• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Managing boards
 Faculty officers
 Standing committees
 Degrees conferred
 Enrollment
 Bulletin
 Copyright
 Application
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Catalogue 1928-1929, Forty-First Edition; Announcements 1929-1930. Series 19. No. 1.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000114/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Catalogue 1928-1929, Forty-First Edition; Announcements 1929-1930. Series 19. No. 1.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1928
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000114
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB5999

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Calendar
        Page 3
    Managing boards
        Page 4
    Faculty officers
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Standing committees
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Degrees conferred
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Enrollment
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Bulletin
        Page 31
        Calendar
            Page 32
        Faculty officers
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        General information
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Colleges
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
        Index
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
    Copyright
        Page 120
    Application
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text





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: ies 19, Number 1 May 1928
Afr Negrots
CATALOGUE
1927-1928
FORTY-FIRST EDITION
BULLETIN
1928-1929
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Entered as second-class matter, August 24, 1912, at the Post Office,
Tallahassee, Florida, under the Act of August 24, 1912
1 ntrd sseon-lasma---Auut 4,1-----hePstOfie





TABLE OF CONTENTS
Calendar (1927-1928) -----.......-.......----....---....................--- 3
Board of Control .----...._-........ ..... _-.................---------------.....- 4
Faculty (1927-1928) _-_ --.. -.-...---..-------------------- 5
Committees ...-.........-. .-------------------------------.---.......-------- 11
Scholarship and Prizes --..........-... ...------- --.. ---.- ........_..............12
Degrees ------------...----------- I- _......... 13
Register of Students-
(a) Regular session students..- ...---.--... .5...... .....1-- -
(b) Summer session students ---- --...-...........24
Bulletin (1928-1929) .._.._--...-.-- ..--- ......... ---- 31
Calendar (1928-1929) -__ -... ........ .-- -- --......----32
Faculty (1928-1929) __ ........ ---------...------.... 33
Act Establishing College .... ..._ -- -------..------.----...-------------------------- 39
Registration -___ .......... .__.. .-....- ..... _..--. _... 42
Admissions _- ....-..-.. --............... ... ._'.46
Organization .--- .-.. ....-. .._............ -- 50
College and Normal Department -----.._1-.. ...... ..51
Agricultural Department .---_ --.-......._._... -- 69
Mechanic Arts Department ..--_..--..-_-........_ ----- --78
Home Economics Department .....-.....-....----.---...- 97
Nurse Training Department .-__- -- ---_..-...-....._.... ____ 101
Senior High School Department --...-----.----_-. --.104
Junior High School Department ------....---.---...-..-....- ..108
Index ....._.._......- ._ __ _- L... - 114
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CALENDAR
1927
Sept. 24 Saturday Boarding Department Opens
Sept. 26 Monday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 27 Tuesday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 28 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 24 Thursday Thanksgiving
Dec. 8 Thursday Annual Farmers' Conference
Dec. 24-26 Sat.-Mon. Christmas
1928
Jan. 2 Monday Emancipation Day
Jan. 24-27 Tues.-Friday First Semester Examinations
Jan. 30 Monday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 7-8 Wed.-Thurs. Leon County Boys Club Meeting
Apr. 20 Friday Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 4 Friday Oratorical Contest (Faculty Prize)
May 12 Saturday National Hospital Day
May 15-18 Tues.-Friday Second Semester Examinations
May 20 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 21 Monday Home Economics Exhibition
May 21 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 22 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 22 Tuesday Physical Training Exhibition
May 23 Wednesday Class Day
May 23 Wednesday Class Play
May 24 Thursday Commencement
June 11 Monday Summer School Begins
Aug. 3 Friday Summer School Closes
I





MANAGING BOARDS
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Hon. JOHN W. MARTIN, Chairman, Governor.
Hon. W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction.
Hon. H. CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State.
Hon. FRED H. DAVIS, Attorney General.
Hon. J. C. LUNING, State Treasurer.
STATE BOARD OF CONTROL
Hon. P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola.
Hon. E. L. WARTMAN, Citra..
Hon. W. B. DAVIS, Perry.
Hon. A. H. BLANDING, Tampa.
Hon. E. W. LANE, Jacksonville.
Hon. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary; Tallahassee.
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
J. R. E. LEE, President.
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean College of Arts and Sciences and Secretary.
J. B. BRAGG, Dean Mechanic Arts.
C. O. BROWN, Acting Director Agricultural Department.
J. R. E. LEE, JR., Business Manager.
MRS. N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
MAJOR C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant.
Miss E. M. GRIGGS, Dean Home Economics Department.
DR. L. H. B. FOOTE, Resident Physician.
REV. A. P. TURNER, Chaplain.





FACULTY AND OFFICERS OF
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICA
COLLEGE 19 27-1928
J. R. E. LEE
President
A. B., M. A., Bishop College; 'LL. D. Wilberforce University; Graduate work,
University of Chicago and University of Wisconsin.
OR. O'HARA LANIER
Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Prof. Education
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania; Graduate work, Columbia University.
A. L. KIDD
Acting Dean, Principal Senior High School, Bookkeeping and Accounting
A. B., University of Michigan; Special work, University of Pittsburg
CLARENCE BACOTE
Education and History
A. B., University of Kansas
M. A. LEE
Head Department of English
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate work, University of Chicago
JUANITA RABOUIN
English
A. B., University of California
DOROTHY JACKSON
Ancient and Romance Languages
PH. B., University of Chicago
*H. M. EFFERSON
Head Mathematics Department
A. B., Atlanta University; Advanced study, University of Minnesota
E. F. MANCE
High School Mathematics, College Mathematics for 1927-28
B. S., Howard University; Graduate work, Columbia
A. P. TURNER
Chaplain, Sociology, Public Speaking, Moral and Religious Education
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate work, University of Chicago





6 FLORIDA A. F M. COLLEGE
BERNICE P. CHISM
College Science, Chemistry and Biology
B. S., Howard Uni'eriin, Gr;adaau.iJr7rk. University of Chicago
F. EARL .WVANE
B. S., Bates College,-Lewiston, Me.
E. E. BRADFORD
General Science
B. S.,.A and'iM College; Advanced study, University of Chicago'
S. H. R. RLFED
Principal INli ... Hi-h S. /..-/
Chicago Normal Scll.ol,
BEATRICE COLES JONES
Junior High Si.-/ld M./'rh,,*,,rs j,,lJ English
Normal School, Atlanta University; Summer courses, Columbia and University
of Chicago
E. E. MATTHEWS
In charge of Model School, Fifth and Sixth Grades, Critic Teacher, Instructor,
School Management.
B. S., Howard Univeristy
MARION BRITTON-
Third and Fourth Grades, Model SchOol, Instructor Penmanship
Tuskegee Institute
AMY JACKSON
First and Second Grades, Model School, Kindergarten Methods
A and M College; Special work, Hampton Institute
D. ALEXANDER
Mathematics
B. S., Florida A and M College
F. E. JAMES
Public School Music, Director of Choral and Glee Clubs
A. B., Wiley University
IDALENE STRANGE
Vocal and Instrumental Music
American Conservatory
C. 0. BROWN
Acting Director, Agricultural Department Farm Projects, Husbandry
Hampton Institute





CATALOG, 1927-1928 7
L. A. MARSHALL
Teacher Training and Science
B. Sc. Agriculture, Prairie View College; B. Sc. Agtkhlture, Iowa State College;
Graduate Work, Iowa State College.
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University, Cornell University, Michigan Agricultural College
B. L. PERRY
Superintendent Farm and Truck Garden
Tuskegee-Institute; Special studyt Iowa State College
R. L. REYNOLDS
Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture
B. S., Ohio State University
JOHN D. WRAY
Agronomy, Rural Education and Entomology
B. S., M. S., Agricultural and Technical College
J. C. BALDWIN
Farm Extension Agent
B. S., Florida A and M College
*ANNIE V. WILKIE
Home Demonstration Work
L. I., Home Economics, Florida A and M College
ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean, Home Economics Department, Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking
A. B., Bishop College; B. S., Simmons University, Boston
C. B. NELSON
Domestic Science
Wilberforce University; Special work,. Hampton Institute
I. L. COLEMAN
Domestic Science
Spellman College; Special work, Columbia University
MARIE F. McMILLAN
Plain Sewing
B. S., Florida A and M College
HATTIE BRITT
Handicrafts, Elementary Manual Art
Tuskegee Institute
J. B. BRAGG
Dean Mechanic Arts
Tuskegee Institute; A. B., Talladega College





8 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
G. M. JONES
31.. i,.-... and Architectural Drawing
B. S., 4 yM. S.i University .of Michigan
M. S. SA.NDFRS
-,. .Upholstering
B. S., Agricultural and Tcclhr. ;, College, Greensboro, N. C.
-B. F: HOLNMS. JR.
* -Carpentry
Hampr-..n Institute
\' Ihl.\Xf H.i STICKNEY
t:. rtinting
State A and M College, Normal, AlathjmJ: Special course, Mergenthaler Linotype
School, Chicago, Illinois. -
'. T. REED
.u.\ ,; .M. l/'.JA.
Hampton Institute; ,Special course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago, Illinois.
Z. R.' HERCEY
Engineering and Plumbing
Tuskegee. Institute
S. L. THORPBE:
Electrical Egjinfitng
Tuskegee Institute ,
'CHAS. C. HAYLING
Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
C. B. 'N.AiBY
Practical Arts, Freehand Drawing
Geo. R. Smith College, Chicago Art School
A. C. PHILLIPS
Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute
EDW )ARD JONES
Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute
CLYDE M. BRADFORD
Shorthand and Typewriting, Business English
Florida A and M College
K'





CATALOG, 1927-1928 9
N. S. McGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant
Tuskegee Institute
E. C. WEARE
Librarian
Washburn College; Student Syracuse Library School
GEORGIANNA V. REESE
Assistant Librarian
B. S., Florida A and M College
L. H- B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
M. D., HIoward University
N. B. COOPER
Superintendent Nurses
R. N., Meharry Medical College
O. A. M. FOOTE
Nurse
R. N., Freedmans
A. S. PRATER-STEWART
Physical Educationa for Girls, Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman Institute, Hampton Institute
F. A. BYRD
Athletic Director
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania; Law Student, New York University
LOLLIE M. FLEMING
Registrar
B. S, Florida A and M College
A. W. LEE
Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
Business Manager, Custodian of Property
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania
ESTELLE D. DRAKEFORD
Bookkeeper
,Orange Park Academy





10 FLORIDA A. es M. COLLEGE
IVA HILL
Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier
Tuskegee Institute
CASTELLA A. DANIELS
Assistant in Bookkeeper's Office, Student Accounts
Florida A. & M. College
M. ARMAND JONES
Matron, Tucker Hall
Atlanta University
L. V. RIVERS
Matron, Clarke Hall
Hartshorn Memeorial College
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Lodge
Claflin College
A. D. PADDYFOTPE
Matron, Men's Union
Allen University
S. R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary
C. T. FREELAND
Secretary to Business Manager
Florida A. & M. College
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Hampton Institute
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE
Secretary to President
Wilberforce University
LETITIA REED
In Charge of Cafeteria
Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute, Petersburg, Va.
FLORA LEWIS FRANKLIN
In Charge of Laundry
Hampton Institute
W. A. POOLE
Dining Room Matron
Virginia Seminary, Lynchburg, Va.
'"First Semester.
'"Leave of absence 1927-1928.





CATALOG, 1927-1928 11
STANDING COMMITTEES
RELIGIOUS COMMITTEE Y. M. & Y. W. C. A.
A. P. TURNER, Chairman MRS. A. D. PADDYFOTE
MRS. N. S. MCGUINN DOROTHY JACKSON
MAJOR C. J. A. PADDYFOTE J. C. BALDWIN
CATALOG COMMITTEE
A. L.KIDD, Chairman G. M. JONES, Mechanic Arts
L. A. MARSHALL, Agriculture ETHEL M. GRIGGS, Home Economics
CLARENCE BACOTE, College 0. A. M. FOOTE, Hospital
RHETORICALS SCHOOL PLAYS ORATORICAL CONTESTS
TRAINING OF COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS
JUANITA RABOUIN M. A. LEE, Chairman
E. C. WEARE I. L. COLEMAN
BEATRICE C. JONES S. L. THORPE
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
J. B BRAGG, Chairman FRANZ BYRD
MAJOR C. J. A PADDYFJTE ANITA P. STEWARD
J. R. E.LEE, JR. BERNICE CHISM
W. H. STICKNEY
NIGHT SCHOOL COMMITTEE
S. L. THORPE, Principal E. E. BRADFORD
C. B. NASBY
SOCIAL COMMITTEE
C. B. NELSON, Chairmdn MRS. N. S. McGuiNN
ANNIE WILKIE MAJOR C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
MRS. CLYDE BRADFORD I. L. COLEMAN
MARIE MCMILLAN FRANZ BYRD
MUSICAL RECITALS AND ENTERTAINMENTS
F. E. JAMES, Chairman IDALENE STRANGE
A. W. LEE
RECORD AND DELINQUENT STUDENT COMMITTEE
E. F. MANCE, Chairman L. M. FLEMING, Secretary
MARION BRITRON I. L. COLEMAN
MRS. C. M. BRADFORD IDALENE STRANGE
MAJOR C. J. A. PADDYFOTE MRS. N. S. McGJINN
HATTIE BRITT
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12 'FLORIDA A. ES M. COLLEGE
DEBATES
A. P. TuRNER E. E. BRADFORD
JUANITA RABOUIN
The President of the College and the Dean are ex-officio members of all com-
mittees of the College.
SCHOLARSHIP AND PRIZES
SARAH.LEVY SCHOLARSHIP, $50.
Through the generosity of Mrs. Sarah Levy, a citizen of Tallahassee, a scholar-
ship of $150 is given yearly to a worthy young man or woman of Leon County to
pursue the four-year College Course. Hershell Lee Williams, Tallahassee, holds
this scholarship at the present time.
FACULTY ORATORICAL PRIZE, $20.
Offered to members of the College Department for oratorical effort by mem-
bers of the Faculty.
DECLAMATORY CONTEST PRIZE, $I5.
This contest is open to students of the High School Department and offered by
the Literary Societies of the High School.
COLLEGE WITS PRIZE, $5.
The College Wits, a college men's organization offers the above prize each year
to a young man of the College Department who has attained highest honors and
scholastic average.
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE, $10.
Offered by the Alumni Association to students in the College 'and Normal
classes having hte highest scholastic record.
SUSAN J. BLACK PRIZE, $5.
Established by Mrs. Susan J. Black, in Alumnus of the College and offered to
the student in the High School Department having the highest scholastic rceord.
ROSA WELTERS BUTLER PRIZE, $10.
Established by Mrs. Rosa Welters Butler, an Alumnus of the College and
offered to the student making the highest average in pianoforte music.
FRANK L. MURRAY PRIZE, $10.
Offered by Frank L. Murray, a former student of the College. A division is
made of this prize, and awards made to a High School man adjudged to be of the
greatest value to the athletic activities of the school, and to members of the Cadet
Corp for tidiness of quarters.
JOHN D. WRAY MEDAL.
Awarded to student completing the full four-year course in Agriculture with
the best record, upon the following conditions: The successful student entering
the contest must have a general average of B in every agricultural and academic
subject during the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years, and a general average of
A in his practical work and deportment. The student to be eligible in his Senior
year must have a general average of A in all his agricultural and academic subjects
and A in his practical deportment.
McMILLAN SCHOLARSHIP, $50.
Awarded to the most worthy agricultural student.
Awarded to George Conoly in 1928.





CATALOG, 1927-1928 13
DEGREES CONFERRED
IN THE CALENDAR YEAR 1927
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Austin, Charles* McFarlin, Novik Minola*
Fitzgiles, Margaret F. Reese, Georgianna Victoria
Freeman, Maud Lucile (With highest honor)
Livingston, Leedy Rose
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
King, Emanuel L. Jackson, Horace
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS
McMillan, Marie
LICENTIATE OF INSTRUCTION
EDUCATION
Anderson, Annie Lee Duncans, Olivia Margarett
Carter, Gladys Fossett, Verdie Lee
(With highest honor) Hall, Clariss M.
Castillo, Theresa T. Lewis, Ella Louis
Clark. Marie Catherine (With honor)
Douglass, Helen Clark Pinkney, Theresa Sadie
(With honor)
HOME ECONOMICS
Kennedy, Corene Mildred Wilkie, Annie V.
Rolfe, Pansy W. (With highest honor)
Scotto, J. Hazel Wilson, Vashti
COMMERCIAL GRADUATES 1927
Colston, Callie Graham, Mabel E.
Daniels, Castella Acosta Rozier, Nellie V.
Edwards, Alzade L.
NURSE TRAINING GRADUATES
Arnold, Cora





14 FLORIDA A. a M. COLLEGE
REGISTER
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
FRESHMAN B. S.
Male
Name Postoffice County
McMillan, Alzo B. Pensacola Escambia
Sutton, Harry H. Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Otis Pensacola Escambia
Female
Bryant, Ida Marie Tallahassee Leon
Fleming, L. Beatrice Jacksonville Duval
Hair, Thelma Lucretia Jacksonville Duval
Myrick, Alma Theora Tallahassee Leon
Massey, Marie Tallahassee Leon
Nixon, Jenethel Leon Madison Madison
Walker, Ethel Lucile Melbourne Breward
FRESHMAN B. S. M. A.
Allen, John Calhoun Arran Wakulla
Adderly, Julian Carlyle Lakeland Polk
Cooper, Samuel John Greenville Madison
Dobbs, David Henry Clearwater Pinellas
Greene, George Henry Ddray Palm Beach
Hargrove, Lawrence Gifford Indian River
Jackson, George Baton Sanford Seminole
Jackson, Nathaniel Jacksonville Duval
Mahone, Godfrey Ernest Jonesboro, Ark.
McDonald, Stephen Jacksonville Duval
McMurray, Orville Chicago, Ill.
McFarlin, Betram Pensacola Escambia
Portier, Rodney Miami Dade
Robinson, William Henry Tallahassee Leon
Washington, Bernard Tallahassee Leon
FRESHMAN B. S. A.
Jones, Disney Quincy Gadsden
Robinson, Canary Delray Palm Beach
SOPHOMORE B. S.
Boyd, Simon William Pensacola Escambia
Jones, Junius Ben. New Smyrna Volusia
Kirksey, Leander A. Madison Madison
Long, William Henry Cottondale Jackson
Nixon, Ulysses Grant Madison Madison
Stevens, Robert Mathews Quincy Gadsden
Stewart, Wm. Blodgett Jacksonville Duval
Thompson, Carl Leesburg Lake
SOPHOMORE B. S. M. A.
Bell, Leslie Palatka Putnam
SOPHOMORE B. S. AGRICULTURE
Godbolt, Albert Miami Dade





CATALOG, 1927-192S
SOPHOMORE EDUCATION
Schell, Cora L. Jacktsonville Duval
JUNIOR B. S.
Delancy, Ellen Jane West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Hawkins, Godfrey William Orlando Orange
JUNIOR B. S. IN AGRICULTURE
Johnson, Fred W. Edgar Putnam
JUNIOR 'B. S. IN EDUCATION
Bates, Winifred Palatka Putnam
JUNIOR B. S. IN MECHANIC ARTS
Lockhart, John Wesley Tampa Hillsborough
Williams, Herschell Lee Tallahassee Leon
JUNIOR B. S. IN HOME ECONOMICS
Britt, Floy Lenora Campbellton Jackson
JUNIOR A. B.
Hart, Leona Jacksonville Duval
SENIOR B. S.
Cady, Davis A. DeFuniak Springs Walton
Lewis, Alphonso Leroy Orlando Orange
Nixon, William Verdier Madison Madison
SENIOR B. S. IN EDUCATION
Anderson, Miriam Jackson Tampa Hiilsborough
SENIOR B. S. IN AGRICULTURE
Bragg, Eugene James Tallahassee Leon
Conoly, George Whitfield Panama City Bay
Kenon, Reubin Rush Quincy Gadsden
Gilchrist, James Franklin Lakeland Polk
Hamilton, William McKinley Tampa Hillsborough
Hall, John Lee Oviedo Seminole
Maxey, William Singleton Ocala Marion
SENIOR B. S. IN HOME ECONOMICS
Duncan, Modeste Pensacola Escambia
Noble, Edna Fernandina Nassau
SENIOR B. S. IN MECHANIC ARTS
Evans, St. Clair Perry Taylor
Whitehead, Anthony Julius Jacksonville Duval
Rolfe, Everette Richard Tampa Hillsborough
SENIOR A. B.
Stirrup, Jr., E. W. Franklin Cocoanut Dade





16 FLORIDA A. 6 M. COLLEGE
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
JUNIOR EDUCATION
Allen, Daisy Tallahassee Leon
Gordon, Essie Mae Ft. Pierce Saint lucky
Henry, Amanda Jacksonville Duval
Henderson, Ida"Rebecca Jacksonville Duval
Jackson, Hallie Okeechobee Okeechobee
Odom, Alice Jacksonville Duval
Sweet, Lillie Mae St. Petersburg. Pinellas
Jackson, Harriet Jacksonville Duval
Gore, Seth Tallahassee Leon
Weatherspool, William -Bainbridge, Ga. Decatur
SENIOR EDUCATION
Anderson, Irene Reba Tampa Hillsborough
Collins, Emma Jacksonville Duval
Ellison, Maude Miami Dade
Mattox, Josie Marie Lake City Columbia
Mattox, Viola Gertrude Tallahassee Leon
McRae, Waltee Mamie Jacksonvill Duval
Preston, Pollie Bell Quincy Gadsden
Pauline, Lucile Joan Jacksonville Duval
Robinson, Catherine Jacksonville Duval
Starr, Fannie Showers Homeland Dade
Thomas, Ruth Beatrice St. Petersburg Pinellas
Wilson, Rosa Belle Miami Dade
JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Frazier, Celestine B. Pensacola Escambia
Gordon, Eunice Thelma Thomasville, Ga ... -
Robinson, Clyde Tampa Hillsborough
McGinnis ,Iola W. Tarpon Springs Pinellas
SENIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Cooper, Bernice Octavio Fernandina Nassau
Foster, Lola Mae Pensacola Escambia
Lynch, Mary Elizabeth Pensacola Escambia
Williams, Virgie Marie Pensacola Escambia
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
JUNIOR CLASS
Anderson, Octavie Tallahassee Leon
Harris, Rosa B. Jacksonville Duval
Sallette, Thelma Jacksonville Duval
Sermons, Jessie Valdosta, Ga -
Simmons, Ynestra Pensacola Escambia
Washington, Hettie Lakeland Polk
Martin, Dorothy Clearwater Pinellas
Yarn, Oscar Clearwater Hillsborough
SENIOR CLASS
Davis, Hattie Tampa Hillsborough
Stewart, Alma Jacksonville Duval
Wilson, Pollie Quincy Gadsden





CATALOG, 1927-1928 17
Name City County
Williams, Georgia U. Pensacola Escambia
Blue, Theo. R. Tampa Hillsborough
Hoffman, Alphonso Sanford Seminole
Sweet, W. Barton Bartow Polk
TAILORING
Boyd, Mary Elizabeth Pensacola Escambia
Merrit, Frank Marianna Jackson
NURSE TRAINING DEPARTMENT
SENIOR NURSES
Doyle, Dorothy Miami Dade
Lundy, Emmette Alveo Gainesville Alachuai-
Nash, Dorothy Ethel Tallahassee Leon
JUNIOR NURSES
Debose, Viola Gainesville Alachua
Jefferson, Annie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Knox, Marie Tampa Hillsborough
Shade, Lela Aldonia Clearwater Pinnelas
Sweet, Cyntha Elizabeth Bartow Polk
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
*SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL III
Ayers, Samuel Willie Madison Madison
Brown, Lorenzo Bartow Polk
Barnett, Chas Gillislee Jacksonville Duval
Beasley, Sylvester Jacksonville Duval
Cosby, Felix Edward Orlando Orange
Collins, Mack Walter Orlando Orange
Greau, St. Elmo Key West Monroe
Green, Douglass Delray Palm Beach
Gilbert, Louis Phillip Sanford Seminole
Hart, Lorenzo Jas. Jacksonville Duval
Lewis, David T. Jacksonville Duval
Minott, Curby L. Sanford Seminole
Magbe, Geo. Henry Tallahassee Leon
Nims, Frank Robert Tallahassee Leon
Norwood, Edwin Fred Tallahassee Leon
Rogers, James. Wm. Tampa Hillsborough
Ritchie, Oscar Washington St. Petersburg Pinellas
Smith, Fred D. Apalachicola Franklin
Thomas, Ulysses West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Wilkins, Oliver W. Madison Madison
Williams, Joshua W. Sanford Seminole
Burt, Laurel V. Trilby Pasco
Brown, Ellen C. Tallahassee Leon
Cheatman, Grace M. DeFuniak Walton
Cobb, Elvira Josephine West Palm Beach Palm Beach
*This is the Senior High School Graduating Class.





