• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 State boards
 Faculty
 Committees
 Scholarships and prizes
 Degress conferred and candidates...
 Register of students
 College distribution
 Bulletin
 Copyright
 Front Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Catalogue 1929-1930, Forty-second Edition; Announcements 1930-1931. Volume III. Number 2.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000117/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Catalogue 1929-1930, Forty-second Edition; Announcements 1930-1931. Volume III. Number 2.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1930
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000117
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB5999

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Calendar
        Page 3
    State boards
        Page 4
    Faculty
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Committees
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Scholarships and prizes
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Degress conferred and candidates for diplomas
        Page 17
    Register of students
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    College distribution
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Bulletin
        Page 27
        Calendar
            Page 28
        State boards and officers
            Page 29
        Faculty
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        General information
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Organization, outlines and descrption of college courses
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
        Demonstration high school
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
        Index
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
    Copyright
        Page 143
        Inside front cover
    Front Cover
        Front cover
Full Text
iltc Xifloviba A4rgicltlurcal anb
jrrlIlanuica'l Cltellce
3 i e~1uBllctilt
.. _
Volume III 1930 Number 2
CatalZOge 1929-1930
Frtn.,Sc',: .' E.i;':. :...
An/louncemte'ts 1930-1931
..
.* .
a- .' .
. IssIed Qularterly By
'I-IE FLORIDA' AGRICULTURAL &: MECHANICAL COLLE(3E
Tallahassee, Florida





CA LENDAR
1930 1931
JULY JANUARY ULY
SIMIT I\jT IF S SiMIT ,\;' iF IS SIMIT IWIT IF jS
1-._. ....... 1 213 2 3 4
678 9101112 451678 10 5 67 8 911 1011
13114 15 16 1718 19 11112 13j14 15 16 17 12 114 1516 1718
20121 22232412526 18 19 20i21122 23 24 25
2.128J29 30,311 .... .5 26 27 2822 9 3 0 31 2627282930...31
AUGUST FEBRUARY AUGUST
...- I ..... I12 1 21 3 l 4 5 6 --41-5--1 .---
31461 5 61 7 8 9 1 1011 12.13 14 23 4 5 7
10111 12 13 14 15,I6 15 1617l18192021 9 10111213 14115
17819 2012122123 1223 24125 26 27 28 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
2i251261272812930 23242526127 2829
, 26 .2- 28 29.3 ... ..-......... ..
__ :1-, ___!_ _I.. .- 3031....
SEPTEMBER MARCH SEPTEMBER
1: 34 1 21 3 1 4 5 61 j7 -17-- 11 2 3 5
7 81 910111,l;l 1 121311 67 89101112
1411511617181920 5i'18192021 13 14115161789
2112223i25262 22j23;2425l2623 2 I21 2223124 2526
2I 2 2 41255116 276L 2 23 2 ?
28 29130 .... 2930131 I3 27282930.
OCTOBER APRIL OCTOBER
. 1 2 31 41. I l 21 3 4 1 2 3
5678 91011 561 8 910111 4 5 6 78 910
12,13 1415116 1718 12131415161718 11 12'1311415 16 17
1912U11222124 25 19 2021 22123 24125 18119 201211222324
2627 28 293031 26 2728 29!30 .. 2 2512 812930 31
NOVEMBER MAY NOVEMBER
;, ,, 6,, 8 12 11 21 3 4 5 6 7
21 31 48 3 456 7 81 9 1 1011 12 13114
9 o10 1112131415 101121131415116 15 1617 18 19[2021
1617 18119202122 171819 2021 2223 22232425262728
232 22 9 24525 227 2 2 2829 30 29 30
3f_ .. 31 .. I.. ....-.... ---- -- --
DECEMlBER ]JUNE DECEMBER
1 231 4 56 1 21 3 1 45 6.1 1 31 41 5
7 8 911011 12113 8 91011 1213 67 8 9101112
141516171819120 14151617181920 13 14 15 16 1 18 19
21122123124252627 2122232425262712021 2223 24 2526
28129130 31 .l. 12829 30 -- 27128292 30|31 .





Taft ,rloria 'xri ctulmmat anl
cuimXl Qort 1
Volume III 1930 Number 2
Caralogue 1929-1930
Forty-Second Edition
Announcements 1930-1931
.
Entered as second-class matter, August 24, 1912, at the Post-Office, Tallahassee, Florida,
Under the Act of August 24, 1912.





Table of Contents
CATALOG, 1929-1930
Page
Calendar ........- ---.. 3
State Board of Education ---------------- ------------- -- -. 4
State Board of Control .--------------------- ---------------- 4
Officers of Administration ---.----___________-_____________-_____ 4
Faculty --------------.----------____----.- -.------- 5
Committees --------------_------- .---------- --------- .. 12
Scholarships and Prizes -----.---_--_..-- ____ ..-_._-_-_ 15
Degrees -------------------------- -- ---- ---------- 17
Register of Students ------------------ ----- --- 18
College Distribution ------- ---------------------_.._______ 25
Enrollment Summary .---- ___..--_- ---- ---- ------- 26
BULLETIN, 1930-1931
Page
Calendar ..- ---------------.---------------- 28
State Board of Education -------- -----...------ 29
State Board of Control ---.-- -- --------.-------- _________-_ 29
Officers of Administration ------------ ---------- 29
Faculty -----,----------------- --.. -- 30
General Information ------------- ---- ----. --- 37
Information for Students ------------.--- ------.--.- 40
ORGANIZATION, OUTLINES AND DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE COURSES---
Organization and Outlines-
Department of Agriculture _-------------- -- ------ 53
Department of Home Economics...---------------5---- 55
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences ----------- --------- 56
Department of Mechanic Arts _..... -------_ ----- ---- 64
Department of Nurse Training and Health ----------------_..- 68
Requirements for Majors .- -------------..----------- 71
Descriptions-
Department of Agriculture ----------------- ----- 74
Department of Home Economics ----------------_---- 80
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences -------_ -----_...-- 82
Department of Mechanic Arts _--_------------------- 106
Department of Nurse Training and Health-----------------------------.110
Demonstration High School ..----------.---.._ ------113
Organization of High School----------------------------------------------. 114
Outline of High School Courses ------------------------.116
Description of High School Courses .-----------.---.---__ .. 121
Demonstration Elementary School ----------.--------------136
Index -- ----------------- ----------137





CALENDAR
1929-Sept. 22, Sunday, Boarding Department Opens.
Sept. 24, Tuesday, Enrollment and Classification.
Sept. 25, Wednesday, Enrollment and Classification.'
Sept. 26, Thursday, First Semester Begins.
Nov. 28, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day.
Dec. 21, Saturday, Christmas Vacation Begins.
1930-Jan. 2, Thursday, Christmas Vacation Ends.
Jan. 21-24, Tuesday-Friday, First Semester Examinations.
Jan. 27, Monday, Second Semester Begins.
Mar. 5-6, Wednesday-Thursday, Leon County Boys and Girls'
Meeting.
April 18, Friday, Declamatory Contest (High School).
May 2, Friday, Oratorical Contest (College).
May 12, Monday, National Hospital Day.
May 20-23, Tuesday-Friday, Second Semester Examinations.
May 25, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon.
May 26, Monday, Home Economics Day.
May 26, Monday, Annual Musical Recital.
May 27, Tuesday, Alumni Day.
May 27, Tuesday, Physical Training Exhibition.
May 28, Wednesday, Class Day.
May 28, Wednesday, Class Play.
May 29, Thursday, Commencement.
June 9, Monday, Summer School Begins.
July 31, Thursday, Summer School Closes.





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
HON. DOYLE E. CARLTON, Governor, President
HON. W. M. IGOU, Secretary of State
HON. W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Superintendent of Public Instruction
HON. F. H. DAVIS, Attorney-General
STATE BOARD OF CONTROL
HON. P. K. YONGE, Chairman (Pensacola)
HON. F. J. WIDEMAN (West Palm Beach)
HON. A. H. BLANDING (Bartow)
HON. W. B. DAVIS (Perry)
HON. R. F. MAGUIRE (Orlando)
HON. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary (Tallahassee)
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
1929-1930
J. R. E. LEE, SR., President of College.
J. B. BRAGG, Dean of Mechanic Arts Department.
Miss MARGARET COLLINS, Dean of Home Economics Department.
B. L. PERRY, Dean of Agricultural Department.
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean of Academic Department.
A. L. KIDD, Assistant Dean of Academic Department.
MRS. N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
-MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant.
J. R. E. LEE, JR., Business Manager.
REV. A. P. TURNER, College Chaplain.
DR. L. H. B. FOOTE, Director of Hospital.





FACULTY-1929-1930
J. R. E. LEE
President
A.B., A.M., Bishop College; LL.D., Wilberforce University; Graduate Work,
University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota.
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
R. O'HARA LANIER
Dean of College of Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Education
A.B., Lincoln University (Penna); A.M., Leland Stanford Junior University;
Summer Work, Columbia University.
A. L. KIDD
Assistant Deas, College of Arts and Sciences; Head Department, Political and
Social Sciences
A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; Special Work,
University of Pittsburg.
C. A. BACOTE
Head, Department of History
A.B., University of Kansas; A.M., University of Chicago.
B. P. CHISM
College Science, Chemistry, and Physics
B.S., Howard University; Graduate Work, University of Chicago.
GEORGE DECOURSEY
Director, Commercial Department; Bookkeeping, Accounting, Economics
B.S., Hampton Institute
H. M. EFFERSON
Head, Department of Mathematics
A.B., Atlanta University; A.M., Columbia University; Summer Work, University
of Minnesota.
J. L. LANGHORNE
Acting Head, Department of English
A.B., University of Michigan; Graduate Work, University of Michigan
RALPH H. LEE
English and Journalism
A.B., University of Wisconsin; Graduate Work, University of Wisconsin
JOSEPH REASON
Modern Languages
A.B., New Orleans University; Graduate Work, Ohio State University
A, P. TL'r,\El
Chaplain, Public Speaking, Moral and Religious Education, Instructor in High
School English.
A.B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
E. EARL WARE
College Biology
B.S., Bates College (Maine)





6 FLORIDA A. s M. COLLEGE
C. B. NASBY
Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing, Public School Art
George R. Smith College; Chicago Art School
A. S. PRATER-STEWART
Physical Education for Girls; Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman; Hampton Institute; Florida A. and M. College
WINIFRED LUCILE BATES
Assistant, Physical Education for Girls, Physiology and Hygiene
B.S.E., Florida A. and M. College
JENNIE E. BAKER
Librarian
A.B., Atlanta University; B.Sc., Library, Hampton Institute
E. C. WEARE
Assistant Librarian
Washburn College; Student, Syracuse University
THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
B. L. PERRY
Dean, Agricultural Department
Tuskegee Institute; Special Study, Iowa State College
J. C. BALDWIN
Agronomy
B.S., Florida A. and M. College
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University; Cornell University; Michigan Agricultural College
LASALLE D. LEFFALL
Vocational Agriculture
B.S., Iowa State College; Graduate Work, Iowa State College
L. A. MARSHALL
Teacher Training and Science
B.Sc., Agriculture, Prairie View College; B.Sc., Agriculture, Iowa State College;
J. E. SANFORD
Poultry
Hampton Institute
A. A. TURNER
State Farm Demonstration Agent for Men
Ohio State University
JULIA MILLER
State Demonstration Agent for Women
Tuskegee Institute





CATALOG, 1929-1930 7
THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
*ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean, Home Economics Department
B.S., Bishop College; B.S., Simmons College (Boston)
MARGARET COLLINS
Acting Dean, Home Economics Department
B.S., Michigan State College
I. L. COLEMAN
High School Domestic Science
Spelman College; Special Work, Columbia University
MARIE F. MCMILLAN
Plain Sewing
B.S., Florida A. and M. College; Special Work, Hampton Institute
C. B. NELSON
Domestic Science
Wilberforce University; Special Work, Hampton Institute
ORA VANN
Handicrafts
Tuskegee Institute
THE SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
J. B. BRAGG
Dean, Mechanic Arts Department
Tuskegee Institute; A.B., Talladega
JAMES D. TAYLOR
Assistant Dean, Mechanic Arts Department, Mechanical and Architectural Drawing
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
CHAS. C. HAYLING
Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
Z. R. HERCEY
Engineering and Plumbing
Tuskegee Institute
W. HAVRE HOLLINS
Assistant, Printing
A. and M. College (Normal, Ala.)
B. F. HOLMES, JR.
Carpentry
Hampton Institute
EDWARD JONES
Instructor in Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute
*Leave of absence year 1929-1930.





8 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
A. C. PHILLIPS
Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute; Summer Work, Hampton Institute
W. T. REED
Auto Mechanics
Hampton institute; Special Course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago.
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY
Printing
A. and M. College (Normal, Ala.); Special Course, Mergenthaler Linotype School,
Chicago.
S. L. THORPE
Electrical Engineering
Tuskegee Institute
THE NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL AND SCHOOL OF
HEALTH
L. H. B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
B.S., M.D., Howard University
0. A. M. FOOTE
Nurse
R.N., Freedmen's Hospital, Howard University
LULA R. LONG, R.N.
Super;itendent of Nurser
Blue Ridge Hospital, Ashville, N. C.
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
GEORGE DECOURSEY
Director, Commercial Department, Bookkeeping, Accounting, Economics
B.S., Hampton Institute
CLYDE M. BRADFORD
Shorthand, T,, .. -, Business English
Florida A. and M. College; Special Work, Columbia University
MUSIC DEPARTMENT-PIANO AND VOICE
F. E. JAMES
Public School Music; Director, Choral and Glee Clubs
A.B., Wiley University
J. V. A. COLLINS
Vocal and Instrumental Music
A.B., Bishop College; New England Conservatory; Mus.B., Bishop College Music





CATALOG, 1929-1930 9
BAND AND ORCHESTRA
CAPT. W. CAREY THOMAS
Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute
HIGH SCHOOL OR DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL
G. T. WIGGINS
Principal of Senior High School; Instructor in Languages and Mathematics, and
Director of Teacher Extension Work.
A.B., Syracuse
D. MARTYN-DOW
High School Science
B.S., Victoria College (London); B.S., Wilberforce University
T. E. LANG
Junior High Mathematics and English
Florida A. and M. College
E. F. MANCE
High School Mathematics
B.S., Howard University; Summer Study, Columbia University
A. S. PARKS
Principal Junior High School, Instructor, Social Science
B.S., Indiana State Normal College, Terra Haute, Ind.
J. M. RABOUIN-PHILLIPS
English
A.B., University of California; B.A., Education, Florida A. and M. College
THE NORMAL SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND
DEMONSTRATION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
'SE. E. MATTHEWS
Supervising Principal, Practice School
B.S., Howard University
MALISSA SYDES
Acting Snlperlising Principal, Practice School
B.S. in Elementary Education, Columbia University
; IRENE R. ANDERSON
7'scher, )'raciicic School
Florida A. and M. College (Normal Department) Study, Hampton Institute
DOROTHY GUNN-HOLMES
Cr:t'c Teacher, Third and Fourth Grades
Hampton Institute; Study, Hampton Institute
*Leave of absence, year 1929-1930.






10 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
AMY JACKSON
Teacher Practice School, Kindergarten Methods; Critic Teacher, First and Second
Grades.
Florida A. and M .College (Normal Department)
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant
Tuskegee Institute
W. MCKINLEY KING
Coach, Assistant to Commandant, Instructor Agricultural Department
B.S., Hampton Institute
A. D. PADDYFOTE
Matron, Men's Building
Allen University
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT
N. S. MCGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute
E. O. PAIGE
Matron, Clarke Hall
Vienna Millinery and Tailoring School, N. Y.; Chicago Academy of Fine Arts,
Columbia University.
L. F. CURRY
Matron, Tucker Hall
Clark University
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Lodge
Claflin College
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
J. R. E, LEE, JR.
Business Manager, Custodian of Property
A.B., Lincoln University (Penna.)
JAMES H. BLOW
Bookkeeper
Hampton Institute; School of Commerce, Wilberforce University
IVA HILL-BALDWIN
Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier
Tuskegee Institute





CATALOG, 1929-1930 1
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE
Secretary to President
Wilberforce University
CASTELLA A. DANIELS
In Charge Student Accounts
Florida A. and M. College
LOLLIE M. FLEMING
Registrar
B.S., Florida A. and M. College
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Hampton Institute; Secretarial School, New York
R. HILDA JONES
Secretary to Business Manager
Gregg Business College, Chicago
GEORGIA U. WILLIAMS
Clerk and Post Mistress
Business Department, Florida A. and M. College
D. E. HARVEY
Assistant Dietitian, Matron, Dining Hall
A.M., Roger Williams University; Special Work, Temple University
M. ARMAND JONES
In Charge Administration Building
Atlanta University
L. F. REED
In Charge Cafeteria
Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute
S. R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary
MAYME E. THOMAS
In Charge Laundry
Selden Institute (Brunswick, Georgia)





12 FLORIDA A. c M. COLLEGE
COMMITTEES FOR SCHOLASTIC YEAR
1929-1930
ASSIGNMENTS
R. O'HARA LANIER, College J. D. TAYLOR, Mechanic Arts
G. T. WIGGINS, High School L. R. LONG, Hospital
L. A. MARSHALL, Agricultural A. S. PARKS, Junior High School
M. E. COLLINS, Home Economics
All heads of departments are ex-officio members of the above committee.
ATHLETICS
J. B. BRAGG, Chairman MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
W. M. KING J. R. E. LEE, JR.
B. P. CHISM E. C. WEARE
WINIFRED BATES DR. L. H. B. FOOTE
A. P. STEWART
ADMISSIONS
A. L. KIDD, Chairman, College R. O'HARA LANIER
E. F. MANCE, High School G. T. WIGGINS
L. M. FLEMING, Registrar and Secretary
CATALOGUES AND BULLETINS
A. L. KIDD, Chairman W. H. STICKNEY
G. T. WIGGINS L. A. MARSHALL
R. O'HARA LANIER
All heads of departments are ex-officio members of the above committee.
COLLEGE CURRICULA, COURSE OF STUDY
R. O'HARA LANIER, College L. M. FLEMING, Secretary
M. E. COLLINS, Home Economics MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
J. D. TAYLOR, Mechanic Arts N. S. MCGUINN
M. A. LEE
COLLEGE LITERARY SOCIETIES
C. A. BACOTE, Chairman J. H. REASON
M. E. COLLINS
DEBATES
A. P. TURNER, Chairman *J. L. LANGHORNE
E. E. WARE J. D. TAYLOR
J. R. PHILLIPS M. A. LEE
EXTENSION
G. T. WIGGINS, Chairman and Director L. A. MARSHALL
R. O. LANIER J. R. E. LEE, JR.
A. L. KIDD C. E. FRAZIER
M. E. COLLINS L. M. FLEMING
J. D. TAYLOR G. DECOURSEY





CATALOG, 1929-1930 13
COLLEGE PLAYS-RHETORICALS
J. L. LANGHORNE, Chairman B. F. HOLMES
R. H. LEE J. D. TAYLOR
A. P. TURNER S. L. THORPE
C. M. BRADFORD Z. R. HERCEY
E. C. WEARE
HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULA, COURSE OF STUDY
G. T. WIGGINS, Chairman MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
T. E. LANG E. F. MANCE
I. L. COLEMAN L. M. FLEMING
S. L. THORPE N. S. McGUINN
J. E. SANFORD
HIGH SCHOOL LITERARY SOCIETIES
T. E. LANG, Chairman E. F. MANCE
J. R. PHILI.IPS M. J. ANDERSON
A. C. PHILLIPS S. L. THORPE
RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES
A. P. TURNER, Chairman W. L. BATES
H. M. EFFERSON W. T. REED
A. S. PARKS, Y. M. C. A. S. L. THORPE
C. B. NELSON, Y. W. C. A. M. A. JONES
D. E. HARVEY A. D. PADDYFOTE
N. S. McGUINN G. DECOURSEY, Supt., Sunday School
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTB
SOCIAL
B. F. HOLMES, Chairman M. J. ANDERSON
L. D. LEFFALL N. S. MCGUINN
J. R. E. LEE, JR. I. L. COLEMAN
C. B. NELSON I. R. ANDERSON
A. P. STEWART D. G. HOLMES
A. C. PHILLIPS C. W. THOMAS
C. M. BRADFORD M. E. COLLINS
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE F. E. JAMES
E. E. WARE
COMMENCEMENT
R. O'HARA LANIER M. A. LEE
A. P. TURNER J. L. LANGHORNE
CONC E RTS AND .EC TURES-VISITORS
F. E. JAMES, Chairman A. D. PADDYFOTE
J. E. BAKER C. B. NASBY
W. C. THOMAS M. E. THOMAS
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
*0





14 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
LIBRARY
R. O'HARA LANIER J. R. PHILLIPS
M. A. LEE J. L. LANGHORNE
MALISSA SYDES
Representatives from each department.
NIGHT SCHOOL
S. L. THORPE, Chairman A. S. PARKS
M. J. ANDERSON ORA VANN
L. D. LEFPALL E. E. WARE
M. F. MCMILLAN C. B. NASBY
I. R. ANDERSON R. 0. LANIER
W. M. KING G. T. WIGGINS
E. C. WEARE A. L. KIDD
G. DECOURSEY AMY JACKSON
C. A. BACOTE W. L. BATES
J. H. REASON
PUBLICATIONS
H. M. EFPERSON, Weekly News B. L. PERRY, Vocational Bulletin
C. A. BACOTE I. L. COLEMAN, Home Economics
M. A. LEE A. L. KIDD, Publicity
W. H. STICKNEY R. 0. LANIER
J. R. PHILLIPS, Proofreader G. T. WIGGINS
T. E. LANG, Alumni Column J. L. LANGHORNE





CATALOG, 1929-1930 15
SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES
SARAH LEVY SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE $150.00-Through the
generosity of Mrs. Sarah Levy, a citizen of Tallahassee, a scholarship
of $150.00 is given yearly to a worthy young man or woman of Leon
County to pursue the four-year College Course. The holder of the
scholarship for 1930-1931 is Jerome Emory Matthews.
McMILLAIN SCHOLARSHIP, $50.00-Awarded to the most
worthy agricultural student. Awarded for 1930-1931 to Horace Wood-
ward.
THE WOMEN'S SOCIAL AND ART CLUB SCHOLARSHIP,
$50.00-Awarded to the most needy, most orderly and most deserv-
ing student (girl). Awarded for 1930-1931 to Celestine Frazier.
FACULTY ORATORICAL PRIZE $24.00-Offered to mem-
bers of the college department for oratorical effort by members of the
faculty. Winners for 1929-1930-First prize, $12.00, Ulysses G. Nix-
on; Second prize, $8.00, Ollie Belle Colden.
YADSEUT SCHOLARSHIP-Awarded to the student making
the highest average who has completed two years of college work.
Awarded to Florence Rebecca Whaley for 1930-1931.
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE $10.00-Offered by the
Alumni Association to student in the College and Normal Classes hav-
ing the highest scholastic record. College Department: Albert Godbolt;
Normal Department:Jennie Richardson.
S. H. COLEMAN PRIZE-To the best all-round non-comission-
ed officer. Awarded to Albert J. Godbolt, $3.00.
S. H. COLEMAN PRIZE-To the best non-commissioned officer
in appearance. Awarded to Joseph McMillan, $2.00.
ROSA W. BUTLER PRIZE $10.00-Established by Mrs. Rosa
W. Butler, an alumna of the College and offered to the student making
the highest average in pianoforte music. Winner of prize: Pauline
Millicent Hall.
FLOYD CALVIN PRIZE -For the best all-round student (col-
lege) in the senior class. First prize, 96.!00, awarded to Albert J. God-
bolt; second prize, $4.00, \'illlam Blodgett Stewart.
FLOYD CALVIN PRIZE-For the best practice teacher for both
semesters. First prize, $3.00, awarded to Florence Rebecca Whaley;
Second prize, $2.00, awarded to Jennie Louise Richardson.





16 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
GEORGE CONOLY PRIZE, $5.00-Awarded to the ranking
high school student in Agricultural Department. Awarded to Charles
Carey in 1929-1930.
C. T. SIKES PRIZE-For the highest general average in the
senior high school awarded to James Keller, $2.50.
VIRGINIA G. YOUNG SILVER LOVING CUP TROPHY-
Awarded to the best all-round girl in school by Mrs. V. G. Young
of New York City. Awarded to Celestine Frazier for 1930-1931.
N. S. McGUINN PRIZE, $2.00-Awarded to the highest rank-
ing student in the Senior High School Department. Awarded to Lu-
cretia Dean McKee.
J. R. E. LEE MINATURE GOLD FOOTBALL PRIZE-Award-
ed for meritoriously consistent athletic activity. Awarded to Junius
Benjamin Jones and William Doc Sweet for 1929-1930.
HERFF-JONES KEY-Awarded to the highest ranking student
in the Senior High School Department. Awarded to Lucretia Dean
McKee for 1929-1930.





