematics: Arithmetic, Algebra Geometry and Trigonometry.
2. English: Grammar, Composition, and Rhetoric, English and American Litera-
ture.
3. Science: Agriculture, Physics or Chemistry, Biology.
4. Foreign Languages: Latin, German, Greek, French, Spanish (any two).
5. History: American, including the Constitution of the United States, General
English and Geography.
6. Bookkeeping: Bookkeeping. Commercial Law, Commercial Arithmetic.
7. Stenography: Shorthand, Typewriting, English Grammar.
8. Music: Harmony, Public School Music.
9. Industrial Arts: Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing.
10. Home Economics: Domestic Science, Domestic Art.
Special Certificates are good for teaching in all grades of the High School only
those subjects covered by the certificate; life of certificate, five years.
An applicant for special certificate must give satisfactory evidence of graduation
from a four-year High School or its equivalent and of the completion of two years of
additional work in the subjects to be included in the Special Certificate, unless the ap-
plicant held a Florida certificate prior to July 1, 1924. Examination fee, $2.00.
EXEMPTIONS
An applicant for a Second Grade Certificate who holds a valid Third Grade Cer-
tificate may be exempt from examination on subjects of Orthography, Reading, and
Physiology, provided the average of this group is 80 per cent, with no grade below 60
per cent. If average is less than 80 per cent, exemption will be given only on sub-
jects with grade of 80 per cent, each.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 29
An applicant for a First Grade Certificate- who holds a valid Second Grade Cer-
tificate may be exempt on all subjects covered by the certificate held, provided that
average is 85 per cent or more. If the average is less than 85 per cent, exemption may
be claimed on each subject with grade of 85 per cent, or more. (Exemption can not be
given on Algebra on a Second Grade issued under law of 1923.)
An applicant for a Primary Certificate who holds a valid Third Grade certificate
will be exempt on the academic subjects covered provided that the grade on that sub-
ject is 80 per cent, or more. An applicant for a Primary Certificate who holds a valid
First or Second Grade certificate will be exempt on the academic subjects covered by
the certificate held, provided the average grade of that group is 80 per cent, or more.
An a plicant for a Professional Certificate who holds a valid First Grade Certificate
may be exempt on all subjects covered by the certificate held.
Examination questions are not based upon any particular texts.
Prinicples of High Schools must hold either a Graduate State or a Professional
Certificate.
CERTIFICATES ON GRADUATION
Regulations Relative to Graduate Certificates
Graduate State Certificates are issued upon record of graduation from standard
universities, colleges and normal schools. An application blank for a certificate upon
diploma will be sent upon request. These certificates are based on the following law:
Chapter 9122, Acts of 1923, Amended 1927
Sec. 12. A Graduate State Certificate valid for five years from date of issue and
authorizing the holder thereof to teach all subjects upon which he specialized in his
college or normal course, shall be issued to any regular graduate of a standard college
requiring the com letion of a four-year course for graduation, or a standard normal
school or junior college requiring the completion of a four-year course for graduation,
or a standard normal school or junior college requiring the completion of a two-year
course for graduation upon the fulfillment of the following requirements:
1. The application must be made on a form prescribed by the State Department
of Public Instruction.
2. The applicant must file satisfactory testimonials and a statement of health and
character and at the same time pay a fee of $3.00.
3. A complete transcript of the applicant's High School record and College or
Normal School record must be filled by the President, Registrar or Dean of the Col-
lege or Normal School in the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction
upon the request of that officer and on a form prescribed by his office. The said
transcript must show that the applicant attended the institution for the full time re-
quired to complete the course pursued, or that he completed a part of such course in
another standard institution; the transcript must also show that the applicant devoted
three-twentieths of his time to the study of Education; provided that in lieu of such time
devoted to this subject a teaching experience of twenty-four months may be accepted.
RANGE OF GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
In general, graduates of standard institutions who have met all other requirements
are certified as follows:
1. A graduate of a standard four-year college is certified to teach all elementary
subjects through the eighth grade; and the subjects in which he has specialized through
the twelfth grade.