18 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
Name City County
Fields, Sallie Lee Sanford Seminole
Holly, Winnie B. St. Petersburg Pinellas
Hill, Bridie Oliver Leesburg Lake
Kinder, Josephine E. Monticello Jefferson
McKinney, Ruth Jacksonville Duval
Nixon, Essie Mae Valdosta, Ga.... ...... -
Proctor, Ora Lee Deland Volusia
Simmons, Rephillia Gainesville Alachua
Speed, Hisetta V. West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Stewart, Ritchie Tallahassee Leon
Taylor, Alberta Tallahassee Leon
Thompson, Enith M. Coconut Grove Dade
Taylor, Alma Mary Ft. Myers Lee
Williams, Rachel Edith Quincy Gadsden
Washingtota, Ruby Belle Tallahassee Leon
Moore, Olive New Smyrna Polk
Williams, Cornett Lakeland Broward
Way, Lillia Pompano Polk
Young, Gussie Lee Bartow Franklin
Young;, Geraldine Wilfort Apalachicola Seminole
Martin, Ireta Sanford Volusia
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL I I
Anderson, Louis Napoleon Palatka Putnam
Black, Henry Cheatham Greenville Jefferson
Burton, George Washington Sanford Seminole
Clark, Louis Pearl Thomasville, Ga. Thomas
Clark, Edward Apalachicola Franklin
Fort, Lamar Live Oak Suwannee
Green, Alphonso Alonzo Gainesville Alachua
Gurley, David Tallahassee Leon
Holland, Theodis Hiawatha West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Howard, Oscar Decosta Miami Dade
Hamilton, Leroy Roscoe Sanford Seminole
Hampton, Charles Greenville Jefferson
Jones, Gamabel Hezekiah Orlando Orange
Jackson, Jr., John Henry Tampa Hll.b.,,rugh
Kidd, Charles Duquesne, Pa. AllIeheny
Meuse, Jesse Lee Sanford Seminole
Lowen, Glinnis Ft. Myers Lee
Mills, Lucius Robert Tampa Hillsborough
McFadden, Alphonso Harold Tallahassee Leon
Perry, John Allen Miami Dade
Pinder, Frank Key West Monroe
Simmons, Louis Tampa Hillsborough
Smith, Hoskie Harold Tallahassee Leon
Smith, Daniel Charles Punta Gorda Charlotte
Taylor, Preston Charles St. Petersburg Pinellas
Verdier, Marcus Tallahassee Leon
Wright, Hanson Wallace Ft. Myers Lee
Wilson, Wesley Oneal Leesburg Lake
Youngblood, Ozie Delray Palm Beach
Adams, Melissa Winter Park Orange
Bellamy, Hattie Gertrude Starke Bradford





CATALOG, 1927-1928 19
Name City County
Butler, Lindell Palatka Putnam
Brown, Lucille Lillian Orlando Orange
Barco, Johnnie Dorthy St. Petersburg Pinellas
Black, Ruth High Springs Alachua
Borden, Theresa Marie Live Oak Suwannee
Evans, Jessie Bell Alachua Alachua
Ford Sudelle Juanita Tallahassee Leon
Ford, Rebecca Jacksonville Duval
Gardner, Irma Tampa Hillsborough
Guions, Alberta Beatrice Lakeland Polk
Hawkins, Thelma Lucile Tallahassee Leon
Holden, Evangeline Harvey West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Hadley, Vernease Tampa Hillsborough
Hawkins, Rosa Lee Orlando Orange
Hawkins, Janie Orlando Orange
Henry, Minnie Apalachicola Jackson
Hunt, Hila Mae Brooksville Hernando
Jones, Hattie Mae Sarasota Sarasota
Jackson, Geraldine Lou Sanford Seminole
Jones, Sadie Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Livingston, Annie Mae Apalachicola Jackson
Livingston, Lillian Marianna Jackson
Miller, Eloise Tallahassee Leon
Martin, Mary Thelma Sanford Seminole
Mayes, Mildred A. Ocala Marion
McFadden, Ethel B. Tallahassee Leon
McMeekin, Susie Alice Edgar Putnam
Robert, Ruby Mae Winter Park Orange
Reid, Ethel Sarasota Sarasota
Speed, Elnora Odessa West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Speed, Lillian West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Smith, Lucy Pensacola Escambia
Turner, Frankie Oliver Quincy Gadsden
Watts, Edna Lucile Gainesville Alachua
Wood, Rosena Bainbridge, Ga. Decatur
Williams, Katherine St. Petersburg Pinellas
Williams, Irene St. Petersburg Pinellas
Waldron, Lillian High Springs Alachua
Kinder, Beatrice Monticello Jefferson
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL I
Allen, Roy Arran Wakulla
Banks, Lucas Anniston, Ala Calhoun
Bevel, Thomas Edison Live Oak Suwannee
Bragg, Jubie B. Tallahassee Leon
Cunningham, Grover C. Tampa Hillsborough
Crosby, Albert F. Madison Madison
Cameron, Wm. Roderick West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Evans, Samuel Jas. Jacksonville Duval
Ford, Algie Russell Tallahassee Leon
Glenn, Lucius Spencer Clearwater Pinellas
Garcia, Joseph Anthony Key West Monroe
Hargrett, Jas. T. Apalachicola Franklin
Hamilton, Alfredo Bartow Polk
Jones, Eugune R. New Smyrna Volusia





20 FLORIDA A e M COLLEGE
Name City County
Kershaw, Joseph Long Key West Monroe
Lipscombe, Thomas Tallahassee Leon
Lewis, Horace Pompano Broward
Morgan, Wm. Oscar Tampa Hillsborough
Mathew, Jerome Emory Tallahassee Leon
Nickson, Dallas Homeland Polk
Moses, Vardy Aaron Anniston, Ala. Calhoun
Pheonix, William Tampa Hillsborough
Robinson, Harry E. Deland Volusia
Simmons, Cleveland M. Altamonte Springs >c..l
Saxon, Maxwell Walker Lakeland Pblk
Scott, Fred Jackson Tallahassee Leon
Aikins, Bessie Mae West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Bragg, Rebecca E. Tallahassee Leon
Broxton, Elvesta Wabasco Indian River
Burt, Thelma Trilby Pasco
Bryant, Elnora D. Manatee Manatee
Cook, Willie Mae New Smyrna Volusia
Chester, Bertha Tallahassee Leon
Calloway, Elizabeth Palmetoo Manatee
Carnegie, Thelma Miami Dade
Chandler, Dannie Mae Leesburg Lake
Clark, Corene Theresa Daytona Beach Volusia
Dabney, Maxine Miriam Leesburg Lake
Dennis, Josephine E. Apalachicola Franklin
Ford, Sallie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Felder, Peachy Lee Lakeland Polk
Franklin, Lena E. Lake City Columbia
Goodwin, Louise Palmetto Manatee
Hall, Margaret Lake City Columbia
Hood, Johnnie Belle Perry Taylor
Hughes, Margaret Jacksonville Duval
Henry, Ethelda High Springs Alachua
Hooper, Aramentha E. Sanford Seminole
Isral, Annie Belle Orlando Orange
Isler, Bernice Althea Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Aretha Tallahassee Leon
Jackson, Marjorie Daytona Beach Volusia
Johnson, Marjorie Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Zelma Florenct Villa Polk
Johnson, Jessie Lee Tallahassee Leon
King, Inez Hattie Leesburg Lake
Mansfield, Arbie Delray Palm Beach
McMillian, Myrtle E. New Smyrna Volusia
McKee, Lucretia Dean Fruitland Park Lake
McKinney, Willie Mae Manatee Manatee
Parson, Annie Grace Daytona Beach Volusia
Smiley, Mirian Lizzie Ocala Marion
Simms, Annie Mae Mims Brevard
Stewart, Rosa T. Orlando Orange
Stewart, Jennie Tallahassee Leon
Thomas, Shellie E, Madison Madison
Thomas, Maude Apalachicola Franklin
Taylor, Cecilia Helen Tarpon Springs Pinellas
Twine, Fannie C. Tallahassee Leon
Watson, Christelle L. Marianna Jackson
Womack, Jessie Tallahassee Leon
Watson, Lucile Elizabeth Marianna Jackson
L --Jc k pson





CATALOG, 1927-1928 21
Name City County
Williams, Alice C. Plant City Hillsborough
Williams, Vera Mae Tallahassee Leon
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
:JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL III
Allen, Gretwood Orlando Orange
Alexander, Frank Edward Jacksonville Duval
Bailey, Carlton Deerfield Broward
Berry, Theo. Franklin Clearwater Pinellas
Boston, Prince Butler Oviedo Seminole
Chester, Robert Tallahassee Leon
Ellerbe, Jas. A. Palatka Putnam
Faircloth, Theodore Daytona Beach Volusia
Grant, Radford Deerfield Broward
Harris, Reed Lakeland Polk
Harris, Albert Carrabell Franklin
Hunt, Lester Nero Brooksville Hernando
Jackson, Lorenzo Jacksonville Duval
James, Jessie West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Jackson, John Henry Tampa Hillsborough
Joyner, Henry Lakeland Polk
Keller, James Franklin Starks Bradford
Lott, Cauly New Symrna Volusa
Roberts, James Miami Dade
Russ, Lindy Pensacola Escambia
Smith, Rufus Wilkins Apalachicola Franklin
Austin, Essie Mae Carrabelle Franklin
Brown, Emma Lee DeFuniak Walton
Bailey, Josie Offermat, Ga. Pierce
Bell, Catherine Tallahassee Leon
Banks, Alice Rosa Tallahassee Leon
Brooks, Ruby Willie Deerfield Broward
Blakely, Alice Eulee Tallahassee Leon
Bailey, Hazel Tallahassee Leon
Cavis, Ruby Lee Tallahassee Leon
Combs, Theora Tallahassee Leon
Davis, Mae Belle Jacksonville Duval
Edward, Marie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Edgecomb, Thelma M. West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Ford, Augusta Tallahassee Leon
Frazier, Mary Laura Tallahassee Leon
Ganby, Willie L. Jacksonville Duval
Gavin, Joanna Frances Wakulla Wakulla
German, Hilda Mae Tallahassee Leon
Griffin, Minerva M., Deland Volusia
Irvin, Louise Blountstown Calhoun
Jones, Garlzie DeFuniak Walton
Jackson, Francine E. Carrabelle Franklin
Jackson, Louise Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Dianna Miami Dade
Lockett, Laura Jacksonville Duval
Miller, Annie Tallahassee Leon
Niles, Vivian Anna Orlando Orange
Philyaw, Osceola Margie Bainbridge Decatur
Richardson, Ernestine Jacksonville Duval
Simms, Myrtle Althamease West Palm Beach Palm Beach
"This is the Junior High School Graduating Class.





22 FLORIDA A es M COLLEGE
Name City County
Smith, Christine Waldo Alachua
Thompson, Hattie Louise Reddick Marion
Wilson, Bertha Mae Palatka Putnam
Wells, Fannie Pearl Miami So. Dade
Wallace, Christine J. Lisbon Lake
Woodberry, Pearl Tallahassee Leon
Young, Virginnia Ruth Metcalf, Ga.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL I I
Abner, James Henry Tallahassee Leon
Alderman, Fraddie R. New Smyrna Volusia
Hudson, George Tampa Hillsborough
Johnson, George Orlando Orange
Proctor, William Rufus Deland Volusia
Williams, Rufus Benhaden Wakulla
Anderson, Odell H. Tallahassee Leon
Britt, Myria Lee Campbellton Jackson
Bailey, Hazel Curt Tallahassee Leon
Banks, Ruby Mae New Smyrna- Volusia
Berry, Mildred Tallahassee Leon
Hector, Gussie St .Petersburg Pinellas
Killens, Donella Gretna Gadsden
Killens, Mindora Gretna Gadsden
Roberts, Ruby Sanderson Baker
Rhoulace, Belle Pensacola Escambia
Robinson, Eva Deland Volusia
Stirrup, Grace E. Coconut Grove Dade
Speights, Lovenia Tallahassee Leon
Sikes, Hollis Eunice Dade City Pasco
Monroe, Evangeline i Edgar Putnam
Twine, Louise Tallahassee Leon
Patterson, Lucinder Tallahassee Leon
Wood, Georgia Louise Pensacola Escambia
White, Rixie Cottondale Jackson
Washington, Rosa Lakeland Polk
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL I
Armitage, Lloyd Jacksonville Duval
Bragg, Robert Tallahassee Leon
Clark, George A. Lake City Colurmbia
Greene, Caesar William Beachton, Ga.
Kirkland, Henry Lee Millville Bay
Williams, Ira Lisbon Orange
Aikens, Mozell High Springs Alachua
Coleman, Geneva T allahassee Leon
Fitzgerald, Gladys Tallahassee Leon
Hill, Maggie Willie Tallahassee Leon
Hill, Maretha Mae Tallahassee Leon
Manning, Hazel Lee Tallahassee Leon
McFadden, Clarissa E. Tallahassee Leon
Rollins, Bidesta Tallahassee Leon
Turner, Carrie Inez Tallahassee Leon
Turner, Willie Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Wheeler, Dorothy Orlando Orange





CATALOG, 1927-1928 23
NIGHT STUDENTS
Name City County
Armstead, Gerson Ft. Myers Lee
Cosby, Wesley Orlando Orange
Franklin, Eddie James Arran Wakulla
Glymph, James Ocai Marion
Harley, John Tallahassee Leon
Holloway, Leroy Florahome Putnam
Harper, William Lake City Columbia
Langston, Thomas Arrar Wakulla
Monroe, Moody Edgar Putnam
Nickson, Dallas G. Homeland Polk
Robinson, John Jacksonville Duval
Ross, David Charles Jacksonville Duval
McNeil, Willie Lee Panama City Bay
Sams, Willie Lee Fairfield Marion
Sampson, Samuel Orlando Orange
Thompson, Robert Benjamin Tallahassee Leon
Tutson, Leroy Hawthrone Alachua
Williams, Joseph Tallahassee Leon
Donaldson, Lois Bainbridge Decatur
Gantling, Mildred Jacksonville Duval
Morgan, Ethel Arena Apopka Orange
Shaw, Dollie Daytona Volusia
Smith, Maggie Lou Tallahassee Leon
Thompson, Rosa Lee Tallahassee Leon
UNCLASSIFIED
Peak, Beranton Lakeland Polk





24 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
SUMMER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 1927
Name City
Anderson, George C. Wewahitchka, Fla.
Anderson, Hermina Lee Jacksonville, Fla.
Aarons, Maxey j Jasper, Fla.
Adger, Jessie St. Augustine, Fla.
Anderson, Miriam J. Tampa, Fla.
Allen, John Aaron, Fla.
Adams, Leona Tallahassee, Fla.
Austin, Chas. Eiris West Palm Beach, Fla.
Ayers, Samuel t Madison, Fla.
Austin, Edith Jacksonville, Fla.
Anderson, Eloise Quincy, Fla.
Alexander, Daphne B. Orlando, Fla.
Adams, Maggie Tallahassee, Fla.
Allen, Daisy L:' Tallahassee, Fla.
Adams, Esther '. Moultrie, Ga.
Alston, Warrerl Hielen Ocala, Fla.
Adderly, N. L.- Lakeland, Fla.
Brown, F ir.ic 1-.,e Tallahassee, Fla.
Brown, Ethel Jacksonville, Fla.
Bailey, Hazel i Tallahassee, Fla. '
Braceful, Moelle Miami, Fla.
Barnet, Charles G. Jacksonville, Fla.
Belfon, Frankie Theresa Miami, Fla.
Belfon, Elsie Miami, Fla.
Boyd, Blanche General Reddick, Fla.
Bragg, Robert Lloyd Tallahassee, Fla.
Bryant, Lucinda M. Lake Wales, Fla.
Bragg, Eugene James Tallahassee, Fla.
Benboe, Elsie M. Pensacola, Fla.
Bailey, Maurice Punta Gorda, Fla.
Bowens, Estella Miami, Fla.
Bently, Bertie Coconut Grove, Fla.
Blake, Claronell Miami, Fla.
Bryant, Charlotte Hollie Tampa, Fla.
Beramy, Hattie Starks, Fla.
Blanks, Elsie B. Tampa, Fla.
Bailey, Josie Dunellon, Fla.
Burnett, Verdelle Pensacola, Fla.
-Bently, Patsy Lee New Smyrna, Fla.
Brown, Netta Blanchette Sanford, Fla.
Branham, Dorothy C. New Smyrna, Fla.
Bisson, Vera Mae Miami, Fla.
Baker, Effie Lucile Marianna, Fla.
Burnett, Minnie C. Pensacola, Fla.
Britt, Floy Campbellton, Fla.
Brown, Gertrude E. Pensacola, Fla.
Butler, Lessie Mae Cario, Ga.
Bennett, Sarah J. Quincy, Fla.
Bowers, Georgia Havana, Fla.
Barnes, Essie G. Jacksonville, Fla.
Bryant, Ida Tallahassee, Fla.
Brooks, Oliveta Tallahassee, Fla.
Berry, Mildred Tallahassee, Fla.
Brown, Ruth B. Deerfield, Fla.
Patterson, Laura Benhaden, Fla.
Blakely, Alice St. Augustine, Fla.





CATALOG, 1927-1928 25
Brooks, Allie Jacksonville, Fla.
Barge, E. J. Pensacola, Fla.
Bynes, Ruth Reese St. Petersburg, Fla.
Brvant, Lillian F. .. West Palm Beach, Fla.
Bellamy, Jeanette Ocala, Fla.
Bland, Bertha Jacksonville, Fla.
Carter, Ola Mae Americus, Ga.---.'
Carlton, Hattie Tallahassee, Fla.
Conoly, Cora Orlando, Fla.
Clifton, Nella ', Miami, Fla.
Cambridge, Clarinda West Palm Beach, Fla
Coleman, Lucile G. Jacksonville, Fla.
Crooms, A. H. Orlando, Fla.
Carter, Thomas Wiley Jacksonville, Fla.
Carter, Mageie L. Jacksonville, Fla.
Cason, Lilla G. Live Oak, Fla.
Chavis, Ruby Lee Tallahassee, Fla.
Clark, Lou;s Pearl Thomasville, Ga.
Dawkins. Lillie E. Jacksonville, Fla
Davis. Dovie Tallahassee, Fla.
DeVaughn. Jesie V. Pensacola, Fla.
naves. Daisy B. Tallahassee, Fla.
DeShazoir. Jennetta Miami, Fla.
Duncan, Fssie '. Greenwood, Fla.
Duncan, Modeste, Pensacola, Fla.
Daniels. Castella .a Jacksonville, Fla.
Davs, Mattie F. Gainsville, Fla.
DuBignon, Mary L. Jacksonville, Fla.
Fmanuel, Camilla Jacksonville, Fla.
Fllerson, Fanny Young St. Augustine, Fla.
Ellison, Maude Miami, Fla.
Fllison, Charlotte Miami, Fla.
Evans, Mattie Clearwater, Fla.
Eagle, Hattie L. Watkins Clearwater, Fla.
Frazier, Elizabeth P. Tallahassee, Fla. -
Frazier, Erline C. Charleston, S. C.
Fisher, Mary Webster, Fla.
Frazier, Wm. A. Tallahassee, Fla.
Frazier, Mary Laura Tallahassee, Fla.
Foster, Ollie J. Deerfield, Fla.
Ford, Algie Tallahassee, Fla.
Freeman, Maud Madison, Fla.
Fisher. Marie St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ford, Lucile Robinson Ta'!ahassee, Fla.
F;tzgerald, Gladys Tallahassee, Fla.
Ford. Sudella Tallahassee, Fla.
Ford, Rebecca Tallahassee, Fla.
Faust. Arabella Clearwater, Fla.
Fogarite, Holland Hall Jacksonville, Fla.
Grambling, Ethel R. Sanford, Fla.
Gilmore, Salina Marianna, Fla.
Glover, Loraine B. Plant City, Fla.
Green, George Delray, Fla.
Gilchrist, James Lakeland, Fla.
Gilmore, R. T. Marianna, Fla.
Godbolt, Albert J. Kansas City, Kans.
Glover, Ethel 'L. Plant City, Fla.
Gavin, Ophelia Wakulla, Fla.
Gavin, Blanche Wakulla, Fla.





26 FLORIDA A. g M. COLLEGE
Harris, Pauline V. Leesburg, Fla.
Howard, Oliva Wakulla, Fla.
Huggian, Alice L. Ocala, Fla.
Hughes, Mamie J. St .Petersburg, Fla.
Hughes, Dolly Tallahassee, Fla.
Henderson, Iola Tampa ,Fla.
Hayes, Vera S. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hamilton, Charlie Mae Tampa, Fla.
Hamilton, Kitty Mae Seffner, Fla.
Hansberry, Lillie Mae Havana, Fla.
Hayes, Ruby Beatrice Tallahassee, Fla.
Hunter, Viola Tallahassee, Fla.
Hyatt, Pauline Wakulla, Fla.
Harris, Eleanor Arcadia, Fla.
Holloway, N. L. St. Augustine, Fla.
Hicks, Bella Pensacola, Fla.
Hill, Vivian L. Jacksonville, Fla.
Holmes, Gertrude Jasper, Fla.
Hamilton, William M. Tampa, Fla.
Isler, Bernice A. Tallahassee, Fla.
Johnson, Minnie S. E. Jacksonville, Fla.
~nings, C. William Jacksonville,' Fla.
Johnson, Gertrude Hill Edgar, Fla.
'cl-son, Mathew James Corrondial, Fla.
Tovner. Ruth PlAl City, Fla.
Jackson, Geo B. Sanford, Fla.
Johnson, Ethel Plant City, Fla.
Taclkson, Katie R. Pensacola, Fla.
Jackson, Frank M. Cottondale, Fla.
Johnson, Frances G. Tallahassee, Fla.
Jones, Agnes (deceased) Gainsville, Fla.
'?ckson, Ruth Edwena Pensacola, Fla.
Johnson, Julia B Columbia, S. C.
Jackson, Rubianna D. Jacksonville, Fla,
Tones, Disney T. Quincy, Fla.
Jefferson, Annie Mae Tallahassee, Fla.
Johnson, Alma Miami, Fla.
Jackson, Effie Mae Jacksonvill, Fla.
King, Ondria Jacksonvill, Fla.
Kenon, Reubin Quincy, Fla.
Kennedy, Corene M. Fernandina, Fla.
Kennedy, Blanch Sparr, Fla.
Kilker, Pearl Milton, Fla.
Kelley, Annie B. Pensacola, Fla.
Kennebrew, Rosa Lee Palatka, Fla.
Long, E. L. Pensacola, Fla.
Lavette, Padro Jacksonville, Fla.
Taylor, Alberta Tallahassee, Fla.
Toney, Pauline Deerfield, Fla.
Lewis, Suwannee Tallahassee, Fla.
Livingston, Celestine Tallahassee, Fla.
Lowe, Eulise S. Pensacola, Fla.
Longworth, Jackson C, Bartow, Fla.
Laws, Christine Ormand, Fla.
Livingston, Lillian Marianna, Fla.
Lindsey, Jimmie Grace Miami, Fla.
Mobley, Prudence J. Leesburg, Fla.
Martin, Annie E. Dunnellon, Fla.