CATALOG, 1929-1930 17
DEGREES CONFERRED
1929-1930
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
BACHELOR OF ARTS (With Distinction)
William Blodgett Stewart
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Leander Alphonso Kirksey
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Ulysses Grant Nixon
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE (With Distinction)
Albert James Godbolt (Valedictorian)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Leslie Arnett Bell (Printing), Junius Benjamin Jones (Printing), Doc William
Sweet (Printing).
CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
EDUCATION
Lula Belle Benton Alma Howe Johnson Ruby Lee Baskerville
Ernestine Beatrice Pender Ida Lorcne Carter Bernice Rosebud Polite
(with Greater Distinction) (with Greater Distinction)
Narvella Beatrice Douglas Jennie Louise Richardson Pauline Millicent Hall
(with Greatest Distinction) (with Greatest Distinction)
Myrtle Louise Rodriguez Pricilla Edith Jones Modeste LaJune Stewart
(with Distinction)
Alma Mary Taylor Irene Dorothy Williams Gussie Lee Young
(with Distinction) Mattie Louise Williams
COMMERCIAL
Susie Beatrice Kelker (with Distinction)
HOME ECONOMICS
Tobitha Eardline Allen Irie Mae Gordon Mabel Symrna Byrd
(with Distinction)
Willie Belle Clay Thelma Louise Hall Marion Louise DeLaney
Martha Winifred DeLaney (with Distinction) Birdie Olive Hill
Thelma Frankie McKelvin Eddye Evelyn McRae Corrinne Sophenia Shaw
(with Distinction) (with Distinction)
Yinestra Y'Vonne Simmons Frankie Olivia Turner Helen Bobby Wilson
NURSE TRAINING
Claudie Mae Bryant Lela Aldonia Shade (with Distinction)





18 FLORIDA A. E M. COLLEGE
REGISTER OF STUDENTS
1929-1930
MEANING OF FOLLOWING ABBREVIATIONS
NOTE: Abbreviations and numbers in the center should be interpreted as follows:
B.S.A.-Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
B.S.E.-Bachelor of Science in Education,
B.S.H.-Bachelor of Science in Home Economics.
B.S.-Bachelor of Science.
A.B.-Bachelor of Arts.
B.S.M.-Bachelor of Science in Mechanic Arts.
Sp.R.-Special (Rehabilitation).
S.N.E.-Senior Normal Education.
S.N.H.-Senior Normal Home Economics.
J.N.E.-Junior Normal Education.
J.N.H.-Junior Normal Home Economics.
S.N.C.-Senior Normal Commercial.
J.N.C.-Junior Normal Commercial.
N.S.-Night School.
B.S.C.-Bachelor of Science (Commercial).
Sp.- Special.
N. Nurse.
S.H.-Senior High School.
J.H.-Junior High School.
COLLEGE
1. Freshman. 2. Sophomore. 3. Junior. 4. Senior.
HIGH SCHOOL
1. First Year 2. Second Year. 3. Third Year.
Abner, James H .- 1..-.........H. 1 .--- .. ...-- .Tallahassee
Adams, Verdelle Vivian ..-...S.H. 1 i------ .-W.-.. Winter Haven
Aikens, Bessie ------- ..------- S.H. 3- .. --------......---West Palm Beach
Aikens, Mozel .J.. -------------J.H. 3-..------------------ High Springs
Alderman, Freddie -----S---- S.H. 1 .-...--------------..-... -New Smyrna
Alexander, Frank. ---------- -S.H. 2 .-...-- ----------. ...South Jacksonville
Alexander, Sarah -------.-----A.B. 1 ---..... ... ....--- --.- Miami
Alien, Gretwood. .... -N.S ----.-----.---- ------. ..------. Orlando
Alien, Roy .--..---.--------.--S.H. 3 ... ... ...----------- ... ..Sopchoppy
Allen, Tobitha E.-------S.N.E. ------ ...Jacksonville
Anderson, Bernice -.....-......-J.H. 3 ----- ..-.-.O-- ._Ormond
Anderson, Josephine ----..--.B B.S.E. 1 ---. .. ...- ...Quincy
Anderson, Therese -..-........ J.N.E. -..-...-.- ......... Leesburg
Anderson, Odel --------------J.H. 3 -- ........-.. ---- Tallahassee
Anderson, Willie Jas..-.----- .. B.S.A. 1 .. ..---. .-.. ... -Quincy
Andrews, James -...----. -- B.B. S.A. I-- --- ... ......Quincy
Austin, Essie Mae .-------- S.H. 1 -- -----.. .-..... -...- Carrabelle
Ayer, Helen J. -S... ---------.S.H. 2 ..-... .... ....- .Gainesville
Bailey, Josie-S 2-----------S......H. 2. ... .--....-..Offerman, Ga.
Banks, Lucas A.....---- S.H. 3 -.. Anniston, Ala.
Banks, Ruble Mae.--_. ----- S.H. 1 .... ..- .....-New Smyrna
Barco, Johnnie De ------.--_J.N.E. .--..-..._.. .............St. Petersburg
Baskerville, Ruby Lee -----S.N.E. ---- -----.------ Orlando
Bassy, Violet N. -------------S.H. 2------ ........ .. Orlando
Beasley, Sylvester --.............B.S.M. 1 -- ---- .. ...... Tuskegee, Ala.
Beatty, Virginia ...--------...Sp.R. .. _----.--- ..-.......-- Sanford
Belfon, Elsie -..-...--------...- S.H. 2 .---- .......------ --.....Miami
Bell, Leslie Arnett..-..------- B.S.M. 4 ...- .............. ---- Palatka
Bellinger, Juanita -------.. ---- J.N.E. .-- -....-.-- Jacksonville
Bennett, Noah --- ..... ...-... S.H. 3 ..--........... White Springs
Benton, Lula Belle---... S.N.E. ------------------- ... Ft. Pierce
Benton, Ruth -. ..--.- -_.S.H.' 2 -....... ..... Fernandina
Berry, Mildred B..------ ..-.... S.H. 1 -.S..---...- -- .... Tallahassee
Bethel, Josephus ---...------- J.H. 3 --- ..... --Miami
Bethel, Nelson --------------.tN.S .- -...S-. .--- .Miami
Bevel, Thomas E.. -S.....------- S.H. 3 --- ... -- Live Oak
Bishop, Agnes .--- S.--------....S.H. 1 ---- .... ....Haines City
Bishop, Lyllian -.......... ..--- S.H. 2 .........-. .... ...Haines City





CATALOG, 1929-1930 19
Blackshear, Fred ...--------.. N.S. .------------------... Marianna
Blakley, Alice .----------------S.H. 1-- .--.. .--.---------.Tallahassee
Bolen, Charles -------.- B.S.A. 1 ..--.-.. .- Sanford
Bozeman, Floyd ..---------.-B.S. 2 ------.Tampa
Bragg, Jubie Barton, Jr.----S.H. 3 .- ------------.-. Tallahassee
Bragg, Robert .. ----------. J.H. 3 ..--------------------- ---.Tallahassee
Bragg, Rebecca -..-------- S.H.S. 3-- --------- -----.. -Tallahassee
Brinson, Grant -- B.S. 1 ..------ --..- Tampa
Brooks, Ruby --------- S.H. 2--. -------- ----Deerfield
Brown, Alfred --------. J.H. 2 -----.--- --Lakeland
Brown, George Henry ----- S.H. 2 .. ..--- --_. -.Sarasota
Brown, Shirley --------B.S.E. 1...----.-Tallahassee
Bryant, Claudie --- ----- N. 3 --- ---- Valdosta, Ga.
Bryant, Eulalia E.. .------ S.H. 3 -...- ....-------- -Jacksonville
Bryant, Ida --..-------- _.B.S.E. 2.----.------.----.--.Tallahassee
Bryant, Mathew ------- J.H. 1 --. Tallahassee
Burns, Annie J.. .--------N. 1 .----- -.----.-----.....St. Augustine
Butler, Hallie Q.------.------ J.N.H.E. .--.------.. .-Ocala
Butler, Terrecita -------.J.N.C. .----- Miami
Burnette, Verdelle ----- J .N.C .....-.Pensacola
Byrd, Mable S. ------------ S.N.H.E.- ---- .. .... .-Melbourne
Byrd, Juanita ---------.J.H. 2 .-...- Havana
Caldwell, Irene F.-. 3S------S.H. 3 ------- ..Quincy
Calloway, Elizabeth .-------S.H. 3 ---- ----... Pellmetto
Cambridge, Christene M. --J.N.E. -Old Town
Campbell, Alpha 0.----- J.H. 2 -- .-.Tallahassee
Campbell, Jacob .0. -----N.S ---- -- ..Tampa
Carnegie, Thelma SF------S.H. 3 ----- ---- Miami
Carter, Ida Lorene -- S.N.E ---- ---- Palatka
Cameron, William R -------S.H. 3 ---..-.-.--- ---West Palm Beach
Cary, Charles ---------------S.H. 1--- -.... ...- --Coconut Grove
Cash, George --------- -----S.H. 1- -.... ---..---- -Coconut Grove
Charlton, Richard ------- .S.H. 2 --- .Winter Park
Chavis, Ruby --------: -...-S.H. 2 ... -.--------.. ....-----.. Tallahassee
Chester, Bertha .-.---------...S.H. 3---- ... ... --....Tallahassee
Chester, Robt. -----------..S.H. 2 .-----.--... --.. .---.Tallahassee
Childs, Lincoln -- ........ ..B.S. 1 .-..- Gainesville
Clay, Willie Belle ....----S.N.H .-...--- -... --- ...Pensacola
Clark, William -f--------- T J.H. 1 -- -.. -.-... .....--- Coconut Grove
Cosby, Felix -------- -B.S.H. 2 _------ ---.Orlando
Cohen, Ernest H ..-- J.H. 3---- Jakin, Georgia
Cohen, Samuel O'Tanner .-- B.S.M. 1------------.---- Miami
Coker, Ida Lee ..-- ...--- A.B. 1 ------ ....- -- Ocala
Colden, Ollie Belle ----- J.N.E. ---------- --Ocala
Coleman, Dora --- -J.N.E. --..-.--. .Pensacola
Coleman, Geneva. ---_------J .H. 3 .---------.- ...--- Tallahassee
Coleman, Maggie ----_..-. S.H. 2 ----- ..--..._------ .Columbus, Georgia
Colston, Nathaniel .-.- SF------S.H. 2 ---.-.. --- .--. Winter Park
Cook, Willie Mae .------ ..S.H. 2 .. -New Smyrna
Cooper, Minnie Lee -_ ---- J.N.E. .------...----- .Pom ano
Cooper, Samuel ------- B.S. 3 ---- Monticello
Collier, Ida Mae -------J.H. 1 ------------Tallahassee
Colbert, Sadie ----- ---S.H. 3 -------Leesburg
Combs, Genieve .---.. --. J.H. 1 ----- Tallahassee
Crockett, Essie Mae -----...J.N.E. .._--- ..___.lenton
Crooms, Georgianna ..-----.. J.N.C. .---.----------------Jacksonville
Crooms, Theodore.. ------S.H. 2 ..- Orlando
Crowder, Bernard --- ---S.H. 2 ----.Montgomery, Ala.
Crosby, Albert ---------. S.H. 3- -.... -Madison
Crosby, Minerva -- ----- S.H. 3-- _-_-__--- .-Orlando
Cross, Edna ---- -- A.B. 2 ------- Sanford
Daniels, Ju!..,j iI 1 ..-Tallahassee
DeLaney, -!ir.,- N H Jacksonville
DeLaney, Martha W. .---.S.N.H. -..------------ ----Fernandina
Demery, Cleo E. ----------J.N.E. -------.... ... .......Clearwater
Douglas, Narvella B. --S.N.E. -----D.aytona Beach
duBignon, John -------B.S. 1 -Jacksonville
Duncombe, Eugene ------ B.S. 1 -----..Miami
Dobbs, David D ..-- ------ B.S.M. 3----------... ----. Clearwater
Erwin, Louise E. -J.-...-....J .H. 3 --.--.... __....-. Blountstown
Edwards, Herbert ---------- Sp. ----- ---------------.Tallahassee
Edwards, Helen ...-. ---- J.H. 2 ---- Tallahassee
Edwards. Maria --- S.H. 2 ------ Tallahassee





20 FLORIDA A. E M. COLLEGE
Ellis, Vivian O. ..---------.... B.S. 2 ---..J.._....---...---.Jacksonville
Ellerbe, James --..-.. ......-N.S ----.....----- --.------Jacksonville
Emanuel, Leroy -....-.-.. ....B.S. 2 -...-.-....- -J....acksonville
Everett, Thornton ..-- AB-...-.. A.B.E. 4 .---------------J..---.Jacksonville
Evans, Jessie Belle-...._.-- J.N.H. .---------------.------.--...--Alachua
Evans, Samuel .-...-----..... S.H. 2 .---.. -..--.. .-Jacksonville
Edwards, Charlotte .--.-.... -- S.N.C. --.....-...-.-----Tallahassee
Fort, Washington --.- -. N.S. .------------------------..-----------Live Oak
Ford, Algie .-- ...-- -... S.H. 3 ------... -------.. -Tallahassee
Ford, Augusta.-.-----...-..-.S.H. 2 .-- .------Tallahassee
Fort, Lamar ...- .-------- .B.S.A. 1 -.....---. -----. -----.Live Oak
Ford, Sallie Mae ----- S.H. 3 ----------------.....-- Tallahassee
Ford, Vera Mae..----J------ J.H. 2 -..-----------.--- -----Tallahassee
Ford, Sudelle J .----...- J.N.H.E. ----------... ------------------.Tallahassee
Franklin, Lena ._- ...----- S.H. 3 ...----------------------------Lake City
Frazier, Celestine B ..--.-----B.S.H.E. 3------------------------------Pensacola
Fleming, L. Beatrice --...B.S. 3 ---------------------------------.Jacksonville
Faust, Ola L. ---- _--- _.._S.H. 2 --...---.... ---------- St. Petersburg
Gainey, Irene S.N.E. -- ---...... ....---..... --- Jacksonville
Gibson, Clarence .----....._. S.H. 1- ..-.. ---....'.. ..--- Coconut Grove
Gibson, Wilford-.. --........ _J.H. 1 --.......-------... Coconut Grove
Gaskin, Laura -----------.--.S.H. 3 ..-..-.--------------- Eustis
Glover, Algie ...--S...N.E. ....--------.-----. Lakeland
Goodwin, Louise -----.. ------S.H. 3 ....-----.. ------.... Palmetto
Goodman, Alma .s------..... S.H. 3 .....------... ---- .Lake City
Goodwin, Barbara A.. ---.-.. S.H. 3-------.. ----------- --.....Palmetto
Griffin, Minerva -------....... S.H. 2 -....-----------.- .- f-eLtnd
Graham, Naola .....- --J.H. 3--------.---- ---. St. Petersburg
Gordon, Bernice -------..... J.N.E. .--W..-.-- --. .....-..West Palm Beach
Gordon, Irie Mae -..---------S.N.H. Thomasville, Georgia
Green, Al honso --..... -B.S.A. 1 .. .... ....--.. -......... Gainesville
Greene, Douglas W......---- B.S. 2 -......................-- DeIRay Beach
Guion, Alberta ...---- -S.H. 3---------..------- eland
Godbolt, Albert J.. ----. .....B--.S.A. 4.......-- -------------. Miami
Garcia, Joseph -.. .-------.. N.S. .......-------------- Key West
Gillislee, J. K. .....------- N.S. ------........St. Petersburg
Gooden, Robert C ..--...-........N.S. .........-. ..............Laurel
Graham, Lillian L. ---....--J.N.E. --------- --.......-Jacksonville
Goodwin, Hiriam -...... -N.S. --... J- .... _Jacksonville
Greaux, St. Elmo ._-..-----. B.S.A. 2 .........-... ... .........Key West
Hall, Margret .-.....--..-... S.H. 3 ------.--.... ---------Lake City
Hamilton, Alfredo ---. S.H. 3 -.....-----.Bartow
Hart, Jessie ------------------N.S. --------. -----......Reddick
Hart, Moses ---------.. ---- N.S. --......... ............. Millville
Hargret, James ..--...... S.H. 3---- --- ....Apalachicola
Hargret, Tessie .......-.-------S.N.E. ----- ...Apalachicola
Hart, Loris M. ..--------... S.H. 2-- -- ..-. St. Petersburg
Harris, Ruth --------..-.J.H. 2 ---- ..... .-. ..West Palm Beach
Harris, Clarence -....................S.H. 3-...... ....-------... .....DeLand
Harris, Reed ---------.-------S.H. 1- ... ..... .......Lakeland
Hargrove. Lawrence -....-.. B.S. 3 ... ..............Gifford
Harvey, Ethel ...-----N----_-J.H. 1 -........ ----------.... Tallahassee
Harrell, Charlie -....------ S..S.H. 2 ...... ....--....--- High Springs
Harris, Albert S..N--------... S.H. 2-- ..-...-- ------ -. Carrabelle
Hall, Ernest B. ---...-...... .B.S.A. I ..--.....------.--- Jacksonville
Hawkins, Rosa Lee --...--- J.N.E. .--...... .......-Orlando
Hawkins, Thelma -------....-- J.N.C. ---... ..--------.--... .Tallahassee
Henry, Ethelda .---- S.H. 3--......--. .. High Springs
Henderson, Grace ..----------S.H. 1 .-.... ... ...... -Graceville
Hillman, Oscar .----....-----. B.S.C. 1-.. ....-.......... Jacksonville
Hinton, Annie ...--.---------J.H. 2 ..---.. .-- ...-------.. Tallahassee
Hicks, Perry .-....--.JJ .H. 2 .--... ----....... ....-Tallahassee
Hill, John S. ..-- SN------...S.H. 1. ..-...--- ...... .. Portland
Hills, Beatrice --.--....----EB.S. 2 ....... .... -- --- .Tampa
Hill, Maggie M ....- -N------'.H. 3..--....-.......... .Tallahassee
Haynes, Rosa .......--..... J.H. 1- ...-.. --.......-.._.Tallahassee
Hines, Constanche .....--- J._.J.N.E .....-.... --Jacksonville
Hill, Thelma --..---------- -.J.H. 3---- .-.....- ---. Fruitland Park
Hoffman, Alphonso -----.... B.S.C. 3 -. -... .......- ..---Sanford
Hollaway, Leroy. ---. S..N----S.H. 3 -........ .......- ....Florahome
Holmes, India...-.----....... J.N.E. ---- ..-.... ..-West Palm. Beach
Hopps, John .- ......-.-.. --J.H. 1 -- ........ .....Live Oak
Holland, Annie Belle .-.....J.N.E. ---. ..... Live Oak





CATALOG, 1929-1930 21
Howard, Horace G. -..--- B.S.A. 1- --_ .. ...Tallahassee
Hooper, Aramentha --.----- S.H. 2. -. .--...-- -.....-- .-Sanford
Hood, Johnie -- -- S.H. 3 ....- --- Perry
Hunt, Hila Mae .------ J.N.H. B------- Brooksville
Hunter, Doris Mae. --.---- J.H. 3 --- ...----.... --........St. Petersburg
Hubert, Benjamin --------S.H. 2 --------------Eau Gallie
Hill, Birdie ---------S.N.E. ..------------Leesburg
Hall, Thelma .-... .-...---S.N.H. .- ..---. .-- J.. Jacksonville
Hall, Pauline M. ------------ S.N.E. ---------- ---.......-Live Oak
Hart, Mildred -----------------S.N.E. ..----..... ------ St. Augustine
Hegg, Owen ------------ J.H. 3-- ----- ---- Sarasota
Hicks, John ---- -. J .H. 1 .--- ...I allahassee
Hair, Thelma ... ..-------- B.S. 3 ..-.....-Jacksonville
Harley, John ----- N.S. ---- -- Orlando
James, Chas. F. .---..-.......B.S. 2- .- .-.. .Pensacola
Jackson, Mary L. ---- J.H. I .-- .- Tallahassee
Jackson, Geo. -...------....... B.S.M. 1-.....-.... .-----Sanford
Jiles, Thelma K. .-----... A.B. 1 -----... ..-- -.-----. Tallahassee
Jones, Disney --- B.S.A. 3 ................. Quincy
Jones, Gamaliel ------... B.S.A. 1 -----------.... .---. Orlando
Jackson, Nathaniel --------. B.S. 2 .--- .. ..........----.Jacksonville
J-ohnson, Jas. .------- B.S. 1 -- --.......................... Miami
Johnson, Dorothy --- A.B. 1 .. I--..---- Miami
Johnson, Alma Howe ----. S.N.E ....--... Miami
Jackson, Leroy ..-.--------S.H. 1 ... .-- ......-- Gifford
Jones, Priscilla E. .. S.N.E -. Jacksonville
Johnson, Frances ------- S.N.E. ------------ -Tallahassee
Jones, Edna C. ...-.. ..---- J.N.E. ....-..----------_-. Jasper
Jackson, Fred Scott .-------S.H. 2 -............................ Tallahassee
Jackson, Louise ----------- S.H. 2 ..-------..---.--------. Tallahassee
James, Jesse -----------... -S.H. 2 .------------.-------.. West Palm Beach
Johnson, Alma .----.------S.H. 2 ................... cala
Jones, Ethel .... --------..... J.H. 3 -......---..... --_... -- Tampa
Jordon, Violet .----- J.H. 3 -----0.......-- O__Orlando
Johnson, Katie -------------S.H. 3 .----.......---......-. Winter Haven
Jones, Eugene ------ S.H. 3--------- -- New Smyrna
Johnson, George .---.------ S.H. 1- .------------.----.... Orlando
Jones, Ruby ----------- J.H. 1 ----.-............ .---Tallahassee
Jordon, Sophia -.J..- J.H. 2 .- ...---_-.- .......High Springs
Johnson, Hollis .....------ N.S. ------- Kansas City, Mo.
Jones, David .'_ ...._. .N.S. -. ..._.......-- -----_---..Tampa
Johnson, Nancy ..---------- N. 1 ...---------------..... Gainesville
Jones, Florence ----. A.B. 1 ...-..J.. .----J- Jasper
Jones, J. Benjamin. -- E----- B.S.M. 4 --.------------------New Smyrna
Kershaw, Joseph. -. ..--..J.H. 2 ...................................Key West
Kelker, Susie -----------------S.N.C. -. -------- Milton
King, Inez ------- --- S.H. 3 -.-- -_.........St. Petersburg
Kirksey, Leander...----.. --- B.S. 4 ---....--.... ............Madison
Killens, Donella ---..-...-.. -S.H. 1- ------. --....... Gretna
Keller, James ------------.-- S.H. 2 .--..-- ---......... Starke
Larry, Juanita -------------_ J.N.E. ... .._.._... ___Tampa
Lester, Otis ---------------- N.S. --------------.Yalaha
Lewis, Farris -----------------N.S ....-_... ._..----- Fruitland Park
Lewis, Horace ----- -....... S.H. 3 --------------.-.....__ Pompano
Little, Martha L.-........---- A.B. 1-------------- -Bainbridge
Long, Pearl W. --J.J.N.C. _-. .---..... Ashville, N.C.
Lang, Martha E. ------- J.N.C. .- --_ Gainesville
Lott, Cauly -.._ N.S. .--.....Jacksonville
Louden, Glinis--- -_- -S.H. 3 --.-.. ---..--..Ft. Myers
Lawton, .Wilhelmina .------.- J.H. 3- --.... ------......... Cocoa
Lamb, Preston -. ._... -__ S.H. 2 __..._._..._.._ St. Petersburg
Martin, H:- .. .SH 3- --.. ___.. ._St Augustine
Martin, r { r6 1 .. l--:__ ....-.....--. Sanford.
Martin, .'. It.r SH 2- _- .........-. ..._ISanford
Maxey, Clifford-.- E_---- --- B.S.A. 1 _---_.........Sanford
Mathews, Jerome ..........S.H. 3 -__. __ Tallahassee
Mayes, Mildred -..--__ ..... _J.N.H. --..--.._.... ....__.. Ocala
Martin, Ireta ..-----_..____B.S.E. 2 --.--........ ---__._ Sanford
Meuse, Jesse.. _...M ...._.. B.S.M. 1 -. ___......_. Sanford
Mills, ? I',;i'. T N.E. Jacksonville
Mitchel EJ. -Ii ----...... S. ____ TJlacksonville,
Mobley, Clora Etta-___- :- -J.N.H. --'_-___ Tallahassee.
Mobley, Prudence -.... .S.N.E. .____ ..' _Leesburg