2. A graduate of a standard two-year college is certified to teach all elementary
subjects through the eight grade; and the subjects in which he has specialized through
the tenth grade.
3. Provision is made for the certification of a graduate of any standard institution
that offers a highly specialized type of training.
A graduate from a standard two-year, or three-year course in which approximately
fifty per cent of the credit is in one subject will be certified to teach that subject, only,
through the twelfth grade.
SPECIALIZATION REQUIRED
P)^~~ ~In order that an applicant for a Graduate certificate may be certified to teach a
given subject above the eighth grade, it is necessary that this transcript show at least
twelve semester hours college credit in that subject with a reasonable high school back-
ground in that subject.
CERTIFICATE ON ADDITIONAL SUBJECTS
If the holder of a Graduate State Certificate desires to teach a subject not listed
on the face of his certificate, he may secure enough additional college credits in the sub-
ject to bring his total number of semester hours in that subject up to the minimum re-
quirement, which is twelve semester hours.
(Before beginning courses with a view to adding subjects to the face of the cer-





30 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
tificate, the holder of a Graduate State Certificate should consult the State Department
of Public Instruction on his particular case.) When the required additional credits
have been secured, the certificate should be sent in to the State Department with the
request that the credits be added. (A change on a certificate must be made by the
State Department.)
EARLY GRADUATION FROM COLLEGES NOW STANDARD
The minimum requirement for a Graduate State Certificate is graduation from a
standard college, or normal school which at the time of the, applicant's graduation re-
quired for graduation not less than two years' attendance (sixty semester hours' credit
beyond and the completion of a standard four-year high school course).
An applicant who graduated from a college that is now standard before present
entrance requirements were in force, should by summer school attendance and exten-
sion work, secure enough additional credit to be granted a standard diploma, and then
secure a Graduate State Certificate. (The Florida A. & M. College first required four-
year high-school graduation (16 units) for entrance in 1917.)
REQUIREMENTS AS TO THE EXAMINATION ON THE
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
An examination on the Constitution of the United States is required of every ap-
plicant for a certificate, who has not already satisfied the requirements of the law by:
1. Securing a Florida certificate since the law of 1925 went into effect, or,
2. Having six semester hours' credit entered by the college authorities on the
official certificate form as "American History and Government, including Constitution
of the United States." (This latter exemption applies to applicants for Graduate State
Certificates, only.)
EXTENSIONS
All valid certificates may be extended for a period of one year by attending for a
period of not less than six weeks an approved college or normal school and satisfactorily
of which shall be devoted to academic subjects not covered by the certificate held and
completing a prescribed course carrying not less than fifteen recitations per week, ten
of which shall be devoted to academic subjects not covered by the certificate held and
five of which shall be devoted to professional subjects.
When making application for extension send certificates to the State Department
accompanied by record of work signed by the president or registrar of institution at-
tended. Not more than one extension shall be granted for any period of continuous
attendance and not more than two extensions shall be granted the same person on a
Third Grade Certificate or on Third Grade Certificates. Certificates may also be ex-
tended by completing a Reading Circle Course as prescribed by the State Board of Edu-
cation and given through the Extension Division of the State University.
Write to Dr. B. C. Riley, Director of Extension Division, Gainesville, for par-
ticulars regarding this course.
Application for extension must be made to the State Department of Public In-
struction immediately upon completion of summer school work, regular term attendance
or correspondence work.
NOTE:-A complete description of these courses may be found in the general
catalog.





