• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Summer school calendar
 Faculty
 General information
 Information for negro teachers...
 Revised normal course
 Agricultural courses
 Summer school home economics...
 High school department
 Enrollment
 Graduates
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Summer School for Teachers, One Term of Eight Weeks, June 10 to August 2, 1929. Eleventh Session. Volume II. Number 1.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000116/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Summer School for Teachers, One Term of Eight Weeks, June 10 to August 2, 1929. Eleventh Session. Volume II. Number 1.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1929
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000116
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2651

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Summer school calendar
        Page 4
    Faculty
        Page 5
        Page 6
    General information
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Information for negro teachers about certificates and certification
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Revised normal course
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Agricultural courses
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Summer school home economics courses
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    High school department
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Enrollment
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Graduates
        Page 53
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
\CLLiME i ,IA'. I 29 NUMBER I
BULLETIN
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FOR NEGROES
Summer School For Teachers
ONE TERM OF EIGHT WEEKS
JUNE 10 TO AUGUST 2, 1929
ELEVENTH SESSION
WIi
Stale Authorized and Supported
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Entered ]J l,-.n cli,, matter. Auui 24. 1912 ri Po,,i OdlicL 3 Talllhl,,ee,
Fl.,r.J). undr rhe A.\[ .t Augbu 24. 1912










BULLETIN
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FOR NEGROES
Summer School For Teachers
State Authorized and Supported
ONE TERM OF EIGHT WEEKS
JUNE 10 TO AUGUST 2, 1929
ELEVENTH SESSION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
- -- i





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE PRESS
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA





TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Admission ----- ----- -. ------ --- -9
Announcements --; 8----------------8
Calendar-------------------- 4
Courses of Instruction
Agricultural Courses ---. .. ..-.-....-----. .28.2 8
Art --- ..0..-------- .
Biology -- -- --------------- 30
Chemistry .....-------------.--.---.....------.---.... 30
Civics -... ........----- 31
Education ----------..----- ----.--.. ------. --- --........... .. .............----- 31
English ------ --..-......... .. -.......---31
Home Economics -----------_-.--...-----.------ 3 5
Hygiene -- ... ................._. ........... 30
Languages --.. ... ..... .................. -37
Library --------------.-.. ..-- ----- ............ 39
Mathematics -... --...-..- .. ... .... ........ .... ......37
Music -..---. --------.- ............-3..... 8
Physics -------- .. --------------.--.--.-- ..--.....-.. .......- -.....3 8
Physical Education -------.......-.......-33
Psychology ----..---------------.... .38
Sociology ---. -- -- --..--- ---.. .. ... .39
Zoology ----- ---........................ 31
Credits
College -- .------- ------ 21
High School -------- ----.. -- ........ 20
Description of High School Courses ----..... .. ..--.-- ..... 42-45
Extension of Certificates --- .. .....-. ..................-----------.......-- .20
Faculty ---------56--..................................... -5-6
General Information .--- -.-... ..... ................................. .........-- 7-12
General Information for Negro Teachers About
Certificates and Certification-----------------.. .------.. -------. ---.-------------------....16-23
High School Department and Division -..-.. ---------... 40
Normal Courses (1929)-...-- ---------- .... 24-25
Residence Requirements-------- -----.-----.. ....21
Schedule ---------...---.---------------------------- 11
Summer School Enrollment
(1928) .....----------------..-----------------------...-------- 46-52
Summer School Graduates
(1928) ------.--------------....3
Tuition and Fees -..-.-...----------- -...... -------.----------------------------.... -- .- -11





SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR-1929
Registration -----------....- ...--..----------------.------..- June 10
High School and First Summer Students ----. --------------.----.....J- June 10
College and Normal ..-.-.... .....---.- ------ ...----. -...............- June 11
Classes Begin ..--- -_------------------- -- ..---- ---- June 12
Opening Assembly.- ------_ --------.----- ----------- June 12
Summer School Picnic .---- .....-----------------.......---------.--- July 4
Patriotic Program .---------------------- -------- July 4
Summer School Debate ...-------------- ---..........- July 12
Mid-Summer Examinations -------... ------------.- -------- .July 12
Last Date For Entrance For Credit Toward Graduation ..---..-.. ---.-..June 17
Last Date of Entrance For Credit Toward Extension of Certificate ----------June 24
Last Date For Change of Program ----------.....----...-- ------- June 24
Change of Schedule -- ........ .............----------- --- --.June 24
Summer School Carnival (auspices of Womens' Club) ---...-.... ---...July 19
Demontration School Play ---.. ----- ---... July 27
Rosenwald Week ------- ...-_...........July 22-26
Summer School Drama ..--.. ...-..................- --------- July 20
Summer School Commencement _------- ..._. ...- .. --....... .-----_- August 2





FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SESSION
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
J. R. E. LEE, President
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean and Secretary
A. P. TURNER, Chaplain
J. R. E. LEE, Jr., Business Manager and Custodian
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Dean of Men
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women
B. L. PERRY, Dean of Agricultural Department
J. B. BRAGG, Dean of Mechanic Arts Department
E. M. GRIGGS, Dean of Home Economics Department
L. H. B. FOOTE, Medical Director
J. R. E. LEE, A.B., A.M., LL.D., President
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.M., Dean and Director of Education
A. L. KIDD, A.M., Assistant Director, History and Government
G. THURSTON WIGGINS, A.B., Director of Secondary Division
Mathematics and Language.
L. M. FLEMING, B.S., Registrar
IRENE ANDERSON, Critic Teacher, 5th and 6th Grades
J. C. BALDWIN, B.S., Agriculture
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Dairying
BERNICE P. CHISM, B.S., College Science
J. V. A. COLLINS, A. B., Mus. B., Public School Music
I. L. COLEMAN, Food and Nutrition
H. M. EFFERSON, A. M., College Mathematics and Statistics
JAMES ESPY, B.S., High School Science
ISAAC FISHER, A.M., College English
E. M. GRIGGS, B.S., Clothing and Textiles
B. F. HOLMES, Manuaf Training and Industrial Arts
J. H. HUNT, A. B., Languages and History
AMY JACKSON, Critic Teacher, 1st and 2nd Grades
F. E. JAMES, A.B., Education and English
C. S. LONG, A.B., Science
[r]





E. F. MANCE, A. B., High School Mathematics
L. A. MARSHALL, B.S., Rural Economics and Rural Sociology
E. E. MATTHEWS, B.S., Education and Supervisor of Practice Teach-
ing
C. B. NASBY, Freehand Drawing
R. REYNOLDS, B.S.,Vocational Agriculture
JUANITA RABOUIN, A. B., High Schol English and Assistant Li-
brarian
B. L. PERRY, General Agriculture
J. E. SANFORD, Poultry
MARY N. SMITH, Instructor and Conference Director for the Jeanes
Teachers of Florida
ANITA PRATER-STEWART, Physical Education
A. P. TURNER, A.B., High School English
ORA VAN, Clothing and Handicraft
C. C. WALKER, A. B., A. M., Mathematics
E. E. WARE, B.S., Zoology, Biology
CAPT. W. CAREY THOMAS, Band Master
Teacher for Primary Methods to Be Appointed.
IVA HILL-BALDWIN, Bookkeep,'r
J. H. BLOW, Chief Accountant and Bookkeeper
N. B. COOPER, Registered Nurse
O. A. M. FOOTE, Registered Nurse
C. E. FRAZIER, Secretary to Director and Dean
D. E. HARVEY, Matron Dining Hall
M. A. JONES, Matron
R. HILDA JONES, Secretary to Business Manager
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE, Secretary to President
A. D. PADDYFOTE, Matron
L. F. REED, Manager of Cafeteria
L. H. WASHINGTON, Matron
SYLVIA THOMAS, Dietitian
E. C. WEARE, Librarian
[61





GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORICAL STATEMENT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the College was
established in 1887 as a State Normal School. Under the Principalship
of Mr. T. D. Tucker, assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was opened at
Tallahassee, October 5, 1887, with an attendance of 15 students. In
1905 it passed from the direct management of the State Board of Edu-
cation to the management of the Board of Control as one of the insti-
tutions of higher learning. In 1909 its name was changed to that of the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes by the
legislature. It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropriations.
THE GROWTH OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL WORK MAY BE
SEEN BY THE FOLLOWING TABLE FOR THE PAST FOUR
YEARS
1925 ---....-......-..._...._1........._.123
1926 ---.- .. ......- ..- ._ _---- 310
1927 --- ....------...- ....------- 327
1928 ----------- ----- -.. -----------.........._ 3 63
SUPPORT
The summer school for teachers at the Florida Agricultural and Me-
chanical College is operated and under the direction of the Department
of Education of the State of Florida providing for the maintenance
and support of the Summer School.
STATE APPROVED
"That there is hereby created and established in this State three
Summer Schools to be located as follows: One in connection with the
University of Florida, at Gainesville; One in connection with the
Florida State College for Women, at Tallahassee; and one in connec-
tion with the Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes, at
Tallahassee.
"That the summer schools created herein shall be in charge of the
State Board of Control, whose duty it shall be to hold sessions of one
or more of them each summer; the said sessions to begin not later than
June 28 and to continue for a period of not more than ten weeks.
"The summer schools hereby created shall be open to all students who
desire to graduate and to undergraduates for professional or vocational
work of any character, and no teacher shall be employed to teach there-
[7]





in who is not a specialist and whose educational qualifications have not
thoroughly equipped him or her for high-grade work.
"All work conducted at the said summer schools shall be of such char-
acter as to entitle the students doing the same to collegiate, normal or
professional credit therefore and may be applied towards making a de-
gree."
AIMS OF THE SUMMER SESSION
The summer session is intended to provide instruction for teachers
and prospective teachers who are desirous of professional preparation
and educational growth. It is intended to serve the following groups
of persons.
1. Elementary school teachers, Secondary or High School teachers,
Principals and Supervisors seeking professional or non-professional in-
struction either with or without relation to a certificate, diploma or
degree.
2. Those persons interested in extension of Certificates already
held. (see certificate regulations)
3. Candidates for degrees at this institution or other institutions.
4. Rural school teachers, and supervisors, Jeanes Supervisors.
5. Pre-Medical students desiring to complete requirements for en-
trance to Dental, Medical and Pharmaceutical College.
6. Those students who have not finished high school or who are grad-
uates of non-standard institutions who desire to get advanced credit
for entrance to college.
7. Housewives and citizens who desire courses for immediate prac-
tical courses or cultural advancement.
8. Those who desire to increase value of graduate state certificate
already held.
ROOM AND BOARD
It is advised that as many as possible register by mail, reserve rooms
and pick out courses in advance. Women write or wire Mrs. N. S. Mc-
Guinn, Dean of Women. Men write or wire Major C. J. A. Paddyfote,
Dean of Men, for room reservations.
TEACHERS WITH CHILDREN
Teachers having children are advised that they must make special ar-
rangement for the handling of the children before coming. It is advised
that the teachers stay in the city or in cottages. However, if a letter is
written, special information can be given concerning the same. No per-
son is advised to come with children without first giving proper notice.
Full board is charged for children over five years of age-$6.00 a week.
[8]





ADMISSION
No examination is required for admission to courses offered during
summer session. Certain special pre-requisities may be required of stu-
dents who become candidates for graduation.
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE NORMAL AND
COLLEGE COURSES FOR CREDIT WITH THE REVERSE AS
TRUE.
General courses for all regardless of classification will be listed as
SUCH.
REDUCED RAILROAD RATES
Reduced railroad rates have been granted from points in Florida at
one and one-half fare for the round trip. Those who wish to take ad-
vantage nf these rates must secure a certificate which will be furnished
by the school. These certificates can be secured on application to the
President's office. Tickets on sale June 7-13, final return limit, August
9. (No reduction can be secured unless teachers secure their railroad
certificate in advance from the school so as to present it at the railroad
office when purchasing the ticket.)
CERTIFICATION-EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES
All persons possessing any type of Florida Certificate may have the
same extended by attendance at the regular Summer session and making
not less than "C" in subjects taken, carrying not less than fifteen reci-
tations per week, ten of which shall be devoted to academic subjects
not covered by the certificate held and five of which shall be devoted
to professional subjects. Not more than one extension shall be granted
for any period of continuous attendance and not more than two exten-
sions shall be granted the same person on a Third Grade Certificate.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
ATTENDANCE-No credit is granted for attendance in a class until
registration has been completed and proper fees paid.
ABSENCE-NO credit is granted students absent from the regular
class meeting of any course in excess of 10 per cent of the total number
of such meetings for the session unless the student present to the
instructor satisfactory evidence that the work thus missed has been
made up. Students absent for any cause in excess of 25 per cent of
the total number of scheduled meetings of the course may not be grant-
ed the privilege of completing the work thus missed and may not re-
ceive credit in that course.
4 absentees equal possible credit by making up work.
5 absentees equal half credit
10 absentees equal no credit at all.
[9]





TUITION AND FEES
Registration Fee is $5.00 (This is not returnable)
Board and room $6.00 per week
(If paid in advance for eight weeks $43.00.)
$1.50 a day is charged for periods less than a week.
ITEMIZED EXPENSE ACCOUNT OR PROBABLE EXPENSE
FOR THE EIGHT WEEKS
Registration ---_----- -. -----_..-- __. _.. --.--.. $ 5.00
Board for 8 weeks ---------.--..---------- 48.00
Books (about) -..._ -.-- --...... 10.00
Science Fee --------_---_.-------- ..----------------- 2.00
Total for the eight weeks about.-65-------------------- 65.00
If Board is paid in advance-total $60.00 (estimate)
Tuition Free to all residents of the State
PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fees are due and payable at the time of registration,
except as otherwise arranged for by the individual Checks, money
orders, etc., should be made payable to the Florida A. & M. College.
Personal checks not accepted.
REFUND
The registration fee is not refundable.
In cases where a refund of board is necessary only a refund for the
entire week will be given and not a refund for a fractional part of
the week,
LABORATORY FEES
One dollar and fifty cents for High School Students, and $2.50 for
College and Normal School Students who take work in Science.
Payable two weeks after registering for course.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR MUSIC
MEMBERSHIP-
A. Band
B. Orchestra
C. Choir
D. Glee Club
E. Quartette
F. Community Sing,
BAND AND ORCHESTRA
The purpose of this course is not to turn out finished musicians but
to help those who would like to become musicians or who would like
to broaden their knowledge. We welcome beginners,
[ 10