22 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Monroy, Leroy -.--- N.S. ------.--..---------Midway
Moore, Herbert --.----... --...A.B. I --- ..-..---. --- .-.Tallahassee
Morris Lucius ------------------B.S. 1 ------------------- Jacksonville
Moses, Vardry A.---- S.H. 3 ----------------------Anniston, Ala.
Mounts, John E. .-- --. ._ B.S. 1------....... ------------- Key West
Myrick, Alma- ---- 8.-------B.S.E. 3----- --------------------- Tallahassee
McDonald, Stephen -..... ---B.S.M. 1 ---.------. ---.- Jacksonville
McFadden, Beatrice--.. -----B.S.E. 1 ---..--..-- ..--Tallahassee
McFadden, Alphonso .-..-.-..B.S.A. 1 ----...--... ----. Tallahassee
McFarlin, Constance --.... .A.B. 1 ...--------------- -------------Pensacola
McDaniels, Florine -....----- S.H. 2 .... ---------- New Smyrna
McKee, Lucretia ..-- -----.... -S.H. 3 ---------------- Fruitland
McQueen, Lula --J..--..J.N.H. .---------------------- --------Pensacola
McQueen, Bernice ------J.H. 1 ------------- ------------ 'allahassee
McClinton. Mary ..--- J.H. 1-------..--------------- Tallahassee
McKee, Clytie--- ----- S.H. 1--- -----------------------Fruitland
McNealy, Wm ..--.... --- J.H. 1 .---.--.--------- ----.. -Quincy
McRobbinon, Savannah J.N.E. ------------------------ Zellwood
McKinney, Ruth M ---------J-J.N.C -. --------.-..------------- .. acksonville
McMeekins, Susia A...--. J.N. ---------.---------- --------Edgar
McKelvin, Thelma F. ---.. --.. S.N.H.E ------------------------- Jacksonville
McRae. Eddye E. ..--.--..---. S.N.E. -.. ...Tampa
McPherson, Edwin -.-.-----B.S.A. 2 ---.-. .--... ----------Pensacola
McPherson, Thomas ---.. --- B.S. 2 ---..--- -------.------Gainesville
McFarlin, Bertram ---.-.----B.S. 3 .. .--------------------- Pensacola
McMillan, Alzo .---- --B.S. 3 .--------- ---- --- Pensacola
Morgan, Margaret -. ----------J.H. 2 -----...- St. Petersburg
Manning, Hazel --- --J.H. 2 ------- DeFuniak Springs
Morgan, William ------------S.H. 2 ---- ------ --Tampa
Merritt, Frank C. -----------------B.S.M 4-- -----Marianna
Manns, Kenneth ---M------- N.S. ------ ----- .. ------- ---- Jacksonville
McMillan, Joseph .--------J.H. 3 ---.----Sarasota
Marshall, Eva .---------- N. 1 -------------- Gainesville
Muller, Arbesta --- J.H. 3 .---- .. .- Geneva
Niblack, Roy ----- --- N.S. --- --..----Lake City
Niles, Clarence ---------S.H. 1---- --- .----. Cleveland, Ohio
Niles, Vivian ---- S.H. 2 --- -----.Orlando
Nixon. Ulysses Grant ------.- B.S.E. 4 .--.....- -.--.- -Madison
Norwood, Edwin --.-----.-------B.S.E. 2 ..-----.. ----.... Tallahassee
Noble, Ray Ulysses ..-------B.S.C. 2 .-- --.- Fernandina
Nairn, George B. ------------B.S. 1-J kovJacksonville
Nash, Dorothy .--... --.. Sp --------------- --.- Tallahassee
Nickson, Irma ..-.S.H. 1- .. --..Homeland
Nash, Jerry ----- ----- J.H. 2 -------- ------------- Tallahassee
Nims, Thelma ------- .H. 3- .-..... .----------- Tallahassee
Patterson, Edward .-------. J.H. 3 ..---------.--.... ---- Reddick
Payne, Geo. P. P S 2 .--- -----. .- --Jacksonville
Payton, Nellie I rI E ---------- Lakeland
Pender, Ernestine .------ -S.N.E. -..--..- Warrington
Pemberton, Evelyn -------N. 2- ---.- --'..Tallahassee
Penny, Andrew --- N.S. ---. Fruitland Park
Phoenix, William .-------- .S.H. 3 -------- Tallahassee
Pieze, Eliot John ---- S..I. Si. 1S. ------ Miami
Pender, Frank .-- -B.S.A. 1 ---------- ey West
Pinkney, Dorothy. .-.... J.N.E ...-.------.. -- Tamn a
Pinkney, James --------... -- B.S.A. 2 ---- -----Ta!lahassee
Polite, Bernice R....--------.. S.N.E. --- J------- -Jacksonville
Proctor, Ora Lee -------.--S.N.E. .--- ---- DeLand
Ponder, Essie .----------- J.H. 2 -..-------------..Tallahassee
Pottier, Rodney--- ----...--. B.S. 3 -..---- -..... Miami
Price, Delores L. J.N.C. .--------------- Jacksonville
Price, Evelyn L. -----------J.N.E. ----------------- Fernandina
Preston, Leila .------.---- S.H. 3-- ---------- ---. Quincy
Proctor, James ...-------------S.H. 1----------.... .DeLand
Parker, Frank --- B.S. I .-- -- Jacksonville
Reddick, Virgil ---------- -B.S. 1 --------- .-- .---- Gainesville
Ritchie, Oscar ----E.--.-- B.S. 2 .------------------- St. Petersburg
Roby, Richard --------- B.S.A. 2-- ------------Jacksonville
Roberts, Thornton--------.. EB.S. 1 ......-----------.. Gainesville
Roberts, Ruby Mae .------.. J.N.E. -.----... --_.. _--------_ Winter Park
Robinson, Margaret------.. J.N.E. ----------------...-.. Ja:ksonville
Roy, Savannah .--- ----.... -- J.N.E -------------.-...-..--- St. Louis, Mo.
Reeves, Ernestine ----...-- S.H. 2 ---....-.... .. .--- Pompano





CATALOG, 1929-1930 23
Roberts, Geneva ----------J.H. 3 .--... -------. Starke
Robinson, Harold ..--S--.. ..S.H. 3 ------.---.-....--.-.St. Petersburg
Robinson, John ..----....... S.H. 2 --..--..... .. ....----. Jacksonville
Rodriguez, Myrtle ----.--------S.N.E. .--- --..-... --Tampa
Richardson, Jennie ---...... ..S.H. 3 .-----..... ---T.---..... allahassee
Rolfe, Nancy ..... ....B.S.E. 2 .. ----....... ---T..... Tampa
Rollins, Emma .- -.... -- .--S.N.H. .--- ... ...-..-Tallahassee
Roach, WXoodrow .. --........ S.H. I -.---_-_-_.---- ...-Brooklyn, N. Y.
Rogers, Roland ....--------.... S.H. 2 .--.--...-.-... ........DeLand
Ross, David .- -..--------- J.H. 3 .---.....-- ---... .... Jacksonville
Robinson, William ---B---- .--B.S.M. 3 ..---- ------.... .Tallahassee
Robinson, Canary -_.......-B.S.A. 3 ..--. ..._--.... ...-DelRay Beach
Robinson, Clyde F. .- B.S.H. 3 ---_-- -....---_----- Tampa
Reddick, John ..-.---. .. ..... Sp. -........----..... West Palm Beach
Saunders, Sara .--.---.. ..._.-.J.H. 3- .---------........- High Springs
Scott, Sarah .-...-...... S.H. -1.-- .- .... .Miami
Sewell, Samuel ....-. ...-. ..S.H. 2 ------.----.---..........Maitland
Shade, Lela ...-.....- ...-N. 3 ... ------.........----- Clearwater
Shaw, Corrinne S...----..-. S.N.H. ---- ......------.--Jacksonville
Simpson, Vernon .........--....... B.S. 2 ..--- ..- .. ---Fernandina
Simmons, Rephelia .- ...-JN..-.J.N.C ._ -- --.. --..._... Gainesville
Simms, Annie Mae ..-....S.H. 3 ----.--' Mims
Simmons, Lillian -..... SR... S.H. 2 ..----... --... Alamonte Springs
Simmons, Yinestra .---- ..... S.N.H. .. ...--_ --.. _-_.._ Pensacola
Smith, Hoskis H .-..---. .B.S. 1 .-__..-..... ---.....Tallahassee
.Small, James P. ... -...-.. .B.S.A. 1--- ..-.-----. ...--.. Jacksonville
Smith, Fred D .- .. .-B.S. 2 -..-..... .... Apalachicola
Speed, Hisetta .-- ...-....-B.S.E. 2--... ....-.--. .........West Palm Beach
Smith, Rufus ..-. ....S.H. 2 ...--......-.. Apalachicola
Smith, Ezelle A. .--... J.N.H. ------..-..Pensacola
Smith, Ellen -- .....J.H. 3 .-- --- ...St. Petersburg
Smith, Eugene .......... i S.H. I- -.Sparr
Smith, Daniel C. .....---.. S.H. 3 _.....-...-..---..... Punta Gorda
Sneed, Johnnie Mae ..-..- .- J.H. 2 --..-... --- _- Tallahassee
Smiley, Marian .----..-- S -S.H. 3 --.......--....- Ocala
Smith, James -..B...-.... ..._-- B.S. I1 .-------------.... Jacksonville
Smith, Maggie ...--- JR------ J.H. 3-- ..-. ...-.... Tallahassee
Spencer, James J ....___... _J.H. 2 --............. Tallahassee
S eed, Lillie -..-..------_ S.H. 3 _-- ..................... West Palm Beach
Stewart, Modeste L.-.......---.S.N.E .. .--............. .... Pensacola
Stephens, Pearl .-...---..-_..-. S.H. 3 ..-... ..--.---..--.....- Quincy
Stewart, George .--...- J.H. 2 -- .. .. Tallahassee
Stewart, Willie B ......--. J.H. 2-- ............Tallahassee
Stewart, Jennie -..... ----- S.H. 3 .---_. ...---------..---Tallahassee
Stevens, Inez ..-........ ..._ S.H. 3.---..-... ...-......._ Quincy
Stewart, Theresa R .-.-...S..--S.H. 3.---... --..... Orlando
Stephens, Evelyn --..........S.H. 2 ..--....._-...... Palmetto
Stewart, Caleb ----B..-.... --B.S.A: -;--- ---1 .. Pensacola
Stewart, Richie Belle --..... B.S.E. 2 .--- ...-- ...........-Tallahassee
Washington, Ruby -............B.S.E. 2 -. ...-... -_ -----Tallahassee
Wright, Hanson ..---....S..... S.H. 2- -.. ...... -------Ft. Myers
Wilson, I.ottie M. ..-...-. S.N.E.....--------------- ..Tallahassee
Williams, Mattie L ...-.. ...S.N.E. -----_.-.... ___ ..-..Lakeland
Williams, Thelma -. ..J.I. 33 High Springs
Wood, Gieorgia -.. .. SR-- ..-S.H. 1 ...- --... ......- Pensacola
Williams, Ira .- 3.... J.H. 3 ... Lisbon
Wilson, Lucius .. J.H. 3- Leesburg
Williams, Otto --... .. .N.S. .- -----.. Jasper
Williamson, Thelma ..--...S.H. 1--- --- .. Apopka
Williams, Rufus .-- S.. ------------...------. .-Benhaden
Williams, William ----.... J.H. 1 ..--..... .---..... .....Apopka
Williams, Rose Marie ..-- J.H. 2 --...._...Tallahassee
Wilson, Sarah --- J.. Tallahassee
Williams, Vera Mae .-....- S... 3 -----------------------------Tallahassee
Wilson, Gre.:chen -. ----.S.H. 3--- _- ----- Quincy
Woodburv, Pearl ....... S.H. ----------------- -- Tallahassee
Wong, Cleo ......... .. J... ..H. 3-_-- __ __ __ New Smyrna
Wright, Louise E ----...S.H. 3---.....-_.... Ft. Myers
White, Clarence .......-. ...S.H. 3-...--.....--.. -.. Jacksonville
Wells, Fannie -----..S.H. 2 ..........------------- S. Miami
Wyche, Mamie Louise ..-.. J.N.E .......- Jacksonville
Wyche, Christine .-......J... ..J.N.E. -........--------....-----Jacksonville
Wynns, Alma E ..--............... A.B. 1 .....-------------- ..Jacksonville





24 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
Wells, George ............. S.H. 3 ----- Orlando
Wililams. Lavrence -- S.H. 3--- --- Winter Park
Young, Geraldine. -------.. S.N.E -..------... ---.-Apalachicola
Young, Virginia ---S.H. 2---- -- Thomasville, Georgia
Young, Gussie Lee .. -.S.A .E. ----- Bartow
Yant, Rosa Lee .------------B.S.E. 2 ..------.. -_.-. .-- Tallahassee
Youngblood. Ozie. ..---. .B.S.A. 2 ----... --.--------.DelRay
Stewarr, William -----.-- A.B. 4 .. .....-------- -- Lake Alfred
Stroman, Carelle .------.---- .S.N.C. _- -----_..- ------- Apalachicola
Sweet, Doc William .--.---- B.S.M. 4 _----_----------- New Berry
Surles, Soloman ..------... N.S. Jacksonville
Sams, Willie .-----S.H. 2--- -----.Lloyd
Sampson, Samuel -------B.S. 1 ------ -- Bartow
Small, Eddie------ J.H. 1--- -- Pensacola
Taylor, Samuel ----...--.--.. B.S.A. 1 ..------------..--- Fairfield
Taylor, Alma M.-----.- -S.N.E. --------- Orlando
Taylor, Walleice---- ----- J.N.H. ------------ Tallahassee
Taylor, Kathleen --------S.H. 1 .-- Tallahassee
Taylor, Cecelia H. ------S.H. 3 ------------- Ft. Myers
Terrel, Thelma ---------S.H. 2 ------.-------. Tallahassee
Thomas, Shellie ------------ S.H. 3 .---------..------ Eau Gallie
Thompkin, Eddie --.-----...S.H. 1 I ...--.- Tarpon Springs
Thames, Addie -- ----S.H. I Tangerine
Thames, Millie ........------....--- J.H. 3 ----- --------- Madison
Thomas, Eddie Lee.------ S.H. 2... ----------.. High Springs
Washington, Beulah --------S.H. 2--.----------------- Zellwood
Walker, T..,. !.- IT --------Zellwood
Thomas, .. i: Ni H _. --------____Quincy
Trapp, Vernon .-- ---S.H. 2-------------- Tallahassee
Turner, Frankie ---.. .-- .S.H. 1 ----------------- Tallahassee
Twine, Fannie e------- Sp.R. ----- ------------ Madison
Twine, Louise ------- J.H. 2-- -- Pensacola
Tooks, Beatrice ---- -------- J.H. 3 ------------Tallahassee
Travis, Gladys .....-------J.H. 3 ----. ...--.--- ---- Tallahassee
Turrner Carrie --...--- J.N.E. ----------- Jacksonville
Turner, Willie -----------B.S.M. 2---- ---------- Montgomery, Ala.
Trowell, Rosa Lee ------J.N.C. ----.- Jacksonville
Thomas, Ulysses --..- ------.S.H. 1 ----------_.------- West Palm Beach
Vanderhost, Ruth. ----S.H. 2 -- --. Mulberry
Vickers. Carl ----------J.N.H. --------------Tallahassee
Ward, Johnnie ---- ------J.N.E. -------------- Ft. Myers
Washington, Bennie ---J.N.H. ---- Pompano
Watts, Edna L .-- --- .S.H. 3-- --.- Sanford
Way, Gertrude .-------.-- _--- B.S.E. 2 .-n. Melbourne
Wheeler, Dorothy ---J.H. 3 -------------- Orlando
Weatherspool, Wm..--.---. A.B. I ---1-------.-------- Bainbridge, Georgia
Whaley, Florence P. --..--S.N.E. -----.----.--------- Jacksonville
White, Andrew .--._ .---Sp -. ------ Marianna
Williams, Otis M. -...---.... -B.S. 3. ----..----------- Pensacola
Wilkins, Oliver W.--------- B.S. 2 ..-----.-----.----.. Madison
Williams, Joshua...--.----- B.S. 2. --------.... --------- Lakeland
Williams, Morris ------- B.S. 1.-.--. Jacksonville
Woodard, Horace..-------- .B.S.A. 2 -------.---.---..- Quincy
Williams, Irene -----------.. S.N.E. ..--------..------ St. Petersburg
Wilson, Jessie ---- J.N.E. -- ----- Hastings
Wilson, Doris Thelma ----J.N.E. ---------..--------. West Palm Beach
Williams, Cornette ----J.N.H. .-.---- Lakeland
Williams, Joanna -----J.N.C.- --.-- .Pensacola
Wilson, Wesley .0 --- --- B.S.A. 1-.. ------------.. Leesburg
Williams, Rachel ------------ S.N.E- ......... ----Quincy
Wilson, Helen Bobby --- S.N.H ........------------- Tampa





CATALOG, 1929-1930 25
COLLEGE DISTRIBUTION
1929-1930
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Senior --..--..-..._.--.....--- 2
Junior ----------.-- ---.--.-----. 0
Sophomore ---...-......------------------ 1
Freshman ----.1-I .----.--._--11
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Senior ---- ..-------- --.---_ ---------.---- 1
Junior --------.----------.--- ----.___ ------------- 8
Sophomore __---_- .... ...------ -14
Freshman -.._---_.----- -----_-.- __-___- --_13
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Senior Class ._-__----- ____ __ ._...__..-- --------- -_.. 1
Junior Class _---__--------_----_______-______... .- 1
Sophomore Class .------------------.--_...... .. 8
Freshman Class .-_------____..___.__________ 5
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Senior Class .---------------..---____________ ____ 1
Junior Class _--_- .---___. _-____________ __________ 2
Sophomore Class_. ----_- -.- --_______-__________ ... 8
Freshman Class ... ..--_------________________ 16
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
Senior Class ----.___- -- ------_----------___ 0 o
Junior Class ----_---- ___ ---___-______ ___--- 2
Sophomore _----------_____ 0
Freshman .---------------.------._-___._.__-___.-_ 0
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Senior Class --------- ...- .------------ _______--- 4
Junior Class -.._---- _____ ___' ..-..__ ..-- 2
Sophomore Class _-:----------........- .... -_-___ 1 .
Freshman Class -----------_-....__ _.---._ ...____-_ 5
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE
Senior Class ..- :------------------------__- 0
Junior Class ----------.... ....-.._.._____....i.______.___ 1
Sophomore Class ------....--.---.-------___. -._._____ 0 .''
Freshman Class -........ ...._ 2 '





26 FLORIDA A. L M. COLLEGE
NORMAL
Senior Normal Education -_-- ----._ -2 8
Junior Normal Home Economics -__----------_ 32
Senior Normal Home Economics ---------------15
Junior Normal Home Economics ----____.-... 12
Senior Normal Commercial .--.--- -----_------- 4
Junior Normal Commercial----------------------------------11
NURSE TRAINING
Junior Nurse ---____..........-- 1
Freshman Nurse -.- ------------- ---.--. 3
Senior Nurse:. --_------------_.-______----------- 2
HIGH SCHOOL
-........................------------------------246
ENROLLMENT SUMMARY
1929-1930
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Grand
Male Female Total Total
Senior College -----.. 9 0 9
Junior College ..------_ 11 6 17
Sophomore College ----21 11 32
Freshman ---------- 39 12 51
Senior Normal --_------ 1 46 47
Junior Normal ---...-- 0 55 55
Senior Nurse ._--------- 2 2
Junior Nurse -- 1 1
Freshman Nurse.------ 3 3
Special Students.----.--.. 2 2 219
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
Grand
Male Female Total Total
Senior High School II__22 36 58
Senior High School II_23 31 54
Senior High School I .-16 16 32
Junior High School III_10 24 34
Junior High School II 6 14 20
Junior High School I --- 9 Ia' 19
Night School ___--__... 26 26
Special Students ----.. -- 1 2 3 246





BULLETIN
1930---1931





CALENDAR
1930-Sept. 21, Sunday, Boarding Department Opens.
Sept. 22, Monday, Enrollment and Classification.
Sept. 23, Tuesday, Enrollment and Classification.
Sept. 24, Wednesday, First Semester Begins.
Nov. 27, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day.
Dec. 12, Friday, Farmers' Conference.
Dec. 20, Saturday, Christmas Vacation Begins.
Dec. 30, Tuesday, Christmas Vacation Ends.
1931-Jan. 1, Thursday, New Years Day.
Jan. 20-23, Tuesday-Friday, First Semester Examinations.
Jan. 26, Monday, Second Semester Begins.
Mar. 4-5, Wednesday-Thursday, Leon County Boys and Girls'
Meeting.
Apr. 17, Friday, Declamatory Contest (High School).
May 1, Friday, Oratorical Contest (College).
May 12, Tuesday, National Hospital Day.
May 19-22, Tuesday-Friday, Second Semester Examinations.
May 24, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon.
May 25, Monday, Physical Training Exhibition.
May 25, Monday, Annual Music Recital.
May 26, Tuesday, College Class Play.
May 27, Wednesday, Alumni Day.
May 27, Wednesday, High School Commencement.
May 27, Wednesday, Class Day Exercises.
May 28, Thursday, Commencement.
June 8, Monday, Summer School Begins.
July 30, Thursday, Summer School Closes.





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
HON. DOYLE E. CARLTON, Governor, President.
HON. W. M. IGOU, Secretary of State.
HON. W.S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Superintendent of Public Instruction.
HON. F. H. DAVIS, Attorney-General.
HON. W. V. KNOTT, State Treasurer.
STATE BOARD OF CONTROL
HON. P. K. YONGE, Chairman (Pensacola).
HON. F. J. WIDEMAN (West Palm Beach).
HON. A. H. BLANDING (Bartow).
HON. W. B. DAVIS (Perry).
HON. R. F. MCGUIRE (Orlando).
HON. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary (Tallahassee).
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
1930-1931
J. R. E. LEE, SR., President of College.
J. B. BRAGG, Acting Vice-President, Dean of Men.
B. L. PERRY, Dean of Agricultural Department.
E. M. GRIGGS, Dean of Home Economics Department.
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department.
G. M. JONES, Dean of Mechanic Arts Department.
L. H. B. FOOTE, M.D., Director of Hospital.
A. L. KIDD, Director of College Press Service.
J. R. E. LEE, JR., Bnti;,l' Manager
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant.
REV. A. P. TURNER, College Chaplain.
L. M. FLEMING, Registrar and Secretary.