CATALOG, 1927-1928 27
Moore, Nellie B. Miami, Fla.
Mitchell, Georgia 'P. Lake City, Fla.
Meuse,- Jesse Sanford, Fla.
Merrit, Frank Marianna, Fla.
Moncrief, Leila W. Ft. Meyers, Fla.
Mason, Mabelle William Jacksonville, Fla.
Mangram, Marie Higgins Jacksonville, Fla.
Madison, Lillian B. Jacksonville, Fla.
Mickens, Mollie West Palm Beach, Fla.
Major, Ethel L. Tampa, Fla.
Mickens, Molley Key West, Fla.
Meuse, Carrie W. Kissimmee, Fla.
Mullen, Leroy O'Brien, Fla.
McClain, Anna D. Lakeland, Fla.
Major, Anthony J. Tampa, Fla.
Mobley, Clara Tallahassee, Fla.
Maxey, William S. Ocala, Fla.
Moore, Maggie N. Pensacola, Fla.
Martin, B. E. Palatka, Fla.
Matthews, Ruth Tallahassee, Fla.
Malloy, Carrie L. Palatka, Fla.
McFadden, Ethel Tallahassee, Fla.
Myers, Estelle Lakeland, Fla.
Myrick, Beatrice Jacksonville, Fla.
Mann, Luethel Midway, Fla.
Murray, Richard Jacksonville, Fla.
Minor, Isabelle DeFuniak, Fla.
Mattox, Viola G. Tallahassee, Fla.
McFarland, A. E. Miami ,Fla.
Milliner, Myrtle Gretna, Fla.
Mattox, Josie Lake City, Fla.
McAdams, Jessie Welliston, Fla.
Madison, Wi. Jacksonville, Fla.
McFarlin, Novik M. Pensacola, Fla.
McMillan, Marie F. Pensacola, Fla.
Nash, Dorothy Tallahassee, Fla.
Nearn, Bertha J. Lakeland, Fla.
Noble, Edna A. Fernandina, Fla.
Neely, Arimetha Key West, Fla.
Noriega, Emma Tampa, Fla.
Nims, Frank Robert Tallahassee, Fla.
Norwood, Edwin Tallahassee, Fla.
Newbern, Elizabeth Jacksonville, Fla.
Pollard, Margaret Tallahassee, Fla.
Prince, Bessie Johnson Jacksonville, Fla.
Perry, Annie Louise Tallahassee, Fla.
Primous, Sadie Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Palmer, Estelle Jacksonville, Fla.
Perkins, Susie Tallahassee, Fla.
O'Neil, Edna Jacksonville, Fla.
Patterson, Hannah V. Palatka, Fla.
Pratt, 'Olivia Tampa, Fla.
Pottsdamer, Pinkey L. Tallahassee, Fla.
Pinkney, Sarah G. St. Petersburg, Fit.
Pickens, E. Verdelle Pensacola, Fla.
Pearson, Lillie Jacksonville, Fla.
Patten, Viola K. Pensacola, Fla.
Roberts, Edythe M. Miami, Fla.





28 FLORIDA A. S M. COLLEGE
Reid, Emma Tallahassee, Fla.
Rainey, Bernice Pensacola, Fla.
Roule, 'Katie V. Chipley, Fla.
Reeves, Nellie B. Pensacola, Fla.
Rutland, Rosa C. Reddick, Fla.
Roberts, Marie D. Miami, Fla.
Reese, Myrtle Tallahassee, Fla.
Robinson, William Tallahassee, Fla.
Rolfe, Everett R Tampa, Fla.
Rollins, Emma G. Tallahassee, Fla.
Rainey, Addie E. Lakeland, Fla
Robinson, Bessie Tallahassee ,Fla.
Rutherford, Wm. j I ..,.. 11.. Fla.
Sanchez, Firman Jacksonville, Fla.
Small, Clara Quincy, Fla.
Sharp, Lula J. Eustis, Fla.
Schell, Cora L. Jacksonville, Fla.
Speed, Nancy Clearwater, Fla.
Stewart, Ritchie Bell Tallahassee, Fla
Stirrup, E. W. Franklin Coconut Grove ,Fla.
Shedrick, Vera West Palm Beach, Fla.
Sunday, Idella Pensacola, Fla.
Smith, Lucy A. Quincy, Fla.
Siples, Oto T. Red Bay, Fla.
Stephens, Helen L. D. Jacksonville, Fla.
Stroman, Carelle Lloyd, Fla.
Scott, Hazel Miami, Fla.
Simms, John A. Jacksonville, Fla.
Sanders, Louise Apalachicola, Fla.
Sweeting, Cloie D. Miami, Fla.
Sutton, Lillian Mae Miami, Fla.
Speed, Lillie L. West Palm Beach, Fla.
Speed, Hisetta Veronica West Palm Beach, Fla.
ganders, Mabel Deland, Fla.
Spann, Alberta Pensacola, Fla.
Starr, Fannie S. Homestead, Fla
Stays, Elbe Fernandina, Fla.
Simms, Carrie Pensacola ,Fla.
Simmons, G. Mae Tacksonville ,Fla.
Sands, Winifred Key West, Fla.
Symonette, Mizpha Mami, Fla
Strother, Mamie C. Miami, Fla
Simpson, Lillian Havana ,Fla.
Smith, Susie A. Tallahassee, Fla.
Taylor, Katherine High Springs, Fla.
Taylor, Phoebe Tallahassee, Fla
Tunshill, J. R. Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, Emporia New Smyrna, Fla.
Thorpe, Eunice Brown Ocala, Fla
Thompson, Panchita West Palm Beach, Fla.
Thompson, Emily A. West Palm Beach, Fla.
Thomas, Marcellas A. Homestead, Fla.
Twine, Elsie Tallahassee, Fla.
Thomas, Emily Corine E. Palatka, Fla.
Thompson, Ruby Jacksonville, Fla.
VanBrunt, Alice Tallahassee, Fla.
VanBrunt, Edna Tallahassee, Fla.
Williams, Annie Lee Tallahassee. Fla.





CATALOG, 1927-1928 29
Williams, Marie Citra, Fla.
Wiggins, Lucinda P .Sarasota, Fla.
Williams, Virgie Pensacola, Fla.
Wallace, Necie Mae Tallahassee, Fla.
Williams, Handy Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams, Fannie Mae Miami, Fla.
Williams, Maletha St. Petersburg, Fla.
Watson, Eunice Elzora Plant City, Fla.
Welters, Wilhemina Key West, Fla.
Wilson, Emma N. Tampa, Fla.
Watts, Mary Rosa Jacksonville, Fla.
Wilson, Rosabelle Miami, Fla.
Washington, Ruth B. Plant City ,Fla.
Wong, Hortense New Smyrna, Fla.
Williams, Alice S. Pensacola, Fla.
Williams, Mattie Lakeland, Fla.
Wolfe, Marie L. Thomasville, Ga.
Wimberly, Lottie R. Jacksonville, Fla.
Washington, Bernard Tallahassee, Fla.
Wesley, Mary Leontine Pensacola, Fla.
Wilson, Lottie M. Tallahassee, Fla.
Washington, Mary F. Pensacola, Fla
White, Carrie Tallahassee, Fla.
Williams, Katie L. Pensacola, Fla.
Whitaker, Mary Ann Tallahassee, Fla.
Womack, Jessie B. Tallahassee, Fla.
Williams, Maragret Jacksonville, Fla.
Wheeler, Asa Cottondale, Fla.
Washington, Ruby Tallahassee, Fla.
Washington, Modest P. Warrington, Fla.
Williams, Geneva Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams, Julia C. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Watson, Idella V. Ft. Meyers, Fla.
Weston, Lula B. West Palm Beach, Fla.
Williams, Herschel Tallahassee, Fla.
Washington, Julia A. Pensacola, Fla.
Williams, E. L. Gainesvilla, Fla.
Young, Rosa Lee Jacksonville, Fla.





30 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
GENERAL SUMMARY
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Male Female Total
Seniors .-. ----...-.- ._.--- --_-- -.......--...--.---- .:_--. 14 3 17
Juniors --------------..........---------.--------.. 4 4 8
*Sophomores ..------------------.----- --..........- .. ....... 13 21 34
*Freshmen ------------- .-. 23 26 49
NURSE TRAINING DEPARTMENT
Seniors ..-----------.-------. .- --- ..-.. .- -. ... 0 3 3
Juniors .........................------------ --......... 0 5
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Third Year .- ..-- .. ---------- ...... 21 25 46
Second Year .-.-.. ....-----.--.--..--.. ..------. -.- ..- ... 29 41 70
First Year ..- ... --- --.... ----- -- -. -.- .... 26 48 74
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Third, Year --.--- .- ... .--. -.- 21 37 58
Second Year ....-----------_ ....-- ----------.-....... 6 20 26
First Year .-- ......-- .---- .... ..... ..-. .- --..- --6 11 17
NIGHT SCHOOL
Night Students -- ...---....- ------- .-... .. 18 6 24
Unclassified .-..-.-.-.-----..- -- ---- .......--------... -- ----..-I- 1 I
TAILORING DEPARTMENT
Seniors -.----......... .. ....I.---- ..-.. 1 1 2
TOTAL ENROLLMENTS 1927-1928
Winter School .-...- .... --.----------------------. ....-- 434
Model School -_ -. --- ---- 151
Correspondence and Extension -- .........--..... 204
Summer School 1927..--------------- -----....... .. 327
Total .-..------ ---..._----- .. .... 1116
Leon County Boys and Girl's Conference. -------. 90
Four-H Club (State Agents) ........---. -.- -- 82
Farmers' Conference .-- --- -...- -------- ..- --- 315
Total .-......... ------------- 487
*Sophomore and Freshman College includes the Normal Education, Normal
Home Economics and Commercial Departments.





Florida A and M College
BULLETIN
For
1928-1929
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
THE COLLEGE.
THE NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL.
THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL.
THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL.
THE CHILDREN'S HOUSE.





CALENDAR
1928
Sept. 22 Boarding Department Opens
Sept. 24 Monday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 25 Tuesday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 26 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 29 Thursday Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 25 Tuesday Christmas Day
1929
Jan. 1 Tuesday Emancipation Day
Jan. 22-25 Tues.-Friday First Semester Examinations
Jan. 28 Monday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 6-7 Wed.-Thurs. Leon County Boys Club Meeting
Apr. 19 Friday Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 3 Friday Oratorical Contest (College)
May 12 Sunday National Hospital Day
May 22-24 Tues.-Friday Second Semester Examinations
May 26 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 27 Monday Home Economics Exhibition
May '27 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 28 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 28 Tuesday Physical Training Exhibition
May 29 Wednesday Class Day
May 29 Wednesday Class Play ~9
May 30 Thursday Commencement
June 10 Monday Summer School Begins
Aug. 2 Friday Summer School Closes





FACULTY AND OFFICERS OF
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
COLLEGE 1928-1929
J. R. E. LEE
President
A. B., A. M., Bishop College; LL. D. Wilberforce University; Graduate Work,
University of Chicago and University of Wisconsin.
R. O'HARA tANIER
Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Prof. Education
A. B., Lincoln University; A. M., Leland Stanford Junior University; Summer
Work, Columbia University.
*C. A. BACOTE
Education and History
A. B., University of Kansas
JUANITA RABOUIN
English
A. B., University of California
H. M. EFFERSON
Head Mathematics Department
A. B., Atlanta University; Advanced Study, University of Minnesota; A. M.,
Columbia University.
E. F. MANCE
High School Mathematics
B. S., Howard Uaiversity; Graduate work, Columbia
BERNICE P. CHISM
College Science, Chemistry and Physics
B. S., Howard University; Graduate work, University of Chicago
E. EARL WARE
Biology
B. S., Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
E. E. BRADFORD
High School Science, Assistant Principal Night School
B. S., A and M College; Advanced study, University of Chicago
*M. A. LEE
Head Department of English
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate Study University of Chicago 1926-27; Study
University of Chicago 1928-29.





34 FLORIDA A e M COLLEGE
A. L. KIDD
Principal Senior High q '. '. Bookkeeping and Accounting
A. B., University of [Michigan;-Special work,: University of Pittsburg
A. P. TURNER '
Chaplain, Socidlogy,iPublic Speaking, Moral 'n.dReligious Education
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate work, University of Chicago
-:,N MURRAY
A. B., Lincoln University (Pa.)
BEATRICE COLES JONES
Junior High School Mathematics and English
Normal School, Atlanta University; Summer courses, Columbia and University
of Chicago
J. B. BRAGG
Dean Mechanic. Arts
Tuskegee Institute; A. B-, Talladega College
G. M. JONES
Mechanical and '. i jl Drawing
B. S. A., M. S., Unive'rsity of Michigan
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY
Printing
State A and M College, Normal, Alabama; Special course, Mergenthaler Linotype
School, Chicago, Illinois. .. '
C. B. NASBY
Practical Arts, F ...' ..
Gee. R-. Smith College, CIh.;:. Art School
B. F. HOLMES, Tr.
Carpentry
Hampton Institute
Z. R. HERCEY :
Engineering and Plumbing
Tuskegee Institute
S. L. THORPE
Electrical Engineering
Tuskegee Institute '
CHAS. C. HAYLING
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, Bl. iW.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929' 35
A. C. PHILLIPS
Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute
EDWARD JONES
Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute
M. S. SANDERS
Upholstering
B. S., Agricultural and Technical College, Greensboro, N. C.
W. T. REED
Auto Mechanics
Hampton Institute; Special course, Carnegie Institute of Technology; American
School, Chicago, Illinois.
C. O. BROWN
In charge Poultry
do)^~~~ ~ Hampton Institute
L. A. MARSHALL
Teacher Training and Science
B. Sc. Agriculture, Prairie View College; B. Sc. Agriculture, Iowa State College;
Graduate Work, Iowa State College.
R. L. REYNOLDS
Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture
B. S., Ohio State University
B. L. PERRY
Dean Agricultural Department; Landscape Work and Truck Gardening
Tuskegee Institute; Special study, Iowa State College
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN
,animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University, Cornell University, Michigan Agricultural College
JOHN D. WRAY
Agronomy, Rural Education and Entomology
B. S., M. S., Agricultural and Technical College
J. C. BALDWIN
Farm Demonstration and Farmers' Conference Agent
B. S., Florida A and M College
A. A. TURNER
State Agent
Ohio State University
ETHEL M. GRIGGS
Dean, Home Economics Department, Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking
B. S., Simmons University, Boston





36 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
MARIE F. McMILLAN
Plain Sewing
B. S., Florida A and M College
C. B. NELSON
Domestic Science
Wilberforce University; Special work, Hampton Institute
I. L. COLEMAN
High School Domestic Science
Spellman College; Special work, Columbia University
HATTIE BRITT
Handicrafts, Elementary Manual Art
Tuskegeeo Institute
CLYDE M. BRADFORD
Shorthand and Typewriting, Business English
Florida A & M College; Special Work, Columbia University
E. C. WEARE
Librarian
Washburn College; Student Syracuse Library School
GEORGIANNA V. REESE
Assistant Librarian
B. S., Florida A and M College
A. S. PRATER-STEWART
Physical Education for Girls, Physiology and Hygiene
Bethune-Cookman Institute, Hampton Institute
F. A. BYRD
Athletic Director
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania; Law Student, New York University
IDALENE STRANGE
Vocal and Instrumental Music
American Conservatory
F. E. JAMES
Public School Music, Director of Choral and Glee Clubs
A. B., Wiley University
A. W. LEE
Bandmaster
Tuskegee Institute
E. E. MATTHEWS
In charge of Model School, Fifth and Sixth Grades, Critic Teacher, Instructor,
School Management.
B. S., Howard University





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 37
IRENE R. ANDERSON
Assistant, Practice School
Fi,.r;Jj A & M College
AMY JACKSON
First and Second Grades, Model School, Kindergarten Methods
A and M College; Special work, Hampton Institute
L. H. B. FOOTE
Resident Physician
M. D., Howard University
N. B. COOPER
Superintendent Nurses
R. N., Meharry Medical College
O. A. M. FOOTE
Nurse
R. N., Freedmans Hospital, Howard University
N. S. McGUINN
Dean of Women
Hampton Institute
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE
Commandant
Tuskegee Institute
LOLLIE M. FLEMING
Registrar
B. S., Florida A and M College
J. R. E. LEE, JR.
Business Manager, Custodian of Property
A. B., Lincoln University, Pennsylvania
L. H. WASHINGTON
Matron, Melvin Lodge
Claflin College
M. ARMAND JONES
Matron, Tucker Hall
Atlanta University
A. D. PADDYFOTE
Matron, Men's Union
Allen University
ESTELLE D. DRAKEFORD
Bookkeeper
Orange Park Academy





38 FLORIDA A e M COLLEGE
S. H. R. REED
Principal Junior High School
Chicago Normal School
IVA HILL
Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier
Tuskegee Institute
CASTELLA A. DANIELS
Assistant in Bookkeeper's Office, Student Accounts
Florida A. & M. College
C. EMILY FRAZIER
Secretary to Dean of College
Hampton Institute
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE
Secretary to President
Wilberforce University
S; R. THOMAS
Dietitian
Scotia Seminary
TRACY H. MITCHELL
Assistant D,. .
A. B., Kansas University
LETITIA REED
In Charge of Cafeteria
Virginia Normal and Industrial' Institute, Petersburg, Va.
"Leave of absence 1928-29.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 39
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORICAL STATEMENT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the College was established
in 1887 as a State Normal School. Under the principalship of Mr. T. D. Tucker,
assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs,,it was opened at Tallahassee, October 5, 1887, with an
attendance of 15 students. In 1891 the Col'ge moved to its present site. In 190'5
it passed from the direct management of the State Board of Education to the manage-
ment of the Board of Control as one of the institutions of higher learning. In
1909 its name was changed to that of The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes by the Legislature. It is supported mainly by State and Federal
appropriation.
LOCATION
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College is located in Tallaeassee,
Florida, an educational and industrial center with a population of nearly six
thousand five hundred. It is distant about one hundred seventy-two miles from
Jacksonville and about two hundred miles from Pensacola.
Situated at the Nothern border of the state at what is stated to be the highest
point in the state, excessive humidity is seldom experienced and the climate is
bracing.
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The College Campus is a tract of land about 250 acres, part of which now is
included within the city limits of Tallahassee. This tract is about a quarter of a
mile from the depot and a mile from the center of the city on a hill overlooking
the city of Tallahassee.
The fifteen (15) main buildings on the campus are as follows: the Y. M. C. A.
Building, The Band Cottage, Tucker Hall, Clark Hall, Melvin Lodge, and the Girls
New Dormitory used as student dormitories; Mebane and Gwyn Cottage used as
women and men teacher cottages respectively; The Library, containing both library
facilities and the administration offices; The Dining Hall, accommodating four hun-
dred (400) students and seventy (70) teachers; The Cafeteria, containing a lunch
room and book room; The Home Economics Building, housing the girls' industries;
Tha Mechanic Arts Building housing the boys' industries; The Agricultural Building,
the headquarters of the agricultural department and used for classroom instruction;
The Science Building, the main classroom building and contains the office of the Dean
of the College; The Junior High School Building, containing classroom facilities for
the secondary grades; The Children's House, containing facilities for the elementary
grades; Ti-r: ij ry Barn, providing facilities for the dairy division of the agricultural-
department; The Hospital, providing facilities for the treatment of students.
In addition to the main buildings, mentioned above which are used for the
activities of the institution, the Legislature of 1925 made provision for the erection
of an administration building (brick) to cost $250,000 and the Girls New Dormitory
(brick) to cost $100,000. The latter is now completed and in use. The adminis-
tration building is under construction.
In addition to these main buildings, provision was also made for completing our
new Dining Hall, New Science Building, Mechanic Arts Building and a Sewerage
and Water System. Most of this has been completed but there yet remains the
Mechanic Arts Building to be completed and the Dining Hall extension.
The Le.:i;ltru-r nrf IQ27 made provision for the erection of a boy's dormitory
(brick) t(. c- L I !.. '"'" With these new buildings and the completion of il]- e





40 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
already mentioned we shall have the very best facilities for the young men and
women of this state who are desirous of taking advantage of the opportunity to
study at the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
Art. Industrial Arts.
Bacteriology. Latin
Biology. Logic.
Bookkeeping. Mathematics.
Business Law. Office Practice.
Chemistry. Public School Music.
Commercial Courses. Physics.
Comparative Anatomy. Practice al Teaching.
Embryology. Philosophy.
Economics. Psychology.
Ethics and Religious Education. Physical Education.
English. Sociology.
French Spanish.
Government. Science.
Geography. Typewriting.
History. Writing.
Histology. Zoology.
THE ACADEMIC YEAR
The academic year begins on the 24th day of September and Commencement
Day is the 26th of May.
The college exercises are suspended for a short period on each of the National
Holidays.
The Summer School begins on Monday, June 11, and continues in session eight
weeks.
(Students are expected to be present on the first day of the term and continue
in attendance from day to day to the end of the term).
ADMISSION
Students are admitted to the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College
upon the basis of two requirements:
1. Scholarship qualifications.
2. Personal qualifications.
Candidates must present 'satisfactory recommendations as to personal character
and must offer and file application on date of or previous to entrance. Proper
application blanks will be furnished upon request. Request for information and
for application forms should be addressed to the Registrar.
SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted to all of the schools and departments upon presenting:
1. Letter of honorable dismissal from institution last attended.
2. Diploma, certificate, record or promotion card from last school attended
For advanced standing, exact duplicate of work here must be produced.
In lieu of proper written record, a written examination in all subjects
is required for advanced standing. This might be supplemented by standard
and intelligence tests.
College Entrance Examination questions as outlined by the College Entrance
Board with an average of 75, and no mark of less than 70, or C, will be accepted,





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 41
SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS
THE DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION
The Dramatic Association is a very active student organization which presents
a number of plays each year under the direction of the department of English.
The College Arms is a magazine published monthly by the school. The editorial
and business management is in the hands of a student board with faculty advisors.
COLLEGE WITS
This is a college organization confined to the men on the campus. It was
established in 1913 under the sponsorship of E. B. Jones, B. S., M. S.
The direct purposes for the formation of this organization was the raising of the
standard of scholarship, fostering a more genuine college spirit and promoting the
general welfare of the college. Its activities encompass the literary,' scientific,
and athletic fields.
ATHEANEUM LITERARY SOCIETY
This is a college organization confined to the women on the campus.
Its purposes are to create greater enthusiasm in dramatics and reading; to
promote higher scholastic standing; to support firmly law and order on the campus,
and to develop moral character in pure womanhood.
COLLEGE LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY
This organization wa established in October, 1927, at the suggestion of Presi-
dent J. R. E. Lee. The purpose of this organization is the cultivation of a better
appreciation for literature and art, in order that students might better prepare them-
selves for service in their respective communities.
HIGH SCHOOL LITERARY SOCIETIES
The Senior and the Junior High School each has its own literary society.
These organizations function in much the same manner as the college literary
society, confining, of course, their membership to the senior and junior high school
classes. They meet regularly under the sponsorship of certain teachers who direct
their efforts in the proper channels. The English Department is held largely respon-
sible for the successful conduction of the literary societies.
STUDENT LIFE
It has always been the policy of the College to give to its students the greatest
possible individual liberty of action and to adopt few rules of conduct.
It is assumed that each student will conform to the recognized standards of
morality, good order, commendable conduct, and that he will not absent himself
unnecessarily from College exercises, and that above all he will give his serious and
constant ,- .; to his work as a student.
While recognizing the fullest possible measure of student self-government the
College recognizes the fact that the individuals and groups among the student body
require a reasonable amount of oversight in their various undertakings.
All organizations are under such control as will insure proper caution and
development and recognition of responsibility in business dealings.
Participation in extra-curricula activities is denied to those students only
whose scholarship record is such that further encroachment upon their time and
attention may interfere with the completion of their course. The requirements are
more 'definitely stated under "Athletic Requirements."
To facilitate good order and a sense of. responsibility for the proper adminis-
tration or student offense, etc., a Student Council has been organized and func-
tions coordinately with the Executive Council.





