• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 State board and officers
 Faculty
 Standing committees
 Degrees conferred and enrollme...
 Bulletin
 Copyright
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College bulletin. Catalogue 1927-1928, Forty-First Edition; Bulletin 1928-1929. Series 20. Number 2.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000115/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College bulletin. Catalogue 1927-1928, Forty-First Edition; Bulletin 1928-1929. Series 20. Number 2.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1930
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000115
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3231

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Calendar
        Page 3
    State board and officers
        Page 4
    Faculty
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Standing committees
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Degrees conferred and enrollment
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Bulletin
        Page 35
        Calendar
            Page 36
        Faculty
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        General information
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        The college
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
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            Page 81
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            Page 88
            Page 89
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            Page 113
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            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
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            Page 125
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            Page 128
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            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
        Index
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
    Copyright
        Page 156
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Page 158
Full Text










4erllanimral (nlok0
Series 20 August, 1929 Number 2
Catalogue 1928-1929
Forty-First Edition
Announcements 1929-1930
Entered as second-class matter, August 24, 1912, at the Post-Office, Talla-
hassee, Florida, Under the Act of August 24, 1912.
^~~~~~~~~~~~nn
' ^





TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Calendar 1928-'29--__ 3
Board of Control --- -.....--.--..--...._----- 4
Faculty 1928-'29- ----_-.........._-- 5, 6, 7, 8
Committees 1928-'29 -- -......-----.......__ __ ..... 9, 11, 12, 13
Scholarship and Prizes ---.__ ------_... .... 13-15
Degrees Conferred May, 1928 -___..-- -- --.___.. 16
Register of Students Summary _-.--___--- -_______ ... 32, 33
2. Regular session ..--____..-......... 16
b. Summer session-- -..-_--- .--2-... ....... 25-32
Bulletin 1929-'30 _---- ---. --.._.._... 35
Calendar 1929-'3 0--- _.. ___-.... 36
Faculty 1929-'30 --------------........ .-_..------... .. 37-43
Act Establishing College .------------- --.---.. 44
Registration --.-..-_-__-__....._----- 47
Fees and Tuition ---_---___ _.. __. 47
Boys (expenses) ----_________._.---.----,__ .--. 47
Girls (expenses) _-___ --. ..-_.. .. ..._----__ ..... 48
Admissions __-___ __________.-.-.-........---_ 45-46
Student Organizations __-.....- ...-.___ --....._ _______ .___.- 49
College Arts and Sciences ._----.. ... ---__-_ .._ ._ 70
Normal Education .....--- --- ....-.............._._ ._- ... 75
Agricultural Department ..---- --_ ._____-.-.._ ...-.._..------- 58
Mechanics Arts Department .--- .. -.-.-__-. _1.0__. -__ __-......... 100
Home Economics Department .--____ -___ _..--....--- 95
Nurse Training Department--..-_-..-..__-----____ ..__ .._ 120
Night School.__. _-_,- ....---- -------.--- ___...__ --------...-- 147 '
Senior High School Department ----__-.____________ 144
Junior High School Department--_ ..... ._._.---___ ._ 145
Index ----- -_..... -___ ___. 1 52





CALENDAR
1928-January 2, Monday, Emancipation Day
January 24-27, Tuesday-Friday, First Semester Examinations
January 30, Monday, Second Semester Begins
March 7-8, Wednesday-Thursday, Leon County Boys' Club
Meeting
April 20, Friday, Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 4, Friday, Oratorical Contest (Faculty Prize)
May 12, Saturday, National Hospital Day
May 15-18, Tuesday-Friday, Second Semester Examinations
May 20, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon
May 21, Monday, Home Economics Exhibition
May 21, Monday, Annual Music Recital
May 22, Tuesday, Alumni Day
May 22, Tuesday, Physical Training Exhibition
May 23, Wednesday, Class Day
May 23, Wednesday, Class Play
May 24, Thursday, Commencement
June 11, Monday, Summer School Begins
August 3, Friday, Summer School Closes
1929-January 1, Tuesday, Emancipation Day
January 22-25, Tuesday-Friday, First Semester Examinations
January 28, Monday, Second Semester Begins
March 6-7, Wednesday-Thursday, Leon County Boys Club
Meeting
April 19, Friday, Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 3, Friday, Oratorical Contest (College)
May 12, Sunday, National Hospital Day
May 22-24, Tuesday-Friday, Second Semester Examinations
May 26, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon
May 27, Monday, Home Economics Exhibition
May 27, Monday, Annual Music Recital
May 28, Tuesday, Alumni Day
May 29, Wednesday, Class Day
May 28, Tuesday, Physical Training Exhibition
May 29, Wednesday, Class Play
May 30. Thursday, Commencement
June 10, Monday, Summer School Begins
August 2, Friday, Summer School Closes
i
4.~~~





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Hon. DOYLE E. CARLTON, Governor, Chairman
Hon. -H CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State
Hon. W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction
Hon. F. H. DAVIS, Attorney-General
Hon. V'. V. KNOTT, State Treasurer
STATE BOARD OF CONTROL
Hon. P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
Hon. F. J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
Hon. A. H. BLANDING, Bartow
Hon. W. B. DAVIS, Perry
Hon. E. W. LANE, Jacksonville
Hon. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
J. R. E. LEE, President
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean College of Arts and Science, and
Secretary
J. B. BRAGG, Dean Mechanic Arts
B. L. PERRY, Dean Agricultural Department
L. H. B. FOOTE, Medical Director
J. R. E. LEE, Jr., Business Manager
Mrs. N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women
MAJOR C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant
REV. A. P. TURNER, Chaplain
ETHEL MAE GRIGGS, Dean of Home ESonomics Department





FACULTY 1928-1929
J. R. E. LEE
President of the College
A. B., A. M., Bishop Colleg-e; LL. D. Wilberforce University; Graduate Work,
University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin and University of Minnesota.
IRENE R. ANDERSON
Assistant Instructor, Practice School
Licentiate of Instruction, Florida A. & M. College
IVA HILL BALDWIN
Assistant Bursar
Tuskegee Institute
J. C. BALDWIN
Instructor, Farm Demonstration and Farmers' Conference Agent
B. S.. Florida A. & M. College
*C. A. BACOTE
Professor of Education and History
A.B., University of Kansas
JAMES HAROLD BLOW
Bnrsar
Hampton Institute, School of Commerce, Wilberforce University School of
Business, Wilberforce, Ohio.
CLYDE M. BRADFORD
Instructor, Shorthand and Typewriting, Business English
Florida A. & M. College; Special Work, Columbia University
J. B. BRAGG
Dean of Mechanic Arts
Tuskegee Institute; A. B., Talladega College
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE
Secretary to President
School of Commerce, Wilberforce University
P. A. BYRD
Athletic Director
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania; Law Student, New York University
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Instructor, Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University; Cornell University; Michigan Agricultural College; Hampton
Institute.
BERNICE P. CHISM
Instructor of College Science, Chemistry and Physics
B. S., Howard University; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
Leave of absence year 1928-29 to study at University of Chicago.





6 FLORIDA A. dL M. COLLEGE
I. L. COLEMAN
Instructor, High School Domestic Science
Spellman College; Special Work, Columbia University
JOHNNIE V. AMOS COLLINS
Instructor, Instrumental and Public School Music, Piano
A .B., Bishop College; Mus. B., Bishop College Music Department; Summer Work,
New England Conservatory of Music, Boston.
NUBIAN J. CONLEY
Instructor in Printing
Tuskegee Institute and Roger Williams University
N. B. COOPER
Superintendent Nurses
R. N., Meharry Medical College
CASTELLA A. DANIELS
Student Accounts
Business Department, A. & M. College
* D. MARTYN-DOW
Instructor, Biology, Zoology, Household Chemistry
Associate Bachelor, Victoria College, London; B. S., Wilberforce University, Ohio
HENRY MANNING EFFERSON
Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department
A. B., Atlanta University; A. M., Columbia University; Summer Work, University
of Minnesota.
ISAAC FISHER
Acting Head of English Department and Instructor in English
Tuskegee Institute, A.M., (Honorary) A. & M. College, Normal, Alabama
L. M. FLEMING
Registrar -
B. S., A. & M. College
DR. L. H. B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
M. D., Howard University
O. A. M. FOOTE
Nurse
R. N., Freedsman Hospital, Howard University
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Secretarial School, Y. M. C. A., New York
ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean, Home Economics Department; Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking
B. S., Simmons University, Boston
* Part of year.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 7
FRANCIS M. HALL
Interne
A.B., Iincoln University; M.D., howard University Medical School
DAISY E. HARVEY
Dining Room Matron
Roger Williams University
*OSCEOLA THOMPSON HAWKINS
Matson, Clark Hall
B. S., Knoxville College
CHAS. C. HAYLING
Instructor in Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
Z. R. HERCEY
Instructor in Engineering and Plumbing
Tuskegee Institute Alabama
B. F. HOLMES, JR.
Instructor in Carpentry
Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia
JAMES HENRY HUNT
Professor of Foreign Languages and History
A. B, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
AMY JACKSON
Insructor, First and Second Grades, Practice School, Kindergarten Methods
L. I., Florida A. & M. College
F. E. JAMES
Instructor, Public School Music, Director of Choral and Glee Clubs
A. B., Wiley University, Texas
EDWARD JONES
Instructor in Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia
BEATRICE COLES JONES (MRS.)
Junior High School Mathematics and English Instructor
Normal School, Atlanta University; Summer Work, Columbia and University of
Chicago.
G. M. JONES
Instructor in Mechanical and Architectural Drawing
B. S. A., M. S., University of Michigan
M. ARMAND JONES
Matron, Tucker Hall
Atlanta University
R. HILDA JONES
Secretary to Business Manager
Gregg Business College, Chicago
Part of year.





8 FLORIDA A. a M. COLLEGE
-ARTHUR L. KIDD
Principal of Senior High School, Bookkeeping and Accounting
A.B., University of Michigan; Graduate Work, Columbia
R. O'HARA LANIER
Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Education.
A.B., Lincoln University, (Penna.) A.M., LelandjStanford Junior University; Summer
Work, Columbia University. '
-* THERESA I. LANG
Matron, Clark Hall
A. & M. College
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
Business Manager, Custodian of Property
A. B., Lincoln University, Pa.
tMAURICE A. LEE
Professor of English and Head of the Department
A.B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
* SHRUMPERT LOGAN
Instructor in Science
A. B., University of Nebraska
EVELYN F. MANCE
Instructor of High School Mathematics
B. S., Howard University; Summer Work, Fisk University and Columbia University
L. A. MARSHALL
Instructor in Teacher Training and Science; Itinerant Smith-Hughes Teacher
(Agriculture)
B. Sc., Agriculture, Prairie View College; B. Sc., Agriculture, Iowa State College;
Graduate Work, Iowa State College
E. E. MATTHEWS
In Charge of Model School, Fifth and Sixth Grades, Critic Teacher, Instructor,
School Management.
B. S., Howard University
ROSS M. MILLER
Instructor in Bookkeeping, Economics, Business English, Head of Bookkeeping
Department.
B. C. S., Northeastern University
* LEON MURRAY
Instructor in Languages
A. B., Lincoln University
N. S. McGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute, Virginia
* Leave of absence year 1928-29 to study at University of Chicago.
'* Part of year.
* Leave of absence year 1928-29 to study at Columbia University.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 9
MARIE F. McMILLAN
Instructor, Plain Sewing
B. S., Florida A. & M. College
CLARENCE B. NASBY
Instructor in Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing
George R. Smith College; Chicago Art School
C. B. NELSON
Instructor, Domestic Science
Wilberforce University; Special Work, Hampton Institute
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant
Tuskegee Institute, Ala.
A. D. PADDYFOTE
Matron, Men's Union
Alien .University
A. S. PARKS
Principal, Junior High School; Instructor Social Science
B. S., Indiana State Teachers' College
B. L. PERRY
Dean Agricultural Department; Landscape Work and Truck Gardening
Tuskegee Institute; Special Study, Iowa State College
A. C. PHILLIPS
Instructor in Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute Alabama
JUANITA RABOUIN
Instructor in High School English and Assistant Librarian
A. B., University of California; Summer Work, University of California
LETITIA FLOWERS REED
In Charge of Cafeteria
Virginia N. and -I. Institute, Petersburg, Va.
W. T. REED
Instructor in Auto Mechanics
Hampton Institute; Special Course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago, Illinois
GEORGIANNA V. REESE
Assistant Librarian, Instructor in English
B. S., Florida A. & M. College
R. L. REYNOLDS
Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture
B. S., Ohio State University
M. S. SANDERS
Instructor in Upholstering
B.S., Agricultural and Technical College, Greensboro, N.-C.





10 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
JAMES E. SANFORD
Instructor, Poultry Husbandry and Agriculture
Kittrell College, Hampton Institute; Summer Work, Hampton and A. & T.
College, Greensboro, N. C.
ANITA PRATER-STEWART
Instructor, Physical Education for Girls, Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman College, Hampton Institute, Virginia
ANGELINE TATUM
Critic Teacher, Fourth and Fifth Grades, Model School
Atlanta, University, Atlanta, Ga.
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY
Instructor in Printing
State A. & M. College, Normal, Alabama; Special Course, Mergenthaler Linotype
School, Chicago, Illinois.
MAYME E. THOMAS
Matron, Laundry
Selden Normal and Industrial Institute
SYLVIA R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary, Concord
W. CAREY THOMAS
Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute, Alabama
S. L. THORPE
Instructor in Electrical Engineering
Tuskegee Institute Alabama
A. P. TURNER
Chaplain, Sociology, Public Speaking, Moral and Religious Education
A. B., Morehouse College, Graduate Work, University of Chicago
A. A. TURNER.
State Agent
Ohio State University
ORA VANN
Instructor, Handicraft-Clothing
Tuskegee Institute, Alabama
E. EARL WARE
Instructor of Biology
B. S,. Bates College, (Maine)
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Lodge
Claflin College
E. E. WEARE
Librarian
Washburn College; Student, Syracuse Library School





CATALOG, 1928-1929 11
G. THURSTON WIGGINS
Acting Principal, Senior High School, Instructor, Mathematics, Romance Languages,
Assistant Director of Extension Department.
A. B., Syracuse University, New York; Graduate Work, Syracuse University.
GEORGIA U. WILLIAMS
Post Mistress
Business Department, A. & M. College





12 FLORIDA A. dL M. COLLEGE
STANDING COMMITTEES
RELIGIOUS COMMITTEE-Y. M. C. A. & Y. W. C. A.
REV. A. P. TURNER, Chairman MRS. D. E. HARVEY
MRS. N. S. McGUINN MR. J. E. SANFORD
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE MISS C. B. NELSON
MISS GEORGIANNA V. REESE MR. A. S. PARKS
MRS. A. D. PADDYFOTE MR. H. M. EFFERSON
CATALOGUE COMMITTEE
DEAN R. O'HARA LANIER, Chairman DR. L. H. B. FOOTE
MR. L. A. MARSHALL MR. J. B. BRAGG
MR. G. T. WIGGINS MR. W. H. STICKNEY
MR. G. M. JONES MR. B. L. PERRY
MISS E. M. GRIGGS MISS O. A. M. FOOTE
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS-RHETORICALS
MR. ALBERT S. PARKS, Chairman MR. B. F. HOLMES
MRS. B. C. JONES MRS. J. V. A. COLLINS
MISS MARIE McMILLAN MR. W. T. REED
ORATORICAL CONTESTS-TRAINING
COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS
MR. ISAAC FISHER, Chairman MR. R. L. REYNOLDS
REV. A. P. TURNER MISS E. C. WEARE
DEAN R. O'HARA LANIER MR. B. F. HOLMES
MISS JUANITA RABOUIN MISS B. P. CHISM
MISS I. L. COLEMAN MISS E. E. MATTHEWS
MR. JAMES H. HUNT MR. R. M. MILLER
MRS. C. M. BRADFORD MR. L. H. MARSHALL
All heads of departments are ex-officio members of above committees.
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
MR. J. B. BRAGG, Chairman MR. FRANZ A. BYRD
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE MR. J. R. E. LEE, JR.
MRS. ANITA P. STEWART MISS B. P. CHISM
MR. W. H. STICKNEY DR. F. M. HALL
(Interne)





CATALOG, 1928-1929 13
SCHOLARSHIP
MR. H. M. EFFERSON, Chairman MISS E. F. MANCE
MISS L. M. FLEMING, Secretary MR. W. T. REED
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE MR. CHAS. CHAPMAN
MR. D. MARTYN-DOW MRS. N. S. McGUINN
MISS MARIE McMILLAN
NIGHT SCHOOL COMMITTEE
MR. S. L. THORPE, Chairman MR. R. M. MILLER
MR. D. MARTYN-DOW MR. C. B. NASBY
MISS ANGELINE TATUM MR. A. S. PARKS
DEAN R. O. LANIER, ex-officio
LECTURES AND RECITALS
MR. F. E. JAMES MRS. J. V. A. COLLINS
W. CAREY THOMAS
DEBATES
MR. ISAAC FISHER, Chairman REV. A. P. TURNER
MISS E. E. MATTHEWS
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PLAYS--RHETORICALS
MR. G. T. WIGGINS, Chairman MISS E. F. MANCE
MISS JUANITA RABOUIN MR. W. T. REED
MR. A. C. PHILLIPS MR. Z. R. HERCEY
SOCIAL COMMITTEE
MR. E. EARL WARE, Chairman MR. Z. R. HERCEY
MISS C. B. NELSON MR. H. M. EFFERSON
MR. J. R. E. LEE, JR. MR. R. L. REYNOLDS
MAJ. C. J. A. PADDYFOTE MISS ORA VANN
MRS. A. P. STEWART MR. FRANZ A. BYRD
MRS. N. S. McGUINN
SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES
SARAH LEVY SCHOLARSHIP $150.00-Through the generosity
of Mrs. Sarah Levy, citizen of Tallahassee, a scholarship of $150.00
is given yearly to a worthy young man or woman of Leon County to





14 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
pursue the four-year College Course. The holder of the scholarship
for 1929-1930 is Hoskis Smith.
SUSAN J. BLACK PRIZE $5.00-Established by Mrs. Susan J.
Black, an Alumnus of the College, and offered to the student in the
High School Department having the highest scholastic record. Win-
ner of prize: Ethel Reid.
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE $10.00-Offered by the Alum-
ni Association to student in the College and Normal Classes having
the highest scholastic record. Winners of prize for 1928-1929:
Celestine Frazier, Normal Senior; Godfrey W. Hawkins, College Senior.
ROSA W. BUTLER PRIZE $10.00-Established by Mrs. Rosa W.
Butler, an Alumnus of the College and offered to the student making
the highest average in pianoforte music. Winner of prize: William
Phoenix.
McMILLIAN SCHOLARSHIP $50.00-Awarded to the most
worthy agricultural student. Awarded for 1929-1930 to Horace
Woodard.
FLOYD CALVIN PRIZE-For the best all-round student (college)
in the senior class. First prize, $6.00, awarded to Godfrey Hawkins;
second prize, $4.00, Floy Britt.
FLOYD CALVIN PRIZE-For the Best practice teacher for both
semesters; awarded: First prize, $3.00, Alice Odom; Second prize,
$2.00, Essie Mae Gordon.
C. T. SIKES PRIZE-For the highest general average in the senior
high school awarded to James Keller, $2.50.
C. T. SIKES PRIZE-To the student making the highest average
in the Home Economics Department. Awarded to Celestine Frazier,
$2.00.
FACULTY ORATORICAL PRIZE $20.00-Offered to members
of the college department for oratorical effort by members of the
faculty. Winners for 1928-1929-First prize $12.00, L. Beatrice
Fleming. Second prize, $8.00, Celestine Beatrice Frazier.
S. H. COLEMAN PRIZE-To the best all-round non-comnmission-
ed officer. Awarded to G. H. Jones, $3.00.
S. H. COLEMAN PRIZE-To the best non-commissioned officer
in appearance. Awarded to Ralph Nobles.
GEORGE CONOLY PRIZE-For the best high school average in
Agriculture, awarded to Lamar Fort, $s.00.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 15
YADSEUT SCHOLARSHIP $50.00-This club is composed of
seven young women, members of the school faculty. This scholar-
ship is awarded to a student who has completed two years of college
work with a high average. Awarded to L. Beatrice Fleming.
WILLIAM S. MAXEY PRIZE-For the best kept room for the
term 1928-1929, awarded to Charles Kidd and St. Elmo Greaux, $2.00.
WILLIAM S. MAXEY PRIZE-To the best all-round commission-
ed officer. Awarded to Charles G. Barnett, $3.00.
COLLEGE WITS PRIZE $5.00-To the organization with a high
scholastic record. This prize was not offered for the term 1928-1929.