30 FLORIDA A. & MI. COLLEGE
COLLEGE FACULTY
1930-1931
J. R. E. LEE
President
A.B., A.M., Bishop College; LL.D., Wilberforce University; Graduate Work,
University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota.
J. B. BRAGG
Acting Vice-President; Dean of Men; Head Coach; Professor of Physical Education
Tuskegee Institute; A.B., Talladega College; Summer Work, University of Illinois
Coaching School, 1920-1922.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
B. L. PERRY
Dean; Associate Professor of Landscape Gardening and Field Crops
Tuskegee Institute; Special Study, Iowa State College
J. C. BALDWIN
Assistant Professor of Agronomy; Agronomy
B.S., Florida A. & M. College
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Associate Professor of Dairying; Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University; Cornell University; Michigan Agricultural College
W. MCKINLEY KING
Instructor; Assistant Coach
B.S., Hampton Institute
L. A. MARSHALL
Professor of Agricultural Education; Teacher Training and Science
B.Sc., Agriculture, Prairie View College; B.Sc., Agriculture, Iowa State College;
Graduate Work, Iowa State College.
J. E. SANFORD
Instructor; Poultry
Hampton Institute
DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean; Professor of Home Economics; Textiles and Clothing
B.S., Bishop College; B.S., Simmons College (Boston); M.S., Kansas State
Agricultural College.
',--LrGLEtAN '.i ; .'
Assistant Professor; High School Domestic S.- .tcc
Spelman College; Special Work, Columbia University
MARIE F. MCMILLAN
Assistant Professor; Plain Sewing
B.S., Florida A. & M. College; Special Work, Hampton Institute
*Year leave of absence (1930-1931) to study at Michigan State College.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 31
C. B. NELSON\ V
Assistant Professor of Home Economics; Teacher Training, Methods, Domestic
Science.
Wilberforce University; Special Work, Hampton. Institute
ORA VANN K
Instructor; Handicrafts
Tuskegee Institute
DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
R. O'HARA LANIER
Dean; Professor of Education and Psychology
A.B., Lincoln University (Penna.); A.M., Leland Stanford Junior University;
Summer Work, Columbia University.
JENNIE E. BAKER
Assistant Professor of Library Science; Librarian
A.B., Atlanta University; B.Sc., Library, Hampton Institute
EMORY BIRCH
Assistant Professor of Biology; Biology
A.B. Lincoln University (Penna.)
CLYDE M. BRADFORD.
Instructor; Shorthand, Typewriting, Business English
Florida A. & M. College; Special Work, Columbia University
J. V. A. COLLINS
Associate Professor; Vocal and Instrumental Music; Music, Appreciation
A.B., Bishop College; New England Conservatory; Mus.B., Bishop College
GEORGE DECOURSEY
Head, Division of Commerce and Finance; Instructor; Bookkeeping, Accounting,
Economics.
B.S., Hampton Institute
H. M. EFFERSON
Professor of Mathematics; Head, Division of Mathematics
A.B., Atlanta University; A.M., Columbia University; Summer Work, University
of Minnesota.
CULLEN S. HOLMES
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics; Acting Head, Division of Sciences
A.B., Claflin University; M. S. Columbia University
F. E. JAMES
Assistant Professor; Public Scho.l Ar,, ..- Director, Choral and Glee Clubs
A.B.,- \V\,I University
A. L. KIDD
Director of College Press Service; Professor of Political Science; Head, Division
of Political and Social Sciences.
A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; Special Work,
University of Pittsburg.
L. A. KIRKSEY
Instructor; Violin and Reed Instruments
B.S., Florida A. & M. College





32 FLORIDA A. ? M. COLLEGE
J. L. LAN;HORNE
Assistant Professor of English; Acting Head, Division of English
A.B., University of Michigan; Graduate Work, University of Michigan
R. H. LEE
Assistant Professor of English
A.B., University of Wisconsin; Graduate Study, University of Wisconsin
E. E. MATTHEWS
Supervisor of Practice Teaching; Professor of Edication (Elementary); Head,
Division of Teacher-Training and Practice.
A.B., Howard University; A.M., Columbia University
CLARENCE B. NASBY
lsstructor; Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing, Public School Art
George R. Smith College; Chicago Art School
JOSEPH REASON
Associate Professor of Languages; Modern Languages
A.B., New Orleans University; Graduate Work, Ohio State University
E. P. SOUTHALL
Professor of History; Head, Division of History
A.B., Howard University; A.M., University of Chicago; Summer Work, Boston
University.
A. S. PRATER-STEWART
Instructor; Physical Education for Girls; Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman Institute; Hampton Institute; Florida A. & M. College
CAPT. W. CAREY THOMAS
Instructor; Wind Instruuents; Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute
:E. Et. 55 .LE
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., Bates College (Maine)
E. C. WEARE
Assistant Librarian
Washburn College; Student, Syracuse University
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC ARTS
Dean; Professor of Architecture and Applied Mechanics
B.S.A., University of Michigan; M.S.A., University of Michigan
CHAS. C. HAYLING
Instructor; Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill & Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
*Year leave of absence (1930-1931) to study at University of Chicago (Rockefeller
Foundation Scholarship).





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 33
Z. R. HERCEY
Instructor; Engineering and Plumbing
Tuskegee Institute
W. HAVRE HOLLINS
Assistant Instructor; Printing
Alabama A. & M. College (Normal, Ala.)
B. F. HOLMES, JR.
Instructor; Carpentry
Hampton Institute
EDWARD JONES
Instructor; Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute
A. C. PHILLIPS
Instructor; Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute; Summer Work, Hampton Institute
W. T. REED
Instructor; Auto Mechanics
Hampton Institute; Special Course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago.
JAMES P. SCOTT
Instructor; Architecture and Applied Mechanics; Mechanical Drawing
B.S., Howard University
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY
Instructor; Printing
Alabama A. & M. College (Normal, Ala.); Special Course, Mergenthaler Lino-
type School, Chicago.
S. L. THORPE
Instructor; Applied Electricity
Tuskegee Institute
DEPARTMENT OF NURSE TRAINING AND HEALTH
L. H. B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
B.S., M.D., Howard University
LULA R. LONG
Superintendent of Nurses
R.N., Blue k.d...- Hospitals Asheville, N.C.
ANNIE B. ROBINSON
Nurse
R.N., Freedmen's Hospital, Howard University
Visiting Staff
DR. A. O. CAMPBELL
Tallahassee, Florida





34 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
DR. J. A. D. JAMES
Thomasville, Georgia
DR. W. S. STEVENS
Quincy, Florida
DEMONSTRATION HIGH SCHOOL
Principal, Demonstration High School; Professor of Secondary Education; Lan-
guages and Mathematics; Director Teacher Extension Service.
A.B., Syracuse University
M. J. ANDERSON
Instructor; High School Science
B.S., Florida A. & M. College
T. E. LANG
Instructor; Junior High School Mathematics and English
Florida A. & M. College (Normal Department)
E. F. MANCE
Associate Professor of Mathematics; Mathematics
B.S., Howard University; Summer Study, Columbia University
A. S. PARKS
Instructor; Social Science
B.S., State Normal College (Indiana); Summer Work, University of Wisconsin
J. M. RABOUIN-PHILLIPS
Instructor; High School English
A.B., University of California; A.B., Education, Florida A. & M. College;
Summer Work, Hampton Institute.
A. P. TURNER
Chaplain
Associate Professor of Moral and Religious Education; High School English
A.B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
DEMONSTRATION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
MALISSA SYDES
Principal, Practice School; Assistant Professor of Elementary Education and
Primary Methods.
B.S. in Elementary Education, Columbia University
IRENE ANDERSON
Critic Teacher, Practice School
Florida A. & M. College (Normal Department)
DOROTHY GUNN-HOLMES
Critic Teacher, Practice School; Third and Fourth Grades
Hampton Institute
*Year leave of absence (1930-1931) to study at University of Chicago (Rockefeller .
Foundation Scholarship).





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 35
AMY JACKSON
Critic Teacher, Practice School; First and Second Grades; Kindergarten Methods
Florida A. & M. College (Normal Department)
INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
Business Manager; Custodian of Property
A.B., Lincoln University (Penna.)
JAMES H. BLOW
Bookkeeper
Hampton Institute; School of Commerce, Wilberforce University; Special Study,
University of Chicago.
IVA HILL-BALDWIN
Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier
Tuskegee Institute
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE
Secretary to President
Wilberforce University
H. W. COLLEY
Secretary to Business Manager
University of Nebraska
In Charge Student Accounts; HospitalRecord Clerk
Florida A. & M. College Commercial Department
L. M. FLEMING
Registrar
B.S., Florida A. & M. College
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Hampton Institute; Y. M. C. A. Secretarial School, New York
GEORGIA U. WILLIAMS
Clerk and Postmistress
Commercial Department, Florida A. & M. College
L. F. CURRY
Matron, Tucker Hall
Clark University
M. A. JONES
In Charge Administration Building
Atlanta University (Normal Department)
E. O. PAIGE
Matron, Clarke Hall
Vienna Millinery and Tailoring School, N. Y.; Chicago Academy of Fine Arts;
Columbia University.





36 FLORIDA A. g M. COLLEGE
N. S. MCGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute
A. D. PADDYFOTE
Matron, Men's Building
Allen University
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Mel'in Lodge
Claflin University
L. F. REED
In Charge Cafeteria
Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute
S. R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant; Instructor; Military Science and Physical Education
Tuskegee Institute; Summer Work, Y. M. C. A. College (Springfield)
A. A. TURNER
State Farm Demonstration Agent for Men
Ohio State University
JULIA A. MILLER
State Demonstration Agent for Women
Tuskegee Institute





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 37
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORICAL STATEMENT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the College
was established in 1887 as a State Normal School. Under the prin-
cipalship of Mr. T. D. Tucker, assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was
opened at Tallahassee, October 5, 1887, with an attendance of 15
students. In 1891 the College moved to its present site. In 1905
it passed from the direct management of the State Board of Education
to the management of the Board of Control as one of the institutions of
higher learning. In 1909 its name was changed to that of the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legis-
lature. It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropriation.
It has received the benefit of some very needed assistance from
such outside sources as the General Education Board, the Julius Rosen-
wald Fund, as well as the gifts of interested friends.
The Presidency of this institution has been held by four men,
respectively, T. D. Tucker (1887 to 1901); N. B. Young (1901 to
1923); W. H. A. Howard (1923 to 1924); J. R. E. Lee (1924-).
LOCATION
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is located in
Tallahassee, Florida, an educational and industrial center with a popu-
lation of nearly six thousand five hundred. It is about one hundred
seventy-two miles from Jacksonville and about two hundred miles
from Pensacola.
Situated at the Northern border of the state at what is stated
to be the highest point in the state, excessive humidity is seldom
experienced and the climate is bracing.
The College Campus is about a quarter of a mile from the rail-
way station and a mile from the center of the city on a hill overlooking
the city of Tallahassee.
PURPOSE
The primary aim of the College is to prepare teachers for the
colored public schools of the State and training to those who plan to
enter professional fields. Knowledge of the subjects to be taught and
skill in the technique of teaching are among the chief objectives.
Professional training is afforded by college courses in education,
agriculture, trades and industries, and home economics and by two
years of normal-school work. Practice teaching in the Practice School
is required of all students in the college and in the normal school that
they may try out in actual work their ability to apply the theories
studied in the various professional subjects.





38 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
PHYSICAL PLANT
LAND. The College Campus consists of a tract of land of about
250 acres, part of which now is included within the city limits of
Tallahassee. All except the actual campus site is under cultivation.
THE NEW AUDITORIUM. Erected as a result of a legislative
act of 1925 at a cost of $250,000, contains administrative offices,
classrooms, music rooms and an auditorium with a seating capacity
of 1,700 with a stage of the capacity of seating a 150-voice choir.
AGRICULTURAL BUILDING. Administrative offices for the
department and for the State Agricultural Extension workers, as
well as classrooms, and laboratories for experimental purposes on the
main and basement floors afford agricultural students splendid theory
facilities.
MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING. This building is of brick struc-
ture and contains shops for auto mechanics, printing, carpentry, elec-
tricity, tailoring, painting, mechanical drawing, masonry and plumb-
ing.
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING. This building equipped with
electric and gas ranges, sewing tables, looms, etc., provides the facilities
and opportunity for young women to learn the science and technique
of home making.
SCIENCE HALL. This building with eleven rooms makes pro-
vision for all the science work of the school. Separate chemistry, phy-
sics and biology laboratories are provided. The high school classes are
held in the remaining portion of this building with administrative office
for the high school staff.
SANITORIUM. Hospitalization and general attention to the
health of students is cared for by a trained staff consisting of a Direc-
tor, an Interne and two (2) registered nurses with nurses in training.
An X-Ray and other modern equipment is provided in this 25-bed
capacity sanitorium and health centre.
DAIRY BUILDING. The Dairy Building was enlarged in 1928.
It is a substantial structure, the front portion of which consists of
class rooms and laboratories for animal husbandry. The rear portion
contains staunchions for the milking of cows, and other equipment.
GYMNASIUM. The Gymnasium is a spacious building with
floor space sufficient to accommodate 125 students at a time. It is
equipped with the necessary apparatus.
THE LIBRARY. The Library contains about 5,000 volumes and
is housed in a separate building. General Reference, Reading, Children's
and Conference Rooms are provided. A trained Libraria/ with an as-
sistant is in charge.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 39
THE COMMONS. The dining room now, since the addition of
the west wing in 1929, can conveniently seat 800 students and 103
teachers, if necessary. Kitchen facilities with the very latest utensils,
apparatus with refrigeration and steam tables make the dining room
activities one of the most praiseworthy features of this institution's
life.
COLLEGE WOMEN'S HALL. A dormitory for college women
with adequate facilities for the housing of 75 students. Bathing facili-
ties on each corridor, modern furniture, ample light, ventilation and
a heating plant provides the students with everything essential to
comfort. Fire prevention apparatus are a part of the equipment of this
building.
TUCKER HALL-CLARKE HALL-MELVIN LODGE. Three
additional girls' dormitories not quite as modern as the one above but
with comfortable facilities and clean surroundings. Fire prevention
apparatus are a part of the equipment of these buildings.
COLLEGE MEN'S HALL. A dormitory for college men with
the most modern equipment and facilities to comfortably house 76
students. Separate showers and laboratories on each floor. Each room
opens on the corridor and is well lighted, ventilated and heated. Fire
prevention apparatus are a part of the equipment of this building.
Y.M.C.A. BUILDING-BAND COTTAGE. Two additional
boys' dormitories. The former not quite as modern in its appointments
as the one listed above but comfortable and clean. The latter abandon-
ed since the erection of the New Dormitory for Men. Fire prevention
apparatus are a part of the equipment.
LAUNDRY. The school has a complete laundry unit housed in
a separate building. The laundry of the student is taken care of weekly.
MISCELLANEOUS BUILDINGS. Many other buildings used
for various purposes constitute the balance of the total of thirty build-
ings. Some of them, such as Gwyn, Mebane and Howard Cottages are
used as either male teachers' dormitories or homes for families. Several
cottages for families are situated on or near the campus.





40 FLORIDA A. f M. COLLEGE
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted to The Florida Agricultural and Mechan-
ical College from the following accredited high schools in the State
without conditions:
Lincoln High School, Gainesville, Florida; Booker T. Washing-
ton, Miami, Florida; Stanton High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Wash-
ington High School, Pensacola, Florida; Lincoln High School, Talla-
hassee, Florida; Howard Academy, Ocala, Florida; Central Academy,
Palatka, Florida; Lincoln Park Academy, Ft. Pierce, Florida; Edward
Waters College, Jacksonville, Florida.
Students may be admitted to the Florida Agricultural and Me-
chanical College upon the basis of the following:
1. Record from high school; 2. Recommendations; 3. Letter con-
cerning personal qualities, such as character; 4. Aptitude Test; 5. Phy-
sical and Medical Examination. General entrance must be upon, 1. cer-
tificate, or, 2. examination.
COLLEGE ENTRANCE UNITS
Minimum of 16 units without condition.
Minimum of 15 units with condition.
Required:
4 years English -. .. ............-- 3 units
2 years Ancient or Modern Language 2-----.-- --....2
1 year of Science -- -..1.-........
2 years of Mathematics .--- .-2........__.. __2
SPECIFIC ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
For Entrance to Home Economics, 1 unit of Home Economics.
For Entrance to Mechanic Arts, 1 unit Trade Mechanical Drawing.
For Entrance to Agriculture, 1 unit General Agriculture.
For Entrance to Bachelor of Arts, 2 units of High School Latin, 2 units
High School Social Science, 2 units High School Mathematics.
For Entrance Bachelor of Science, 4 units High School Science, 2 units
Modern Language.
For Entrance Bachelor of Science Education, same as B.S.; 3 units
Social Science.
REMOVAL OF ENTRANCE CONDITIONS
All entrance conditions must be made up before the beginning
of the second year.
CREDIT FOR WORK DONE IN OTHER SCHOOLS
Applicants who have done work for which they wish to receive
credit should state this fact when they apply for admission. Classifi-





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 41
cation based on such work will be provisional only, depending on the
quality of work during the first year at Florida A. & M. College.
In no case can any request for work done elsewhere be considered
unless presented during the first year. The college authorities reserve
the right, in case of error, or for other sufficient cause, to revise at a
later date, either up or down, the rating given any student at entrance.
ADVANCED STANDING
Students coming from other colleges will receive credit as fol-
lows:
Class A colleges, credit for credit; class B colleges, two-thirds
credit; class C colleges, one-third credit. No credit accepted from class
D colleges.
THE COLLEGE YEAR AND UNIT OF CREDIT
The unit of College Credit is the Semester Hour. Any subject
taken once per week for 16 or 18 weeks carries 1 semester hour of
credit. Laboratory, Art, Home Economics, Industries and Physical Edu-
cation, Military Science, Agricultural Field and Laboratory courses
must operate two hours per week or 1 double period for one semester
hour College Credit.
GRADUATION
One hundred twenty-four hours are required for college grad-
uation. Four of which may be in Physical Education and Military
Science.
ENGLISH REQUIREMENTS-No person will be graduated
who does not pass the comprehensive English Vocabulary and Grammar
Usage Composition Test. Positively no person will be graduated who is
deficient in English regardless of the satisfaction of quantitative re-
quirements.
HONORS
Distinction at graduation is bestowed upon student who has at-
tained the required record with the first 32 grades in major courses.
WITH DISTINCTION: Twenty-four "A's" and "B's" of which
at least ten are "A's."
WITH GREATER DISTINCTION: Twenty-seven "A's" and
"B's" of which at least sixteen are "A's."
WITH GREATEST DISTINCTION: Thirty-two "A's" and
"B's" of which twenty-four are "A's."
Grades in Physical Education and Industries will not be considered
in averages for honors unless such courses are majors and minors.
REGISTRATION
The first day of the academic year and of the Summer Session
is devoted to the registration of students and formulating of student





42 FLORIDA A. W M. COLLEGE
programs. Second semester registration is held for college students talk-
ing one semester subjects or for those desiring additional work for the
second semester.
Failure to register on the days designated is penalized; in the case
of winter students, by a fine of one dollar for first week, and by a fine
of one dollar for each week thereafter.
EXPLANATION OF THE NUMBERING OF COURSES
Under 100 ------------------- High School
100 to 199 ---------------- Freshman
200 to 299 ---- ----------------Sophomore
300 to 399 -J----------------Junior
400 to 499 -------------------------------- Senior
500 ---------Special Senior and Advanced Courses
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The regulations of the college are few and simple, appealing to
the student's self-respect and personal responsibility. Punishment is by
demerits, as follows: Five demerits make one warning, or mark; ten
demerits, two warnings or marks; fifteen demerits in any one session
make a student liable to suspension. Suspended students may be re-
instated by the Executive Committee or by the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be withdrawn must
be made to the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry. Clothing
must be marked with indelible ink.
GRADES AND MARKS
The system of grades and marks in the college is the alphabetical
system. A, 90-100; B, 80-89; C, 70-79. No credit below C. Condi-
tion, D, 60-69 and below; F, 60-59 and below. I, incomplete; W,
withdrawal.
All conditions, a grade of D, incurred by students must be re-
moved by students before one year of date after they have been made.
If it is not removed in one year's time, the D becomes an F. A condition
can be removed by class work or examination. An F must be removed
by class work, repeating the subject.
The grade "I" is reported when the student misses the final ex-
amination in the course or when the examination has been passed but
some part of the required work of the course is unfinished. In every
instance incomplete grades must be removed within one semester
following the original report.
The privilege of removing "I" (conditioned) extends over one
semester only. After that time the grade automatically becomes "F"
and it is necessary to repeat the course.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 43
Plus added, equals extraordinary grade, as A plus, better than
average.
Minus added, equals less than average for that group.
Records transferred from other schools will be rated with "C."
DROPPING OF COURSES
1. A student may not drop a course without the consent of the
Dean.
2. A student who drops a course after the mid-semester is given
a final grade of "F." If he drops a course before the mid-semester:
A. With the permission of his Dean he is reported "Dropped."
B. Without the permission of his Dean he is reported "F."
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Students in the College are grouped into four classes according to
the records in the Registrar's office. The basis for this classification is
as follows:
Summer Students who have credit for at least ninety-six (96)
semester hours of work, and who have no conditions in the sophomore
class.
Juniors. Students who have to their credit at least sixty-four
(64) semester hours of work, and who have no conditions in the
Freshman Class.
Sophomore:. Students who have credit for at least thirty-two
(32) semester hours of work, and have no entrance conditions.
Freshmen. All other students, not registered as unclassified, are
ranked as Freshmen, having for entrance at least 15 units of high
school work.
UNCLASSIFIED STJDENTS
Students are unclassified who have not met the requirements as
their respective courses call for. Students may receive classification,
when they have met requirements.
PROBATION
Students on probation are those whose scholastic records are un-
satisfactory, although they have not been finally dismissed from col--
lege.
If the work of a student is unsatisfactory in quantity or quality,
the case will be investigated and the student will be warned, placed on
probation or dismissed from the College. Such action will usually be
taken at the end of a semester.
1. A student is on probation at the end of the first semester
of residence who has a deficiency of more than two subjects.
2. No student on probation shall hold a scholarship.
3. Whenever the work of a student during the current semester
becomes unsatisfactory, he may be placed on probation by the Dean.





44 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
4. The Dean shall post a list of students who are on probation, as
well as a list of students who do superior work. This list of superior
students, shall be known as the Dean's List.
5. Students on probation shall not participate in extra-curricular
activities.
THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
The second week in February of the candidates Senior Year is
given over to a comprehensive examination and the candidate is given
a comprehensive examination testing of the candidate's general in-
formation, culture and general intelligence. The candidate is given one
general examination and a comprehensive examination in his Major
Field.
ADVISORS
A complete list of readings by years is given each college student
at the beginning of his Freshman Year, the advisors check up on his
reading at the end of each year to insure his application to the work
and reading, year by year.
A student failing the comprehensive examination, may be asked
to spend another semester or year to satisfy the requirements of the
committee in this respect and regard.
General tests which are given after student enters:
1. Physical Examination.
2. Intelligence Test.
3 English Placement Examination.
4. An Achievement Test.
5. An Aptitude Test in the persons-selected subject for a major.
6. A Reading Examination.
ATHLETIC
All athletic activities and teams are under direct management of
a governing board, consisting of Faculty and Student members. The
student members of this board are elected by the members of the ath-
letic association, which comprises the entire student body.
1. No student with an average grade below "70" or "C" may
participate in any athletics until the removal of such standing or
condition.
2. No student may wear upon the campus the letter or athletic
insignia of another institution.
3. A "letter man" is one who participates in the majority of the
major games, including the "Thanksgiving Classic."
4. Any student who fractures a major rule may be expelled from
the squad, at the direction of the coaches.
5. No cursing or use of foul and abusive language will be toler-
ated.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 45
6. No student will be allowed to use tobacco in any form while
participating in the major sports.
7. Only students who have won Varsity "F" may wear the same
on any sweater or coat.
8. "Letter students" transferring from schools will not be allow-
ed to participate in major athletics until after a year's residence.
MISCELLANEOUS
MILITARY CALISTHENICS AND SCIENCE
Two hours per week in military science is considered a part of
the requirement in Physical Education for men.
All young men of the college are under military discipline; they
are members of the school battalion. With the exception of the Com-
mandant all the officers of the battalion are drawn from the student
body, and are promoted from year to year as vacancies occur. Setting-
up exercises and military drill will be conducted under the regulations
prescribed by the Commandant.
In May of each year the several companies hold a competitive
drill.
MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS
Some of the units of the College Band and Orchestra are a
Concert Band of fifty pieces; a Symphony Orchestra of twenty-five
pieces and a Junior Band of twenty pieces; a Girl's Orchestra of fifteen
pieces; a Girl's Drum and Bugle Corps of thirty-six pieces; a Sym-
phonic Orchestra of fifteen pieces. The Concert Band is attached to
the Military department. It is a uniform organization and leads the
students in march to chapel Wednesdays and Sundays. Band concerts
are rendered in the Webb Bandstand every Sunday at 4:15 p.m. The
Symphony Orchestra plays at all noon assemblies and renders special
music at Sunday evening services while the Symphonic Orchestra is
used for entertaining.
Some of the outstanding engagements of the Band and Orchestra
are the Jacksonville Fair in November, the South Florida Fair at
Tampa in January, lasting ten days. The Band and Orchestra are heard
over the radio almost every evening while at the Fair.
The Orchestra gave several concerts over radio station WRUF,
at Gainesville, during the school year 1930.
Students with previous training who can qualify are permitted to
take part in either or both of these organizations. Those wishing to
begin will be admitted to the Junior organization and transferred to
the Senior organization as soon as there is a vacancy.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
All students are required to take some phase of Physical Educa-
tion, a minimum of two hours per week. This may be directed phy-
sical activities or recreation.