42 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Practically all matters except those of a grave nature are acted upon by this
organization after which action the Student Council makes its recommendation to
the Executive Committee.
REGISTRATION
The first day of the academic year and of the Summer Session are devoted to
the registration of programs of study. Second semester registration is held for
college students taking one semester subjects or those desiring to carry additional
work the second semester.
Failure to register on the days designated is penalized, in the case of winter
students, by a fine of one dollar.
TUITION AND FEES
Registration fee, per year .... ..... $ 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per month) -.. --.. .-.. 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year -..-------.-.... -2.00
Breakage fee, per year. ---- ----.. ----.----.......... -...-. 1.00
Athletic fee, per year -._..- .-.---------- -..----- -_ 7.00
Total entrance fee---..- -_ ------ ---- .--..---- $14.00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year ------- $20.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional.
EXPENSES FOR BoYS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month,
$16.00; 8 months ----..-------- $128.00
Laundering, etc., per month, 8 months .----------. -.-------.-- 16.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day, while sick in addition to board -.-----------. 1.00
Books -.............-------------..-....-..._. 10.00
*Uniform ----_- -.----- .--_-------- ---- --------- 20.00
Registration fee, per year -_..-...-.-.-- -----.....--- 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25cper month) -.....-...-- --... 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year ---......- ---.---.- -- 2.00
Breakage fee, per year --. -....-. ....------------..---- ..-- 1.00
Athletic fee, per year -._....---------....- ------ ----__. 7.00
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-State boys-._-.-.-..- -- -1---- 189,00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year -_-.-......-......---..... 20.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State boys, per year ---..- ..---..---_.- $209.50
*The young men's uniforms are made of blue serge. A suit of uniform includ-
ing cap for High School students, cost $20.00, for college students, $25.35 and for
students of the Band, $26.00. The uniforms are made in thecollege Tailor Shop.
Payment for a uniform suit is required for matriculation of a young man.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 43
EXPENSES FOR GIRLS
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per month;
$16.00; 8 months --------...--..---..--------- $128.00
Hospital fee, $1.00 per day while sick, in addition to board _---- -_- ... 1.00
Registration fee, per year --..-.... .....-.. -------.-----. 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per month) ..-----...--.- 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year _..........._.... -- ------. 2.00
Breakage fee, per year --....-...---...... --. --.---- 1.00
Athletic fee, per year- ---- ------.- .-.......- -----...-...... 7.00
'*Books ------- ----------------_-....-..........--------.. 10.00
Total entrance fee and minimum sum for in-State girls-....-_.---1........ 153.00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year .-_-_-.._....-.-._ 20.00
Minimum sum for out-of-State girls, per year .....-------..----........ $173.00
PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable not later than the fifth of each month. In all cases
where students have not paid their bills by the fifth of the month they will be
required to give up school and do such work as the school may assign them until the
bills are paid. During the time they are out of school for non-payment of bills, the
work which they will do will pay only their board for that time.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances for students, to send
money by postal money order, express money order or registered letter direct to
the President. He will not be responsible for money sent to students.
FACILITIES FOR SELF-SUPPORT
A limited number of earnest young men and women will be allowed to work
out a part of their board and laundry expenses. Application for this privilege must
be made in writing and accepted before arrival. Money thus earned will be applied
to the boarding account of the student.
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL TRAINING
The Medical Director, Dr. L. H. B. Foote, exercises general supervision over
matters of health and hygiene in the school. All students are required to have a
thorough medical examination at the beginning of each school year. Two hours
per week of Physical training are required of all who are not excused for adequate
reasons.
The Medical Director is available during the academic year and the Summer
Session for conferences and medical advice and treatment. It is intended that this
service -. ill be primarily of a preventive nature. However, the school does conduct
a hosp:. ri i care for cases of illness requiring medical attention and hospital
accommodations.
The Directors of Physical Education have supervision over all required physical
training and other athletic activities. In the matter of inter-collegiate contests he
is assisted by the Athletic Committee composed jointly of faculty members and
students.
The College has an athletic field sufficiently large for football, baseball, and
track facilities, and two courts affording tennis and basketball facilities. At the
present time the auditorium is used for girls gymnasium.
**The cost of books varies with the program of study.





44 FLORIDA A. $ M. COLLEGE
In connection with boys athletics a military organization is maintained. The
young men are organized into Cadet Companies in charge of a Commandant, who
is a member of the faculty. The officers of the cadet companies, Commissioned
and Non-Commissioned are chosen frcm the young men in the College Department,
who show the necessary ability and qualification.
The organization is maintained to help in the well rounded physical, mental
and moral development of the boys. It is also intended to cultivate habits of neat-
ness, punctuality, obedience and to give an erect, healthy, manly bearing and a high
regard for law and order.
In addition to company and battalion drill, a course of military calisthenics or
gymnastics is given in the open air, also a course in Physical Education.
ATHLETIC REGULATIONS
All athletic activities and teams are under direct management ot a governing
board, consisting of Faculty and Student members. The student members of this
board are elected by the members of the athletic association, which comprises the
entire student body.
1. No student with an average grade below "70" or "C" may participate i'r
any major athletics until the removal of such standing or condition.
2. No student may wear upon the campus the letter or athletic insignia of another
institution.
3. A "letter man" is one who participates in the majority of the major games,
including the "Thanksgiving Classic."
4. Any student who fractures a major rule, may be expelled from the squad,
at the direction of the coaches.
5. No cursing or use of foul and abusive language will be tolerated.
6. No student will be allowed to use tobacco in any form while participating
in the Major sports.
7. Only students who have won the Varsity "F" may wear the same on any
sweater or coat.
8. "Letter students" transferring from schools will not be allowed to par-
tidipate in major athletics until after a year's residence.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The regulations of the College are few and simple, appealing to the student's
self-respect and personal responsibility. Punishment is by demerits, as follows: Five
demerits make one warning, or mark; ten demerits, two warnings or marks; fifteen
demerits in any one session make a student liable to suspension. Suspended students
may be reinstated by the Executive Committee or by the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be withdrawn must be made to
the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry. Clothing must be mark-
ed with indelible ink.
RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian In addition to the
daily devotion, mid-week prayer service, Sunday School, Sunday preaching, Vesper
services and Bible study courses, there are active Young Men's Christian Association
and Young Women's Christian Association. The Chaplain of the College preaches
every Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 45
RHETORICALS
Public rhetorical exercises are held at regular intervals.
An annual Declamation Contest is held in which representatives from each of
the High School literary societies compete.
An annual Faculty Oratorical contest is held in which representatives from
the College Societies compete.
BAND
A band composed of young men of all departments is organized in connection
with the battalion. Young men who can play any wind or string instrument should
become members of the Band or Orchestra. Regular attendance to rehearsal three
times per week is required for each member of the Band.
From the members of the Band is formed a twenty piece Concert Orchestra.
This organization plays at each Chapel exercise. Young women playing string or
wind instruments may become members of this organization. Regular rehearsal
three times each week is required of members of the Orchestra.
COLLEGIATE REQUIREMENTS
Every candidate for admission should file an application in the office of the
Registrar on a blank provided for that purpose, copies of which may be obtained
from the Registrar, Academic Department, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College.
A list of the subjects ordinarily accepted for admission to the Freshman class
is submitted below. The number of units after the subject indicates the maximum
credit allowed for entrance in these subjects, either as required, elective, or both.
(Example: Four (4) units is the maximum number of credits in English allowed
for admission-three are required and one may be elective.)
The unit used in this chart is the usual college entrance unit or unit of second-
ary work, representing a year's study in high school or preparatory school consti-
tuting approximately 4 (one-fourth) of a full year's work of not less than 120
clock hours in recitation. Two laboratory, drawing, industrial, agricultural or
home economic periods are regarded as the equivalent of one recitation period.
English ..- 4 History -.-- 4 "Greek 3 French -- 4
Economics ...- 1 "Latin .----- 4 "Spanish .. 4
Civics -.......-. 2 *German -.---.. 4
Citizenship -....2 '"Italian --------- 4
Algebra --.----.--- 1 Physics ..----. 1 Drawing -..1 -----.- 1I
Advanced Algebra-- .2 Chemistry :_...-------. 1 -Domestic Art--------- 2
Plane Geometry .--- 1 Botaryy ------. 1 Domestic Science-----. 1
Solid Geometry -..-..-. 2 Zoology-- -.------.-- l Fine Arts -- .- 2
Trigonometry ------.---. 2 Astronomy ---------- I Stenography --- 2
Co.-. I :, ,.r, General Physiology .......-- Industrial Arts ------- 2
? I ,-:,-. :'.c (ninth General Science----I- 1 Bookkeeping ---------- 2
grade) -- ----- 1 General Biology--- 1 Typewriting ------ 1I
Physiography ---I-. .. 1 Commercial Geography 7
Geology --- -..--.---- 1 Manual Training ...... 1
Agriculture ...--- 1
'Not less than two units accepted in this subject.
ENTRANCE WITH CONDITION
A student may enter the College with one condition, but will be classed in
the lower class until condition is removed. No transferred record is valuable or
valid unless s;rme is signed by Principal or Record Officer, bearing seal, giving name





46 FLORIDA A. g M. COLLEGE
of text-books, number of hours pursued and grades. Credit for High School,
Science or College Science must be accompanied with note-books.
Applicants for admission to the Freshman class without condition must present
sixteen units. Applicants who present fourteen units may be admitted conditioned
in two units. One unit of such deficiency must be made up before the beginning
of the Sophomore year. All entrance conditions must be removed by the beginning
of the Junior year.
Single half units will be accepted only in the sciences and civics. Less than
two units of foreign language will not be accepted in fulfillment of entrance
requirements.
Standard collegiate credits from other institutions of higher learning are accepted
so far as these credits apply on the curriculum to which the student is admitted.
ADMISSION TO COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
Students will be allowed to begin work in the Agricultural Department if they
have satisfied the above entrance requirements. They should present at least tw'o
(2) units in high school dairying, general agriculture and farm project work.
This should be their elective high school work.
ADMISSION TO COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS
Students will be allowed to take the Normal or the College Home Economics
course if they have satisfied the above entrance requirements. They are also advised
to present two (2) units in Domestic Science, sewing or handicraft. This should
be their elective high school work.
ADMISSION TO COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS
Students will be allowed to begin work in the Mechanic Arts Department if
they have satisfied the above entrance requirements. They should also present two
(2) units of mechanical drawing; two (2) units of mathematics and one (1) unit
of manual training or industries.
ADMISSION TO COURSE IN EDUCATION
Students will be allowed to begin work in the Education Department if they
have satisfied the above entrance requirements. They should present three units of
Latin or Greek and two (2) units of a modern language.
ADMISSION TO SUMMER SCHOOL COURSES
Teachers and students who enter without registering for a degree are exempt
the usual College entrance requirements and are granted certificates of proficiency
on the successful completion of the various courses. In addition to these certifi-
cates, academic credit toward the Bachelor's degree is allowed for the majority of
courses to all students, who, either by examination or on their school records, have
been admitted to candidacy for a degree. This same principle applies to high school
department.
ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS
The College urges very strongly that each student enter a regular course and
take the work as outlined for that course, even though he can stay for a limited
time. Students are given special classification only when the age and preparation of
the applicant seems to render such action necessary and expedient.
MAJOR WORK
Every student for the degree of Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Arts, must
elect a major department and file application with the Dean of the Department in
which he wishes to do major work before February of the Sophomore year.
Each department prints the plans of its major work, but these plans may be
changed by the department to suit individual cases. A Major consists of not less





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 47
than 30 semester hours or not more than 60 semester hours, as indicated by the
departments. This work may be done in one department, or part of it may be in
allied subjects in other departments, provided that at least 30 semester hours of the
major work are taken in some one department.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The School is organized on the semester basis, with the hope of quarterly
organization by change. One semester hour is the credit allowed for any College
course pursued 16 or 18 weeks, one recitation per week. If pursued a year, it be-
comes two (2) semester hours, 1 year hour, College credit or unit. 64 semester hours
or 32 year hours or credits are required for Normal and Junior College graduation;
124 semester hours for College graduation B. S. or A. B. Physical education is
required. One unit is allowed for any High School course operated five times or
recitations each week ,with a total of not less than 120 clock hours of recitation.










THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
AND
NORMAL SCHOOL
THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
THE SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
AND
NORMAL SCHOOL
THE NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL
THE HIGH SCHOOL
THE DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL
*THE EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE
DIVISION
**THE SUMMER SCHOOL
*The Extension and Correspondence Bulletin is available for dis-
tribution in October of each school year.
*"-The Summer School Bulletin is available for distribution after
April 15 of each school year.





50 FLORIDA A. Fd M. COLLEGE
ORGANIZATION
I. The College of Arts and Science.
(a) A curriculum leading to the A. B. degree.
(b) A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree.
II. The School of Education and Normal School.
(a) The School of Education with curriculum leading to the degree of
A. B. and B. S. in Education.
(b) The Normal School with curriculum leading to the Licentiate of
Instruction in Education.
(c) The Business School with curriculum leading to Certificate in
Commerce.
III. The School of Agriculture.
(a) The School of Agriculture with curriculum leading to the degree
of B. S. in Agriculture.
(b) The Normal School with two-year course in Poultry Husbandry.
IV. The School of Mechanic Arts.
(a) The School of Mechanic Arts with degree leading to B. S. in Mechanic
Arts.
V. The School of Home Economics and Normal School.
(a) The School of Home Economics with curriculum leading to the
degree of B. S. in Home Economics.
(b) The Normal School with curriculum leading to the Licentiate of
Instruction in Home Economics.
VI. The Nurse Training School.
(b) A curriculum leading to the degree of R. N. in Nursing.
VII. The High School.
(a) The Junior High School (three grades) meeting the Junior High
School program of the State of Florida.
(b) The Senior High School (three grades) meeting the requiremtns of
the State of Florida and the entrance requirements of the major
colleges.
VIII. The Demonstration School.
(a) The Elementary School (six grades).
(b) The Kindergarten.
IX. The Summer School.
X. The Extension and Correspondence Division.





THE
COLLEGE AND NORMAL
DEPARTMENT





52 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
THE COLLEGE AND NORMAL FACULTY
R. O'HARA LANIER, Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Prof. of Education.
A. B. Lincoln University, Summer Work (1923) Coulumbia University;
Leland Stanford Graduate Study 1927-1928.
JAMES L. IRVING, Education and Psychology.
A. B., University of Iowa; M. A., University of Iowa.
M. A. LEE, English.
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate Study, University of Chicago.
C. A. BACOTE, History
A. B., University of Kansas
H. M. EFFERSON, Head of Mathematics Division
A. B., Atlanta University; M. A., Columbia University.
BERNICE P. CHISM, Head Science Division; Chemistry.
B. S., Howard University; Graduate Work, University of Chicago.
E. E. WARE, Biology
B. S., Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
REV. A. P. TURNER, Chaplain and Sociology
A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, University of Chicago
A. P. STEWART, Physical Education for Girls.
Cookman Institute, Hampton Institute.
F. A. BYRD, Athletic Director
A. B., Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), Sometime Law Student, N. Y. U.
C. B. NASBY, Freehand Drawing
George R. Smith College, Chicago Art School
F. E. JAMES, Public School Music; Director of Chorus and Glee Clubs
A. B., Wiley University
CLYDE E. BRADFORD, Shorthand and Typewriting
Commercial Course, Florida A. & M. College; Special Work, Columbia University
A. L. KIDD, Bookkkeeping and Accounting
A. B. University of Michigan; Special Work, University of Pittsburg
B A. COURSE
FRESHMAN
FIRST SEMESTER
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Periods Semester
English ----- __.__ .....--_ 5 3
Introduction to Education ._ ..._.......... 3 3
Foreign or Ancient Language -- ...... ............... 3 3
Algebra -------------- ..-..-......-................. 3 3
General Chemistry or General Biology .........-- ..-.. __... 9 or 6 f or 3
Physical Education ---._ .......__-..._.-........-._... .. 2 %
Freshman Talks





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 53
SECOND SEMESTER
English .----.---- --- ---- 5 3
Introduction to Education -- .....--......--... ..- 3 3
Foreign or Ancient Language -..-.... .....------.. .. .- 3 3
Algebra .----------- 3 3
General Chemistry or General Biology -9----.-_-_---_..---9 or 6 5 or 3
Physical Education ---_----------------_---------. 2 %
Freshman Talks
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Periods Semester
English --- ------------- 3 3
Physics ----------------------------6 4
Economics ----- ------ ----- 3 3
Mathematics or Ancient Language. -------.- ---------- 3 3
Elective ------------3....._ 3 3
Elective --------_...--_.--.----- .--------.----- 3 3
Physical Education -- ----------------------- ------- -- 3 3
SECOND SEMESTER
English ---- _------ 3 3
Physics -------------- --------.--------------- 6 4
*Economics --------_--------- -- ----- 3 3
Mathematics or Ancient Language-_ .--_.. _...... 3 3
Elective ---- -------- --------------- 3 3
Elective .- -. -...-----------------.. 3 3
Physical Education --------------...-..----_.--.-- 3 3
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Periods Semester
English ----.-- -- ------ 3 3
Sociology -----------.----...--.... .. 3 3
Psychology .- ------------------------------------- ----------------- 3 3
History-European -----...... ---------.---.----3 3
Elective -------_..--.------ ...-.-.---- 3 3
Elective -- .--.... ------- 3 3
Physical Education -------------------........----- 2
SECOND SEMESTER
English -- --__ -------3 3
Sociology -----..-.---.....-------.. 3 3
Psychology ----... -------,- -----------......--..........------------- 3 3
History-European -...----..------ 3 3
Elective -___- ----...------- ------------ ----- ------ 3 3
Elective -------------------------------------- 3 3
Physical Eduaztie ..............._----1.---........--





54 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Government ..,--- ------.------ -----..-.-..--- 3 3
English ----- --------------- 3 3
History --.---------------- ------- 3 3
Elective ------- -- ----- 3 3
Elective --. .-------------------------.--------.--------------- 3 3
Economic Geography ----------------- --3 3
Physical Education ------- ------------ 2 %
Physical Education 2 -/z2
SECOND SEMESTER
English ----------- ---------- 33 3
Government --. --... --.- --..- -----.--.---.--.- 33 3
History -- --.---------.--.- --------.- ------.- -. 3 3
Economic Geography ---..------ --.---....---...-- 33 3
Elective .... ---- ..-..- --- -----......... ----- 33
Elective -- ---------------------- --------------------------------------------------- 3 3
B. S. IN EDUCATION-FOUR YEARS
FRESHMAN
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
FIRST SEMESTER
English -------- -------------- ---.-.-------------.----..----..--- ..5 3
Introduction to Education and Manual Arts--.3---3------- 3 3
College Algebra ...----.---------------.---------- .3 3
Foreign Language -----.- ---...------------- 3 3
Chemistry .------.---..--------------------------.----------.-----.-- 9 5
Physical Education -----------..... --------...-----------.--- 2 .
Freshman Talks .-..----------- ----- I --
25 17/2
SECOND SEMESTER
English ......- --- ..._ -...-.----.-- .------ -- 5 3
Class Management and Problem Study, Industrial Arts..- 3 3
Advanced College Algebra or Ed. Biology ------3-3---..... 3 3
Foreign Language -. _----- ------ 3 3
Chemistry -- ---...------------------------------------ 95
Physical Education --.. ....-----------2 2
Freshman Talks ----------.....--- --.--------..- 1
25 17%





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 55
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
English --- .._.....- -------. ...-.... 3 3
Elementary Methods -.................. .....3 3
Physics .---. ------ -- --...-. 8 4
Foreign Language ..-...... ------_ --............._ 3 3
Physical Education -.....--.-- .....- ...-... --.. ----.- 2 /2
Mathematics, Philosophy, Sciences Elective
Education-Select one ------10.... .......-.... 6-3
Science-Elective.
School Gardening .-..........- 2 1
SECOND SEMESTER
English -----.. --........---- 3 3
Education IV-Methods of Teaching in High Schools and
Manual Training --------------------..-........ 3 3 -.
Physics ------ .......----.. 8 4
Foreign Language ----.- ---...._... .....--.. 3 3
Physical Education .--.....--.....--- --_.. 2 Y
Mathematics, Philosophy, Science, Elective
Education-Select one ..--.... ......... 10-6-3
Science-Elective.
School Gardening -------------------...-.. 2 1
'JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Psychology I .-......._..... .__ .-- --- ---3. 3 3
English -...--... --..-..- ....... .......3 3
First Elective
Second Elective
Education V- --------.----.-............... 3 3
Physical Education ---..--..........-..- 2 2
SECOND SEMESTER
Psychology II ...- .------------..---- .......-...- 3 3
English ----_... ---.. -. --. ------......-.............................. 3 3
First Elective
Second Elective
Education V ------.-.. -----------........--- 3 3
Physical Education ----. .........- ......... ...... .......2 2
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Government and Advanced Civics .-- ...-.._........-_ 3 3
U. S. History -----....-- -................ 3 3
Education VI or Psychology VII -- -....... ........ 3 3
Florida School Laws.------------.........----------. 2 2
First Elective ----- --- 3...-.....-..--3 3
Industries-School Repair ---....- .............. 4 2
Physical Education ...----.............--..-. ---.. 2 2





56 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
SECOND SEMESTER
Principles of Education-Tests and Measurements ---...... 3 3
Student Practicum and Conference.
Supervised Teaching --------_ --...-..-... 20 10
Industries-Elective or Vocational Education -. -....... 4 2
Physical Education ---------_------- --------- -----._....--.... 2 %
Elective ---------.----- -- -------------- 3 3
OUTLINE OF NORMAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM
JUNIOR NORMAL
FIRST SEMESTER
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Periods Semester
Introduction to Teaching ---_--_----. -._- .---_ 3 3
English 1, Composition 3, Rhetoric 2-------_..-- ----------- 5 3
Music -------.---- -----------... 3 1 V
Art ..................... ... .. 2 1
Physical Education ... .... ........... 2 1
Biology--(1 double, 2 single) --- --........ --- ------...... ---.... 4 3
Home Economics Handicrafts-Sewing or Industries --- 2 1
Advanced Arithmetic with Methods---. -------------- 3 3
24 172
SECOND SEMESTER
English ----- ---_ ..- --...... 5 3
Class and School Management-General Methods ---.-----. 3 3
Psychology and Child Study .-.------------------------ 3 3
Music ---.-------- --- -----..------ 3 1 2
Art -------.. ....-...... ... 2 1
Physical Education ---. -----. --.--.---..- 2 1
Nature Study and School Gardening --.-.-----..-----.. 2 1
Handicraft-H. E. or Sewing or Industries------- 2-------- 2 1
Principles of Geography with Methods -. ............... 3 3
24 17%
SENIOR NORMAL
FIRST SEMESTER
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Periods Semester
English Literature for Teachers and Story Telling ---------- 3 3
Health Education -. -- ----..---- ---..------------------- 3 3
Advanced American History with Methods ----------------- 3 3
Adv. Civics. Government and Specific Study of Constitution 3 3
Physical Education _-......... .---.---. 2 1
Writing -- ------ -------- 2 1
Education and Practicum; Technique of Teaching; Study of State
School Law; Civics and Course of Study ------------ 3 3
19 18