16 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
DEGREES CONFERRED
CALENDAR YEAR 1928
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Name Postoffice County
Anderson, Miriam Jackson Tampa Hillsborough
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Bragg, Eugene James Tallahassee \ Leon
Conoly, George Whitfield .Panama City Bay
Kenon, Reubin Rush Quincy Gadsden
Gilchrist, James Franklin Lakeland Polk
Hamilton, WilliaA McKinley Tampa Hillsborough
Maxey, William Singleton Ovieda Seminole
Hall, John Lee Ocala Marion
r~~* ~BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Cady, Davis A. DeFuniak Springs Walton
Lewis, Alphonso Leroy Orlando Madison
Nixon, William Verdier Madison Orange
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
Duncan, Modeste Pensacola Escambia
Noble, Edna Fernandina Nassau
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Evans, St. Clair Perry Taylor
Whitehead, Anthony Julius Jacksonville Duval
Rolfe, Everette Richard Tampa Hillsborough
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Stirrup, Jr. E. W. Franklin Coconut Grove Dade
ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS
1928-1929
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
SENIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Name Postoffice County
Hart, Leona Y'vonne Jacksonville Duval
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Johnson, Fred Willard Edgar Putnam
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Bates, Winifred Lucile Palatka Putnam
DeLancey, Ellen Jane West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Greene, Garriette Lucile* Delray Beach Palm Beach
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
Britt, Floy Lenora Campbellton Jackson
Summer Session.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 17
SENiOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Lockhart, John Wesley Tampa Hillsborough
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Hawkins, Godfrey William Orlando. Orange
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Stewart, William Blodgett So. Jacksonville Duval
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Godbolt, Albert James Miami Dade
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Schell, Cora Louisa Jacksonville Duval
Nixon, Ulysses Grant Madison Madison
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Bell, Leslie Arnett Palatka Putnam
Merritt, Frank Marianna Jackson
Sweet, William D. Bartow Polk
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Jones, Julius Benjamin New Smyrna Volusia
Kirksey, Leander Alphonso Madison Madison
Thompson, Carl Linneas Leesburg Lake
Stevens, Robert Quincy Gadsden
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Jones, Disney Theodore Quincy Gadsden
Robinson, Canary Delray Beach Palm Beach
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Myrick, Alma Theora Tallahassee Leon
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
*Robinson, Clyde Farrar Tampa Hillsborough
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Dobbs, David Clearwater Pinellas
Robinson, William Tallahassee Leon
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Cooper, Samuel Johnnie Monticello Jefferson
Fleming, Lula Beatrice Jacksonville Duval
Greene, George Henry Delray Beach Palm Beach
Hair, Thelma Lucretia Jacksonville Duval
Hargrove, Lawrence Gifford Indian River
McFarlin, Bertram E. Pensacola Escambia
McMillan, Alzo Burnelle Pensacola Escambia
Portier, Rodney Harcourt Miami Duval
Sutton, Harry Haylan Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Otis Pensacola Escambia
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF ARTS
Cross, Edna Sanford Seminole
Carter, Ida Palatka Putnam
DeBose, Sarah Gainesville Alachua
*Part of year.





18 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Ellis, Vivian Olymphia Jacksonville Duval
Hill, Beatrice Tampa Hillsborough
Martin, Alice Tampa Hillsborough
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Byrd, Henry S. 3 Quincy Gadsdesr
Cosby, Felix Edward Orlando Orange
Greaux, St. Elmo Ambrose Key West Monroe
McPherson, Edwin Pensacola Escambia
Pinkney, James Tallahassee Leon
Payne, C. George Jacksonville Duval
Woodard, Horace Albert Quincy Gadsden
Youngblood, Ozie Franklin Delray Beach Palm Beach
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Bryant, Ida Marie Tallahassee Leon
Bryant, Frankie Tallahassee Leon
Bozeman, Floyd Tampa Hillsborough
Johnson, Malinda Tallahassee Leon
Martin, Ireta Essie Sanford Seminole
Norwood, Edwin Fred Douglas Tallahassee Leon
Roby, Richard Thomas Jacksonville Duval
Rolfe, Nancy Anna Tampa Hillsborough
Speed, Hissetta Veronica West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Sallette, Thelma Jacksonville Duval
Stewart, Richie Belle Tallahassee Leon
Walker, Lucile Melbourne Duval
Washington, Ruby Belle l'allahassee Leon
Wodbury, Bessie Mae Tall'hassee Leon
Yant, Rosa Lee Tallahassee Leon
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
Simmons, Yinestra V. Pe-sacola Escambia
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Edwards, Herbert Meade 'allahassee Leon
Jackson, George Sanford Seminole
Ritchie, Oscar St. Petersburg Pinellas
McDonald, Stephens Jacksonville Duval
Thomas, Ulysses Montgomery, Ala. Montgomery
Yarn, Oscar Samuel Clearwater Pinellas
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Barnett, Charles Gillislee Jacksonville Duval
Emanuel, Leroy Lorenzo Jacksonville Duval
Greene, Douglas Warren Delray Beach Palm' Beach
Hart, Lorenza James ** Jacksonville Duval
Jackson, Nathaniel Jacksonville Duval
McPherson, Thos. Benjamin, Jr. Pensacola Escambia
James, Charles Gainesville Alachua
Simpson, Vernon Samuel Fernandina Nassau
Smith, Fred De Weese Apalachicola Franklin
Wilkins, Oliver Wendell Madison Madison
Williams, Joshua Walter Palatka Putnam
Williams, Morris Benj. (2nd. Sem.) Palatka Putnam
* Will graduate in August.
*1 Withdrew.
L





CATALOG, 192 8-1929 19
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR EDUCATION
Allen, Daisy Lillie Belle Tallahassee Leon
Browne, Katie Flonne DeLand Volusia
Gordon, Essie Mae Fort Pierce St. Lucie
Gore, Seth Leon Tallahassee Leon
Hannibal, Reba Costella Key West Monroe
Henderson, Ida Rebecca Jacksonville Duval
Livingston, Mrs. Celestine Tallahassee Leon
Nixon, Jenyethel Leon Madison Madison
Odom, Alice Jacksonville Duval
Pinkney, Idella Alene Fernandina Nassau
Sweet, Lillie Mae St. Petersburg Pinellas
JUNIOR EDUCATION
Benton, Lulu Belle Fort Pierce St. Lucie
Douglas, Narvella Beatrice Daytona Beach Volusia
Hall, Pauline Millicent Live Oak Suwannee
Jones, Priscilla Edith Jacksonville Duval
Proctor, Oralee DeLand Volusia
Polite, Rosebud Bernice Jacksonville Duval
Pender, Ernestine Pensacola Escambia
Richardson, Jennie Louise Jacksonville Duval
Rodriquez, Myrtle Louise Tampa Hillsborough
Stewart, Modeste La June Pensacola Escambia
Taylor, Alma Mary Fort Meyers Lee
Whaley, Florence Rebecca Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Edith Rachel Quincy Gadsden
Young, Gussie Lee Bartow Polk
Young, Geraldine Wilfont Apalachicola Franklin
SENIOR NORMAL COMMERCIAL
Harris, Rosa Beatrice Jacksonville Duval
Martin, Dorothy Anita Clearwater Pinellas
Washington, Hettie Elzora Lakeland Polk
JUNIOR NORMAL COMMERCIAL
Edwards, Charlotte Nathan Tallahassee Leon
Kelker, Susie Beatrice Milton Santa Rosa
Noble, Ray Ulysses Fernandina Nassau
Stroman, Carlle Lloyd Jefferson
SENIOR HOME ECONOMICS
'Frazier, Celestine Beatrice Pensacola Escambia
'Gordon, Eunice Thelma Thomasville, Ga. Thomas
- Meginniss, Winifred Iola Tarpon Springs Pinellas
JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Allen, Tabitha Earldine Jacksonville Duval
*Byrd, Mable Smyrna Melbourne Brevard
'Clay, Willie Belle Warrington Escambia
'Delaney, Martha Fernandina Duval
'DeLaney, Marion Louise Jacksonville Nassau
'Gordon, Irie Mae Thomasville, Ga. Thomas
*Hall, Thelma Louise Jacksonville Duval
Hill, Birdie Leesburg Lake





20 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
,McRae, Eddie Jacksonville Duval
"King, Annie Leona Jacksonville Duval
.McKelvin, Thelma Frankie Mae Tampa Hillsborough
*Shaw, Corrinne Sophenia Jacksonville Duval
.Turner, Frankie Olivia Quincy Gadsden
'Williams, Irene Dorothy St. Petersburg Pinellas
,Wilson, Helen Bobby Tampa Hillsborough
NURSE TRAINING DEPARTMENT
SENIOR NURSES
Knox, Marie Tampa Hillsborough
JUNIOR NURSES
Shade, Lela Aldonia Clearwater Pinellas
Pemberton, Evelyn Tallahassee Leon
Jamison, Agnes Orlando Orange
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL III.
Anderson, Lewis N., Jr.* Clearwater Pinellas
Barco, Johnnie D St. Petersburg Pinellas
Beasley, Slyveser Lee Tuskegee, Ala. Macon
Brown, Lucile Lillian Orlando Orange
Butler, Lindell Palatka Putnam
Cheatham, Grace Margaret DeFuniak Springs Dade
Clark, Edward Miami Walton
Clark, Louise Pearl Thomasville, Ga. Alachua
Evans, Jessie Belle Alachua
Ford, Sudella Juanita Tallahassee Leon
Fort, Lamar Live Oak Suwannee
Greene, Alphcnso Lonzo Gainesville Alachua
Gardner, Irma Tampa Hill.borough
Guion, Albertha Beatrice Lakeland Polk
Hamilton, Leroy Roscoe Sanford Seminole
Hart, Berthena Edith Reddick Marion *
Hawkins, Rosa Lee Orlando Orange -
Hawkins, Thelma Lucile Tallahassee Leon
Henry, Minnie Apalachicola Franklin
Holland, Theodies Hiawatha Pompano Broward
Hunt, Hila Mae BrooksviIle Hernando
Jackson, John Henry, Jr. Tampa Hillsborough
Jones, Gamaliel Hezekiah Orlando Orange
Jones, Hattie Mae Sarasota Sarasota
Kidd, Charles Perry Duquesne, Pa. Allegheny
Lewis, David 'T. Monticello Jefferson
Kinder, Beatrice Mae Apalachicola Franklin
Livingston, Annie Mae Montgomery, Ala. Montgomery
MscFadden, Alphonso Harold Tallahassee Leon
McFadden, Ethel Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
McLaurin, M. Alexander So. Jacksonville Duval
McMeekin, Susie Alice Edgar Putnam
Martin, Mary Thelma Sanford Seminole
Part of year.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 21
Mayes, Mildred Alexander Ocala Marion
Meuse, Jeessie Lee Sanford Semionle
Miller, Eloise Tampa Leon
Mills, Lucius Robert Tallahassee
Montgomery, Ruth Beaman Thomasville, Ga. Hillsborough
Moore, Herbert Eustis Tallahassee Leon
Perry, John A. Miami Dade
Finder, Frank Key West Monroe
Reid, Ethel Sarasota Sarasota
Roberts, Ruby Mae Winter Park Orange
Sampson, Samuel Goulden Orlando Orange
Smith, Hoskis Harrel Tallahassee Leon
Speed, Elnora Odessa West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Sweet, Cynthia E. Bartow Polk
Rogers, Altamease Quincy Gadsden
Watts, Edna Lucile Gainesville Alachua
Williams, Cornette Marguerite Lakeland Polk
Wilson, Wesley LeesburgLake
Wood, Rosena Y'Vonne Bainbridge Ga. Decatur
Way, Lila Pompano Broward
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL II.
Aikins, Bessie Mae Leesburg Lake
Adams, Agnes West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Allen, Roy Arran Wakulla
Barnes, Frank Jacksonville Duval
Banks, Lucas Algernon Anniston, Ala. Calhoun
Bennett, Noah Harold White Springs Hamilton
Bevel, Thomas Edison Live Oak Suwannee
Bragg, Jubbie Barton, Jr. Tallahassee Leon
Bragg, Rebecca Eleanor Tallahassee Leon
Brown, Gabriel Maitland Orange
Bryant, Eulalia Elizabeth Jacksonville Duval
Caldwell, Irene Frances Quincy Gadsden
Calloway, Elizabeth Palmetto Manatee
Cameron, William Roderick WVest Palm Beach Palm Beach
Carnegie, Thelma Miari Dade
Chester, Bertha Annie Tallahassee Leon
Cloud, Augusta Mae Caire, Ga. Decatur
Colbert, Sadye T. Lcesburg Lake
Crosby, Albert Fraliegh Madison Madison
Crosby, Minerva Minnie Orlando Orange
Dixon, Idella Leona DeLand Volusia
Ford, Algie Russell ral!ah!assee Leon
Ford, Sallie Mae ralla!lassee Leon
Franklin, Lena E. Lake City Columbia
Goodman, Alma Katrina Palmetto Columbia
Goodwin, Louise Greenwood Manatee
Granberry, Sarah Louise Lake City Jackson
Hall, Margaret Lake City Columbia
Hamilton, Alfredo Luther Bartow Polk
Hargrett, James T. Apalachicola Franklin
Harris, Clarence W. DeLand Volusia
Henry, Ethelda E. High Springs Alachua
Hooper, Aramentha Sanford Seminole
Holloway, Leroy H. Florahome Putnam
Hughes, Lydia Margaret Jacksonville Duval





22 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Jackson, Geraldine Louise Sanford Seminole
Johnson, Katie -Winter Haven Polk
Jones, Eugene B Ncw Smyrna Volusia
King, Inez H. Leesburg Lake
Lamb, Preston Charles St. Petersburg Pinellas
Laws, Christina Ormond Volusia
Lewis, Horace Pompano Broward
Lipsoomb, Thomas Tallahassee Leon
Martin, Joseph Edward St. Augustine St. Johns
Martin, Hazel Mae St. Augustine St. Johns
Matthews, Jerome E. Tallahassee Leon
McKee, Lucretia Fruitland Park Lake
Morgan, William Oscar Tampa Hillsborough
Moses, Vardry A Anniston, Ala. Calhoun
Nobles, Ralph A, Orlando Orange
Nickson, Dallas Homeland Polk
Phoenix, William Tallahassee Leon
Pierson, Catherine K. DeLarnd Volusia
Preston, Leila A. Quincy Gadsden
Robinson, Harry E. DeLand Volusia
Simmons, Cleveland *2 Alamonte Springs Seminole
Smith, Daniel Punta Gorda Charlotte
Simms, Annie Mae Mims Brevard
Smiley, Marian E. Ocala Marion
Stanley, George Henry Orlando Orange
Stephens, Inez Quincy Gadsden
Stephens, Pearl Victori Quincy Gadsden
Steward, Rosa Theresa Orlando Orange
Speed, Lillie West Palm Be [h Palm Beach
Stewart, Jennie Tallahassee ~ Leon
Taylor, Cecelia HL Tarpon Springs Pinellas
Thomas, Maud" Apalachicola Franklin
Thomas, Shellie Madison Madison
Waldron, Lillian C.* High Springs Alachua
Washington, Beulah Lee Sanford Seminole
Wells, George Wright Orlando Orange
Williams, Lewrence Albean Winter Park Orange
Williams, Vera Mae Tallahassee Leon
Wilson, Gretchen L. Quincy Gadsden
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL I.
Alexander, Edward Frank Jacksonville Duval
Allen, Gretwood Alphonso Orlando Orange
Bailey, Josie Altha Offerman, Ga. Pierce
Belfon, Elsie Ameretta Miami Dade
Benton, Ruth Belle Fernandina Nassau
Brown, Emma Lee DeFuniak Walton
Banks, Alice Tallahassee Leon
Brooks, Ruby Willie Deerfield Broward
Brown, George Henry Sarasota Sarasota
Chester, Robert Tallahassee Leon
Chavis, Ruby Tallahassee Leon
Crowder, Bernard Benjamin Montgomery, Ala. Montgomery
Comb, Theora Tallahassee Leon
Coleman, Frank D. Jacksonville Duval
Ellerbe, James* Palatka Putnam
Edwards, Marie Mae Tallahassee Leon





CATALOG, 1928-1929 21
Faust, Ola Lea St. Petersburg Pinellas
Ford, Augusta E. Tallahassee Leon
Griffin, Minerva DeLand Volusia
Harris, Albert Carrabelle Franklin
lart, Loris Mae St. Petersburg Pinellas
Hunt, Lester Nora, Jr. Brooksville Hernando
Isler, Bernice Althea *Tallahassee Leon
Jackson, Louise Tallahassee Leon
Jackson, John Henry Tampa Hillsborough
James, Jessie Harold West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Jones, Garlzia DeFuniak Springs Walton
Keller, James Franklin Starke Bradford
Niles, Vivian Orlando Orange
Reeves, Ernestine Venetta Pompano Broward
Robinson, Clarence David Jacksonville Duval
Rogers, Roland Wordsworth DeLand Volusia
Scott, Fred Tallahassee Marion
Twine, Fannie Tallahassee Leon
Simmons, Lillian D. Altamonte Springs Seminole
Smith, Rufus Wilkins Fairfield Leon
Thompson, Hettie Apalachicola Franklin
Sams, Willie Lee Reddick Marion
Wallace, Jennie Christine Lisbon Lake
Wells, Fannie Pearl So. Miami Dade
Wilson, Bertha Palatka Putnam
Young, Virginia Ruth Metcalf, Ga.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL III.
Abner, James Henry Tallahassee Leon
Alderman, Freddie Reginald New Smyrna Volusia
Anderson, Harriet Odell Tallahassee Leon
Bailey, Hazel Catherine Tallahasset Leon
Banks, Ruby Mae New Smyrna Volusia
Berry, Mildred Beatrice Tallahaseee Leon
Blakely, Alice Tallahaseee Leon
Clemons, Carreatha **Ft. Mead Polk
Cash, George Frederick Coconut Grove Dade
Donaldson, Nathaniel *l
Gibson, Clarence Coconut Grove Dade
Grant, Maude *2 Miami Dade
Grant, Radford Deerfield Broward
Harris, Reed Lakeland Polk
Henderson, Grace Graceville Jackson
Johnson, George Orlando Orange
Jackson, Lorenz o So. Jacksonville Duval
Killens, Donella Gretna Gadsden
Mckee, Clytie Louise Fruitland Park Lake
Nickson, Irma Catherine Homeland Polk
Niles, Clarence Willburn Cleveland Cuyahoge
Pierce, Julia Leesburg Lake
Proctor, Willie James DeLand Volusia
Roberts, James Wilfred Miami Dade
Robinson, Eva DeLand Volusia
Russ, Lency, Jr. Pensacola Escambia





24 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Sikes, Hollis Eunice Dade City Pasco
Stafford, Clem Tallahassee Leon
Smith, William Clarence Tampa Hillsborough
Staples, Elzora DeLand Volusia
Twine, Louise Tallahassee Leon
Vickers, Carl Richard West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Williams, Rufus Benhaden Wakulla
Williamson, Thelma L Apopka Orange
Wood, Georgia L. Pensacola Escambia
Woodbury, Pearl DeLand Volusia
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IL
Coleman, Geneva Arvella High Springs Alachua
Aikens, Mozel Tallahassee Leon
Bragg, Robert L Tallahassee Leon
Fitzgerald, Gladys Tallahassee Leon
Hill, Maggie Willie Arran Wakulla
Jordan, Violet A. Orlando Orange
Jackson, Arthur Montgomery, Ala. Montgomery
Mallory, Chanie Mae Clearwater Pinellas
McFadden, Clarisa E. Tallahassee Leon
Nims, Thelma E Tallahassee Leon
Smith, Maggie Lee Chaires Leon
Stirrup, Grace Coconut Grove Dade
Thompson, Rosa Lee Tallahassee Leon
Turner, Carrie Inez Tallahassee Leon
Turner, Willie Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Wheeler, Dorothy Mae Orlando Orange
Williams, Julia Greensboro Gadsden
Williams, Willie Mae* Lisbon Orange
Williams, Thelma Evelyn High Springs Alachua
Williams, Ira Lisbon Orange
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL I.
Brown, Alfred James Lakeland Polk
Byrd, Juanita Havana Gadsden
Campbell, Alpha O. Tallahassee Leon
Collins, Mary Levonia Greenville Madison
Edwards, Helen Edwards Tallahassee Leon
Ford, Vera Mae TallahasSee Leon
Hicks, John Hanson Tallahassee Leon
Miller, Lue Ella Tallahassee Leon
McFadden, Robert Leonard Tallahassee Leon
Na'sh, Jerry Nelson, Jr. Tallahassee Leon
Patterson, Olivia E. Tallahassee Leon
Ponder, Essie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Sneed, Johnnie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Spencer, James Monroe Tallahassee Leon
Stewart, Willie Buckner Tallahassee. Leon
Stewart, George Nelson Tallahassee Leon
West, Lillian Bernice Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Rose Marie Tallahassee Leon
NIGHT STUDENTS
Andrews, Elton Quincy Early
Cohen, Ernest Howard Jakin, Ga. Gadsden
Evans, Samuel James Jacksonville Duval
*Part of year.