46 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
THE BOOK STORE
The book store is operated through the office of the Business
Manager. Books and articles of general need and use of students are
sold here. It is located in the Administration Building.
UNIFORMS
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or blue serge,
and, with cap, cost $20.00.
These uniforms are made in the College Shop. Payment for uni-
form is required for matriculation of a young man.
SUGGESTED ARTICLES FOR STUDENTS TO BRING
General List For All Students
4 Sheets 6 Table Napkins
4 Pillow Cases 2 Bed Spreads
6 Towels 1 Bible
2 Blankets 1 Bottle Indelible Ink
2 Scarfs for Dressers 1 Dictionary
Raincoat 1 Rug (small)
GIRL'S LIST
1 Navy Blue Coat Suit 1 Raincoat
2 Navy Blue Wash Dresses 1 Umbrella
3 White Uniform Blouses (long sleeves) 3 Navy Blue Skirts, pleated or plain
1 Pair Rubbers 6 Middies (all white, long sleeves)
3 Laundry Bags Bloomers
3 White Voile Social Blouses
BOYS' LIST
Negligee Shirts Pajamas
White Collars Underclothing sufficient for three weeks
Black Ties Comb, Brush, Toothbrush
Laundry Bag Black Shoes
Pair Overalls Raincoat
1 Shoe Polishing Outfit
THE CAFETERIA
There is a cafeteria where light refreshments and meals to order
may be secured at a nominal cost.
THE SUMMER SCHOOL
One of the regular School Publications and Bulletins is devoted to
the announcement of the Summer School Courses and Program for
teachers. The summer school is operated for teachers. Regular winter
students are not allowed to attend. This allows a chance for distinct
professional work. It is divided into two distinct divisions- high
school and college.
TUITION AND FEES
Registration fee, per year --...--....-------------...--- --. $ 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year -----------------------------------.--.-...- 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year -----------.-----.-------- 2.00
Breakage fee, per year _... .....-------------------- _. 1.00
Athletic fee, per year ------------------- 7.00
Science fee ---------------.- 2.00
Total entrance fee ----------------------- ..----$15.50
Tuition fee for out-of-State students, per year ----.----- --.... ---.$20.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional, each week late.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 47
EXPENSES FOR BOYS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month --- --_---- $ 16.00
8 months .-.....--.------... -- -----.-------------.._ 128.00
Laundering, etc., per month, 8 months. __----.. .----------..._ ---... 16.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day, while sick in addition to board _---.. -.. 1.00
Books --- ----------. --.---....-- .-----------------------------------------.-- 10.00
Uniform .- .....-- ------.-.. -...... ........ 20.00
Registration fee, per year --- --- ............. 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per month) -_.---..-----._..--- 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year -----..._ --___.. 2.00
Breakage fee, per year .---- ------------------..... .---..----.....------ 1.00
Athletic fee, per year ---------------------------------. ----- 7.00
Science fee ---..-...-------. --------------......2.00
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-State boys ... ---------.----- -- 190.50
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year .--------...---...------ 20.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State boys, per year .. -----..----..----------- $211.00
EXPENSES FOR GIRLS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month ----$....---..$ 16.00
8 months --- -----------------------.----- 128.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day while sick, in addition to board ...------.------- 1.00
Registration fee, per year ........-----------------.--------.------------- 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per month) ------ ..------- 2.00
Entertainment fee, (25c per month) per year .----------.-----..- ----- 2.00
Breakage fee, per year ---_.------------------_-------- ..-- ------- 1.00
Athletic fee, per year .-------------------. ---.--- .----- -------. ...- --------- 7.00
Science fee .... --------- .----..-----.....----- 2.00
Books .......... ---------.------------------ 10.00
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-State girls. ..--.--..... ---. 153.00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year .-_- ..----------.. -------- 20.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State girls, per year _...--------..---.- -----$174.50
MUSIC
Per Month
(a) Elementary (2 periods per week) --....---. ----..------------- $4.00
(b) Advanced Elementary (2 periods per week) ... ---- 4.00
(c) Intermediate (2 periods per week) .....---- ---------..--- 4.00
PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable not later than the fifth of each month. In all
cases where students have not paid their bills by the fifth of the month
they will be required to give up school and do such work as the school
may assign them until the bills are paid. During the time they are
out of school for non-payment of bills, the work which they will do
will pay only their board for that time.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances for stu-
dents, to send money by postal money order, express money order or
registered letter direct to the President. He will not be responsible for
money sent to students.





48 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD
Transcripts are issued to institutions and not to students. The
first transcript of record is issued free of charge. For each additional
transcript a fee of $1.00 is charged.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
ATHENAEUM LITERARY SOCIETY
This is a college organization confined to the women on the cam-
pus. Its purposes are to create greater enthusiasm in dramatics and
reading; to promote higher scholastic standing; to support firmly law
and order on the campus, and to develop moral character in pure
womanhood.
THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB
All Agricultural students are required to attend bi-monthly meet-
ings of the Agricultural Club. The membership of this club is made
up of all students connected with the department. The purpose of the
organization is to stimulate group and cooperative thinking, and to
build up a high appreciation for agricultural development. The club
promotes an annual banquet, and assists in raising funds to defray
expenses of departmental extra-curricula activities.
COLLEGE LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY
This organization was established in October 1927, at the sug-
gestion of President J. R. E. Lee. The purpose of this organization is
the cultivation of a better appreciation for literature and art, in order
that students might better prepare themselves for service in their
respective communities.
COLLEGE WITS
This is a college organization confined to the men of the College
Department. It was established in 1913 under the sponsorship of E. B.
Jones, B.S., M.S. (deceased).
The direct purpose for the formation of this organization was
the raising of the standard of scholarship, and the fostering of more
genuine college spirit and the promotion of the general welfare of the
college. Its activities encompass the literary, scientific and athletic
fields.
FARMERS' CONFERENCE
This is an annual event set apart as a day of instruction and enter-
tainment of farmers, their families, and rural workers. This Con-
ference takes place the second Friday of December.
THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB
This club includes all of the young women who are enrolled in
the college and normal curricula for teaching home economics. It





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 49
aims to study and discuss such questions as pertain to the teaching of
home economics and to professional home making.
PUBLICATIONS
The Weekly News, a paper published weekly, edited by the 1928-
1929 and 1929-1930 Freshman classes and published by the college.
RELIGIOUS
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian. In ad-
dition to the daily devotion, mid-week prayer service, Sunday School,
Sunday preaching, Vesper services and Bible study courses, there are
active Young Men's Christian and Young Women's Christian Associa-
tions. The Chaplain of the College preaches every Sunday at 11 o'clock.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL
The student council is an organization composed of college stu-
dents who put forth every effort to assist the administration in what-
ever way possible for the welfare of the college.
It has the following representation from the college department:
3 seniors, 2 juniors, 1 sophomore, 1 freshman.
THE HERBART-PESTALOZZI SOCIETY
An organization composed of students taking courses in Edu-
cation, Educational Methods, Educational Psychology, Practice Teach-
ing and the general theory of Education. It meets twice a month. The
purpose is to stimulate interest in the general field of Education and
teacher training and keep alive the principles enunciated by the great
teachers, Pestalozzi and Herbart.
GIRLS AND BOYS' DAY
Is an annual meeting of the boys and girls of Leon and adjoining
counties. Two days are usually devoted to this meeting in the month
of March, and the visitors are given instruction in the various fields
of agriculture, usually by means of demonstration. Agricultural Con-
tests are a feature of these meetings. The girls receive instruction
from the Department of Home Economics, and space is provided, and
prizes awarded for farm and home exhibits brought to the meeting.
INTERCOLLEGIATE JUDGING CONTEST
As a part of the extra curricular activities, the young men in the
college department of the Agricultural School have preliminary con-
tests each year to choose a team of young men to compete in the na-
tional contest which is held at some land-grant college each year dur-
ing the spring.
This particular activity trains young men to select and judge
animals as to soundness and ability to perform the function for which
they are best suited. In addition to the judging, an essay contest is
held, the best essay on some agricultural subject is presented by each
college of the Intercollegiate Judging Association to be read in com-
petition sometime during the judging contest.





50 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
VOCATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SMITH-HUGHES WORKERS
This Conference is held in the month of June, usually the first
week of the Summer Session. This meeting is featured by the assembly
of boys from all the Vocational Training Schools of the State with
their instructors. Each school sends at least three members in order
to be able to compete in the Annual Judging Contests held the first
day. A silver loving cup is awarded the School whose team scores the
highest number of points in the contests. After the first day, the time
is given over to business and instructional meetings.





ORGANIZATION, OUTLINES AND
DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE
COURSES





52 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE
A. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:
1. Division of Agronomy and Farm.
2. Division of Animal Husbandry and Farm.
3. Division of Agricultural Chemistry.
4. Division of Horticulture.
5. Division of Poultry and Swine.
6. Division of Agricultural Teacher-Training.
7. Division of Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture.
B. DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS:
1. Division of Applied Arts.
2. Division of Clothing.
3. Division of Foods.
4. Division of Home Economics Teacher-Training.
5. Division of Smith-Hughes Househould Management.
C. DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES:
1. Division of Business and Commercial Science.
2. Division of Education.
(a) Demonstration Elementary School.
(b) Demonstration High School.
3. Division of English.
4. Division of Fine Arts.
5. Division of History, Political and Social Sciences.
6. Division of Language.
7. Division of Mathematics.
8. Division of Military Science.
9. Division of Music.
10. Division of Philosophy and Psychology.
11. Division of Physical Education.
12. Division of Science.
D. DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC ARTS:
1. Division of Auto-Mechanics.
2. Division of Building Construction.
3. Division of Carpentry.
4. Division of Electricity.
5. Division of Masonry.
6. Division of Painting.
7. Division of Plumbing and Heating.
8. Division of Printing.
9. Division of Tailoring.
10. Division of Vocational Teaching.
E. DEPARTMENT OF NURSE TRAINING AND HEALTH:
1. Division of Health.
2. Division of Nurse Training.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 53
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FACULTY
B. L. PERRY, Dean; Associate Professor of Landscape Gardening and
Field Crops.
W. MCKINLEY KING, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture; As-
sistant Director of Athletics.
J. E. SANFORD, Poultry and Swine Husbandry.
L. A. MARSHALL, Teacher-Training; Agricultural Chemistry and Edu-
cation.
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Animal Husbandry and Dairying.
J. C. BALDWIN, Agronomy and Farm Manager.
A. A. TURNER, State Farm Demonstration Agent.
JULIA A. MILLER, State Home Demonstration Agent.
Purpose
Since the soil is the basis of all Agriculture, the work of all Divis-
ions is closely related, and centered around the Agronomy and Farm
Division.
The purpose of all Divisions is to train men and women for better
and more efficient service in the broad fields of technical and practical
Agriculture. Many graduates now serve as Principals and Instructors
in some of the largest Training Schools in Florida and bordering States,
while others are making good as Demonstration Agents, and practical
farmers.
Equipment
The School is well provided with facilities for all agricultural
classes and laboratory work. Classrooms and laboratories are pro-
vided in the Agricultural Hall and Dairy Building. All are well equip-
ped for the types. of work given. There is sufficient work-stock to
serve the 225 acre farm, together with modern tools, tillage imple-
ments, and a tractor. There are barns for storage, and for the housing
of stock, a modern dairy barn, the equal of which is found in few
schools of this type, a dairy herd of 65 heads of grade and pure-bred
animals, headed by pure-bred and registered sires. The Swine herd
consists of around 100 head, with an exceptionally good herd boar,
and a poultry flock of around 1000 head, together with a well
equipped incubator room, and other poultry supplies. A good agricul-
tural library is available to the students, and there are exceptional op-
portunities for rural community activities and study in the County in
which the College is located.
Requirements for Graduation
To complete this course successfully, a minimum of 124 semester
hours are required. In addition the student must have a thorough
and practical knowledge of farm activities, and of rural life conditions,





54 ; FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
before receiving a degree. The student is required, therefore, to spend
a school year in each of the practical divisions as follows: The Farm
and Agronomy Division; the Animal Husbandry and Dairy Division;
the Horticulture Division; the Swine and Poultry Division.
Four-Year Course In Agriculture
This course leads to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri-
culture. Entrance requirements are found elsewhere in this catalog.
Only men with the B.S. Degree will be eligible to teach Vocational
Agriculture in the State of Florida.
OUTLINE OF COLLEGE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English 101 --.--- 5 5 English 101 .....---------------.. 5 5
General Chemistry 101 -------------7 5 General Chemistry 102 .----------7 5
Zoology 103 ....-...5-------------5 3 General Botany 101 .--------- ..-4 3
Physical Education 101 -1 1 Agronomy 102----------- 4 3
Agronomy 101 --------------4 3 Physical Education 102 .------- 1 1
Freshman Talks (Orientation) Freshman Talks (Orientation)
and Library Methods .----------1 and Library Methods -...l-----1
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English -------------- -------- 3 3 English -.. --------------......3 3
Agricultural Chemistry 205 ----.--7 5 Agricultural Chemistry 206 ..----7 5
Dairying 201 --.----------------4 3 Animal Husbandry 202 ------.---- 5 3
Poultry 201- ------4 Horticulture 201--- ---- 4 3
Farm Mathematics 201 .-- -------2 2 Vocational Education 201 .-. ---. 3 3
Physical Education 203 .....-------1 1 Physical Education 204 .....------1 1
THIRD YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English --. --.... 2 2 English ---------- 33
Agr'l Edu. (Edu. Pay.) 307 ----3 3 Agr'l Education (Methods) 308-.-3 3
History of Agr'l 301 ...-....... 3 3 Agr'l Economics 302 ---------3.--....3 3
Agr'l Bacteriology 301 .--..--------- 4 3 Agr'l Botany 302 -------------... -4 3
Agr'l Engineering 301 .------------3 3 Landscape (Architecture) 303 -...4 3
Horticulture 302 ............---..... 4 3 Econ. Entomology 301 4---------4 3
Elective ...............---- --3 ..Elective ----._-- .3 3
FOURTH YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English --...... ..........2 2 English .._ .....2 2
Agr'l Education 404 --...-....._ 3 3 Agr'l Education 405 --_..3......... 3 3
Agr'l Economics 403 --...........-3 3 American History ---........ -----.3 3
Constitution and Gov'mt ........----3 3 Rural Sociology 404 ..-......----. -3 3
Education 412 -----..._...... ---..2 2 Physical Education 404 _.---.. 1 1
Physical Education 403 .........---- 1 1 Electives ...3....------- ... 3 3
Electives -.4------ ---------------_ 4 4 Education 414 .-- ..2.............. 2
Electives:
Animal Husbandry 304, 305, 306 and
307.
Rural Sociology 405.
Agricultural Education 406.
Agronomy 301.
Horticulture 404.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 55
DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
FACULTY
ETHEL MAE GRIGGS, Dean; Professor of Home Economics.
IRMA LEONA COLEMAN, Foods, Household Management.
C. B. NELSON,. Foods, Special Methods.
FRANKIE M. MCMILLAN, Clothing.
ORA VANN, Applied Arts, Clothing.
Purpose
The Home Economics Department occupies an entire building
sufficiently equipped for thorough instruction. The aim of the depart-
ment is to prepare women to be home makers, teachers of home eco-
nomics and to prepare them for vocations arising out of this broad
field.
The courses are planned to meet the needs of three types of
students:
1. Those who expect to be special leaders in this field of work.
2. Those preparing to teach.
3. Those wishing a general knowledge in home making.
Advanced students are permitted to major in subjects of greater
interest to them. A major consists of not less than thirty hours of
work.
OUTLINE OF COLLEGE COURSES IN HOME
ECONOMICS
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit
English --------------..-... ---..... ..-3 English -................--------...-. 3
General Chemistry .------------------------..... 3 General Chemistry----------------------..--.... 3
Biology ... --------------- 3 Biology .....- ---- -------- 3
French and Spanish ..----... ----------.-------- 3 French and Spanish -.........-.. ......... 3
Foods (H. E. 101) ------------------- 2 Foods (H. E. 101) ----------------- 2
Clothing (H. E. 101) .-......---- 2 Clothing (H. E. 101) -------- 2
Applied Design ------ ....... ................... 2 Physical Education ------------------------I 1
Physical Education -------.------------.--------- 1
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit
English ---- ----............. ..... -- 3 English ---- .----............--- 3
Bacteriology ..------.....--..... ....---- 3 Bacteriology -------.....---......-... 3
French or Spanish --------------------- 3 French or Spanish --------------------- 3
Household Chemistry---................----.-.--. 3 Home Management --------------------_....... . 3
Dressmaking (H. E. 201) ---------...... 2 Foods (H. E. 201)------ 2
Foods (H. E. 201) ...........-...--------------- 2 Dressmaking (H. E. 201) -------.2-..... 2
Physical Education............ ------ .-----...- 1 Physical Education.---------------.------ 1
THIRD YEAR
First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit
English --------. ------------. --... ...........-. 3 English ------..3-- ....3...........- -
Psychology ----------...-........... 3 Educational Psychology--....-.... ...... 3
Nutrition .............-.--......-.. ..... 2 H. E. Education--................_--._.. 3
Millinery ...................--..... 2 Home Management---......._... 2
Dressmaking ................. ...... 2 Dressmaking ......-- --------....................... 2
History -...-..-...---------.----- 3 Art Applied to the Home-_.._. 2
Physical Education -.-..._..- __ 1 Physical Education ..--..........._...._.-------. I





56 FLORIDA A. ae M. COLLEGE
FOURTH YEAR
First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit
English ---------- 2 English .-.. --------......- 3------ 3
Economics -.. ---------------- 3 Practice House ---- -.. 3
Methods of Teaching ..... ...-------. 3 Practice Teaching and Observation..--.. 3
Home Nursery and Child Care .-------- 2 Clothing ---------.....-----.-------.. 2
Large Quantity Cookery ...------------. 3 Government ---- -- -- 3 .- 3
Physical Education.--------------------- 1 Physical Education ---......... ------ 1
*Two-Year Teacher-Training Course
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit
Foods ---------- 2 Foods---- ----- ..-- 2
Art and Design --------------- 2 Clothing ---2------ -.------ 2
Education 101 ,------------------------ 3 Home Management ------------2-------- 2
English .- ---...----....--------- 3 English ---------------....... 3
General Chemistry ---- -- 3 General Chemistry ..---- 3
Rural Economics ---------------------- 2 Child Care and Training ---._------.3-_ 3
Physical Education -------. -- 1 Physical Education.-- -- -
. SECOND YEAR
First Sentester Credit Second Semester Credit
NutritNutrition .- .. -....-.. 2 Nutrition -----. --------- 2
Clothing ----------- .------- 2 Clothing ------------------- 2
English -------- 3 Practice Teaching ..----- 3
Methods of Teaching H. E. ---------- 3 General Science ...-3---------------.- 3
General Science .------------------. 3 English ------------------.....3----- 3
History ... -------- ------------------3 Government ..-. ......-----------. ----. 3
Practice House. -------.---.--3 Physical Education...----- -----------.... 1
Physical Education---.--------- 1
*This course meets the approval of the Smith-Hughes program.
DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND
SCIENCES
FACULTY
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean; Professor of Education and Psychology.
JENNIE E. BAKER, Librarian.
CLYDE M. BRADFORD, Instructor, Shorthand, Typewriting and Business
English.
J. B. BRAGG, Vice-President, Dean of Men, Director of Athletics, Pro-
fessor of Physical Education.
EMORY BIRCH, Assistant Professor of Biology.
J. V. AMOS-COLLINS, Vocal and Instrumental Music.
H. M. EFFERSON, Professor of Mathematics, Head Division of Mathe-
matics.
GEORGE DECOURSEY, Head, Commercial Division; Associate Professor;
Economics, Bookkeeping and Accounting.
CULLEN S. HOLMES, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics;
Acting Head, Division of Sciences.
F. E. JAMES, Public School Music, Director Choral and Glee Clubs.
A. L. KIDD, Director of College Press Service; Professor of Political
Science; Head, Division of Political and Social Sciences.
LEANDER KIRKSEY, B.S., Violin and Reed Instruments.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 57
J. L. LANGHORNE, Associate Professor of English; Acting Head, Divi-
sion of English.
R. H. LEE, Assistant Professor of English.
E. E. MATTHEWS, Professor of Education (Elementary), Supervisor
Practice Teaching; Head, Division of Teacher-Training.
CLARENCE B. NASBY, Instructor, Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing,
Public School Art.
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant; Professor of Military Science and
Instructor in Physical Education.
JOSEPH REASON, Associate Professor of Languages, Modern Languages.
E. P. SOUTHALL, Professor of History; Head, Division of History.
A. PRATER-STEWART, Teacher, Physical Education for Girls; Phys-
iology and Hygiene.
MALISSA SYDES, Principal, Practice School; Assistant Professor of Pri-
mary Education.
W. CAREY THOMAS, Band and Orchestra Director.
A. P. TURNER, Chaplain; Public Speaking; Religious Education; In-
structor, High School English.
'E. EARL WARE, Associate Professor of Biology.
E. C. WEARE, Assistant Librarian.
Purpose
The purpose of the course in Arts, Education, Science and Letters
is to provide the student with a liberal education and such specific
specialized information as will provide the student with preparation
for further graduate study along professional and technical lines.
The aim is to give such specific information as will help the stu-
dent not only to be proficient but to be a better citizen and student
of public affairs.
*Year leave of absence (1930-1931) for Graduate Study, University of Chicago.





58 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
OUTLINE OF COLLEGE COURSES IN LIBERAL ARTS
AND SCIENCES
BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
Days Cr. Days Cr.
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR
English -.--.. -- -------------------.3 3 English ..-. .....-------- .... 3 3
Math., Language or Music -------3 3 Math., Language or Music.--.---_-3 3
History ....3 3 History .-.. ----.. -_ ----3 3
Biology or Chemistry -----..-.. 5 or 3 3 or 4 Philosophy -..; --3 3
Physical Education ... ..----------.2 2 Group (selected) ------------......3 3
Group (selected) --....... ....3 3 Physical Education _-- -----...- -2 '/2
Freshman Talks -.. ---- 1 0
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English -------- ------------ 2 2 Language or Mathematics ..-...--3 3
History or Music* ...-....... English --. ..-...... ...---.--2 2
Economics or Sociology .------. 3 3 Group-Music .- -- -3 3
Group-Music ...3 3 Group ...------.. ---- ----- 3 3
Language or Mathematics .---------3 3 Free Elective ...- ...------ ..__----. 3 3
Government .... ---------... -3 3 Physical Education ._--- 1 -I 1/
Physical Education ---------I--1 1/2 Second Semester Elective
Free Elective ....-...---- ------.. ...-..-- 3 3 Industries required each year.
*It is possible in the A.B. Curriculum to major in music and take Language as minor.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English .......---------- 3 3 English ..-..-... ...---------- 3 3
Mathematics or Language -..- ...-...3 3 Math. or Ancient Language. ---3 3
Education .- -- ----- ....-. --- 3 3 Education -...-...-----. .. .---.-.- 3 3
Biology or Chemistry -----.-- 4 or 6 4 Physical Education ---.----------.--- 2 /2
Physical Education _--.----.... ----22 1 Philosophy --...----.. -----.._ --3 3
Group (selected) ..-..- --- ..------ .3 3 Grou ...-. ..-.. .. ..-. -..-.- -3 3
Freshman Talks ..-.-----..1-_..... 1--- 0
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English ----....----........- 2 2 English -2... ........2 2
Education _---.- _--.- ----._.3 3 Mathematics or Language ...---. .3 3
Mathematics or Language --... --.- 3 3 Education -..--. .......-....3. ..3 3
History ----.. --.. --.-.----3 3 Group -. ...-.... .....--.--- ...------3 3
Group ...._---_.....-.---- .3 3 Free Elective .----..---.------.. ---- 3 3
Free Elective .-......--....3 3 Physical Education .- ._-... _...---2 V/
Physical Education .---------- 2.---2 1/2
One year of some science. Industries required each year.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English ---........---3 3 English .---..--_..-- --. 3 3
Science .. ..---.... ---.-. -7 5 Science (elective) .-------.------.-.. 3
Mathematics ...-- ..--.. --.... ...... --3 3 Physics ----.-.6....-- -..... 6 4
Language .............. .- 3 3 Language --- ..3.... ..--. ....--.3 3
Physical Education .--... -......... -2 1/ Elective ----. ..-........3 3
Elective ..--.--.-...3.. ...3 3 Physical Education --....----.. --. 2 M
Freshman Talks ----l.---. --.-..-......- 0
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cs
English .---.......--------.--. .2 2 English ---....... ............ .. 2 -
Science ...--- ...6... ---.-6 or 8 3 or 4 Science .-. ...------------..-- .6 or 8 -
Group I or II ------.--.---.3 3 Group -----.-...--.... -. ---... 3
Elective -- .. ............33 3 Elective -- -- ...3 3
Geology ----------------33 3 Government or Economics _.---- 3 3
General Psychology -.-----------..- 3 3 Physical Education --..-... --.. 1 /
Physical Education2 ----....-...-. 2 /2
Industries required each year.
NOTE:-Second Semester of all the above courses same as for First Semester.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 59
OTHER REQUIREMENTS FOR SCIENCE DEGREE
3 years of some one science, English four years
2 years of another, Industries four years
I year of Physics. Physical Education and Military Science
Biology must be included in one of the four years
three.
PRE-MEDICAL COURSE (Specific Requirements)
General Chemistry -..8..---------.8 or 10 Language -------_-----_ .------ 12
Biology ------ .8....... -----...8 English .....------------------- 8
Physics ------ 8
Organic Chemistry--- ...-------.. -- 4
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (Elementary)
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
Education ----- -- 3 3 Education --------3 3
English -...-----------.-- 3 3 English ---........ 3 3 3
History (European) or Math. Elem. Practice Teaching .........- 10 3
or Science .-........3.-----. or 4 3 Mathematics or Science ..........3 3
Group .- --------..... ..-----.3 3 Group .........3 3
Physical Education ......-----.--- 1 1/2 Physical Education 2 1/2
Geography -........-.----- 3 3 History (American) ----..- ... .. 3 3
Freshman Talks .-...-----.. ---.---- 1 0
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English --------- --.---- 2 2 English --------. ..... 2 2
Education .. .. ..........--.-- ---- 3 3 Education ......................3 3
P. S. Art -------------......22 1 Group ------- 3 3
Music, Pub. Sch. ......---------- 2 1 Government ----- .- .3 3
Science (Elective) -....---- 4 or 6 3 or 4 Electives -------- 3 3
Group .......3 3 Physical Education ----- 2 /2
Psychology (General) -..------.. -.3 3
Physical Education ..---------- 2 -/2
*Second semester Economics or Sociology.
Industries required as institutional demand.
Group selection is for definite continuance of one subject.
Military science and tactics are a PART OF THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PROGRAM.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
Education --------3 3 Education --- ---- 3 3
English ---------- .. 3 3 English .- -- ----- 3
Language .....---- -- ..-3 3 Language -----3.......... 3 3
Mathematics or History -----------3 3 Mathematics or History ---.------ 3 3
Science ---- 6 or 3 3 or 4 Science ........6 or 8 4
Freshman Talks ......-----------..1 0 Physical Education -...........- _...2 /2
Physical Education ............2 /2
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
Education --- ------ 3 3 Education ----- 3 3
English .------ 2 2 English ---------2 2
Practice Teaching ._---- ...... ------ _5 2'/2 Practice Teaching Second Subject 5 2'1/
Group -- ----- 4 or5 3 Group I ----........3.....-.-3 3
Group II (Elective) ...---....... 3 3 Group ...--.... -----.3 3
Group Minor Elective --..... .3 3 Government --- 3
Physical Education -..------- .._ 1 l/2 Free Elective ------- ....-......... -----3 3
NOTE:-Second Semester of all the above courses same as for First Semester.
The B.S. degree in Education carries B. S. in Elementary Education, preparation
for Elementary school teaching, B.S. in Secondary Education, preparation for high
school teaching.





60 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS IN SCIENCE FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Two years of some one science, 1 year of B.ology, if it is not selected as the one
subject or science for two-year. One year of college mathematics unless 4 units of high
school mathematics are presented which includes Trigonometry and Advanced Algebra.
One teaching maior and two teaching minors to be selected from one of the seven
groups of subjects.
Practice Teaching, materials and methods in the subject may be classed as part of
the Education requirement above 18 specific semester hours in Education.
NORMAL EDUCATION
FIRST YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
English 101 3 3 English 102 --- 3 3
Human Geography 101 -----.----- 3 3 Arithmetic for Teachers 101 ----- 3 3
Educational Biology --- 5 3 Princples of Aesthetics, Nature
Public School Music 101 1--------3 1 V/ of Beauty, Picture Study 101.. 2 2
Drawing 101 .--...-.- .- .. 2 1 Public School Music 102--- .. 3 11/2
introduction and Survey Practical Art 102 -..-----..-- -.. 2 1
(Education) 101 .-..-- ----- 3 3 Penmanship 101 .------- ........ 2 0
Civilization in Transit and Educational Psychology 308. 3 3
World History .-- ----------.- 3 3 Physical Education 102.- ...... 2 /2
Physical Education 101 ------------ 2 /2 Nature Study and School
Freshman Talks and Orientation-. 1 0 Gardening 101 ....- .-------- 2 1
Freshman Talks and Orientation
Industries required, Home Economics or trade work.
SECOND YEAR
Days Cr. Days Cr.
Literature for Teachers ------..... 3 3 Education (Oral and Silent
Education (Practice Teaching and Reading) 207 --. --- -----... 2 2
Units of Teaching) 206a .--15 5 Education (Practice Teaching and
American History 101 ------------ 3 3 Units of Teaching) 206b ----15 5
Physical Education (Plays and Government 101--- -3-- 3
Games) 103 --_...........-... 2 1 Manual Training and School
Health Education and Repair 100 ----------.---.. 2 1
Educational Hygiene 205 ---- 3 3 Public Speaking and Oral
English .- .-- -----....... 2 2
Physical Education (Plays and
Games) -------.--------........ 2 1
Rural Education 101 ---------------. 2 2
Industries required, Home Economics or trade work.
Sixty-four Semester Hours required for graduation exclusive of Industries and
Physical Education.
GROUPS
The term GROUP means a combination of subjects for concen-
tration usually called major. The Department of Liberal Arts and
Sciences offers the following GROUPS for concentration:
1. English and Romance Languages.
2. Science, including Chemistry, Physics, Biology.
3. Music (Vocal and Instrumental), Fine Arts.
4. History, Social and Political Sciences, Geography.
5. Education.
6. Languages (if not combined in 1, 12 Romance).
7. Mathematics.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 61
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Students deficient in spelling will be required to take spelling
until proficient.
Students deficient in oral expression will be required to take such
courses as may be required td build up this deficiency.
Students deficient in writing will be required to take writing
until a certain grade in writing is made.
The final judgment of the ability to teach and conduct a class
will determine recommendation for graduation.
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS
Purpose
The Normal Course in Commerce aims to train young men and
young women for clerical and secretarial positions.
The Four-Year College Course in Commerce leading to Bachelor
of Science degree is especially arranged to train teachers of Commercial
subjects in High School.
Four-Year Commercial Course
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English 101 ------3 English 101 ------3 3
Modern Foreign Language 101- Modern Foreign Language 101-
102 or Science _-------------- 3 3 102 or Science..--------- 3 3
Education 101 .------.------ 3 3 Education 101 ......--------. 3 3
Economic Geography 101 -------- 3 3 Economic Geography 101 ------ 3 3
Economic History ...- ---------- 3 Economic History ----------_. 3
Penmanship 101 ----------- 2 0 Penmanship 101.---------- 2 0
Electives ---- 3 Electives- 3
Freshman Talks ------_ --------- 0 Freshman Talks ..---------0------ 0
Electives: Electi ,es:
Typewriting or Bus. Arithmetic 3 Typewriting or Bus. Arithmetic 3
Accounting Principles ------.-- 3 Accounting Principles --------- 3
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
English 201 ------- 3 3 English 201 ------ 3 3
Modern Foreign Language 103- Modern Foreign Language 103-
104 or Science .-------- ------- 3 3 104 or Science ------------- 3 3
History 101 ------------ 3 3 History 101.-.- 3 3
Government 101 ----------------- 3 Government 101 .------------- 3
Education -_- 3 3 Education .------------- 3 3
Electives -------3 Electives ------- 3
Electives: Electives:
Shorthand or Advanced Ac- Shorthand or Advanced Ac-
counting Principles .---------3 3 counting Principles..-- ------3 3
THIRD YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Economic Princi les -..---------. 3 3 Economic Principles ---------- 3 3
Commercial Law 101 ...-- ... 3 3 Commercial Law 101 ------------ 3 3
Business Business English ._. 3 Business English ---3 3
Electives ---..-. .......-----_----....... 6 Electives -------- ------ 6
Electives Electives:
Advanced Accounting. Advanced Accounting.
Advanced Typewriting. Advanced Typewriting.
Advanced Shorthand Advanced Shorthand.
Business Organization. Business Organization.
College Algebra College Algebra.





62 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
FOURTH YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Advanced Business English ------ 3 3 Advanced Business English --.---- 3 3
History of Commercial Edu. 3 3 Hlistory of Commercial Edu. .. 3 3
The Teaching of Comm. Subs. The Teaching of Comm. Subs.
in High School ------------- .. 3 in High School ---_--...-----. 3
Edu. 206a (Observation and Edu. 206a (Observation and
Practice Teaching)'-_---------- 3 3 Practice Teaching) ---_.. ..- 3 3
Electives: Electives:
Principles of Marketing.------- 3 3 Principles of Marketing --------- 3 3
Business Organization ------------ 3 3 Business Organization-..-------- 3 3
Cost Accounting -------.. _. --- 3 3 Cost Accounting -----------.--. 3 3
Advertising ---...----.. 3 3 Advertising -- 3 3
Salesmanship ..------------. 3 3 Salesmanship ..-- 3
Normal Commercial
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Principles of Accounting.--------- 5 Princi les of Accounting _.------- 5
English --- -- 3 English ..- -----------....... -- ---3- 3
Typewriting ------- 5 2 1/ Typewriting -- --- 5 21/2
Shorthand ------------- 5 2 1/2 Shorthand -------------- 5 2 /2
Economic Geography -------------- 3 3 Economic Geography ---.. ----- 3 3
*Economic History .--.-.........-. 3 *Economic History-- ------------ 3
Business Arithmetic. ...-------- 4 2 Business Arithmetic ..--------------4 2
Penmanship ------------.... 2 0 Penmanship ..------- 2 0
Freshman Talks and Orientation 1 Frc-shman Talks and Orientation- 1
Electives: Electives:
American Government or American Government or
Business Organization.------ 3 3 Business Organization ----.-. 3 3
Office Training.-----------------. 3 3 Office Training -----:. --- -----... 3 2
*History may be taken.
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Hrs. Cr: Secon^Semester Hrs. Cr.
Business English ----...-- --.... -- 3 3 Business English _--- --- ------ 3 3
Commercial Law ------------------ 3 3 Commercial Law ---.---_ .... --- 3 3
Economic Principles ------- ------ 3 3 Economic Principles -------... --- 3 3
Electives: Electives:
Secretaries
Advanced Typewriting.. --.------- 3 2 Advanced Typewriting ----------- 3 2
Advanced Shorthand --------------- 3 2 Advanced Shorthand --..---------- 3 2
Practice --- --------- 10 /2 Practice -------- ------- 10 1
Office Training ....... --..... ------ 5 2 Office Training ------------------- 5 2
Bookkeepers and Office Clerks
Insurance or Bus. Organization_ 3 3 Insurance or Bus. Organization .. 3 3
Advanced Accounting --.. --.--.... 3 3 Advanced Accounting ------------ 3 3
Practice ----..---------101/2 Practice -------- 10 1/2
NOTE: Plan to have students go in offices every other day (M. W. F.) from 1:30-5:00.
Second year classes should be arranged in the morning on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday in order to give afternoon to practice.
Music
Band and Orchestra Courses
PURPOSE
High School and College bands and orchestras offer honors and
privileges not enjoyed by the ordinary student and it not infrequently
happens that membership in such an organization results in an offer to
become a member of some professional band or orchestra where remu-
nerative employment may be obtained.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 63
OPPORTUNITIES
Positions as Band, Orchestra and Bugle Corps Teachers in high
schools and colleges are new and fertile fields. Salaries are very in-
ducive for the one who is prepared. With such in view we are offering
a course here that will enable one to handle such work.
Curriculum
All students enrolling in the Department of Music are classified as
to their standing musically and are registered under one of the follow-
ing classifications:
1. Preparatory Students: Those pursuing the course of study giv-
en in the Preparatory Division of the Department of Music.
2. Full Course Advanced Students.
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year-Candidate for Mus.B. Degree.
3. Special Students: Those who are pursuing only a part of a
regular course or who are students in applied music only (Voice, Viol-
in, Piano, etc.).
Outline of Music Course
I. PREPARATORY
VOICE, VIOLIN, PIANO
Students are classified according to attainments and knowledge,
and promotion is made from one grade to another as rapidly as the stu-
dent is qualified.
II. ADVANCED
INSTRUMENTAL (PIANO, VIOLIN OR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Hrs. Per Week
Piano, Violin or Orchestral Instruments .. 2-- .-----------2
Harmony .... .. --....--..................... .---- 2
Music Appreciation ..-.. ... ........ -1
Orchestra (For Violin Students) 3..---.. ........ -------------3
Elective (For Piano Students) --.--- .... -----------..--- 1
Recital Attendance and Performance --...--.._...-------.2 (Hrs. Per Yr.)
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Hrs. Per Week
Piano, Violin or Orchestral Instrument. ----------...__--2
History of Music .-.-------------.... ----------1
Harmony ------.---------------......... --2-.....2
Recital Attendance and Performance ---.......2-.....-2 (Per Year)
Orchestra (For Violin Students) ... ..--_--..---...............3
Elective (For Piano Students) --- ..--...... ....---------I.





64 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
JUNIOR YEAR
Hrs. Per Week
Piano, Violin or Orchestral Instrument -...--.. -----... 2
Composition ------..-... ....--..--.....------------------ 2
Recital Attendance and Performance -.......3- ... (Per Year)
Elective (French, English or Spanish) .....-----------_... --3
Orchestra (For Violin Students) -----....._ .. -3
Counterpoint, Canon and Fugue- -.- -- 2
SENIOR YEAR
Hrs. Per Week
Piano, Violin or Orchestral Instrument --...--.----------- 2
Composition ..-.......---------- -----------... .... -- 2
Recital Attendance and Performance -----.. --.. ------...- 3 (Per Year)
Elective (French, English or Spanish) ---..._......-------- 3
Orchestra (For Violin Students) ..--------------------... -- 3
Ad. Counterpoint and Fugue ----.....2..---. 2..
Chamber Music, Composition and Orchestration -------.... 2
Course in Public School Music
The following course is offered to those desiring a Teacher's Cer-
tificate in Public School Music.
FIRST YEAR
History of Music ------........_---- ----------- 2
Harmony -..--.- ......--- -- -----------... ---- 2
Applied Music (Voice, Piano or Violin) ---- --..-....- 1
Methods and material for grades and high school, including con-
ducting child voice, practice teaching, sight singing, and ear training.
SECOND YEAR
Harmony ......-- -----.---------.. .... 2
History of Music ---.....-..---..... ..__........1
Principles and Methods of teaching; school and
Classroom Management ------------------- -- --_ 3
Music Appreciation .- .---.-..... ...---. ..-. .1---1
Applied Music (Voice, Piano or Violin)------------------.... ---1--....
STUDENTS MAY SELECT A MAJOR IN MUSIC AND WORK TOWARD
THE B.A. DEGREE. IN THIS CASE MUSIC IS TAKEN 4 YEARS.
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC ARTS
FACULTY
G. M. JONES, B.S.A., M.S.A., Dean; Professor of Architecture and
Applied Mechanics.
C. S. HAYLING, Tailoring.
W. HAVRE HOLLINS, Printing.
B. F. HOLMES, Carpentry.
Z. R. HERCEY, Plumbing, Heating.
EDWARD JONES, Painting and Decorating.
A. C. PHILLIPS, Masonry and Plastering.
W. T. REED, Auto-Mechanics.
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY, Printing.
S. L. THORPE, Applied Electricity.





F
BULLETIN, 1930-1931 65
JAMES P. SCOTT, B.S,, Instructor; Architecture and Applied Mechanics;
Mechanical Drawing.
Purpose
The purpose of this department is to prepare young men for life's
work in the trades as mechanics, contractors, teachers of trades and
directors of departments.
The shops are housed in the Mechanic Arts Building. This building
t is a two-story brick structure well lighted and ventilated for shop
work. Each department has space with blackboard for discussion
of shop projects after which the students work either in the shop or
are carried to one of the various field jobs.
The young men have much practice along with theory. Students
in building trades have had and are having excellent opportunities in
new structures, alterations, and additions on the school grounds. Most
of the related sciences and mathematics are given in the Mechanic Arts
Department.
Courses Offered
FOUR-YEAR COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Auto-Mechanics. Tailoring.
Building Construction. Vocational Teaching (Teachers'
Printing. Course in Manual Training).
FOUR-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT TRADE COURSES LEADING
TO TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
Auto-Mechanics. Painting.
Carpentry., Plumbing, Heating.
Electricity. Printing.
Masonry. Tailoring..
TWO-YEAR SMITH-HUGIHES COURSES LEADING TO SPECIAL
CERTIFICATE
Auto-Mechanics. Painting.
Carpentry. Plumbing, Heating.
Electricity. Printing.
Masonry. Tailoring.
OUTLINE OF COLLEGE COURSES IN MECHANIC ARTS
FOR ALL FRESHMEN
First Slnlestcr Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Mathematics (College Alg.)----- 3 3 Mathematics (Analytical Geom.) 3 3
General Chemistry -- 7 5 General Chemistry 7 5
English ...------------------..-- -- 5 5 English ...... 5 5
Drawing .... ... 6 3 Drawing ..... ...... 6 3
*Shop ..10 5 Shop ..... 10 5
Physical Education .-..-.. ... --- 1 1/2 Physical Education -1 /2
Except for their shop work there is a common first year for all
college students entering without deficiencies or advanced credit.





66 FLORIDA A. 5 M. COLLEGE
Auto-Mechanics
SOPHOMORE
First Selester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Mathematics (Calculus) .------- 3 3 Mechanism ------.. --...... -------- 6 3
Physics --......-.- ------------. 6 4 Physics ..-------.. -- 6..._ ..- 6 4
English -----------------......... 5 5 English ----.... ---..---------- 5 5
Drawing ---------- .---------------- 6 3 Elective -------... --...---------.-- 3 5
Shop ----------------......--- 10 5 Shop -------....- -----.......----10 5
Physical Education 1 i/2 Physical Education ---. ----------- 1 /2
JUNIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Mechanism ..- -.... ---------- 6 3 Strength of Materials.-------.. 4 4
Engineering Mechanics .....---. ..- 3 4 Heat Engines ...- ------... ..--. 3 3
Heat Engines --. .... ... 3 3 Economics ---..--..- 3 3
Economics .---------------- -----. 3 3 English -----------------------------------.. 5 5
English --------- ----.... ----.... 5 5 Shop -----.... --.. ----------- 8 4
Shop .- ------------- ......-- 6 3 Physical Education .........- .--- 1 1/2
Physical Education ...----------... 1 1/2
SENIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Testing Materials --------.---- 4 2 Metals -------- 4 2
Dynamics ...--------.. .-------- 3 3 Thermodynamics ..-----.-----.. 3 3
Industrial Management- .....- 3 3 Industrial Management ...--. 3 3
English .-... .....----.-------. 5 5 English .....------ ---------- .. 5 5
Shop- -----------------... ------ 10 5 Shop --..- ---.--..... ---------..10 5
Physical Education 1 /2 Physical Education--1 1/2
Building Construction Schedule
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Mathematics (Calculus) -----... ..- 3 3 Surveying ...------ ---... -----2. 2 1
Physics ..-.. ----.... 6 4 Physics ..---. ---... -- --..---... 6 4
English -----.-.. ...--... 5 5 English ..--.........-. 5 5
Drawing ....-----. ------. -. ..... 6 3 Materials of Construction....... 3 3
Shop (Masonry) ---..- 1...- -- 0 5 Drawing .. --...... ------.. 6 3
Physical Education -...------.--... 1 1/2 Shop (Masonry) --...---..---..10 5
Physical Education -------.---...---. 1
JUNIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Engineering Mechanics. --..------- 4 4 Strength of Materials ---------. 4 4
Heat Engines ...------.-- ------- 3 3 Heating and Ventilating-..-..---- 3 3 3
Economics -----....- ---..--.. 3 3 Economics --........----------- 3 3
English ----------......._---.-. 5 5 English .........---..- -.---- 5 5
Shop (Plumbing) --...--.---.. -. 6 3 Drawing -. ...._--------.-- 4 2
Drawing .......-----... --------- 4 2 Shop (Plumbing) ----... -----. 6 3
Physical Education .------.----.--. 1 I/2 Physical Education ....- -----. 1 /2
SENIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Testing Materials .--- ----....-- 4 2 Specifications and Contracts-- --2- 4 2
Reinforced Concrete .. ..--..... --- 3 3 Building Construction -...----.----. 6 4
Timber and Steel Const ..---.. ---- 3 3 Inspection .....--...- -------...---- 2 1
Industrial Management --.------- 3 3 Industrial Management. .-_. ..---- 3 3
English ...------- ... ---... 5 5 English ------ --- 5 5
Shop (House Wiring) -.----.. ---- 6 3 Shop (House Wiring) --_.---.. -- 6 3
Physical Education--- --..--. 1 1/2 Physical Education...-----------. 1 /2
*The Freshman year Vocational Shop is Carpentry.
Printing
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Chemistry ----._- ---- -- -----..._. 7 5 Chemistry -----.....--..-. 77 5
English -----.... --. ----...-..._._ 5 5 English .---..--.... ---._.. 5 5
Drawing (Lettering) -------- .....4 2 Drawing (Lettering) ..-..------.... 4 2
Shoo ...------------.....------. 10 5 Shop ------.-..... .......--.10 5
Physical Education ---...... --...... .-.-- 1 /2 Physical Education -..-- .......... 1 ..
41





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 67
JUNIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Psychology ------ 3 3 Psychology --- -- ---- 3 3
Economics ------- ...... ........... 3 3 Economics ----..---....---.. 3 3
History ------- .._ 3 3 History ------- 3 3
English -------..----_ 5 5 English -----. -5. 5
Shop ------..-------.10 5 Shop ..-..- ..-.. ------10 5
Physical Education ..- ---------1 /2 Physical Education -..-_- 1_. 1
SENIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Advertising ----------- ------- 3 3 Advertising ...._---------- 3 3
Elective --- ---- 3 3 English ------------- --------- 5 5
Industrial Management ....--..-.. 3 3 Shop .------ ------_-----...... 10 5
English ----- ------------ .5 5 Industrial Management -.--- .-- 3 3
Shop ----- --.----- .------- 10 5 Elective .... ....------------ 3 3
Physical Education 1 V/ Physical Education.------ 1 I
Tailoring
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Chemistry .------ 7 5 Chemistry ------ 7 5
Drafting .....----.. --------2 1 Drafting ------...--..-------- 2 1
English ----.-- 5 5 English --------- 5
Drawing ------- 4 2 Drawing 4----------- 4 2
Shop ....... ---------------10 5 Shop ---- 10 5
Physical Education ..--.. ------ 1 /2 Physical Education.------------- 1 i /
JUNIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Chemistry .. -------------. 6 4 Chemistry -.---. 6 4
Economics --- ---- 3 3 Economics -- -- 3 3
Designing ---. --.--.-..-- 2 1 Designing ----.-.-- 2 1
English ---- ----- 5 5 English ---- ---- 5 5
Shop --------...-------- 10 5 Shop ---------10 5
Physical Education --.--.. ---- 1 Physical Education--- -------- 1 1/
SENIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Textiles and Clothing ---------- 3 2 Textiles and Clothing --------- 3 2
Industrial Management ---. ---. 3 Industrial Management -----. 3 3
English --------------------- 5 5 English ------------ ........ 5 5
Dyeing ----- ---------- ------ 4 3 Cleaning and Dyeing ---.------- 5 4
Shop --- --1----0 5 Shop ---------- 2 1
Drafting -------- 2 1 Drafting --------2 1
Physical Education .---------- 1 /2 Physical Education ------------. 1 2
Vocational Teaching
(Teachers' Course in Manual Training)
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Mathematics (Calculus) ------. 3 3 Surveying --- 2 1
Physics ------------------------ 6 4 English ---------.------- --.-----.. 5 5
English -.---------.--...----- 5 5 Physics _.-.--- ----- 6 4
Drawing ..----------..-.-..-.. -------. 6 3 Materials of Construction. --_.. --. 3 3
Shop ------ .... ..- 10 5 Drawing -- ------- 6 3
Physical Education..... ---------- .. 1 /2 Shop -------.-.-----. .------....10 5
Physical Education----... -----...1 1/ l
JUNIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Engineering Mechanics ----------. 4 4 Economics ._----. ...------------- 3 3
History -- ---------------------- 3 3 History -------.. --... ------------- 3 3
Economics _----------.- ------ 3 3 Strength of Materials ----------- 4 4
English --- ------ 5 5 English -- ------ 5 5
Drawing -------------------------- 6 3 Drawing ------.... --... ---._- --..- 6 3
Shop -----.... --.-- -------..- 6 3 Shop ----------------------......... 6 3
Physical Education------. ---..-.. 1 1/2 Physical Education------. ..-- 1 /





68 FLORIDA A. cq M. COLLEGE
SENIOR
First Semester Hrs. Cr. Second Semester Hrs. Cr.
Heat Engines ..------ .- ......-.. ..-- 3 3 Education (Methods of Teaching
Educational Psychology ....--------- 3 3 in High Schools .. ..---------- 3 3
Education (Classroom M'gement) 3 3 Vocational Education --... ------- 4 4
English 5 5 Practice Teaching -----... -----_- 10 5
Shop 1---- 0 5 Shop --- -10 5
Physical Education- .. -__1 '/2 Physical Education .... --.-------- 1 1/2
THE DEPARTMENT OF NURSE TRAINING
AND HEALTH
HOSPITAL STAFF
DR. L. H. B. FOOTE, M.D., Medical Director
DR. E. A. CARTER, Interne
L. R. LONG, R.N., Superintndclnt of Nurscs
A. B. ROBINSON, R.N., Head Nurse
The professional course for nurses offered by this hospital ex-
tends over a period of three years-twelve months each-two weeks
in the first and second years being allowed for vacation.
All applicants for this course must be above grammar grade, must
have finished, preferably, a four year high school course or its equiva-
lent. Age limit, not less than 18 or more than 35 years old, however,
in some cases, candidates are admitted after completing their second
or third year high school work.
The probation period is of three months duration. The qualifica-
tions of pupils for the work and the propriety of retaining or dis-
missing them at the end of their probationary term is determined by
the Training School Committee. The Training School Committee can
also recommend for dismissal any pupil for cause at any time.
In sickness the pupils are cared for gratuitiously, but all time so
lost must be made up.
Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Any student having more
than 10 percent unexcused absences in any one subject will not be al-
lowed to take the examination in that subject.
The duty hours for the day staff are from 7:00 a.m., to 7:00
p.m., and 7:00 p.m., to 7:00 a.m., for the night staff. The day nurses
have two hours off each day besides their meal hours, one-half day
each week, and will also be excused from duty a part of each Sun-
day.
A registration fee of fourteen dollars ($14) is paid on entrance.
Nurses furnish their own text books (which to begin with cost $20)
and their own bedding.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 69
THE HOSPITAL AND STAFF
The nurses receive their training in a twenty-five bed hospital,
occupying a unique and one of the highest points on the campus, sur-
rounded by beautiful lawns and shrubbery. New equipment and im-
proved facilities are being constantly added to the hospital so that we
are enabled to do more effective work. Our proposed plan calls for a
fifty-bed brick hospital with modern equipment and facilities. We
hope to realize this plan within the next few years.
The hospital staff of officials consist of a medical director, two
salaried graduate nurses, an interne and a record librarian. Daily visits
are made by the six or seven physicians of the city, who also give
instructions and talks to the nurses whenever their time permits.
This group of officials function under the supervision of the President
and the Executive Committee of the College.
The hospital enjoys the distinction of being the only hospital
between Pensacola and Jacksonville catering exclusively to colored
patients. This fact, along with the proposed program of improvement
and development, bids fair to making this the medical, surgical and
general health center of West Florida. During the past few years a
modern X-Ray and laboratory equipment were installed. Our most
recent addition to equipment being a very modern and up-to-date
operating table. Prospects are now promising also for a contagious
ward for communicable diseases, a children's ward, a maternity ward
and delivery room.
The nurses now occupy an exclusive section of the College Wom-
en's dormitory. This will afford the nurses the advantage of quietness
during the day while on night duty as well as quietness for rest and
study during free hours of the day.
REQUIREMENTS FOR NURSES
While serving the three months' probation period, each nurse is
required to wear the probation uniform, which consists of blue dresses
and white aprons. These are made in the dressmaking department
after measurements are taken. These are supplied at cost of eight dol-
lars, which sum is deposited in the office by the candidate upon enter-
ing. The hospital supplies the regular uniform.
Nurses must bring two pairs of black oxfords with rubber heels.
Plain white oxfords with rubber heels are permitted on special oc-
casions. Other necessities are a pair of house slippers, a warm kimona,
rubbers and raincoat, since the College Women's Dormitory and the
dining hall are a little distance from the hospital. Each nurse must have
a watch with a second hand.





70 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
CIINICAL FEATURES
Every student of the college is given a thorough examination at
the beginning of each school year. Free clinics for prospective mothers
and baby clinics are conducted at intervals during the year. There is
a constant supply of patients from the city of Tallahassee and vicinity
both for out-patient clinics and hospital patients. Daily student clinic,
vaccination of students, teachers and citizens against smallpox and
typhoid fever are other features. At our annual medical and surgical
clinic, numerous patients receive medical and surgical attention each
year. A new clinical feature this year was the beginning of an annual
Tuberculosis Clinic in which early diagnoses are made by a specialist
and advice given.
COLLEGE HELP
The school furnishes board, lodging and uniforms to the regular
nurses. Medical attention is given gratis while in training. Several
small cash prizes are awarded each year to nurses, based on scholarship
and efficiency of nursing.
EMPLOYMENT
Our graduate nurses find ready employment upon completing
their course of training. Thirty-two nurses have graduated from this
institution and are kept busy as institutional nurses, private, visiting
and public health nurses.
OUTLINE OF COURSE IN NURSE TRAINING
FRESHMEN JUNIORS
Chemistry -------------....--. 5 (32) Pediatrics -------------------- -.2 (16)
Hygiene --- ......- ------ 1 (16) Obstetrics -.1---------- (32)
Anatomy and Physiology .-------2 (32) Urinalysis --..... 1.---- -..---1 (16)
Practical Nursing-2 ..............2-- (32) Medical and Surgical Nursing --I-1 (32)
Ethics and History of Nursing ----1 (16) Materia Medica and Therapeutics 3 (32)
Drugs and Solutions --1--------1 (32) Swedish Massage --.......----- 1 (16)
Bacteriology ----.---------2 (16) Dietetics ------------. 3 (16)
SENIORS
Anaesthesia ----- --------1 (16)
Obstetrical Nursing --- 1 (32)
Nervous Diseases ----1--....1 (16)
Communicable Diseases .---.- 1 (16)
Dentistry ..-.---------- 1 (16)
Gynecology ----- 1 (32)
Surgical Nursing --l.....---..1 (32)
NOTE:-Numbers in parenthesis indicate the number of weeks the course is
pursued
B. S. IN NURSING
Beginning with the second semester 1930, the college organized
and offered the course of B.S. in Nursing. The strictly scientific courses
are being taught in the classrooms and laboratories of the college
department, while the advanced nursing subjects are being taught
by members of the hospital staff.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 71
REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS
(PARTIAL LIST)
Education
ELEMENTARY
Education courses 101 or 102, 103, 204, 205, 206, 207, 308 or
309, 310, 413, 415, and 18-24 hours in some one subject matter field
or group.
SECONDARY
Education 101 or 102, 205, 206a, 207, 308, 310, 311, 312, 412a
and b, 413, 420 and 423.
Persons majoring in Education must take a minimum of 24 sem-
ester hours in two teaching subjects from groups 1 to 7 of elective
group. (See College Outline of Courses.)
English
I. Requirements for a major in English should include 30 semester
hours of work.
II. Requirements for a minor should be fulfilled by taking 23
semester hours of work.
A course in English History is required of all students electing
English as a major or minor English field of specialization.
English 101, 102, 201, 202, 204, and 205; 20 specific, 12 semi-
elective and 10 semester hours in any of the courses in the 300 group.
(See English Division for further outline.)
Required Courses Hours
English 101 -.... ...3......--------.. .-----..3
English 102 3------------- ----3..3
English 201 4..........------.-...-- ..--4
English 202 ... ........-----..-- ..-----4...
English 204 ------- ---------------.-------_ -- .3
English 205 ---------------------------- --3
And at least ten semester hours in any of the courses in the 300
group.
History
A minimum of 24 hours of credit in History which must in-
clude History 101, 102, 203, 204, 404. Students majoring in History
are advised to elect courses in Economics and Sociology.
Home Economics
The Four-year College course in Home Economics requires 143
semester hours for its completion. A major in Home Economics con-





72 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
sists of not less than 30 hours in some particular course as outlined in
any one of the divisions.
Sciences
BIOLOGY
Thirty semester hours are required for a major in biology or zo-
ology-18 semester hours for a minor. Pre-medical students are advis-
ed to take the following courses in the order numbered: Zoology 101
(may be accompanied by Zoology 107); Zoology 103-105 (may be ac-
companied by Botany 101-103); Zoology 203 (may be accompanied
by Zoology 207 or 201). Courses (105, 203, 107) are required by
those taking a major or pre-medical course.
Students majoring in Biology should select the following courses
as outlined to amount to 24-30 semester hours. A minor should consist
of 16-18 semester hours.
Required Courses Hours
General Biology 101- ------- -----------4
Invertebrate Zoology 1-103- ..-------------4
Invertebrate Zoology II-105 4-----
Vertebrate Zoology 203 -..--- ---.-5
REQUIRED COURSES FOR BIOLOGY MINOR
General Biology 101 ------4
Zoology (1 year) -----8..-------- -- 8
ELECTIVES
Botany 101 ----4.----- -------.---- -4
Botany 102 ._.. 4-----------
Physiology 107 --- -----4-----------4
Bacteriology 201 ..------ --------- -3
CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS
Chemistry may be taken as a major by taking at least twenty-
two semester hours or as a minor by taking at least fourteen semester
hours.
General Chemistry 101 --------------------- -3
Qualitative Analysis 201 ------------ -4
Quantitative Analysis 202 ------- 4---4
Organic Chemistry 302 ----- -4
Physics may be selected as a major by taking at least sixteen
semester hours or as a minor by taking at least eight semester hours.
The course prescribed for students preparing to teach science in
secondary schools of Florida consists of eighteen semester hours of
chemistry, nine semester hours of biology, eight semester hours of
physics.
TRIPLE SCIENCE
Three years of one science. One year of Biology or Chemistry, if
not included in the two years of one science and one year of physics.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 73
(Mathematics, Geography or Geology may be selected for one year
of the three years of one science).
Mathematics
A student majoring in mathematics should cover the following
courses or their equivalent:
Required Courses Hours
Mathematics 98-Trigonometry- ------------ -3
Mathematics 102-College Algebra ------- 3
Mathematics 201-Analytic Geometry --- 6
Mathematics 301 or 302.
Mathematics 301-The Teaching and Super-
vision of Mathematics- -----------6
Mathematics' 302-Differential and Integral
Calculus---- --- __.. _-6
ELECTIVES
Astronomy ...-.. ..........---------- ..------3
Geology ..-.3........---- 3
The student should present at least 24 (six of these may be'elec
tives) hours for a major.
A student minoring in Mathematics should do at least twelve
hours, three of which may be electives.
Mechanic Arts
A major in any phase of Mechanic Arts can only be secured by
satisfactorily completing the courses as outlined in any one of the
Divisions.
Romance Languages
French 201, 202, 301, and 302; Spanish 201, 202, 301 and 302,
and a course in the Materials and Methods of teaching modern lan-
guages constitute a major in Romance Languages.
GROUPS
The term GROUP means a combination of subjects for concen-
tration usually called major.
The Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers the follow-
ing groups for concentration:
1. English and Romance Language.
2. Science, including Chemistry, Physics, Biology.
3. Music (Vocal, Instrumental) Fine Arts.
4. History, Social and Political Science, Geography.
5. Education.
6. Languages (if not combined in 1).
7. Mathematics.





74 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE COURSES
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Education
201 Introduction to Vocational Education. The object of this course
is to introduce the prospective teacher of vocational agriculture
to the aims and organization of our educational system and aid
him in realizing the place of agricultural education in it. The
objectives of education will be developed; our school system will
be surveyed as an agency for realizing the objectives of educa-
tion; and the Smith-Hughes Act will be studied in its relation
to our national scheme of education. Three recitations. Prerequi-
site: Sophomore standing.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Hill-Introduction to Vocational Education.
404 Special Methods. In this course the objectives of Vocational
Education in Agriculture will be established, then a study of the
Smith-Hughes Act and the State Plan of Florida, as they are
designed for furthering these objectives, will be made. A greater
part of the course will be devoted to course making, enterprise
analysis, job analysis, and a project method of teaching in vo-
cational agricultural education. Prerequisite: Agricultural Educa-
tion 101, 202 and 203. Three recitations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Schmidt-New Methods in Agriculture.
405 Directed Observation and Practice. The first part of the course
will be devoted to such phases of Agricultural Education as
part-time and evening schools, community work, and the equip-
ment of a department of vocational agriculture. The remainder
will be devoted to observation and practcie. Prerequisite: Agri-
cultural Education 204. Three recitations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Schmidt-New Methods in Agriculture.
406 Principles of Vocational Education. This is an elective course
in which is made a detailed study of the principles of vocational
education as developed in recent years. Prerequisite: Junior Stand-
ing. Three recitations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Prosser a. Allen-Vocational Education in a Democracy.
307 Educational Psychology. See Department of Education.
308 Methods of Teaching in the High School. See Department of Edu-
cation.
9.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 75
301 History of Agriculture. The history of agricultural organiza-
tion and practice with the accompanying rural life, will be traced
from the primitive time to the present. Most attention will be
directed to Western Europe, and the United States. The purpose
of this course is to give the students an insight into the origin
and development of the present day rural problems. Three reci-
tations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Gras-History of Agriculture.
AGRONOMY
102 Cash Crops. A study of the fundamental principals of crop pro-
duction, soil management, adaptability, distribution and use, seed
selection, seed testing, preparation of the soil, planting, cultiva-
tion, harvesting, and other factors affecting the growth, develop-
ment and maturity of plant life. Three recitations. One 2-hour
laboratory period.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
Text: Davis-Southern Field Crop Enterprises.
101 Soils in Relation to Plant Growth. This course includes the
origin of soils, composition, class and types, chemical composition,
and its relation to plant growth. Soil fertility, production to soil
fertility and plant growth. Two recitations. One 2-hour labora-
tory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Davis- Southern Field Crop Enterprises.
403 Senior Elective. An advanced study of soils and fertilizers. Much
experimental work required. Thesis required before completion.
Two recitations. One 2-hour laboratory.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Osterhount-Experiments With Plants.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
202 Types and Breeds of Livestock. A course covering the origin,
history, development, and characteristics of farm animals. Market
classification and judging is included in this course.
Three recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: VWaters f King-Animal Husbandry.
Ny05 Dairy Herd Management. This course deals with the study of
/ > pedigrees, breeding, judging, testing, handling, and other sub-
jects of importance in the management of dairy herds. Practical
work required. Two recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Junior elective.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Eckles d Warren-Dairy Herd Management.





76 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
201 Poultry Husbandry. This course includes a study of farm poul-
try as a side line on the farm, breeds, classification, culling, poul-
try house construction, feeding, incubation, brooding and care,
sanitation, diseases and prevention, marketing and judging. Three
recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Levis-Productive Poultry.
304 Poultry Husbandry. This course is designed to give the student
the fundamentals in poultry management of the large commercial
flocks as follows: Establishing the plant, arranging the flocks, the
commercial aspects of buying, selling and marketing, incubation
of eggs, management of machines on a large scale, raising, feed-
ing, grading, mating, and special knowledge of this line in breed-
ing, types and construction of poultry houses. Two recitations.
One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Lewiis-Productive Poultry.
BACTERIOLOGY
301 Agricultural and Industrial Bacteriology. This brief introduc-
tory course, the aim of which is to give the student a working
knowledge of the development and control of bacteria, as they
affect the farmer, protecting his crops, and stock from diseases,
and preparing such products as butter, milk, cream, preserved
vegetables and meat for the home and for the market. Three
recitations. Laboratory one 2-hour period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Buchanan-Agricultural and Industrial Bacteriology.
BOTANY
302 Agricultural Botany. A study of botany as it applies to farm
crops. The parts, structure, and function of plants. Heredity and
evolution of plants, and their effects on modern agriculture. Two
recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Robbins d Rickett-Botany.
CHEMISTRY
205 Chemistry of Plants and Animals. The object of this course is
to give the student a general understanding of the facts pertain-
ing to plant and animal nutrition, and ability to use plant life
effectively in feeding farm animals. The course deals only with
organic compounds. The chemistry of milk, vegetables, grain,
blood, and other organic compounds in their relation to digestion
t





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 77
and nutrition. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 and 102. Three reci-
tations. Laboratory two hours.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Text: Chamberlain-Organic Agricultural Chemistry.
206 Chemistry of Soils and Fertilizers. Students will analyze soil
and fertilizer samples for the elements that are significant in fert-
ilizing practice, accompanying their laboratory work with such
textbooks and problem work as will result in a working mastery
of economical crop fertilization. Prerequisite: Agricultural Chem-
istry 105. Three recitations. Two 2-hour laboratory periods.
Credit, 5 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
DAIRY HUSBANDRY
201 Principles of Dairying. A course dealing with general creamery
practice in the care and handling of dairy products. It also in-
cludes the practical use and study of dairy equipment and ap-
paratus. Three recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Judlkins-Principles of Dairying.
\ 306 Milk Imspection and Marketing of Milk. An elective, dealing with
the general handling and care of milk for the market. Includes
standardization, refrigeration, judging and sampling of milk.
Also a study of Dairy barns and equipment. One recitation. Two
2-hour laboratory periods. Junior elective.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Ross-Inspection and Marketing Milk.
07 Ice Cream Making. This course will cover the standardization
\ of mixtures and freezing of ice cream, sherberts and frozen pro-
ducts, and the physical principals involved, types of freezers,
flavors, fillers, and binders. Senior elective. One recitation. One
2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Text: Fisk-Ice Cream Making.
ECONOMICS
302 Introduction to Agricultural Economics. A brief analysis of the
economic problems that confront the individual farmer in the
farming industry, with considerable study of proposed plans for
their solution. Prerequisites: History of Agriculture. Three reci-
tations. Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Holmes-Farm Organization and Management.
403 Marketing. This course will deal principally with the marketing
problems of the Florida Farmer, the process through which farm





78 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
products pass from the producer to the consumer, cooperative
marketing, and the technique of actually preparing typical farm
products for profitable marketing. Prerequisite: Agricultural Eco-
nomics 202. Three recitations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Macklin-Marketing Agricultural Products.
ENGINEERING
301 Agricultural Engineering. This course gives a general under-
standing of the principles of mechanics, studies of farm construc-
tion, sanitation, drainage, irrigation, water supply, lighting, etc.,
are also made in this course. Skill in doing is a prime factor in
this course. A study of farm machines is made. Two recitations.
One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Roehl-Farm Shop.
302 Agricultural Engineering. This is a continuation of course 301,
and is concerned more with operative skill, and adjustment.
Simple surveying and terracing, etc., are included, and practical
problems solved. Two recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Roehl-Farm Shop.
HORTICULTURE
201 Fruit Production. This course includes the general principles of
fruit growing, and a study of the various fruit crops adapted to
the State. In this course the student learns the kinds of sprays,
dusts, and other materials used in successful fruit production.
Three recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semeser hours.
Text: Davis-Horticulture Enterprises.
302 Truck Crop Production. This course covers a specific knowl-
edge of the vegetables best adapted to the various types of soil,
and the proper methods of treating the soil under varying con-
ditions. This course includes seed bed preparation, description,
identification, and testing of seed. Planting, cultivating, fertiliz-
ing and treating vegetables for the market and home. Two reci-
tations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Davis-Horticulture Enterprises.
404 Advanced Truck Crop Production. In this course the student
learns to mix and apply fertilizers, the importance of location,
and the requirements of packing and shipping of fruits and vege-





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 79
tables. This course should give a high type of operative skill to the
student. Two recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
303 Landscape Architecture. The laying off and beautification of
lawns, estates, school grounds, etc. A study of flowers, shrubbery
and trees, terracing, leveling, and shaping the land to fit the
general contour. Greenhouse management. Two recitations. One
2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Waugh-Landscape-Gardening.
ENTOMOLOGY
301 Entomology. Applied entomology based on structure, classifi-
cation, life-history, recognition and general control of insects in-
jurous to farm crops, particularly in the State of Florida. Two
recitations. One 2-hour laboratory period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
MATHEMATICS
201 Agricultural Mathematics. Mathematics related to agriculture
and its branches, especially that which confronts the farmer in
every day practices, such as land measurement, buying and sell-
ing, mixing fertilizers, draft, etc. Two recitations.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Text: Burkett-Farm Arithmetic.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY
304 Rural Sociology. This course acquaints the student with the
forces and factors in rural social progress, development and ad-
aptation of rural institutions and organizations. Three recitations
per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Gillette-Rural Sociology.
305 Community Organization and Leadership. This course acquaints
the student with programs and plans for organization and de-
velopment of rural clubs circles, social center, and selecting rural
leadership, its development, tasks, obligations, and opportunities.
Prerequisite: One course in Rural Sociology. Three recitations.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Ross-Social Control.





80 FLORIDA A. a M. COLLEGE
ZOOLOGY
103 Zoology. A study of the structure, function, and evolutionary
types of invertebrates and the vertebrates. This course is intend-
ed to give the student a somewhat brief, but general knowledge
of the animal kingdom. Three recitations. One 2-hour laboratory
period.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Galloway 0 Welch-Zoology.
DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS
101 Foods. For Freshmen. A study of food and its classification;
tests and analyses, and correct preparation. Marketing, menu
planning, table service, and decorating.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
201 Foods. For Sophomores. Food preparation in relation to nutri-
tion and health. A study of the newer ideas in both the principles
of nutrition and the practice of dietetics.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
301 Nutrifio1n. Nutritive value of foods in relation to body require-
ments and varying incomes. A study of digestion under certain
conditions of health diets for all ages. Required of Juniors, one
semester.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
401 Large Quantity Cooking. The preparation and serving of quan-
tities of food to large groups and for special occasions. Elective in
Senior year.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
101 Clothing. For Freshmen. Garment construction, reviewing the
uses of stitches, hand embroidery, machines, patterns and their
uses as applied to clothing for the family.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
201 Di ,rt.i:';,:.. For Sophomores. Dresses constructed from cotton,
linen, wool and silk. The use of commercial and drafted patterns.
A special study of suitability and costs of materials.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
301 Dressmaking. Art principles applying to selection of designs.
Emphasis placed on selection and identification of textile ma-
terials, fitting and finishing garments. Elective in Junior year.
Credit, 2 semester hours.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 81
302 Applied Art. A study to develop good taste in selecting, furn-
ishing and decorating a home. The making of practical, artistic
home furnishings.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
401 Designing and Draping. The uses of line form, color and texture
of material applied to individual types. The construction of gar-
ments based on line and form without the use of patterns.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
202 Textiles. A study of textiles, fabrics, manufacturing processes,
value through examinations and tests. Training for the selection
of fabrics with greater wisdom and care.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
102 Applied Design. The underlying principles governing structural
design, to be applied to home decoration and clothing construc-
tion.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
303 Millinery. Practical construction of hats, renovation of old ma-
terials. Stress placed on selection and cultivation of good taste
in making and purchasing hats.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
302 Home Management. A study of the efficient use of time and
money in conducting the affairs of the home. Care, furnishing,
budgeting, standards of living and social relationships of the
family.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
402 Practice House. The practical application of Home Economics
302 in living quarters provided on the school grounds.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
401 Home Nursing and Child Care. Arrangement and care of sick
room. Emergency remedies, and preparation of suitable foods for
invalids. A study of the development and growth of the young
child. Directed by a Registered Nurse at the school hospital.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
404 Methods of Teaching Home Economics. A study of methods in
home economics instruction, making lesson plans, organization of
courses of study, equipment and teaching problems.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
403 Practice Teaching. Forty supervised lessons are taught by Smith-
Hughes students and those completing the course leading to a de-





82 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
gree. Opportunity for teaching is given in the Children's School
of Home Economics.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
405 Home Economics Education. A survey of Home Economics, its
place in modern education, and its relative importance in different
groups and communities.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Art
101 Drawing Methods and Use. This course will cover the organiza-
tion of materials for use in the teaching of art in the first, second
and third grades, such as pencil drawing, blackboard illustrations,
wax crayon drawing, construction paper cutting and weaving.
Notebook required. Four periods per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
102 Drawing Methods and Use. This course will cover the organiza-
tion of materials for use in the teaching of art in the Fourth,
Fifth and Sixth Grades, such as pencil drawing, construction
paper cutting, water color painting, charcoal drawing, color
theory, border designing (stencils) and brief study of some of
the great artists. Notebook required. Four periods per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Reference (additional): The Normal Instructor,
The Elementary Teacher.
103 The Sand Table and Its Uses. This course will cover the organ-
ization of the sand table with the following objectives in mind:
(1) To allow children to work out large units of work; (2) To
allow them to visualize ideas that correspond to the geography,
history, language and reading lesson; (3) To satisfy the instinct
of manipulation so outstanding in the children in the primary
grades; (4) to motivate subjects of the curriculum to such an
extent that pupils will be carried over a great deal of work
easily, which if taught by the old time method would seem un-
pleasant; (5) To work out ideas and visualize them; (6) To
foster cooperation in working with others. Four periods per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
104 Advanced Art. (Elective). This course includes figure drawing
(action and proportion) from life, history of art, oil painting,





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 83
animal drawing and fancy lettering. Five periods per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
References: Reinach-The Apollo,
Bridgman-Constructive Anatomy.
300 Applied Design. (Elective). This includes hand painting cry-
stalline lamp shades with Dennison sealing wax colors, painting
pottery with Gypsy craft colors, painting parchment lamp shades
with Gypsy glaze colors, painting Gypsy Glowing Glass pictures,
cut felt work and painting velvet wall tapestry. Four periods per
week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Commerce and Business
101 Business Arithmetic. Consistent drill over the fundamental pro-
cesses to obtain accuracy and speed. This drill is supplemented by
work in interest, discount, payrolls and related bookkeeping arith-
metical problems. Semester course; four hours per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
115 Penmanship. Systematized practice and drill endeavoring to im-
prove each student's handwriting. (Required course.) Two hours
per week.
Credit (None).
101 Typewriting. Intensive, rhythmical drills for accuracy ac-
cording to the touch system. An acquaintance with the machine,
its parts and their care. The emphasis on speed is gradually in-
creased. Year course; five hours per week.
Credit, 2/2 semester hours.
102 Typewriting. Continuation of Typewriting 101.
101 Shorthand Principles. To master Gregg's Shorthand Out-
lines and to transcribe these outlines orally or on typewriter. Year
course; five hours per week.
Credit, 2 /2 semester hours.
102 Shorthand Principles. Continuation of Shorthand Principles 101.
102 Principles of Accounting. A brief study of bookkeeping prin-
ciples; a thorough study of accounting principles, including col-
umnar journals, controlling accounts, partnership accounts. Prac-
tice set. Semester course. Five hours per week; two laboratory
periods.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





84 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
201 Advanced Accounting. Accounting for corporations, branch
house accounting, comparative statements and statistics. Practice
set. Prerequisite: Business 101, 106, 110, 115. Year course. Three
hours per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
202 Advanced Accounting. Continuation of Advanced Accounting
201.
151 Office Training Principles. Drills and practical experience in the
use of the equipment and machines of a modern office including
such work as filing, stencil cutting, mimeographing, use of adding
machines, addressing machines, multigraph machines, etc. Pre-
requisites: Business 130-131. Semester course. Three hours per
week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
201 Advanced Typewriting. An advanced course in typing in
which speed is developed. This work is supplemented by tabulat-
ing and the typing of special reports and forms. Neat and well-
arranged work is absolutely required. Prerequisites: Business 130-
131. Year course. Three hours per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
202 Advanced Typewriting. Continuation of Typewriting 201.
201 Advanced Shorthand. A brief review of shorthand outlines
followed by work which develops speed in note and letter taking
and transcribing. Prerequisites: Business 130-131, Business 140-
141. Year course. Three hours per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
202 Advanced Shorthand. Continuation of Shorthand 201.
206 Business English. A thorough and intensive review of grammar,
first semester. Second semester, introduction to form and me-
chanical routine of letter writing. Theory and practice in business
letter writing, informational inquiries and reports. Year course;
three hours per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
207 Business English. Continuation of Business English 206.
201 Commercial Law. Law of contracts, sales, agency, negotiable
instruments, partnerships, corporation, real property, supple-
mented by case study. Year course; three hours per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
202 Commercial Law. Continuation of Commercial Law 201





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 85
231 Business Organization. A study of the various types of business
organizations and their general nature and evolution; the struc-
ture and history of the corporation. The corporation and trust
problems. Prerequisites: Economics. Semester course. Three hours
per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
205 Office Training. An advanced course in office training in which
the students go into a detailed study of the filing systems, meth-
ods of handling correspondence, sources of information and gene-
ral duties common to all offices. All work done during this sem-
ester is very carefully scrutinized for exact and neat results. Pre-
requisites: Business 151. Semester course. Three hours per week.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
251 Office Practice. A chance to apply the theory learned in the
classroom in the various offices of the institution and surround-
ing vicinity. Prerequisites: Business 150 and 205. Semester course.
Ten and one-half hours per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
291 Insurance. General theory, statistics and procedure used in the
various phases of insurance; a study of the governmental super-
vision; premiums, insurance investments. Semester course. Three
hours per week.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Education
OBJECTIVES OF COURSES IN EDUCATION
The courses in Education are intended to provide professional
training, experience and content in the Science of Education to pro-
duce master teachers.
101 Introduction to the Study of Education. This is a general survey
course designed to give a general review of the first principles
and the history of education. Especially recommended to those
who have had no previous instruction in education.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Rugg d Shumaker-The Child Centered School,
Clapp, Chase & Merriman-Introduction to Education.
102 Principles of Education. This course interprets educational the-
ory and practice. A canvas of school problems in terms of chil-
dren, teachers, subject matter, methods and procedure is made.





86 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Prerequisite: High School Course in education or Educational
Biology.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Chapman FS Counts-Principles of Education,
Bagley-Class Room Management.
203 Education. Class Room Management, organization, control and
directed observation and lesson-planning.
This is a course in the theory of management, observation and
lesson planning. It is an attempt to evaluate the best teaching
procedure by planned and organized technique.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: Education 101 or 102.
Text: Sears-Class Room Organization and Control.
204 Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools. This course affords
situations and activities which permit practice in the material
developed within the classroom instruction period. Concepts in
the elementary grades, the place of drill, kind and amount of
formal standardized tests and scales. Prerequisite: Education 101
or 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
205 Health Education and Educational Hygiene. A general course
in the teaching of health in the schools, school examinations and
the whole problem of health as it affects schools.
Prerequisite: Biology 101; Education 101, 102 or 103.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Terman L Almack-The Hygiene of the School Child.
' 106 Practice Teaching. This course includes actual teaching under
supervision, supplemented by conferences and daily reports.
Prerequisite: Education 101 or 102, 103 and 104.
Credit, 6 semester hours. Three hours daily.
Text: (Not required.)
207 Oral and Silent Reading. This subject reveals the fundamental
principles underlying the subject, the best methods of teaching
reading in the elementary school, remedial work and the means
of measuring results. Prerequisite: Education 101 or 102.
Credit, 2 semester hours.
Text: Uhl-Oral and Silent Reading.
310 Tests and Measurements. A scientific study of tests and meas-
urements as applied to school subjects and intelligence. Prerequi-
site: Education 101 or 102; 207 or 208.
Credit, 2 semester hours.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 87
311 Principles of Secondary Education. This course is a study of
High School education, pupils, curricula course of study, object-
ives and aims. Prerequisite: Education 101 or 102 and 208 or 209.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
412 Methods of Teaching in High Schools. The student actually ob-
serves and participates in the planning of lessons for high school
teachers. Prerequisite: Education 210.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: D.,.' 1,, --UfI rn Methods in High School Teaching.
517 Educational Statistics. The practical uses to be made of statistics
in relation to the improvement of the performance of students and
appreciation of the relationship of mean, median, mode and corre-
lation to educational work. Prerequisite: Education 101 or 102;
208, and Mathematics 102 or 103.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Garret-Statistics in Psychology and Education.
206a Practice Teaching. Actual practice teaching in the grades 1-8
under supervision and criticism of critic teachers. The class reports
15 periods per week but only a section of the group teaches while
the other group observes, conducts supervised study and assists
in routine. Methods, measurements and units of teaching, class
room management are taught in connection with this course.
First semester. Prerequisite: Education 101 or 102, 103 and 104.
Credit, 5 semester hours.
/ 206b Practice teaching. Under supervision-(Elementary School).
This is done in all of the grades. Continued for the year, 5 double
periods per week. The student-teacher teaches on an average 3
periods per week, the other time is spent in conference, acting as
critic, keeping of records, and other detailed matters of school
work. Prerequisites: Education 101 or 102 and 103.
Credit, 5 semester hours.
208 Educational Psychology. Application of psychology to learning
situations. Laboratory work required for credit. Prerequisites:
Education 101, 102 or General Biology.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
209 Child Study and Psychology. The application of psychology to
child life. Intended primarily for those interested in Primary
Education. Laboratory work required.
Credit, I semester hours.
312a High School Methods. This is a course in Methods for second-
ary schools, observation and actual practice teaching in major and
minor teaching fields. Prerequisite: Education 210.





88 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
413 Materials and Methods in Special Fields. By arrangement with
teacher in special field.
(a) English.
(b) Science.
(c) Language.
(d) Social Science (History, Geography and Civics).
(e) Primary Education.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
414 History of Education in the United States. The development of
education in the States. Special attention is given to Educa-
tion in the South, Negro Education and development. No pre-
requisite.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
415 School Supervision. The supervision of the school, organization
and administration of an elementary school. Prerequisite: Educa-
tion 101 or 102. Twelve semester hours of education.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
416 Lesson Planning and Rural School Administration and Sueprvision.
This is a course in the development of lesson plans in all of the
school subjects. It is intended for persons not majoring in Edu-
cation but who need to have the general principles well before
them. Notebook required.
Credit, 1 semester hour.
ADVANCED COURSES OFFERED
The following are advanced courses to be offered to six or more
students upon request. Some of these courses are offered as a part of the
regular Summer School Program for principals, supervisors, and more
advanced students.
419 History of Education. Ancient to present as well as comparative
development in different countries. Departmental original investi-
gation and term paper.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
520 Organization, Supervision and Administration of High School
Teacher-training Classes.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
521 Educational Sociology. Prerequisite: Twelve hours pf Education
and six of Sociology and Economics.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
522 Principles of Educational and Vocational Guidance.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 89
523 High School Organization, Administration and Supervision.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
524 Independent Study Courses.
i25 Education. For advanced students who may work upon topics
and receive credit upon presentation of final term paper based on
individual study and investigation.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
526 Extra-Curricula Activities. For advanced students who are col-
lege graduates. An original investigation necessary.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text (Suggested): Roemer e Allen.
English
The general aim of the courses in English is to give the students
command of the art of communication in speech and writing. Specifi-
cally, the student should be taught (1) to write clear and grammat-
ically correct sentences and paragraphs; (2) to present his ideas dis-
tinctly and effectively in formal and in informal discussions.
100 Remedial English. Required of first-year college students who
are unable to pass the English Grammar Exemption Test given
at the beginning of the Freshman year.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
101 Freshman Composition. Required of all first-year college stu-
dents.
The aim of this course is to train the student to express himself
in clear and concise language. Special emphasis is placed upon the
writing of expository themes, the construction of sentences and
paragraphs, correct usage, the taking of notes, letter writing,
spelling, punctuation, etc. First semester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Wooley-New Handbook of Composition,
Slater-Freshman Composition.
102 Freshman Composition. This course, which is a continuation of
the work in course 101, stresses three forms of discourse; namely,
Argumentation, Narration, and Description. Special attention is
given to the making of briefs, construction of themes, punctua-
tion and sentence structure. Second semester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
200 Remedial English. Students in the senior normal and senior
college classes who show deficiency in the knowledge of the





90 FLORIDA A. ae M. COLLEGE
fundamentals of English are required to take this course. The
course offers a thorough review of grammar and written and
oral composition.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
201 History of English Literature. Open to sophomores and senior
normals.
The aim of the course is to give the student a general knowledge
of the development of English Literature from the Anglo-Saxon
period until the present time.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
Text: Cunliffe, Pyre Young-Century Readings in English
Literature.
Reference: Neilson El Thorndike-History of English Literature.
202 American Literature. Open to all sophomores and senior normals.
This course is a study of American prose and poetry, with the
aim of tracing chronologically the development of the literature.
Credit, 4 semester hours.
Text: Patte-Century Readings in American Literature.
203 Children's Literature. For senior normals only. A course design-
ed to acquaint prospective teachers with the literature of the pri-
mary grades and to familiarize them with the telling of children's
stories.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Clippinger-Children's Literature.
204 The Teaching of English. Primarily for senior normals and Eng-
lish majors. Not open to Freshmen. This course is designed for
prospective teachers of English in the high schools. Careful con-
sideration is given to the aims, materials, and methods of teaching
composition, language and literature. (Offered upon request of
six or more.)
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
205 Argumentation and Debating. Not open to Freshmen.
A consideration of the problems involved in gathering material
and in constructing the type of composition which aims to con-
vince or persuade.
Persuasive speeches and the general theory of debate are discussed.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Foster-Argumentation and Debating.
301 Journalism. Open to juniors and seniors, and others by special
permission.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 91
The course in journalism is designated to give the student in-
struction and practice in newspaper writing and editing. Prac-
tical work is afforded in the publication of the school paper, the
Weekly News.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
302 Public Speaking. This course is open to those who wish to ac-
quire some skill in public address. Special emphasis is placed upon
purpose, audience, occasion and type of speeches.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
303 Shakespeare. Open to all juniors and seniors.
A survey course treating of the principal comedies and tragedies
of Shakespeare. Special consideration is given to the history and
structure of the Elizabethan theatre.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Irving-Shakespeare Complete.
304 The American Short Story. A study of the development of the
American short story from its origin to the present is offered in
this course. The reading of numerous short stories from each
of the principal American short story writers is required.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: (To be selected.)
305 American Negro Literature._-This course offers a study of the
works of the foremost American Negro poets, novelists, and
essayists. Special study is given to the works of contemporary
American Negro writers.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Calverton, V. F., (ed.)-Anthology of American Negro
Literature.
Foreign Languages and Literature
The practical aims of instruction intend to develop in the student
the ability to read, write and speak foreign languages for preparation
for teaching or as a business career. The cultural aims of the study
of foreign languages would give an appreciation for the literature,
customs, traditions, and social institutions of other peoples. Stu-
dents in the department may avail themselves of the opportunities of
Le Cercle Francais and El Circulo Espanol.
FRENCH
101 Elementary Course. The elements of French grammar with





92 FLORIDA A. s M. COLLEGE
abundant oral and written exercises. Special attention to oral
practice and ear training. No prerequisite.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
T e x t: Marinoni-Passarclli-Zacharie-Ani Elementary French
Grammar.
102 Elementary Course. Continuation of French 101. Second sem-
ester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text (additional): France- Michand and Marinoni
201 Intermediate Course. A review of the essentials of French gram-
mar and composition. The reading of short stories and plays by
authors of the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Composi-
tion and translation.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Otto F. Bond-Review Essentials of French Grammar.
Hills d Holbrook-French Short Stories.
202 Intermediate Course. Continuation of French 201. Second sem-
ester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text:' (To be selected.)
301 Elementary French Conversation. A study of French manners,
customs, scenes, games, and life in general. Dictation and com-
position are emphasized. Prerequisite: French 202.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Clement FS Macirone-Voici la France.
302 Advanced Course. Rapid reading of Nineteenth Century Lit-
erature with emphasis on the prose and poetry of the Romantic
Period.
Prerequisite: French 202.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Chateaubriand, Musset, Vigny, Hugo, Lamartine.
401 Advanced Course. Rapid reading of Nineteenth Century Lit-
erature with emphasis on the Realistic Period. Prose and poetry.
Prerequisite: French 302.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Balzac, Gautier, Baudelaire, Nodier, de Maupassant.
LATIN
101 Latin. This course is a review of Latin Grammar and the read-
ing of selected passages from Caesar's Gallic War.
Credit, 3 semester hours.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 93
102 Latin. Six orations of Cicero will be read and some time will
be devoted to prose composition.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
103 Latin. In this course the student will become acquainted with
Latin authors as Livy, Horace, Plautus and Terence through the
reading of selections.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
104 Latin. This course will be devoted to the reading of Catullus,
Pliny, Tacitus and Martial.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
SPANISH
101 Elementary Course. Elements of Spanish grammar with oral
and written exercises.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Hills : Ford-First Spanish Course.
102 Continuation of Spanish 101. Second semester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text (additional): Cuentos y Leyendas.
201 Intermediate Course. A systematic review of Spanish Grammar
and intensive study of idioms and composition. Prerequisite: Span-
ish 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: Seymour d Carnahan-A Short Spanish Review Grammar,
Zaragueta E others-El Capitan Veneo.
202 Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 201. Second semester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
301 Advanced Course. Rapid reading of novels and plays of the
Nineteenth Century with emphasis on the early period of the
century. Prerequisite: Spanish 202.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
302 Advanced Course. Rapid reading of novels and plays with em-
phasis on the Picaresque Novel. Prerequisite: Spanish 301.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
413 Methods of Teaching Modern Languages. A study of practical
classroom questions with special attention to textbooks, tests and
bibliography. Prerequisite: Major in Modern Languages.
Mathematics
The Objectives of this Division are:
1. To help students discover their capacities in this field and help
them to attain the fullest development of those capacities.





94 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
2. To help students acquire skill and ability in handling both ab-
stract and concrete quantities.
3. To help students learn to like mathematics to such an extent
that they will study the higher branches of the subject, not because
they are compelled to, but because they like it and can see some defi-
nite use that can be made of higher mathematcis.
4. To prepare teachers of mathematics.
5. To point out the relation between mathematics and the other
branches of science in such a manner that students will find them-
selves equipped with a useful tool to master those problems encounter-
ed in those sciences.
6. To help students make the necessary preparation for doing
major work at leading universities.
101 Advanced Arithmetic with Methods. This course includes a
complete review of the content material in arithmetic and the
most modern methods of problem solving. Much attention is given
to the most modern method of presenting the subject.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Hart-General Mathematics-Book II.
102 College Algebra. This course includes a brief review of such
high school topics as Variations, Progressions, Mathematical In-
duction and the first two orders of the Determinant. Special at-
tention is given, following this preliminary review, to pure Col-
lege Algebra. This portion of the course covers such topics as the
Determinants of higher order, Permutation, Combination, Theory
of Equations, Mathematics of Investment, etc.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Harding CS Mullins-College Algebra.
103 College Trigonometry. This is a semester course, offered during
the second semester. It is required of all students who are work-
ing for the A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Liberal Arts and
of Mechanic Arts students. The course will consist, in the main,
of problems involving practical applications of trigonometry.
Much attention will be given also to trigonometric equations and
identities.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Curtis S Moulton-Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.
201 Analytic Geometry. This course embraces a complete study of
different types of equations and their loci, polar coordinates and
transformation of coordinates. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Wentworth, Siceloff, Smith-Analytic Geometry.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 95
202 Astronomy. An extensive study of the Constellation and the
Solar System, giving special attention to the earth and its relation
to the other members. An advanced course, not open to Fresh-
men. Offered upon request.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Harold Jacoby-Astronomy.
301 Differential and Integral Calculus. This course is open to those
who have completed Mathematics 201 and is required of those
majoring in Mathematics or Mechanic Arts. The work covers a
study of functions, limits, differentiation and integration of al-
gebraic and transcendental functions, mechanical application,
curve tracing, infinite series and other topics of interest to the
draughtsman. (Not offered 1930-1931.)
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Love-Differential and Integral Calculus.
413 The History and Methods of Teaching Mathematics. In addition
to a study of the history and development of mathematics, much
attention will be given to a review of content work in the sev-
eral branches of mathematics through Mathematics 103. There
will be also a generous discussion of modern methods of teaching
the subject, including some actual practice teaching.
The main purpose of this course is to help Mathematics majors.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Texts: (To be announced later.)
101 College Geology. This course consists of a comprehensive study
of the earth, including its structure, the processes at work on its
surface, and the history of its plant and animal life. Surveys of
nearby regions will be made by the class. The course is open to
students above Freshman classification who, in the opinion of the
instructor, have the ability to do the work required in the course.
It will take the place of the course in Astronomy for the second
semester.
Credit, 3 semester hours.
Text: Bradley-The Earth and Its History.
Music
It is the primary aim of the Division of Music to implant in the
students a thorough technical foundation as a background and also
to stimulate and develop an appreciation of the aesthetic values in
piano, voice and instrumental music. Students are prepared to either
teach or do advanced work leading to concert work.





96 FLORIDA A. e; M. COLLEGE
101 Harmony. Scales, (Major, Minor and Chromatic). Intervals,
triads; Original melody writing. Simple harmonization and analy-
sis. Seventh chords, cadences and inversions of foregoing.
Text: Orem-Beginners Harmony.
201 Harmony. Triple Modulation, Melody harmonization with pri-
mary and secondary triads, the dominant, diminished and other
seventh chords with inversions. Non-chordal tones, including sus-
pension. Analysis of piano and vocal music with illustration.
Text: Chadwick-Advanced Harmony.
301 Composition. Writing phrases, periods, double periods, with dif-
ferent means of extension. Analysis writing in the Two-, Three-,
and Five- Part Forms with Extension.
Text: Orem-Composition of Music.
401 Composition. Writing the Ground Motive, Basso Ostinato and
their development. Analysis of classical examples of these forms.
Analysis and development of the Sonato-Allegro form.
Text: Orem-Composition of Music.
301 Counterpoint, Canon and Fugue. Analysis two-part counter-
point in all special including simple modulations. Florid counter-
point; invertible counterpoint; imitation; the small two-voice in-
ventions; three part counterpoint; diatonic and chromatic; the
small three-voice invention. Various forms of Canon; the Fugue.
Text: Goetschins-Elementary Counterpoint.
401 Counterpoint. Two and Three Voice inventions; native develop-
ment with four contrapuntal parts; choral figuration in small
and large species.
Text: Goetschins-Applied Counterpoint.
101 Music Appreciation. Introduction to music, which includes the
emphasis of the function of music as a force in laying the founda-
tions of civilized life. Days of Knighthood. Pageant of Kings and
Music. Poetic charm and feeling, program music. Native music
of Negroes, Indians and Pioneers.
Text: McGehee-People and Music.
201 History of Music. How Music Began. Music of the Early
Church; Early English Music; Music in Europe and America; the
Growth of Modern Music.
Text: Cooke-Standard History of Music.
ADVANCED BAND COURSE
100 Beginners. Harmony, scales, intervals, triads, chords, progres-
sions, combinations. Proper distribution of parts in band arrange-
ment, special study in scoring song arrangements.





BULLETIN, 1930-1931 97
201 Band. This course is open to young men in the College Depart-
ment who have successfully finished the three year high school
course. Six hour course.
203 Band. Revising and editing parts to meet the needs of particular
band organizations, Fine points of instrumentation. Scoring for
various ensembles; brass quartettes; wood, wind, reed and saxo-
phone.
304 Rehearsal Methods. Band ensemble, methods of securing good
intonation. Tonal and harmonic balance, tone quality, accompani-
ments, attack and release of tones. Fine points in band perform-
ance. Correct methods on teaching wood, wind and brass instru-
ments. Importance of percussion instruments and their proper
use in the band.
Technique of the baton; how to beat time, the preparatory beat,
simple and compound measures, correct use of the left hand. Se-
curing crescendos, dimenuendos, holds and climaxes.
405 Interpretation of Standard Compositions. Study of easy and
difficult band, compositions. Marches, waltzes and novelty con-
cert numbers, overtures, suites. Tempo, phrasing, expression, etc.
406 Band Repertoire. Compilation and presentation of concert pro-
grams. Survey of the best of present day band arrangements from
easy to difficult.
Practical experiences directing the College Band. Regular band
rehearsal three times weekly.
ADVANCED ORCHESTRA COURSE
100 Beginners. Harmony, preliminary scales, intervals, triads, chords
progressions and combinations leading to scoring and arranging
for orchestra instruments.
202 Orchestra. This course is open to both young men and women
in the College Department who have creditably finished the three-
year high school course.
302 Instruments of the Orchestra. General principles of conducting.
Use of the baton, tempo, deportment, obtaining perfect ensemble.
403 Conducting Rehearsal Effectively. A study of symphonic arrange-
ments, orchestra accompaniment of soloist. General principles of
orchestration. Revising score for small orchestras. Arrangement
for orchestra from piano score. Study of director's score. Practical
experience in directing the College Symphony orchestra.
VIOLIN
A special Graded Course in Violin playing will be offered to be-





r
98 FLORIDA A. L M. COLLEGE
ginners and advanced students. This work will be taught by Mr. Leand-
er Kirksey, a graduate of the College and a proficient violinist.
Physical Education
The objectives of the Division of Physical Education:
1. To promote the health and physical development of the stu-
dents. .
2. To stimulate a desire for all types of outdoor exercises.
3. To prepare students to teach physical education in the public
schools of Florida.
101 Principles of Physical Education. This course seeks to establish
the place of physical education and to indicate its indispensable
character in modern life. It views physical education in relation
to life, to life's needs, and hence to the general problems of all
education. Required of all Junior Normals (Education).
Text: Williams-Principles of Physical Education.
102 Personal Hygiene. A study in which an effort is made to teach
students the principles by which to conduct their daily lives. Re-
quired of all Freshman College students.
103 Elementary Dancing, Gymnastics, Games and Stunts. This course
is intended to develop poise, coordination and rhythm through
the agencies of esthetic technique, folk dancing, gymnastics,
marching, stunts and team games.
104 Physical Education. This course includes marching, gymnastics,
hand apparatus, freehand exercises and games. Prerequisite (for
Sophomore Work): Physical Education 101, 102, 103 and 104.
201 Physical Education. Fundamentals of floor apparatus, basket-
ball, base-ball, hand-ball, volley-ball and tennis.
202 Physical Education. A continuation of Physical Education 104.
203 School Hygiene, Anatomy and Physiology. This course has for
its aims the health of school children, physical defects and their
control, communicable diseases and control, care of school plant,
first aid and a brief review of the structure and function of the
body.
204 Materials and Methods in Physical Education. For Grammar
grades. Required of Senior Normals (Education). Prerequisite
(for all Junior Work) :Physical Education 201, 202, 203 and 204.





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