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 57
SECOND SEMESTER
Periods Semester
Per Wk. Hrs. Credit
Manual Training or "Elementary Mechanics for Teachers ... 2 1
Student Practice Teaching and Conference Practicum;
Principles of Education .--..-.....-.. ....---_...-. 20 10
English .-...-.......... -- ------. .....--....---..._..- ---_- 3 3
Physical Education -...-.................. -- -- ---- 2 1
Reading, Oral and Silent _-........ -------........_-- .- 2 2
28 17 I
TWO-YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE
JUNIOR 'NORMAL COMMERCIAL
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Bookkeeping I -__. _-...-...S.... Bookkeeping II --..-. ............ 5
English V .....-................ 5 English V ..------- ..........I... ..- 5
Typewriting I -......-....--........ 5 Typewriting II .-......-..-.-.. -.-.. 5\
Business English --.-....-...S.-.... 5 Spelling (Commercial) ..---...... 5S
Stenography I ..-...-.....-. --..... 5 Stenography II ___..._...-.... ... 5
Electives Electives
Psychology I Economic Geography
Penmanship Psychology II
SENIOR NORMAL COMMERCIAL
FIRST SEMESTER S.tCONND SEMESTER
Accounting I ------... --......__.. 5 Accounting 1II .--...-.._ -
Office Training .-.....---_-....- 3 Typewriting IV --_..... --.-_.. ._ 5
Commercial Law .-_ -..... English VI _- .------5
Typewriting III ---......_.---.. .... Salesmanship -.--.-_- 3
Stenography III --------- ---_----- 5 Stenography IV ..............-...- 5
English VI ..........----...-...... 5 Business Ethics
Electives Electives
Insurance Advertising
Real Estate
*Elementary Mechanics: Six weeks in Plumbing, Painting, Carpentry, Deco-
rating, Elementary Industrial and Mechanic Arts, Auto-Mechanics, Electricity and
Upholstering. '*





58 FLORIDA A s M COLLEGE
DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND NORMAL SCHOOL
COURSES
THE COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
This course has for its main purpose the development of a broadly cultured
'individual. It aims to provide the resources which will make an individual appreci-
ate the problems of the present day, and also enable an individual to meet both
the practical and the unexpected problems and emergencies in an adequate manner.
The course extends over a period of four (4) years, and leads to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts, (A.B.); Bachelor of Science, (B.S.) in education.
THE COURSE IN EDUCATION
The course of the College may be combined with the course of the School of
Education so as to enable a student to receive either the degree of Bachelor of Arts
(A.B.), or the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Education. Students desiring to take
such a combined course should register this intention in the office of the Dean of
the College and with the Head of the Department of Education.
THE COURSE IN THE NORMAL SCHOOL
The Normal School prepares teachers for work in kindergartens, primary
schools and junior high schools and commercial training. The degree of Licentiate
of Instruction is conferred upon the completion of this two-year curriculum.
ART
ART 101-This will cover the organization of materials for use in the teaching
of art in the first three grades.
ART 102-INTERMEDIATE ART. This will cover the organization of material
to be used in the grades 4-8.
ART 103-ADvANCED ART. This will cover clay modeling, applied design and
stencilling.
ECONOMICS
ECONOMICS 101-This course opens up an elementary discussion of man's
efforts at making a living. The fundamental principles underlying all business, with
references to the industrial development of the United States.
Credit, three hours.
ECONOMICS 102-Questions of applied economics, such as taxation, specu-
lation, immigrants, labor, credit, rent, and the tariff. This course must be proceeded
by Economics 101.
ENGLISH
ENGLISH 101-FRESHMAN COMPOSITION. Required of all first-year College
students. The aim of the course is to train the student to express himself in clear,
concise language. Short and long themes are constantly required. The emphasis
during the first semester is on Exposition. The student is thoroughly drilled in the
writing of term papers, taking notes, letter-writing, etc.
Text: Slater's Freshman Rhetoric.
References: Gross' College Composition.
Credit, six hours.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 59
ENGLISH 102-REVIEW COLLEGE ENGLISH. GRAMMAR. 'Required of first
year College students who are unable to pass the English Grammar Exemption Test.
Sentence structure, parts of speech; paragraph development, punctuation, are
thoroughly reviewed. Themes are required periodically. Close watch is kept on
the student's progress with a view to advancement. No credit is given.
Texts: Blunt and Northup-English Grammar.
Royster-Thompson-Practice Sheets and Guide to Composition.
ENGLISH 103-HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. The aim of the course
is to give the student a survey of English literary history from 449 A. D., to the
present time.
Elective to first-year College students who select English as a major study.
Text: Neilson and Thorndike-History of English Literature.
Credit, six semester hours.
ENGLISH 104-ENGLISH LITERATURE. Not open to Freshmen.
Students who have six hours of work in English are eligible. The course is
comprehensive of the biographies, writings and significancies of the English writers
from the beginning of English literature to 1900.
Text: Century Readings in English Literature.
Credit, six hours.
ENGLISH 105-AMERICAN LITERATURE. Open to Freshmen. The aim of the
course is to acquaint the student with American men and women of letters from
early historical times of the country to 1900. Much of the material is biographical.
Text: Cunliffe, Pyre, Young-Readings in American Literature.
Credit, six hours.
ENGLISH 10--AMERICAN LITERATURE, NEW ENGLAND GROUP. A study of
the American men and women of letters whose intellectual life was centered in
Cambridge and Concord. The course comprises an intensive study of the works
of the New England authors, beginning with Emerson and ending with Howells.
Time is given to the discussion of Unitarianism and Transcendentalism and their
allied movements.
Prerequisites: Six hours of American History or the consent of the instructor.
Text: Boynton's Anthology of American Poetry.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 107-CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Contemporary
American novelists, dramatists, critics and poets.
Prerequisite: 12 hours of English.
Credit, two semester hours.
ENGLISH 108-SHAKESPEARE. The course consists of the intensive study of
three of Shakespeare's plays and the rapid reading of fifteen others. Special con-
sideration is given the history and structure of the Elizabethan Theater.
Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 0I9o THE ENGLISH NOVEL. A study of the principal English
novelists from 1800 to 1900. Together with the required reading of 20 assigned
novels, there is considered their historic development, and autobiographic relation
of an author with his novels, where such exists.
Text: Cross-The Development of the English Novel.
Credit, three hours.
ENGLISH 110-ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATING. Not open to Freshmen.
The purpose of the course is to train the student to cultivate the power to analyze
a question, to write briefs, and to debate effectively. Ample practice is accorded
him in debates, discussions and assignments.
Text: Foster-Argumentation and Debate.
Credit, three hours.





60 FLORIDA A Fe M COLLEGE
ENGLISH 111-THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH. Not open to Freshmen. The
course is designed for teachers or prospective teachers of English in high schools.
Special attention is given to the methods of teaching English grammar and literature.
Credit, three hours, one semester.
ENGLISH 112-LITERATURE FOR TEACHERS AND STORY-TELLING.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 113-READING, ORAL AND SILENT.
Text: Stone-Twenty-first Year Book.
Credit, three semester hours.
ENGLISH 114-ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Short story writing, elementary
journalism and newspaper work.
On request.
Text: To be selected.
ENGLISH 115-PUBLIC SPEAKING. This course deals with practice of speech-
making, speech analysis and scientific speech building.
EDUCATION
EDUCATION 101-INTRODUCTION. Texts: Keith and Bagley.
Credit, three hours.
EDUCATION 102-CLASS MANAGEMENT AND PROBLEM SRUDY.
EDUCATION 103-MODERN METHODS OF TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
AND SURVEY OF PRACTICE. Stormzand. Credit, three semester hours.
EDUCATION 104-METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOLS. Douglass Methods.
Primary Methods. 1-3 grades general. See description.
EDUCATION 10 -a-PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION.
Text: Clement's Principles of Secondary Education.
Credit, three semester hours.
b. THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM AND COURSE OF STUDY.
Moore: The Primary School.
EDUCATION 106-PRINCIPLES OF JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.
EDUCATION 107-EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY.
Smith-Educational Sociology.
EDUCATION 108-a-PUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION.
Text: Cubberly-Public School Administration.
b. PRIMARY PROJECTS. The Krokowitzer.
EDUCATION 109-HISTORY OF EDUCATION.
Text: Cubberly.
b. HISTORY OF THE CHILD "PAIDOLOGY."
EDUCATION 110-PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION AND CONFERENCE.
EDUCATION 111 and 112-PRACTICUM. Observation and Practice Teaching.
Lesson Planning.
EDUCATION 113-METHODS OF SUPERVISION.
EDUCATION 114-SUPERVISED SRUDY. a. High School 7-12. b. Elementary
Schools 1-6.
EDUCATION 115-EDUCATIONAL LOGIC AND PHILOSOPHY. Analysis of think-
ing and learning in education with the educational adaptions. Year course.
Six semester hours credit.
Text: Dewey-How We Think.
EDUCATION 116-ADVANCED PRACTICUM. Lesson planning and practice
teaching required of all College students.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 61
GEOGRAPHY
GEOGRAPHY 101-PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY. A review course in geography
with emphasis placed on many of the advanced features of the subject.
Text: Atwood's Higher Geography, Book II.
Credit, three hours.
GEOGRAPHY 102-ADVANCED GEOGRAPHY. (METHODS). This course is de-
signed for those pupils who intend to teach geography or do advanced work in
the subjects. Special emphasis is placed upon methods of teaching geography.
Text: Branon's Teaching of Geography.
Credit, three hours.
GEOGRAPHY 103-INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. This course
is primarily for those students who intend to major in business administration. It
stresses the economic relationship of man to his environment.
Credit, four hours.
GEOGRAPHY 104-HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. A study of population, the distri-
bution of various races of mankind, and the geographical factors involved.
Text: To be selected.
Credit, three hours.
HISTORY
HISTORY 101-ADVANCED AMERICAN HISTORY (FOR NORMAL STUDENTS).
This course is designed for those students who intend to teach American History.
A comprehensive review is made during the first semester.
Text: Muzzey.
Credit, three hours.
During the second semester a course emphasizing the methods of teaching the
fields of history, and especially American, is given.
Texts: Johnson-Teaching of History; Tryon's Methods of Teaching in the
High Schools.
Credit, four hours.
History 102-MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY I, 378-1500. This course em-
braces the development of Europe from the barbarian invasions to the close of the
fifteenth century; the study of medieval civilization and a survey of the economic,
social and political institutions.
HISTORY 103-MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY II, 1500-1926. The modern
development of the European nations from the fifteenth century to the present day.
Text: Hazen's Europe Since 1500.
Credit, three hours.
HISTORY 104-NEGRO HISTORY, PAST AND PRESENT. A survey of the part
played by Negro peoijes in American history during the past and also the present
time in which we live.
Text: Woodson's History of the Negro.
Credit, three hours
OFFERED UPON REQUEST-
106-CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
107-CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF ENGLAND.
Three hours each semester.
108-ANCIENT HISTORY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Three hours.





62 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
LANGUAGES
FRENCH 101-ELEMENTS OF FRENCH GRAMMAR, COMPOSITION, PRONUNCI-
ATION. Reading of simple text.
Text: Frazier and Squair.
FRENCH 102-ADVANCED FRENCH COMPOSITION.
SPANISH 101-FUNDAMENTALS OF SPANISH GRAMMAR. Composition, reading
of simple text.
Text: Fuentesy Francais First Year Spanish.
SPANISH 102-ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR. Composition, reading of an
intermediate text, careful analysis of pronunciation difficulties.
Text: Fuentes Y Francias.
SPANISH 103-ADVANCED SPANISH. Review Grammar reading of texts from
modern Spanish authors.
MATHEMATICS
MATHEMATICS 101-ADVANCED ARITHMETIC. This course is required of all
students taking the L. I. degree. Special attention is given to the application of
different methods in solving problems, percentage and its application and the
arithmetic solution of plane figures. *3.
Texts: Higher Arithmetic-Stone and Mills. The Teaching of Arithmetic
-Smith.
MATHEMATICS 102-COLLEGE ALGEBRA. This course is required of 'all
Freshmen. The first half of the course is a review of advanced High School
Algebra; the second half covers work in mathematical induction, determinants,
permutation, combination, progression, theory of equation, mathematics of invest-
ment, and any other topics of importance. *3.
Text: College Algebra-Hart.
MATHEMATICS 103-ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS. This course
is open to sophomores who have completed Mathematics IX, and is required of all
students majoring in mathematics and all students doing major work in Mechanic
Arts. It is combined with Trigonometry, College Algebra, Analytic Geometry and
Calculus, making a comprehensive application of the principles learned in these
branches of mathematics. *3.
Text: Smith and Granville.
MATHEMATICS 104-DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. It is open
to Juniors who have completed Mathematics X, and is required of students majoring
in Mathematics and Mechanic Arts. The work embraces an intensive study of func-
tions, limits, differentiation and integration of Algebraic and Transcendental func-
tions, mechanical applications, curve tracing, infinite series and many other topics of
interest to the draughtsman. *3.
Text: Differential and Integral Calculus-Love.
SCIENCE
The Science Division of the Academic Department, consists of Biology, Chem-
istry, Physics, and General Science, ranging from Junior High School through four
years of College. The courses are so organized that they will meet the demand of
the students from each of the other departments, with the primary purpose, however,
of preparing science teachers, pre-medical students and research scholars.
In the college courses, chemistry may be selected as a major by taking at least
'Numbers refer to the number of times a week the classes meet.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 63
22 semester hours, or as a minor by taking at least 14 semester hours. Biology may
be selected as a major by taking at least 15 semester hours. Physics may be selected
as a minor by taking at least 8 semester hours, which is suggested to be combined
with mathematics or chemistry, as a major.
The course prescribed for students preparing to teach science consists of 18
semester hours of chemistry; 9 semester hours of biology; 8 semester hours of physics.
NOTE-Notebooks are required in all courses.
BIOLOGY
BIOLOGY 101-GENERAL BIOLOGY. Designed to lay a broad itjndjri.,n of
the general principles of biology as a part of a college ~Jucjit-.n -i.,dJ i i preprir.ti .!
for the study of medicine. Emphasis is placed on tlh i-r.r.,il kIam.dor- --, i. large
range of laboratory work on typical specimens and e:..ir.c Eadv "-t lt-. ir-nelids.
Required of sophomores. Open to all college students. First semester. Two lectures
and one two-hour laboratory period each week.
Text: Foundations of Biology-Woodruff.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 102-BOTANY. Distribution, classification, activities, structures of
typical specimens in the plant kingdom are studied. Special attention is given to the
origin and production areas of economically important plants and commercial
plant products. Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory
period each week.
Text: Principles of Botany-Sinnott.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 103-ZOOLOGY. Structure, life histories, and physiology of animals
are studied. Laboratory work on specimens from each of the groups of the animal
phyla. Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each
week. Prerequisite:General Biology.
Text: Galloway & Welch. Manual-Drew.
Credit, three semester hours.
BIOLOGY 104-BACTERIOLOGY. See Agricultural Department.
BIOLOGY 105-COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. Study of the vertebrates in regard
to similarity in structures and functions with reference to and the dissection of the
dogfish and the cat. First semester. Three two-hour periods each week. (No
credit given until Biology 106 has been taken.) Prerequisite: Biology 103.
Text: Vertebrate Anatomy-Kingsley. Manual-Davidson.
BIOLOGY 106-COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. Continuation of Biology 105.
Second semester. Three two-hour periods each week.
Credit, three semester hours.
CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY 10f-GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Detail study of laws
and theories. Non-metalic elements and familiar compounds are studied by means
of lectures, demonstrations, recitations, problems, and experiments. Required of all
Freshmen. First semester. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each
week.
Text and Manual: Newell.
Credit, five semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 102-GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Continuation of Chem-
istry 101 for which no credit will be given until Chemistry 102 has been taken.
Second semester. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Credit, five semester hours.





64 FLORIDA A e M COLLEGE
CHEMISTRY 103-QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Designed to give fundamental
principles involved in analysis, to develop the deductive reasoning power of the
student, and to broaden his knowledge of inorganic chemistry. Preliminary experi-
ments of known substances are analyzed, then each student is required to report
the analysis of a number of unknown samples. For sophomores. First semester.
One lecture and three two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: Chem-
istry 101 and 102.
Text: Baskerville and Curtman.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 104-QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Elementary course of gravi-
metric and volumetric analysis. Use of common samples, especially of ores.
For sophomores. Second semester. One lecture and three two-hdur laboratory
periods each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 103.
Text: Allen.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 105-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. In this course the underlying prin-
ciples of the aliphatic series with emphasis on the properties of important compounds
in the aliphatic series. For Seniors. First semester. Two lectures and two two-
hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 103.
Text: Outlines of Organic Chemistry-Moore. Manual: Moore and
Underwood.
Credit, four semester hours.
CI-IENMI'I'RY 106-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. To take up the compounds of
the aromatic series. Prerequisite: Chemistry 105. Second semester. Two lectures
and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 107-ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Study of the properties
of important compounds in the aromatic series with emphasis on dyes, paints, and
simple drugs. Reports on the industrial value of organic chemistry. Elective.
First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods each week.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 106.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 10 8-ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. Elementary physi-
cal chemistry with emphasis on solutions. Elective either semester. Two lectures
and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 104 and
Calculus.
Text and Manual: Chapin.
Credit, four semester hours.
CHEMISTRY 109-AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. See Agricultural Department.
CHEMISTRY 110-HOUSEHOLD CHEMISTRY. See Home Economics Department
CHEMISTRY 111-CHEMISTRY OF TEXTILES. See Mechanic Arts Department.
PHYSICS
PHYSICS 101-GENERAL PHYSICS. This course presents in detail the laws
with proofs and all the various theories of the principle divisions of physics.
To cover mechanics and heat. Demonstrations, frequent quizzes, problem notebook,
each week. Prerequisite: College Algebra and Trigonometry. (No credit given
until Physics 102 has been taken).
Text: Stewart. Manual: National Notebook Sheets.
PHYSICS 102-GENERAL PHYSICS. To include magnetism, electricity, sound
and light. Second semester. Two lectures and two two-year laboratory periods
each week. Prerequisite: General Physics.
Credit, four semester hours.
PHYSICS 104-HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS. See Home Economics Department.
"1





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 65
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY 101-INTRODUCTON TO PSYCHOLOGY. The purpose of this
introductory course in psychology is to give the beginning pupils a thorough,
practical knowledge of the fundamental principles and application of psychology.
Text: Introduction to Psychology by E. Seashore.
FTn'. II.,,, first semester.
PS CHOLOGY 102-CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. In this course an analytical study
of child hclljvior is made. Such concepts as instincts, emotions and habits are
studied from the point of view of their development in the early life of the child.
One hour, second semester.
PSYCHOLOGY 103-APPLIED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, TESTS, MEASURE-
MENTS. The goal in this course is that of subjecting all of the principles learned
to scientific experiment. It is indeed a cold scientific plunge into the field of
psychology. Educational and mental tests.
Text: Monroe, Devoss, Kelley, Terman, M. of I.
Three hours, first semester.
PSYCHOLOGY 104-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the mental
processes of the child are required to master the fundamental processes, such as-
mathematics, language and science.
Text: Starch, Educational Psychology.
.Three hours, second semester.
WRITING
WRITING 101-The aim is to stress upon formation of letters, spacing of
letters, slant and height of letters, and difficult combinations of letters. Special
attention paid to muscular movement.
Textbook: Grave's Muscular writing Book No. 7.
WRITING 102-The aim of this course is to lay stress on speed, quality and
form. Practice using muscular movement in writing on unruled paper, envelopes,
receipts, bills and checks. History of penmanship, function and standards are
learned. Scales are used for quality.
Textbook: Grave's Muscular Writing Book No. 8.
WRITING 103-This course is for the Normal Students. Special attention
is placed on methods in penmanship. Early writing, teaching beginners and advanc-
en students, are part of the work. Muscular movement, uses of Thorndike's Ayre's
and Freeman's scales and practice work.
Textbooks: Grave's Muscular Writing Books Nos. 7 and 8.
DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL COURSES
BOOKKEEPING 101-This course assumes that students have had no previous
training in bookkeeping procedure. The fundamentals are explained and the student
is tl'.. r u.l-.lr introduced to the elements of double entry record keeping.
This course is based on intermediary accounting problems, which are designed
to train the student in analyzing and expressing the results through the medium
of suitable statements.
Credits, five hours.
STENOGRAPHY 101-The Gregg system is used. The work included in the
first course familiarizes the student with the theory of the system.
STENOGRAPHY 102-This begins the student on dictation of letters for
transcription. A medium rate of speed must be acquired for proper credit in course.
TYPEWRITING 101-The first studies in this course cover the use of all keys
by the touch system. Accuracy, without speed, is stressed for the first semester.





66 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC 101-Drill in the solution of mental and
written arithmetical problems. Rapid calculation practice and the study of short-
cut systems.
Credit, three hours.
INSURANCE 101-This course discusses the fundamental principles and actual
practices of accident, health, fire and life insurance. Automobile, credit and other
L i.l insurance will be studied: 'Ti..1 1 I.. of the insurance company and the
policy-holder will both be considered.
REAL ESTATE 101-This is a newly organized course prepared to.meet the
demand of, the times with reference to real estate dealings, Zoring, city-planning
and development of property will be treated.
ADVERTISING 101-The purpose of this course 'is -to present the fundamental
principles and psychological laws that effect an advertising appeal, together with
sufficient illustration and application to make their use practicable. The problem
method will be used. ,
ETHICS 101-Moral and religious education in public schools, with attention
to problems of adjustment. This course deals with the problems of every-day life.
It attempts to shed new light on the situation, involving altruism, .'.m n i.l duty,
and to help the student to choose the better of two alternatives.
Four hours, first semester.
ENGLISH 114-PUBLIC SPEAKING. This course deals with practice speech-
making, speech analysis and scientific speech building.
Texts: Effective Speaking-Phillips. Baker's Forms of P'.ld. d A.dr.
Two hours. (Elective).
MUSIC
The aim of the Music Department of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College is to create in the student body, as a whole, a love and proper appreciation
for the beautiful and uplifting in the broad field of music; to afford ample oppor-
tunity for,individual development of a technique and power of interpretation of the
best music, both instrumental and vocal; to encourage and foster creative ability.
The Choral Union is open to all students and affords opportunity for acquaint-
ance with the best sacred and secular music.
The course in Theory includes Harmony, General Theory, Musical History
and Appreciation. This course is designed primarily to acquaint the student with
the origin and meaning of terms, to teach principles of part-writing and to furnish
a general knowledge of music with which every student should be familiar.
The methods of teaching are those following our present-day principles of
psychology and pedagogy. The student is led to think and work out logically the
problems arising from his work. Students in all stages of advancement are received
and credit given for work done.
Special arrangements may be made for students to major in Public School Mus'c.
Every student is required to take music for the entrr. f .-!r years of high school
and pass an examination each semester.
AUXILIARY COURSE
PUBI.C SCHOOL MUSIC
This study includes a review of all notes and rests, kinds of measures, signatures,
terms, including tempo and variations in tempo, the constructions of the major,
the minor and the chromatic scales, simple transposition and sight singing.
The following books will be used, iPr.-'.r,. series, Music Essentials, Marvoll;





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 67
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Buker. There will be work in sight scales,
exercises, chorus work and community singing.
1. Beginners-Sight Reading.
2. Primary Music-1-3 grades.
3. Intermediate Music-4-7 grades.
4. J. H. Music-Chorus and community singing.
FIRST YEAR
Notation. Keys, signatures and exercises in the nine keys.
SECOND YEAR
Review of scales. The Rhythmic Figuresl-Divided beat.
Two and three part singing.
THIRD YEAR
Review of second year's work. Melodic progressions in each key. Tuition-
$4.00. per month for instrumental music.
General review.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The aim of the Physical Education Department is to present a well-rounded
two-year course so that the graduates may enter into fields of coaching, play
ground directors, and instructors of Physical Education.
The course of instruction has been so arranged as to give the students practical
and theoretical work in methods in physical education, personal hygiene, exercise
for health correction, and school games.
Courses are offered in the coaching and technique of football, baseball, track,,
basket ball, field hocky for women, and tennis.
Each student before graduation is required to coach and develop at least one
class team.
Girls taking the course are required to teach class teams of field hockey, -basket-
ball, volley ball, tennis or dodge ball.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101-FIRST YEAR.
1. Personal hygiene.
2. Methods in Physical Education.
3. School games.
4. Coaching, technique and practice.
5. Study 'of football.
6. Study of track.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 102-SECOND YEAR.
1. Exercise for health and correction.
2. Games, contests, and relays.
3. Study of baseball.
4. Study of tennis.
5. Study Of basketball.
6. Study of field hockey.
OUTLINE OF COURSE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 103-PERSONAL HYGIENE. The wisdom of physical
efficiency; statistical study of the physical examination; description of the skin and
its functions; muscles and their functions; digestion; defects in body carriage.





68 FLORIDA A F M COLLEGE
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 104-METHODS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Formal
exercises, calisthenics, organized play, effort, cooperation, knowledge of games.
Athletic (Inter-class or Inter-school): Participation; ability. Health Habits:
Care of body (teeth, hair, hands, face, etc.); posture of body; neatness of person
and surroundings. Discipline: general attitude toward others; general attitude
toward physical education work.
Text: O. C. Bird.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 105-EXERCISE FOR HEALTH CORRECTION. Setting
up exercises: Breathing, neck bending, arm, trunk, leg, ankle, squatting, arm, leaning
rest, postural exercises, abdominal retraction exercises, arm circumduction, full leg
flexion, back exercise.
Text: Dickinson, Dively.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 106-SCHOOL GAMES. Pedagogy of games, games
for the lower grades, games for the upper grades, games for Junior High School,
games for Senior High School, games for the College, relay races, combative contests
(methods and use), mass combative contests, individual combative contests.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 107-FOOTBALL AND BASEBALL. Technique, defense,
offense, forward passing, blocking, tackling, kicking, team plays and coaching.
Lecture course. Laboratory period.
Technique, pitching, batting, catching, base running, coaching.
Lecture course. Laboratory period.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 108-TRACK. Fundamental-Sprints, middle dis-
tance running, distance running, cross country running, walking, hurdle racing, high
jump, broad jumping, pole vaulting, shot put, discus and javelin throw, coaching.
Lecture course.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ]09-BASKETBALL. Fundamental. Handling ball,
shooting, handling of body, offense, defense, hygiene of training and coaching.
Lecture course.
Students are required to develop at least one class team in football, baseball,
track, basketball.





THE AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT FACULTY
B. L. PERRY, Director, Agricultural Department; Landscape Work and Truck
Gardening.
Tuskegee Institute; Special Study Iowa State College.
C. O. BROWN, Poultry and Swine Husbandry
Hampton Institute.
L. A. MARSHALL, Agricultural Chemistry and Education
B. S., Iowa State College.
R. L. REYNOLDS, Smith-Hughes Vocational Agriculture
B. S., Ohio State University.
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Howard University; Cornell University; Michigan Agricultural College.
JOHN D. WRAY, Agronomy
B. S., M. S., Agricultural and Technical C...11,.:. Grc.i.b..r.'N. C.:
J. C. BALDWIN, Farm Demonstration and Farmers' Conference Agent
B. S., Florida A & M College
A. A. TURNER, State Agent
Ohio State University
THE AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
FRESHMAN
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English ..---. --- 5 English .. ------ 5
General Chemistry .-S....-..... --- 5 General Chemistry ----- --...... 5
Z., ,. --- ------ General Botany ----.- -- 3t+
1; *i,.I.l Education -1--_ 1 Agronomy (Pasture and
Agronomy (Cash crops) ----.. .A.... Forage crops -......... --.... ----- -
Physical Education -.-......... ---- 1
~~~~18~18
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English .---------._ 3 English -. .----- -- 3
Agr. C9hm..trr! (Plant and Agr. Chemistry (Soils and
A.\-,;mjl N r.l .t11 a, 5 Fertilizers) .-....--..- -- -------.- 5
IJ,,,r' ,.mtd' C i 4 Animal Husbandry (Gen) .-...- 3
Poultry ....-.. --.... ------ 4 Horticulture (Fruit Production).. 4
Farm Mathematics ._-----... -------. 2 Agr. Education (Introduction
Physical Education -....---... 1 to Voc. Education _.............- 3
Physical Education ----..... ... .- 1
19
19





70 FLORIDA A !F M COLLEGE
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English (Business) .-......--.....-- 3 Agr. Education (Principles
Agr. Education (Educational of Teaching) -- _-........ _- .,3>
Psychology) -------.- Agr. Economics ---_---
History Agr. Education ...-..__. 3 Agr. Botany ....--..... ._. .--__._ 4- '
Agr. Bacteriology ...._...--.. 4 Agr. Engineering -......... '2
Agr. Engineering ....- .......-.-.. --,-,. Animal Husbandry (Swine
Horticulture (Truck Crop Production) ---......-. ------..... 3-
Production) .-.-........ 3 Engl:.h ,'T..ur ,l:,,i', 3'"
Physical Education_ I.... .1 -:. '. '.. .-.
' %6~~fc ~~19'
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English (Public Speaking) --.---- 2 English (Public Speaking) -..--... 2
Agr. Education (Special Meth.) -- 3 Agr. Education (Directed
Economics (Marketing) .- : ---...--. 3 Observation and Practice) --.... 3
Constitution and Government .--.-- 3 Economic Entomology ---......... 3
Physical Education --..._.--. I Constitution and Government ..-.- 3
Electives _'--_____ .-- -- 5 Rural Sociology -...---------- 3
--- Physical Education --_............ I
-~' 17 Electives ---:- ,------ 2
17
ELECTIVES:
Incubation and Brooding (Poultry
No. 2.
Advanced Truck Prod't (Horti-
culture No. 3.
Principles of Vocational Education
(Education No. 6.)
Landscape, Architecture (Horti-
culture No. 4).
Advanced Dairying (Dairying No.
3.)
Advanced Field Crop Production
(Agronomy No. 3).
A TWO-YEAR COURSE IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY
(FOR BOYS AND GIRLS)
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English .---. ----. .......... ........ English -------.. ..... --.......... 5
Poultry ...---........... ....-. --_ General Bacteriology '-.---.-..---... 3
Farm Arithmetic --...... ._..-... 1 I Poultry Culling (Lecture Work)-- I
Animal Nutrition .. .----_..._.. --.- Incubator and Practice Work ..-.. 2
Poultry Research Work Seminar _--..-.--........... 1
(Seminar) -.--- ............. Electives (approved)
Incubator and Practice Work -.... 2
Electives (approved)





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 71
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER- SECOND SEMESTER
Credits Credits
English .-.3'.-.-.-.. Y3 English. ..... .... 3
Poultry Architecture -------.. ---._ 2 Poultry Histology -.-... 3
Poultry Survey .. ........ 1 Zoology ..-.....--- 3
Poultry Breed Comparison ----.---- 2 Agricultural Economics --...--...... 3
Crating, Fattening and Marking Poultry Judging and Egg
Poultry (Lecture Work) .-...-.-. 2 Gardening (Lecture Work).----2-- 2
Incubator and Practice Work Seminar ---.-- ...----.......------...- 1
.Seminar .-- ..............-- 1 Incubation and Practice Work.
DESCRIPTION OF AGRICULTURAL COURSES
The Department of Agriculture is made up of all the divisions in the, school of
agriculture, devoted to the various phases of technical and practical work. The
work of the various divisions is closely related, and the purpose of all of them is
to train men and women for better service in the broad field of agriculture.
Only men with a B. S. Degree in Agriculture will be eligible to teach Vocational
Agriculture in the State of Florida.
Students who complete the various High School courses will receive certificates.
and the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B. S. A.) will be conferred
upon those who finish the College Department of Agriculture.
The Florida A & M College offers four courses in Agriculture. They are as
follows:
(1) A four-year course in Agriculture leading to the degree of B. S. A.
(2) A. two-year course in Poultry Husbandry leading to a diploma.
(3) A two-year course in Horticulture and Vegetable Gardening leading to
a diploma.
4, A two-year course in Dairy Husbandry leading to a diploma.
TI.e., two-year courses are intended mostly for girls. Boys may take them
if they wish. For those .who wish positions in high schools or county training
schools, or county supervision work in the public schools, these three two-year
courses offer flattering opportunities. It means a good position at a good salary
for those who finish these courses, or it means bigger money for those who would
go out and start a poultry farm or engage in gardening or dairying. The opportuni-
ties for such students are unlimited in the State of Florida.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 I-,.INTRODUCTION TO VOCATIONAL EDU-
CATION. The object of this course is to introduce the prospective teacher of vo-
cational agriculture to the aims and organization of our educational system and aid
him in ;l;:ii ; the place of agricultural education in it. The objectives of
education 4'.l I-. developed; our school system will be surveyed as an agency for
realizing the objectives of education; and the Smith-Hughes Act will be studied in
its relation to our national scheme of education.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 102-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. This
course will acquaint the student with the facts of psychology that are of direct value
to the teacher. Work will center around original' nature, the learning process,
and the factors that condition learning. Prerequisite, Agr. Ed. 101.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 --PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING. An analy-
sis will be made of the kinds of learning involved in the mastery of vocational





72 FLORIDA A 3 M COLLEGE
agriculture. Following this, a study of the methods of teaching that are of greatest
value in teaching vocational agriculture will be made, together with a study of the
psychological principles governing their adoption and use.
Prerequisite, Agricultural Education 102. l/Ny-. t
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 104-SPECIAL METHODS. In this course
the objectives of vocational education in agriculture will be established, then a study
of the Smith-Hughes Act' and the State Plan for the State of Florida, asr they are
designed for furthering these objectives, will be made. The greater part of the course
will be devoted to course-making, enterprise analysis, job' analysis, and the project
method of teaching in vocational agricultural education. Prerequisite, Agr. Ed. 103.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 105-DIRECTED OBSERVATION AND PRAC-
TICE. The first part of the course will be devoted to such phases of agricultural
education as part-time and evening schools, community work, and the equipment
of a department of-vocational agriculture. The remainder will be devoted to obser-
vation and practice. Prerequisite, Agricultural Education 104.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 106-PRINCIPLES OF VOCATIONAL EDUCA-
TION. This is an elective course in which is made a detailed study of the principles
of vocational education as developed in recent years. The basic text is Prosser
and Allen's Vocational Education in a Democracy. Much reference work to other
authors will be required. Prerequisite, Junior standing.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 107-The history of agricultural organiza-
tion and practice, with the accompanying rural social life, will be traced from primi-
tive times to the present. Most attention will be directed to Western Europe and
the United States. The purpose of the course is to give the students an insight into
the origin and development of the present-day rural problems.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 101-CHEMISTRY OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS.
The object of this course is a general understanding by the students of the facts of
plant ahd animal nutrition, and ability to use plant life effectively in feeding farm
animals. The course deals only with organic compounds. The chemistry of mik,
vegetables, grains, blood and other organic compounds in their relation to digestion
and nutrition receive considerable attention. Prerequisite, one year of general
Freshman chemistry.
Credits, five, recitations ,three.--'- .. s .
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 102-CHEMISTRY OF SOILS AND FERTILIZERS.
Students will analyze soil and fertilizer samples for the elements that are significant
in fertilizing practice, accompanying their laboratory-work with such textbook and
problem work as will result in a working mastery of eonomical crop _ferr;lizJi .i.
Prerequisite, Agricultural Chemistry 1001.et.6 I- .-. ":. X
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 101-INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS. A brief analysis of the economic problems that confront the individual
farmer and the farming industry as a whole, with considerable study of proposed
plans for their solution. Prerequisite, History of Agriculture.
Three recitations, three credits.
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 102-MARKETING. This course will deal
principally with the marketing problems' of the Florida farmer. The processes
through which farm products pass from producer to consumer; cooperative market-
ing, and the technique of actually preparing typical farm products for profitable
marketing, are the topics that will receive most attention. Prerequisite, Agr. Ec. 101.
^S^^SP^-Si-.^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ '*k:l~, \ -.-.^-*-'. '. *"'





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 73
AGRICULTURAL BACTERIOLOGY
AGRICULTURAL BACTERIOLOGY 101-This is a brief introductory course,
the aim of which is to give the student who masters it a working knowledge of the
development and control of bacteria-as -they T.. r [1.. f ... r protecting his crops
and stock from diseases, and of preparing such products as butter, n l 1. cream,
preserved vegetables and meats, etc., for the home table and for the market.
t i,,...'- ., ....1 three; laboratory one .. -' period .
,HOP
^_Sf'i! HI 'Ki-' !, !---[rhis is a r.:- .-' course, the purpose of which is to develop
in r,,ti..r li... il- !l. : construct the simpler buildings and ir'pl. .., about the
far r'. I-. ,.., .I lake needed repairs. Practice in ,*'-'li. rl;, ironwork,
glazing, leather work, gas engine adjustment and repair, and similar every-day activi-
ties is given.
Credits, four (two each semester). Laboratory two two-hour periods.
- ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
ANiti..I.L J,itt b.,ANL i,'i l d I -i I' v. t I. i .' ...P L'lI Jl.n.
horses, ..ifI. .!. ] -rI.I'_.. '" [ I ... ... nr, 1!1. [ .Ji.I';' t
_ci v ...... !. ,, i -', .1 ii, I ...! F r ..,.-,,
Three credit holus, two recitations each week. Lab. one double period.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 0ot-TYPES AND BREEDS OF LIVE STOCK. For college
students. A course covering the origin, history, development and characteristics of
the different.breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine. In the recitations, the types
and market classes of farm animals and their uses are considered; in the laboratory
period, judging to familiarize the student with animals of various types is practiced.
Textbook:- Phumb's -Ty-pes--and -Breeds--of Farm Animalsr
Three credit, hours, two recitations each week. Lab. one double .period.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 104-PORK PRODUCTION. For college students, second
semester. Cost of pork production;- equipment; swine types-pure bred, scrub stock';
building up a breeding herd; feeding;, marketing breeding stock; herd management;
fitting i, ...1 ..- :i'. r .. --. 1 ,i. FJ:.,g practice.
Three credit hours, two recitations each week. Lab. one double period
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 1I0-DAIRY HERD MANAGEMENT. For college stud-
ents. This course deals with the feeding and management of dairy herds. It in-
cludes a study of pedigree, handling, testing cows, judging of dairy cattle, and other
subjects pertaining to the successful management of dairy herds. The student will
be required to care for certain individuals in the herd. Senior elective.
Ce.rb...l.. --l ,, (:i l r i J M.!. o'r .,l rIC''..f-l--t'-
T, .. .. Lab. one double period.' 'a -
DAIRYING
I \ll.,' iNi"- .-' ..I COMPOSITION AND TEXT. For High School Students' .7
The course includes the composition of milk, and its secretion; the Babcock test
for fat in milk and its products; acid test; salt tests; moisture tests; use of lacometer,
and some of the tests for preservaties and adulteration.
i'.nfr!I.-'' ~' Phrr.s.-.,44i..x-,led-.e 'tli..LJis-A.'.i-'jn.jL'.'-i ''-
T. .- L, ...'
DAIRYING 101-PRINCIPLtES OF DAIRYING. For college students, first semes-
ter. This is a general course in dairying, dealing with the secretion, composition,





74 FLORIDA A S M COLLEGE
and properties of milk, with the factors influencing the quality and quantity of
milk, and with the care of milk and cream, on the farm. It includes a study of the
different methods.of creaming, and the construction and operation of farm separators,
the principles and application of the Babcock tests, the use of the lactometer, and
farm butter-making.
.Tccrhb.r-4-srrstjlc: *r1' ),;r.rinS-I-1Ell1 .
i'. ,..1...- .. ,. -.-. ... week. Lab. one double period.
DAIRYING 102-MILK INSPECTION AND MARKET MILK. For college students.
This course will take up the standardization of milk and cream; effect of bacterial
action on tie quality of milk; cooling, handling and general care of milk on the
farm; ;.,_i3..!. .1 -.;... 1;. ; 1 ., ..; iJective.
TEc\rb ..k" K ~* !lw hB'lB lt~;- t.CI, .e ,,r
F"' ......1' *, ..... .. .reek. Lab. one double period.
DAIRYING 103-ICE CREAM MAKING. F-4i L. .t Standardization
of mixtures and freezing of ice cream, sherbets -..1 .Iir ,- *.. products, and the
physical principles involved; types of freezers, flavoring materials, fillers and binders.
Junior elective.
This course begins the second week in March, and lasts until the term closes.
T.;,,-ri*,*'"~"'lC-~'l-'~-...';
Two hours credit, one lecture eac week. Lab. one double period.
HORTICULTURE
HORTICULTURE 101-FRuIT PRODUCTION. This course includes the general
principles of fruit growing, and a study of the various fruit crops, adapted to the
state. Fruit crops are studied especially because the students do not have the opprr-
tunity elsewhere to learn the names and varieties of fruits which may be grown in
the home community. In this course, the student learns the kinds of sprays, dusts,
and other materials used in successful fruit production.
Sophomore year. Second semester.
Three theoretical, and one Practical period each week.
HORTICULTURE 102-TRUCK CROP PRODUCTION. The purpose of this
course is to give the student a specific knowledge of the vegetables best adapted to
the various types of soils, and the proper methods of treating the soil under varying
conditions. This course includes seed-bed preparation, description, identification, and
testing vegetable seeds, the methods of planting and cultivating, fertilizing, and treat-
ing vegetables for market and home consumption. Junior year, first semester.
Two theoretical hours, and one practical hour required.
HORTICULTURE 103-ADVANCED TRUCK CROP PRODUCTION. This course
is studied especially to prepare the student who means to make vegetable growing a
specialty. In this course, the student learns to mix and apply fertilizers for the
special marketing problems, such as location, requirements, packing and shipping.
Before this course is completed, the student must have a clear conception of local
and distant market requirements, as well as a high degree of operative skill in
vegetable production. Senior year elective. Either semester.
One theoretical and two practical periods each week.
HORTICULTURE 104-LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE. This course is designed
to prepare the student for the constant demand for trained people who have ability
to properly layout and beautify estates, school grounds, etc. A study of flowers,
their color blending, shrubbery and shade trees, is taken up, as well as terracing,
levelling and shaping of land to suit the general contour. The student is taught to
propagate plants both in the greenhouse and in the open. Senior elective. Either
semester. One theoretical hour and two practical hours.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 75
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
POULTRY HUSBANDRY 101-SOPHOMORE YEAR. The course includes a
study of farm poultry as a side line on the farm, breeds, classification, culling, poultry
house construction, feeding, incubation, brooding and care, sanitation, diseases and
prevention, marketing, and judging.
First semester, fo/r hours each week, four semester credits.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY 102-This course consists of sixteen lessons prepared
by the poultry staff of the College. The characteristics and useful qualities of the
more common breeds of poultry are briefly discussed. The location, construction,
and care of buildings, incubation, brooding, diseases, the selection and care of eggs
and of breeding stock, feeding for egg production, artificial illumination, and
approved methods and practices in marketing, are fully discussed and considered.
One semester, two credit hours, two classes each week.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE I-PLANT PRODUCTION. A study of the
economic plants, their structure and activities, and the distribution of the field
plants commonly found in Florida. Each student taking the course will be required
to conduct a crop project, in the conduct of which special attention will be given to
farm shop practice, farm implements, crop succession, the cultural method intended
to increase production, and cost accounting. High School Course.
Five ninety-mlinute periods each week.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE II-ANIMAL PRODUCTION. A general
study of practical animal production, and animal products, with special reference to
Florida conditions. Special attention will be given to the problems of selection, feed-
ing management and marketing. Supervised practice will be required, and student
will be encouraged to conduct ownership records of all work carried on. High
School Course.
Five ninety-minute periods each week.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE III-HORTICULTURE. A practical study of
the elementary principles of home and commercial gardening and fruit growing,
with special emphasis on Florida conditions. Attention will be given to cultural
methods, propagation and pest control. Each student will be required to conduct a
horticultural project, keep accurate records, and carry on shop work allied with the
course. High School Course.
Five ninety-minute periods each week.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IV-DAIRYING AND POULTRY HUSBANDRY.
In this course the student has the opportunity to study the fundamental principles
of practical dairying and poultry production. Supervised practice work is required,
as well as any shop work connected with the course, and students will be encouraged
to conduct ownership projects. High School Course.
Five Ninety-minute periods each week.
AGRONOMY
A'. i:-'Nr .! Y 101-Freshman Year. This deals with fundamental principles
of crop production, soil management, adaptability, distribution and uses of various
crops, seed selection, seed testing, preparation of soil, planting, cultivating, harvest-
ing, and other factors affecting the growth, development, and maturity of plant life.
First semester. Text: Productive Farm Crops-Montgomery.
Four hours credit, three recitations each week, Lab. one double period.
AGRONOMY 102-Freshman Year. This course is in soils. It includes the
origin of soils, composition, classes and types, chemical composition and its relation
to plants. Soil as a factor in plant growth, soil fertility and productivity, drainage





76 FLORIDA A. e M. COLLEGE
and irrigation and tillage, soil organisms and their relation to soil fertility and plant
growth, plant food, etc.
Second Semester. Text: Productive Soils-Wier.
Four credit hours, three recitations each week, one double laboratory period.
AGRONOMY 103-Senior Elective. This course will consist mainly of experi-
mental work, and covers a comparison of various methods of cultivation, various
qualities of fertilizers under the same crop, a test of the various kinds of seed show-
ing which are best adapted to this particular section of Florida, and the keeping of
careful records, tabulating the results of each of the above experiments for compari-
son. This work also includes the identification of various farm seeds, weed seeds,
and the plants upon which these seeds grow. A thesis will be required giving the
results of the findings in the above work.
Three credit hours, two recitation each week, .,. double laboratory period.
ZOOLOGY/'"
ZOOLOGY 101-Freshman Year. A study of the structure, function, relation-
ship, and evolutionary types of inverterbrates and the vertebrae. This course is
intended to give the student a somewhat brief but general knowledge of the Animal
Kingdom.
i' i. t_ 'rr! T.. r r itk r -, -, ill..- ,1 ... I ~.-,I.Ic
- ,' hours, three recitations each weck, one double laboratory period.
AGRICULTURAis L BOTANY
AGRICULTURAL BOTANY 1( i ; ,-'-''tea r. A study of Botany as it
applies to farm- crops... The plant, its structure, its parts and their functions, the
flower, its parts and functions, fruit and seeds, germination, cells and tissues, roots,
stems and leaves and their functions, and the evolution and heredity of plants
and their effects on modern Agriculture.
Three -. .' -' ",' one recitation period, two double laboratory periods.
ENTOMOLOGY
ENTOMOLOGY 101-Applied Entomology based on structure, classification,
life history, recognition and general control of insects injurious to farm crops, partic-
ularly in the State of Florida.
Laboratory; two double periods each week.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 101-Junior Year. This course covers
general farm mechanics and repair, drainage, irrigation, rural sanitation, water
supply, farm buildings and other structures, together with upkeep and repair.
Students will be required to become efficient in performance of everyday skills that
arise on the average farm by their performance on the school farm.
Junior Year-Second Semester. Study will be made in the operation, adjustment
and repair of all classes of farm machinery. Simple surveying, terracing, laying of
land, orchards, mensuration, etc. Practical problems will be presented as they arise
on the school farm and campus.
Two laboratory periods each week.
AGRICULTURAL MA/HEMATICS
AGRICULTURAL MATHEMATICS i 01-Second Semester-Sophomore Year.
Mathematics relating to agriculturd/infal its branches, especially that which con-
cerns the farmer in every-day /actices, such as land measure, buying and selling,
mixing fertilizers, draft, etc.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 77
GENERAL AGRICULTURE
GENERAL AGRICULTURE 101--This course is a general one including the
study of plants and animals, poultry and such other objects that the average student
will come into contact with after leaving school. The course gives the student
a general knowledge of selecting a good cow, judging a proper type of horse, hog,
or sheep, culling poultry, etc. This course is continued thru both semesters of the
Junior High School Year, and is connected with a practical garden project.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY
RURAL SOCIOLOGY 101-This course acquaints the student with the
forces and factors in rural social progress development and adaption of rural
institutions and organization. T credit h
Three recitations per week. Three credit hours.





78 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
THE MECHANIC ARTS DEPARTMENT FACULTY
J. B. BRAGG, Dean of Mechanic Arts Department
Tuskegee Institute; A. B., Talladega College.
G. M. JONES, Assistant Dean, Architectural and Mechanical Drawing, Science and
Mathematics
B.S., M.S., University of Michigan.
A. C. PHILLIPS, Masonry and Plastering
Tuskegee Institute.
B. F. HOLMES, Carpentry
Hampton Institute.
M. S. SANDERS, Upholstering and Cabinet Work
B.S., Agricultural and Technical College, Greensboro, N. C.
EDWARD JONES, Painting and Decorating
Hampton Institute.
S. L. THORPE, Electricity
Tuskegee Institute.
Z. R. HERCEY, Plumbing, Heating and Ventilating
Tuskegee Institute.
W. T. REED, Auto-Mechanics
Hampton Institute.
WILLIAM H. STICKNEY, Printing
State A. & M. College, Normal Ala., Mergenthaler Linotype School, Chicago.
C. S. HAYLING, Tailoring
Trade Training, Goodwill and Wilson, Ltd., Trinidad, B. W. I.
C. B. NASBY, Freehand Drawing
George R. Smith College; Chicago Art School.
DIVISIONS
The object of this department is to prepare young men for life's work in the
trades as mechanics, contractors, teachers of trades and directors of departments.
The shops are housed in the Mechanic Arts Building. This build;ig is a two
story brick structure well lighted and ventilated for shop work. Each department
has space with black board for discussion of shop projects after which the students
work either in the shop or are carried to one of the various field jobs.
The young men have much practice along with theory. Students in building
trades as masonry, carpentry, plumbing, electricity and painting have had and are
having excellent opportunities in new structures, alterations, and additions on the
school grounds. The Dining Hall, Science Hall and Nurses' Cottage were recently
built by the students. The structures that are now in progress are the band stand
and the dairy barn including dormitory, and there are soon to be such jobs as build-
ing an implement house for the Agricultural Department and an elementary school
building. Students get experience on these jobs from the working out of the plans
through actual construction of the job.
Other divisions such as auto-mechanics, tailoring and printing have ample
opportunities in getting experience for the industrial world. Most of the related
sciences and mathematics are given in the Mechanic Arts Department.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 79
MASONRY SHOP-
This division is equipped with all necessary tools for masonry and plastering as
well as for a thorough study of the properties of materials. Experience in this
department is always available on the school grounds.
CARPENTRY SHOP-
The carpentry division has a planer, jointer, mortiser, lathes, band saw, band
saw filer, combination rip and cross cut saw, and bench tools. Here the students
have a splendid opportunity for experience in their trade.
CABINET SHOP-
The cabinet shop is equipped with bench and necessary tools for upholstering
and cabinet work. This department does the making and renovating of mattresses,
furniture repairing and broom-making. The commercial outlook for graduates from
this department is very favorable.
PAINT SHOP-
The painting division is equipped with paints, brushes and benches of various
kinds, which afford the students a fair knowledge of what is required for the
average shop, and an opportunity to become good painters.
ELECTRIC SHOP-
This shop is equipped with a first class store room from which the students are
supplied with any apparatus necessary for proper instructions. An abundance of
experience is obtained from the motors throughout the campus, a moving picture
machine, hospital electrical equipment, etc. Special attention is paid to house wiring.
PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING--
This shop is equipped with a complete stock of wrenches that are used in the
practical work of the trade, pipe bending, forms, strong work benches, lead working
tools, and complete sets of different caulking tools.
AUTO-MECHANIC SHOP-
The automobile shop is equipped with drill press, lathe, forcing press, grinder,
electric vulcanizer, auto hoist, jacks, forge, battery charger, and bench tools. Ex-
perience in repair work is always available on all makes of cars as well as an organ-
ized laboratory procedure.
PRINTING SHOP-
The equipment of the printing division consists of four Hamilton type cabinets,
two Hamilton spacing materials cabinets, two imposing stones, one Challenge proof
press, one Miller saw trimmer with attachments, one Chandler & Price 8 x 12 press,
one Chandler & Price 12 x 18 press, one Chandler & Price paper cutter, one Linotype
model 14, one Linotype model 5, one Boston staple binder.
TAILOR SHOP-
The tailor shop is equipped with four sewing machines, two drafting tables, dress-
ing room, electric irons, pressing boards and all necessary equipment for the correct
teaching of the sartorial art.
DRAWING ROOM-
The drawing room is very well equipped to take care of mechanical and archi-
tectural drawing. In this department a general knowledge of drawing is given the
student for about one year, after which he does individual work related to his par-
ticular trade. A large "solar blue print machine" with a completely equipped blue
print room is a feature of this department. In this room the related sciences and
mathematics are taught.





80 FLORIDA A. d M. COLLEGE
COURSES OFFERED
FOUR-YEAR COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANIC ARTS
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
General
Masonry
Carpentry
Painting
Electricity
Heating, Ventilating, and Plumbing
VOCATIONAL TEACHING
The vocational teaching program for the building trades is as given on page 81.
Those students in auto-mechanics, printing and tailoring who wish to prepare to
become teachers of their trades must have the outline of their course altered by the
mechanic arts dean with the requirements of education and history. This must be
done before the end of the second year. The requirements are 18 hours in education
and 6 hours in American history and government including the constitution of the
United States.
AUTO-MECHANICS
PRINTING
TAILORING
FOUR-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT TRADE COURSES
LEADING TO TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
Masonry
Carpentry
Upholstering and Cabinet Work
Painting-
Electricity
Heat'ng, Ventilating and Plumbing
Auto-Mechanics
Printing
Tailoring
TWO-YEAR SMITH-HUGHES COURSES LEADING TO
SPECIAL CERTIFICATE
Masonry
Carpentry
Upholstering and Cabinet Work
Painting
Electricity
Heating, Ventilating and Plumbing
Auto-Mechanics
Printing
Tailoring
WORK OF THE MECHANIC ARTS DEPARTMENT
Except for their shop work there is a common first year for all college students
entering without deficiencies or advanced credit.
The program of studies for the first year college Mechanic Arts students is as
follows:





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 81
STUDIES FOR THE FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Mathematics (College Alg.) 3 3 Mathematics(Analytic Geom.) 3 3
General Chemistry .----....--. 7 5 General Chemistry ----_---- 7 5
English --.... ------.5 5 English ---.......-. 5
Drawing -- -----... 4 2 Drawing --................. 4 2
Shop --....--- ----- 10 5 Shop. -----..---.. 10 5
Physical Education .-- ........ 1 /I Physical Education ...----- 1 2
*BUILDING CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Mathematics (Calculus) --. 3 3 Surveying ----------_------. 2 1
Physics ........-------. 6 4 Physics ------.- -- 6 4
English -- --. -------- S5 English ------- .-- ... 5 5
Drawing ----------...... 4 2 Materials of Construction.- 3 3
Shop (Masonry) .---- 10 5 Drawing --..- 4 2
Physical Education .---. 1 /2 Shop (Masonry) ----- --- 10 5
Physical Education ....-. -_ 1 1/
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Engineering Mechanics ... ... 4 4 Strength of Materials ---- 4 4
Heat Engines .-3..-.. ... 3 3 Heating and Ventilating ...-. 3 3
Economics --._. -- 3 3 Economics ------3 3
English --, -------.------- 5 5 English ----------
Drawing .-..---. 4 2 Drawing ----- 4 2
Shop (Plumbing) ---..--.--- 6 3 Shop (Plumbing) ..-----.----- 6 3
Physical Education ....--- 1 Y Physical Education ---- 1 /
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Testing Materials ..-.-------. 4 2 Specifications and Contracts- 4 2
Reinforced Concrete ...-... 3 3 Building Construction ------ 6 4
Timber and Steel Const..... 3 3 Inspection --. ........ 2 1
Industrial Management ..-.- 3 3 Industrial Management ---- 3 3
English ..... 5 5 English ..--..-.-S ---------. 5
Shop (House Wiring)------ 6 3 Shop (House Wiring).----- 6 3
Physical Education 1 % Physical Education ----.--- 1 %
''The Freshman year building construction shop is carpentry.
' VOCATIONAL TEACHING
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Mathematics (Calculus) 3 3 Surveying ----- 2 1
Physics -- ---- 6 4 English ----.--. 5 5
English .- ------.-....... 5 5 Physics ---- ------ 6 4
Drawing .. ...- -... ........... 4 2 Materials of Construction- 3 3
Shop (Masonry) ...------ 10 5 Drawing -----....-.---- .-_ 4 2
Physical Education ----.--- 1 Shop (Masonry) --......... 10 5
Physical Education _---. 1 /
*The Freshman year vocational teaching shop is carpentry.





':s
i :
82 FLORIDA A ES M COLLEGE-
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND: SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Engineering Mechanics --- 4 4 Economics --..------------ 3 3
History ------ 3 3 History ..---------------- 3 3
Economics ----------------- 3 3 Strength of Materials 4 4
English ----- 5 English ------------ 5 5
Drawing ------.---- -------- 4 2 Drawing -.--- 4 2
Shop .....--------- 6 3 Shop: ----- 6 3
Physical Education .-- 1 /2 Physical Education -- 1 2
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Heat Engines .. 3 3 Education (Methods of
Educational Psychology ..- 3 3 Teaching in High Schools) 3 3
Education (Classrooom Vocational Education ----. 4 4
Management) --- 3 3 Practice Teaching --- 10 5
English ....----5 5 Shop ....------10 5
Shop- ------. 10 5 Physical Education ---- I- 1 /
Physical Education -- 1 /2
AUTO-MECHANICS
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Mathematics (Calculus)--- 3 3 Mechanism ----..- ----..... 4 2
Physics .--.-- --- --- 6 4 Physics ------- 6 4
English .....-------- 5 5 english 5 5
Drawing -----------..... 4 2 Elective ------------------- 3 3
Shop .- ----- 10 5 Shop ...--------- --...-10 5
Physical Education --- 1 '/2 Physical Education ------ 1 V
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Mechanism ....... ----- 4 2 Strength of Materials----- 4 4
Engineering Mechanics -- 4 4 Heat Engines --.-- -- 3 3
Heat Engines---- .... ---- 3 3 Economics ..------ 3
Economics ----- 3 3 English ----. 5 5
English ---- 5 5 Shop ..........------------- 8 4
Shop ...- -- 6 3 Physical Education ..----_ 1 12
Physical Education ----.. 1 '2
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Testing Materials 4 2 Metals 4 2
Thermodynamics .-- 3 3 Thermodynamics .---------- 3 3
Industrial Management ------ 3 3 Industrial Management ----- 3 3
English ..- 5 5 English ------------. 5 5
Shop ...- -- 10 5 Shop .--..-. ..----------- 10 5
Physical Education ----- 1 V2 Physical Education ---- 1 '2





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 83
PRINTING
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Chemistry ---- 7 5 Chemistry -------- --- 7 5
English ------- -- 5 5 English --- 5 5
Drawing (Lettering) -- 4 2 Drawing (Lettering) .. 4 2
Shop ------- 10 5 Shop ------ 10 5
Physical Education .----. 1 /2 Physical Education -- 1 2
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Psychology ------ 3 3 Psychology .. .- 3 3
Economics .----------- 3 3 Economics ---- 3 3
History .------------ 3 3 History ..- ..--------- 3 3
English ----- 5 5 English -------------- 5
Shop ------ 10 5 Shop -------10 5
Physical Education -----..- 1 '/ Physical Education ------ 1 V
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Advertising ----- 3 3 Advertising .----- ----- 3 3
Elective .--------------- 3 3 English -- -- ---- 5 5
Industrial Management -- 3 3 Shop .--- .- 10 5
English ---- 5 5 Industrial Management --- 3 3
Shop -- ----- -------- 10 5 Elective -- -- 3 3
Physical Education ---...- 1 V Physical Education --- 1 V
TAILORING
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Chemistry ------------ -- 7 5 Chemistry ------ -7------- 7 5
Drafting 2 1 Drafting ----- 2 1
English ---- 5 5 English ------ 5 5
Drawing -----------.. ----- 4 2 Drawing .--- -- 4 2
Shop .--- --- 10 5 Shop ------ 10 5
Physical Education .---- I- 1 V Physical Education -_.---- 1 %
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER FIRST SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Chemistry ----.- --------- 6 4 Chemistry ---------- ----- 6 4
Economics ------------------ 3 3 Economics ------- --------- 3 3
Designing -- -- 2 1 Designing -- ---- 2 1
English .----- -- 5 5 English ------ 5 5
Shop ----..--- 10 5 Shop -------- 10 5
Physical Education -------- 1 i 2 Physical Education --- 1 %
t





84 FLORIDA A a M COLLEGE
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Textiles and Clothing _..---.. 3 2 Textiles and Clothing -. ... 3 2
Industrial Management --_- 3 3 Industrial Management .._...- 3 3
English ---.... ---.... ....... 5 English ----- --....... ----------- 5 5
Dyeing _-- ._-.--- -..-- 4 3 Cleaning and Dyeing --... 5 4
Shop -------.-........ 10 5 Shop ..-------------------- 10 5
Drafting ---. .. _----- 2 1 Drafting .......-.-------- 2 2 1
Physical Education ---.---- 1 % Physical Education ------.- 1 '/2
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
GENERAL
MECHANIC ARTS 101-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. Building materials and
processes; working drawing; specifications; quality and cost estimates. Six hours of
work a week are required for this course.
Four hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 102-CLEANING AND DYEING. A list of various kinds of
dyes, the art of fixing coloring matter, and miscelleaneous recipes for dyeing cotton
wool and silk; the preparation of cleaning fluid; bleaching; the removing of spots
and stains from garments; the washing of silk and cotton; the washing of flannel
and other woolen articles; the cleaning of clothes, carpets, etc.; steam cleaning; dry
cleaning. Theory given in science department by Miss Chism. Laboratory work
by Mr. Hayling. Five hours of work a week are required for this course.'
Text: Dyeing and Cleaning Textile Fabrics-Owen, Standage.
Four hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 103-ENGINEERING MECHANICS. Elementary mechanics
and graphic statics. Mechanics problems solved both graphically and analytically.
Four hours a week are required for this course.
Text: Applied Mechanics-Poorman.
Four hours, first semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 104-HEAT ENGINES. General principles involved in the
action of the various forms of heat engines, including steam engines and boilers.
This is a descriptive course. Three hours a week required.
Three hours, first semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 105-HEAT ENGINES. A review of Heat En-ines 104.
The internal combustion engine with special attention given to the different typ.s
in use. The general problem of a modern power plant is considered. Three hours
a week are required.
Text: Heat Engines-Allen and Bursley.
Three hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 106-HEATING AND VENTILATING. Elementary theory;
design and construction of hot air, direct and indirect steam, hot water and fan
heating systems. Three hours a week are required for this course.
Text: Heating and Ventilating-Allen and Walker.
Three hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 107-MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION. An elementary study
of the manufacture and properties of the ferrous and non-ferrous alloys, cements,
clay products, protective coatings, fuel and water softening. Four hours of work
a week are required.
Three hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 108-MECHANISM. Principles of mechanism; purpose of
variations of elementary mechanisms, gears, cams, bands, etc.; analysis of simple
machines. Fcur hours a week are required.
Two hours, second semester.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 85
MECHANIC ARTS 109-MEcHANISM. Systematic development of compli-
cated machines to accomplish specified purposes. Four hours a week are required.
Text: Mechanism-Keown.
Two hours, first semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 110-REINFORCED CONCRETE. Concrete theory. Reci-
tations, problems, text, and lectures covering theory and design of masonry structures,
with particular reference to reinforced concrete. Foundations and flat slab con-
struction are studied. Three hours a week are required for this course.
Text: Principles of Reinforced Concrete Construction-Turneaure & Maurer.
Three hours, first semester.
MECHANTC ARTS 11II-SPECIFICATIONS AND CONTRACTS. Technical relations;
ethics; bids and bidders; methods of payment for contract and extra work. Con-
tract documents with reference to building are studied in detail. Two hours a week
are required for this course.
Two hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS I12-STRENGTH OF MATERIALS. Elementary stresses and
strains; flexure of beams; continuous girders; flexure of long columns; combined
stresses. Four hours a week are required for this course.
Text: Strength of Materials-Boyd.
Four hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 113-SURVEYING. Use of the instrument and simple level;
ing; lectures, classroom work and field work. Two hours a week are required for
this course.
Text: Plane Surveying-Tracy. One hour, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 114-TESTING MATERIALS. This is a laboratory course
in the physical testing of the various kinds of building materials. Four hours a
week are required. Tuo hours, first semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 115-THERMODYNAMICS. Heat theory, slightly mathe-
matical. Three hours a week are required.
Text: Heat-Shealy.
Three hours, first semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 116-THERMODYNAMICS. A course in applied thermody-
namics. Three hours a week are required.
Text: Heat Engineering-Greene.
Three hours, second semester.
MECHANIC ARTS 117-TIMBER AND STEEL CONSTRUCTION. Structural
theory. Lectures, recitations, problems, and drafting. Three hours a week required.
Text: Modern Framed Structures, Parti-Johnson, Bryan, Turneaure.
Three hours, first semester.
COURSE IN MASONRY-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
MASONRY 101-Manufacture; properties and uses; methods of performing
tests on all masonry materials. The application of materials for different jobs in
different sections of the country.
Text: Materials of Construction-Johnson.
SOPHOMORE
MASONRY 102-Detail wall construction, flues and fire places. Details of
plastering and stucco.
Text: Materials of Construction-Didder.
JUNIOR
MASONRY 103-Arch building: construction of semi-circular, chamber, jack
and elliptical arches.
Text: Symmetrical Masonry Arches-Howe.





86 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
SENIOR
MASONRY 104-Practical use of specifications and contracts; inspection trips
to large construction jobs. Foreman practice under supervision.
COURSE IN CARPENTRY-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
CARPENTRY 101-The use of bench tools and simple joinery in the construc-
tion of articles useful in school or at home. Construction and decoration are also
taken up this year.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
SOPHOMORE
CARPENTRY 102-In addition to the use of the more common hand tools,
work is given in the elements of house carpentry, wood turning, elementary furniture
construction. A study is made of forestry, lumbering, wood, nails, screws, glue and
working machinery and the getting out of stock are also taken up.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
JUNIOR
CARPENTRY 103-Exercises in framing sills, floor joists, walls and roofs are
taken up. Sketches of all our problems as well as of model houses are made. The
exterior finish of a house, including setting door and window frames and' running
cornice and siding are also taken up this year.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
SENIOR
CARPENTRY 104-This is a continuation of the work of the previous years.
Problems in interior finish, including casing and hanging doors and windows. Stair
construction is taken up during this year. Stock bills and estimates on all jobs
done during the year are required.
Texts: Carpenter's Guide-Audel. Walker's Building Guide.
COURSE IN PAINTING-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
PAINTING 101-Use and care of tools and equipment; a study of wall surfac-
ing; a study of pigments, their composition and manufacture; measurements; letter-
ing; pumice stone; rubbing varnish.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
SOPHOMORE
PAINTING 102-Fillers; stains; furniture painting; varnishing, etc. A study
of the chemistry of paints; inside painting; floors; cloth signs; lettering.
Texts: Basic Lettering-Atkinson. Auto Painting-Vanderwalker. Paint-
ing Magazines.
JUNIOR
PAINTING 103-Color mixing; painting and kalsomining; auto painting;
chemistry of paints; lettering.
Texts: Basic Lettering-Atkinson. Auto Painting-Vanderwalker. Paint-
ing Magazines.
SENIOR
PAINTING 104-Sign painting; auto painting; color blending; glazing; manu-
facture of glass and putty; interior decorating; papering; manufacture of paper.
Texts: Basic Lettering-Atkinson. Auto Painting-Vanderwalker. Paint-
ing Magazines.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 87
COURSE IN ELECTRICITY-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
ELECTRICITY 101-Energy; power; effects of current; magnets; chemistry;
electrolytes; electrolysis; heat; light. Drawing of machine parts; conductors and
insulators; cells and their construction; chemical action; Ohm's law; underwriter's
practice; interior lay-outs of electrical circuits.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope
SOPHOMORE
ELECTRICITY 102-Experiments and problems explaining the fundamental
laws of electric circuits; experiments with electrical apparatus; engines, their con-
struction; mechanical and electrical horsepower; electrical fittings; National Electric
Code; electrical installation; conduit work; study of lighting circuits; wiring devices;
knob and tube wiring; calculations involving Ohm's law.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
JUNIOR
ELECTRICITY 103-Light; power wiring; circuit calculations; selection of
electrical materials; making out bills for materials; estimates; job construction;
underwriter's code; problems in electrical wiring; motors, A. C. and D. C. systems;
installation of same.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
SENIOR
ELECTRICITY 104-Plan reading; alternating current apparatus; measuring
instruments; D. C. and A. C. machines; storage batteries, construction, care and
operation; shop drawings; transformers; induction motors; electric lighting; power
plant design; watt-hour meter reading; incandescent lamp circuits; efficiency of
lamps; wiring calculations; job estimates; practice work.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
COURSE IN PLUMBING, HEATING AND VENTILATING-
COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
PLUMBING 101-Acquaintance with tools used in trade work; making threads;
sketching for each project assigned; bending pipe; making different kinds of coils;
building coils; the care of tools, etc.; connecting range boilers to ranges; piping
traps; checking operations; connecting water meters; caulked joints; the use of sol-
der; the use of small angular fittings; connecting radiators; classification of pipes.
Texts: Practical Plumbing-Starbuck. Steamfitter's Guide-Audel.
SOPHOMORE
PLUMBING 102-Tapping water mains; installing sewers; making wiping sol-
der; wiping joints; roughing-in; installing fixtures; bathroom designing; connecting
water pipes to lead; roof connections; composition roughing-in. Determining the
sizes of wastes; different toilet tanks; continuous vent for a line of fixtures; venting;
connecting high pressure boilers; constructing over-head heating coils; installing a
one-pipe heating system; one pipe circuit system; installing driers for laundries;
cooling coils for fountains; wall coils and radiators.
Texts: Practical Plumbing-Starbuck. Steamfitter's Guide-Audel
JUNIOR
PLUMBING 103-Installing plumbing jobs to be inspected by instructor;
installing fixtures according to project; calculating required radiation for a room;
calculating the different sizes of risers; operating a heating system; special lead
work jobs; installing complete circulating systems; estimating jobs from plans, com-
positions on the different projects.
Texts: Practical Plumbing-Starbuck. Steamfitter's Guide-Audel.





88 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
SENIOR
PLUMBING 104-Layout plumbing and heating job combined, using a state
building code; sealed bids on projects in competition with other students; foreman
a job to satisfy instructor as to ability to handle jobs. Study of State Plumbing
Code; shop hours spent as apprentices on jobs in city; observation of buildings under
construction.
Text: Practical Plumbing-Starbuck. Steamfitter's Guide-Audel.
COURSE IN AUTO-MECHANICS-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
AUTO-MECHANICS 101-General preliminary survey; automobile construc-
tion; explosion engines, cylinders, pistons, valves and camshafts. Connecting rods;
crankshafts; crankcases; carburetors; cooling systems; inlet and exhaust manifolds;
clutches.
Text: Automobile Engineering-American Technical Society.
SOPHOMORE
AUTO-MECHANICS 102-Transmissions; rear axles; brakes; steering gears;
frames; springs; and shock absorbers; front axles and bearings; welding. Wheel; tire
construction and repairs; rims; Ford car construction; aviation engines; tractors;
motorcycles; shop information.
Text: Automobile Engineering-American Technical Society.
JUNIOR
AUTO-MECHANICS 103-Ignition fundamentals; ignition systems; ignition
operation motors; generators; batteries; electrical repairs; reading wiring diagrams;
electrical equipment; electrical wiring diagrams and data.
Text: Automobile Engineering-American Technical Society.
SENIOR
AUTO-MECHANICS 104-Thermodynamics; machine shop work; machine
shop management; tool making; tool design. Mechanism; forging; pattern making;
foundry work; sheet metal work; dies and sheet metal stamping.
Text: Automobile Engineering-American Technical Society.
COURSE IN PRINTING-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
PRINTING 101-Study and use of print shop equipment and materials;
general shop work.
Texts: The Practice of Printing-Polk. Group 9 Standard Apprenticeship
Lessons for Printers.
SOPHOMORE
PRINTING 102-Advanced imposition; cylinder press work; advanced machine
composition; color work and its relation to the art of printing.
JUNIOR
PRINTING 103-Estimating; the study of materials; type; engraving; paper;
ink; bindery materials. The analysis and routing of the printed job; copy fitting.
SENIOR
PRINTING 104-Continuation of junior year's work; estimating and productive
problems; industrial management; principal factors in industrial administration; unit
and bulk effort and production





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 89
COURSE IN TAILORING-COLLEGE
FRESHMAN
TAILORING 101-Altering, cleaning, pressing and dyeing; coat, vest and pants
making, cutting and fitting.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal, and American Tailor and Cutter.
SOPHOMORE
TAILORING 102-A study of styles; cutting and fitting coats, vest and pants;
ladies' tailoring.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal, and American Tailor and Cutter.
JUNIOR
TAILORING 103-Coat, overcoat, vest and pants making; color study; draft-
ing and jobbing; ladies' tailoring.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal, and American Tailor and Cutter.
SENIOR
TAILORING 104-General review; tailoring economics; finance and ethics;
advertising and salesmanship; overcoats; ladies' tailoring.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal, and American Tailor and Cutter.
HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT PROGRAM
FOR ALL TRADES GIVEN IN MECHANIC ARTS
DEPARTMENT
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Algebra .. ---.-...-..-...__ ..5 5 Algebra -......... ........... ..... 5 5
Commercial Geography ........ 5 5 Commercial Geography .......... 5
English ..-- -----..--..---...... 5 English -- --.....---._ .--........... 5 5
Drawing ..-----.... -- --_- ... 4 2 Drawing ......--. .-.-.-.--.. 4 2
Trade ..- .......--.-----.----- 10 5 Trade --.........-...____ 10 5
Physical Education ...------ 1 VI Physical Education --_ .... ... %
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECON DSEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Algebra -..-....--.-- .--._ ... 5 5 Algebra ..._-. .. _.. ...-.. 5
History S --..........- History .-..
English Eglish --..-.-. 5 English ----.--..__ 5 5
Drawing --... -_..-._ 4 2 Drawing --..---... 4 2
Trade ..- .........-------. 10 5 Trade --. .....-... ... 10 5
Physical Education --.....-- 1 VI Physical Education --_. I .z..1 -
THIRD YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Plane Geometry ..--- .S...-... 5 Plane Geometry -------S---..... 5 5
Chemistry ----. --...... 7 5 Chemistry --.---._ 7 5
English -------. .......----. 5 5S English --...-....--.... -------- 5 5
Drawing ..-.....- .-----... 4 2 Drawing ------..... ... ...-..... 4 2
Trade .--...-. .. _.-- 10 5 Trade ------ .-....-.--.-- ....... .. 10 5
Physical Education .-..-- --. 1 Y Physical Education ---..--1 I 2.





90 FLORIDA A M COLLEGE
FOURTH YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Solid Geometry,. : S ..S--.. 5 5 Trigonometry -.--- --.-----.-- 5 5
Physics --- 7 5 Physics ..7.. ..----.--.-.. 7 5
English ---- ..---.... 5 English -S.- 5
Drawing .- ..... 4 2 Drawing ..- ..--... ..--- 4 2
Trade ....- -- 10 5 Trade ...- -- .. -- 10 5
Physical Education ..-..-. 1 2 Physical Education .. ---- 1 2
COURSE IN MASONRY-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
MASONRY I-Study of tools and materials; foundatiu.s; concrete walks;
pottery.
Text: Bricklaying in Modern Practice-Scrimshaw.
SECOND YEAR
MASONRY It-Plain stucco and plastering; flues and simple wall construction
Text: Eric:Ilaying in Modern Practice-Scrimshaw.
THIRD YEAR
MASONRY III-Detail wall construction; chimney construction; plastering of
diffcrznt finishes; stucco of different styles.
FOURTH YEAR
MASONRY IV-Arch building and ornamental brick and plastering designs.
Text: Bricklaying in Modern Practice-Scrimshaw.
COURSE IN CARPENTRY-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
CARPENTRY I-Tools, care and use; planing; sawing; making simple objects;
foundations; floors; framing.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
SECOND YEAR
CARPENTRY II-Foundations; framing; floor plans; windows, doors, etc.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
THIRD YEAR
CARPENTRY III-Framing; roofs; steps; shingling plan reading.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel.
FOURTH YEAR
CARPENTRY IV-Review of work of previous years; inside finishing; esti-
mating.
COURSE IN CABINET-MAKING AND UPHOLSTERING
HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
CABINET MAKING I-Students are taught bench carpentry, chair caning,
the putting in of chair bottoms out of ready woven close and open cane, care and
use of bench tools.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 91
SECOND YEAR
CABINET MAKING II-The work of the first year is continued with more
advanced bench carpentry in the making of useful articles for the school and the
home. Resetting springs, and upholstering foot stools and leg rests are also taken
up.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.
THIRD YEAR
CABINET MAKING III-Third year students are taught wood turning, pattern
making, furniture upholstering, home furniture making and introduction to mattress-
making. Special attention is given to broom-making.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.
FOURTH YEAR
CABINET MAKING IV-The fourth year students are taught the making
of various kinds of cabinets and home furniture. Upholstering is continued and
study of wood, stains, finishing, fillings, and tufting the mattress are also given.
Special attention is given to broom-making.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.
COURSE IN PAINTING-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
PAINTING I-Study of paints and construction of tools; wall painting, rough
and smooth; mixing pants.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
SECOND YEAR
PAINTING II-Furniture. painting; interior priming; mixing of combinations;
matching; varnishing; advanced brush practice.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
THIRD YEAR
PAINTING III-Glazing; auto painting; exterior priming; varnishing; mixing;
composition of pigments, and manufacture.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
FOURTH YEAR
PAINTING IV-Sign painting; estimating job work; color mixing, advanced;
chemistry of paints; management of shop.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
COURSE IN ELECTRICITY-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
ELECTRICITY I-Electricity magnetism, conductors and insulators, electrical
units, E. M. F. magnetic fields; effects of a current around an iron core; Ohm's law;
interior wiring rules; names of electrical materials; bell wiring and operation;
underwriters' rules.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
SECOND YEAR
ELECTRICITY II-Wiring rules; open and concealed wiring, making joints,
soldering, conduit work, wire calculation; methods of connecting cells, laying out
simple electrical circuits; underwriters' code; repair jobs.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.





92 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
THIRD YEAR
ELECTRICITY III-The incandescent lamp; fuses and their uses; kinds of
fuses; rating; A. C. and D. C. currents; bell-ringing; transformers, construction
and use; connections and installation; electrical measurements; volts, amperes,
resistance, watts, power; watt-hour meters; reading of same.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
FOURTH YEAR
ELECTRICITY IV-Motors. Kinds of motors, uses, operation; locating troub-
les; repairs; installation of motors and motor circuits; brush setting; care of com-
mutators; switchboard and its construction; electrical heating apparatus; care of the
same; repairs; installation layout of electrical circuits; estimating on jobs.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
COURSE IN PLUMBING, HEATING AND VENTILATING
HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
PLUMBING I-Tools; their use and care; materials, pipes, valves, fittings;
measurements; threads, etc., water supply.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
SECOND YEAR
PLUMBING II-Fixtures; kinds, location, and placements; heating; care of
boilers; firing; study of fuels; pumps; condensers; faucets; specifications and general
repairs.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
THIRD YEAR
PLUMBING III-Sanitation; engines; valve gearing; evaporation; sewers;
cesspools; furnaces; hot-water repairs; ventilation.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
FOURTH YEAR
PLUMBING IV-Drainage; bathroom and kitchen fixtures; general review.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
COURSE IN AUTO-MECHANICS
HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
AUTO-MECHANICS I-Principles of automobile construction: frames, springs,
steering gears, front and rear axles, brakes, differentials, clutches, transmissions,
universals, power plants, power generation, engines, engine parts and their functions;
oiling systems; cooling systems; gasoline systems; carburetors and carburetion; engine
timing; soldering; and driving.
Text: Automotive Trade Training-Kuns.
SECOND YEAR
AUTO-MECHANICS II-Experiments and practical jobs in general repairing,
body repairing, top repairs; tractors; stationary motors, steam automobiles; machine
tool work; fundamentals of blacksmithing; and automobile accessories.
Text: Automotive Trade Training-Kuns.
THIRD YEAR
AUTO-MECHANICS III-Fundamental electrical data, batteries, their care
and repair; battery ignition, ignition timing; starting motors; generators, wiring
and lighting systems; tire care and vulcanizing; machine tool work; oxygen-acety-
lene welding and braving.
Text: Automotive Trade Training-Kuns.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 93
FOURTH YEAR
AUTO-MECHANICS IV-Garage shop repair methods; diagnosis of troubles;
shop systems, shop arrangements; cost keeping, estimates and records; laws and regu-
lations; care of cars.
Text: Electrical Principles-Kuns.
COURSE IN PRINTING-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
PRINTING I-Layout of cases; handling types; laying case; picking up type;
putting type in stick; setting from printed copy; correct use of proofreader's
marks; correcting proof; distributing type.
Texts: The Practice of Printing-Polk. Machine Composition.
SECOND YEAR
PRINTING II-During the second year the student will take up the study of
American Point System of measuring; study of platen press; locking up forms; vital
parts and care of press.
Texts: The Practice of Printing-Polk. Machine Composition.
THIRD YEAR
PRINTING III-The third year includes advanced make-ready on platen press;
use of paper cutting machines; quality of paper; making dummies and layouts. A
study of display types and job composition in full will also be taken up, together
with machine composition.
Texts: The Practice of Printing-Polk. Machine Composition.
FOURTH YEAR
PRINTING IV-The fourth year's work will consist of advanced composi-
tion; shop routine, together with theory and practice.
Texts: The Practice of Printing-Polk. Machine Composition.
COURSE IN TAILORING-HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENT
FIRST YEAR
TAILORING I-Care of shop and tools; manipulation of square, needle and
thimble; practice in machine stitching; making sleeves; canvas; padding; flys;
button-holes; instruction on trousers-making.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.
SECOND YEAR
TAILORING II-Review of first year; making pockets; pattern designing and
drafting trousers;' shaping and joining of trousers; cuffing from cloth; making of
grade B trousers; plain vest making; altering; fitting; instructions in the art of
making ladies' suits.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.
THIRD YEAR
TAILORING III-Review of second year; instructions on how to take measure-
ments; practice on grade A trousers; making single and double-breasted fashionable
and conservative coats; drafting double-breasted overcoats and top-coats.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.
FOURTH YEAR
TAILORING IV-Review previous work; study and measurements of human
figures in relation to tailoring; instruction in cutting, formal and semi-formal dress
clothes; theory of shop management; economy in cutting; study of materials; how
to design and draft patterns; trade talks; the study of the text books on the art of
tailoring.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.





94 FLORIDA A es M COLLEGE
SMITH-HUGHES COURSES
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Related Mathematics --------- 3 3 Related Mathematics .....3 3
Related Science ----.. --- 3 3 Related Science -- 3 3
English .- --.. .- 5 5 English .- ..--.---. 5
Drawing -. -- 4 2 Drawing .- 4 2
Trade --- ----_ 15 7 Trade ---- 15 7
Physical Education -----. 1 % Physical Education ------.-- 1 V
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Hours Credit Hours Credit
Related Mathematics ...- 3 3 Related Mathematics ..----. 3 3
Related Science ----.. 3 3 Related Science -. .... 3 3
English ----.... ---.- -5 5 English -- 5 5
Drawing ..-.- -. 4 2 Drawing -..--.-. --.... -- 4 2
Trade ... -.. 15 7 Trade --- 15 7
Physical Education --..----- 1 / Physical Education --- 1
COURSE IN MASONRY-SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
MASONRY I-a-Study of tools and materials; foundations; concrete walks and
pottery; plain stucco and plastering; flues and simple wall contsruction.
Text: Bricklaying in Modern Practice-Scrimshaw.
SECOND YEAR
MASONRY II-a-Detail wall construction; chimney construction; lastcring of
different finishes; stucco of different styles; arch building and ornamental brick
and plastering designs.
Text: Bricklaying in Modern Practice-Scrimshaw.
COURSE IN CARPENTRY-SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
CARPENTRY I-a-Tools, care and use; planing; sawing; making simple objects;
foundations; floors; framing; floor plans; windows, doors, etc.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel
SECOND YEAR
CARPENTRY II-a-Roofs; steps; shingling; plan reading. Review of work of
previous year; inside finishing; estimating.
Text: Carpenter's Guide-Audel
COURSE IN CABINET-MAKING AND 'UPHOLSTERING
SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
CABINET-MAKING I-a-Students are taught bench carpentry; chair caning;
the putting in of chair bottoms out of ready woven close and open cane; and the
use of bench tools. They are also taught how to make useful articles for the school
and the home; resetting springs; making foot stools and leg rests.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.
SECOND YEAR
CABINET-MAKING II-a-The students are taught wood turning; pattern
making; furniture upholstering; home furniture and cabinet making and mattress
making.
Text: Problems in Woodwork-Worst.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 95
COURSE IN PAINTING-SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
PAINTING I-a--Tools, parts and construction; wall painting, rough and smooth;
mixing paints. Furniture painting; interior priming; mixing; matching; varnish-
ing; color harmonies; brush practice.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
SECOND YEAR
PAINTING II-a-Glazing; exterior priming; varnishing; mixing; composition of
pigments; manufacture; estimating job work; advanced color mixing; chemistry of
paints; management of shop.
Text: House Painting-Vanderwalker.
COURSE IN ELECTRICITY-SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
ELECTRICITY I-a-Electricity and magnetism, conductors and insulators, elec-
trical units, E. M. F. magnetic fields; effects of a current around an iron core; Ohm's
law; interior wiring rules; names of electrical materials; bell wiring and operation;
underwriters' rules. Open and concealed wiring, making joints, soldering, conduit
work, wire calculation; methods of connecting cells, laying out simple electrical
circuits; underwriters' code; repair jobs. n
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoopc.
SECOND YEAR
ELECTRICITY Il-a -The incandescent lamp; fuses and their uses; kinds of
fuses; rating; A. C. and D. C. currents; bell-ringing; transformers, construction
and use; connections and installation; electrical measurements; volts, amperes, resist-
ance, power; watt-hour meters; reading of same. Kinds of motors, uses, operation;
locating troubles; repairs; installation of motors and motor circuits; brush setting;
care of commutator; switchboard and its construction. Electrical heating appara-
tus; care of same; repairs; installation; layout of electrical circuit; estimating on jobs.
Text: Lessons in Electricity-Swoope.
COURSE IN PLUMBING, HEATING AND VENTILATING
SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
PLUMBING I-a-Tools, their use and care; materials; pipes, valves, fittings;
measurements; threads, etc.; water supply. Fixtures, kinds, location and placements;.
heating; care of boilers; firing; study of fuels; pumps; condensers; faucets; specifi-
cation and general repair.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
SECOND YEAR
PLUMBING II-a-Canitation; engines; valve gearing; evaporation; sewers; cess-
pools; furnaces; hot-water heating. Drainage; bathroom and kitchen fixtures;
ventilation; general review.
Text: Elements of Sanitation-Dibble.
COURSE IN AUTO-MECHANICS-SMITH-HUGHES
dIVaX LSMIJI
AUTO-MECHANICS I-a--Principles of automobile construction; frames, springs,
steering gears, front and rear axles, brakes, differentials, clutches, transmissions,
universals, power generation, power plants, engines, engine parts, and their func-
tions; oiling systems; cooling systems; gasoline systems; carburetors and carburetion;
engine timing; soldering and driving. Experiments and practical jobs in general





96 FLORIDA A d1 M COLLEGE
repairing, body repairing, top repairs, tractor repairing; stationary motors; steam
automobiles; machine tool work fundamentals of blacksmithing; automobile
accessories.
Text: Automobile Essentials-Kuns.
SECOND YEAR
AUTO-MECHANICS II-a-Fundamental electrical data; batteries, their care and
repair, battery ignition, ignition timing, starting motors, generators, wiring and
lighting systems. Tire care and vulcanizing; machine tool work; oxygen-acetylene
welding and brazing; garage shop repair methods; diagnosis of troubles; shop
systems; shop arrangements; cost keeping, estimates and records; laws and regulations;
care of cars.
Text: Automotive Essentials-Kuns.
COURSE IN PRINTING-SMITH-HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
PRINTING I-a-Layout of cases; handling type; laying case; picking up type;
putting type in stick; correcting proof; distributing type; taking up the study of
Amcr-can Point system of measuring; study of platen press; locking up forms; vital
parts and care of press.
Text: The Practice of Printing-Polk.
SECOND YEAR
PRINTING II-a-Advanced make-ready on platen press; use of paper cutting
machines; quality of papers; making dummies and lay-outs; study of display types
and job composition in full will be taken up, together with machine composition.
Text: The Practice of Printing-Polk.
COURSE IN TAILORING-SMITH HUGHES
FIRST YEAR
TAILORING I-a-Care of shop and tools; manipulation of square, needle and
thimble; practice in machine stitching; making sleeves; canvas; padding; flys;
button-holes; instruction on trousers-making; making pockets; pattern designing
and drafting trousers; shaping and joining of trousers; cuffing'from cloth; making
of grade B trousers; plain vest making; altering; fitting; instructions in the art of
making ladies suits.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.
SECOND YEAR
TAILORING II-a-Instructions on how to take measurements; practice on grade
A trousers; making single and double-breasted overcoats and top-coats; drafting
single and double-breasted, fashionable and conservative coats; instruction in formal
and semi-formal dress clothes; theory of shop management; economy in cutting;
study of materials; how to design and draft patterns; trade talks; the study of
textiles and clothing. Study and measurements of the human figure in relation to
tailoring.
Texts: Sartorial Art Journal. American Tailor and Cutter.





BULLETIN, 1928-1929 97
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
ETHEL MAL GRIGGS, Head of Department; Clothing.
FRANKIE M. MCMILLAN, Elementary Clothing.
C. B. NELSON, Foods, Special Methods.
IRMA LEONA COLEMAN, High School Foods, Household Management.
HATTIE BIITT, Handicraft.
The Home Economics Department occupies an entire building sufficiently
equipped for thorough instruction. The aim of the department is to prepare women
to be home makers, teachers of home economics and to prepare them for vocations
arising out of this broad field.
The courses are planned to meet the needs of three types of students.
1. Those who expect to be special leaders in this field of work.
2. Those preparing to teach.
3. Those wishing a general knowledge in home making. (Required of
all girls.)
Advanced students are permitted to major in subjects of greater interest to
them. A major consists of not less than thirty hours of work.
Smith-Hughes students are required to have two years of vocational experience
at home during the summer, and in the school dormitories before graduation.
FOUR YEAR COLLEGE COURSE
FRESHMAN
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English .....--------------.- --3 English ......---------- ---.-3
General Chemistry ....--------.-- -.3 General Chemistry ----__- --- 3
Biology .-----..-...3----- 3 Biology ..-...------_--._--- -. 3
French or Spanish --------- -3 French or Spanish -------.. ... 3
Home Economics 101 (Foods) --.-2 Home Economics 101 (Foods) --2
Home Economics 106 (Clothing)-2 Home Economics 106 (Clothing)_2
Physical Education ---------...... I Physical Education -------I----- 1
SOPHOMORE
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English .... ---------. ....---.-_ 3 Eiglish ...-------- --..._.---... 3
French or Spanish ..-._. ----- -3 French or Spanish -- ._-_. -3
Bacteriology ---- ....... .-- 3.. 3 Bacteriology ----3
Household Chemistry .--.. __... ---. 3 Home Economics 107
Home Economics 107 Dressmaking ---_..... .. --3
Dressmaking --- _... ----... 3 Home Economics 102
Home Economics 102 Advanced Foods -----.---... 3
Advanced Foods -....----.. ----.3 Home Economics 113
Home Economics 111 Handicraft -----
Applied Design History -------------....3
History ---- .- --... ..... -- -._..... Physical Education --- .... ......_ 1
Physical Education .._-_ ..-----1





98 FLORIDA A d M COLLEGE
JUNIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Crei Cdit Credit
English ----.....3------ -3 English ---- .....- 3
Psychology ----..... ----- 3 Psychology -------- ----....-3
Home Economics 114 Home Economics 119
Home Management ..-. 2 Home Economics Ed. ..--.-2
Home Economics 103 Home Economics 104
Nutrition ---------.- 2 Meal Planning, preparation
Home Economics 110 and Serving ------.----- 2
Textiles ---------.. 2 Home Economics 112
Home Economics 107 Millinery -...-....- 2
Dressmaking ----- 2... ---..2- Home Economics 107
Physical Education ----._.--- --I Dressmaking ....... -- 2
Physical Education -----... ---. I
SENIOR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
English ----- --------... 3 English ..- .3
Economics ....-----..... --- 3 Economics .-... ... 3
Home Economics 117 Home Economics 11i
Methods of Teaching H. E ..-.2 Practice House .--------... 3
Home Economics 116 Home Economics 118
Home Nursing and Child Care 2 Practice Teaching ....- 2
Home Economics 105 Home Economics 10S
Large Quantity Cooking ...... 3 Designing and Draping .3
Physical Education .... 1. Physical Education I...
TWO-YEAR SMITH-HUGHES TEACHER TRAINING
COURSE
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Nutrition .---.-- 2 Foods and Nutrition .- ......3
Textiles and Clothing -.. .....--.. .2 2 Textiles and Clothing .......- ... 2
Education 1 -....... 3 English --3.- ..... ...3
English .3... ------ .3 Household Chemistry ..- 3.... 3
Chemistry ---- ... 3.... .3 General Science ----- 3
General Science or Biology ...---3 Bacteriology .-.. 3
Physical Education ---- I Methods of Teaching H. E. 3
Physical Education ---. .......1I
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Credit Credit
Foods and Dietetics -- -3 Foods and Dietetics ----. 3
Textiles and Clothing --- 3 Textiles and Clothing ---------3
English ---- -3 English .---- --.2
Educational Psychology -- 3 Practice Teaching & Observation 3
Home Management ------ -. 2 Child Care and Training 2---..
Handicraft ..... -. 2 Rural Economics ---- 2
Physical Education ------. Physical Training -.....





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