BEGINNERS COURSE
(1) Musical Theory-Rudiments
(b) Prescribing suitable instruments
(c) Technique of the different instruments
How to produce a tone
Scales, how to apply them to the respective instruments
(d) How to practice, individually
How to practice in unision.
(2) Intermediate course-
(a) How to organize a band or orchestra
(b). The proper instrumentation
(c) How to tune the band and orchestra
How to hold rehearsals so as to get the best results
How to train beginners
(3) Advanced Course-
(a) How to seat the Concert band or orchestra
(b) How to arrange a Concert program
How to line up the Marching Band
(c) 'Lectures and illustrations on all band and orchestra instru-
ments.
(d) Hints on conducting
(e) How to beat time. The left hand, when to use it
(f) How to interpret a Conductors score
How to arrange and supplement parts for other instru-
ments.
Practical experience in conducting summer band
Credit will be allowed for this course
Private lessons on instruments by appointment
Capt. W. Carey Thomas, the college bandmaster, will be in charge
of this work. As a trainer and organizer of bands his name stands out
among some of the best in the country. He was formerly Musical
Director of the Pullman Company, Chicago, Illinois, having trained
and conducted their prize winning band.
He has several musical organizations to his credit about the country.
Captain Thomas studied cornet under the world famed Liberati and
has won quite a bit of popularity as a soloist.
CHAPEL ATTENDANCE REQUIRED OF ALL 11:30 DAILY
Roll taken, six (6) absentees make one liable for reduction or loss
of credit and no extension.
MEAL HOURS
Breakfast-- --.-...-........---......................--- ---------------------------------------- ........0 ................................... M.
SpBreakfastr------------ -- -- 6:10 A. M.
~Dinner- -- --12:30 P. M.
Supper -- __ -___ 1:30 P. M.
r 1 1





A. and M. College Dining Hall. (Docrs of the D:n'ng Hall are closed five minutes
after the ringing of the last bell).
Rising Bell. .-:...----- ..---- -- ... .... -5:30 A..M.
Chapel Bell ... --.. ..... ... __ .._.-. 11:20-1130 A. M.
Study Bell --- -- ... 7:30 P. M.
Retiring Bell"*'- -- -- -- -. 9:45-10:30 P. M.
STUDENT HEALTH
Two members of the Department of Physical Education; one (1)
resident physician; two (2) graduate nurses have been retained for the
summer session to look after the health of the teachers. It is highly
desirable that each teacher avail himself or herself of the opportunity
to take some form of Physical Education. Tennis, Volle7 Ball, Medicine
Ball and Swimming are some of the sports in which teachers may en-
gage. Free clinic for examination and medical advice will be given
at the Hospital once every week. Wednesday from 10:00 to 12:00.
All persons should avail themselves of the opportunity to have a phy-
sical examination and get advice at the same time.
TEACHER PLACEMENT SERVICE
The Agricultural and Mechanical College maintains a teacher place-
ment bureau as a part of its service to this Stite. Its purpose is two-
fold: (a) to aid its teachers in securing desirable positions and (b) to
aid superintendents and principals in finding well qualified teachers.
No fee is charged. Teachers desiring to change employment are asked
to make application early on entering summer school or the first part
of June, so that proper credentials may be provided.
All correspondence should be directed to tie President of the Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical College.
ENTERTAINMENT
BAND CONCERTS-
All teachers who have knowledge of reading music are asked to
bring their instruments with them and become a part of the college
band and orchestra. Concerts are given by this group three times a
week-Tuesday, Thursday, and Sunday evenings. This is a special
part of the entertainment for teachers.
MOVIES-
Moving pictures every Saturday night. Through the efforts of the
Business Manager of the institution he has been able to book many of
the most recent screen productions for the summer. Only the very
best pictures of both educational and entertainment value are procured.
"Chapel attendance is compulsory. Roll is taken and six (6) absentees make one
liable to loss of right to Extension and full credit.
"'"Doors of the several dormitories will be closed promptly at 10:30 P. M. Ab-
sence from dormitories must be accounted for and permission to remain out after
this hour must be obtained from the Dean of Women or the Dean of Men.
[ 12 ]





SPECIAL FEATURES-
In harmony with the idea of cultivating the social ideals, the dormi-
tory is conducted with the freedom which characterizes a home of
refinement. Social clubs organized by the teachers every summer and
the other organizations on the campus contribute to the social life of
the summer school.
EDUCATIONAL EXCURSIONS
A concerted effort will be made by the summer school faculty to
give practical demonstrations throughout the term of the educational
value of properly planned excursions to points of civic and historical
interest, and centers of industrial activity.
The President and Director of Summer School will arrange for ex-
cursions during the afternoon and on Saturday to such places as the
Home of the Tallahassee Girl, State College for Women, Capitol,
Spanish Graveyard, which is rich in Florida History, Saint Marks where
the oldest railroad of Florida is located and to numerous lakes that
surround Tallahassee.
THE OBSERVATION SCHOOL
One of the definite objects of the Summer School is to exemplify
the best educational practices of the country, not only in the teaching
of all grades and subjects but in the general organized activities of the
school as a social institution. To this end a school of observation with
a kindergarten and grades from first to sixth will be in session in a
building devoted to this particular work five days each week for the
full period of the summer school term. Work in the Observation
School will be open to observation dairy from 8:30 to 11:30 A. M.
Systematic observation for which credit is given, will be directed by
instructors on the staff of the senior college. Privileges of observation
shall be open without payment of additional fees.
(a) PLAN OF WORK-The daily session will be divided for class-
room work into six periods of 30 minutes each. The content of the
work will follow closely the course of study for the elementary grades
of the Florida public schools.
While the number of pupils in each room will be limited, efforts will
be made to have them representative of the typical school group. The
teachers in charge are not mere theorists, but trained workers familiar
with the discouraging conditions which teachers have to meet. They
have in every instance been chosen because of their well demonstrated
ability to help teachers now in service to get a larger outlook on the
aims of education and to master the technique of classroom work under
conditions of actual schoolroom difficulties. The grade demonstra-
tion teachers will endeavor to be especially helpful in private con-
[13]





ference in suggesting references and in giving every other possible
material aid to teachers in their regular work.
A detailed schedule of the demonstrations to be featured in each of
the grades and subjects will be posted daily in the Observation School
building.
(b) The Observation School constitutes the hlboratory for the
courses in principles of teaching and special methods. Classes in these
courses may, if desirable, use half or the whole of the class period in
observation of actual work in the elementary grades. Visiting stu-
dents should be present in the demonstration classroom at the opening
of the period and remain until the close of the half-hour.
ATHLETIC CONTESTS AND SPORTS
The Athletic field and tennis courts of Florida A. & M. College will
be open to summer school students. The department of physical edu-
cation will have charge of outdoor games and contests. Every effort
will be made to give the teachers motive and incentive for some active
participation in outdoor sport.
RELIGIOUS EXERCISES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian. In ad-
dition to the daily devotion, mid-week Prayer Service, Sunday School,
Sunday Preaching, Vesper Services and Bible Study Courses, there are
active Young Men's Christian Association and Young Women's
Christian Association. The Chaplain of the College preaches every
Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
WHAT TO BRING-NECESSITIES-MINIMUM LIST
5 sheer? Suggested Articles
3 pill -s cases
I pill w
1 rug 1 bathing suit
I pait curtains 1 tennis racket
Sue M pictures and other necessities which will help beautify the room. Each room is
provii ?d with bed, chairs and dresser.
*GYMNASIUM COSTUME
1 mic!dy blouse
2 pails black bloomers
3 pairs black lisle stockings
I pair rubber bottom shoes or slippers.
'Note: Each person is required to take some phase of Physical Education and the
above is absolutely necessary on the basis of the requirements.
REGISTRATION JUNE 10
High School and First Summer ...._..-__ June X0
College and Normal -- ....- -.June 11
Close of Registration --------. ... June 11
Last Date For Change of Registration -.-._. June 24
[14





REGISTRATION BY MAIL
Prospective students, who through illness or enforced absence and
are unable to be present on registration day may register by mail All
requests for the privileges of registration by mail, enclosing a self-
addressed envelope, should be sent to the Registrar. Registration by
mail is accepted on the following conditions only:
The regular registration forms must be correctly filled out and
in the hands of the Registrar before registration is closed in the course
or courses desired.
A certified check, or postal money order made payable to the Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical College for the exact amount of fees due
accompanying the registration blank together with a self-addressed en-
velope for the return of receipt card.
The student must comply with all regulations regarding "Close of
Registration," "Number of Courses in which student may register, etc."
I 1$ I





INFORMATION FOR NEGRO TEACHERS
ABOUT CERTIFICATES AND CERTIFICATION
Courtesy State Department of Education, Mrs.
W. S. Cawthon and Miss Lois Stuckey.
All subject to change by legislature of 1929, in
session during publication of this Bulletin.
Every one who teaches in Florida must hold a valid Florida certifi-
cate covering at least the subjects which he or she teaches.
Certificates issued in other states cannot be transferred to Florida.
Teachers of other states desiring to teach in Florida should send their
applications to County Superintendents. This Department does not
conduct a placement bureau. We have no voice in the employment
of teachers.
Schools usually open about September 1, while some smaller schools
and rural districts have s'ort-r terms. Salaries and length of term are
fixed by County School Boards and therefore vary in different counties.
CERTIFICATES BY EXAMINATION
Three Uniform examinations are held each year in each county seat
in the State, beginning on the first Thursday of February and June,
and on the third Thursday of August. We issue the following grades
of certificates upon examination: Primary, Third Grade, Second
Grade, First Grade, Professional and Special.
Subjects required for Primary Certificate are: Reading, Arithmetic,
English Grammar, Composition, Geography and United States His-
tory, including the Constitution of the United States, Nature Study,
Drawing, Manual Arts, School Singing and the elements of Psycholo-
gy. The average grade required for the certificate is 80, minimum
60. A Primary Certificate is valid for teaching only the first, sec-
ond and third grades of a regular graded school of not less than four
teachers. Life of certificate is four years. Examination fee, $2.00.
The subjects for a Third Grade Certificate are: Orthography,
Reading, Arithmetic, English Grammer, Composition, Geography,
United States History, including Constitution of U. S.; Physiology
and Theory and Practice of Teaching; average grade required 70,
minimum 50; valid for one year. Examination fee, $1.00.
Subjects for Second Grade are those required for a Third and also
Agriculture, Civil Government; the average required is 80, the mini-
[161





mum 60. A Third or Second Grade Certificate is valid for teaching
,in the first eight grades only. Life of certificate, three years. Ex-
amination fee, $1.50.
The subjects included in a First Grade are those required for a
Second Grade, also Biology, Psychology, General History, Rhetoric
and Algebra; average' grade required 85, minimum 60; valid for
five years and for teaching in the first ten grades. Examination
fee, $2.00.
Subjects required for a Professional Certificate are those included in
a First Grade and also English Literature, Plane Geometry, a foreign
language, History and Principles of Education, School Administration
and the school laws of Florida. Average grade received, 85; mini-
mum, 60. This certificate is valid for teaching in all grades of the
High School only those subjects named herein. Applicants must
give satisfactory evidence of having completed four years of High
School work unless they have held a Florida certificate prior to July
1, 1924. Life of certificate, five years, Examination fee,. $2.00
Special certificates are issued upon examination in groups of sub-
jects as follows:
1. Mathematics: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and Trigo-
nometry.
2. English: Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, English and
American Literature.
3. Science: Agriculture, Physics or Chemistry, Biology.
4. Foreign Languages: Latin, German, Greek, French, Spanish,
(any two).
5. History: American, including the Constitution of the United
States, General, English and Geography.
6. Bookkeeping: Bookkeeping, Commercial Law; Commercial
Arithmetic.
7. Stenography: Shorthand, Typewriting, English Grammar.
8. Music: Harmony, Public School Music.
9. Industrial Arts: Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing.
10. Home Economics: Domestic Science, Domestic Art.
Special Certificates are good for teaching in all grades of the High
School only those subjects covered by the certificate; life of the cer-
tificate five years.
An applicant for special certificate must give satisfactory evidence
of graduation from a four-year High School or its equivalent and of
the completion of two years of additional work in the subjects to
be included in the special certificate, unless the applicant held a Flo-
rida certificate prior to July 1, 1924. Examination fee, $2.00.
[17]





EXEMPTIONS
An applicant for Second Grade Certificate who holds a valid Third
Grade Certificate may be exempted from examination on subjects of
Orthography, Reading, and Physiology, provided the average of this
group is 805%. If average is less than 80%, exemption will be given
only on subjects with grade of 80%C, each.
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES ON GRADUATION
Graduate State Certificates are issued upon record of graduation
from standard universities, colleges and normal schools. An appli-
cation blank for a certificate upon diploma will be sent upon request.
These certificates are based on the following law:
Sec. 12. A Graduate State Certificate valid for five years from date
of issue and authorizing the holder thereof to teach all subjects upon
which he specialized in his college or normal course, shall be issued
to any regular graduate of a standard college requiring the comple-
tion of a four-year course for graduation, or of a standard normal
school or junior college requiring the completion of a two-year course
for graduation upon the fulfillment of the following requirements:
1. The application must be made on a form prescribed by the
State Department of Public Instruction.
2. The applicant must file satisfactory testimonials and a state-
ment of health and character and at the same time pay a fee of $3.00.
3. A complete transcript of the applicant's High School record and
College or Normal School record must be filed by the President,
Registrar or Dean of the College or Normal School in the office of
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction upon the request of
that officer and on a form prescribed by his office. The said trans-
cript must show that the applicant attended the institution for the
full time required to complete the course pursued, or that he com-
pleted a part of such course in another standard institution; the tran-
script must also show that the applicant devoted three-twentieths
of his time to the sudy of Education; provided that in lieu of such
time devoted to this subject a teaching experience of twenty-four
months may be accepted.
EARLY GRADUATION FROM COLLEGES NOW STANDARD
The minimum requirement for a Graduate State Certificate is
graduation from a standard college, or normal school which at the
time of the applicant's graduation required for graduation not less than
two years' attendance (sixty semester hours' credit beyond and the
completion of a standard four-year high school course).
An applicant who graduated from a college that is now standard
before present entrance requirements were in force, should be sum-
mer school attendance and extension work, secure enough additional
[18]





credit to be granted a standard diploma, and then secure a Graduate
State Certificate. (The Florida A. & M. College first required four-
year high school graduation (16 units) for entrance in 1917.
REQUIREMENTS As To THE EXAMINATION OF THE CONSTITUTION
OF THE UNITED STATES
An examination on the Constitution of the United States is required
of every applicant for a certificate, who has not already satisfied the
requirements of the lay be:
1. Securing a Florida certificate since the law of 1925 went into
effect, or,
2. Having six semester hours' credit entered by the college au-
thorities on the official certificate form as "American History and
Government, including Constitution of the United States." (This
latter exemption applies to applicants for Graduate State Certificates,
only).
CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATE
RANGE OF GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATE
1. A graduate of a standard four-year college is certified to teach
all elementary subjects through the eighth grade; and the subjects in
which he has specialized, through the twelfth grade.
2. A graduate of a standard two-year college is certified to teach
all elementary subjects through the eighth grade: and the subjects in
which he has specialized, through the tenth grade.
SPECIALIZATION DEFINED
The minimum requirement for specialization in a given subject,
for purposes of certification, is twelve semester hours' credit in a
given subject with a reasonable high school background in that
subject.
THE ADDITION OF SUBJECTS To THE FACE OF A
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATE
If the holder of a Graduate State Certificate desires to have subjects
added to the face of his certificate by securing additional credits, or
by examination, it is necessary that he write to this office for infor-
mation in his particular case before beginning any course of study
or taking any examination for this purpose.
EXEMPTION FROM THE EXAMINATION ON THE CONSTITUTION OF
THE UNITED STATES
A course of six semester hours in American History and Govern-
ment, including the Constitution of the United States, may exempt
an applicant for a Graduate State Certificate from examination on
[ 9 ]





the Constitution. However, no attempt is made on the part of the
Certificate Department to determine what course will satisfy this
requirement. This exemption is allowed ONLY when the Registrar
of the college from which the record comes states that a student has
a minimum of six semester hours in American History and Govern-
ment, including the Constitution of the United States. A special
space is provided on the official certificate form for this information
and unless this space is properly filled by the recording officer the
applicant will be required to pass a satisfactory examination on the
Constitution before Graduate State Certificate can be issued.
EXTENSION OF CERTIFICA FE
All valid certificates may be extended for a period of one year by
attending for a period of not less than six weeks an approved college
or normal school and satisfactorily completing a prescribed course
carrying not less than fifteen recitations per week, ten of which shall
be devoted to academic subjects not covered by the certificate held
and five of which shall be devoted to professional subjects.
When making application for extension send certificate or certi-
ficates to the State Department accompanied by record of work signed
by the President or Registrar of institution attended. Not more than
one extension shall be granted for any period of continuous attendance
and not more than two extensions shall be granted the same person
on a Third Grade Certificate or on Third Grade Certificates. Cer-
tificates may also be extended by completing a Reading Circle Course
as prescribed by the State Board of Education and given Through the
Extension Division of the State University.
UNIT OF CREDIT
HIGH SCHOOL
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary
school, so planned as to constitute approximately one-fourth of a full
year of work for a pupil of normal ability. To earn a unit in sum-
mer school, one must do 40 120-minute periods of work in one sub-
ject. This means that the student takes the course for eight weeks
five times a week doing double periods (Two 60-minute periods).
Units given on State Examination Certificate when High School
records can not be obtained an average of four units or one year of
High School credit is allowed for any first grade certificate.
, An average of eight units, or two full years of High School credit
is allowed for any first grade certificate.
No credit will be given in the eleventh and twelth grades on exami-
nation certificates.
NOTICE: Be it understood that the scheme of organization for
the summer high school is based upon winter extension work.
[20]





CREDIT-COLLEGE AND NORMAL
Any course taken five (5) times per week with at least five (5)
conferences through a period of eight (8) weeks will carry with it,
providing a grade of "C" is made, (3) three semester hours' credit.
No person will be allowed credit for any Science course which is not
accompanied by manual, note book and double periods for laboratory
work. Double periods, that is two hours (2) will be required in the
following subjects: All phases of Domestic Science, Domestic Art,
Manual Training for Teachers, Drawing, Demonstration, Observation
in Primary Methods, Elementary Education and Handicrafts.
COLLEGE CREDIT
The unit of credit for the College is a semester hour. Any subject
taken once a week for 16 or 18 weeks carries one semester hour of
credit.
SUMMER SCHOOL CREDIT
Any course taken five times per week for 8 weeks carries 3 semester
hours of credit, including, Science or Industries, Physical Education
or Music, where double periods carry full credit.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
A minimum residence requirement of 3 summers of 8 weeks each
will be demanded and required of all students who expect to finish
the regular two-year Normal course. This is exclusive of the high
school residence requirements or 3 summers in addition to the work
done to fulfill high school requirements. One year of residence require-
ment or equivalent will be required of those who intend to finish B. A.
or B. S. course. (After 1929)
Students must satisfy the requirement for graduation in English.
Positively no person will be graduated who is deficient in English.
Major and minor requirements must be met in the college depart-
ment. Thirty semester hours in some one group of subjects.
PRACTICE TEACHING REQUIREMENTS OF INEXPERIENCED AND
-EXPERIENCED TEACHERS
Practice Teaching will be required of all teachers until all have
demonstrated their ability to plan a lesson, manage a class. teach a
class, show efficiency in general methods in all of the subjects taught
in the elementary school. This cannot be satisfied by examination
but must be satisfied by supervised teaching in the demonstration school.
It is the desire that a teacher taking the Normal course, select some
one subject and specialize in that subject for two years; so there is
offered an elective between Geography, History, Mathematics or Biolo-
gy for the two years.
[21]





GENERAL PRIMARY METHODS
A special course in Primary Methods handled by a specialist is offer-
ed for the benefit of those desiring special work in particular branches.
A general course is offered of general value to the rural teacher of a
one-room school, general elementary teachers, and a first course for
principals. This course is opened to all people regardless of classifica-
tion.
PRIMARY CERTIFICATES
No persons will be allowed to receive a Primary Certificate before
completing the high school course. A Primary Certificate will be
issued to persons having taken primary methods for three consecutive
summers. These certificates do not carry with them any State recog-
nition, they are only certificates of merit for special work in primary
methods.
MINIMUM OF SUBJECTS TO BE TAKEN
No person will be allowed to take less than two content or profession-
al courses or not more than four professional courses.
Credit will not be granted for less than the above or more than the
above without permission. COLLEGE CREDIT WILL NOT BE
GIVEN FOR HIGH SCHOOL WORK AND NO COLLEGE WORK
CARRIES HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE
There will be no changes in the schedule after three days of date of
registration. Record in office must be changed officially by the direc-
tor of the summer school session. Positively no credit will be given
for unassigned classes. Where course is dropped without giving proper
notice, a grade of "F" is recorded; where a course is taken without
proper assignment, the grade of "I" or incomplete is recorded.
LAST DATE FOR REGISTRATION FOR CREDIT
Credit for an extension of certificate is granted for 6 weeks attend-
ance and two-third credit is allowed provided it is the last six weeks
of the summer session and not the first six weeks. No credit toward
graduation is given for those who attend the first six weeks of the sum-
mer session. This will be strictly enforced and those persons who leave
before the end of the six weeks will not be given credit.
GROUP SYSTEM OF GRADUATION
The group system of graduation simply means that the work of the
regular school year is subdivided into sections of requirements which
can be met by summer school work and extension work.
[22]





REGULATIONS
1. Not more than one-half of the work can be done by correspond-
ence work and extension. No exceptions.
2. The other one-half must be done in actual residence at the Flori-
da A. & M. College. This means residence work and work done at the
Florida A. & M. College.
2a. Records from other summer schools and other extension courses
will be considered a part of the one-half which can be done not in
residence.
[23





REVISED NORMAL COURSE-1929
The purpose of the Normal Course is to train teachers for the elemen-
tary schools and also to give specific training in two additional subjects
for Intermediate, Junior High School or Platoon School Specialty. The
NORMAL GRADUATE WILL AT LEAST HAVE DEFINITE IN-
FORMATION ABOUT TWO SUBJECTS OF THEIR CHOICE.
This is in accord with the idea of specialized training for even Elemen-
tary intermediate and Junior High School teacliing. Selection m-s't
be made from the following GROUPS:
1. English
2. Science
3. Mathematics
4. History
5. Geography
REVISED OUTLINE OF NORMAL COURSE FOR TEACHING
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
JUNIOR NORMAL FIRST SEMESTER
Recitation Credit
1. English .... ------ ----.....----- .---.---...-. 5 3
2. Advanced Mathematic -... ...--.. 3 3
3. General Biology .- .. ... ..-..-. --.... 3
4. Principles of Geography _.._-...-_ ___ _3.... .. __- 3 3
5. Public School Art -----_ ---... ...-4 2
6. Public School Music --- 4- __----- --.--- 2
7. Physical Education -----..- _---..._. --- .-- 4 2
8. Introduction to Education -..-..- _- _._ __3.. 3
9. Home Economics .-- -.------ -----_-- -- .2 1
Handicraft or Industries
JUNIOR NORMAL SECOND SEMESTER
1. English --.--. .. ... -..-------. .- _-. ---... --. .-3 3
2. Education .. ..... ....... 3 3
3. Psychology --.. 3
4. Art -----.......... .. -----.... -_ ---4 2
5. Public School Music -_.__--_-_-_____-2 1
6. European Background to American I-istory ..-3 3
ELECT ONE
Advanced Biology -__---__.---_--___-_ ____ 6
Physical Education- .- -- --2 1
Home Economics, Industries .... -- ---....... ------. 2 1
[24]





SENIOR NORMAL FIRST SEMESTER
English .- ------ -- .5 3
Health Education -------- _._...... ----- -...- 3 3
Government add Constitution ---.. -.-__ _. ._.----- 3 3
Directed Practice Teach. Project ...-- -- -- ...._- 15 3
ELECT ONE
Home Economics and Geography .--________. 2
College Botany 6
American History 1789 to Date ---- __-__.___ 3
College Algebra --_ -- ------- 3
Rev. Solid and Plane Geometry --.__.----...--.-- 3
Physical Education .--.-__ 2 1
H. E. Industries Handicraft ..-... ._ 2 1
Education -------- -..- ---------.---------------------.--- 3 3
SENIOR NORMAL SECOND SEMESTER
Oral and Silent Reading -... --_-------.-__.-------2 2
Directed Practice Teaching-- -- -_ ....- 15 3
Manual Training and Arts -_-_.-_.- __-- __--_..- 4 2
English ------ .... ......--------... ------ 3 3
Tests and Measurements .. __-- .-_.. --_.-- _-.. ._- 2 I
Physical Education -- -__------- ..- 2 1
Home Economics Handicrafts .._--._ .______ 2 1
ELECT ONE
European History ..-.. ..-_..- --. __.... ._- .- 3
Comparative Anatomy .---_- __ ____.__ 6
Human Geography _...----- ----- --..-.----__---__.--._-- 3 3
Negro History -- ----. --- 3
Teaching of Math. in J. H. S...- --.- ...... 3
SUGGESTIVE OUTLINE FOR COMPLETION OF NORMAL COURSE BY o
SUMMER WORK
SUMMER 1.
English \101 (a)
Education 101
Public School Music 101 (a)
Public School Art 101 (a)
Physical Education 101
SUMMER 2.
English 101 (b)
Public School Music 101 (b)
Public School Art 102
Physical Education
Education
General Biology
SUMMER 3. a
English
Advanced Arithmetic-With methods
Principles of Geography
Physical Education
General Psychology
Home Economics Industral Art or Sewing
Select One
[251





SUMMER 4.
English
History-European Backgrounds to American History to 17S9
including History of Constitution
Education
Select One From:
Science History
Math. English
Geography Education
Health
H. E.
SUMMER S.
English
Educational Projects and Directed Observation
Government and Advanced Civics
Industrial Arts
Select from goup, 2 subjects.
SUMMER 6.
English
Directed and Supervised Teaching
Tests and Measurements
Negro History
Physical Education
Industrial Arts, Applied Design or H. E.
Elective- -
GET A HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE FIRST, THEN TAKE
NORMAL AND COLLEGE WORK
REQUIREMENTS FOR COLLEGE GRADUATION
124 semester hours are required for college graduation. Complete
description of itemized requirements may be found by getting regular
school catalogue, which will be furnished upon request.
Some specific requirements of all students are:
4 semester hours of Physical Education.
2 semester hours of Home Economics, Domestic Science, Manual
Art, Agriculture or Genetics.
12 hours of a foreign language-French or Spanish.
12 hours of English.
8 hours of Physics.
3 hours of College Biology or Zoology.
3 hours of Sociology or Economics.
6 hours of College Algebra, Trigonometry.
18 hours of Education and Psychology and Practice Teaching.
'*6 hours of U. S. History and U. S. Government.
Others may be electives which must cover a major subject and a
minor. 30-36 hours in one group.
124 Semester Hours required.
[26





74 Specific required-semi-electives.
50 Hours of Electives.
Specific information concerning graduation will be furnished upon
request.
"If Graduate State Certificate is desired upon graduation without taking Ex-
amination in Constituion of U. S.
TIME OF COLLEGE GRADUATION
No person will be graduated in less than three summers, regardless of
previous credit. This must be in residence at the A. & M. College with
terms of not less than eight weeks each. Full residence of one contin-
ued school year will be required of all applicants after 1929. (Those
who register before this time will be exempted for 36-week continued
residence requirement.) This does not apply to A. & M. College form-
er students or graduates who have spent one year here, doing College
work or work of College grade. High School residence requirement
not accepted in lieu of above.
[27j





AGRICULTURAL COURSES
S. 101-This will be a general course in Agriculture covering the elements of
Agriculture.
HORTICULTURE-High School courses in Gardening and simple planting.
Room, 3. Hour, 10:30-11:30. Credit,3. Text, Productive Horticulture. Pub-
lishers, Lippincotts, Address, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTOR, R. REYNOLDS
S. 102-AGRONOMY-This is a simple study of field crops. College credit. Room,
3. Hour, 8:30-9:30 Credit, 3. Text, Productive Crops, by E. G. Montgomery.
Publisher, Lippincotts. Address, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTOR, J. C. BALDWIN
S. 103-School Gardening. A special course in planning the gardens for school
class especially designed for teachers. Normal and College credits will be given. This
course is combined with Nature Study. The State course of study will be used.
Room, 2. Hour, 10:30 to 11:30. Credit, 3 College. Text, Horticulture by Kary
C. Davis. Publisher, Lippincott. Address, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTOR, B. L. PERRY
S. 104-Dairy Husbandry. Study of animal life in connection with dairy pro-
duction. Elective. Room, Dairy Barn. Hour, 8:30-9:30. Credit, 3 College. Text,
Principals of Dairying, Judkins, Publisher, Wiley and Sons. Address, N. Y.
INSTRUCTOR, C. H. CHAPMAN
S. 5. Poultry course is designed to demonstrate ways and means of productive
Poultry. Room, 8. Hour, 9:30-10:30. Credit, 3 High School. Text, Beginners in
Poultry. C. S. Valentine. Publisher, MacMillan. Address, Atlanta.
INSTRUCTOR, J. E. SANFORD
RURAL SOCIOLOGY
S. 103-RURAL SOCIOLOGY. A course in the application of the principles of Soci-
ology to rural life and conditions. Room, 6. Hour, 9:30-10:30. Credit, 3 College.
Text, Gillette Rural Sociology. Publisher, MacMillan. Address, Atlanta, Ga.
INSTRUCTOR, L. A. MARSHALL
ECONOMICS COURSES
S. 102.-RURAL EcoNoMICS. The application of the principles of Economics to
farm life, special attention to co-operative marketing, collective bargaining, and
farm barter. Room, 6. Hour, 10:30 to 11:30, Credit 3. Text, Outlines of Agri-
cultural Economics, Taylor. Publisher, Macmillian Co. Adress, Atlanta, Ga.
INSTRUCTOR, L. A. MARSHALL
SHORT COURSES
SUMMER SCHOOL COURSE FOR TEACHERS IN
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE-SUMMER 1929
The courses in Professional and Technical Agriculture are to be
given for a period of eight weeks, and are planned to meet the needs
of men engaged in teaching, and those planning to teach Vocational
Agriculture. Special attention will be given to methods of teaching
[28]





Agriculture, and the content and application of technical Agriculture
such as Poultry, Husbandry, Horticulture, Fertilizers and Agricultu-
ral Engineering.
The courses are of College grade, and can be applied toward a B.Sc.
in an Agricultural Degree.
All classes will extend thru the entire eight weeks, and will meet
at least five days in each week.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OFFERED
S. 201-METHODS OF TEACHING AGRICU UTRE. The following jobs will be discussed
and carried to completion in a practical way during the eight weeks: Making a
course of study from a farm survey, analyze the enterprises into jobs, analyze jobs into
teaching layout, making out a community program, determining a long time teaching
layout or program, distributing the instruction within the years, determining the
farm jobs to be taught, determining teaching devices, constructing a project plan and
project study outline. Conducting a project study, conducting project supervision,
conducting a school farm or laboratory plot, financing trips to judging contests,
conducting evening and partime classes.
Special attention will be given to individual needs and problems brought in by
the men.Room, 6 Ag. Building. Hour, 8:30-9:30. Credit, 3. Text, New Methods
of Teaching Agriculture, by Schmidt. Publisher, The Century Co. Address, N. Y.
INSTRUCTOR, L. A. MARSHALL
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
S. 101-This course is planned to meet the individual needs and problems. The
jobs to be discussed and carried out in a practical way are as follows: Culling, feeding
and caring for laying stock and baby chicks, incubation and brooding of baby chicks,
managing the breeding and growing stock, controlling diseases and parasites, natural
incubation and brooding, poultry records, accounts and advertising, etc.
This course will be given forr weeks of the summer school. Room, 8 Ag. Building.
Hour, 10:30-11:30. Credit, 2 College. Text, Product.ce Poultry Husbandry, Harry
Lewis. Publisher, Lippincott. Address, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTOR, J. E. SANFORD
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
S. 201-This course is planned to have the stvder acquire 'he stills in construct-
ing farm buildings, making the necessary repairs about the farm buildings, caring
for and securing farm machinery, soldering, plumbing, harness repair, shaping of
tools, construction of poultry houses and devices, construction of dairy devices,
greasing and storing farm machinery.
This course will be carried on in connection with the course in Horticulture
and Poultry u-sbandry whenever work of a farm shop nature is necessary it will be
given four weeks. Hour, 7:30-8:30. Room, 8. Credit, 2 College. Text, Equip-
ment for the Farmstead by Ramsawer. Publisher, Ginn and Company. Address
Atlanta.
INSTRUCTOR, R. L. REYNOLDS
S. 101-The purpose of this course is to give the student a specific knowledge
of the vegetables best adapted to the various types of soil, and the proper methods
of treating the soil under varying conditions. The course includes seedbed preparations
descriptions, identification and testing vegetable seeds, the methods of planting,
cultivating, fertilizing, and treating vegetables against insects and diseases, and a
general knowledge of preparing vegetables for the market and for home consumption.
It also includes the making of fertilizer formulas, mixing fertilizers to suit the needs
[29]





of various classes of plants, and a general knowledge of the sources and composition
of fertilizer materials. Room, 2 Ag. Building. Hour, 9:30-10:30..- Credit, 3 College,
Text, Fertilizer and Crops, Lewis L. Van Slyke. Publisher, Orange Judd Co. Ad-
dress, N. Y.
INSTRUCTOR, B. L. PERRY.
DIVISION OF ART
Illustration for Primary Grades
Art S. 101-A course for teachers who are interested in the development of Art
training for children in the primary grades. The course will include work in illus-
tration, nature drawing, picture study, landscape and color. Room, 8. Hour, 9:30.
Credit, 2 semester hours. Text, Publisher, Address
INSTRUCTOR, NASEY
Illustration for Intermediate Grades
Art S.102-A course for teachers who are interested in the development of Art
training for children in the intermediate grades. This course will include training
in drawing illustration, picture study, nature object, landscape, color design and its
various applications, appreciation of Nature and the Arts. The problems will inter-
grade with history, geography, literature. Room, 8. Hour, 10:30. Credit, 2 se-
mester hours. Text, Publisher, Address
INSTRUCTOR, NASBY
Applied Art
Art S. 103-A course for teachers who are interested in fabric painting and ar-
ticles of practical use within the home. Room, 8. Hour, 3:30. Credit, 2 semester
hours.- Text, Publisher, Address.
INSTRUCTOR, NASBY
DIVISION OF BIOLOGY
General Biology
Biology S. 101-This is a general introductory course in the principles of biology.
Animals and plants are selected from the different orders for the study of life ac-
tivities. The life processes are studied in a series of plants and animals. The application
)f biological science to human welfare is emphasized. This course is planned for teach-
ers of elementary science, Junior High School teachers and for those desiring a foun-
dation for further work in biological science. Room, 10. Hour, 1:30. Credit, 3.
semesterr hours.- Text, Publisher, Address
INSTRUCTOR. WARE
HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND COMPARATIVE ANATOMY
Biology S. 104-A Course in human biology, dealing with the fundamental struc-
ture and function of the human mechanism, together with the interpretation and
application of biological principles to human existence. Room, Hour,
Credit Text Publisher Address
Instructor
HYGIENE
Biology S.-A course dealing with personal hygiene, the cause and prevention of
disease, immunity and the elements of proper sanitary practice. Room, Hour,
Credit, Text, Publisher, Address,
Instructor
DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
S. 101 A-General Inorganic Chemistry. To give detail study of laws' and
theories.
Room, 9 Sc. Hall. Hour, 7:30. Credit, 2. Text, Publisher Address
INSTRUCTOR, MIss CHISM
S. 102 B.-General Inorganic Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 101 A
[30]





for which no credit will be given until this course has been completed. Room, 9.
Hour, 9:30. Credit, 2. Text, Publisher, Address
INSTRUCTOR, MISS CHISM
ZOOLOGY
Zoology 103-Zoology, structure, life histories and physiology of animals are
studied. Laboratory work on specimens from each of the groups of the animal
phyla. Hour, 8:30-9:30. Room, 12. Credit, Text, Galloway and Welch.
Manual by Drew. Publisher, P. Blakiston. Address, Philadelphia, Pa.
INSTRUCTOR, E. E. WARE
CIVICS
S. 201-Government and Constitution. Room, 2. Hour, 2:30. Credit, 3. Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, MR. KIDD
S. 101-Constitution only for review for Examination. Room, 2. Hour, 4:30
Tues.-Thurs. Credit, Text, Publisher
INSTRUCTOR
S. 202-Advanced Civics and Teaching of Citizenship Civics, Politics and Theory
of Government. Room, Hour Credit, Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR
(offered upon request)
EDUCATION
S. 101-Introduction to Education. Introduction to the study and principals of
education. A first course in Education designed especially fcr those who desire a gen-
eral review in first principles and history, and for those who have had no previous in-
struction in Education. Room, 1. Hour, 8:30. Credit, 3. Text, Fraiser and Armen
trout. Publisher, Scott-Foresmcn and Co. Address, Atlanta.
S. 102-Management. Study and discussion of problems of school administration
and classroom management from the point of view of the teacher. Particular con-
sideration will be given to actual problems encountered in the experience of members
of the course. Room, 1 J. H.- Hour, 3:30. Credit,3. Text, Sears..- Publisher,
Haughton-Mifflin Publishing Co. Address, Boston.
INSTRUCTOR, Miss MATTHEWS
S103-Methods in Elementary Grades. Room, 1. Hour, 7:30. Credit, 3. Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, Miss MAI THEWS
The purpose of this course is to study, analyze and apply the fundamental prin-
ciples underlying the teaching process in the elementary grades.
S.-Practice Teaching. Practice Teaching under supervision of experts will be
demanded in the summer course. Room, Hour, 8:30-10:30.---Credit..--- Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR
Demonstration School Daily.
S. 104.-Educational Projects. Room, 1. Hour, 7:30. Credit, 1. S. H. Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, Miss MATTHEWS.
S. 210-History of Education in the United States. Room, 1 Sc. Hall. Hour, 10:30.
Credit, 3 Semester Hours. Text, Cubberly. Publisher, Haughton-Mifflin Pub. Co.
Address,
INSTRUCTOR, MR. JAMES
S. 215.-Principles of Education. Room, 1. Hour, 9:30-10:30, Saturday Credit,
1.- Text, Bolton..-- Publisher, Scribners, Address, Atlanta.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. LANIER.
[31]





S. 203.-Methods in High Schools. Hour, 3:30. Room, 2 Sc. Hall. Credit, 3. Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, Ma. KIDD
S. 206-Principals of Secondary Education. Hour, 9:30.__Room, 1. Credit, 3.
Text, Willis L. Uhl. Publisher, Silver, Burdett and Co. Address, New York, N.Y.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. LANIER.
S.-Vocational and Educational Guidance. Offered upon request. Hour, 7:30
Room, 1. Credit, 3. Text, Procter. Publisher, Haughton-Mifflin Pub. Co. Ad-
dress,
INSTPUCTOR, MR. LANIER
S. 216-Educational Statistics. Offered upon request of 6 or more. Room,
Hour, Credit, Text, Publisher, Address
INSTRUCTOR,
COLLEGE ENGLISH
The aim of the courses are three in number: (1) To give to the students a work-
ing knowledge of all the tools of expression, both written and spoken; (2) To pro-
vide such constant practice in the use of these tools as must result in facility and
ease in speaking and writing; and (3) to interpret certain master-pieces of language
in such a way as to create an appreciation of the best in literature.
To achieve these ends the following courses are offered:
English S. 101 (a) Freshman Composition A-Required of all first-year college
students. I he aim cf the course is to train the student to express himself in clear
and concise language. While the normal requirement under this section will be the
completion of the first 132 pages of Wooley's New Composition Book, the order will
be reversed and the second part of the book will be studied first, if the class shows
fundamental weaknesses in the use of punctuation marks spelling and grammar.
Text, New Handbook of Composition-Wooley. Credit, 3 semester hours, Room, 1.
Publisher, D. C. Heath. Hour, 2:30.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. FISHER.
English S. 101 (b) Freshman Composition B-This is the second half of the
required work in composition. Freshman Composition A being a prequiorite for this.
The work to be done is included in the last part of Wooley's Composition Book-
the parts dealing with putting discourse on paper, analytical outlines, letter writing,
etc. Text, New Handbook of Composition, Wooley. Credit, 3 semester hours.
Hour, 3:30. Room, 1. Publishcr.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. FISHER.
Eng!ish S. 102. Review College Grammar. Required of first year college students
who are unable to pass the English Grammar Exemption Test. Sentence structure,
parts of speech, paragraph development and punctuation are carefully reviewed.
Themes are required periodically. Close watch is kept on the students' progress with
a view to advancement. No credit is given. Text, The Century Collegiate Hand-
bool;, Greener and Jones. Publisher, Hour, Room,
INSTRUCTOR,
No credit but required if test is not passed.
English S. 104. English Literature. Not open to Freshmen. Students who have
had six hours of English are eligible. The course comprehends the principal writings
and biographies of the English writers from the beginning of Englsh Literature to
the year 1900. Text, Century Reading in English Literature. -Credit, 3 semester
hours. Hour, 9:30. Room, 11. Publisher, Century Co.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. JAMES.
English S. 215 Public Speaking-This course is not open to Freshmen. The work
includes expression, drill in the principles of effective public speaking and dramatic
presentation of rhetorical matter and study and practice of the laws of argumen-
[32 ]





ration and debate. Text, Forms of Public Address, Baker and Supplementary ma-
terial. Hour, 7:30. Room, Chapel. Publisher.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. FISHER.
S. 209-The English Novel-A study of the history and technique of the novel as
a literary form, and an appreciation of its value as an artistic expression of life.
The social and historical significance of individual novels as interpretations and ex-
ponents of the different periods of their composition will be emphasized. Room, 7.
Hour, 7:30. Credit, 3. Text, Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, MR. JAMES
S. 212-Literature for Children-A study of principles governing the selection of
literary materials for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, and of methods for their
presentation. Room, Hour, C edit Text, Publisher, Address.
(upon request)
S. 216-P;ay Production-This course is given for those who have been coaching
in the schools or who wish to coach plays in the future and for those who desire
a more intimate knowledge of dramatics and training in dramatic interpretation.
Room, 1. Hour, 4:30. Credit, 3. Text, Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, MR. FISHER.
S. 217-The School Newspaper-This course is given for those who have been spon-
soring school Newspapers or who wish to sponsor school Newspapers. Room, Hour.
Credit, Text, Publisher, Address.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. FISHER.
(upon request).
S. 102-Geography. Human Geography-The principles of human geography appli-
ed to the important physical regions of Europe. Room, 10. Hour, 8:30. Credit, 3.
semester hours. Text, Hunting and Cushing. Publ.'sher, John Wiley. Address.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. HUNT
S. 101-Geography. Principles of Geography. A study of the fundamental geogra-
phy of the larger countries with which the United State has important relation-
ships. Room, Hour, Credit, Text, Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR,
S. 201. Geography of North America. (offered upon request.) A regional and in-
dustrial study of North America.
S. 203. Geography-Economic Geography. (offered upon request.) A survey of the
subject matter organized as follows: Relation of our industries to the natural re-
sources, climate and other geographical influences; agriculture and the food supply.
S. 103. Geography--Geography Projects. Specific projects in Geography. (offered
upon request.)
DIVISION OF HEALTH AND RECREATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
S. 101. Priciples of Physical Education-The fundamental principles of physi-
cal education. Text:Williams Principles of Physical Education. Hour, 7:30, Gymna-
sium. Credit, 2.
INSTRUCTOR, MRS. A. PRATER-STEWART.
S. 101 (a) Personal Hygiene-A lecture conference course designed to improve
the quality of living of the individual. Hour, 7:30. daily. Credit, 2.
S. 102. Plays and Games-For grades 1-3. Room, Gymnasium. Hour, 8:30.
INSTRUCTOR, STEWART.
S.103. Plays and Games-For intermediate grades. Room, Gymnasium. -- Hour,9:30.
Credit, 2.
INSTRUCTOR, A. P. STEWART.
[33]





S. 104. Folk Dancing.
S.105.Rhythmetic and Natural Dancing. Room, Gymnasium. Hour, 3:30
Credit, 2.
INSTRUCTOR, A. P. STEWART
S.106. School Seating and Posture. (upon request).
S. 106. Educational Hygiene-A course designed to correlate with the education
of the child. Room, Hospital, Hour, 9:30. Credit, 3. Text, Averill. Publisher
Houghton-Mifflin Publishing Co.
INSTRUCTOR, COOPER.
DIVISION OF HISTORY
S. HISTORY-English History since 1832. This course aims to make the
student familiar with the formative forces in the life of England during the past
one hundred years. Room, Library. Hour, 9:30. MR. KIDD.
S. HISTORY-American Colonial History. A history of the United States
from 1482 to 1789. Particular stress is put upon the history of the colonies as a
phase of English History and upon the concrete manifestation of the adoption of the
Europeans to the new environment. Room, Library. Hour, 8:30. Credit 3.
Text, Greene, The Foundations of Nationality.._ Publisher, American Book Co.
Address, Atlanta.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. KIDD.
S. AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE CIVIL WAR. This is a general course for the
period from 1865 to the present time. Credit,. 3. -Text, Forman. Publisher, Cen-
tury. (upon request).
S. HISTORY-EUROPE 1600 to 1815. An outline course for the student who
have not already studied this period of European history. (offered upon request).
S. HISTORY-HISTORY OF GREEK AND ROMAN CIVILIZATION. This
course is a study of industrial conditions and social problems of Greek and Roman
Civilization. Room, 3 J. H. Hour, 9:30. Text, Maurice Croiset._ Publisher,
Alfred A. Knopf.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. HUNT.
[34]





SUMMER SCHOOL HOME ECONOMICS COURSES
The opportunity will be given persons who wish to take the Normal
Course in Home Economics leading to a Graduate State Certificate.
This course will be offered to persons who have completed all high
school requirements.
All other classes in Home Economics will be organized and conduct-
ed in terms of the student's ability, academic classification, and the
immediate needs of such students.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The length of the Normal Course is sixty-eight semester hours and
may be completed with a minimum residence requirement of four sum-
mers of eight weeks each or the equivalent of the same. Where exten-
sion courses in some of the subjects can be arranged for, and proper
credit given, the summer hours will be lessened. Applicants are ad-
vised to do this.
OUTLINE OF THE COURSE FOR SUMMER SCHOOL
HOME ECONOMICS AND EXTENSION WORK
SUMMER I Hours Credit SUMMER II Hours Credit
Foods and Nutrition 32d 2 Foods and Nutrition 32d 2
Textiles and Clothing 32d 2 Textiles and Clothing 32d 2
English 48 3 English 48 3
Education 48 3 Education 48 3
Chemistry 48 3 Chemistry 48 3
General Science 48 3 General Science 48 3
Physical Training 16 1 Physical Training 16 1
SUMMER III Hours Credit SUMMER IV Hours Credit
Foods and Nutrition 32d 2 Foods and Nutrition 32d 2
Textiles and Clothing 32d 2 Textiles and Clothing 32d 2
English 48 3 English 48 3
Home Management 48 3 Psychology 48 3
Handicraft 48 3 Practice Teaching 48 3
Physical Training 16 1 Child Care 48 3
Physical Training 16 1
Advanced College courses for those who have already finished Normal course in
Home Economics will be arranged upon request.
DESCRIPTION OF HOME ECONOMIC COURSES
Foods and Nutrition I and II. A study of food and its classification, correct
preparation, tests, and analyses of foods. Marketing, menu planning, and food pre-
servaticn. Table service and decoration. Text, Principles of Food Preparation.
Foods and Nutrition I and II. A study of foods and its classification, correct
[35]





preparation, tests, and analysis of foods. Marketing, menu planning, and food pre-
servation. Table service and decoration. Texts Principles of Food Preparation.
Foods and Dietetics III and IV. A study of the new ideas in both the principles
of nutrition and the practice of dietetics. Food preparation in relation to nutrit-
ion and health. The determination of food values, the cost of foods, and of diet
in health and disease. Texts, Nutrition in Health and Disease-Cooper, Bacher, and
Mitchell.
Foods V. A course for students who teach foods and who are not qualified for
the course above high school; also a study for the improvement of the home maker.
The underlying principles and processes in the following units are given. Breakfasts,
luncheons, dinners, and the school lunch. Text: Every Day Foods-Harris and
Lacy.
Note: All food students will supply themselves with white Hoover aprons, a pot
holder, and small hand towels for laboratory work
Clothing and Textiles I and II. To increase students' ability to make garments,
to understand line in relation to the human form, and to know more of the wise
selection of clothing through the study of textiles. Problems: Tailored garment
from commercial patterns. Notebook study of elementary hand and machine pro-
cesses. Construction of dress form, lingerie dress garment from pattern designed by
student. Text, Essentials of Sewing-Cook.
Clothing III and IV. The study of textiles, teaching more of clothing .ppreci-
ation and fabrics used in home furnishings. The development of more skill in the
construction of garments for the family and dress making. Problems: Construction
of layette and children' garments. Sport clothing. Advanced problems in silk
and wool garments. Simple hats and renovation of hats. Text: Textile Fabrics-
Dyer. Hats and How to Make Them-Patty.
Clothing V. A course for students who are not eligible and who do not wish
Normal Certificates. The problems are based on the needs of students and will be
helpful for home sewing as well as school room use for those who must teach clothing.
Note: All clothing students will supply themselves with well equipped sewing baskets.
Eight to fifteen dollars should be provided for sewing problems.
Home Economics Education. A survey of Home Economics and related prob-
lems in different groups and communities. A study of methods in home economics
instruction, lesson plans, and equipment. Text, The Teaching of Home Economics,
by Brown and Haley.
Home Management. A study of the efficient use of time and money in conduct-
ing the affairs of the home. Care, furnishing the home, and a social relationship of
the family. The practiced application applied in living quarters on the grounds or
credit given for correct housekeeping experience.
Handicraft. Hooked, woven, and other types of rugs for home use. Reed, raffia,
pine needles, and corn shucks used in construction of useful articles. The principles
of good taste in horre decoration, as well as economy are given.
Practice Teaching. Senior Normal students will teach classes in Home Economics
from the Children' School. Forty supervised lessons are required. Prerequisites:
Home Economics Education.
Child Care. A study of development and growth of the young child. Experi-
ments in the physical care, nutrition and handicaps of children. Under the direction
of a registered nurse at school hospital.
NOTE: See academic subjects for a description of other courses required for
graduation. Six to ten dollars should cover the cost of text books for one summer.
[36]





ROMANCE LANGUAGES
S. 10 1-FRENCH. Elements of French Grammar, Composition, Pronunciation.
Reading of simple text. Hour, Room1, Credit
INSTRUCTOR, Text, Publisher Address
S. 102-FRENCH. Advanced French (Composition.) Hour, 1:30. Room, 5
INSTRUCROR, MR. HUNT
Text, Credit 3. Publisher, Address,
S. 101-SPANISH. Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. Composition, reading
of simple text. Hour, 3:30. Room, 4. Credit, 3. Text,
Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, WIGGINS
S. 102-SPANISH. Advanced Spanish Grammar. Composition, reading of an
intermediate text, careful analysis of pronunciation difficulties. Hour 4:30.
Room, 5. Credit, 3, Text, Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, HUNT
SPECIAL METHODS
EDUCATION S. 5-Advanced course in Methods and Practice Teaching under
supervision.
MATHEMATICS
S. 102-Arithmetic advanced with methods-see Mathematics 102.
WRITING
S. 101-Writing and Penmanship offered upon request.
LIBRARY METHODS
S. 101-Library Methods offered upon request of 10 or more.
DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS
S. 101-ADVANCED ARITHMETIC WITH METHODS. This course is required for
the L. I. degree. It includes a complete review of the content material in Arithmetic
and the most modern methods of problem solving. Much attention is given to the
most modern methods of presenting the subject.
Room, 3. Hour, 10:30. Credit, 3. Texts, New H'gher Arithmetic by Stone-
Millis, and Modern Methods of Teaching Arithmetic by Newcomb.
Publ.'shcr, Houghton-Mifflin Pub. Co.
INSTRUCTOR,
S. 102 a-b. College Algebra. This course is required of all students working
for th2 A. B., or B. S., degree. After a brief review of such high school topics as
Variations, Progressions, Mathematical Induction and the First Two Orders of
the Determinant, special attention is given to pure College Algebra. This will cover
a study of the Determinant of Higher Ordcr, Permutation, Combination, Theory
of Equations, Mathematics of Investments and other topics oi importance, Theory
Course a,8:30, Course b, 9:30. Room, 3, Sc. Hall. Credit, Course, a 3. Course,
b, 3. Text, College Algebra, Siceloff-Smith. Publisher, Ginn and Co. Address,
Atlanta, Georgia.
INSTRUCTOR,
S. 103-Mathematics-Solid Geometry (See high school credit course.)
Room, Hour, 9:30. Credit, 3. Text, Publisher
Address, INSTRUCROR, WALKER
S. 103-b-ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. All students majoring in mathematics and in
Mechanic Arts are required to take this course. It embraces a study of the relations
between points. lines and planes, geometric magnitudes, equations and their loci, polar
co-ordinates and transformation of coordinates. Room, 3. Hour, 2:30. Credit, 3.
Text, Analytic Geometry-Wentworth-Siceloff-Smith. Publisher, Gin & Co., Atlanta.
[37 ]





Other advanced ccvrses in mathematics may be arranged upon the request of five
or more students.
INSTRUCTOR, EFFERSON
S. 201-CoLLEGE ASTRONOMY. This course is open to all students above the
Freshman class. It deals with an extensive study of the Constellations and the Solar
System, giving special attention to the tarth and its relation to the other members.
Room, 3. Hour, Credit, Text, by Harold Jacoby. Publisher The
MacMillan Co. Address, New York and Atlanta.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. EFFERSON.
DIVISION CF MUSIC
S. 101-Music. Find and placing a child's voice. Note singing. Room, 7. Text,
Hour, 8:30. Credit, 2 hours Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, Miss COILINS.
S. 102-Music. History and Development of Public School Music. This course
will include sight reading and singing. Hour, 9:30. Room, 7.
S. 103-Music. Elementary Music Appreciaticn. Information as to appro-
priate material for use in the first six grades.' Methods of presenting rhythm, vocal
and instrumental music will be emphasized. Room, 7. Text, Credit, 2 hours.
Hour, 3:30. Publisher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, Miss COLLINS.
S. 104-HARMONY CLASS. To be organized upon request. Room, 7.
INSTRUCTOR, MISS COLLINS AND MR. JAMES.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
S. 201-NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. A general survey of the struc-
ture and operation of our national government. Among the topics considered are:
the federal system, its advantages and defects; the presidency and its relation to
other branches of the government; the organization and methods of Congress; ju-
dical review of legislation and problems related to it; the conduct of foreign re'a-
tions; civil liberties under the Constitution. Room, 1. Hour, 2:30. Credit, 3 semes-
hours, Text, PulI.sher, Address,
INSTRUCTOR, MR. KIDD.
PSYCHOLOGY
S. 101-GENERAL PSYCHeOLCGY. This is a basal course covering the field of
pscyhology in a comprehensive manner and forming an introduction to the more
advanced courses. Instinct and emotion, sensation and perception, habit and memory,
imagination, reasoning, will and personality are the main topics considered in aiming
to give the student and understanding of the human mind in general. Attention will
be given to the understanding of the behavior of children of elementary school age,
especially with reference to the motivation of conduct and to the learning process.
Room, 3 J. H. Hour, 8:30. Credit, 3. Text, J. F. Dashiel. Publisher, H. Mifflin
Co. Address Boston.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. LONG.
DIVISION OF PHYSICS
PHYSICS S. 102-Continuation of S. 101. Covering second semester work, (upon
demonstrations, recitations problems and experiments. Five lectures and three two-
hour laboratory periods per week. Room, 9 and 12. Hour, 7:30.-8:30. Credit, 2.
Text, Stewart. Publisher, Ginn and Co. Address, Atlanta.
'INSTRUCTOR, MIss CHISM.
PHYSICS S. 102-. Continuation of S. 101. Covering second semester work, (upon
request).
PSYCHOLOGY
S. 201-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. This course presents a background for
understanding the fundamental psychological principles underlying our modern
[38]





theories of education, and a basis for the evaluation of the various educational
methods now in common use. Stress is laid upon original nature and individual
differences therein; heredity and its bearing upon educational problems; the laws of
learning and their application to the work of the elementary school. Other topics
treated include: Efficiency in mental work; mental fatigue; mental hygiene and the
adjustment of minor cases of mental abnormality. Concreteness is aimed at through-
out by constant citation of illustrations drawn from the problems and work of the
school and by demonstrations and class experiments. Required for the Bachelor of
Science in Educaticn degree, Hour 2::0. Room, 1 Sc. Hall. Credit, 3. Text, Sandiferd
Publisher, Longmons-Green and Co. Address, N. Y.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. LANIER.
S. 202-PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. This course aims to present the nature
and development of the behavior of children from early childhood to adolescence
and the practical application of these facts to schoolroom procedure. Consideration
will be given to play, instinctive tendencies, heredity, individual difference, habits,
moral development and training. A study will be made of discipline and the most
effective methods of securing control over children of school age. Some attention
will be given to problems of children. Hour, Room, Text, Credit,
Publisher, Address,
(offered upon request).
INSTRUCTOR.
READING-REMEDIAL CLASS IN OPERATION
S. 101-ORAL AND SILENT READING. A study of the most advanced methods of
teaching reading. Room, Hour, Credit, Text, Stone. Publisher, H. Mifflin Co.
Address, Boston. (offered upon request).
INSTRUCTOR,
S. 203-STATISTICS. This is a course in the use and methods of getting facts
concerning social conditions. It covers such materials as a case worker or social
engineer should have need for. Room, Hour, Credit, Text, Garret. Publi-
sher, Longmon Green. Address N. Y.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. EFFERSON, MR. LANIER.
SOCIOLOGY
S. 201-INTRODUCTION TO SCCIOLOGY. This is purely a first course covering the
fundamentals of groups and social control. Room, 3 Ag. Bldg. Hour, Credit, 3.
Text, Beach. Publisher, H. Mifflin Co. Address, Boston.
INSTRUCTOR, MR. TURNER.
S. 202-HISTORY OF SOCIAL THOUGHr. This is purely a first course covering the
development of the Sciences of Sociology from a historical standpoint and showing
the relation to the whole field of social sciences. Room, Hour, Credit, _- Text,
Publisher, ......Address, ................(offered upon request).
INSTRUCTOR,
SPECIAL REVIEW CLASSES
In cases where teachers come merely to prepare for the State Teachers Examination
special classes will be operated for groups of ten or more to cover this specific work.
Classes will be operated for the following: First Grade, Second Grade, Third Grade
and Special Primary. Schedule to be arranged upon request.
THE LIBRARY
The Carnegie Library of the Florida A. and M. College contains over 3,000
volumes and will be open for the use of the Summer School Students:
Hours: Monday to Friday.
7:45 to 12:00.
1:30 to 5:30.
[39]





Night: 7:00 to 9:45.
Saturday
10:00 to 12:00.
2:00 to 5:00.
Night: 7:00 to 9:45.
Each student, teacher and faculty member may withdraw books for home use
subject to certain necessary Library Regulations.
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
THE DEPARTMENT IN GENERAL
Quite different from previous summers the High School Department
for the 1929 summer session will be completely separated in operation
from the College Department.
This department covers work of the four year Standard High School.
Applicants will be admitted who have completed eight grades of work
in a standard Elementary school.
Those completing the High School Course will be admitted to the
Normal, College of Arts and Science, Agriculture, Home Economics,
Commercial or Mechanic Arts Department of the Florida A. & M.
College on the basis of graduation.
DEFINITION OF A HIGH SCHOOL UNIT
A High School unit represents a year's study in any Secondary school
subject constituting approximately one-fourth of a full year of work
for a pupil of normal ability doing not less than 120 sixty-minute hours.
Time spent in shop and laboratory work will count one-half as much as
for recitation.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Sixteen units shall be required for High School graduation earned in
grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 as follows:
units
English ---------..-- -...- -______...- 4
'Mathematics --.-----------__.....____ ._- 3 or 4
Laboratory (Shop and Industries) ......_..___ 1
'Foreign Languages or Education .- ..-....---_-. 2
Social Sciences 3
Science ...2........ 2
Total --............_.----. 16 -
"Mathematics and Foreign language will be required of those who
plan taking the four-year college course, while those who only plan tak-
ing the two-year Normal course will be allowed to take the Education
instead.
[40]





CREDIT FOR CERTIFICATE ALREADY EARNED BY
EXAMINATIONS
One year of High School credit is allowed for any Second Grade
Certificate. Two years of High School credit is allowed for any First
Grade Certificate. None of the work accepted may go toward credit
in the eleventh and twelfth grades of required work for High School
graduation. The equivalent to finishing Elementary School is allowed
for a Third Grade Certificate in lieu of possession of a Certification
of Graduation from some Elementary School of eight grades.
Note: No person will be graduated who does not the previous winter
take some form of Extension work during the winter previous to appli-
cation for graduation.
PRCGRAM OF COURSES BY SUMMERS
Summer I
unit
English S. 1 (a) and S. >vb) (2 hour periods) .----...-_- 1---------------- 1
Mathematics S. I (a) and S. 2 (b) hourr periods) -- ..1.-.... -........
Industry
Drawing
General Science I hr. rec. 2 hr. Lab.-.....1-. 1----------- -1
Summer II
English S. 11 (a) and S. 11 (b) (2 hour periods) ..-.... ..---..------.. 1
Mathematics S. 11 (a) and S. 11 (b) (2 hour periods) --- 1
Industry
Music
Drawing
Summer III
Science, Biology or Chemistry 3 hrs. .-..1----------------------I.
Foreign Language (French or Spanish 2 hr. periods) .-.------
Industry
Music
Drawing
Summer IV
Science, Biology or Chemistry 3 hrs ..... ......-. .... ...................- ---.1
Foreign Language continued from summer 3. ..----- .- ------ 1 ..-
Education or a Social Science ------------.. .... .... ---. .... ---------... I
Music
Drawing
Industry
Summer V
History (Our World Today and Yesterday) ...-- -----...1.......I
Geography (commercial) -....------... .....l----1-----------.--
Industry
Music
Drawing
Physical Education
Physical Geography- ..-.... ..................I- 1
[41]





Summer VI
Education -- --- .. -... .......---..---- ---..- -- -- 1
English S. III (a) and S. III (b) ---.----. .I1
Industry
Music
Drawing
Physcal Education
Summer VII
English S. IV American History and Civics VII and (b) -.....-....---.. .. .1----I
Physics 3 hrs. -....1... .. ------ -- ---------- --....... ---.1
Education .-.-------........- --- --..---. ...- ....-... ..--- 1
Physical Education
DESCRIPTION OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
Note: There is a requirement of seven summers to complete the high school
course by summer attendance alone. 2 hour periods will be required in those courses
for which one unit of credit is given upon completion of same.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
Note: There will be a minimum requirement of four units of English for gradu-
ation from the High School Department.
ENGLISH S. 1 (a)-This course is designed for the ninth grade and offered to
those who have not had any high school English at all. Much emphasis is placed on
introducing the pupil to the study of High School English. Text, Advanced Lessons
in English Grammar by Maxwell. Publisher, American Book Co._ Address, Atlanta.
Room, Assembly Room, Library. Hour, 2:30 to 3:30.
INSTRUCTOR, Miss J. RABOUIN.
ENGLISH S. IB-This course is offered to those who have already studied English
of high school grade but have not completed a full year of it. The particular value
of this course lies in Exercises based on the following important matters: Sentence
structure, Choice of Words, Punctuaticn, Oral English and interpretation of Poetry.
Text: "Grammar at Work," New Edition by Jessie Wheeler, Allyn & Bacon Co,
Atlanta. The following classics will be used: "Quentfn Durward," by Sir Walter
Scott. "The Last of the Mohicans" by J. F. Cooper and Myths and Their Meaning
by Herzberg. Hours, 3:30 to 4:30, Library Assembly, INSTRUCTOR, J. RABOUIN.
ENGLISH S. 2(a)-For those who are just beginning the 10th grade work. The
first work of composition and rhetoric in secondary schools will be taken up.
Three aims:
1. To present the familiar principles in a novel and attractive manner.
2. To emphasize the social aspect of composition.
3. To give due weight to the vital relationship of speaking and writing.
Text, Elementary English Composition by F. N. Scott, Allyn Bacon & Co. Atlanta.
Classes to be assigned. Hours, 10:30 to 11:30; Library Assembly.
INSTRUCTOR, J. RABOUIN
ENGLISH S. 2(b)-This course is for those who have already done some English
in the 10th grade, but not completed it. A continuation of English S. 2(a). Text,
The New Composition-Rhetoric, by F. N. Scott. Recommended Classics, "Selected
Poems From Poe, Gray and Goldsmith" by G. A. Watrons, Allyn Bacon & Co. Li-
brary Assembly Room 10:30 to 11:30. INSTRUCTOR, J. RABOUIN
ENGLISH S. 3 (a)--English Composition only designed for those beginning English
in the 11th grade. Sentence Interpretation, paragraph construction and thene de-
velopment. Text, "Composition and Rhetoric by Scott & Denney Allyn & Bacon
Co., Atlanta, Ga. Room, 5 Sc. Hall; 7:30 to 8:30, A. P. TURNER, INSTRUCTOR.
[42]





ENGLISH S. 3 (b)-For those who have already studied English in the Eleventh
grade without completing it. Only English Literature and assigned Classics will be
stressed. Text, "English Literature with Readings, New Edition by R. Bennett
Pace-Allyn Bacon Co., Atlanta. Room 5 Sc. Hall 8:30 to 9:30. A. P. TURNER
ENGLISH S. 4(a)-For beginners of 12th grade English Composition and Rhetoric
only. Text, New Practice Book in English Composition by Alfred Hitchcock.
Henry Holt Co. Room, 4 Sc. Hall, 1:30 to 2:30. A. P. TURNER, INSTRUCTOR.
ENGLISH S. 5(b)-Designed for the second half of the 12th grade. American
Literature and assigned Classics will be stressed. Text, The Century.
Texts, American Literature With Readings (New Edition) by R. Bennett Pace-Allyn
Bacon Co., Atlanta, Ga.
The Century Vocabulary Builder by Greener & Bachelor. The Century Co. N. Y.
Room, 4 Sc. Hall, 1:30 to 2:30 A. P. TURNER.
MATHEMATICS
The mathematics department will broaden its scope for summer school by offering
a varied program of courses. Most of the classes will meet for two-hour periods
during the summer session. Thus one may earn the full unit during the summer
which is equivalent to one full term of winter work.
MATHEMATICS S. 1(a)-For beginners of ninth grade only. The main emphasis
is placed on Algebraic operations with special attention given to principles involving
positive and negative numbers, solving equations and the like. Text, New High
School Algebra by Wells and Hart, D. C. Heath Co., Atlanta, Room 4 Sc. Hall
9:30 to 10:30. G. T. WIGGINS, INSTRUCTOR.
MATHEMATICS S. 1 (b)-A continuation of Math Sl (a) and open to those who
have not as yet finished Mathematics for the ninth grade. Text, New High School
Algebra by Wells and Hart. Room, 4 Sc. Hall 10:30 to 11:30. G. T. WIGGINS,
INSTRUCTOR.
MATHEMATICS S. 2 (a)-C'pen to those who are beginning Intermediate Algebra
and recommended for tenth grade. This course treats of factoring, fractions, Graphs
and all principles of Algebra leading up to Quadratics. Text, Intermediate Algebra
by Edgerton and Carpenter, Allyn-Bacon Co., Atlanta. Room 4 Sc. Hall 7:30 to
8:30, E.. F. MANCE, INSTRUCTOR.
MATHEMATICS S. 2(b)-Quadratics and beyond. Opin to students who have
finished the first half of intermediate algebra. Text, Intertediate Algebra by Slaught
and Lennes, Allyn-Bacon Co., Atlanta. Room 4, Sc. Hall. 8:30 to 9:30.
E. F. MANCE, INSTRUCTOR.
MATHE. ATICS S.3(a)-First half of Plane Geometry. Recommended for those
doing eleventh grade. Special stress is laid on the solution of original problems and
their application to practical problems in life. This course includes the first half of
plane Geometry. Text, Plane Geometry by Royal A. Avery, Allyn-Bacon Co., Atlanta,
Ga. Room, 2 Sc. Hall 9:30 to 10:30.
E. F. MANCE, INSTRUCTOR
MATHEMATICS S. 3(b)-The latter half of Plane Geometry. A continuation of
course S. 3(a). Special attention is given to those theorems giving the student a
better background for abstract reasoning. Text, Same as for S. 3(a). Room, 2 Sc.
Hall, 10:30 to 11:30.
E. F. MANCE, INSTRUCTOR.
MATHE ATICS S. 4-Solid Geometry. Five single periods per week. The construc-
tion and measuring of solid figures. Open to those who have had mathematics S.
3 (a) and (b). Text, Wentworth and Smith, Ginn and Co., Atlanta. Room, 5 Sc.
Hall, 10:30 to 11:30.
C. C. WALKER, INSTRUCTOR.
[43]





MATHEMATICS S. 5-Review Arithmetic. Designed to help those preparing for
Teachers' Examination. A complete review of 7th and 8th grade Arithmetic.
Room, 3 Science Hall.
E. F. MANCE, INSTRUCTOR.
MATHEMATICS S. 6-Review Algebra. A course offered to those who desire to
refresh themselves in the fundamentals of algebra as well as for those who plan
preparing for State Examination. Text, Complete Algebra by Slaught and Tennes.
Allyn-Bacon Co., Atlanta, Ga., Room, 4 Sc. Hall, 2:30 to 3:30.
G. T. WIGGINS, INSTRUCTOR.
LABORATORY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
The summer High School Science Department consist of General Science, Biology,
Physical Geography, Chemistry and Physics. These courses are so organized that
they will meet the demand of the students preparing them particularly for higher
courses whereby they may become teachers of science, pre-medical students or re-
search scholars.
GENERAL SCIENCE-A course for the ninth grade. Specially designed to acquaint
the pupil with the principles and general laws of mechanics, light, heat, sound,
electricity and magnetism. Recitation 1 hr. lab. 2 hrs. Text, Our Environment,
How we use and control it. By Wood and Carpenter. Allyn and Bacon Co. Atlanta.
Ga. Manual for General Science, by Wood and Carpenter. Lecture Room, 4 Junior
High Building 7:30 to 8:30. Lab. Room, 6 Ag. Building 1:30 to 2:30.
JAS. EsPY, INSTR.
BIOLOGY-An introductory course to the study of plant and animal life giving
the fundamental principals and phenomena of the living world. Text, Elementary
Biology by Gruenberg. Manual, Experiments and Projects in Biology, Ginn and Co.
Atlanta. By Gruenbery and Robinson. Notebook, Triplex Binder Notebook, Room,
4 Junior High Building. Lecture 8:30 to 9:30. Lab. 2:30 to 4:30.
MR. ESPY, INSTRUCTOR.
CHEMISTRY. A course designed to deal with those facts which figure most con-
spicuously in daily life. Elements and their compounds, the chemical Law and Chemi-
cal processes are carefully studied from the practical point of view of their impor-
tance. Text, Chemistry by Greer and Bennett, Manual by same authors. Notebook
required. Allyn-Bacon Co. Atlanta, Ga. Lecture, Room, 11 Sc. Hall 1:30 to 2:30.
Lab. Room, 11 Sc. Hall 2:30 to 4:30.
C. S. LONG, INSTR.
PHYSICS-Open to 12th grade and special students. An introductory course leading
to College physics.Text and Mal:ual Miliken and Gale. Lecture Room 10 9:30 to
10:30.
Lab. Room, 10 and 12, 10:30 to 11:30.
C. S. LONG, INSTR. assisted by C. C. WALKER.
PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE-A review course for teachers who plan preparing for
State Examination. Hours and room to be arranged.
O. A. M. FOOTE AND N. B. COOPER. INSTR.
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY-Sem- elective. Much stress placed in the underlying
causes of Economic distribution. Roon, 4. junior High Building, 9:30 to 11:30.
Text, Commercial Geography by Robinson. Rand McNally Co. Chicago.
JAS. EsPY, INSTRUCTOR.
PRE-NORMAL EDUCATION
EDUCATION 1 and 2-Offered as a requirement for those of the 12th grade and
those who plan to finish high school. A special study of the history of Education and
Elementary Psychology. Texts, Peters Human Conduct for Ed. 1. Boyers History of
Education for Education 2. McMillan Company, Atlanta. Room, 4 Junior High,
2:30 to 3:30
[44]





AMERICAN HISTORY AND CIVIcS-A required Course in 12th grade and offered to
those who plan taking State Examination. Texts, History by Stephenson, Ginn and
Co. Civics by McGruder, Ginn and Co. Atlanta. Room, 4 Junior High, 3:30 to 4:30.
C. C. WALKER. INSTR.
LATIN-Fundamentals of Latin. Grammar and Composition. Latin to English and
English to Latin translations. Text, Clark and Game. Room, 3 Junior High, 7:30
to 8:30.
C. S. LONG, INSTR.
'SPANISIr-Offered to give the pupil an introduction to the study of Spanish Fun-
damentals of Grammar and Composition. Text, Spanish Grammar by DeVitis, Allyn-
Baccn Co. Atlanta. Room, 4 Sc. Hall 3:30 to 4:30.
G. T. WIGGINS, INSTRUCTOR.
HOME ECONOMICS
The Home Economics Department will be open to 12th grade students. Other high
school students will be allowed to take instruction in this department only by
special permission.
CLOTHING AND DESIGN-Text, Art in Home and Clothing, by Trilling and
Williams. J. B. Lippincott Co. (classes to be arranged for).
FooD AND NUTRITION-Text, Food Study for High Schools. By Well-man. Book
Store, A. & M. College. (classes to be arranged for).
[45]





SUMMER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
1. Aarons, Maxey Jasper Hamilton
2. Adams, Bertha Wacissa Jefferson
3 Adams, Maggie Tallahassee Leon
4. Adams, Leona Tallahassee Leon
5. Adams, Leonie Miami Dade
b. Adderley, Nettie L. Lakeland Polk
7. Adderson, Ola Mae Havana Gadsden
8. Albury, Ruth St. Petersburg Pinellas
9. Alexander, Mamie Dunnellon Marion
10. Alexander, Corine Tampa Hillsborough
11. Allen, Vivian Hill Jacksonville Duval
12. Allen, Margaret Eva Cocoa Brevard
13. Anderson, Ruby Crescent City Putnam
14. Anderson, Hermia Lee Jacksonville Duval
15. Anderson, Eloise Quincy Gadsden
16. Arrington, Ruby Tampa Hillsborough
17. Armstrong, Algie B. Tallahassee Leon
18. Artson, C. E. Orlando Orange
19. Asia, Rosa L. Palatka Putnam
20. Austin, Charles L. West Palm BeachPalm Beach
21. Austin, Edith Jacksonville Duval
22. Baile*, Maggie Lou Tallahassee Leon
23. Battles, .ITssie Mable Chiefland Levy
24. Baker, Lffie L. Marianna Jackson
25. Bassa, Nathalie Lloyd Jefferson
26. Barge, E. J. Pensacola Escambia
27. Bartley, Ruth Jacksonville Duval
28. Baynes, Izora Pensacola Escambia
29. Belfon, Elsie Miami Dade
30. Belfon, Frankie Miami Dade
31. Bellamy, Jeannette A. Ocala Marion
32. Benboe, Elsie Pensacola Escambia
33. Benbow, Dinah E. Deland Volusia
34. Bisson, Vera Victoria Miami Dade
35. Blanks, Elease Tampa Hillsborough
36. Blue, Theo. R. Tampa Hillsborough
37. Bouks, Leola Tampa Hillsborough
38. Booker, Willie Mae St. Petersburg Pinellas
39. Bracewell, Hazel Quincy Gadsden
40. Bowers, Georgia Havana Gadsden
41. Brown, Gertrude Pensacola Escambia
42. Brown, Celia E. Tallahassee Leon
43. Brown, Minnie Jasper Hamilton
44. Brown, Katie F. Deland Volusia
45. Bronson, Uriah R. Deland Volusia
46. Bryant, Charlotte Tampa Hillsborough
47. Bryant, Lucinda Lake Wales Polk
48. Bryant, Corine Orlando Orange
49. Bryant, Lillian Flynn West Palm BeachPalm Beach
[46 ]





50. Burney, Ethel Sanford Seminole
51. Butler, F. L. Ocala Marion
52. Butler, Ida R. West Palm BeachPalm Beach
53. Cambridge, Clarinda West Palm BeachPalm Beach
54. Gampbell, Leoletta Tampa Hillsborough
55. Campbell, Valdee Argyle
56. Carey, Ethel Bartow Polk
57. Carlton, Hattie Tallahassee Leon
58. Carter, Ola Americus, Ga. Sumpter
59. Carter, Maggie L. Jacksonvillle Franklin
60. Carter, Louise Apalachicola Duval
61. Chambers, Sadie Jacksonville Duval
62. Charles, Eliza Mae Jacksonville Escambia
63. Clay, Lucile ?ensacola Dade
64. Clifton, Nellie Miami Volusia
65. Coleman, Lucile Jacks nville Duval
66. Colson, Callie Mae Winter Park Orange
67. Conoly, George Bay Harbor Bay
68. Cowan, Rhina H. Jacksonville Duval
69. Cooper, Annie Clermont Lake
70. Cooke, Harriet Pensacola Escambia
71. Craft, Nannie J. Jacksonville Duval
72. Cromartie, Margaret Orlondo Orange
73. Crooms, Annie H. Orlondo Orange
74. Crump, Pearl Tallahassee Leon
75. Dames, Marion Tallahassee Leon
76. Daniels, Erma Tampt Hillisborough
77. Dansby, T. D. Ocala Marion
78. Dansby, Olive B. Ocala Marion
79. Daniels, Blanche Llkeiani Polk
80. Daniels, Estelle Ocali Marion
81. Davis, Melissa A. Jacksonville Duval
82. Davis, Daisy Belle Tall:asassc, Leon
83. Davis, Beatrice Chattahoochee Gadsden
84. Davis, Mollie Paiatkk Putnam
85. Davis, Dovie Tallahassee Leon
86. Dawkins, Lillie Estelle Jackonville Duval
87. Dayes, Mattie F. Gain:evil!e Alachua
88. Dennis, Sarah Tallahassee Leon
89. DeShazior, Jennette Miami Dade
90. DeVeughn, Jessie V. Pensacola Escambia
91. Dean, Maggie Lloyd Jefferson
92. Donaldson, Mary Tallahassee Leon
93. Dudley, Jessie C. Lakeland Polk
94. Duncan, Essie Grenwood Jackson
95. Dunbar, E. L. Lakeland Polk
96. DuBignon, Mary Jacksonville Duval
97. Davis, Hattie Tampa Hillsborough
98. Eagle, Hattie Clearwater Pinellas
99. Eckles, Pauline St. Augustine St. John
100. Edmunds, Mary L. Pensacola Escambia
101. Evans, Bessie M. Clearwarer Pinellas
102. Faust, Arrabelle Clearwater Pinellas
103. Fisher, Marie St. Petersburg Pinellas
104. Fisher, M. A. Webster Sumpter
[47]





105. Foster, A. J. Tampa Hillsborough
106. Foster, Ollie J. Deerfield Broward
107. Ford, Sudella Tallahassee Leon
108. Footman, Edith Odessa Hillsborough
109. Gainey, Irene Quincy Gadsden
110. Gaines, Katie Tallahassee Leon
111. Gainey, Arrie Eustis Lake
112. Gandy, Clem Miami Dade
113. Gavin, Blanche Wakulla Wakulla
114. Gaulding, C. L. Kissimmee Dsceola
115. Garrett, Lillian C. Tampa Hillsborough
116. Gilmore, Annie Gainesville Alachua
117. Glover, Lorene Plant City Hillsborough
118. Glover, Algie Mae Tamr. Hillsborough
119. Gordon, Carrie Lee Jacksonville Duval
120. Grambling, Ethel Sanford Seminole
121. Grover, Wm. M. Monticello Jefferson
122. Gray, Florence St. Petersburg Pinellas
123. Green, Deloca Bartow Polk
124. Gardner, Georgia Tallahassee Leon
125. Hailman, Elizabeth St. Augustine St. Johns
126. Hare, Annie L. Palatka Putnam
127. Harris, J. D. Tallahassee Leon
128. Hardon, Lillian Tallahassee Leor
129. Hart, Mildred St. Augustine St. Johns
130. Harville, Christine Tampa Hillsborough
131. Harvey, Viola ilnson Gadsden
132. Hartsfield, iana Tallahassee Leon
133. Hall, Sula G. Ocala Marion
134. Hamilton, Kattie Tampa Hillsborough
135. Hargrett, Olive Tallahassee Leon
136. Hayes, Ruby B. Tallahassee Leon
137. Haynes, H. E. Kissimmee Osceola
138. Hector, C. B. Xakeland Polk
139. Herrera, Alice Key West Monroe
140. Henzie, Florence Key West Monroe
141. Hicks, Bella Pensacola Escambio
142. Hines, Margie F. Palatka Putnam
143. Hill, Brunetta C. Birmingham, Ala.Jefferson
144. Hightower, Alberta Cottondale Jackson
145. Holmes, Gertrude Jasper Hamilton
146. Howard, Ruth G. Tampa Hillsborough
147. Hart, Nellie St. Augustine St. Johns
148. Hodges, Mamie C. Jacksonville Duval
149. Horton, Mary G. Plant City Hillsborough
150. Hunter, Hayes H. Miami Dade
151. Hunter, Viola Tallahassee Leon
152. Jackson, Ruth Pensacola Escambia
153. Jackson, David Marianna Jackson
154. James, Frances Pensacola Escambia
155. James, Esther Mae Palatka Putnam
156. James, Dora Bartow Polk
157. Jackson, Rebecca Pensacola Escambia
158. Jackson, F. M. Cottondale Jackson
159. Jackson, E. M. Jacksonville Duval
[48]





160. Jackson, Naomie Palatka Putnam
161. Jackson, Marie Ocala Marion
162. Jackson, John T. Cottondale Jackson
163. Johnson, F. G. Tallahassee Leon
164. Johnson, Pearl Kissimmee Osceola
165. Johnson, M. A. Kissimmee Osceola
166. Johnson, Annie Glass Pompana Broward
167. Johnson, Claudia West Palm BeachPalm Beach
168. Johnson, Willie Mae Jacksonville Duval
169. Johnson, Ruth Miami Dade
170. Johnson, Ethel Plant City Hillsborough
171. Jones, Ruth Tallahassee Leon
172. Jordan, Daisy Jacksonville Duval
173. Jordan, Rebecca Pensacola Escambia
174. Joyner, Ruth Plant City Hillsborough
175. King, Emanuel Kissimmee Osceola
176. King, Ondria Jacksonville Duval
177. Lamb, Blanche Lake City Columbia
178. Lang, Aniece Tallahassee Leon
179. Lvette, Padro Jacksonville Duval
180. Laws, Christine Ormond Volusia
181. Lewis, Alphonso Lero Odando Orange
182. Lester, Susie Tampa Hillsborough
183. Lewis, Claude Tampa Hillsborough
184. Leonard, Mable Lloyd Jefferson
185. Long, Eulalia Lois Pensacola Escambia
186. Lewis, Suwannee Tallahassee Leon
187. Lightbourne, Marjorie Tampa Hillsborough
188. Livingston, Celestine Tallahassee Leon
189. Longworth, J. C. Bartow Polk
190. Love, Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
191. Lucas, Mary Lakeland Polk
192. Lovett, Ine West Palm BeachPaim Beach
193. Madison, Hallie G. Jacksonville Duval
194. Maple, Frances Ocala Marion
195. Madison, William Jacksonville Duval
196. Mathews, Ruth Tallahassee Leon
197. Manigault, Estella Jacksonville Duval
198. Menchon, Lucene Florence Villa Sebring
199. Meadows, Lettie Highland Polk
200. Merritt, Frank Marianna Jackson
201. Mitchel, Alma West Palm BeachPalm Beach
202. Mimms, J. E. Ft. Meyers Lee
203. Murray, Richard J. Jacksonville Duval
204. Mullin, Leroy O'Brien Suwannee
205. Mobley, Prudence Leesburg Lake
206. Moore, C. A. Gifford Indian River
207. Moore, Cornelia Citra Marion
208. Moore, Maggie N. Pensacola Escambia
209. Moore, M. Benetha Jacksonville Duval
210. Morehead, Christine Jacksonville Duval
211. Morgan, Rosa St. Augustine St. Johns
212. Mosely, Carolyn Lloyd Jefferson
213. Meyers, Estelle Marie Lakeland Polk
214. McBride, Emma Eustis Lake
215. McBride, Anna Fort Meade Polk
[49]
-A





216. McCall, Sarah Warcissa Jefferson
217. McCall, Kathleen Palatka St. Johns
218. McCray, Alice St. Augustine Escambia
219. McFarland, Artie Pensacola Dade
220. McKinnon, Mary Miami Walton
221. McKee, Golie Lang DeFuniak Lake
222. McKinney, Bernice Fruitland Park Jefferson
223. McPhaul, E. B. Aucilla Polk
224. Malloy, Carrie L. Lakeland Putnam
225. Nearn, Bertha Lakeland Polk
226. Nickson, Mable Homeland Polk
227. Nix, Masue Pensacola Escambia
228. Nimmons, Lucile Plant City Hillsborough
229. North, Ruth Wm. Miami Dade
230. Oliver, Mary Ocala Marion
231. Payne, M. E. Jacksonville Duval
232. Patterson, Ida E. New Smyrna Volusia
233. Perry, Annie L. Tallahassee Leon
234. Pete, Susie Pensacola Escambia
235. Pearson, Lillie Mae Jacksonville Duval
236. Pickens, Hortense Pensacola Escambia
'37. Pinkney, Sara G. St. Petersburg Pinellas
238. Pierce, Marie Louise St. Petersburg Pinellas
239. P'ckens, Verdella Pensacola Escambia
240. Potts, Elvan St. Petersburg Pinellas
241. Powell, Bertha M. Deerfield Broward
242. Prince, Bessie Johnson Jacksonville Duval
243. Primous, Sadie Deerfield Brevard
244. Rainey, Bennie Lakeland Polk
245. Rainey, Bennie Pensacola Escambia
246. Roberts, Minnie M. Deerfild Brevard
247. Richard, Pearline West Palm BeachPalm Beach
248. Rhoulac, Katie Chipley Washington
249. Rhoulac, Eliza Chipley Washington
250. Russ, Pearl Mills New Smyrna Volusia
251. Reid, Fannie B. Sanford Seminole
252. Reaves, C. S. Ocala Marion
253. Reed, Sallie R. Tallahassee Leon
254. Robinson, Katherine Jacksonville Duval
255. Robinson, Custaria Ft. Pierce Ft. Pierce
256. Reid, Emma Pensacola Escambia
257. Rozier, Nellie Sanford Seminole
258. Reddick, M. E. St. Augustine St. Johns
259. Rolf, Willie Mae Ft. Meyers Lee
260. Rollins, Emma G. Tallahassee Leon
261. Roberts, Marie Miami Dade
262. Robinson, Mamie Bartow Polk
263. Rutland, Rosa C. Reddick Marion
264. Robinson, Bessie L. Tallahasr.e Leon
265. Rhue, Luella E. Jacksonville Duval
266. Richardson, Sophia Jacksonville Duval
267. Reeves, Nellie Pensacola Escambia
268. Small, Carrie Tallahassee Leon
269. Sampson, Clara Tallahassee Leon
270. Saunders, Charlie Mae Tampa Hillsborough
271. Scurry, Marina Florahome Putnam
[50.]
'V
-s





r
272. Simmons, G. M. Jacksonville Duval
273. Sims, Ruth Havane Gadsden
274. Simms, Valerio Mims Broward
275. Simms, Carrie Pensacola Escambia
276. Sherman, Elizabeth Tallahassee Leon
277. Spann, Alberta Pensacola Escambia
278. Speed, Willie L. Lloyd Jefferson
279. Speed, Nancy Clearwater Pinellas
280. Speed, Willie Miami Dade
281. Starks, Frances Jacksonville Duval
282. Starr, Fannie Homestead Dade
283. Stone, Maude L. Melbourne Brevard
284. Stephenson, Edna L. Kissimmee Osceola
285. Stewart, Ernestine Orlando Marion
286. Stroud, Doretha Tampa Hillsborough
287. Strictland, Louise Pompano Brevard
288. Sutton, Lillian Mae Miami Dade
289. Sunday, Idella Pensacola Escambia
290. Sutton, Efie Miami Dade
291. Sowell, K. Luretta Jacksonville Duval
292. Scrivens, Elsie Tampa Hillsborough
293. Smith, Susie Tallahassee Leon
294. Smith, Mamie West Palm Beach Palm Beach
295. Smith, Jessie E. Tampa Hillsborough
296. Sweeting, Cloie D. Miami Dade
297. Symonette, Mizpah Miami Dade
298. Sneed, Daisy Tallahassee Leon
299. Thweat, H. H. Miami Dade
300. Thomas, Marion Tallahassee Leon
301. Thomas, Emporian Daytona Beach Volusia
302. Thomas, Vera Havana Gadsden
303. Thomas, Lola Tallahassee Leon
304. Taylor, Catherine High Springs Volusia
305. Twine, Alease Tallahassee Leon
306. Thompson, Emily A. West Palm BeachPalm Beach
307. Thompson, Ella G. City Point Palm Beach
308. Thompson, Ruby Jacksonville Duval
309. Thorpe, Eunice Ocala Marion
310. Thompson, Panchita West Palm BeachPalm Beach
311. Taylor, J. F. Fernandina Nassau
312. Taylor, Sallie Bartow Polk
313. Taylor, Dollie Daytona Beach Volusia
314. Tunsill, Josephine Jacksonville Duval
315. Taylor, Phoebe Tallahassee Leon
316. Vaught, Gertrude Ocala Marion
317. Williams, Mattie L. Lakeland Polk
318. Williams, Mattie R. Jacksonville Duval
319. Waters, Janie St. Petersburg Pinellas
320. Williams, Cassie E. Tallahassee Leon
321. Welch, Marie St. Augustine St. Johns
322. Whittaker, Mary Ann Tallahassee Leon
323. Whigum, Cornette Payhcad Santa Rosa
324. Williams, Geneva 'acksonvlle Duval
325. Weston, Lula B. West Palm BeachPalm Beach
326. Walker, Elnora Lakclcnd Polk
[51]





327. Wiggins, Lucinda Sarasota Sarasota
328. Williams, Katie L. Pensacola Escambia
329. Walker, Effie Miami Dade
330. Williams, Emma Gaines-ille Alachua
331. Williams, Fannie Miami Dade
332. Williams, Bessie E. Palatka Putnam
333. Watson, Jewel Tallahassee Leon
334. Williams, Maggie T. Tampa Hillsborougi
335. Willis, Marie Tampa Hillsborougr.
336. Washington, Julia Pensacola Escambia
337. Ward, Eva Lee Tampa Hillsborotgh
338. Williams, Caroline Tampa Hillsborough
339. Washington, M. F. Pensacola Escambia
340. Watson, Willie L. West Palm BeachPalm Beach
341. Watkins, Bernice Palatka Putnam
342. Williams, Gussie L. Tallahassee Leon
343. Williams, Mable Waycros., Ga.
344. Worthy, Etta Lloyd Jefferson
345. West, Linna Tampa HMlsboroulIi
346. Wilson, Lucy Tampa Hillsborough
347. Williams, Ruth Pensacola Escambia
348. Wilson, Rosa A. Tallahassee Leon
349. Wilson, Dora Bartow Polk
350. Williams, Rosa Tallahassee Leon
351. Wilson, Lottie Tallahasse e Leon
352. Wilson, Rosa Jasper Hamilton
353. Williams, Ponce DeLone DeLand Volusia
354. Young, Odessa DeLand Volusia
355. Young, Catherine Palatka Putnam
356. Young, Rosa Lee Jacksonvilie Duval
357. Young, Lillie Belle Tampa Hillsborough
358. Glover, Boysie Plant City Hillsboroigli
[52]
55





GRADUATES-SUMMER SCHOOL 1928
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Longworth, Jackson Ciphus
Thorpe, Eunice Brown*
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Madison, William
LICENTIATE OF INSTRUCTION IN EDUCATION
Alien, Vivian Hill Jordan, Rebecca Louise
Anderson, Hermia Lee* Madison, Hallie Gertrude
Austin, Edith Nitabell Pearson, Lillie Gertrude
Barge; Evannah Jones Rhue, Luella Adams
Benboe, Elise Margret Simmons, Luanna Girtha Mae
Bisson, Vera Victoria Starr, Fannie Showers
Blanks, Elise Bryant Stewart, Ernestine Ramona
Bryant, Charlotte Hollis Spann, Albertha Alerthia
Clifton, Nella Mae Kelly Sweeting, Cloie Dingle
Coleman, Lucile Griffin Symonette, Mizpah
Deshazior, Jennetta Gertrude Robinson, Catherine
Fisher, Marie Taylor, Jannie Francena
Hamilton, Kittie Mae Williams, Mattie Richardson
Jackson, Effie Brookins Young, Rosa Lee
Johnson, Claudia Retoria
COMMERCIAL DIPLOMA (as of May 1928)
Davis, Hattie Mae
TAILORING DIPLOMA (as of May 1928)
Merritt, Frank
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
Taylor, Catherine Lewis, Suwannee
Cambridge, Clarinda Nickson, Mable
Charles, Eliza Mae Reid, Emma Harley
Grambling, Ethel Speed, Nancy
Hodges, Mamie C.
SMITH-HUGHES CERTIFICATES
L. L. Nixon (Auto-Mechanics)
Jas. Glymph (Auto-Mechanis)
Leroy H. Holloway (Masonary)
"Speaker for the class
[53]





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