CATALOG, 1928-1929 25
Harley, John Francis Orlando Orange
Hart, Jessie Reddick Marion
Lott, Cauly New Smyrna Volusia
Louden, Glinis Fort Meyers Lee
McNealy, William Frank Greensboro Gadsden
Manns, Kennet Jacksonville Duval
Martinez, Louis Tampa Hillsborough
Patterson, Willie Edward Reddick Marion
Robinson, John Samuel Jacksonville Duval
Ross, David Jacksonville Duval
Sewell, Lewis Samuel Maitland Orange
White, Chester A. Russelville, Ark. Pope
Williams, Otto W. Jasper Hamilton
Wilson, Lucius Alexander Yalaha Lake
White, Clarence Jacksonville Duval
SPECIAL STUDENTS
Beatty, Virginia (H. E.; Rehab.) Sanford Seminole
Smith, John (Rehabilitation) Clearwater Pinellas
Thomas, Robert (Auto Mech.) Jacksonville Duval
Verdier, Marcus (Agri.) Tallahassee Leon
Washington, Flora (Commercial) Tallahassee Leon
GRADUATES-SUMMER SCHOOL 1928
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Longworth, Jackson Ciphus
Thorpe, Eunice Brown *
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Madison, William
LICENTIATE OF INSTRUCTION IN EDUCATION
Allen, Vivian Hill Jordan, Rebecca Louise
Anderson, Hermia Lee Madison, Hallie Gertrude
Austin, Edith Nitabell Pearson, Lillie Gertrude
Barge, Evannah Jones Rhue, Luella Adams
Benboe, Elsie Margret Simmons, Luanna Girtha Mae
Bisson, Vera Victoria Starr, Fannie Showers
Blanks, Elsie Bryant Stewart, Ernestine Ramona
Bryant, Charlotte Hollis Spann, Albertha Alerthia
Clifton, Nella Mae Kelly Sweeting, Cloie Dingle
Coleman, Lucile Griffin Symonnette, Mizpah
Deshazior, Jeanetta Gertrude Robinson, Catherine
Fisher, Marie Taylor, Jannie Francena
Hamilton, Kittie Mae Williams, Mattie Richardson
Jackson, Effie Brookins Young, Rosa Lee
Johnson, Claudia Retoria
COMMERCIAL DIPLOMA (as of May 1928)
Davis, Hattie Mae
TAILORING DIPLOMA (as of May 1928)
Merritt, Frank
Speaker for the class.





26 FLORIDA A. s M. COLLEGE
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
Taylor, Catherine Lewis, Suwannee
Cambridge, Clarinda Nickson, Mable
Charles, Eliza Mae Reid, Emma Harley
Grambling, Ethel Speed, Nancy
Hodges, Mamie C.
i. SMITH-HUGHES CERTIFICATES
L. L. Nixon (Auto-Mechanics)
Jas. Glymph (Auto-Mechanics)
Leroy H. Holloway (Masonry)
* Speaker for the class
SUMMER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
1928
Aarons, Maxey Jasper Hamilton
Adams, Bertha Wacissa Jefferson
Adams, Maggie Tallahassee Leon
Adams, Leona Tallahassee Leon
Adams, Leonie Miami Dade
Adderley, Nettie L. Lakeland Polk
Adderson, Ola Mae Havana Gadsden
Albury, Ruth St. Petersburg Pinellas
Alexander, Mamie Dunnellon Marion
Alexander, Corine Tampa Hillsborough
Alien, Vivian Hill Jacksonville Duval
Allen, Margaret Eva Cocoa Brevard
Anderson, Ruby Crescent City Putnam
Anderson, Hermia Lee Jacksonville Duval
Anderson, Eloise Quincy Gadsden
Arrington, Ruby Tampa Hillsborough
Armstrong, Algie Tallahasse Leon
Artson, C. E- Orlando Orange
Asia, Rosa L. Palatka Putnam
Austin, Charles West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Austin, Edith Jacksonville Duval
Bailey, Maggie Lou Tallahassee Leon
Battles, Jessie Mable Chiefland Levy
Baker, Effie L. Marianna Jackson
Bassa, Nathalie Lloyd Jefferson
Barge, E. J. Pensacola Escambia
Bartley, Ruth Jacksonville : Duval
Baynes, Izora Pensacola Escambia
Belfon,. Elsie Miami Dade
Belfon, Frankie Miami Dade
Bellamy, Jeanette A. Ocala Marion
Benboe, Elsie Pensacola Escambia
Benbow, Dinah E. DeLand Volusia
Bisson, Vera Victoria Miami Dade
Blanks, Elease Tampa Hillsborough
Blue, Theo. R. Tampa Hillsborough
Bouks, Leola Tampa Hillsborough
Booker, Willie Mae St. Petersburg Pinellas
Bracewell, Hazel Quincy Gadsden
Bowers, Georgia Havana Gadsden





CATALOG, 1928-1929 27
Brown, Gertrude Pensacola Escambia
Brown, Celia E. Tallahassee Leon
Brown, Minnie Jasper Hamilton
Brown, Katie DeLand Volusia
Bronson, Uriah R. DeLand Volusia
Bryant, Charlotte Tampa Hillsborough
Bryant, Lucinda Lake Wales Polk
Bryant, Corine Orlando Orange
Bryant, Lillian Flyan West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Burney, Ethel Sanford Seminole
Butler, F. L. Ocala Marion
Butler, Ida R. West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Cambridge Clarinda West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Campbell, Leoletta Tampa Hillsborough
Campbell, Valdee Argyle Jackson
Carey, Ethel Bartow Polk
Carlton, Hattie Tallahassee Leon
Carter, Ola Anericus, Ga. Sumpter
Carter, Maggie L. Jacksonville Duval
Carter, Louise Apalachicola Franklin
Chambers, Sadie Jacksonville Duval
Charles, Eliza Mae Jacksonville Duval
Clay, Lucile Pensacola Escambia
Clifton, Nellie Miami Dade
Coleman, Lucile Jacksonville Duval
Colson, Callie Mae Winter Park Orange
Conoly, George Bay Harbor Bay
Cowan, Rhina H. Jacksonville Duval
Cooper, Annie Clermont Lake
Cooke, Harriet Pensacola Escambia
Craft, Nannie J. Jacksonville Duval
Cromartie, Margaret Orlando Orange
Crooms, Annie H. Orlando Orange
Crump, Pearl Tallahassee Leon
Dames, Marion Tallahassee Leon
Daniels, Erma Tampa Hillsborougli
Dansby, T. D. Ocala Marion
Dansby, Olive B. Ocala Marion
Daniels, Blanche Lakeland Polk
Daniels, Estelle Ocala Marion
Davis, Melissa A. Jacksonville Duval
Davis, Daisy Belle Tallahassee Leon
Davis, Beatrice Chattahoochee Gadsden
Davis, Mollie Palatka Putnam
Davis, -Dovie Tallahassee Leon
Dawkins, Lillie Estelle Jacksovivlle Duval
Dayes, Mattie F. Gainesville Alachua
Dennis, Sarah Tallahassee Leon
DeShazior, Jennetre Miami Dade
DeVaughn, Jessie V. Pensacola Escambia
Dean, Maggie Lloyd Jefferson
Donaldson, Mary Tallahassee Leon
Dudley, Jessie C. Lakeland Polk
Duncan, Essie Grenwood Jackson
Dunbar, E. L. Lakeland Polk
DuBignon, Mary Jacksonville Duval
Davis, Hattie Tampa Hillsborough





28 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Gainey, Arrie Clearwater Pinellas
Gaines, Katie St. Augustine St. John
Gainey, Irene Pensacola Escambia
Footman, Edith 'Clearwater Pinellas
Ford, Sudella Clearwater Pinellas
Foster, Ollie J. St. Petersburg Pinellas
Foster, A. J. Webster Sumpter
Fisher, M. A. Tampa Hillsborough
Fisher, Marie Deerfield Broward
Faust, Arrabelle Quincy Leon
Evans, Bessie M. Tallahassee Hillsborough
Edmunds, Mary L Odessa Gadsden
Eckles, Pauline Tallahassee Leon
Eagle, Hattie Eustis Lake
Gandy, Clem Miami Dade
Gavin, Blanche Wakulla Wakulla
Gaulding, C. L. Kissimmee Osceola
Garrett, Lillian C. Tampa Hillsborough
Gilmore, Annie Gainesville Alachua
Glover, Lorene Plant City Hillsborough
Glover, Algie Mae Tampa Hillsborough
Gordon, Carrie Lee Jacksonville Duval
Grambling, Ethel Sanford Seminole
Grover, Wm. M. Monticello Jefferson
Gray, Florence St. Petersburg Pinellas
Green, Deloca Bartow Polk
Gardner, Georgia Tallahassee Leon
Hailman, Elizabeth St. Augustine St. Johns
Hare, Annie L. Palatka Putnam
Harris, J. D. Tallahassee Leon
Hardon, Lillian Tallahassee Leon
Hart, Mildred St. Augustine St. Johns
Harville, Christine Tampa Hillsborough
Harvey, Viola Hinson Gadsden
Hartsfield, Diana Tallahassee Leon
Hall, Sula G. Ocala Marion
Hamilton, Kattie Tampa Hillsborough
Hargrett, Olive Tallahassee Leon
Hayes, Ruby B. Tallahassee Leon
Haynes, H. E. Kissimmee Osceola
Hector, C. B. Lakeland Polk
Herrera, Alice Key West Monroe
Henzie, Florence Key West Monroe
Hicks, Bella Pensacola Escambia
Hines, Margie F. Palatka Putnam
Hill, Brunetta C. Birmingham, Ala. Jefferson
Hightower, Alberta Cottondale Jackson
Holmes, Gertrude Jasper Hamilton
Howard, Ruth G. Tampa Hillsborough
Hart, Nellie St. Augustine St. Johns
Hodges, Mamie C. Jacksonville Duval
Horton, Mary G. Plant City Hillsborough
Hunter, Hayes H. Miami Dade
Hunter, Viola Tallahassee Leon
Jackson, Ruth Pensacola Escambia
Jackson, David Marianna Jackson
lames. Francis Pensacola Escambia





CATALOG, 1928-1929 29
James, Esther Mae Palatka Putnam
James, Dora Bartor Polk
Jackson, Rebecca Pensacola Escambia
Jackson, F. M. Cottondale Jackson
Jackson, E. M. Jacksonville Dubval
Jackson, Naomie Palatka Putnam
Jackson, Marie Ocala Marion
Jackson, John T. Cottondale Jackson
Johnson, F. G. Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Pearl Kissimmee Osceola
Johnson, M. A. Kissimmee Oscei!a
Johnson, Annie Glass Pompano Broward
Johnson, Claudia West Plm e alm Beach Palm Beach
Johnson, Willie Mae Jacksonville Duval
Johnson, Ruth Miami Dade
Johnson, Ethel Plant City Hil!hbArolgh
Jones, Ruth Tallahassee Leon
Jordon, Daisy Jacksonville Duval
Jordon, Rebecca Pensacola Escambil
Joyner, Ruth Plant City Hillsborough
King, Emanuel Kissimmee Osceola
King, Ondria Jacksonville Duval
Lamb Blanche Lake City Columbia
Lang, Aniece Tallahassee Leon
Lavette, Padro Jacksonville Duval
Laws, Christine Ormond Volusia
Lewis, Alphonso Leroy Orlando Orange
Lester, Susie Tampa Hillsborough
Lewis, Claude Tampa Hillsborough
Leonard, Mable Lloyd Jefferson
Long, Eulalia Lois Pensacola Escambia
Lewis, Suwannee Tallahassee Leon
Lightbourne, Marjorie Tampa Hillsborough
Livingston, Celestine Tallahassee Leon
Longworth, J. C. Bartow Polk
Love, Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Lucas, Mary Lakeland Polk
Lovett, Inez West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Madison, Hallie G. Jacksonville Duval
Maple, Frances Ocala Marion
Madison, William Jacksonville Duval
Mathews, Ruth Tallahassee Leon
Manigalt, Estella Jacksonville Duval
Menchon, Lucene Florence Villa Sebring
Meadows, Lettic Highland Polk
Merritt, Frank Marianna Jackson
Mitchel, Alma West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Mimms, J. E. Ft. Meyers Lee
Murray, Richard J. Jacksonville Duval
Mullin, Leroy O'Brien Suwannee
Mobley, Prudence Leesburg Lake
Moore, C. A. Gifford Indian River
Moore, Cornelia Citra Marion
Moore, Maggie N Pensacola Escambia
Moore, M. Benetha Jacksonville Duval
Morehead, Christine Jacksonville Duval
Morgan, Rosa St. Augustine St. Johns





so FLORIDA A. ? M. COLLEGE
Mosely, Carolyn I oyd Jefferson
Meyers, Estelle Marie Lakeland Polk
McBride, Emma Eustis ,Lake
McBride, Anna Fort Meade Polk
McCall, Sarah Warcissa Jefferson
McCall, Kathleen Palatka St. Johns
McCray, Alice St. Augustine Escambia
McFarland, Artie Pensacola Dade
McKinnon, Mary Miami Walton
McKee, Golie Lang DeFuniak Lake
McKinney, Bernice, Fruitland Park Jefferson
McPhaul, E. B. Aucilla Polk
Malloy, Carrie L. Lakeland Putnam
Nearn, Bertha Lakeland Polk
Nickson, Mable Homeland Polk
Nix, Masue Pensacola Escambia
Nimmons, Lucile Plant City Hillsborough
North, Ruth Wm. Miami Dade
Oliver, Mary Ocala Marion
Payne, M. E. Jacksonville Duval
Patterson, Ida E. New Smyrna Volusia
Perry, Annie L. Tallahassee Leon
Pete, Susie Pensacola Duval
Pearson, Lillie Mae Jacksonville Escambia
Pickens, Hortense Pensacola Escambia
Pinkney, Sara G. St. Petersburg Pinellas
Pierce, Marie Louise St. Petersburg Pinellas
Pickens, Verdella Pcnsacola Escambia
Potts, Elvan St. Petersburg Pinellas
Powell, Bertha M. Deerfield Broward
Prince, Bessie Johnson Jacksonville Duval
Primous, Sadie Deerfield Brevard
Rainey, Bennie Lakeland Polk
Rainey, Bennie Pensacola Escambia
Roberts, Minnie M. Deerfield Brevard
Richard, Pearline West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Rhoulac, Katie Chipley Washington
Rhoulac, Eliza Chipley Washington W
Russ, Pearl Mills New Smyrna Volusia
Reid, Fannie B. Sanford Seminole
Reaves, C. S. Ocala Marion
Reed, Sallie R. Tallahassee Leon
Robinson, Katherine Jacksonville Duval
Robinson, Custaria Ft. Pierce Ft. Pierce
Reid, Emma Pensacola Escambia
Rozier, Nellie Sanford Seminole
Reddick, M E. St. Augustine St. Johns
Rolf, Willie Mae Ft. Meyers Lee
Rollins, Emma G. Tallahassee Leon
Roberts, Marie Miami Dade
Robinson, Mamie Bartow Polk
Rutland, Rosa C. Reddick Marion
Robinson, Bessie L. Tallahassee Leon
Rhue, Luella E. Jacksonville Duval
Richardson, Sophia Jacksonville Duval
Reeves, Nellie Pensacola Escambia
Small, Carrie Tallahasse Leon





CATALOG, 1928-1929 31
Sampson, Clara Tallahasse Leon
Saunders, Charlie Mae Tampa Hillsborough
Scurry, Marina Florahome Putnam
Simmons, G. M. Jacksonville Duval
Sims, Ruth Havana Gadsden
Simms, Valerio Mims Broward
Simms, Carrie Pensacola Escambia
Sherman, Elizabeth Tallahassee Leon
Spann, Albertha Pensacola Escambia
Speed, Willie L. Lloyd Jeffersa*
Speed, Nancy Clearwater Pinellas
Speed, Willie Miami Dade
Starks, Frances Jacksonville Duval
Starr, Fannie Homstead Dade
Stone, Maude L. Melbourne Brevard
Stephenson, Edna L. Kissimmee Osceola
Stewart, Ernestine Orlando Marion
Stroud, Doretha Tampa Hillsborough
Strictland, Louise Pompano Brevard
Sutton, Lillian Mae Miami Dade
Sunday, Idella Pensacola Escambia
Sutton, Effie Miami Dade
Sowell, K. Luretta Jacksonville' Duval
Scrivens, Elsie Tampa Hillsborough
Smith, Susie Tallahassee Leon
Smith, Mamie West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Smith, Jessie E. Tampa Hillsborough
Sweeting, Cloie D. Miami Dade
Symonette, Mizpah Miami Dade
Sneed, Daisy Tallahassee Leon
Thweat, H. H. Miami Dade
Thomas, Marion Tallahassee Leon
Thomas, Emporian Daytona Beach Volusia
Thomas, Vera Havana Gadsden
Thomas, Lola Tallahassee Leon
Taylor, Catherine High Springs Volusia
Twine, Alease Tallahassee Leon
Thompson, Emily A. West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Thompson, Ella G. City Point Palm Beach
Thompson, Ruby Jacksonville Duval
Thorpe, Eunice Ocala Marion
Thompson, Panchita West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Taylor, J. F. Fernandina Nassau
Taylor, Sallie Bartow Polk
hfIlnr. Dollie Daytona Beach Volusia
Tansill, Josephine Jacksonville Duval
Taylor, Phoebe Tallahassee Leon
Vaught, Gertrude Ocala Marion
Williams, Mattie L. Lakeland Polk
Williams, Mattie R. Jacksonville Duval
Waters, Janie St. Petersburg Pinellas
Williams, Cassie E. Tallahassee Leon
Welch, Marie St. Augustine St. Johns
Whittaker, Mary Ann Tallahassee Leon
Whigum, Cornette Bayhead Santa Rosa
Williams, Geneva Jacksonville Duval
Weston, Lula B. West Palm Beach Palm Beach





32 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
Walker, Elnora Tallahassee Leon
Wiggins, Lucinda Palatka Putnam
Williams, Katie L. West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Walker, Effie Pensacola Escambia
Williams, Emma Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Fannie Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Bessie E. Pensacola Escambia
Watson, Jewel Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Maggie T. Tampa Hillsborough
Willis, Marie Tallahasse Leon
Washington, Julia Palatka Putnam
Ward, Eva Lee Miami Dade
Williams, Caroline Gainesville Alachua
Washington, M. F. Miami Dade
Watson, Willie L. Pensacola Escambia
Watkins, Bernice Sarasota Sarasota
Williams, Gussie L Lakeland Polk
Williams, Mable Waycross, Ga.
Worthy, Etta Lloyd Jefferson
West, Linna Tampa Hillsborough
Wilson, Lucy Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Ruth Pensacola Escambia
Wilson, Rosa A. Tallahassee Leon
Wilson, Dora Bartow Polk
Williams, Rosa Tallahassee Leon
Wilson, Lottie Tallahassee Leon
Wilson, Rosa Jasper Hamilton
Williams, Ponce DeLone DeLand Volusia
Young, Odessa DeLand Volusia
Young, Catherine Palatka Putnam
Young, Rosa Lee Jacksonville Duval
Young, Lillie Belle Tampa Hillsborough
Glover, Boysie Plant City Hillsborough
GENERAL SUMMARY
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Class Male Female Total
Seniors ----- 3 5 8
Juniors 10 1 11
Sophomores .- --.-------. 12 4 16
Freshmen -. .-;----- 29 19 48
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
Senior Normal Education__ -- 1 10 11
Junior Normal Education_---- 0 15 15
Senior Normal Home Ecnomics 0 3 3
Junior Normal Home Economics 0 15 15
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
Senior Normal Commercial 0 3 3
Junior Normal Commercial 1 3 4
Ii





CATALOG, 1928-1929 33
NURSE TRAINING DEPARTMENT
Senior Nurse ._____-_...... 0 2 2
Junior Nurse -_---- 0 2 2
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Senior High III _--------- 23 30 53
Senior High II______ 31 43 74
Senior High I---- 17 25 42
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
Junior High III _---_ ----- 17 19 36
Junior High II .. ___ .._ 3 17 20
Junior High I -__- -_ -_- --- 6 12 18
Night School Students ___--- 18 18
Special Students _-___ 3 2 5
TOTAL ENROLLMENT FOR 1928-1929
Winter School __--- -----______________________ 403
Children's School -_ 1_..... ...._._.... __ 154
Correspondence and Extension __- --_______. .....----_ __ 263
Summer School 1928 _-_------ --3_____.____________ 363
Total __--___- 1183





BULLETIN 1929--1930
I





CALENDAR
1929-Sept. 22, Sunday, Boarding Department Opens.
Sept. 24, Tuesday, Enrollment and Classitmcaton.
Sept. 25, Wednesday, Enrollment and Classification.
Sept. 26, Thursday, First Semester Begins.
Nov. 28, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day.
Dec. 21, Saturday, Christmas Vacation Begins.
1930-Jan. 2, Thursday, Christmas Vacation Ends.
Jan. 21-24, Tuesday-Friday, First Semester Examinations.
Jan. 27, Monday, Second Semester Begins.
Mar. 5-6, Wednesday-Thursday, Leon County Boys and Girls
Meeting.
April 18, Friday, Declamatory Contest (High School).
May 2, Friday, Oratorical Contest (College).
May 12, Monday, National Hospital Day.
May 20-23, Tuesday-Friday, Second Semester Examinations.
May 25, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon.
May 26, Monday, Home Economics Day.
May 26, Monday, Annual Music Recital.
May 27, Tuesday, Alumni Day.
May 27, Tuesday, Physical Training Exhibition.
May 28, Wednesday, Class Day.
May 28, Wednesday, Class Play.
May 29, Thursday, Commencement.
June 9, Monday, Summer School Begins.
July 31, Thursday, Summer School Closes.
36





FACULTY-1929-1930
J. R. E. LEE
President
A.B., A.M., Bishop College; LL.D., Wilberforce University; Graduate Work,
University of Chicago, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota.
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
R. O'HARA LANBER
Dean of College of Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Education
A.B., Lincoln University, (Penna.); A.M., Leland Stanford Junior University;
Summer Work, Columbia University.
A. L. KIDD
Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sciences; Head Department, Political and
Social Sciences
A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Columbia University; Special Work,
University of Pittsburg.
C. A. BACOTE
Head, Department of History
A.B., University of Kansas; A.M., University of Chicago
B. P. CHISM
College Science, Chemistry, and Physics
B.S., Howard University; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
GEORGE DECOURSEY
Director, Commercial Department; Bookkeeping, Accounting, Economics
B.S., Hampton Institute
H. M. EFFERSON
Head, Department of Mathematics
A.B., Atlanta University; A.M., Columbia University; Summer Work, University
of Minnesota.
M. A. LEE
Head, Department of English
A.B., Morehouse College; Ph.B., University of Chicago; A.M., University of Chicago
A. P. TURNER
Chaplain, Public Speaking, Moral and Religious Education, Instructor in High
School English.
A.B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
E. EARL WARE
College Biology
B.S., Bates College, (Maine)
JOSEPH REASON
Modern Languages
A.B., New Orleans University; Graduate Work, Ohio University
For additional instructors in Education see Normal School.
37
i-1 *





38 FLORIDA A. X M. COLLEGE
THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
B. L. PERRY
Dean, Agricultural Department
Tuskegee Institute; Special Study, Iowa State College
J. C. BI )\-WIN5
Agronomy.
B.S.,-Florida A. and- M. College
. CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University; Cornell University; .Michigan Agricultural College
LASALLE D. LEFFALL
Vocational Agriculture
B.S., Iowa State College; Graduate Work, Iowa State College
L. A. MARSHALL
Teacher Training and Science
B.Sc. Agriculture, Prairie View College; B.Sc. Agriculture, Iowa State College;
Graduate Work, Iowa State College.
J. E. SANFORD
Poultry
Hampton Institute
A. A. TURNER
State Farm Demonstration Agent for Men
Ohio State University
JULIA MILLER
State Demonstration Agent for Women
Tuskegee Institute
THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
*ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean, Home Economics Department
B.S., Bishop College; B.S., Simmons College, (Boston)
MARGARET COLLINS
Acting Dean, Home Economics Department
B.S., Michigan State College
I. L. COLEMAN
High School Domestic Science
Spellman College; Special Work, Columbia University
MARIE F. MCMILLAN
Plain Sewing
B.S., FloridaA. and M. College; Special Work, Hampton Institute
11i





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 39
C. B. NELSON
Domestic Science
Wiiberforce University; Special Work, Hampton Institute
ORA VANN
Handicrafts
Tuskegee Institute
THE SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
J. B. BRAGG
Dean, Mechanic Arts Department
Tuskegee Institute; A.B., Talladega
JAMES D. TAYLOR
Assistant Dean, Mechanic Arts Department, Mechanical and Architectural Drawing
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
CHAS. C. HAYLING
Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
Z. R. HERKEY
Engineering i`WaPnmbiug
Tuskepe Institute
WALTER H. HOLLINS
Assistant, Printing
A. and M. College, (Normal, Ala.)
B. F. HOLMES, JR.
Carpentry
Hampton Institute
EDWARD JONES
Instructor in Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute, Virginia
A. C. PHILLIPS
Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute; Summer Work, Hampton Institute
W. T. REED
Auto Mechanics
Hampton Institute; Special Course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago.
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY
Printing
A. and M. College, (Normal, Ala.); Special Course, Mergenthaler Linotype School,
Chicago.
S. L. THORPE
Electrical Engineering
Tuskegee Institute
,;





40 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
THE NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL AND SCHOOL OF
SJEALTH
t L. H. B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
B.S., M D.. Howard University
(AA. M. FOOTE
Nurse
R.N., Freednen's Hospital, Howard University
LULA R. LONG, R.N.?
SnPaanl nd,-,t of Nurses
Blue Ridge Hospital, Asheville, N. C.
THE NORMAL SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND
DEMONSTRATION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
*E. E. MATTHEWS
Supervising Principal, Practice School
B.S., Howard University
MALISSA SYDES
Acting Supervising Principal, Practice School
B.S., in Elementary Education, Columbia University
IRENE ANDERSON
Teacher, Practice School
Florida A. and M.' College (Normal Department) Study, Hampton Institute
DOROTHY GUNN-HOLMES
Critic Teacher, Third and Fourth Grades
Hampton Institute; Study, Hampton Institute
AMY JACKSON
Teacher Practice School, Kindergarten Methods; Critic Teacher First and Second
Grades.
Florida A. & M. College (Normal Department)
C. B. NASBY
Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing, Public School Art
George R. Smith College; Chicago Art School
A. S. PRATER-STEWART
Physical Education for Girls; Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman; Hampton Institute; Florida A. and M. College
WINIPn.D -LUCILE BATES
Assistant, Physical Education for Girls, Physiology and Hygiene
B.S.E., Florida A, and M. College
JENNIE E. BAKER
Librarian
A.B., Atlanta University; B.Sc., Library, Hampton Institue
* Leave of absence year 1929-1930.





. BULLETIN, 1929-1930 41
E. C. WEARE
;i_~ -~ ~~'Assistant Librarian
- Washburn College; Student, Syracuse University
Other instructors in Normal Department are listed under College
of Arts and Sciences and School of Education.
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
GEORGE DECOURSEY
Director, Commercial Department, Bookkeeping, Accounting, Economics
B.S., Hampton Institute
CLYDE M. BRADFORD
Sborth-ind, Typewriting, Business English
Florida A. and M. College; Special Work, Columbia University
HIGH SCHOOL OR DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL
G. T. WIGGINS
Principal of Senior High School; Instructor in Languages and Mathematics, and
Director of Teacher Extension Work.
A.B., Syracuse
D. MARTYN-DOW
High School Science
B.S., Victoria College (London); B.S., Wilberforce University
T. E. LANG
Junior High School Mathematics and English
Florida A. and M. College
E. F. MANCE
High School Mathematics
B.S., Howard University; Summer Study, Columbia University
A. S. PARKS
Principal Junior High School, Instructor, Social Science
B.S., Indiana State Normal College, Terra Haute, Ind.
J. M. RABOUIN-PHILLIPS
English
A.B., University of California; B.A. Education, Florida A. and M. College
MUSIC DEPARTMENT-PIANO AND VOICE
F. E. JAMES
Public School Music, Director Choral and Glee Clubs
A.B., Wiley. University
J. V. A. COLLINS
Vocal and Instrumental Music
A.B., Bishop College; New England Conservatory; Mus.B., Bishop College Music





42 FLORIDA A, e; M COLLEGE
BAND AND ORCHESTRA
CAPT. W. CAREY THOMAS
Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant
Tuskegee Institute
W. McKINLEY KING
Coach, Assistant to Commandant, Instructor Agricultural Department
B.S., Hampton Institute
A. D. PADDYFOTE
Matron, Men's Building
Allen University
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT
N. S. MCGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute
E. O. PAIGE
Matron, Clarke Hall
Vienna Millinery and Tailoring School, N. Y.; Chicago Academy of Fine Arts,
Columbia University.
L. F. CURRY
Matron, Tucker Hall
Clark University
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Lodge
Claflin College
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
Business Manager, Custodian of Property
A.B., Lincoln University (Penna.)
JAMES H. BLOW
Bookkeeper
Hampton Institute; School of Commerce, Wilberforce University
IVA HILL-BALDWIN
Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier
Tuskegee Institute





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 4}
A. C. BRECKENIDDGE
Secretary to President
Wilberforce University
CASTELLA A. DANIELS
la Charge Student Accounts
Florida A. and M. College
LoLLIE M. FLEMING
Registrar
B.S, Florida A. and M. College
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Hampton Institute; Secretarial School, New York
R. HILDA JONES
Secretary to Business Manager
Gregg Business College, Chicago
GEORGIA U. WILLIAMS
Clerk and Post Mistress
Business Department, Florida A. and M. College
D. E. HARVEY
Assistant Dietitian, Matron, Dining Hall
A M. Roger Williams University; Special Work, Temple University
M. ARMAND JONES
In Charge Administration Building
Atlanta University
L. F. REED
In Charge Cafeteria
Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute
S. R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary
MAYME E. THOMAS
In Charge Laundry
Selden Institute (Brunswick, Georgia)
ADDENDA
COLIEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
THELMA M. WETHERS
Professor of English and Public Speaking
A.B, Fisk University; A.M, Columbia University





44 FLORIDA A. L4 M. COLLEGE
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORICAL STATEMENT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the College
was established in 1887 as a State Normal School. Under the prin-
cipalship of Mr. T. D. Tucker, assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was
opened at Tallahassee, October 5, 1887, with an attendance of 15
students. In 1891 the College moved to its present site. In 1905
it passed from the direct management of the State Board of Education
to the management of he Board of Control as one of the institutions of
higher learning. In 1909 its name was changed to that of The
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legis-
lature. It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropriation.
LOCATION
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is located in
Tallahassee, Florida, an educational and industrial center with a popu-
lation of nearly six thousand five hundred. It is about one hundred
seventy-two miles from Jacksonville and about two hundred miles
from Pensacola.
Situated at the Northern border of the state at what is stated
to be the highest point in the state, excessive humidity is seldom
experienced and the climate is bracing.
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The College Campus is a tract of land about 2 50 acres, part of
which now is included within the city limits of Tallahassee. This
tract is about a quarter of a mile from the depot and a mile from the
center of the city on a hill overlooking the city of Tallahassee.
The fifteen (15) main buildings on the campus are as follows:
the Y. M. C. A. Building, The Band Cottage, Tucker Hall, Clark Hall,
Melvin Lodge, and the Girls New Dormitory used as-student dormi-
tories; Mebane and Gwyn Cottage used as women and men teacher
cottages respectively; The Library, containing library facilities; The
Dining Hall, accommodating four hundred (400) students and seventy
(70) teachers; the Cafeteria, containing a lunch room and book room;
the Home Economics Building, housing the girls' industries; the Me-
chanic Arts Building, housing the boys' industries; the Agricultural
Building, the headquarters of the agricultural department and used
for classroom instruction; the Science Building, containing the office
of the Principal of the High School and all science classes are taught
here; the Junior High School Building, containing classroom facilities
for the secondary grades; the Childern's House, facilities for the ele-
mentary grades; the Dairy Barn, providing facilities for the dairy divi-





-;i .BULLETIN, 1929-1930 45
sicn of the agricultural department; the Hospital, providing facilities
for the treatment of students,
The New Administration Building, which is completed, contains the
following offices: The Book Store; offices of the Business Manager,
Cashier, Post Office, Dean and Registrar, President, eleven classrooms
for college classes, an Auditorium and chapel with a seating capacity
of 1600, Music practice rooms, 6 private Seminar rooms for advanced
classes and offices of heads of departments in college.
In addition to these main buildings, provision was also made for
completing our new Dining Hall, New Science Building, Mechanic Arts
Building and a Sewerage and Water System. Most of this has been
completed but there yet remains the Mechanic Arts Building to be
completed and the Dining Hall extension.
The Legislature of 1927 made provision for the erection of a boys'
dormitory (brick) to cost $100,000. This building is now under
construction.
PURPOSE
The primary aim of the College is to prepare teachers for the
colored public schools of the State and training to those who plan to
enter professional fields. Knowledge of the subjects to be taught and
skill in the technique of teaching are among the chief objectives striven
for.
Professional training is afforded by college courses in education, agri-
culture, trades and industries, and home economics and by two- years
of normal-school work. Practice teaching in the Practice School is
required of all students in the college and in the normal school that
they may try out in actual work their ability to apply the theories
studied in the various professional subjects.
PRESIDENTS
T. D. Tucker 1887 to 1901.
N. B. Young 1901 to 1923.
W. H. A. Howard 1923 to 1924.
J. R. E. Lee 1924-.
ADMISSION
Students are admitted to The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College from the following accredited high schools in the state with-
out conditions:
Lincoln High School, Gainesville, Fla.; Booker T. Washington,
Miami, Fla.; Stanton High School, Jacksonville, Fla.; Washington
High School, Pensacola, Fla.; Lincoln High School, Tallahassee, Fla.;
Howard&Academy, Ocala, Fla.; Central Academy, Palatka, Fla.; Lin-
coln Park Academy, Ft. Pierce, Fla.; Edward Waters College, Jackson-
ville, Fla





46 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Students are admitted to The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College upon the basis of the following:
1. Record from high school. 2. Recommendations. 3. Letter
concerning personal qualities, such as character. 4. Aptitude Test.
5. Physical and Medical Examination. General entrance must be
upon, (1) certificate, or, (2) examination.
RATING OF COLLEGE BY OTHER STATES
The State of Georgia gives to our graduates the same rating that
is given to graduates of schools in Georgia. The type of certificate
granted is the equivalent of a Graduate State.
The State of North Carolina has recently rated the college as "B"
class issuing three-year credit on North Carolina Certificate and class
"B" certificates from the college course and one year credit to Normal
graduates.
The high school department is accredited by the State Department
of Education.
CREDIT FOR WORK DONE IN OTHER SCHOOLS
Applicants who have done work for which they wish to receive
credit should state this fact when they apply for admission. Classifi-
cation based on such work will be provisional only, depending on the
quality of work done during the first year at Florida A. & M. College.
In no case can any request for work done elsewhere be considered
unless presented during the first year. The college authorities reserve
the right, in case of error, or for other sufficient cause, to revise at a
later date, either up or down, the rating given any student at
entrance.
ADVANCED STANDING
Students coming from other colleges will receive credit as follows:
Class A colleges, credit for credit; class B colleges two-thirds credit;
class C colleges, one-third credit. No credit accepted from class D
colleges
MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIRED
One year of minimum residence is required of all. This means
continuous residence.
SPECIFIC ENTRANCE REQUIREMENT TO COLLEGE
Minimum of 16 units without condition.
Minimum of 15 units with condition.
Required:
4 years English _---._.-__.--___.---.- -----__ __ --. -3 units
2 years Ancient or Modern Language _---- --_ -_ --.--- .2
2 years of Science -_ --____________________ __ ----2
3 years of Mathematics_____ 3





BULLETIN, 1923-1930 47
Industries, Agriculture --_...... ........_----._____-__- 1
Music and Physical Education ---_----. ----____________. ./2
Social Science -_..1.______________............. 1
Free Electives _- -----------------___ ...... ......---___. 3 /2
?F; ~Total ---------._________. ----16 units
[ SPECIFIC DEPARTMENTAL ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
s For Entrance to Home Economics, 1 unit of Home Economics.
For Entrance to Mechanic Arts, 1 unit Trade Mechanical Drawing.
, For Entrance to Agriculture, 1 unit General Agriculture.
For Entrance to Bachelor of Arts, 2 units of High School Latin,
. 3 units High School Social Science, 4 units High School Mathematics.
y For Entrance Bachelor of Science, 3 units High School Science,
2 units Modern Language.
- .For Entrance Bachelor of Science Education sanme as BS.
}i~- ~ REGISTRATION
The first day of the academic year and of the. Summer Session are
- devoted to the registration of programs of study. Second semester
registration is held for college students taking on semester subjects
or those desiring additional work for the second semester.
Failure to register on the days designated is penalized, in the case
of winter students, by a fine of one dollar for first week, and $1.00 each
week thereafter, (additional).
If ~- ~ TUITION AND FEES
Registration fee, per year -_ .__-. --__- __--.-.- __---.-.- $ 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year ..-_ _._.. ...._ ------..--..___ 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year --_---_-__---- -_---___.--_ 2.00
Breakage fee, per year ---_ _- .. ........._ .----._ ..-- -... .__ -_..-----. 1.00
Athletic fee, per year -__ .. ............_..................__... (7.00
Science. fee --_-----_-- __...-- - /-1.50
Total entrance fee __-__-..... ---------__ ----_ $1 5.50
Tuition fee for out-of-State students, per year.._ ..___ -.-.___.._.. ___. $20.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional, each week late.
EXPENSES FOR BOYS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month,
- $16.00; 8 months -----__ __ __- ---- $128.00
Laundering, etc., per month, 8 months .___----__ -.___ ._. .__ ._ ._ 16.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day, while sick in addition to board__ ___. .._ 1.00
Books --_- -- __ -_ ___---- -_------------------ -__-----._ 10.00
* Uniform __-- _--...----_____._-_..- ._.._ ._._._ 20.00
Registration fee, per year -.....-_ ___.__._--__. ..__ 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per month) -__._ .___ 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year__.__ --__ 2.00
Breakage fee, per year_ _----___ __... ___._.____ __ 1.00
A Athletic fee, per year_ -_ ---- -___ __--.0___ _._____ 7.00





48 FLORIDA A. s M. COLLEGE
Science fee --- -_- --- ----- ... _-_._.---- .---__-- 1.50
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-State boys .__ -_ _._- 190.50
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year --.. ..._ ---.-----_____- 2Q.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State boys, per year -_- -... -._ .-_-_... .. $211.00
EXPENSES FOR GIRLS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month;
$16.00; 8 months ..---- ---. -. --__ $128.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day'while sick, in addition to board ..__....------- 1.00
Registration fee, per year- .-----.------......--..------. .... 2.00
Resident physician's service for the.year (25c per month) __ ._.._- _-.. --_ 2.00
Entertainment fee, (25c per month) per year --_ .... ..._ -- -._ 2.00
Breakage fee, per year .....__.. .... ..._....... -------------_------ __ 1.00
Athletic fee, per year -_-__. ..: -----------__- .----__ 7.00
Science fee -- ................- -__ ___ -__ _.--- -----.... ---- 1.50
"*Books .----__-. ...... .--__-.- __.__ __- .._ 10.00
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-Stite girls --_-..... _-. __- 153.00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year .__---._....._ ......_. 20.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State girls, per year---......---..... $174.50
PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable not later than the fifth of each month. In all
cases where students have not paid their bills by the fifth of the month
they-will be required to give up school and do such work as the school
may assign them until the bills are paid. During the time they are
out of school for non-payment of bills, the work which they will do
will pay only their board for that time.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances for stu-
dents, to send money by postal money order, express money order or
registered letter direct to the President. He will not be responsible
for money sent to students.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The regulations of the college are few and simple, appealing to the
student's self-respect and personal responsibility. Punishment is by
demerits, as follows: Five demerits make one warning, or mark; ten
demerits, two warnings or marks; fifteen demerits in any one session
make a student liable to suspension. Suspended students may be re-
instated by the Executive Committee or by the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be withdrawn must
be made to the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry. Clothing
must be marked with indelible ink.
*The young men's uniforms are made of blue serge. A suit of uniform includ-
ing cap for High School students, cost $20.00, for college students, $25.55 and for
students of the Band, $26.00. The uniforms are made in the college Tailor Shop.
Payment for a uniform suit is required for matriculation of a young man.
** Approximately.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 49
RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian. In addi-
tion to the daily devotion, mid-week prayer service, Sunday School,
Sunday preaching, Vesper services and Bible study courses, there are
active Young Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Chris-
tian Association. The Chaplain of the College preaches every Sunday
at 11 o'clock.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
ATHEANEUM LITERARY SOCIETY
This is a college organization confined to the women on the campus.
Its purposes are to create greater enthusiasm in dramatics and reading;
to promote higher scholastic standing; to support firmly law and
order on the campus, and to develop moral character in pure woman-
hood.
COLLEGE LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY
*: This organization was established in October 1927, at the suggestion
of President J. R. E. Lee. The purpose of this organization is the
cultivation of a better appreciation for literature and art, in order
that students might better prepare themselves for service in their
respective communities.
HIGH SCHOOL LITERARY SOCIETIES
The Senior and the Junior High School each has its own literary
society. These organizations function in much the same manner as
the college literary society, confining, of course, their membership to
the Senior and Junior High School classes. They meet regularly under
the sponsorship of certain teachers who direct their efforts in the
proper channels. The English Department is held largely responsible
for the successful conduction of the literary societies. The Senior
High School society is known as the R. O'Hara Lanier Literary
Society.
PUBLICATIONS
The College Arms, the paper of the students and the alumni, pub-
lished monthly by the students,
The Weekly News, a paper published weekly, edited by the 1928-
1929 Freshman class and published by the college.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL
The student council is an organization composed of college students
*who put forth every effort to assist the administration in whatever
way possible for the welfare of the college.





50 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
It has the following representation from the college department:
3 seniors, 2 juniors, 1 sophomore, 1 freshman.
THE BAND
There is a band and orchestra composed of students of the college.
Connected with the band is a very recently organized girls' bugle
corps and girls' band. These organizations are assets to the college.
THE Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A.
These two associations seek to keep alive the Christian life among
the young men and women by promoting voluntary Bible study, by
stimulating attendance upon prayer meetings, andl by discussing
questions that relate to every day life.
COLLEGE WITS
This is a college organization confined to the men of the College
Department. It was established in 1913 under the sponsorship of
E. B. Jones, B.S., M.S. (deceased).
The direct purpose for the formation of this organization was the
raising of the standard of scholarship, fostering a more genuine college
spirit and promoting the general welfare of the college. Its activities
encompass the literary, scientific and athletic fields.
THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB
This club includes all of the young women who are enrolled in the
college and normal curricula for teaching home economics. It aims
to study and discuss such questions as pertain to the teaching of home
economics and to professional home making.
SELF HELP
An opportunity is given to a limited number of students to work
a part of their way through the Institution. Night students will
be given work all day and assigned to two recitation periods at night.
All night students on entering will be required to pay the registra-
tion fee and uniform (boys), and will be subject to the same disci-
pline and regulation and will be accepted on the same basis of
academic preparation as the other students. Application for this privi-
lege must be made in writing and accepted before arrival. Money
thus earned will be applied to the boarding account of the student.
GYMNASIUM C6STUME
(1) Pair Black Sateen Bloomers.
(2) Solid Blue Long Sleeves Middies.
(2) Pairs of Black Cotton Hose.
(1) Pair of all white High Top Tennis Shoes.
(1) Black Sailors Tie.
ATHLETIC REGULATIONS
All athletic activities and teams are under direct management of a





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 51
governing board, consisting of Faculty and Student members. The
student members of this board are elected by the members of the ath-
letic association, which comprises the entire student body.
1. No student with an average grade below "70" or "C" may
participate in any major athletics until the removal of such standing
or condition.
2. No student may wear upon the campus the letter or athletic
insignia of another institution.
3. A "letter man" is one who participates in the majority of the
major games, including the "Thanksgiving Classic."
4. Any student who fractures a major rule may be expelled from the
squad, at the direction of the coaches.
5. No cursing or use of foul and abusive language will be tolerated.
6. No student will be allowed to use tobacco in any form while
participating in the Major sports.
7. Only students who have won the Varsity "F" may wear the
same on any sweater or coat.
8. "Letter students" transferring from schools will not be allowed
to participate in major athletics until after a year's residence.
UNIFORMS
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or blue serge,
and with cap cost $20.00.
These uniforms are made in the College shop. Payment for uni-
form is required for matriculation of a young man. The regulation
is uniform suits, caps.
GENERAL LIST FOR ALL STUDENTS
(SUGGESTED ARTICLES FOR STUDENTS TO BRING)
6 Table Napkins
4 Sheets
4 Pillow Cases 2 Bed Spreads
6 Towels 1 Bible
2 Blankets 1 Bottle Indelible Ink
2 Scarfs for Dressers 1 Dictionary
Raincoat 1 Rug small
GIRL'S LIST
1 Navy Blue Coat Suit 1 Raincoat
2 Navy Blue Wash Dresses 1 Umbrella
3 White Uniform Blouses (long sleeves) 3 Navy Blue Dress Skirts (3)
1 pair Rubbers pleated or plain
3 Laundry Bags 6 Middies (all white, long sleeves)
3 White Voile Social Blouses Bloomers
MILITARY DRILL
All young men of the college are under military discipline; they are
members of the school battalion. With the exception of the Comman-
dant all the officers of the battalion are drawn from the student body.





52 FLORIDA A. F M. COLLEGE
and are promoted from year to year as vacancies occur. Setting-up
exercises and military drill will be conducted under the regulations
prescribed by the Commandant.
In May of each year the several companies hold a competitive drill.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Board and room including lights and fuel, per month
$16.00; S months -------- .--..... ....._... $12S.00
Laundering etc., for boys (per month $2.00) S months .-_ .. .....16.00
BOYS' LIST
Negligee Shirts Pajamas
White Collars Underclothing sufficient for three weeks
Laundry Bag Comb, Brush, Toothbrush
Pair Overalls I Shoe Polishing Outfit
THE BOOK STORE
The book store is operated through the office of the business manager.
Books and articles of general need and use of students are sold here.
It is located in the Administration building.
THE CAFETERIA
There is a cafeteria where light refreshments and me Is to order may
be secured at a nominal cost.
PHYSICAL EDUCATAION
GENERAL STATEMENT-
All students are required to take some phase of Physical Education,
a minimum of two hours per week. This may be directed physical
activities or recreation.
MILITARY CALISTHENICS AND SCIENCE
Young men do two hours per week in military science which is
considered a part of the requirement in Physical Education for men,
THE SUMMER SCHOOL
One of the regular School Publications and Bulletins is devoted to
the announcement of the Summer School Courses and Program for
teachers. The summer school is operated for teachers. Regular
winter students are not allowed to attend. This allows a chance for
distinct professional work. It is divided into two distinct divisions--
high school and college.
REMOVAL OF CONDITIONS
All conditions, a grade of D, incurred by students must be removed
by students before one year of date after they have been made. If it is
not removed in one year's time, the D becomes an F. A condition can
be removed by class work or EXAMINATION. An F must be re-
moved by class work, repeating the subject.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 53
T- ITHE HERBART-PESTALOZZI SOCIETY
',' An organization composed of students taking courses in Education,
Educational Methods, Educational Psychology, Practice Teaching and
- the general theory of Education. It meets twice a month. The pur-
pose is to stimulate interest in the general field of Education and
i 'teacher training and keep alive the principles enunciated by the great
- teachers, Pestalozzi and Herbart.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
One hundred twenty-four hours are required for college graduation.
.Four of which may be in Physical Education and Military Science.
ENGLISH REQUIREMENT-No person will be graduated who
e does not pass comprehensive English Vocabulary and Grammar usage
F-composition test. Positively no person will be graduated who is
'deficient in English regardless of the satisfaction of quantitative re-
quirements.
MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A major consists of 30-36 semester hours taken in one subject or
group of subjects. A minor consists of from 15 to 18 semester hours
of some one subject.
SELECTION OF MAJOR AND MINOR
Students must select some one major and a minor before the end
of the sophomore year. There can be no changes of major and minor
after sophomore year or second year of college.
COLLEGE CUT SYSTEM
The cut system means that in all classes students have allowable
absences before credit is deducted for poor attendance.
ollow half credit no credit
hour course one cut 2 cuts 4 cuts
hour course 2 cuts 4 cuts 8 cuts
3 hour course 3 cuts 6 cuts 12 cuts
4 hour course 4 cuts 8 cuts 16 cuts
5 hour course S cuts 10 cuts 20 cuts
6 hour course 6 cuts 12 cuts 24 cuts
UNIT OF CREDIT
COLLEGE-The unit of College Credit is the Semester Hour. Any
subject taken once per week for 16 or 18 weeks carries 1 semester hour
f credit. Laboratory, Art, Home Economics, Industries and Physi-
al Education, Military Science, Agricultural Field and Laboratory
courses must operate two hours per week or 1 double period for one
ester hour of College Credit.
)e~Ss~;must operate two hours per week or l double period /or one~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





54 FLORIDA A. te M. COLLEGE
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT-See High School Division.
GRADES AND MARKS
The system of grades and marks in the college is the alphabetical
system. A, 90-100; B, 80-89; C, 70-79. No credit for grades
below C. Condition, D, 60-69 and below; F, 60-59 and below.
I, incomplete; W, withdrawal.
Plus added, equals extraordinary grade, as A plus, better than
average.
Minus, not quite excellent, but less than average group.
HONORS
Distinction at graduation is bestowed upon student who has attain-
ed the required record with the first 32 grades in Major courses.
WITH DISTINCTION: Twenty-four "A's" and "B's" of which at
least ten are "A's."
WITH GREATER DISTINCTION: Twenty-seven "A's" and "B's"
of which at least sixteen are "A's."
WITH GREATEST DISTINCTION: Thirty-two "A's" and "B's"
of which twenty-four are "A's."
Grades in Physical Education and Industries will not be considered
in averages for honors unless such courses are majors and minors.
Records transferred from other schools will be rated with "C" grade.
EXPLANATION OF NUMBERING OF COURSES
All High School courses, 1 to 50, Freshman and Sophomore courses,
100 to 199, Junior and Senior courses, 200 to 299. S before course
denote Summer, offered in Summer School; E, Extension; C, Corres-
pondence.





a BULLETIN, 1929-1930 55
THE COLLEGE
--1. THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE.
'2. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES.
3. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
a. THE NORMAL SCHOOL IN EDUCATION.
4 4. THE SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS.
5. THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS.
[ a. THE NORMAL SCHOOL IN HOME ECONOMICS.
F. 6. THE NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL AND SCHOOL OF HEALTH.
7 7. THE SUMMER SCHOOL.
8- 8. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE, (Two YEAR COURSES).
F NORMAL SCHOOL AND SEMI-PROFESSIONAL.
1. EDUCATION, (see School of Education).
2. COMMERCIAL TRAINING.
3. HOME ECONOMICS, (see School of Home Economics).
4. MINOR DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS.
(Where Minor Courses may be pursued leading to Special
Certificates)
a. PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
b. PIANO AND VOICE CULTURE.
c. BAND AND ORCHESTRA.
CREDITS
The semester hour is the basis of credit. Any subject taken once
a week for 16 or 18 weeks carries one semester hour of credit.
GENERAL REQUIREMENT
1. Candidates for degrees or diplomas must meet the requirements
of the curricula as set forth.
2. No candidate will be recommended for any degree or diploma as
long as he is reported deficient in oral and written English.
3. A residence of not less than 34 weeks in the dormitories of the
school or in the city of Tallahassee by permission is required of all
candidates for degrees or diplomas.
- 4. A charge of seven dollars is made for each Normal or Junior
College Diploma. Ten dollars for a College Diploma. One hundred
and twenty-four semester hours required for graduation.
[i. ~ ~DEGREES
iChe Degree of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts is conferred
candidates, men or women in the fields of specialty.





56 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
EXPLANATION OF THE NUMBERING OF COURSES
All courses numbered 100-200 are distinctly Freshman and Sopho-
more courses; 200-300 are distinctly Junior and Senior Courses, with
100-200 prerequisites. Above 300, Senior, Post-graduates and special
courses.
THE PREFIX
S, equals taken in Summer School; E, equals taken by Extension; G,
equals taken by Correspondence. No prefix, taken in regular Fall
and Winter Session.
SELECTION OF MAJOR AND MINOR
The major and minor courses must be selected before the end of the
second semester of the sophomore year.
This is done by application and petition after conferences with
Dean as to pre-requisites, future plans, or high school records.
No change in major after sophomore or second year of College. A
major consists of 30-36 semester hours in some one subject. A minor
consists of from 12-18 hours in some one subject or group of subjects.
TEACHING MAJOR
A teaching major consists of a minimum of 24 hours in some sub-
ject or group of subjects. The purpose is for observation teaching.
followed by observation.
Review of text books, practical teaching professionalized subject
matter and special methods course in the teaching major all totalling
an equivalent of 30-36 semester hours.
MAJOR IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Students in Liberal Arts and other departments may qualify for
State Certificates by electing courses in the School of Education and
Normal School and satisfy requirements of Constitution, History and
Government, either by examination or number of semester hours in
History and Government.
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN VOCATIONS
Agriculture, Home Economics, Industries, Nurse Training, Trades,
Vocations.
Each student in the school, both High School and College, is
required to take some form of the above named industries. No excep-
tions. College-minimum of two hours per week. High School-
minimum of four double periods per week.
STATE CERTIFICATION
All graduates of the school of Education and Normal school of the
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College are granted certificates





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 57
to teach in the State of Florida (Graduate State Certificates) to cover
' line of specialty without further examination, providing a minimum
of: 9 hours of Education, 2 year course; 6 hours of Practice Teaching;
6 hours of Government and Constitution.
Four-year course-18 hours of Education, 6 hours of Practice
Teaching, 6 hours of Government and Constitution, History.
i
=:





58 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
THE FACULTY
B. L. PERRY, Dean; Horticulture and Landscape Architecture.
W. MCKINLEY KING, Assistant in Horticulture and Landscape Archi-
tecture, Director of Athletics.
J. E. SANFORD, Poultry and Swine Husbandry.
L. A. MARSHALL, Teacher-Training; Agricultural Chemistry and Edu-
cation.
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Animal Husbandry and Dairying.
J. C. BALDWIN, Agronomy and Farm Manager.
LASALLE LAFALLE, Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture.
A. A. TURNER, State Farm and Demonstration Agent.
JULIA A. MILLER, State Home Demonstration Agent.
THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
The School of Agriculture of the Florida A. and M. College, is ccm-
posed of the following Divisions:
1. The Agronomy and Farm Division.
2. The Animal Husbandry and Dairy Division.
3. The Agricultural Chemistry Division.
4. The Horticultural Division.
5. The Poultry and Swine Division.
6. The Teacher-Training Division.
7. The Vocational Agriculture Division.
Since the Soil is the basis of all Agriculture, the work of all Divis-
ions is closely related, and centered around the Agronomy and Farm
Division.
The purpose of all Divisions is to train men and women for better
and more efficient service in the broad fields of technical and practical
Agriculture. Many graduates now serve as Principals and Instruc-
tors in some of the largest Training Schools in Florida and bordering
States, while others are making good as Demonstration Agents, and
practical farmers.
EQUIPMENT
The School is well provided with facilities for all agricultural
classes and laboratory work. Class-rooms and laboratories are pro-
vided in the Agricultural Hall and Dairy Building. All are well
equipped for the types of work given. There is sufficient work-stock
to serve the 225 acre farm, together with modern tools, tillage imple-
ments, and a tractor. There are barns for storage, and for the housing
of stock, a modern dairy barn, the equal of which is found in few





--.. BULLETIN, 1929-1930 59
f schools of this type, a dairy herd of 60 head of grade and pure-bred
anrnals, headed by pure-bred and registered sires. The Swine herd
consists of around 100 head, with an exceptionally good herd boar,
and a poultry flock of around 500 head, together with a well equipped
incubator room, and other poultry supplies. A good agricultural
library is available to the students, and there are exceptional opportuni-
F-ties for rural community activities and study in the County in which
the College is located.
, X. FARMERS' CONFERENCE
t'-This is an annual event set apart as a day of instruction and enter-
tainment of farmers, their families, and rural workers. This Con-
ference takes place the second Friday of December.
GIRLS AND BOYS DAY
Is an annual meeting of the boys and girls of Leon and adjoining
Counties. Two days are usually devoted to this meeting in the
month of March, and the visitors are given instruction in the various
fields of agriculture, usually by means of demonstration. Agricul-
tural Contests are a feature of these meetings. The girls receive in-
struction from the Department of Home Economics, and space is
provided, and prizes awarded for farm and home exhibits brought to
the meeting.
VOCATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SMITH-HUGHES WORKERS
- This Conference is held in the month of June, usually the first week
of the Summer Session. This meeting is featured by the assembly of
boys from all the Vocational Training Schools of the State with their
instructors. Each school sending at least three members in order to
be able to compete in the Annual Judging Contests held the first day.
A silver loving cup is awarded the School whose team scores the high-
t number of points in the contests. After the first day, the time
s giveri over to business and instructional meetings.
Thi FOUR YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
This course leads to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricul-
re. Entrance requirements are found elsewhere in this catalog.
nlv men with the B.S. Degree will be eligible to teach Vocational
agriculture in the State of Florida.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
'^To complete this course successfully, a minimum of 124 semester
hours are required. In addition the student must have a thorough
<-practical knowledge of farm activities, and of rural life conditions,
fore receiving a degree. The student is required, therefore, to spend
school year in each of the practical divisions as follows: The Farm and





60 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
Agronomy Division; the Animal Husbandry and Dairy Division;
the Horticultural Division; the Swine and Poultry Division.
THE FOUR-YEAR COURSE OF VOCATIONAL
AGRICULTURE
This course leads to a regular High School diploma, and a Certifi-
cate in Agriculture. The Agricultural units completed at graduation
are as follows: Animal Production (one unit); Plant Produc Lon tone
unit); Horticulture (one unit); Dairy and Poultry Husbandry (one
unit). Each student is required to conduct a project throughout the
four-year course.
THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB
All Agricultural students are required to attend bi-monthly neetings
of the Agricultural Club. The membership of this club is made up
of all students connected with the department. The purpose of the
organization is to stimulate group and cooperative thinking, and to
build up a high appreciation for agricultural development. The club
promotes an annual banquet, and assists in raising funds to defray
expenses of Departmental extra-curricula activities.
CURRICULA-HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Hloars
AlgebAlgebra -___.. _..__ 5 Algebra -.-.-...-.--. 5
Commercial Geography -_._ 5 Commercial Geography ..........
English .... -.__ ._ I__.. E English .--..--..-_-.... .---. 5
DrawiDrawing ___ 4 Drawing .- ___--- 4
Plant Production 10 Plant Production ._-.-.. 10
Physical Education -... -. .__I--..... 1 Physical Education .- ._. 1
Historistory ItI__ H-istory I-___ ___ f -
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Hours
Algebra ___ I Algebra
History _......._ 5 History ___..._..__ f -
English _. English .. __ __
General Science _._. ____... 7 General Science -.---_-..-.. __ 7
Animal Production __ 10 Animal Production __----- 10
Physical Education ....---- I Physical Education._. ...... 1





NW-IC
BULLETIN, 1929-1930 61
- THIRD YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
'- ..: Hours Hours
. Plane and Solid Geometry -_-_. S Plane and Solid Geometry.-.... 5
;'Chemistry _.. --._. __-. 7 Chemistry ._ --..........._.. 7
English __- ......- .. 5 English ____..5... __.. 5
Biology -__ .--.._...._.. ..- 5 Biology _..._-_...-...-.. .... 5
Horticulture -_---- ---- ..10 Horticulture _--- 10
Physical Education ___-.... -_. 1 Physical Education ....--__-.. 1
-FOURTH YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Recitation Recitation
Hours Hours
'"'Trigonomet r __ ......._..-. Advanced Algebra --__.-_.__- 5
Physics -___ __' ___ 7 Physics ..-----_. -....._ 7
english 5 English __Englih __
Languages .____ Languages _. --... _......._.... 5
Poultry and Dairying _._-. 10 Poultry and Dairying _----_ 10
Physical Education -..-........--.. 1 Physical Education- ...---. --. 1
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
FRESHMAN YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English 101-- English 101 B... -...--- 5 5
Gen. Chemistry 101 -..-- 7 5 Gen. Chemistry 102.. 7 5
Zoology 103 .-. _.--.-. 5 3 Gen. Botany 101 -----_ 4 3
Physical Education 101.. 1 I Agronomy 102 --.___.--- 4 3
Agronomy 101_ _--... 4 3 Physical Edu. 102 ...... 1 1
freshman Talks (Orientation) Freshman Talks (Orientation)
and Library Methods 1 and Library Methods 1_
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
- Hours Credits Hours Credits
english 102__ ..... 3 3 English 103 -. 3 3
g'I Chemistry 105 --__... 7 5 Agr'l Chemistry 106 ..- 7 5
irymng 101 __.__. -4 3 Animal Husbandry 102_ 5 3
poultry 101 .___. --.. 4 4 Horticulture 101 _-.. .- 4 3
Mathematics 101 .. 2 2 Vocational Edu. 101..__ 3 3
ysical Education 103 --_ 1 1 Physical Edu. 104 _--. I 1
f-:'~4 ~ JUNIOR YEAR
- FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
english 201... ____.... 2 2 English 202..___.._. 3 3
gr'l Education 202__... 3 3 Agr'l Education 203-- 3 3
history of Agr. 201_ ..... 3 3 Agr'l Economics 202 -... 3 3
!gr'l Bacteriology 201__.. 4 3 Agr'l Botany 202__.__ 4 3
'grl Engineering 201_ 3 3 Animal Hush. 201_ _... 4 3
orticulture 202_...._. 4 3 Physical Education 202._ 1 1
ihsical Education 201 .__ I 1





62 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English 203 --... ___. 2 2 English 204 ---------.- 2 2
Agr'l Education 204 _--- 3 3 Agr'l Education 205.. 3 3
Agr'l Economics 203 ._ 3 3 Economic Entomology 201
Constitution and Gov'mt. 3 3 --- _-.. ---------- .----- 4 4 3
Education 215 --.. .. I. 1- I Constitution and Gov'mt- 3 3
Physical Education 203 _-_'1. I Rural Sociology 204 ---- 3 3
Electives .-_..-- ---... 4 4 Physical Edu. 204 1..- I I
ELECTIVES Electives .-__- -_- _-. 3 3
Animal Husbandry 204-205-206-207.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OFFERED
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 101-See Department of Educition.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 202-See Department of Lducatlun.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 2032-See Department of Education.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 204-Special Methods. In this course
the objectives of Vocational Education in Agriculture will be estab-
lished, then a study of the Smith-Hughes Act and the State Plan
of Florida, as they are designed for furthering these objectives, will
be made. A greater part of the course will be devoted to course mak-
ing, enterprise analysis, job analysis, and a project method of teaching
in vocational agricultural education, prerequisite, Ag. Edu. 101, 202,
203.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 205-Directed Observation and Prac-
tice. The first part of the course will be devoted to such phases of
Agricultural Education as part-time and evening schools, community
work, and the equipment of a department of vocational agriculture.
The remainder will be devoted to observation and practice. Prerequi-
site Ag. Edu. 204.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 206-Principles of Vocational E,.lhi-
tion. This is an elective course in which is made a detailed study of the
principles of vocational education-as developed in recent years. The
basic text is Prosser and Allen's Vocational Education in Democracy.
Much reference to other authors will be required. Prerequisite, Junior
standing.
Three recitations, three credits.
HISTORY OF AGRICULTURE 201- The history of agricultural organi-
zation and practice, with the accompanying rural life will be trced-
from the primative time to the present. Most attention will be di-





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 63
reared to Western Europe, and the United States. The purpose of this
tours; is to give the students an insight into the origin and develop-
eut of the present day rural problems.
Three recitations, three credits.
-* AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 105-Chemistry of Plant and Animals.
The'object of this course is to give the student a general understand-
:g of the facts pertaining to plant and animal nutrition, and ability
to use plant life effectively in feeding farm animals; The course
deals only with organic compounds. The chemistry of milk, vege-
tables, grain, blood, and other organic compounds in their relation to
.digestion and nutrition. Prerequisites, Chemistry 101-102.
Recitations three. Laboratory two hr., credit 5.
'AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 106--Chemistry of Soils and Ferti-
Iiszeri. Students will analyze soil and fertilizer samples for the ele-
ments ihat are significant in fertilizing practice, accompanying their
Laboratory work with such text books and problem work as will
sur in a working mastery of economical crop fertilization. Pre-
quiste. Xgr. Chem. 105.
Recilatlon three, Labs, 2-2 hours, Credit 5.
:* AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
ACGR!CULTURAL ECONOMICS 202-Introduction to Agricultural
nonomusr-. A brief analysis of the economic problems that confront
.indi viduil farmer in the farming industry, with considerable study
proposed plans of their solution. Prerequisites, History of Agr.
Recitations three, credit three.
iRliCLTiUR P ECONOMICS 203-Merketing. This course will
*-princip.lly with the marketing problems of the Florida-Farmer,
focess through which farm products pass from producer to the
I uner, cooperative marketing, and the technique of actually pre-
g typical farm products for profitable marketing. Prerequisites,
Eonomics 202.
lion three, credit three.
_.- S AGRICULTURAL BACTERIOLOGY
RtCULITURAL BACTERIOLOGY 201-This a brief introductory
se, the aim of which is to give the student a working knowledge
fe development and control of bacteria, as they affect the farmer,
ectmng his crops, and stock from diseases, and preparing such pro-
as butter, milk, cream, preserved vegetables and meat for the
.e table .ind for the market.
lzatioin li er, laboratory 1-2 hours, credit three.





64 FLORIDA A. Le M. COLLEGE
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 1-A study of the types of livestock, in-
cluding horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and poultry. A history of the
herd, the adaptation of diierent herds for certain purposes, and gener-
al care of farm animals. For High School Students.
Recitation two, Laboratory 1-2 hours.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 102-Types and Breeds of Livestock. A
course covering the origin, history, development, and characteristics of
farm animals. Market classification and judging is included in this
course.
Recitation three, Laboratory 1-2 hours; credit three.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 203-Pork Production. This course covers
types, breeds, feeding, marketing, fitting, breeding, herd management
and diseases of swine.
Recitation three, Laboratory 1-2 hour; Credit three.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 205-Dairy Herd Management This course
deals with the study of pedigrees, breeding, judging, testing, handling,
and other subjects of importance in the management of dairy herds.
Practical work required.
Recitation two, Lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
DAIRYING
DAIRYING 2-Animal Husbandry 2. A study of milk. Includes
testing, composition, adulteration, etc. For high school students.
Recitation two; lab. 1-2 hour.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 101-Principles of Dairying. A course deal-
ing with general creamery practice in the care and handling of dairy
products. It also includes the practical use and study of dairy equip-
nent and apparatus.
Recitation three, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 206-Milk inspection and Marketing of Milk.
An elective course dealing with the general handling and care of milk
for the market. Includes standardization, refrigeration, judging and
sampling of milk. Also a study of Dairy barns and equipment.
Recitation 1, lab. 2-2 hour, credit three.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 207-Ice Cream Making. This course will
cover the standardization of mixtures and freezing of ice cream, sher-
berts and frozen products, and the physical principles involved, types
of freezers, flavors, fillers, and binders.
Recitation 1, lab. 1-2 hour, credit two.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 65
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 10lb-Poultry Husbandry. This course
includes a study of farm poultry as a side line on the farm, breeds,
classification, culling, poultry house construction, feeding, incuba-
tion, brooding and care, sanitation, diseases and prevention, marketing
" aid judging.
Recitation three, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three semester hours.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 204-Poultry Husbandry. This course is
designed to give the student the fundamentals in poultry management
of the large commercial flocks as follows: Establishing the plant,
arranging the flocks, the commercial aspects of buying, selling and
marketing, incubation of eggs, management of machines on a large
scale, raising, feeding, grading, mating, and special knowledge of this
line in breeding, types and construction of poultry houses.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
HORTICULTURE
HORTICULTURE 101-Fruit Production. This course includes the
general principles of fruit growing, and a study of the various fruit
. crops adapted to the State. In this course the student learns the kinds
of sprays, dusts. and other materials used in successful fruit production.
;*. Recilatom th ree, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
- -.:HORTICULTDRE 202-Truck. Crop Production. This course covers
a specific knowledge of the vegetables best adapted to the various
types of soil, and the proper methods of treating the soil under varying
'conditions. This course includes seed bed preparation, description,
idRitification. and testing of seed. Planting, cultivating, fertilizing
and treating vegetables for the market and home.
. Recilalion Ilno, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
HORTICIrLTLiRE 203-Advanced Truck Crop Production. In this
rse the student learns to mix and apply fertilizers, the importance
location, and the requirements of packing and shipping of fruits and
tables. This course should give a high type of operative skill to
.,student.
Je'ilaliota /Itco, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three semester hours.
IRTICULTLURE 204-Landscape Architecture. The laying off and
cation of lawns, estates, school grounds, etc. A study of
^s, shrubbery and trees, terracing, leveling, and shaping the land
,general contour. Greenhouse management.
cilalion lt o, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
{~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





66 FLORIDA A. ed M. COLLEGE
AGRONOMY
AGRONOMY 102-Cash Crops. A study of the fundamental prin-
cipals of crop production, soil management, adaptability, distribution
and use, seed selection, seed testing, preparation of the soil, planting,
cultivation, harvesting, and other factors affecting the growth,
development and maturity of plant life.
Recitation three, lab. 1-2 hour, credit four semester hours.
AGRONOMY 101-Soils in relation to Plant Growth. This course
includes the origin of soils, composition, class and types, chemical
composition, and its relation to plant growth. Soil fertility, produc-
tivity, drainage, irrigation and tillage. Soil organisms and their rela-
tion to soil fertility and plant growth.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
AGRONOMY 201-Senior Elective. An advanced study of soils and
fertilizers. Much experimental work required. Thesis required before
completion.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
ZOOLOGY
ZOOLOGY 103-A study of the structure, function, and evolution-
ary types of invertebrates and the vertebrates. This course is intend-
ed to give the student a somewhat brief, but general knowledge of the
animal kingdom.
Recitation three, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
AGRICULTURAL BOTANY
BOTANY 201-A study of botany as it applies to farm crops. The
parts, structure, and function of plants. Heredity and evolution of
plants, and their effects on modern agriculture.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three.
ENTOMOLOGY
ENTOMOLOGY 201-Applied entomology based on structure, classi-
fication, life-history, recognition and general control of insects injuri-
ous to farm crops, particularly in the State of Florida.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three semester hours.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
AGRICULTtRAL ENGINEERING 201-This course gives a general
understanding of the principles of mechanics, studies of farm con-
struction, sanitation, drainage, irrigation, water supply, lighting, etc.,





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 67
are also made in this course. Skill in doing is a prime factor in this
course. A study of farm machines is made.
Recitation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three semester hours.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 202-This is a continuation of course
201, and is concerned more with operative skill, and adjustment.
Simple surveying and terracing, etc., is included, and practical
problem solved.
Rec nation two, lab. 1-2 hour, credit three semester hours.
AGRICULTURAL MATHEMATICS
'AC.iRCLi T'URAL MATHEMATICS 101-Mathematics related to agri-
- culture and its branches, especially that which confronts the farmer
"in every day practices, such as land measurement, buying and selling,
-x mxing fertilizers, draft, etc.
Recitation two, credit two.
GENERAL AGRICULTURE
GENT RAL AtRICULTtURE 1-A general course in animal and plant
7 production ior the student not specializing in agriculture, but who
wishes a general knowledge of the subject.
K Recitallon three' times per week, three semester hours.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY
R RUPiL SOCIOLOGY 204-This course acquaints the student with
the forces and factors in rural social progress, development and
*Adaptaion ot rural institution and organizations.
Recitation Illree times per week, three semester hours.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
VOCATIONA.L AGRICULTURE 1-Plant Production. A study of
- uomic plants, their structure, activities, and distribution, with
tafl attention to the State. A land project is required, in which
attention will be given to planting and cultivation methods.
i *merk is also included, as well as other forms of farm mechanics.
. e in'eti --miiute periods per week.
.VoCATINAL AGRICULTURE 2-Animal Production. A study of
al care and production, with special reference to Florida. Feeding
g, selecting, management, and marketing will be included
e skills and problems of this course. Time will also be given to
dy of animal products.
se ninletl-III-1ute periods per week.





68 FLORIDA A. e_ M. COLLEGE
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 111-Horticulture. A study of the
elementary principles of home and commercial gardening, with empha-
sis on Florida conditions. Attention will be given to cultural methods,
insect and disease control. Record keeping, etc.
Five ninety-minute periods per week.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 4-Dairying and Poultry Husbandry.
A study of the fundamental principals of dairy and poultry production,
with stress laid on the skills necessary in the work carried on.
Five ninety minute periods per week.
SPECIAL NOTICE: All Vocational students must have practical
projects dealing when possible with the course pursued, throughout the
four-year course. Record books dealing with all transactions in-
volved in the project must be kept.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 69
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
NORMAL SCHOOL IN EDUCATION
FACULTY
R. O'HARA LANIER, A.M., Education.
A. L. KIDD, A.M., Social and Political Science.
C C. A. BACOTE, A.M., History.
M. A. LEE, A.M., English.
- H. MANNING EFFERSON, A.M., Mathematics.
C. B. NASBY, Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing.
- B, F. HOLMES, JR., Manual Trasing, Industrial Arts.
E. EARL WARE, B.S., Biology.
f MARTYN-DOW, B.S., Psychology.
"E. E. MATTHEWS, B.S. Supervising Principal Demonstration and
Practice School.
:t MA-ISSA SYDEs, B.S., Acting Principal Demonstration and Practice
School, Instructor Class Room Management, General
Methods.
A. PRATER-STEWART, Instructor in Physical Education for girls and
Women.
-C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Instructor in Physical Education for boys and
men.
ILLI.nAM MCKINLEY KING, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education for
men.
N;AMY JACKSON, Critic Teacher, Demonstration and Practice School,
Firsl ard second grades.
-OROTH HOLMES, Third and Fourth grades.
!EsE ANDERSON, Fifth and Sixth grades.
EWrmE E. B.\KER, B.S., Library Science, Library Methods.
L. PERRY, School Gardening.
zC- WE.ARE, Story Telling.
COMMERCIAL
I ORGE DECOURSnY, B.S., Director, Accounting and Bookkeeping,
Economics.
j EiT MALLO-BRADFORD, Typewriting and Stenography.
ieave of absence year 1929-O0.





17
70 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
MUSIC
F. E. JAMES, A.B., Director, Public School Music, Glee Club, Choir.
J. V. A. COLLINS, B.S., Mus. B., Piano and Voice..
W. CAREY THOMAS, Band and Orchestra.
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES OFFERS THE FOLLOWING
DEGREES AND COURSES:
1. Bachelor of Arts.
2. Bachelor of Science.
3. Pre-medical course of two years.
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OFFERS:
1. Bachelor of Arts in Education.
2. Bachelor of Science in Education.
3. Two-year normal course in Education. (Preparation for ele-
mentary school teaching)..
4. Minors in Physical Education and Music, (Piano, Voice, Band
and Orchestra).
INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Vocations, Trades, Industries, Agriculture, Nurse Training, Home
Economics.
Each student in the school both High School and College is re-
quired to take some form of the above named industries. No ex-
ceptions. College, minimum of two hours per week; High School,
minimum of four double periods per week.
OUTLINE OF COURSES
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF ARTS
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English 5 3 English 5 3
Math. or Anc. Language ._ 3 3 Math. or Anc. Language 3 3
History ( 101) -- _-- 3 3 History --_. ....----.--- 3 3
Foreign Language ____--- 3 3 Foreign Language--.----_ 3 3
Physical Education _--_ 2 Physical Education ___ 2 1
Biology (101 ) ------_ j 7 3 Biology .______ 7 3
Freshman Talks _---__ 1
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF ARTS
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English -_.-----_--- 5 3 English -_ .- __ 5 3
Math. or Anc. Language._ 3 3 Math. or Anc. Language_ 3 3
Philosophy ..__--. .. _-- 3 3 Reflective Thinking -_ 3 3
Psychology -.- ---- 3 3 Educational Psychology_ 3 3
Foreign Language._-----___ 3 3 Foreign Language _.- 3 3
Physical Education _----- 2 1 Physical Education__ 2 1
2





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 71
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
F English .-- ---------.3 3 English _..... ___._ 3 3
- Economics --.---..-..-------- 3 3 S-ciology 3 3
ldueation -__ ._ 3 3 Education _--.. -- ___. 3 3
Major Elective ...-_. 3 3 Major Elective .--.__-_ 3 3
First Free .- ---_-___ 3 3 First Free __._-__ 3 3
' Second __:- ._.--- _3 3 Second Free .--_.- 3 3
- Physical Education -_..-- (1) Physical Education .- (1) (1)
SENIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS
.'- FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English ._ .__. 2 3 English --- 2 2
'- American History to 1789 Government _-- 3 3
-_ -_ --__ .-- -. 3 3 Physical Education __ (1)
Phvyical Education ---___ (1) Major Elective ._ 3 3
la Mlor Elective .-- 3 3 First Free Elective 3 3
* .r r Free Elective ------_. 3 3 Second Free Elective 3 3
S. tcoJ Frce Ilec.e -. 3 3
I Flri.i c-,r(r.Jlct tate Certificate is desired with option of taking exami-
' nji-.r, .n C.:n;;tiur!.:-n f United States.
Q1- i ANTITATIVE REQUIREMENT
. .)lijor of 30 hours.
I-. Minors of 12 to 18 hours each.
C 4 Hours of Physical and Health Education.
4~J-1 VOCATION REQUIRED
.' tikht i' I H.ai ..f \'.- ition required in addition to 124 Quantitative Hours men-
* timed lb.-e.
F R E IfMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
S IRT SEFMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hr ouHrs Credits Hours Credits
english ........-5 3 English _____... 3
--_ emri;i 3 3 Mathematics ----__. 3 3
nL Languipc ..... 3 3 Foreign Language _._ 3 3
emistry ..... 3 3 Chemistry __9 4
sca] Educi.i,,r (2) Physical Education___ (2)
eshrman TJIL; rid H-:i, Freshman Talks and How
L he heLibrarv. ... (1) to Use the Library ..- (1)
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
l h _................... S 5 3 English -_-_--- _._. 5 3
Langu ge ...... .. 3 3 Foreign Language _.._ 3 3
cry C.....h.e.m.. 3 3 Chemistry _. --- --...... 3 3
l ... -._ .- ........ (9) 4 Physics ..__ _.. (9) 3
:i e _.. ........ 3 3 Elecstives __._.____ 3 3
LAl Educa;on .(2) Physical Education__._ (2)





72 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English --------__ 2 2 English ------ 2 2
Economics or Sociology ... 3 3 Psychology ------ 3 3
Biology -....___-_ 7 3 Biology -----_ (9)
Electives (Major) _.-....--_ 3 3 Elective (Major) --.. 3 3
Electives (Minor) ---------- 3 3 Elective (Minor) .---.. 3 3
Physical Education -.----.-- (1) Physical Education_-- ..-- (1)
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English -_--__ -- 2 2, English ------- 2 2
Elective -----_ 14 14 Electives -------- 14 14
Physical Education....- (2) Physical Education _.----(2)
Eight (8) hours of Vocation required in addition to 124 semester hours required
for graduation.
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
THE NORMAL SCHOOL IN EDUCATION
For School of Education and Normal School, see College Faculty.
REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN EDUCATION
A major in Education would consist of 30-36 semester hours in
Education including the following courses: Education 101, 102, 103,
104, 105, 306, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 216.
Selection of at least two teaching subjects.
A minimum in Education would consist of 15-18 hours. This is
just enough education to qualify one for meeting the professional re-
quirements for certification in southern states. A major assumes
that the student desires to:
1. Teach Education.
2. Teach two teaching majors, one teaching minor in secondary
schools.
3. To do graduate work in education.
4. To qualify for Supervisor or Principal of Elementary or High
School.
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
For a major or minor in Education 30-36 semester hours in Educa-
tion and Psychology must be pursued.
1. A person must select two teaching majors in which practice
teaching and 15-18 semester hours of work must be done.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 73
2. Persons must do practice teaching in elementary grades.
; 3.' Two minors must be selected in which the person will complete
9-12 hours in some group of subjects.
4. An oral examination in Education and the Major teaching sub-
ecs is required, the passage of which is compulsory.
. (Syllabus is furnished by the department).
5. Prepar.iron of an original paper covering some fields of investi-
aion in elementary or secondary education.
6. Demonstration of the ability to conduct a class, teach the major
.bject and use good oral and spoken English.
7.. A fourth teaching subject may be substituted for 12 hours of
ucation upon special petition which must include previous High
ool preparation in the subject of 3 units of High School work.
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMETSER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
sh .---- 5 3 English 5 3
i'otion ..._. 3 3 Education .__+ _........ 3 3
ogy 7 3 Biology --- -- -- 7 3
*ah or I-fi,orv 3 3 Math. or History...__ 3 3
ical Education ..._ (2) Physical Education ..-__ (2)
Ihnan Talki and How Freshman Talks and liow
- Luse the Librarv..__- (1) to Use the Library_.. (1)
.|-' SFAlgebra .. .._..___. 2 Units
Plane and Solid
Geometry 1
TrigGcnonetry .- .
Advanced Alg. I_
- Total _--- -2) -------- 4
A- SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
'; FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
_____- .........5 3 English ___-__ 3 3
---on __ _-- 3 3 Education Eev__ 3 3
-pc tice Teaching_ 10 3 Elem. Practice Teaching_ 10 3
or Chemistry _---.-. _. 9 4 Physics or Chemistry -.. .9 4
Education (2) Physical Education __. (2)
Elective
: TUNIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
. FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
- 3 3 Education ._____ 3 3
5 3 Ed. Psychology -_. _. ..... 3) 3
-__ __ ..2 2 English 2 2
r, Elective_ __ 3 3 First Major Elective__ 3 3
or Elective__ 3 3 Second Major Elective ..._ 3 3
cation____. (1) Physical Education ... (I)
nay be substituted for Math. provided 4 units of High School Math.
d for entrance including





74 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
SENIOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English _-- ---- 2 2 English _. .--- 2 2
Education ------------ i 3 3 Education .-- __ 3 3
Practice Teaching._- 10 3 Practical Art -.._----_ 2 2
Teaching Practice Teaching
First Major Teaching
Physical Education...---- (1) Second Major --..._.. ---- 10 3
American History _.----_ 3 3 Teaching
Minors
Government -_ .. __ 3 3 3
Physical Education...__ (1)
Electives ----- 3 3
FRESHMAN BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English ...---__ ------- 5 3 English -. 5 3
Math. or Anc. Language__ 3 3 Math. or Anc. Language- 3 3
Education ---------------- 3 3 Education __ -.... .__-- 3 3
Biology _--- ---- ---- 3 3 Biology ----. 3 3
History .-- -3 3 History ...3 3
Freshman Talks and How Freshman Talks and How
to Use the Library ..__ 2 to Use the Library ---. 2
Physical Education ..- __ (2) Physical Education.--- 2----- 2
SOPHOMORE BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English ------5 English -...---- 3
Math. or Anc. Language._ 3 3 Math. or Anc. Language- 3 3
Philosophy _---- 3 3 Philosophy -- _-- ..- 3
Education -------- ...--- 3 3 Education _..--...-- 3.. 3
Practice Teaching Elem. Practice Teaching Elem.
School -_ 10 1 School ..-.-_._ 10 3
History --_-. _-- 3 3 History -. ..__ 3 3
Physical Education. -------_ 2 Physical Education .._- 2
JUNIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English __.___--_.-. 2 2 English --..__._ 2 2
Education ..- -.------__ 3 3 Education -_.-_.. _-__ 3 3
American History ------_ 3 3 Government -..-_.. .------_ 3 3
Principles of Geography ..- 3 3 Human Geography___ 3 3
Electives Electives
Physical Education _---- 2 Physical Education_ 2
SENIOR BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credits Hours Credits
English --_---- _----- 2 2 English .-- .._ ...__... -- 2 2
Practice Teaching Practice Teaching _.. _. 5 2 '/
First Teaching Major --- 5 2 % Second Teaching Major
Education ...---_._... __. 3 Education 3__ ..3--__. 3 3
Physical Education-___- 2 1 / Physical Education -.. -_ 2 V





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 75
THE NORMAL SCHOOL IN EDUCATION
TEACHER TRAINING
The Grammar Grade Curricula
The purpose of this course is to cover methods of teaching in ele-
.ary schools from first to eighth grades.
REVISED NORMAL CURRICULUM
FIRST SEMESTER
indication 101 Credit Credit
'ish 101h____ __ ... .. .._.. ..__. ..__._._.. .. .. 3 3
ltoduction to Study of Education ..__.. 3 3
b: School Music 1801 _..___... 3 1 I/
Slice School Art 101 _- --- .... 4 2
- Education 101 ...._..._ ...-._____..._ 3 1%
anced Arithmetic with Methods 101
h-2 Laboratory, I Recitation ....__..__.. 3
Economics-Handicrafts, Sewing or Industries _. __. 2 1
'"es of Geographyf ..__-. ____ 3 3
directed observation required in connection with Education 101.
SECOND SEMESTER
Credit__ Credit
:101 b. _._.____._ ____. 5 3
Management Education 102 ..__ ... .__ ...._ 3 3
l-ogy -------.-- - 3 3
r -------ing) -- -......---_ __.. 4 2
e' education plays and games for grades 4-8 -_ 2
n Backgrounds to American History ...--____._.___ 3 3
n Geography .- ...... ----- ---..----...--_.-.. ........-- 3 3
e Economics-Handicrafts, Sewing or Industries ___ _- 2 1
p| ries no credit without practice teaching, in demonstration school, to put into
_- theory of Management and Control-grades 1-8.
-7*:-- SENIOR NORMAL FIRST SEMESTER
- Credit__ Credit
- and Health Education_ ....- _. 5 3
_.Iygiene, 1 Lab., 2 Rec ._..._. -.---______ 3 2
i nent and Citizenship, including study of Constitutions
united States and Florida.__.__.... ________ 3 3
- -/nomics, Geography, American History 1789-1860,
ege Botany toupract___ te__ ._ig__ 3 3
-103 ______ 3 3
actsce Teaching ....._._ ___. ____ 10 3
; fcation ____..______---_ 1 /O
1 1
17
without practice teaching.





76 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
School Gardening, I double period, and Nature Study
I single -_---_ _--------------- ___ ----_ __ 2 1
Directed Teaching -- ...-. --------- 25 3
Manual Training and Industrial Arts. -__.-. ._-___.__ 2 t
Commercial and Industrial Geography, or European History __ 3 3
Negro History _- __ _-__-__-__-___-_ 2 2
Oral and Silent Reading___ .2 2
Physical Education ._---___----- -- -_- 2 2
English 3 2
EDUCATIONAL CLUB
The Herbart-Pestalozzi Club and Society is composed of students
who plan to make teaching their life work or are interested in the
subject of Education. Meetings are held twice a month when topics
based upon the principals enunciated by the founders of Modern
Educational Theory, Herbart and Pestalozzi are discussed. Speakers
of note in Education are engaged for the purpose of creating an edu-
cational atmosphere.
COURSES IN PRIMARY EDUCATION
There is a growing demand for teachers who have specialized in
the first three grades to be supervisors of the general field of Kinder-
garten and Primary Education. In order to meet this demand the
department of Education will offer elective courses in the following
lines and fields of instruction.
210 b. History of Primary Education.
20s b. The Primary Curriculum and Education.
104 b. Primary Projects and Lesson Plans.
The Teaching of Primary Numbers.
The Teaching of Primary Reading.
The Teaching of Elementary Science.
The Teaching of Primary Drawing.
The Teaching of Geography, History and Civics.
The Teaching of Primary English and Literature.
Child Study and Psychology.
Tests and Measurements for First Three Grades.
Primary Music.
Primary Games.
Most of the work is offered in the summer school. Persons electing
this field may receive a Graduate State in Primary Education as a
specialty.





. BULLETIN, 1929-1930 77
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
ART
- ART 101-This will cover the organization of materials for use in
be teaching of art in the first three grades.
i ART 1 02-Intermediate Art. This will cover the organization of
material to be used in the grades 4-8.
ART 103.-Advanced Art. This will cover clay modeling, applied
sign and stencilling.
PRACTICAL ART IV
The main objective of the study in practical art is its service in
tual uses of daily life.
IRST Y'..\R-Still life and sketching in pencil, pen and ink, color-
'cravons. chicoal and water colors. Paper cutting and furniture
king.
SECOND YE.AR-Still life and sketching in pencil, pen and ink,
coal, water colors and lettering. Designing and decorating.
THI1 YE.\R-A. Sketching in pencil, charcoal, water, colors and
Clay modeling, designing.
Commercial drawing and history of art.
or Biolog\-See science.
r Botanv-See Agriculutral department.
or Commercial Subject-See Commercial department.
BIBLE
LE I -The Literature of the Bible. An intensive study of the
as a Literary Gem. No attempt at development of creeds or
dit lu'i, ,I-in ester hours. Text, King James Version of the Bible.
ecialv recommended as a study of English majors.
ECONOMICS
NOMucs l1l-This course opens up an elementary discussion of
effortss at making a living. The fundamental principles under-
business. with references to the industrial development of the
States.
k-, th'rec hours.
o .osics 102-Question of applied economics, such as taxation,
action, immigrants, labor, credit, rent, and the tariff. This course
preceded by Economics 101.





78 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
THE OBJECTIVES OF THE DEPARTMENT AND
DIVISION OF EDUCATION
1. To furnish a student with the necessary professional training in
the art and science of teaching, historical, pedagogical and psycho-
logical basis of education so as to insure that each person may appreci-
ate the scientific study of education in the light of educational evo-
lution and philosophy.
2. To provide method, professionalized subject matter in lines of
specialty.
3. To prepare elementary and high school teachers.
4. To prepare elementary and high school principals.
EDUCATION 101-Introduction to study of Education. This is a
general survey course to introduce students to the field of education,
and to offer such general information which might be of help to all
persons whether they are planning to teach or not.
Credit, three semester hours. Texts, Cubberley-Introduction to
Study of Education. Houghton-Mifflin Publishing Co. Bagley-Keith
-An Introduction to Teaching. Frasier and Armentrout-Introduc-
tion to Teaching. Judd-Introduction to the Scientific Study of
Education. Clapp-Chase, Merrman-Introduction to Education.
EDUCATION 102-Classroom Management, Organization and Control.
The study of discipline, daily schedule, program and devices which
will help in school organization are taken up here.
Texts, Sears-Classroom Organization and Control. Bagley-Class
room Management. Bennett School Efficiency.
EDUCATION 102B.-Rural School Management. The study of dis-
cipline, daily schedule, program and devices as applied to the one-
teacher and rural schools.
Credit, three hours. Texts, Pitman-Rural School Management.
Starks-Every Teacher's Problems. Credit, three semester hours.
EDUCATION 103-Principals and Methods of Teaching in Elemen-
tary schools. A survey of best teaching practice and methods with
underlying philosophy and principles.
Texts, Charters-Teaching the Common Branches. Bachman-
Principles of Elementary Education. Almack-Lang-The Beginning
Teacher. Collateral-Henderson-Materials and Methods in the Mid-
dle Grades. Stormzand-The Progressive Primary Teacher. Stormzand
-Progressive Methods of Teaching.
EDUCATION 104-Directed Observation and Projects in Elementary
School Teaching. The purpose of this course is to have the student





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 79
re best teaching procedure and report upon same in project form.
strequisites-Education 191, 102, 103.
dit, three semester hours. Texts, Projects in Observation and
twice Teaching-Hahn. Note book required.
DVUCATION 105-Directed teaching, participation and supervised
F .'ng in elementary school teaching:
y Ga. Grades 1-3 Primary.
,. Grades 4-6 Intermediate.
c. Grades 7-9 J. H. School and upper grades. Ten hours per week
st semester, twelve hours per week second semester:
Credit, six hours. Prerequisite, Education 100 to 103.
EXDUCATION 206-Principles of Secondary Education. This course
study of the High School education, pupils, curricula course of
y, objectives and aims.
Prtrequisites, Education 101 to 102.
.Texts, Douglass-Principles of Secondary Education. Clement-
iples and Practices of Secondary Education. Uhl-Principles of
o-ndary Education. Johnson-High School Education. Koos-
ig ary Education. Koos-7 he Junior High School. Inglis-Prin-
e s of Secondary Education. William and Rice-Principles of
ondary Education.
bUCATION 207-Educationa' Psychology. This is a study of the
location of Psychology to education including a study of the laws
learning, formal discipline, individual differences and the psycho-
cal basis of each school subject.
irerequisites, Biology 101, Education 101, Mathematics 101. In-
d for Junior College students.
; xts, Starch-Educational Psychology (Revised). Gates-Psy-
f gy for students in Education. Cameron-Educational Psycholo-
B:Bolton-Ezveryday Psychology for Teachers. Benson-Lough-
-West--Psychology for Teachers.
-tecATIoN 208.-Modern Methods, Observation of High School
iing and Participation. The student actually observes'and par-
tes in the planning of lessons for high school teaching majors and
xts, Douglass-Modern Methods in High School Teaching. Parker
fhods of Teaching in High Schools. Blackhurst-Directed Ob-
ioe n and Supervised Teaching. Fontaine-Ways to Better Teach-
- Secondary Schools.
UCATION 209-History of Education. This is a study of the
'ttial contributions of Greeks, Romans, development in Middle
thand the Modern rise of educational organizations and systems.
xts, Graves-History of Education. Cubberley-History of Edu-
. Monroe-History of Education.





80 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
EDUCATION 210-History of Education in U. S. A brief study of
the historical development of education in U. S.
Text, Dexter-History of Public School Education in U. S. Cubber-
ley-History of Public School Education in U. S. Knight-History
of Education in The South. Prerequisite, Education 101.
Credit, three semester hours.
EDUCATION 211--Educational and Intelligence Tests- and Measure-
ments. A scientific study of tests and measurements as applied to
school subjects and intelligence.
Credit, two hours.
Texts, Greene-The Use and Interpretation of Education Tests.
Monroe Devons-Kelley.
Credit, two hours. Course (a) for elementary schools.
Paulu-Diagnostic Testing and Remedial Teaching.
Course (b) for High School teachers. Texts, Symonds-Measure-
ments in Secondary Education. Ruch-Stoddard-i escs and Measure-
ments in High School Instruction.
EDUCATION 212-Lesson Planning. This course is designed for
students who are not majoring in Education and belong in other de-
partments who should have some knowledge of the use and preparation
of the Lesson Plan. Lesson plans are made in all elementary school
subjects. Lectures are given.
T exts. Notebook required. Prerequisite, Education 101 or 102.
The following are advanced courses offered upon request of six
or more advanced students.
EDUCATION 213-Educational Sociology.
Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 214-Administration and Supervision of Elementary
Schools.
Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 215-Principles of Education. a. Problems of Teach-
ing Profession. b. Survey of Educational Literature and Classics.
Intended for Senior College Students.
Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 216-Educational Statistics.
Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 217-Principles of Vocational and Educational Guid-
ance. Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 218-Health Education, Child Growth and Develop-
ment. Credit, three hours.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 81
ENGLISH
*I ENGLISH 101-Freshman Composition. Required of all first-year
Illege students. The aim of the course is to train the student to
express himself in clear, concise language. Short and long themes are
lconstantlv required. The emphasis during the first semester is on
Exposition. The student is thoroughly drilled in the writing of term
Papers, taking notes, letter writing, etc.
Te t, Slater's Freshman Rhetoric.
L References: Gross' College Composition.
-.Credit, six hours.
ENGLISH 102-Review College English Grammar. Required of
-first year College students who are unable to pass the English Gram-
mar Exemption Test. Sentence structure, parts of speech, paragraph
development. punctuation, are -thoroughly reviewed. Themes are re-
quired periodically. Close watch is kept on the student's progress with
a view to Advancement. No credit is given.
^ Texts, Blunt and Northup-English Grammar. Royster-Thomp-
snn-Pr.wl,'e Sheets and Guide to Composition.
- ENGLISlI 103-History of English Literature. The aim of the
course is to give the student a survey of English literary history from
449 A. D.. to the present time.
Elective to first-year College students who select English as a major,
.udv.
I Tet. N'eilson and Thorndike-History of English Literature.
Creitil, six semester hours.
. ENGLISH 104-English Literature. Not open to Freshmen.
Students who have six hours of work in English are eligible. The
Iourse is comprehensive of the biographies, writings and significancies
f the English writers from the beginning of English literature to
1900.
'. Tetl, Century Readings in English Literature.
Credil, six hours.
. E4JcaLSHF 105-Ameriacn Literature. Open to Freshmen. The
fim of the course is to acquaint the student with American men and
women of letters from early historical times of the country to 1900.
Such of the material is biographical.
Te\l, Cinliffe, Pyre, Young-Readings in American Literature.
F^4redfi. iix hours.
ENGLISH 206-American Literature, New England Group. A study
the American men and women of letters whose intellectual life was
tered in Cambridge and Concord. The course comprises an inten-
e study of the works of the New England authors, beginning with
-merson, and ending with Howells. Time is given to the discussion





82 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
of Unitarianism and Transcendentalism and their allied movements.
Prerequisites, Six hours of American History or the consent of the
instructor. Text, Boynton's Anthology of American Poetry. Credit,
three semester hours.
ENGLISH 207-Contemporary American Literature. Contemporary
American novelists, dramatists, critics and poets.
Prerequisite, twelve hours of English.
Credit, two semester hours.
ENGLISH 208-Shakespeare's Dramatics. The course consists of the
intensive study of three of Shakespeare's plays and the rapid reading
of fifteen others. Special consideration is given the history and struc-
ture of the Elizabethan Theatre.
Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 209-The English Novel. A study of the principal
English novelists from 1800 to 1900. Together with the required
reading of 20 assigned novels, there is considered their historic develop-
ment, and autobiographic relation of an author with his novels, where
such exists.
Text, Cross-The Development of the English Novel.
Credit, three hours.
ENGLISH 210-Argumentation and Debating. Not open to Fresh-
men. The purpose of the course is to train the student to cultivate
the power to analyze a question, to write briefs, and to debate effective-
ly. Ample practice is accorded him in debates, discussions and
assignment.
Text, Foster-Argumentation and Debate.
Credit, three hours.
ENGLISH 211-The Teaching of English. Not open to Freshmen.
The course is designed for teachers or prospective teachers of English
for high schools. Special attention is given to the methods of teaching
English grammar and literature.
Credit, three hours, one semester.
ENGLISH -212-Literature for Teachers and Story-telling.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 213-Reading, Oral and Silent.
Text, Stone-Twenty-first Year Book.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 214-Advanced Composition. Short story writing, ele-
mentary journalism and newspaper work.
On request.
Text, to be selected.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 83
ENGLISH 215-Public Speaking. This course deals with practice
,of speech-making, speech analysis and scientific speech building.
GEOGRAPHY
GEOGRAPHY 101-The Principals of Geography with Methods.
An introductory course in Geography for College students with
minethods of teaching in elementary schools. Review of Geography
text book used with demonstration lessons.
Text, To be selected.
Credit, three semester hours.
GEOGRAPHY 102-Human Geography. The relation of man to his
environment is studied.
Text, Huntington-Cushing.
Credit, three semester hours.
GEOGRAPHY 102-The Geography of North America. A unit
study of the home and economic factors influencing the distribution of
people on the American continent. A unit study is made of Florida.
._Text, Miller and Parkins-Geography of North America.
Allen-North America.
The Making of Florida.
GOVERNMENT AND CONSTITUTION
GOVERNMENT AND CONSTITUTION 201-A course in advanced
civics, the Constitution and operation of the American Government.
Te.xt, Young-The New American Government.
Kidd-An Outline of the Constitution with Problems.
Thorpe, Constitutional History of the United States.
L- POLITIC.L. SCIENCE 202-The history and development of political
parties in the United States. With a general summary of Economics,
Social and Political Problems in America and International Problems.
GEOLO<, 201-An introductory course in Geology.
Te, l, I'o be selected.
;r. Cr.eil. tIree hours.
For History see Political and Social Science.
LANGUAGES
THE )BJECTIVES OF THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT
The prJctical aims of instruction intend to develop in the student
^e abilti to read, write and speak foreign languages for preparation
'or teaching or as a business career. The cultural aims of the study
foreign languages would give an appreciation for the literature,
ustonis. traditions, and social institution of other peoples. Students
the department may avail themselves of the opportunities of Le
rcle Francais and El circulo Espanol.





84 FLORIDA A. es M. COLLEGE
DEPARTMENT OF LATIN
LATIN 101-This course is a review of Latin grammar and the read-
ing of selected passages from Caesar's Gallic War.
Credit, three hours.
LATIN 102-Six orations of Cicero will be read and some time will
be devoted to prose composition.
Credit, three hours.
LATIN 103-In this course the student will become acquainted with
Latin authors as Livy, Horace, Plautus and Terence through the read-
ing of selections.
Credit, three hours.
LATIN 104-This course will be devoted to the reading of Catullus,
Pliny, Tacitus, and Martial.
Credit, three hours.
THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
FRENCH
FRENCH 101-Elementary Course. This course consists of French
grammar, composition, pronunciation and translation of simple texts.
Credit, three hours.
Texts,
FRENCH 102-Intermediate Course. The work of this course will
emphasize review grammar, composition and reading in class of books
chosen from the works of some of the following authors:
Corneille, Moliere, Hugo, Racine, Voltaire and Maupassant. Besides
the books read in class, two works will be assigned during the year for
outside reading.
Credit, three hours.
FRENCH 103-French Composition. Open to students who have a
knowledge of French and the principles of French grammar to acquire
facility in speaking and writing French. Constant attention is given
to pronunciation. The language is studied through dictations, writ-
ing compositions, memorizing of selected passages, and reports on out-
side readings.
Credit, three hours.
FRENCH 104-History of French Literature. This course is a sur-
vey of French Literature from its beginnings to the present time. The
following works will be read: Moliere, Les Precienses ridicules; Beau-
marchars, Le Barbier De Seville, and Dumas fils, Le Demi-monde.
Credit, three hours.
Texts, Malet, Historie de France. Abry, Ardic, Crouzets, Historie
illustree de la Litterature franchise.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 85
SPANISH
SPANISH 101-Elementary Course. This course consists of Spanish
grammar, composition, pronunciation, and translation of simple texts.
Credit, three hours.
SPANISH 102-Intermediate Course. This course will stress review
grammar, composition, and the reading of books chosen from the works
of some of these authors: Gutierrez, Galdos, Calderon, Alarcon,
Becquer, Alvarez, and others. Besides the books read in class, two
works will be assigned during the year for outside reading.
Credit, three hours.
SPANISH 103-Spanish Composition. Open to students who have
a knowledge of Spanish and the principles of Spanish grammar to ac-
quire facility in speaking and writing Spanish. Constant attention
is given to pronunciation. The language is studied through dictations,
writing of compositions, memorizing of selected passages, and reports
on outside readings.
Credit, three hours.
SPANISH 104-History of Spanish Literature. This course is a sur-
vey of Spanish literature from its beginnings to the present time. The
following works will be read: Northup-An Introduction to Spanish
Literature; Coester-The Literary History of Spanish America.
Two books for outside reading will be assigned.
Credit, three hours.
MATHEMATICS DIVISION
OBJECTIVES:
1. To help students discover their capacities in this field and help
them to attain the fullest development of those capacities.
2. To help students acquire skill and ability in handling both ab-
stract and concrete quantities.
3 To help students learn to like mathematics to such a degree that
they will study the higher branches of the subject, not because they are
compelled to, but because they like it and can see some definite use
t that can be made of higher mathematics.
4. To prepare teachers of mathematics.
. 5. To point out the relation between mathematics and the other
branches of science in such a manner that students will find themselves
,equipped with a useful tool to master those problems encountered in
those sciences.
6. To help students make the necessary preparation for doing major
work at leading Universities.





86 FLORIDA A. &e M. COLLEGE
COLLEGE MATHEMATICS
MATHEMATICS l1O-Advanced Arithmetic with Methods. This
course is required for the L.I. degree. It includes a complete review
of the content material in arithmetic and the most modern methods of
problem solving. Much attention is given to the most modern
method of presenting the subject.
Texts, New Higher Arithmetic by Stone-Millis and Modern Methods
of Teaching Arithmetic by Newcomb.
MATHEMATICS 102--Collge Algebra. This course is required of all
students working for the A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences or Mechanic Arts. After a brief review of such
high school topics as Variations, Progression, Mathematical Induction
and the first two orders of the Determinant, special attention is given
to pure College Algebra. This will cover such topics as the Determi-
nant of higher order, Permutation, Combination, Theory of Equations,
Mathematics of Investments and other topics of importance.
Text, College Algebra by Sicelofj-Smith.
MATHEMATICS 103-Analytic Geometry. This course is open to
all students who have completed Mathematics 102, and is required of
those majoring in mathematics or in Mechanic Arts. It embraces
a complete study of different types of equations and their loci, polar
coordinates and transformation of coordinates.
Text, Analytic Geometry by Wentworth-Siceloff-Smith.
MATHEMATICS 104-Differential and Integral Calculus. This
course is open to those who have completed Mathematics 103 and is
required of those majoring in Mathematics or Mechanic Arts. The
work covers a study of functions, limits, differentiation and integra-
tion of algebraic and trancendental functions, mechanical application,
curve tracing, infinite series and other topics of interest to the
draughtsman.
Text, Differential and Integral Calculus by Phillips.
MATHEMATICS 201--College Astronomy. This course ip open to
all students above the Freshman class. It deals with an extensive
study of the Constellations and the Solar System, giving special atten-
tion to the earth and its relation to the other members.
., Text by Harold Jacoby.
PHILOSOPHY
PHILOSOPHY 101-Introduction to the study of Philosophy and
History of Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Required of candidates
for A.B. degree.
Credit, three semester hours.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 87
PHIoLOSOPHY 102-Introduction to Reflective Thinking. A be-
ginner's course in Logic.
Credit, three semester hours. Text, To be selected,
PHILOSOPHY 201-Ethics. The development of Moral and Religi-
ous views. The principals of Religious instruction in Public Schools
are developed.
Credit, three semester hours. Text, Drake.
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
General
PSYCHOLOGY 101-An introduction to the study of Psychology. A
beginner's course.
Credit, three semester hours.
Texts, Dashiel, Pillsbury, Woodworth, Phillips, Watson.
EDUCATIONAL
PSYCHOLOGY 201-Educational Psychology and Psychology of
- School Subjects.
Texts, Gates-Psychology for Students of Education. Cameron,
Benson-West-Skimner, Sandiford, Boltont
Credit, three semester hours.
H; ~CHILD STUDY AND PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY 102-A general study of child Life.
Credit, three hours. Text to be selected.
For Physics see Science Division.
OUTLINE OF COURSE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
FRESHMAN YEAR
101a. (1) Principles of Physical Education.
101b. (1) Personal Hygiene.
102 (2) Elementary Gymnastics, Games and Stunts.
103 (3) Elementary Dancing.
104 (4) Floor work and hand Apparatus.
'^ 1.~ -SOPHOMORE YEAR
10 (1) Athletics, Games and Floor Apparatus.
106 (2) Intermediate dancing, Gymnastics, Games and Stunts.
107 (3) Anatomy and Physiology.
108 (4) School Hygiene.





88 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
JUNIOR YEAR
201 (1) Play Ground and Community Recreations.
202 (2) History of Physical Education.
203 (3) Corrective Gymnastics and Massage.
SENIOR YEAR
204 (1) Materials and Methods in Physical Education for
205 (2) Advanced Dancing, Folk and Natural.
Grammar Grades.
205 (3) Extra Curricular Activities.
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES,
HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, GOVERNMENT, POLITICAL
HISTORY AND SOCIOLOGY
HISTORY 101-Advanced American History. This course is de-
signed for those students who intend to teach American History, and
is a comprehensive survey of the History of the United States from
1492 to the present time.
Credit, three hours.
Text, Forman's Our Republic.
HISTORY 102-Negro History. A survey of the part played by
Negro peoples in American History.
Credit, three hours.
Text, Woodson's History of the Negro.
HISTORY 103-Methods of Teaching History. The methods of
teaching history are emphasized in this course for the benefit of the
prospective teacher. This course is to be combined with History 102.
Credit, two hours.
Text, Johnson's-Teaching of History.
GOVERNMENT 101-This course is for the study of the Federal
Constitution preparing the prospective teacher for the State Examina-
tion on the Constitution. This course is combined with History 101.
Credit, two hours.
Text, Southworth's Constitution.
COLLEGE
HISTORY 104-World History (Freshman College) This course is
required of all Freshman College Students and is a survey of civiliza-
tion and contributions of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Modern Europe
and America.
Credit, three hours.
Text,





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 89
GOVERNMENT 201-This course will cover the organization and
'practices of the governments of the United States, Great Britain,
France, Germany, Russia, Italy and other countries.
Credit, five hours. Text,
HISTORY 105-Ancient History. Particular emphasis is placed upon
Greece and Rome. This course is required of all students concentrat-
ing in the Department of Social Science, and must be taken in the
sophomore year.
Credit, three hours.
Text,
ECONOMICS 101-The aim of this course which is required of all
second year students concentrating in the social studies is to give an
understanding of the principles of economic theory.
HISTORY 204-Negro History. A history of the American Negro,
and Liberia, Abyssinia, and Haiti. This course is compulsory for all
senior College students majoring in the Social studies.
Credit, five hours. Text,
HISTORY 205-A survey of important historical Literature. This
course intended primarily for senior students majoring in the social
studies, but others admitted with consent of instructor.
Credit, two hours. Text.
SOCIOLOGY 202-This course acquaints the student with the forces
and factors in rural social progress, development and adaption of
rural institutions and organizations.
Credit, three hours. Text.
HISTORY 206-Problems of the Negro. This course will train the
senior student majoring in Social studies to think about the problems
of the Negro and from time to time will hear lectures given by various
members of the faculty and others on racial problems.
Credit, three hours.
SCIENCE
SCIENCE LABORATORY FEES
There will be a charge and fee of $1.5 0 for each College student and
a charge of $1.50 for each Senior High School student as a Science and
Laboratory fee. This is payable upon registration.
SCIENCE DIVISION
/ The Science Division of the Academic Department, consists of
riolcg!, Chemistry, Physics, and General Science, ranging from Junior
.High School through four years of College. The courses are so





90 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
organized that they will meet the demands of the students from each
of the other departments, with the primary purpose, however, of pre-
paring science teachers, pre-medical students and research scholars.
In the College courses, chemistry may be selected as a major by tak-
ing at least 22 semester hours, or as a minor by taking at least 14 semes-
ter hours. Biology may be selected as a major by taking at least 15
or chemistry, as a major.
semester hours. Physics may be selected as a .minor by taking at least
8 semester hours, which is suggested to be combined with mathematics
The course prescribed for students preparing to teach science con-
sists of 18 semester hours of chemistry; 9 semester hours of biology; 8
semester hours of physics.
NOTE: Notebooks are required in all courses.
SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS
For A.B. Degree-One year of a science, not less than 6 hours.
For B.S. Degree-Major in one science, minor in one science; one
full year of another science.
For B.S. Education-One year of Biology, one year of chemistry
or physics. A comprehensive oral examination in major for
graduation.
PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS
The College reserves the right to withhold the recommendation of
any student to a Medical School who has not not maintained a "B"
average.
Schedule for students of the Two-Year Pre-Medical College Course.
FRESHMAN YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Hours
Chemistry 101__ __. 5 Chemistry 102 .__.__..- S
Mathematics 101 ___ 3 Mathematics 102_. ..... 3
Biology 101_ ... 3 Biology 104 ___.. ---. 3
English 101 ____._._... 3 English 102__ -_-- 3
Total _. .........14 Total _--_-- ___14
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Hours
Biology 202 .__ __ ...... 3 Biology 203 _.__- __- 3
Physics 101 _.- -_--____ 4 Physics 102 ___----- 4
Romance Languages 101 ___ 3 Romance Languages 102 --. 3
English 103 _______ 3 English 104 .__ -_ _-- 3
Chemistry 201 _.._.. __.---- 4 Chemistry 202 .__... __. 4
Total ....__. 17 Total ---- --__ --- 17
Sixty semester hours is the minimum requirement for Pre-Medical
students, but the above schedule will net sixty-two semester hours.
Persons desiring the B.S. degree preparatory for Medical School should
major in Biology and must include the above subjects during the four
years.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 91
DESCRIPTION OF SCIENCE COURSES
BIOLOGY
BIOLOGY 101-General Biology. Designed to lay a broad founda-
tion of the general principles of biology as a part of a college education
and as a preparation for the study of medicine. Emphasis is placed on
the animal kingdom with large range of laboratory work on typical
specimens and extensive study of the annelids. Required of sopho-
mores. Open to all College students. First semester. Two lectures
and one two-hour laboratory period each week.
Text, Foundations of Biology-Woodruff.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 102-Botany. Distribution, classification, activities,
structures of typical specimens in the plant kingdoms are studied.
Special attention is given to the origin and production areas of eco-
nomically important plants and commercial plant products. One
semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each week.
Elective for Freshmen and Sophomores.
Text, Principles of Botany-Sinnott.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 103-Botany. Continuation of Biology 102. One
semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each
week. Elective for Freshmen and Sophomores.
Text, Principles of Botany-Sinnott.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 104-Zoology of Invertebrates. Structure, life histories,
and physiology of animals are studied. Laboratory work -on speci-
mens from each of the groups of invertebrate animals phyla.
Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period
each week. Prerequisite, Biology 101. Elective for Juniors, Seniors
and Senior Normals.
Text, Galloway and Welch. Manual, Drew.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 201-Bacteriology. Introductory, study of the develop-
ment and control of bacteria in every-day life. One semester. Two
lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Elective for
Juniors and Seniors and Senior Normals. Prerequisite, Biology 101.
Text, Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 202-Comparative Anatomy. Study of the vertebrates
iift regards to similarity in structures and functions with reference
to and the dissection of the dogfish and the cat. First Semester.
Three two-hour periods each week. No credit will be given until





92 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
Biology 203 has been taken. Prerequisite, Biology 104.
Text, Vertebrate Anatomy-Kingsley. Manual-Davidson.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 203-Comparative Anatomy. Continuation of Biology
202. Second semester. Three two-hour periods each week.
Text, Vertebrate Anatomy-Kingsley. Manual-Davidson.
Credit, three semester hours.
CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY 101-General Inorganic Chemistry. Detail study of
laws and theories. Non-metallic elements and familiar compounds
are studied by means of lectures, demonstrations, recitations, problems,
and experiments. Required of all Freshmen. First semester. Three
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Text and Manual- Newall.
Credit, five semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 102-General Inorganic Chemistry. Continuation If
Chemistry 101 for which no credit will be given until Chemistry 102
has been taken. Second semester. Three lectures and two two-hour
laboratory.periods each week.
Text and Manual-Newall.
Credit, five semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 103-Qualitative Analysis. Designed to give funda-
mental principles involved in analysis, to develop the deductive reason-
ing power of the student and to broaden his knowledge of inorganic
Chemistry. Preliminary experiments of known substances are analyzed
then each student is required to report the analysis of a number of un-
known samples. For sophomores. First semester. One lecture and
three two-hour periods in laboratory each week. Prerequisite, Chemis-
try 101 and 102.
Text, Baskerville and Curtman.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY I 04-Quantitative Analysis. Elementary course of
gravi-metric and volu-metric analysis. Use of common samples,
especially of ores. For sophomores. Second semester. One lecture
and three two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Chemis-
try 103.
Text, Allen. Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 105--Agricultural Chemistry. See Agricultural
Department.
CHEMISTRY 106-Agricultural Chemistry. ---See Agricultural
Department.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 93
CHEMISTRY 107-Household Chemistry. Designed for the need
of the student of Home Economics, and deals with the applications of
chemistry to household affairs, presenting only such portions of theo-
retical chemistry as is essential to the comprehension of these applica-
tions. Prerequisite, General Inorganic Chemistry. One semester of
two lectures or recitations and two two-hour laboratory periods each
week.
Text-Snell. Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 201-Organic Chemistry. In this course the under-
lying principles of the aliphatic series. Elective. First semester. Two
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequi-
site, Chemistry 102.
Text, Outlines of Organic Chemistry-Moore. Manual-Moore
and Underwood.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 202-Organic Chemistry. To take up the compounds
of the aromatic series. Prerequisite, Chemistry 201. Second semester.
Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Text, Outlines of Organic Chemistry-Moore. Manual-Moore
and Underwood. Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 203-Advanced Organic Chemistry. Study of the
properties of important compounds in the aromatic series with empha-
sis on dyes, paints, and simple drugs. Reports on the industrial value
of organic chemistry. Elective. First semester. Two lectures and
two two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Chemistry
202.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 204-Adavnced Analytical Chemistry. Elementary
physical chemistry with emphasis on solutions. Elective either semes-
ter. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Prdrequisite, Chemistry 104 and Calculus.
Text' and Manual, Chapin.
Credit, four semester hours.
PHYSICS
PHYSICS 10--General Physics. This course presents in detail the
laws with proofs and all the various theories of the principle divisions
of physics. To cover mechanics and heat. Demonstrations, frequent
quizzes, problem notebook, each week. Prerequisite, College Algebra
and Trigonometry. No credit given until Physics 102 has been
taken.
Text, Stewart. Manual, National Notebook Sheets.
Credit, four semester hours.





94 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
PHYSICS 102-General Physics. To include magnetism, electricity,
sound and light. Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Physics 101.
Text, Stewart. Manual, National Notebook Sheets.
Credit, four semester hours.
PHYSICS 103-Mechanics and Heat. More intensive study and prac-
tical application of the laws of mechanics and heat. Emphasis on
problems. One semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory
periods each week. Prerequisite, Physics 102.
Credit, four semester hours. Text,
PHYSICS 104-Electricity, Sound and Light. More intensive study
and practical application of the laws of electricity, sound and light.
Emphasis placed on problems. One semester. Two lectures and two
two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, Physics 103.
Credit, four semester hours.
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCES
SCIENCE 4-General High School Biology. An introductory course
of plant and animal life, giving the fundamental principles and phe-
nomena of the living world. It includes the relation of organisms to
environment, heredity, and so forth, with man as the essential factor.
S. H. S. I. (Tenth Grade). Required. Year course of two recitations
and three one-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, General
Science, (Science 3).
Text and Manual, Gruenberg and Wheat.
SCIENCE 5-General High School Chemistry. To include the fun-
damentals of inorganic chemistry. For S. H. S. II, (Eleventh Grade).
Year course of two recitations and three one-hour laboratory periods
each week. Prerequisite, Science 3 and Algebra.
Text and Manual, Black and Conant.
SCIENCE 6-General High School Physics. An introduction to the
laws of mechanics, heat, magnetism, electricity, sound, and light and
their applications. Demonstrations and problems. For S. H. S. II,
(Twelth Grade). Year course of two recitations and three one-hour
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite, General Science and
Algebra and Geometry.
Text and Manual, Milikan and Gale.
WRITING
WRITING 103-This course is for the Normal Students. Special
attention is placed on methods in penmanship. Early writing, teaching
beginners and advanced students, are part of the work. Muscular
movement, uses of Thorndike's Ayer's and Freeman's scales and
practice work.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 95
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
EETHEL MAE GRIGGS, B.S., Head of Department; Advanced Clothing.
MARGARET COLLINS, B.S., Acting Head of the Department.
FRANKIE M. MCMILLAN, B.S., Clothing.
C. B. NELSON, Foods, Special Methods.
IRMA LEONA COLEMAN, High School Foods, Household Management
ORA VANN, Handicraft, Clothing.
The Home Economics Department occupies an entire hbuil&g
sufficiently equipped for thorough instruction. The aim of the depart-
ment is to prepare women to be home makers, teachers of home econom-
ics and to prepare them for vocations arising out of this broad field.
The courses are planned to meet the needs of three types of students:
1. Those who expect to be special leaders in this field of work.
2. Those preparing to teach.
3. Those wishing a general knowledge in home making. (Required
of all girls).
Advanced students are permitted to major in subjects of greater
interest to them. .A major consists of not less than thirty hours of
' work.
Smith-Hughes students are required to'have two years of vocational
experience at home during the summer, and in the school practice
k apartment before graduation.
-^ ~FOUR YEAR COLLEGE COURSE
FRESHMAN
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English 3.......... 3 English ___ 3
General' Chemistry -____3.... 3 General Chemistry_--.. 3
Biology _-__ -..... __._-.._ .-__ 3 Biology ....- __ __-... 3
French or Spanish___ __.. 3 French or Spanish .___-.. 3
Home Economics 101 (Poods)-. 2
- Home Economics 101 (Foods)-- 2 Home Economics 10S
Home Economics 106 (Clothing)-- 2 (Clothing) _-_ _.... 2
Physical Education .. __. ... (1) Physical Education- ...-.-.__-I
Freshman Talks ._.---... (1) Freshman Talks-
'IN~ S nSOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English ----...-_.... ... 3 EnlAh .....-... ........ _.... ;
French or Spanish _..-. ... __ 3 French or Spanish --........_ -..-.
Bacteriology __._..-....... 3 Bacteriology -- ....-. ....
Household Chemistry ..__.. _.-_ 3 Home Economics 107
Leave of absence year 1929-1930,





96 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
Home Economics 107 Dressmaking -------.--. ...- 3
Dressmaking --..._-.. -..-... 3 Home Economics 102
Home Economics 102 Advanced Foods ..---..--- 3
Advanced Foods __..-_. 3 Home Economics 113
Home Economics 111 Homecraft __-.......... 1
Applied Design ._ __....I History, U. S. Constitution. 3
American History .--_-.......__. 3 Physical Education --....-... ..- L
Physical Education---...- 1 Educatidn 103 ..-- ---.......... 3
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English --- -..-.............--- 3 English -..--- .. ------ -_.---..... 3
Psychology ---.....- --... 3 Edu. Psychology _--------- 3
Home Economics 214 Home Economics 219
Home Management -......--.. 2 Home Economics Ed. ----- 3
Home Economics 203 Home Economics 204
Nutrition .-.. ......_---. 2 Meal Planning, Preparation
Home Economics 210 and Serving -- ----- 2
Textiles ......- .--..__ 2 Home Economics 212
Home Economics 207 Millinery ._- ......--.___ 2
Dressmaking _----- _-- -_ 2 Home Economics 207
Physical Education ._......_.._.. 1 Dressmaking .._------ 2
Physical Education-- --.. 1
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
EnglisEnglish ___ _......_ 3 En-ish .-_ _- 3
Economics -..-_........--.--3. 3 Government _......_.. ----.-... 3
Home Economics 217 Home Economics 215
Methods of Teaching H. E. __- 3 Practice House ......_-.... 3
Home Economics 216 Home Economics 218
Home Nursing and Child Care. 2 Practice Teaching_-....__ 3
Home Economics 205 Home Economics 208
Large Quantity of Cooking __ 3 Designing and Draping _.._.3
Physical Education .....--...._.. 1 Physical Education .__-.. _____ .1
TWO-YEAR SMITH-HUGHES TEACHER-TRAINING COURSE
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Nutrition --. .__- ... 2 Foods and Nutrition _..--... 2
Textiles and Clothing ..___.. 2 Textiles and Clothing _---- 2
Education 1 .-.-- ----- ---___ 3 English ----.__ ......------- 3
English -- .._-. ....- ___ --. 3 Household Chemistry .....--- 3
Chemistry .--___ _..... _... 3 General Science .-......- .---__ 3 3
General Science or Biology ___ 3 Methods of Teaching H. E.--._ 3
Physical Education..---.. .-- 1 Physical Education--.....---...- 1





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 97
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Dietetics ..._ ... 2 Foods and Dietetics ..___. 3
Textiles and Clothing.------- 3 Textiles and Clothing ..__... 3
English ....---------._ 3 English ----_--___........ 3
Educational Psychology --_..._...- 3 Practice Teaching and
Home Management ---___.-.... 2 Observation __ 3
Handicraft -------------------. 2 Child Care and Training__ 3
Physical Education ..- -_- ____ I Rural Economics ...__.__ z
Constitution ..._ ............. 2 Physical Training 1__ 1
DESCRIPTION OF HOME ECONOMICS COURSE
HOME ECONOMICS 101-Foods-Freshman. A study of. food and
its classification, tests and analyses, and correct preparation. Market-
ing, menu planning, table service, and decorating.
HOME ECONOMICS 102-Foods-Sophomore. Food preparation in
relation to nutrition and health. A study of the newer ideas in both
the principles of nutrition and the practice of dietetics.
HOME ECONOMICS 103-Nutrition. Nutritive value of foods in
relation to body requirements and varying incomes. A study of di-
gestion under certain conditions of health diets for all ages. Requir-
ed of Juniors, one semester.
HOME ECONOMICS 104-Meal Planning, Preparation and Serving.
A consideration of marketing, preparing, planning and serving all types
of meals. Practical work involves individual preparation of meals.
Required of Juniors, one semester.
HOME ECONOMICS 205--Large Quantity Cooking. The prepara-
tion and serving of quantities of food to large groups and for special
occasions. Elective in Senior year.
HOME ECONOMICS 106-Clothing-Freslhmen. Garment construc-
tion, reviewing the uses of stitches, hand embroidery, machines, pat-
terns and their uses as applied to clothing for the family.
HOME ECONOMICS 207-Dressmaking-Sophomore. Dresses con-
structed from cotton, linen, wool and silk. The use of commercial
and drafted patterns. A special study of suitability and costs of
materials.
HOME ECONOMICS 208-Dressmaking. Art principles applying to
selection of designs. Emphasis placed on selection and identification of
textile materials, fitting and finishing garments. Elective in Junior
year.





98 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
HOME ECONOMICS 209-Designing and Draping. The uses of line
form, color and texture of material applied to individual types. The
construction of garments based on line and form without the use of
patterns.
HOME ECONOMICS 110-Textiles. A study of textiles, fabrics,
manufacturing processes, value through examinations and tests. Train-
ing for the selection of fabrics with greater wisdom and care.
HOME ECONOMICS 211-Applied Design. The underlying prin-
ciples governing structural design, to be applied to home decoration
and clothing construction.
HOME ECONOMICS 212-Millinery. Practical construction of hats,
renovation of old materials. Stress placed on selection and cultivation
of good taste in making and purchasing hats.
HOME ECONOMICS 113-Homecraft. A study of good taste and
economy in home decoration. Hooked, woven, and other types of rugs
for home use. Reed raffia, pine needles, and corn shucks used in the
construction of useful articles for the home. Chair covering and
mattress making.
HOME ECONOMICS 214-Home Management. A study of the effi-
cient use of time and money in conducting the affairs of the home.
Care, furnishing, budgeting, standards of living and social relation-
ships of the family.
HOME ECONOMICS 215-Practice House. The practical applica-
tion of Home Economics 114 in living quarters provided on the
school grounds.
HOME ECONOMICS 116-Home Nursing and Child Care. Arrange-
ment and care of sick room. Emergency remedies, and preparation of
suitable foods for invalids. A study of the development and growth of
the young child. Experiments in physical care, nutrition, and peculi-
arities of the young child. Directed by a Registered Nurse at the
school hospital.
HOME ECONOMICS 117-Methods of Teaching Home Economics.
A study of methods in home economics instruction, making lesson
plans, organization of courses of study, equipment and teaching
problems.
HOME ECONOMICS 118-Practice Teaching. Forty supervised
lessons are taught by Smith-Hughes students and those completing
the course leading to a degree. Opportunity for teaching is given in
the Children's School and in the School of Home Economics.





BULLETIN, 1929-1930 99
HOME ECONOMICS 219-Home Economics Education. A survey
of Home Economics, its place in modern education, and its relative
importance in different groups and communities.
NOTE: Candidate for graduation may take courses in American
Government and the Constitution. Credit for this work will take the
place of an examination for the Graduate State Certificate.





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