EXTENSION BULLETIN 31
INDEX
A College and Normal ..-___7-8
Administrative Staff -------- 4 Group System_._.... -----__._.. .. 8
Agricultural Correspondence Courses_ 11 High School_..._.___.._. 6-7
Agricultural Extension Courses --_ 11 Regulations _-__-- ___.__ 8
A. Purpose of Courses Residence ..--..._........... __. 8
B. Proposed Method for Handling Time -_ --- 8
Agricultural (H.S.) --...__._22 Growth (extension) 5...-
Amount work allowed __.... .__10
C High School Credit.__.___ .. __6-10
Certificates (extension) _.._.___._ 9 High School Division ..__.___ .22
College Graduation _..__..... 7 Description of Courses__ _.._-. 22
Commercial Geography .___- .__23 Historical Statement .--.----..-- 5-
Cooperating Instructors..___._. 4 History (H.S) ___24
Cost .._ -_ -_.____ __.__12 History ------._ ----- --27
Course Outlines .___...-._... -- ..13-16 Home Economics .___ --------- 15
Agricultural -__...._ _. _. _._ 15 I
Home Economics ---.__..-.- __15 Incidental Fees -.__... __...-- 12
Liberal Arts .-----.- __13 Industrial Geography ....._____ 23
Credit -------...- ...._.. ---6-9-10 Information for Teachers .____ _.._ 28
College .----------------- 1. 0 Instructors -___-... -....... 4
High School...h..... .....10 Liberal Arts and Sciences ...______13
No Credit..--- -..... ._ ..---- 10 Library Readings _.._. --__ 10
Private Instruction.____.._.. 9
D Mathematics (H.S)__ --._- _22
Description of Courses _.._._ 17 Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry,
Department of Agriculture ......._.20 Trigonometry.
1. Professional _______ _20 Meetings _-.- --..---------... __.10
2. Research ..____... 21 Miscellaneous Courses ------ ..- 26
3. Technical .--_.._..._ 21 Education _...._.. ...26
Department of Home Economics_.21 English _----..-...--.. 26
Home Management _.__.21 History __-..-.---...-._. 27
Methods Teaching __ 21 Philosophy _-. .-------------- --...26
Nutrition __.__... ._21 Sociology --.-- --..-..-- 27
Department of Liberal Arts N
and Sciences ..__... __ _..17 No credit courses _.... __.... 10
Economics .__ .. __.. 19 Normal Course -..._____....... 13-14
Education -..__-..-. ___1 17-19-26 Normal Education_.- ------- 9
English _..-----_ 19-26 Normal Home Economics .._ ...15
History --------..... 27 Note-books __.._- -------- 10
Philosophy ____ _.......26
Sociology .......-........27
High School Division ......Objectives (extension)__ ...__.. 5
Agriculture .--..___ 22 Organization (cass)_ ___- 6
Commercial Geography ---__.23 P
English .._--- __ ._. 23 Philosophy _.-26
Foreign Languages ._----...._... 24 Practice Teaching. _---____11
History .._.._....... __-24 Private Instruction....-.....-..---- 9
Mathematics _-----__........ -_. 22 Purpose ......_.-.-.-- ----- 13-16
Sciences .-_......24 Agricultural ...--_15...- ..24
Home Economics ..___ .. 15
E ts ,- Liberal Arts ._... .... 13
Economics ---------. _------ 1-2 Special Requirements _.._ ..... 14
Education _- ---- ___-----__ ---- 17-26
English (H.S.) -_ ...... _-- 23 R
English ...__ ........._.........-... 19-26 Registration fee_ ----_.....----__ __._. -12
Extension Class .__ -.. ..-.. __ 6 S
Extension Growth .__.._.. __.._. 5 Sciences (H.S.)___._ __.__.._24
Extension objectives___ .... __.... 9 Selection of Instructors_... ___. 9
'',,Extension of Certificate......__ 9 Semester Hour -_ ................ 7
Extension work allowed-..._...-- __ 10 Separation High School and
F College Students.
Fees --_ __ __ __ _-11 -Special Requirements __.._.... 14
Incidental _~-- __ ___~ 11 Starting Extension Class -.-----__. 6
Registration __ ____ 11 State Board of Control--_-----
Foreign Languages (H.S.)__ _._ 24 State Board Public Instruction_--.. 3
G T
General Agriculture (H.S.)__ 22 Teachers (extension)_ 4
Graduation Requirements ..__ 7-8 Types of Extension Work-_ .- 9
U
(H.S.) High School Course. Units ____ 6















University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs