• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Calendar
 Officers of administration
 Officers of instruction
 Faculty committees
 General information
 Outline of courses
 Description of courses
 Mechanic arts courses
 Home economics courses
 Agricultural courses
 Catalogue of students
 General statement
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). Thirty-Fifth Annual Catalogue, 1921-1922. Series XIII. No. 4.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000113/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). Thirty-Fifth Annual Catalogue, 1921-1922. Series XIII. No. 4.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1922
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000113
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3230

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Calendar
        Page 5
    Officers of administration
        Page 6
    Officers of instruction
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Faculty committees
        Page 9
        Page 10
    General information
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Outline of courses
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Description of courses
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Mechanic arts courses
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Home economics courses
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Agricultural courses
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Catalogue of students
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    General statement
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Index
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text










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Florida A. & -M. College Press
Tallahassee





BULLETIN
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE
THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL CATALOG
1922-1923










CALENDAR
1922
June 14 Wednesday Summer School Begins
Sept. 30 Saturday Refectory Opens
Oct. 2 Monday Entrance
Oct. 3 Tuesday Examination
Oct. 4 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 30 Thursday Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 4 Monday Farmers' Week Begins
Dec. 23-27 Saturday-Tuesday Christmas Holidays
1923
Jan. 1 Monday Emancipation Day
Feb. 1 Thursday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 1 Wednesday Inter-Class Debate
May 25 Friday (Faculty Prize) Oratorical Contest
May 27 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 28 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 29 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 30 Wednesday Class Day and Senior
Chapel
May 31 Thursday Commencement
MANAGING BOARDS
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Hon. CARY A. HARDEE, Chairman, Governor.
Hon. W. N. SHEATS, Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction.
Hon. H. CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State.
*Hon. RIVERS H. BUFORD, Attorney General.
Hon. J. C. LUNING, State Treasurer, Treasurer.
BOARD OF CONTROL
Hon. P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Business, Pensacola.
Hon. E. L. WARTMAN, Planter, Citra.
Hon. J. C. COOPER, Jr., Lawyer, Jacksonville.
Hon. J. B. SUTTON, Lawyer, Tampa.
Hon. W. L. WEAVER, Banker, Perry.
Hon. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee.
K





OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL OFFICERS
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President.
JOHN F. MATHEUS, Auditor and Secretary.
JUANITA M. GILBERT, President's Secretary.
ALBERTIN T. EDMONDSON, Auditor's Secretary.
*FLORENCE A. KENNEDY, Librarian and Registrar.
*SADIE E. PRYOR, Librarian and Registrar.
ETTA B. DAVIS, Stewardess.
JULIA A. DAVIS, Matron in Charge of Dining Hall.
CELIA A. BRADLEY, Superintendent of Laundry.
RICHARD FRAZIER, Supt. of Grounds and Buildings.
DEPARTMENTAL OFFICERS
HOMER THOMAS, Dean of the College and School of Pedagogy.
W. H. A. HOWARD, Dean of Mechanic Arts School.
A. L. MEBANE, Dean of Agricultural School.
B. M. HAWKINS, Dean of Home Economics School.
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
VIRGINIA HILYER, Supt. of Sanatorium.
H. F. COLEMAN, Dean of Men.
E. P. JONES, Principal of Training School.
R. A. EDMONDSON, Y. M. C. A. Secretary.
B. S. BRYANT, Y. W. C. A. Secretary.
*Part of the year.





OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION
(Arranged in Order of Length of Service)
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M., Litt. D.,
Professor of Philosophy and Economics.
ELLEN O. PAIGE,
Domestic Arts.
WILLIAM H. A. HOWARD, A. M.,
SmithiHughes Professor of Mechanic Arts.
LULA M. CROPPER,
Associate Professor-Physiography and Education.
VIRGINIA HILYER, R. N.,
Nurse Training.
EVERETT B. JONES, B. S.,
Professor of Chemistry and Biology.
THOMAS S. JOHNSON,
Wleelwrighting and Blacksmithing.
JOHN F. MATHEUS, A. M.,
Professor of Latin and Modern Languages.
ELIZA P. JONES,
Primary Methods and English.
HOMER THOMAS, A. M.,
Professor of Education.
SARA A. JENKINS, B. S.,
Geography and Physical Culture.
BENJAMIN L. WAITS, A. M.,
Professor of Mathematics and Physics.
CLARA B. MOON,
Domestic Arts.
EARLY E. BROUGHTON, B. S.,
Commercial Instruction.
HENRY F. COLEMAN, A. B.,
Asst. Professor of English.
LEVI ALEXANDER, JR.,
Carpentry and Cabinet Making.
f ALBERT L. MEBANE, B. Agr., M. S. A.,
Professor of Agriculture (Smith-Hughes)
GROVER HARDEN,
Engineering.
HARRIETT J. SMITH, A. B.,
Asst. Professor of English.
BESSIE M. HAWKINS,
Home Economics.





8 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
BAYETTA R: DENT, I
Domestic Science.
BARBARINA S. BRYANT,
Housekeeping.
HATTIE M. SCOTT, R. N.,
Nurse Training.
JUANITA M. GILBERT,
Typewriting and Bookkeeping.
*FLORENCE A. KENNEDY.
Library Methods.
*SADIE E. PRYOR,
Library Methods.
BERTIE MICKENS,
Assistant Music.
JOSEPH D. BRYAN.
Agriculture. Dairying.
RICHARD B. COLLINS,
Drawing.
RALPH A. EDMONDSON, A. B.,
As.t. Professor of Mathematics.
\ RICHARD FRAZIER,
Horticulture.
LILLIAN LATIMER,
Domestic Science.
ANNA S. WHITAKER, A. B.,
Asst. Professor English.
ROSAMOND R. BIYANT, A. B.,
Music.
GEORGE M. GREEN,
Tailoring.
WILLIAM J. GUNN, M. D.,
College Physician.
W. E. GREY, B. S., M. D.,
Lecturer.
JOHN E. HUNTER, M. D.,
Lecturer.
' ANDERSON A. TURNER,
Farmers' Club Organizer.
BESSIE P. FRAZIER,
Assistant Training School.
AMY JACKSON,
Assistant Training School.
MARION G. McCALL, B. S., M. I)
Interne.





FACULTY COMMITTEES 9
RACHEL C. KELLY,
Cafeteria.
ELIZABETH H. MARTIN,
Book Room.
STUDENT ASSISTANTS
SAMUEL JENKINS, Commandant.
JACOB BALDWIN, Animal Husbandry.
CLEM BENTON. Agriculture.
GEORGE WILLIAMS, Engineering.
MARY POWELL, Student Accounts.
WHEELOCK A. BISSON, Laboratory Assistant.
JAUNCY DeVAUGHN, Library Assistant.
SAMUEL J. LEWIS, Dairying.
ALGIE WILLIAMS, Painting.
JOHN C. JORDAN, Printing.
KATIE M. BAKER, Office Assistant.
FACULTY COMMITTEES
1921-1922
1. PRUDENTIAL: Mr. Howard, Mr. Thomas, Miss Hilyer, Mr.
Mebane, Miss Hawkins, Mrs. N. S. McGuinn, Mr. Matheus,
Secretary.
2. REFECTORY: Mr. Matheus, Mr. Frazier, Miss Hawkins, Mrs.
E. B. Davis. Mrs. J. A. Davis.
3. CURRICULUM and GRADUATION: Messrs. Thomas, Howard,
Mebane; Misses Hilyer, Hawkins.
4. BULLETIN and CATALOG: Messrs. Howard, Thomas, Mebane;
Misses Hawkins, Hilyer.
5. COLLEGE ARMS: Messrs. Jones, Alexander (Business Mana-
ger), Collins; Misses B. Bryant, Jenkins.
6. LECTURES: Messrs. Howard, Green, Bryant; Misses Scott,
Smith.
7. Music: Misses Bryant, Mickens, Kennedy; Messrs. Cole-
man, Collins.
8. LIBRARY: Misses Pryor, Whitaker. Moon; Messrs. Edmond-
son, Waits.
9. ROUND TABLE and LITERARY: Messrs. Matheus, Collins;
Misses Kennedy, Bradley; Mrs. Jones.





10 FLORDIA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
10. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES: Messrs. Mebane, Edmondson; Misses
Bradley, Kennedy; Mrs. Julia Davis.
11. STUDENT ACTIVITIES: Executive Committee, Mr. Johnson,
Chairman; Miss Jenkins, Secretary; Mr. Edmondson, Mr.
Alexander, Mr. Coleman, Mr. Broughton, Miss Dent.
12. SUB.-COMMITTEES:
(a) Y. M. C. A.-Messrs. Edmondson, Coleman, Frazier.
(b) Y. W. C. A.-Misses Bryant, Kennedy, Jenkins.
(c) Athletics-Messrs. Johnson, Coleman, Collins; Miss
Jenkins.
(d) Dramatics-Messrs. Coleman, Harden; Misses Jenkins,
Whitaker, Moon.
(e) Inter-Collegiate Debate-Messrs. Thomas, Coleman;
Misses Smith, Whitaker.
(f) Oratorical Contest-Smith, Whitaker; Mr. Edmondson.
(g) Societies-Messrs. Broughton, Edmondson; Misses
Dent, Edmondson.
13. COMMUNITY SERVICE: Miss paige, Mrs. Jones, Mr. Bryan
Mr. Johnson, Miss Cropper (Parent-Teachers.)
14. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: Mr. Johnson, Misses Scott, Gilbert.
Latimer; Mr. Edmondson.
15. AGRICULTURAL AND HOME EXTENSION: Messrs. Turner,
Mebane, Perry, Harrison; Miss Hawkins.
4





GENERAL INFORMATION 11
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY, LOCATION AND SUPPORT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment,
the College was established in 1887 as a State Normal
School. Under the principalship of Mr. T. deS. Tucker,
assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was opened at Tallahassee,
October 5, 1887, with an attendance of fifteen students.
In 1891 the College moved to its present site. In 1905
it passed from the direct management of the State Board
of Education to the management of the Board of Control
as one of the institutions of higher learning. In 1909 its
name was changed to that of The Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legislature.
It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropria-
tion.
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the College are few and simple, ap-
pealing to the students' self-respect and personal respon-
sibility.
Students are not allowed to loaf, to use intoxicating
liquors or tobacco in any form, to gamble or to have or
use firearms.
Punishment is by demerits as follows: Five demerits
make one warning, or mark; ten demerits two warnings
or marks; fifteen demerits in any one session make a stu-
dent liable to suspension. Suspended students may be re-
instated by the Prudential Committee or the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be with-
drawn must be made to the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry,
and students will not be allowed to have laundering done
elsewhere except by special permission from the Presi-
dent. All clothing must be marked with INDELIBLE
INK.





12 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Students should provide themselves with the following
articles:
GENERAL LIST
3 Sheets 1 Quilt or Comfort
3 Pillow Cases 6 Table Napkins
4 Towels 1 White Spread
1 Blanket 1 Bible
1 Bottle of Indelible Ink 1 Dictionary
GIRLS' LIST
1 Navy Blue Coat Suit 1 Pair Rubbers
2 Navy Blue Wash Dresses 1 Waterproof Coat
2 White Uniform Waists 1 Umbrella
2 Fancy Voile Waists 3 Navy Blue Waists
4 Gingham Petticoats 2 Laundry Bags
4 Changes Winter Under- 2 Gingham Aprons
wear 1 Large White Apron
2 Pair High Shoes
The young women are required to wear high shoes and
suitable underclothing during the cold season. All shoes
are to be sensible and comfortable.
Navy blue waists are to be worn on school days and
white uniform waists Sundays and Mondays. The white
uniform waists may be purchased from the College Store.
For spring and fall blue ready-to-wear hats must be worn.
No article of dress need be brought to school except those
named in above list.
BoYs' LIST
4 Negligee Shirts 1 Comb and Brush
6 White Standing Collars 1 Shoe Polishing Outfit
3 Night Shirts 6 White Napkins
1 Pair Overalls Underclothing sufficient for
2 Clothes Bags three weeks
MILITARY ORGANIZATION
The young men, except those in the College are organ-
ized into Cadet Companies in charge of a Commandant.
Each company is commanded by a Cadet Captain and has





GENERAL INFORMATION 13
its full complement of Cadet officers selected from those
students who have been most exemplary in conduct and
soldierly bearing.
The organization is maintained to help in the well
rounded physical, mental and moral development of the
boys. It is also intended to cultivate habits of neatness,
punctuality, obedience, and to give an erect, healthy,
manly bearing and a high regard for law and order.
In addition to Company and Battalion drill a course
of military Calesthenics or Gymnastics is given in the open
air.
A band composed of young men of all departments is
organized in connection with the Battalion.
UNIFORMS
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or
blue serge and with the cap cost $25.00.
These uniforms are made in the college shop and are
sold at actual cost. The patrons are therefore urged not
to buy citizen's suits for their children, but to send money
to the President with which to buy the above uniform suits.
Satisfactory arrangements for the uniforms is one of the
requirements for matriculation of young men. The regu-
lation is-uniform suits, caps, and white gloves.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised in making remit-
tances for students, to send money by postal money order
or express money order or registered letter direct to the
President. He will not be responsible for money sent to
students.
LITERARY SOCIETIES
There are four literary societies: Acme-Forum, for
High School men; Tucker-Lyceum, for High School
women; The College Wits Debating Club, for College men;
and the Athenaeum, for Normal School and College women.
These societies meet fortnightly.





14 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
PRIZES
High School Declamation Prizes, given by High School
Societies.
The Susan Black High School Prize.
The Avent Scholarship Prize.
Fourth Year High School Scholarship Prize (Loving
cup.)
E. B. Jones Freshman Chemical Prize.
Faculty Oratorical Prizes.
The College Wits Scholarship Prize.
Alumni Scholarship Prize.
The John R. Scott Atheletic Prize.
Willie Mitchell Prize (English and Mathematics.)
Class 1922, Short Story Prize.
RELIGIOUS EXERCISES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian.
In addition to the daily devotion, Sunday School, Sunday
Preaching, Vesper Services and Bible study courses, there
are active Young Men's Christian Association and Young
Women's Christian Association.
ATHLETICS
All athletic activities and teams are under direct man-
agement of a Governing Board, consisting of faculty and
student members. The student members of this board are
elected by the members of the Athletic Association, which
comprises the entire student body.
Inter-class and inter-collegiate sports are encouraged
and representative college teams are maintained in foot-
ball, baseball, basketball, and tennis. No student is allowed
to compete whose physical condition or class work is not
satisfactory.
No person shall participate in any inter-collegiate sport
unless he be a bona fide student doing full work in a regu-
lar or special course as defined in the curriculum of the
College.
No student shall participate in inter-collegiate athletics
who is found to be delinquent in his studies to the extent
of more than one-third of his regular work.





GENERAL INFORMATION 15
INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES
A tri-state debate is held each year with Benedict Col-
lege and Clark University. This debate is under the super-
vision of a committee appointed by the President.
Each of the three colleges selects both an affirmative and
a negative team, of three men each. On the second Friday
in April each college holds two debates, one with each of
the other institutions.
The Florida A. & M. College chooses her six tri-state
debators in a contest, or "try-out," open to every student
in the College.
RHETORICAL EXERCISES
Part of the chapel hour, bi-monthly, is given to public
rhetorical exercises.
An annual declamation contest is held in which repre-
sentatives from each of the literary societies compete for
prizes of ten dollars and five dollars offered by the societies.
The oratorical faculty prizes are competed for by the
students of the college department.
BOARDING DEPARTMENT
The Boarding Department, equipped with both dry and
steam cooking facilities, offers an up-to-date dining service.
EXPENSES
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel,
per month, $15.00; 8 months .................$120.00
Laundering, etc., $2.00 per month ............... 16.00
Hospital fee, 25cts. per day while sick in addition
to board.
A athletic fee ........... ....................... 3.00
Registration fee ......... ............... 3.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional.
A student who is not a legal resident of the State is re-
quired to pay tuition fee of $20.00 per year.





16 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FACILITIES OF SELF-SUPPORT
A limited number of earnest young men and women
will be allowed to work out a part of their board and
laundry expenses. Application for this privilege must
be made in writing and accepted before arrival. Money
thus earned will be applied to the boarding account of the
student.
RULES REGARDING DEFICIENT RECORDS
All records below 60 in any subject are deficient. A
deficient record is a failure if below 50 and a condition if
above 50.
All failures and conditions must be removed before a
student can have advanced catalogue classification.
A failure or a condition in any required subject will pre-
vent graduation.
A failure is removable only by repeating the subject in
class as soon as scheduled in program. This subject takes
precedence over all other subjects.
A condition is removable by special examination which
is given within two weeks after the beginning of each
semester. A student will be allowed to take only one
special examination to remove a condition. If a student
fails in this examination, the condition becomes a failure
removable only by repeating the subject in class as soon as
scheduled in program.
An extra special examination will be granted the first
week in May to candidates for graduation for removal of
conditions incurred during the Senior year.
An industrial condition is removable by the students'
performing such work as is designated by the instructor.
A passing record in any subject becomes deficient by
the withdrawal of a student and is ranked as a condition,
provided the student takes special instruction in the sub-
jcct under some one approved by the President; otherwise
it is ranked as a failure. This'special instruction must
cover the work done by the student's class during his ab-
sence.
Four is the maximum number of academic subjects a
student may take during any semester, including repeated
subjects.





GENERAL INFORMATION 17
A student failing to enter school at the beginning of
a semester loses his class standing which may be regained
only by passing an etxra written examination in the sub-
jects covered by the class during his absence.
GENERAL STATEMENTS REGARDING CURRICULUM
The academic or literary activities of the College are
carried on in two schools: The High School and the Col-
lege. There is also a nucleus of a school of music. The
vocational activities are carried forward in five schools:
the School of Agriculture, of Mechanic Arts, of Home
Economics, of Health and of Pedagogy.
ADMISSION
For admission to the High School, applicants must be
at least 15 years old, of sound health and a good reputa-
tion, and must furnish evidence of having satisfactorily
completed the work of the sixth grade. For advance stand-
ing in the High School, applicants must furnish additional
evidence either by examination or by credits from ac-
credited schools, guaranteeing such standing.
For admission to the College Department sixteen units
of preparatory work shall be offered. These units must
include:
English ......................at least 3 units
Mathematics .................. at least 3 units
Foreign Languages ............at least 2 units
History and Civics .............at least 2 units
Science ......................at least 1 unit
Vocational Training ...........at least 1 unit
Additional to be chosen by the
candidate ................at least 4 units
Total ............................ 16 units
DEFINITION OF A UNIT
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a
secondary school, constituting approixmately a quarter
of a full year's work. The definition assumes that the
length of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks
and that a period is from forty to sixty minutes in length,





18 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
and that the study is pursued for four or five periods per
week. It further assumes that "two hours of manual
training or laboratory is equivalent to one hour (or period)
of class-room work."'
For admission to the four year course in Pedagogy see
requirements for admission to the College.
The requirements for admission to the vocational schools
are the same as for admission to the college. Applicant
must be fifteen years of age, of good health, and reputa-
tion and able to enter the seventh grade or first year of the
Junior High School.
Special requirements are found under the various de-
partments.
Students who complete the third year of a standard
High School, may enter the three-year course in the School
of Pedagogy upon presenting twelve standard units.
ADMISSION WITII ADVANCED STANDING
A student entering from any other college will be ad-
mitted with such advanced credit as his previous work
entitles him. If he comes from a college, whose entrance
requirements and curriculum are equivalent to those of
the Florida A. and M. College, he will receive credit for
his past work, but will be obliged to take all the required
subjects in the course in which he wishes to enroll that
have not been covered in his previous work.
All advanced credits allowed must be considered pro-
visional, as the college reserves the right of revising and
altering them whenever the work of the student indicates
the necessity of such a change.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION IN TERMS OF UNITS OR
SCHOOL HOURS
The College unit is the standard unit of American Col-
leges and represents One Recitation Per Week for One
Semester. 120 units is the minimum amount of work re-
quired for graduation, of which at least 18 must represent
major work. The American Standard unit is based upon
not more than 18 recitations per week for teacher or pupil.
For graduation from the two-year course leading to the
degree L. I. in the School of Pedagogy sixty units above
the high school are required.





GENERAL INFORMATION 19
For graduation from the College course one hundred and
twenty units of work are required, of which at least 24
must be major work.
Requirements for graduation from the high school six-
teen units of secondary work shall be offered.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
The College urges very strongly that each student
enter a regular course and take the work as out-lined for
that course, even though he can stay but for a limited
time. Students are given special classification only when
the age and preparation of the applicant seem to render
such action necessary and expedient.
Applicants for admission to the freshman class with-
out condition must present sitxeen units. Applicants who
present fourteen units may be admitted conditioned in
two units. One unit of such deficiency must be made up
before the beginning of the Sophomore year. All entrance
conditions must be removed by the beginning of the Junior
year.
Single half units will be accepted only in the Sciences
and Civics. Less than two units of foreign language wi!,
not be accepted in fulfillment of entrance requirements.
Standard collegiate credits from other institutions of
higher learning are accepted so far as these credits apply
on the curriculum to which the student is admitted.
MAJOR WORK
Every student for the degree of Bachelor of Science
must elect a major department and file application with
the Dean of the department, in which he wishes to do
major work, before February of the Sophomore year.
Each department prints the plans of its major work,
but these plans may be changed by the department to suit
individual cases. A Major consists of not less than 18
units or not more than 36 units, as indicated by the de-
partments. This work may all be done in one department,
or part of it may be in allied subjects in other depart-
ments. provided that at least 18 units of the major work
are taken in some one department.





20 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
OUTLINE OF COURSES
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Reading, alternating with Reading, alternating with
Sanitation .............. 3 Sanitation ............. 3
Mathematics I ........... 5 Mathematics I ........... 5
Grammar ................ 5 Grammar ................ 5
Spelling .................. 5 Spelling .................. 5
Geography ............... 5 Geography ............... 5
History, alternating with History, alternating with
Writing ................ 3 Writing ................ 3
Singing .................. 1 Singing ....... .......... 1
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational TIraining....... 6
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Reading, alternating with Reading, alternating with
History ................ 5 Spelling ................ 5
Geography ............... 5 Geography ............... 5
Physiology, alternating Physiology, alternating
with Agriculture ........ 5 with Agriculture ........ 5
Mathematics II ............ 5 Mathematics II ............ 5
Grammar ................ 5 Grammar ................ 5
Singing ................. 1 Singing .................. 1
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
THIRD YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Required- Required-
English I ................. 5 English I ................. 5
Mathematics III........... 5 Mathematics III ........... 5
Singing ................. 1 Singing .................. 1
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
Select two- Select two-
Latin I ................... 5 Latin I ................... 5
Physical Geography ....... 5 Ancient History........... 5
Ancient History........... 5 General Science........... 5
Drawing ................. 5 Drawing ................. 5





OUTLINE OF COURSES 21
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Required- Required-
English II ................ 5 English II ................ 5
Mathematics IV........... 5 Mathematics IV........... 5
Singing .................. 1 Singing .................. 1
Vocational T.aining....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
Select two- Select two-
Latin II .................. 5 Latin II .................. 5
English History........... 5 English History........... 5
Drawing ................. 5 Drawing ................. 5
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Required- Required-
English III ............... 5 English III................ 5
Mathematics V............ 5 Mathematics V............ 5
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
Singing .................. 1 Singing .................. 1
Select two- Select two-
Physics or Chemistry ...... 5 Physics or Chemistry ...... 5
Zoology .................. 5 Zoology .................. 5
Latin III.................. 5 Latin III .................. 5
Modern Languages ........ 5 Modern Languages ........
Drawing ................. 5 Drawing ................. 5
THIRD YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Required- Required-
English IV................ 5 English IV .............. 5
American History and American History and
Civics ................. 5 Civics ................. 5
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
Singing ................. 1 Singing .................. 1
Select two- Select two-
Latin IV.................. 5 Latin IV.................. 5
Physics I................. 5 Physics I ................ 5
Modern Languages........ 5 Modern Languages........ 5
Education I............... 5 Chemistry ................ 5
Chemistry ............... 5 Social Science ............ 5
Mathematics VI........... 5
N. B.-The figures indicate the number of 50-minute periods a
week State adopted texts used in the High School, and also
State authorized courses.





22 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SCHOOL OF PEDAGOGY
SHORT COURSE LEADING TO L. I. DEGREE OR DIPLOMA
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Education II.............. 3 Education II.............. 3
Education III ............. 2 Education III ............. 2
English V ................ 3 English V ............... 3
Physical Education........ 1 Physical Education ........ 1
Science (Chemistry) ...... 5 Science (Chemistry) ...... 5
Music .................... 1 Music .................... 1
Drawing ................. 3 Geography (Review) ...... 3
SENIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Education IV ............. 3 Education IV ............. 3
Education V .............. 1 Education V .............. 2
English VI ............... 3 English VI ............... 3
Physical Education........ 1 Physical Education ......... 1
Psychology ............... 3 Psychology ............... 3
Home Economics.......... 3 Mathematics 2A........... 3
Elective ................. 3 Elective .................. 2
LONG COURSE LEADING TO B. S. E.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English V ............. 3 English V ............... 3
Education II. ............ 3 Education II. ............ 3
Science ............ 3 Science .................. 3
Mathematics VII ......... 3 Mathematics VII ......... 3
Elective ............ 3 Elective ................. 3
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
English VI .......... 3 English VI .............. 3
Education IV ........... 3 Education IV ........... 3
Science ............ 3 Education V ............ 1
Elective ................. 6 Science .................. 3
Elective ........... 6
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English VIII ............. 3 English VIII ............. 3
Education VI ............ 3 Education VI ............ 3
Science ............. 3 Science .................. 3
Political Economy ........ 3 Political Economy ........ 3
Elective .............. 3 Elective ................. 3





OUTLINE OF COURSES 23
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Education VII ........... 3 Education X ............. 3
Sociology ........... 3 Sociology ................ 3
Philosophy .......... 3 Philosophy ............... 3
History V .......... 3 History V ............... 3
Elective ............ 3 Elective ................. 3
NOTE.-Electives in the Department of Education may be
chosen from the following subject: Education IX, Home Eco-
nomics, Drawing, Manual Arts, Agriculture, Biology, Music.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. DEGREE (PREMEDICAL)
FRESHMAN
Required, 6 Hours; Optional, 10 Hours
English V ............... 3 History IV ............... 5
Mathematics ............. 3 Chemistry ............... 5
Latin V ................. 5
SOPHOMORE
Required, 3 Hours; Optional, 13 Hours
English VI .............. 3 Physics .................. 3
M mathematics ............. 3 Biology .................. 5
Chemistry ............... 5 History IV ............... 5
JUNIOR
Required, 6 Hours; Optional, 10 Hours
English VII .............. 3 Economics ............... 5
Ethics or Psychology...... 3 Geology ............ 5
Chemistry ............... 5 Biology .................. 5
SENIOR
Required, 3 Hours; Optional, 13 Hours
English VIII ............. 3 Philosophy ............... 5
Sociology ................ 3 Geology .................. 5
Physics .................. 3 Biology .................. 5





24 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
COURSE LEADING TO B. S.
Prerequisite-Same as for College Entrance
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry I .............. 5 Chemistry I .............. 5
English V................ 3 English V ............... 3
Education II ............. 3 Education II ............. 3
Foods I ................. 5 Physiology ............... 3
Drawing ................. 2 Drawing ................. 2
Physical Training ........ 2 Physical Training ........ 2
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
English VI .............. 5 English VI .............. 5
Education III ............ 5 Chemistry V ............. 5
Clothing I ............... 4 Foods III ................ 5
Electives:
Clothing III ............ 1 Rural Economics ........ 3
Education IV ............ 5
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
History IV .............. 5 History IV .............. 5
Physics III .............. 5 Physics III .............. 5
Clothing II .............. 5 Methods ................. 2
Clothing IV ............. 5 Foods III ................ 5
Electives: Electives:
English VII ............. 5 English VII ............. 5
Clothing V ............... 5 Household Decoration ..... 5
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Household Administration. 5 Rural Sociology .......... 3
Practice Teaching ........ 3 Practice Teaching ........ 3
Special Problems in Foods Special Problems in Foods
and Clothing .......... 5 and Clothing .......... 5
Electives: Electives:
History of Philosophy..... 3 Ethics ................... 3
Sociology ................ 3 Music ................... 1
Modern Language ........ 3 History of Philosophy ..... 3
Modern Language ........ 3





OUTLINE OF COURSES 25
COURSE LEADING TO DIPLOMA
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
Prerequisite-Junior Normal offered in the Fourth Year of the
High School
MIDDLE
First Semester Second Semester
English V .............. 3 English V ............... 3
Foods I ............. 4 Foods I .................. 4
Clothing I ............... 4 Clothing I .............. 4
Household Administration. 5 Chemistry I (B) ......... 5
Physiology I ............ 3 Rural Economics ......... 4
Chemistry I (B) ......... 5 Methods ................ 2
Elective: Physical Training ........ 2
Bacteriology ............ 3 Elective:
Drawing ....... ... 2 Drawing ................. 2
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English VI .............. 3 English VI ............... 4
Foods II ................. 4 Foods II ................. 4
Clothing II .............. 4 Clothing II .............. 4
Chemistry V ............. 5 Foods III ................ 2
Practice Teaching ........ 2 Ethics ................... 3
Education III ............ 5 Practice Teaching ........ 2
Physical Training ........2 Physical Training ........ 2
Elective: Elective:
Clothing IV .............. 2 Education IV ........... 5
Clothing IV .............. 2
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN M. A.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics VII ......... 5 Mathematics VIII ........ 5
English V ............ 2 English V ............... 2
Chemistry I (B) .......... 5 Chemistry I (B) .......... 5
Elements of Arch ......... 1 History of Arch .......... 2
Mathematics XI .......... 2 Mathematics XI .......... 2
Shop Laboratory .......... 2 Shop Laboratory ......... 2
*





26 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics X .......... 5 English VI .............. 5
English VI .............. 3 Architectural Drawing ... 3
History of Arch.......... 1 History of Arch ........... 3
Perspective .............. 2 Wood Turning ........... 2
Shades and Shadows ...... 2 Freehand Drawing ....... 2
Physics II ............... 2 Physics II ............... 3
Freehand Drawing ....... 2
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics IX .......... 5 Mathematics IX .......... 5
Modern Language ........ 3 Arch. Design ............ 4
Economics ............... 3 Rendering ............... 3
Arch. Design ............. 3 Ethics II ................ 3
Graphic Statics .......... 2 Water Color Drawing..... 3
Building Cons............ 2 Metal Work .............. 2
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Arch. Design ............. 5 Mathematics XII ......... 4
Heating and Vent........ 2 Sanitary Eng. ........... 2
Specifications and Est..... 2 Building Cons ............ 2
Building Cons. ........... 2 Illumination and Wireing. 2
Business Law ........... 2 History of Art............ 1
Plumbing ............... 3 *Thesis ................. 7
*A thesis covering the work of each full school year will be
required.
English V. Chemistry I (B), English VI, Physics II, Modern
Language, Economics, Surveying and Analytic Geometry are
courses the same as in the College of Science.
In each semester one elective will be allowed. This is to be
taken with at least three assigned subjects.
TWO YEAR COURSE
(Trades)
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Arithmetic (Req.) ........ 5 Arithmetic (Req.) ........ 5
English or Civics ......... 5 English .................. 5
Drawing and Plan Read- Drawing (Req.) .......... 5
ing .................... 5 Manual Tr. (Metal) ....... 2
Manual Training (Wood).. 2 Hygiene (Req.) .......... 2
Shop Work .............. Shop Work ..............





OUTLINE OF COURSES 27
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
History or English (Req.). 5 Geography (Req.) ........ 5
Algebra (Req.) .......... 5 Algebra ................. 5
Drawing (Req.) .......... 5 Estimates ................ 2
Shop Work (Practical) Shop Work (Practical)
(Req.) (Req.)
COMMERCIAL COURSE
First Year Third Year
Bookkeeping I ........... 5 Bookkeeping III, IV...... 5
Penmanship .............. 3 Business Organization and
Commercial Arithmetic ... 5 Office Training ........ 5
English .................. 5 Commercial Law ......... 5
Typewriting ............. 3 Two electives:
One of the following electives: Electives
Modern Language ........ 5 Office Management ....... 5
Stenography ............. 5 Insurance ................ 5
Drawing ................. 5 Real Estate Business...... 5
Second Year Geometry ................ 5
Bookkeeping II .......... 5 Fourth Year
English Composition ..... 5 Business Ethics .......... 5
Typewriting ............. 5 Salesmanship ............ 5
Spelling (Commercial) ... 5 Economics ............... 5
Civics and History........ 5 Two electives:
One of the following electives: Electives
Stenography ............. 5 Modern Language ........ 5
Physics .................. 5 Banking and Accounting.. 5
Chemistry ............... 5 English .................. 5
Typewriting ............. 5 Stenography ............ 5
Practice Work in Office... 5
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN AGRICULTURE
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English (V) ............. 3 English (V) ............. 3
Chemistry (I) ........... 5 Chemistry (I) ........... 5
Mathematics (VII) ...... 5 Mathematics (VII) ...... 5
Animal Husbandry (III).. 3 Animal Husbandry (III).. 3
Elective .................. 5 Botany II ................ 3
Elective ................. 3





28 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
English (VI) ............ 6 English (VI) ............ 6
Chemistry (II) .......... 5 Chemistry (II) .......... 5
Entomology .............. 2 Horticulture II ........... 2
Animal Husbandry (IV).. 4 Animal Husbandry (IV).. 4
Agronomy (II) .......... 4 Agronomy III ............ 4
Elective ................. 3 Elective ................. 3
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Economics (II) .......... 3 Ethics ................... 3
Bacteriology ............. 3 Physics (IV) ........... 3
Chemistry (III) .......... 3 Chemistry (IV) .......... 5
Geology .................. 3 Botany (III) ............. 3
Animal Husbandry (V) ... 3 Animal Husbandry (VI) .. 3
Psychology .............. 3 Methods of Teaching ...... 3
Elective ................. 2 Elective ................. 2
Supervised Project Work
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry (VI) .......... 3 Chemistry (VI) .......... 3
Biology .................. 5 Biology .................. 5
Animal Husbandry (VII- Organization and Methods. 3
VIII) .................. 5 Plant Breeding .......... 3
Agronomy (IV-V) ........ 3 Rural Sociology .......... 5
Elective ................. 3 Practice Teaching ........ 3
Supervised Project Work
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
FIRST YEAR
First Semester
English (Review) ................................... 3
Botany .............................................. 2 (1/, )
Chemistry .......................................... 5 (3)
History of. Education ................. ......... 5 (3)
Physiology and Hygiene ............................. 2
Veterinary Science .................. ................ 1 (1)
Applied Mathematics ................................. 2 (11/2)
Animal Husbandry I.................................. 2 (2)
Soils ................................................ 2 (2)
Farm Mech. (Wood Shop) ............................ 1 (/2)





OUTLINE OF COURSES 29
Second Semester
English (Literature and Composition) ................. 3 (2)
Agricultural Botany ................................. 2 (11/.)
Agricultural Chemistry ............................... 5 (3)
Vocational Education ................................ 5 (3)
Farm Sanitation ..................................... 1 ( 1/2)
Veterinary Science ................................... 1 (1)
American History and Civics .......................... 3
Animal Husbandry II................................. 2 (2)
General Horticulture ................................. 2 (2)
Farm Mech. (Forge Shop) ............................ 1 (I/)
SECOND YEAR
First Semester
Argumentation ...................................... 2 ( 1/2 )
Entom ology .......................................... 3 (21/, )
Physics ......... ................ ........... .... 5 (3)
Educational Psychology ............................ 5 (3)
General Economics .......).......................... 5 (3)
Field Crops I ........................................ 2 (2)
Farm Engineering and Machinery..................... 2 (2)
Practice Teaching ................................... 1 (1)
Second Semester
Public Speaking ..................................... 2 (11/2)
Plant Pathology and Bacteriology..................... 3 (21/2)
Farm Management and Accounts ..................... 3 (21/,)
Rural Economics and Sociology ....................... 5 (3)
Agricultural Pedagogy .............................. 3 (21/2)
Field Crops II ....................................... 2 (2)
Farm Dairying ...................................... 1 (1)
Farm Poultry ........................................ 1 (1)
Practice Teaching .................................... 1 (1)
At least two years of actual Farm Life and Practice will be
required before graduation.
Candidates for this course must be graduates from a four-year
high school course.





30 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
NURSE TRAINING
COURSE
JUNIOR
Physiology ........................................ 2 (8)
Anatomy ............................................ 2 (8)
Hygiene ....................................... 2 (8)
Medical Nursing ...................... ............... (34)
Surgical Nursing, Cynaecology ........................ 1(8)
Dietetics ............................................ 2 (34)
Ethics of Nursing .................................. 1 (4)
MIDDLE
Matena ....................................... 2 (8)
Bacteriology ........................................ 2 (6)
Pediatrics ........................................... 2 (7)
Obstetrics ........................................... (6)
Urinalsis ............................................ 1 (4)
Medical Nursing Con .................................. 1 (8)
Surgical Nursing Con ................................. 1 (8)
SENIOR
Obstetrical Nursing .................................. 1 (8)
Nervous Disease (Lectures) ........................... 5
Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat (Lectures) .................... 6
History of Nursing ................................... 2 (8)
Numbers in parenthesis indicate the number of weeks the sub-
ject is pursued.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
STATEMENT
The aim of the Music Department of the Florida Agri-
cultural and Mechanical College is to create in the student
body as a whole a love and proper appreciation for the
beautiful and uplifting in the broad field of music; to af-
ford ample opportunity for individual development of a
technique and power of interpretation of the best in music,
both instrumental and vocal; to encourage and foster
creative ability.





ACADEMIC COURSES 31
The course of public school music including Sight Sing-
ing, Ear Training, Music Appreciation and Chorus Work,
open to all High School Students, gives opportunity for
development of true and correct musical concepts. Students
of the First, Second, Third and Fourth Years are required
to take this course.
The Choral Union is open to all students and affords
opportunity for acquaintance with the best sacred and
secular music.
Piano work is divided into three departments: Beginners,
Intermediate and Advanced. Beginners work is essential-
ly that of establishing fundamentals in technic and hand
culture; thorough acquaintance with and association be.
tween keyboard and notes; and establishment of sense of
rhythms. The intermediate work embodies advanced tech-
nic, study of compositions and etudes of various masters
for cultivation of different touches, phrasing and inter-
pretation. Scales are taught with a view of securing
velocity and legato. The advanced course continues prev-
ious work and in the latter part of the course training in
concert work is given.
The student is required to present at the end of his
course a recital of selected numbers. A certificate of grad-
uation is given for satisfactory completion of this course.
Vocal culture includes correct breathing, posture, tone
quality and production. Exercises and etudes from dif-
erent composers are studied. Exercises in phrasing and
sight-singing form a part of the course. A Recital, upon
the satisfactory completion of this course looking towards
a certificate, is required in the senior year.
The course in Theory includes Harmony, General
Theory, Musical History and Appreciation. This course
is designed primarily to acquaint the student with the
origin and meaning of terms, to teach principals of part-
writing and to furnish a general knowledge of music with
which every student should be familiar.
The methods of teaching are those following our present
day principles of Psychology and Pedagogy. The student
is led to think and work out logically the problems aris-
ing from his or her work. Students in all stages of ad-
vancement are received and credit given for work done





32 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Students who desire to pursue courses in music are per-
mitted to select them.
A prize of $10.00, given by Mrs. Rosa W. Butler, is
offered for the student showing greatest improvement in
either Vocal or Instrumental work for the year.
TUITION:-$4.00 per month.
CREDIT: A student taking a regular course either Piano
or Vocal, practicing one hour each day, with two lessons
weekly receives one unit for work done.
COURSE
FIRST GRADE
TECHNICS: Major scales in one octave, hands separate.
Tonic triads in close position.
STUDIES: Landon's Foundation Studies; Matthew's
Graded Studies, Book I; National Graded Studies;
Emery's Foundation Studies; Kcehler, op. 162 and 190;
easy compositions of Behr, Gurlitt, Brumeur, Lichner, etc.
SECOND GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and harmonic minor scales in one
and two octaves, hands separate. Broken major and minor
triads.
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II. Spind-
ler, op. 273, Books I and II; Ioeschorn, op. 66, Books I
and II; Burlitt, op. 82, Books I and II; Spindler, op. 44;
selection from Merkel, Lange, Schomann, Clementi, Lach-
ner, Ritter and others.
TIIIRD GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and melodic minor scales. Studies
in broken triads (continued.)
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book III; Bnrg-
muller, op. 100, Books I andll, Koehler, op. 157.
PIECES: Selection from Kullah, op. 62; Gade, op. 36;
Mozart, No. I, Low; Lachner, op. 49; Emery, Spindler,
and others.





ACADEMIC COURSES 33
FOURTH GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and minor scales.
STUDIES: Matthew's Studies, Book IV; Koehler, op.
130, Heller op. 47; Czerney, op. 636 and 713.
PIECES: Wilm, op. 12; Schytte, op. 68; Bohm, op. 327,
No. 2; Selections from Haydn, Kerchner, Wollenhaupt,
Heller, Scharwenka, Schumann and Lack.
FIFTH GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and minor scales in contrary motion.
Three and four octaves in 3rd, 6th, 18th.
STUDIES: Heller, op. 46; Czerney, op. 78; Bach, Twelve
Little Preludes. Kullak School of Octave Playing.
Matthew's Studies, Book V.
PIECES: Mendelssohn's Song Without Words, Chami-
made, Gard, Nevin, Schytte, Jensen.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY I. (For Junior Normal Students and
Freshmen.) This is a one-year course. Its design is to
give the student a knowledge of the fundamental prin-
ciples underlying inorganic chemistry, and an acquaint-
ance with the more common elements, their compounds
and industrial application. (Three units of recitation and
two units of laboratory work).
Text Books-McPherson & Henderson's Elementary
Chemistry; Laboratory Manual accompanying the above.
CHEMISTRY II. FOR SOPHOMORES: This course covers a
period of one year. The first Semester is devoted to a
preliminary study of the reactions of metals and acids in
solution, and systematic work in blow-pipe analysis. The
second Semester is devoted to a systematic study of
metals and non-metals, metallic groups and their separa-
tion. The work includes the practical analysis of several
important commercial products. (5 Units).
Text Books-McGregary's Qualitative Analysis; Allyn's
Applied Chemistry.
2-A. & M.





34 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CHEMISTRY III. FOR COLLEGE JUNIORS: Only students
who have completed Courses I, and II. or their equivalents
are permitted to pursue this course. The work is in-
tended to give the student the fundamental principles of
Quantitative Analysis, gravimetric and volumetric and a
working knowledge of the methods used in Analytical
Chemistry. (Five Units.) The work is conducted by
lectures.
Experiments, references.
Reference Books- Olsen's Quantitative Ani,.ii;
Olsen's Pure Foods.
CHEMISTRY IV. (For College Seniors.) This course
covers a period of one year. It is intended to give the
student the fundamental principles underlying organic
compounds and laboratory practice in the analysis of a
few of the simple compounds. (Elective) Five Units.
Text-To be selected.
CHEMISTRY V: This course is offered to agricultural
students, and will deal with that part of chemistry which
relates directly to the agricultural products. Special at-
tention will be given to soils, fertilizers, fungicides and all
spraying solutions used on the farm. College Juniors and
Seniors.
Text-To be selected.
CHEMISTRY VI. (Iousehold Chemistry.) This course
covers a period of one year and is given after one year of
General Chemistry. The purpose of this course is to give
the students a knowledge of the composition and food
values of food materials, adulterations in foods and simple
methods for their detection, soap making and a study of
the chemical processes involved in Laundering. Lectures
and supplementary readings as well as Laboratory experi-
ments form the course. This course is open to students
specializing in Foods and Nutrition.
BIOLOGY I. (Zoology): A choice is offered between
Zoology and Botany in the fourth year of the High School.
This course covers a period of one year and has for its
purpose the development of fundamental principles under-
lying animal life. The work is pursued as follows: Study
(1) Invertebrates. (2) Vertebrates. (3) Economic im-
portance.





ACADEMIC COURSES 35
The type form of the more important animals is studied
systematically. Careful dissections and drawings are
made. Class and laboratory work is supplemented with
collateral reading on the types studied and their economic
importance. Five hours a week.
Text Book-Lindville and Kelly's Elementary Zoology;
Lindville and Kelly's Laboratory Guide.
BIOLOGY II. (For College Seniors): This course covers
a period of one-half year, and is intended to give the stu-
dent the fundamental principles in the structure of ani-
mals and their comparison with plants. Five units.
Text Book-Conn's Practical Biology.
BIOLOGY III. This course covers one-half year and is
intended to give the student the general methods and
special technique used in Histology. The laboratory work
consists of the preparation and completion of slides of the
principal tissues of a lower vertebrate form and the study
with the microscope and drawings of the same. The lab-
oratory work is supplemented by conferences and refer-
ence work.
Text Book-Guyer's Animal Micrology.
PHYSICS I. Open to all students of the fourth year
year High School class. This course is designed to give the
student a thorough knowledge of simpler physical phenom-
ena and includes a study of the fundamental laws of the
mechanics of solids and fluids, heat, sound, light, magne-
tism and electricity.
Laboratory experiments performed by the student him-
self accompany this course and supplement the demonstrat-
ions given by the instructor. Special stress is placed upon
mechanics and the solution of mathematical problems in-
volving the laws of the several departments of the subject.
Textbook: First Principals of Physics, Carhart and
Chute.
PIYSICS II. This course will consist of a deeper study
of mechanics, thermodynamics and electricity than can be
given in Course I., and will be conducted by means of lec-
tures, laboratory and textbook work.
Textbook:-Carhart's College Physics.
PHYSICS III. (Physics and Household Mechanics.)
This course is planned to give the girl a better under-
standing of the use of electricity and electrical appliances
in the home. It involves a study of wiring, plumbing,





36 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
minor repairs, the mechanism of the sewing machine and
various labor saving devises. The purpose is to increase
efficiency in the home by the reduction of unnecessary
labor and expense.
PHYsIcs IV. This course will deal with the soils.and
their moisture retention, effect of deep and shallow culti-
vation, road making, ventilation of farm buildings and
the draft of plows and wagons. Experiments will be per-
formed to show the rate of perculation of water through
the different kinds of soils, the effect of mulches, the de-
termination of the specific gravity; and the mechanical
analysis.
TEXT:-Agricultural Physics-King, Juniors, Second
Semester.
(Required of all College Juniors.)
ASTRONOMY. This course concerns itself primarily with
the mathematical calculations necessary to a clear under-
standing of the solar system, accompanied by telescopic
observations and a study of the principal constellations
of the sidereal system.
Textbook:-Todd's New Astrolomy.
GEOLOGY. The materials soithe earth, its structures,
processes at work on its surface and the history of its plant
and animal inhabitants. Supplemented by the study of
the geology of the vicinity of Tallahassee, and three sur-
veys; one of the phosphate mines near Live Oak, one of
Lake Jackson and its environs, one of the gulf regions near
St. Marks. One year. General Science Seniors and Sopho-
more Agriculture.
MATIIEMATICS
MATHEMATICS I. Seventh Grade Arithmetic.
MATHEMATICS II. Eighth Grade Arithmetic.
A review course in arithmetic required of all seniors in
the L. I. degree course.
MIATHEMATICS III. Elementary Algebra. This course com-
prises the study of Elementary Algebra to Quadratics,
covering the four fundamental operations: Factoring;
determination of H. C. F. and L. C. M. by factoring; linear
equations, both numerical and literal, containing one or
more nuknown quantities; problems involving linear equa-
tions; radicals; evolution, and exponents, both fractional
and negative.
Text: Wells and Hart.





ACADEMIC COURSES 37
MATHEMATICS IV. Intermediate Algebra. This course
embraces the study of quadratics, including simultaneous
quadratics, equations in quadratic form, and covers ratio
and proportion, the progressions, the binomial theorem for
positive integral exponents, and logarithms.
MATHEMATICS V. Plane Geometry. This course covers the
five books of Plane Geometry. Rigorous demonstration is
always insisted upon. The solution of original exercises,
including loci problems, and the mensuration of lines and
plane surface receive much attention.
Text: Wentworth and Smith.
MATHEMATICS VI. Solid Geometry. This course, em-
bracing the three books of Solid and Sperical Geometry, is
completed during the second semester.
MATHEMATICS VII. Introductory Course. Elements of
Plane Analytic Geometry; Plane Trigonometry; element-
ary theory of equations; logarithms; and elements of dif-
ferential and intergral calculus. "Unified" Course.
Text: Introduction to Mathematical Analysis-Griffin.
Required of all Freshmen, five hours per week.
MATHEMATICS VIII. Surveying, Fundamental princi-
pals of surveying; field work with transit, level, compass
and chain; map making and map reading.
Three hours per week, Second Semester.
MATHEMATICS IX. Analytic Geometry. This course em-
braces a study of the straight line, circle, and conic sections.
MATHEMATICS X. This course in Advanced Algebra, em-
bracing a study of Quadratic Forms, Theory of Equations,
progressions, Continued Fractions, Permutations, Combin-
ations and Chance. The course is intended for Sophomores.
Text: Hawkes Advalced Algebra.
MATHEMATICS XI. The subject of Descriptive Geometry
is treated from the stadnpoint of the draftsman. It includes
Orthographic Projections, Profile Plane, Assumption of
Points and Lines, Lines and Planes, Surfaces and their
intersections, Shades and Shadows.
Text: Elements of Descriptive Geometry, Ferris.
MATHEMATICS XII This is a course in applied mathe-
matics, intended to cover exercises growing out of actual
shop practice. In its scope it embraces problems which
deal with electricity, Machine Shop Practice, Carpentry,
Auto Mechanics, Mechanical Drawing, and Building Pro-
jects.
Text: Practical Trade Mathematics, Moyer.





38 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
ENGLISH
ENGLISH I. This course, prescribed for first year High
School pupils, consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-A review of declensions, conjungations,
sentence analysis, and other special topics; (b) Composi-
tion-Letterwriting, oral and written themes, paragraph-
ing, unity, simple figures, punctuation, and capitalization;
(c) Literature-The study of from four to six of the fol-
lowing classics:
Sohrab and Rustum.
Deserted Village.
Lady of the Lake.
Treasure Island.
A Tale of Two Cities.
As You Like It.
Merchant of Venice.
The Odyssey.
The Last of the Mohicans.
Text: Brooks' English Composition, Book I.
ENGLISH II. This course, prescribed for Second Years,
consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-Reviews, as found necessary; (b) Com-
position-A continuation of the first year's work with
emphasis on narration and description, synonyms, anto-
nyms, and coherence as applied to sentence and para-
graphs; (c) Literature-Study of Julius C.esar, Idyls of
the Kings, House of Seven Gables, Silas Marner, The
Ancient Mariner, Evangeline and Old Testament Narra-
tives.
Text: Brooks' English Composition, Book I.
ENGLISH III. This course, prescribed for Third Years,
consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-A review of special topics; (b) Com-
position-Exposition, paragraph development, sentence
structure, the composition as a whole, unity, coherence,
emphasis, scansion and elementary argumentation; (c)
Literature-Study of text book on the History of Amer-
ican Literature, together with Washington's Farewell
Address, Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, Franklin's Auto-
biography, Wilson's \Addresses and State Papers, and
Selected American Poems.
Texts: Brooks' English Composition, Book II.





ACADEMIC COURSES 39
METCALF AND HANADY'S READINGS IN AMERICAN
LITERATURE
ENGLISH IV. This course, prescribed for Fourth Years,
consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-A systematic review of fundamentals;
(b) Composition-Expository and argumentative themes,
brief drawing and forensics; (c) Literature-Study of
text book on the History of English Literature, together
with Macbeth, L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, Lycidas, Comus,
Burke's Speech of Conciliation, Essays from Macaulay and
Carlyle, and selected English Poems.
Text: Brooks' English Composition, Book II.
METCALF'S ENGIISII LITERATURE
ENGLISH Va. This is a course in composition and is re-
quired of Freshmen. In addition to an intensive study of
and frequent practice in the various types of writing, the
course will deal with word study, sentence structure and
analysis, and paragraph development. The short story
will receive special emphasis.
Five hours throughout the year.
Text: Young's Freshman English.
ENGLISH Vb. Students who are unable to write with
a fair degree of mechanical correctness are detained in a
composition section, without credit, until they overcome
this difficulty.
ENGLISH VI. Debating and Public speaking.
This course is required of Sophomores. The first part
consists of a text-book study of the principles of Argu-
mentation, together with the drawing of briefs and the
writing of forensics upon assigned propositions. The
second part consists of a study of the principles of public
speaking, followed by the writing and delivering of
speeches of various types. Three hours.
Texti Baker and Huntington's Principles of Argu-
mentation.
Text in Public Speaking to be selected.
ENGLISH VII. English Literature.
This course will cover the history and development of
English Literature from its earliest times to the present.
It is essentially a course in the reading of the masterpieces





40 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
of prose and poetry, and not a mere study of the literary
history of England.
Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Text: To be selected.
ENGLISH VIII. Shakespeare and Elizabethan Drama.
This course is designed for those who wish to make an
intensive study of such of Shakespeare's plays as are
usually taught in secondary schools. The history of the
English drama will be traced, and the works of Shake-
speare's contemporaries in the drama will receive atten-
tion. Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Text: To be seelcted.
ANCIENT AND MODERN LANGUAGES
LATIN
The aim of the Latin Division, aside from the mental
training gained in translation and in the mastery of the
essentials of the language, is centered in the development
of a genuine appreciation for classic literature and in the
building of a wider and more expressive English vocabu-
lary. The courses are made practical by frequent lectures
on Roman life and customs and the history of the period,
illustrated by a set of 100 slides with a stereoptican.
LATIN I. This course is a study of the principles of
Latin grammar. In the reading lessons great importance
is attached at first to the literal rendering into English,
and then the students are required to employ the English
idiom which most clearly expresses the thought of the
Latin sentence. As far as possible in the first year, stu-
dents are made to compare English and Latin words
formed from the same root. Lectures are given through-
out the year to supplement the regular work.
Textbook: First Year Latin, Clark and Game.
(For Second Year High School)
LATIN II. Cmesar. The reading of a minimum of three
books is required. Prose composition is given once per
week throughout the course.
Text: Walker's "Caesar," Baker and Ingles' "High
School Course in Latin Composition."





ACADEMIC COURSES 41
LATIN III. Cicero classes are required to read at least
three orations, making a study of the history of the time
of Cicero's life. Drill in prose composition is given each
week. Lectures with the lantern are given during the
course.
Textbooks: Johnson and Kingery's Cicero; Allen and
Greenough's New Latin Grammar, Baker and Inglis'
Latin Composition. (For Third Year High School).
LATIN IV. Virgil: Classes read at least three books,
rendering into the best English possible. Considerable
attention is given to scansion and mythological references
are required to be explained throughout the course.
Illustrated lectures are given.
Textbook: Knapp's Vi;g;7. (Fourth Year High School.)
LATIN V. Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. First
half year. Drill in sight reading is given here and special
attention to the discussion of Roman philosophy.
Textbook: (a) F. G. Moore's De Senectute and (b)
To be selected.
LATIN VI. Odes and Epodes of Horace. Second Half
year. In this course special study is made of the theory
of Latin prosody.
Textbook: Bennett's Horace.
These courses are elective in the Senior High School.
MODERN LANGUAGES
Elective courses in French or Spanish may be offered
in the Senior High School as per course for State High
School authorized by Chapter 1910, Acts 1919.
HISTORY
HISTORY I. (First year High School) : This is a course
in Ancient History. It takes the student from the earliest
historical period to the invasion of the Roman empire by
the northern barbarians. The indebtedness of the present
to the past is made clear.
Particular attention is given the ancient republics. The
effect of the introduction of Christianity is especially
noted. Short papers are required from time to time.
Textbook: West's Revised Ancient World.





42 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HISTORY II. This course offers a comprehensive study
of the history of England and its literature.
Especial attention is given to the development of in-
stitutions such as Parliament, the church, local organs
of justice, the borough, the King's prerogative, and also
to the growth of English literature which reflects the
social, political and religious condition of the country.
Written reports on both historical and literary sub-
jects will be required from time to time.
Text: Andrew's Short History of England.
HISTORY III. (Fourth year High School): This course
is a study of U. S. History and covers with civics a period
of one year. Papers are required consisting mainly of
biographies of the great men of the period studied.
The work for the semester covers the Colonial and Revo-
lutionary periods, to the establishment of the republic.
In the second semester the period from the establish-
ment of the republic to the present time is covered. Espe-
cial attention is given to territorial expansion and de-
velopment. Five hours throughout the year.
Text: Stephenson's American History.
HISTORY IV. Negro History: A study of the achieve-
ments and experiences of the American Negro both dur-
ing slavery and since emancipation.
Text: Brawley. "A short History of the Am)erican
Negro." (Revised).
HISTORY V. European History: Required of all Senior
College students during second semester. An introductory
course in which the history of the nations of Europe dur-
ing the medieval and modern periods will be dealt with
jn as broad and comprehensive manner as is consistent
with thoroughness of knowledge and definiteness of out-
line.
Textbook: Robinson's History of Western Europe.
GEOGRAPHY
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY: The work in physical geography
covers one year. The aim is to give the pupils the facts
which determine the basis of human life. Observation and
study of the immediate environment is the first study,
showing how natural conditions determine the resources
and these in turn determine occupations of the people.
Text: New Physical Geography, Dryer.
*





ACADEMIC COURSES 43
EDUCATION
EDUCATION I: Introductory course in Psychology re-
quired of all students who elect special work in Peda-
gogy, in the fourth year High School. The purpose of
this course is to give the student insight into the princi-
pal psychological conceptions and methods. Five hours
second semester.
EDUCATION II: A course in the principles of educa-
tion. Three hours.
EDUCATION III: This course will develop those princi-
ples of teaching that are applied to the work of the fifth and
sixth grades. Observation required. Two hours.
EDUCATION IV: Teaching the common school branches.
Drill in lesson plans. Practice teaching. Three hours.
EDUCATION V: This course will take up the elimination,
selection and the arranging of subject matter in the essen-
tial subjects in the Elementary School and the Junior High
School. One hour.
EDUCATION VI. History of Education: This course is
intended to give the student a breadth of view by treating
the history of education as a vital part of the history of
civilization. Political and social theories in so far as they
affect educational progress will be emphasized. Three
hours.
EDUCATION VII. Child Study: A course dealing with
the nature and development of the mind of the child,
instincts, and their treatment, faults of children, etc., with
special reference to the meaning of these facts to the
teacher. Three hours.
EDUCATION VIII. Rural School Problems: This course
aims to present an instructive preparation for intelligent
endeavor in rural education from the social point of view.
The rural educational problem is presented in its historical
development and present status, rural home life and social
conditions of typical communities, the rural school, the
rural church, the teaching equipment, the reorganization
of rural education and later demands for reform. Three
hours.
EDUCATION IX. The Art of Story Telling: This course
will attempt to give the student the best methods of telling
stories to children of primary or elementary grades. One
hour.





44 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
EDUCATION X. Mental Tests and Measurements: The
principles of mental measurement and of mental tests
standardization will be studied along with practical work
in the use of the various scales and tests. Three hours.
SOCIOLOGY
PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY: This course aims at a syste-
matic study of the underlying principals of social science.
The general plan followed is to begin with personal relat-
ions in their simplest and most direct form, proceeding
thence to the more complex forms of association. Histor-
ical references are freely used, but the main purpose is a
rational interpretation of existing society.
HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY
An introduction to philosophy through the study of its
history. The problems of philosophy are studied in their
origin. The aim is to familiarize the student with the
fundamental problems and categories of philosophy, and
to prepare him to face present-day problems in the light
of the history of philanthropic thought.
Textbook: Russell's First Course.
Five hours-First Semester.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY: In this course a more critical study of
consciousness is based upon Angell's Psychology. This
course is open to Juniors. Credit five hours.
ETHICS
ETHICS I. This course is a practical discussion of rights
and duties as brought out in personal relations with the
view to giving the student correct ethical concepts as rules
of conduct. Required in Senior Normal year. Credit,
five hours during Second Semester.
Textbook: Guick's Mind and Work and Efficient Life.
ETHICS II. In this course there is more detailed dis-
cussion of ethical theories as set forth in Durant Drake's
Problems in Conduct. Junior College, Second Semester.
Credit, five hours.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 45
ECONOMICS
ECONOMICS. I. This course opens an elementary dis-
cussion of man's effort at making a living, based upon
Carver's Rural Economics.
Junior Normal, Second Semester. Credit, five hours.
ECONOMICS II. This is a more advanced course in the
study of economic theory with stress upon the distribution
of wealth.
Textbook: Carver's Political Economy.
Credit, five hours.
CIVICS
This course is offered in connection with United States
History in the fourth year of the High School. It has
as its purpose training in good and intelligent citizenship.
It not only embraces a study of the forms of government
known to us, but also a review of the leading facts in the
history of this government.
Text: Magruder's American Government in 1921.
MECHANIC ARTS COURSES
GENERAL STATEMENT
Through the School of Mechanic Arts the aim is to setf-
fourth courses that will give such practical and theoreti--
cal knowledge as will serve as a proper basis upon which.
more advanced work along the lines of the various courses;
offered may be placed.
The School of Mechanic Arts provides an opportunity
for its students to acquire a sensible outlook upon the
active affairs of life and thus equips them to take up in
a serious way the problems which will be theirs after com-
pleting any one of its courses. Whatever instruction is;
given is intended to enhance the students' value as a con-
tributor to the service of the State.
Students of the High School are assigned to classes in
the School of Mechanic Arts. A reasonable choice is given
them, but the Dean of the School uses his discretion inm





46 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
making the assignments. Special courses are open to all
who can pass the requirements as set fourth in the admis-
sion statements.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO COURSE LEADING TO
DEGREE
1. Every student who desires to enter upon this course
must be:
(a) A graduate (or its equivalent) from an accredited
High School.
(b) Must have completed one of the trade courses of-
fered by the College.
(c) Must major in the work of the School of Mechanic
Arts.
(d) Must be fifteen years old and of good health and
character.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO TRADE COURSES
Any student matriculating in the High School of the
College is eligible for assignment to one of the courses
offered. The admission requirements are the same as those
for admission to the High School.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO COMMERCIAL COURSE
For admission to this course, applicants must have com-
pleted the work of the second year of an accredited High
School. For advanced classification the student must meet
such requirements as will guarantee such standing as he
seeks. This might be done either through credentials or
examinations.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO TIIE AUTO MECHANIC
COURSE
Applicants should be at least fourteen years of age,
physically and mentally able to do the work required.
While neither an absolute nor uniform standard as to edu-
cational qualifications are fixed, pupils failing to make
normal progress in regular schools can be entered in this
course only upon probation.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 47
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO TIlE TEACHER TRAINING
COURSE (SMITII-HUGHES)
Students entering this course must be of advanced
scholarship standing. They must have spent two years
in trade experience, either as a journeyman or in trade
preparation in an accredited vovcational school, and must
take the course in the light of the vocation he desires to
teach.
ADMISSION TO SHORT COURSE
Any one desiring an intensive trade course may be ad-
mitted to this work without regard to regular scholarship
standing; must be of sound health and have a desire to
complete this course satisfactorily.
DEGREES, DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES
(a) Upon completion of the College Course in the
School of Mechanic Arts the student will have the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Mechanic Arts (B. S. M. A.)
conferred upon him.
(b) A certificate will be given upon the completion
of the four year Trade Course taken in connection with
the four years work of the High School.
(c) A diploma will be awarded to those students wha
finish the four year Commercial Course.
(d) A certificate will be given upon the completion
of the course in Auto Mechanics (Smith-Hughes).
(e) Certificates will be given upon the completion of
the Teacher Training Course.
(f) Those finishing the two-year Short Course in a
trade will be given certificate showing that same was
satisfactorily done.
VOCATIONAL TRADE COURSES
1. Auto Mechanics.
2. Typewriting and Stenography.
3. Carpentry and Cabinet Work.
4. Machine Shop Practice.
5. Painting.





48 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
6. Plumbing and Steam Fitting.
7. Printing.
8. Tailoring.
9. Wheelwrighting.
10. Electricity.
11. Drawing.
*12. Tinning.
*13. Bricklaying and Plastering.
*14. Shoe-making and Harness-making.
*Not organized.
AUTO MECHANIC COURSE
GROUP I.-Engine Types and Parts:
(a) Single and multiple Cylinder Engines.
(b) Knight slide valve motor.
(c) Types of cylinder construction.
(d) Valve systems.
(e) Piston crankshaft and Crankcase parts.
(f) Lubrication and engine cooling systems.
GROUP II.-Power Transmission:
(a) Clutches-their forms and requirements.
(b) Change speed gearing.
(c) Types and operations.
(d) Gas and electric systems.
(e) Methods of transmission.
(f) Forms of driving gears.
TROUP III.-Fuels, Fuel Supply and Carburetion Action:
(a) Advantages and disadvantages of various fuels.
(b) Methods of fuel supply.
(c) Proper tank location.
(d) Ignition.
(e) Purpose of Carburetor.
(f) Types of feed.
(g) Methods of operation.
GROUP IV.-The Chassis:
(a) Types of frames and method of construction.
(b) Types of springs.
(c) Front axles and steering mechanism.
(d) Rear axles nomenclature, description of various
types.
(e) Differential, gear action, its purpose.
(g) Wheels, fims and tires, methods of repair.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 49
GROUP V.-Starting and Lighting Systems:
(a) General talks upon modern systems, operation,
care, repair.
(b) Single wire lighting.
(c) Two wire lighting.
(d) Combination switch wiring.
(e) Single unit starting, starting switches, motor
generators, directly connected and gear driven
starting.
GROUP VI.-Ignition:
(a) High tension magnetos.
(b) -Low tension magnetos.
(c) Battery magnetos.
(d) Induction coils.
(e) Ignition switches.
GROUP VII.-Generator:
(a) Single unit.
(b) Magneto generation.
(c) Motor generation and ignition.
(d) Automobile- cut-outs.
(e) Voltage and amperage regulation.
Related subjects taken in connection with the Auto
Mechanics 3 year course.
FIRST YEAR
English ... ................................ 4
Mathematics III ........................... 4
General Science ............................ 4
Drawing ................................... 3
SECOND YEAR
English .................................... 4
Mathematics IV ............................ 5
Physiology and Hygiene..................... 3
Drawing ................................... 3
M ath. X II .................................
THIRD YEAR
C ivics ..................................... 3
Mathematics V ..................... 5
Trade Science ............................. 4 .
D raw ing ................................... 3





50 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SPECIAL COURSES
A. Driving Course:
(a) Instruction in care and operation of various types
of cars.
(b) Traffic rules.
(c) Actual driving experiences.
(d) Maintenance hints of value; suggestions for oiling.
Winter care of automobiles.
B. Storage Battery Course:
(a) Care, repair, charging.
(b) Lead burning.
It requires three full school years to complete the Auto
Mechanics Course, and eight months to complete one of
the special courses.
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
(Vocational)
FIRST YEAR
GROUP I:
1. Development of Vocational Education:
(a) In Europe.
(b) In the United States.
2. Teaching Principles:
(a) Learning.
(b) Essentials of the Lesson.
3. The Trained Teacher:
(a) Qualifications (personal).
(b) Trade knowledge.
(c) Education.
(d) Teaching ability.
GROUP II:
1. Trade Analysis:
(a) By text.
(b) By building a Trade Card Index.
2. Teaching Processes:
(a) Aims.
(b) Lesson steps.
(c) Methods.
(d) Lesson planning.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 51
GROUP III:
1. Organization of:
(a) Training groups.
(b) Training conditions.
(c) Material.
(d) Subject matter.
SECOND YEAR
GROUP I:
1. Arranging effective instructional order.
2. Arranging effective instructional conditions.
GROUP II:
1. Practice Teaching:
(a) Observation.
(b) Records and reports.
GROUP III:
1. Trade science.
2. Trade drawing.
3. Trade mathematics.
DESCRIPTION OF DEGREE COURSE
PERSPECTIVE DRAWING
The study of perspective drawing is required in order
that the student may secure for himself and also give to
others a correct notion as to the appearance of the struc-
ture he designs.
SHADES AND SHADOWS
A working knowledge of shades and shadows is a pre-
requisite to the successful rendering of architectural com-
position and is acquired by the student through the solv-
ing of numerous problems ranging from the shadow cast
by a straight line to the complicated shading of and shad-
ows cast by the more elaborately ornamental architectural
features.





52 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
This work includes a study of the principles of design
and a large amount of practice in their application to the
solution of practical problems.
HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE
In this course the student is made familiar with ancient,
medieval, and modern styles of architecture, and the in-
fluence of the older upon the newer styles is studied by
descriptions, diagrams and pictures of the best examples.
GRAPHIC STATICS
This subject embraces the method of determining stres-
ses in framed structures, arches and beams by graphical
means.
WOOD TURNING
This is a shop course complementing the course in car-
pentry, and is designed to teach the use of wood turning
tools and assist in developing aesthetic feeling by construct-
ing beautiful as well as useful forms in the working out of
the problems given for solution.
ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE
This course is designed to acquaint those pursuing the
B. S. in Mechanic Arts with the first principals in arch-
itecture and thus prepare them to comprehend the more
advanced orders.
HEATING AND VENTILATION
In this course the physical laws underlying the gener-
ation of heat, its propagation and the movement of air and
renewing the atmosphere in public buildings and private
dwellings, the design and installation of systems are taken
up in a practical way.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 53
SPECIFICATIONS AND ESTIMATES
This is a course which considers the writing of the sev-
eral clauses of the specifications including the description
of the methods to be pursued by the contractor in perform-
ing his work and the designing of the materials to be used.
BUSINESS LAW
This course of lectures is to acquaint the student with
the laws governing contracts, real estate, negotiable paper
and the methods of transacting business.
SANITARY ENGINEERING
This study covers the entire field of conservation of the
health of occupants of buildings and their environs. It
deals with the construction of plumbing fixtures, sizes of
wastes, vent and supply pipes and fittings, the sources of
the water supply, the disposal of sewage and the proper
installation of systems.
PLUMBING
Running parallel with the course in sanitary engineer-
ing is a practical course in plumbing which aims to firm-
ly implant in the mind of the student the principles gov-
erning the correct design and installation of plumbing
fixtures.
ELECTRIC WIRING AND ILLUMINATION
Considered in this course are the proper intensity of
lights, their distribution, the kind, size and location of
wires and electrical accessories. Some practice is given
in designing and wiring.





54 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
DESCRIPTION OF TRADE COURSES
CARPENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING
This course is intended to give the student some knowl-
edge of the principles underlying house and shop carpen-
try and a moderate amount of practice in applying these
principles to some of the representative problems with
which the workers at this trade are most frequently meet-
ing.
At the beginning of the study the problems set for the
student are designed to be such as will, through an appeal
to his school or home life interests, enlist his best efforts,
so that by the end of the year he will have achieved suffi-
cient success in his work to encourage him to continue the
work in this division.
The work just mentioned is also given to the first year
wheelwrights.
The second year is given to the study of and practice
in erecting simple frame buildings, beginning with fram-
ing and then taking up door and window frame construc-
tion, outside finishing, floor laying, inside finishing and
stairbuilding.
Following this, in the third year, the time is devoted
to cabinet making, the more simple pieces of house furni-
ture being selected for this phase of the work.
The fourth year's work is a study of the first principles
of the trades which, together with carpentry, are employ-
ed in the erection of buildings, and a brief consideration
of the work of the architect in their design and the super-
intendence of their construction.
Arithmetic for Carpenters by Dale, Shop Problems by
Burton, used as a supplementary text.
WHEELWRIGHTING
The first year's work in this industry is identical with
that of the same period of the carpentry course.
During the succeeding years the students come into con-
tact more specifically with wheelwrighting and the use
of tools peculiar to the vehicle-making trade. This is ac-
complished through the making of spokes and felloes and
the subsequent building of wheels, gears, buggies and car-
riages of various descriptions.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 55
All the vehicles used by the College are built conjointly
by the young men of the wheelwrighting and blacksmith-
ing divisions.
Text: Farm Shop Work, Brace and Mayne.
BLACKSMITHING
The course in blacksmithing is intended to cover the
field of general blacksmithing operations and gives some
instruction in the ironing of vehicles and shoeing of horses.
At the beginning of the course, study is made of fire-
making and incidentally some attention is given to the
characteristics of coals, the construction of forges and
chimneys and the action of fans and bellows.
Thereafter the student is introduced to the more simple
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting,
punching, cutting off, and welding as used in the shaping
of staples, hooks, and collars and the making of chains.
The above-mentioned work occupies the time for the
first year. During the second year, the young blacksmith
co-operates with the wheelwright through the ironing of
the wooded parts of wheelbarrows, push carts, wagons,
buggies, surreys and phaetons.
Vehicle ironing is continued for a portion of the third
year course, while the remainder of the year is devoted
to the elements of horseshoeing.
Advanced horseshoeing and general repairing consti-
tute the work of the fourth year.
Supplementary text: Forge Practice, Bacon.
PAINTING
The division of painting affords an excellent oppor-
tunity to those desiring to become acquainted with the
more important phases of the painter's trade.
A study is made of the painter's brushes and other
tools; the source and manufacture of pigments, oils,
driers, varnishes, stains and the mixing of paints. Colors
and laws of harmony and contrast are given consideration
and practically applied in the painting of vehicles, auto-
mobiles and the interiors and exteriors of buildings.





56 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Glazing, including cutting, frosting, staining and em-
bossing glass, and sign writing are also taught.
Texts: House Painting, Sabin; Carriage and Automo-
bile Painting, Howard.
PRINTING
The College printer is equipped with two Chandler
and Price Gordon job presses, a two-revolution Campbell
cylinder press and enough printing materials to give the
typographer quite satisfactory notions as to the operation
of a first-class job office.
The course of study and practice includes, in the first
year, the learning of the cases, simple composition, the
names, care and use of the more common type faces and
printer's materials. During the following year attention
is given to the job work (in colors, fancy and plain),
primary stock cutting and estimating. Imposition, job
composition, estimating, and stock cutting are studied the
third year.
The student in this division has the opportunity of
doing quite a variety of work, since the College printing
done during the eight month's session is the work of the
young men of this division.
Text: Progressive Exercises in Typography, Loomis.
Supplementary Text: Printing for Shop and School,
Henry.
TAILORING
This division of the College's work is designed to give
the students such knowledge of the tailor's trade as will
enable them, with a little experience in a merchantile shop,
to become competent journeymen.
Instruction is given in the making of pockets and other
details before the construction of finished garments is un-
dertaken. Trousers, vests, and coats are taken up in the
order of their difficulty and a study made of shop economy
in cutting. Cleaning and repairing are also given the
attention, since this class of work constitutes a large part
of that done in every tailor shop.
The John J. Mitchell Standard of Drafting is used.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 57
MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE
The course in machinery is designed to give a prac-
tical and theoretical basis upon which to build along the
following engineering work: Machine installation and
machine shop practice.
On the machines and the material in use the students
get a liberal amount of practice in installation, operation
and repair.
The course in machine shop work is laid out to cover
work on bench and vise with hammer, cold chisel, files,
wrenches, screw drivers, rules, scales, calipers and other
hand and machine tools used in construction and repair.
This leads beginners up to the more advanced on drill
press, milling machine, power saw, lathe and grinder.
One hour each week is given to lectures on work in hand
and the mechanical and physical principle underlying
same.
Text: Machine Shop Practice, Kaup.
HOUSEHOLD ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL REPAIR
The electric apparatus used for lighting and power pur-
poses in connection with the College are kept in adjust-
ment and repair largely by the aid of students of the
machinery division, under the guidance of the instructor
in engineering.
PLUMBING REPAIR
Many of the buildings of the College are fitted with
sanitary fixtures and some with gas for water heating,
cooking, etc. The pipe lines for water supply, the sanitary
drains, as well as the steam boilers for heating those build-
ings so fitted, are kept in repair and operated largely with
student labor under the instruction and guidance of the
instructor in Engineering.
The practical mechanics that may be learned through
this work will be a valuable supplement to the training
received in machinery.





58 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
*TINNING
In this work the student will be taught to make templets
and therefrom draft and build the ordinary utensils used
in culinary establishments. He will also be given instruct-
ion in building roofs, down-spouts, gutters and simple cor-
nices. In this work an opportunity will be given to make
practical application of conies and curved surfaces.
*BRICKLAYING AND PLASTERING
In bricklaying the usual types of piers, chimneys, rough
and pressed brick walls will be constructed, special atten-
tion being given to types of arches. Mortors will be
studied so that the student may be able to differentrate be-
tween the kinds for specific purposes. The operations in
plastering will include lathing, scratch coats, second coats
both sand and putty and the application of hard surfacing
plasters. Paving will be considered in its connection with
the work. Estimating will be given large consideration.
*SHOE AND HARNESS MAKING
Before the student enters upon the actual making of
shoes he is required to be able to whole and half sole shoes
both the pegged and sewed types. Patching and repairing
heels must also be a part of the preliminary work which he
must master. In taking up the actual making of the shoe
a thorough study of the foot along with measurements of
same must be made. In order the lasts, inner sole, vamps
and uppers are to be considered. Special attention to
finishing will be given. A working knowledge of all hand
tools will precede the use of machinery.
The work in harness making will consist of repairs and
the actual making of bridals, blinds collars, traces, saddles,
straps, yokes and bands. As in shoemaking the use of
hand tools will precede that of machinery.
*These courses will not be offered during 1922-23.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 59
DESCRIPTION OF THE COMMERCIAL COURSE
BOOKKEEPING
The work in this subject is intended to give the student
a knowledge of the ordinary methods of transacting busi-
ness and making business records. The Twentieth Century
bookkeeping system is used and covers four sets as fol-
lows: Retail business, partnership, corporations and cost
accounting.
The course is open to a limited number of young men
and women, who may choose between the two or four year
courses. Only those, however, who finish the four year
course will be given a certificate or diploma.
TYPEWRITING
In typewriting, information about the care of machines
will be given. The touch method is used and emphasis
is placed upon correct fingering. Much attention is given
to correct typewritten forms, and in the meantime, speed is
developed.
Text: Touch Typewriting, Smith.
STENOGRAPHY
This subject is conducted for all students in the course.
It is based upon the Gregg system of shorthand, and it is
so taught that the student is able to learn with ease and
rapidity the fundamentals of a practical course.
AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course is the same as that taken in the High School
English III.
ETHICS
The students in Commercial Instruction will pursue this
subject, Ethics I, with those students of the Senior Normal
Class. The course is a practical discussion of rights and
duties growing out of personal relationships.





60 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY
This course is intended to make the student intelligent
upon the following topics: (a) The country's resources;
(b) the manufacturing interests, and (c) transportation.
Text: Frye's Commercial Geography.
PENMANSHIP
The Spencerian method is used as prescribed by Zauer
and Bloser through the Business Education Magazine, stu-
dent penmanship edition.
COMMERCIAL ARITIIMETIC
This is a course in which the time is spent in becoming
acquainted with Interest, Percentage, Stocks and Bonds,
Discount and other subjects related to business computa-
tion.
Text: Milne Progressive Arithmetic.
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
This course is intended to lay a good grammar founda-
tion for those pursuing the work in Commercial Instruc-
tion. Stress will be laid upon the proper use of the parts
of speech and upon careful sentence building.
Text: Hyde's English Grammar, Book II.
SPELLING
This is meant to be a rigid course in spelling, in which
a business vocabulary will be built up from words found
in newspapers, magazines and commercial books.
Text: The Word Speller, Sorelle.
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
The student will be required to write compositions
which will be criticised for spelling, sentence structure,
proper use of words, phrases, clauses and punctuation.
Text: Freshman English, Young.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 61
COMMERCIAL LAW
This subject treats of the practical laws of business and
is taught so that every student in the course will have a
working knowledge of the subject.
Commercial Law, Burgess.
SALESMANSHIP
This course treats of the scientific methods of making
sales and of efficiency in general business transactions. It
is intended to develop business initiative in those taking
the course.
Text: Salesmanship, Knox.
OFFICE TRAINING; PRACTICE WORK; MANAGEMENT
This course is conducted in order to teach the duties of
the stenographer and secretary. It is directed to the end
that they may become efficient in this line of work. Letter
writing, filing, managing, and use of time are emphasized.
Text: Ruperd Sorelle.
DRAWING
This is an elective course. It is intended to develop the
ability of the student, through Freehand Drawing, to make
ordinary sketches.
PHYSICS
This is a parallel course to Physics I in the School of
Science.
CHEMISTRY
This course is identical with Chemistry I in the School
of Science.
INSURANCE
This course is intended to make the students familiar
with the practice employed in handling insurance papers
and to teach them how to differentiate between the various
kinds of insurance.





62 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
REAL ESTATE
In this course special attention is paid to deeds, mort-
gages, sales, transfers and handling of the papers that
pertain to real estate matters.
GEOMETRY
This is a course in Plane Geometry covering at least the
first three books of the subject. Course parallel to the
same course in the High School.
ECONOMICS
This course is the same as Economics II in the School
of Science and covers one semester's work.
BUSINESS ORGANIZATION
In this course it will be the purpose to bring the lessons
offered in intimate relation to the business life of the com-
munity by covering such subjects as Proprietorship,
Working Capital, Borrowing, Wages, Purchasing, etc.
Text: Business Organization and Administration, Hass.
BANKING
In connection with the work in Commercial Instruction
there is established a student bank in which those taking
this course might learn the principles of banking. The
purpose is to conduct the affairs of the bank upon rigid
lines so that in this manner the work will be as real as in
actual banking.
Text: Banking and Bank Accounting, Morton.
DESCRIPTION TEACHER-TRAINING COURSE
This course is so designed as to embrace the following
teaching subjects: Training in the Plant, The Analysis
of Trade Knowledge, Establishing an Effective Instruc-
tional Order, Methods of Instruction, Lesson Planning,
Management, Organization and Use of Material in In-
struction Training Classes.
Text: The Instructor, the Man and the Job, Allen.





HOME ECONOMICS 63
DESCRIPTION AUTO-MECHANIC COURSE
The course in Motor Mechanics is organized in connec-
tion with the course in Machine Shop Practice and is
designed to afford a practical outlet through which trained
machinists may reach and fill the need for auto, truck and
farm tractor machines. Practical and theoretical work
is done on automobiles, trucks, tractors and gas engines
for farm use.
DESCRIPTION OF SHORT COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS
This course is established especially for those young
men who wish to lay a foundation in the fundamentals
of a trade, and for those who wish to spend a minimum
of time at the academic branches of study and a maximum
in the shops. It will be open to those men who have had
limited school advantages and it has been so planned as to
meet their requirements. After a student completes this
course he is fitted to pursue more advanced work in the
College if he so desires.
DESCRIPTION OF MANUAL TRAINING COURSE
This is a course in elementary wood and metal work,
occupying one year. The problems of construction in
wood and metal are such as require the use of knife, plane,
saw, hammer, chisel and the equipment of the blacksmith
shop in their solution. The course is open to the students
of the Training School and such others as are not assigned
to the regular shop courses. It also offers a field for those
in the Teacher Training course in which to do practice
teaching.
HOME ECONOMICS COURSES
The work done in the Department of Home Economics
is designed to give a girl high ideals and right standards,
to stimulate her towards the development of the highest
type of womanhood of which she is capable.
Every woman who expects to become the head of a house-
hold should prepare herself with the knowledge which will
enable her to meet the many problems which confront





64 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
every housewife. So also should the girl who intends to
be a teacher of other girls be trained in the science of home
making. The girl who can make excellent bread, and
knows the comparative value of different kinds of food,
who knows the good cuts of meat and how to prepare and
make nutritious and appetizing the tougher and cheaper
cuts, and the cost of each, who understands sanitation,
and furnishing, and decoration of the house and the mak-
ing of her own hats and dresses, finds herself in a position
to meet more readily and easily her daily problems.
Home Economics is required in the Junior High, and
Tenth Grhde. Those who wish to specialize may elect an
extra year in Clothing or Food and Nutrition, either in the
Eleventh or Twelfth Grades
Two courses are offered in the School of Home Econom-
ics above High School grade; the Smith-Hughes Teacher
Training Course of two years, and a four year college
course leading to B. S.
CLOTHING I. (Elementary Clothing.) The aim of this
course is to teach the cutting and making of simple gar-
ments. The use of commercial patterns and some drafting
are taught.
CLOTHING II. (Advanced Clothing.) The purpose of
this course is to teach the art of dressmaking and the use
of the Vienna Ladies Tailoring System by which patterns
and designs are made, the designing of ordinary garments,
the use of lines, color, proportion, adaption of materials,
to develop neatness, accuracy, self reliance, and high ideals
in work. Commercial patterns are also used. Lectures
and class discussions are held on artistic and appropriate
dress. Practice is given in variety by making dresses
in the department for teachers and students.
CLOTHING III. (Textiles.) This course includes the
history and development of textiles, the study of fibers to
processes of manufacture and economic use of fabrics. A
scientific study of the composition and physical properties.
CLOTHING IV (Millinery.) Designing, making, trim-
ming and decorating fall and spring hats, with a view of
developing originality and skill, are the aim and purpose
of this course. Stress is placed upon the artistic side of
the work by study of harmony, color and line. The pract-
ical side is also taught by emphasizing the economy in the
utilization of old materials renovated.





HOME ECONOMICS 65
This course is elective and may be taken by the Home
Economics specials in connection with dressmaking.
CLOTIIING V. (Costume Design.) This course includes
a study of the history of costumes, proportion of the human
figure and the application of the principal. of designing
to gowns and hats.
A brief study is given to pinned paper models.
FooDs I. (Elementary Foods and Nutrition.) Work
in elementary Foods and Nutrition consists of the cooking
of simple dishes, and the planning and serving of simple
meals.
FOODS II. (Advanced Foods and Nutrition.) This
course is a continuation of Elementary Foods and Nutrit-
ion and gives practice in several phases of cookery. The
processes carried out are more elaborate than in the junior
year. Self-reliance on the part of the student in the plan
and execution of her work is encouraged. Planning and
serving meals under home conditions, large quantity cook-
ing and serving are included in this course.
FOODS III. (Dietetics.) It is the aim of this course
to give the student some idea of the fuel value of foods,
food requirements, the construction of the dietaries, as well
as the processes involved in dietary calculations.
PHYSIOLOGY I. This course is intended for students
specializing in Foods and Nutrition. It covers a period
of one Semester. The students are given work in the di-
gestion of foods, as applied to Domestic Science, and the
various functions of the different organs of the body.
Laboratory experiments performed by the students are a
part of this course.
HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTRATION
Household management gives chance to gather under
one head the numerous lines of instruction necessary to
to administer a household. The aim of this course is to
show the relation of science, art, economics to the pract-
ical needs of the home. Organization of the household,
household decoration, marketing, budgeting, and launder-
ing are taught in this course.
3-A. & M.





66 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
NURSE TRAINING
STANDARD HOSPITAL
The Florida A. and M. College Hospital and Nurse
Course is standardizing to meet the State requirements.
Our capacity has been increased to twenty-five beds, the
Nurse Course lengthened and made stronger by additional
teachers and the number of nurses increased to meet the
demands.
There are several vacancies to be filled for those who
can meet the following requirements:
1st. High School graduates are given the preference.
2nd. Good health and good morals.
3rd. Adaptability to the work.
4th. Age limit, from 18 to 30 years.
5th. A three year course in training.
COLL.EGE HELP
The school furnishes board, lodging and laundry to its
nurse students. Applicants are required to serve three
months on probation to test their fitness for the training.
At the expiration of the probationary period the appli-
cants may withdraw, or, the institution reserves the right
to accept or reject all probationers.
If accepted, the regular nurses uniform of the school is
provided by the school and is worn at all times, with few
exceptions, throughout the course of training.
REQUIREMENTS OF NURSES
While on probation, only wash dresses and aprons,
which each probationer must furnish, are worn.
Nurses will need a change of comfortable common sense
shoes, a pair of house slippers, a warm kimona, raincoat,
rubbers and an umbrella, as the dining hall and dormi-
tory are some distance from the Sanatorium.
Nurses are required to furnish their own text books. A
registration fee of $5.00 will be required and paid on en-
trance to the school.
Hours are allowed from duty for class recitation, recrea-
tion and half holiday on Sundays. Time lost on account
of illness or other absence from duty must be made up be-
fore finishing. Two weeks vacation during the summer is
also given.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 67
Nurses who are candidates for diplomas must reside on
the campus where they are housed in a nurse's home, and
subject to rules governing such, and are responsible for
the cleanliness of the home.
EMPLOYMENT
Our graduated nurses find ready employment, and are
kept busy, some as institution nurses; private nurses and
visiting nurses. The future graduates will be more effi-
cient, because of the increased capacity and enlarged facil-
ities for training. Graduates will be eligible for the title
of Registered Nurse.
Plans are being made for the erection of an annex for
contagious diseases and a modernly equipped nurse's home.
AGRICULTURAL COITRSES
Students who complete the regular High School agri-
culture will receive certificates, and the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture will be conferred upon those who
finish the College Department of Agriculture.
(1.) A four year course leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B. S. A.) (2.) Four
year High School course in Agriculture leading to ertifi-
cate. (3.) Smith-Hughes Teacher Training Course lead-
ing to certificate. (4.) One year practical course. (5.)
One week shore course for farmers.
AGRONOMY
AGRONOMY I. (Soils and Fertilizers.) This course
involves a study of the physical nature of soils and their
adaptation to crops, together with proper methods of hand-
ling and maintaining good physical condition, to conserve
moisture and prevent washing. Second year hIigh School.
One year. Text: King on Soils.
AGRONOMY IT. (Soils and Fertilizers.) This course
deals with the origin, formation, texture, composition and
management of soils, to conserve moisture and liberate
plant food. Means of maintaining the -fertility of the soil,
the use of barnyard manures. Green manures and com-
mercial fertilizers are also considered. Sophomore, First
Semester.
Text: Fletcher On Soils.





68 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
AGRONOMY III. (Farm Crops.) The various grain,
fiber, and sugar crops with respect to their habits of
growth, soil, adaptation, fertilizer requirements, general
methods of tillage and harvesting and the most profitable
way of marketing them. Sophomore, First Semester.
Text: Wilson and Warburton, Filed Crops.
AGRONOMY IV (Advanced Course in Farm Manage-
ment.) The selection of a farm, the planning and arrange-
ment of farm buildings, etc. Various systems of farm re-
cords and accounts are studied to acquaint the student with
the more practical methods. Seniors, First Semester.
Text: Card's Farm Management.
AGRONOMY V. (Farm Machinery.) The physics of
farm implements, improved machinery and power. Cor-
rect operation of all available farm machines. Farm roads,
drainage, irrigation and sanitation will be thoroughly stud-
ied. Second Semester. Sophomore.
Text: Davidson's Agricultural Engineering.
HORTICULTURE
HORTICULTURE I (School Gardening.) A specially de-
signed course to train young women how to conduct small
school gardens in connection with the State Public Schools.
The class room work consists of general garden rules and
nature study topics, as proved most interesting. Laboratory
exercises will be given both in class room and on the garden
plots. Each young woman must plant and cultivate her
own garden. One year. First year High School Girls.
HORTICULTURET II. (Fruit Growing and Vegetable
Gardening.) The study of fruit culture generally, nur-
sery practice diseases and injurious insects treated The
culture of truck crops for local market, and the theory and
practice underlying such work will be taken up in order.
Second Semester. Sophomore.
HORTICULTURE III. (Practical Landscape Gardening.
Plant propagation, green house management, the im-
provement and planting of home and school grounds, etc.
Care of lawns, walks, tree surgery, hedges and flower beds.
Elective.
PLANT PRODUCTION
BOTANY I. The aim of this course is to lay a foundation
for the Economical and Agricultural Courses that follow,





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 69
and give the students a general elementary scientific know-
ledge of the growth and development of plant life. One
Year. Fourth Year High School.
Text: Coulter's Plant Life and Plant Uses.
BOTANY II. This subject takes up the structure, and
development of seed plants, their form, classification and
evolution. The economic phase of the subject is stressed.
Freshmen, Second Semester.
Text: Bessey'sEssentials of College Botany.
GENETICS
A study of Heredity and Environment and their appli-
cations to the breeding of plants and animals.
PREREQUISITEs-Botany II, or Biology I. The green-
house for propagation will constitute part of the labora-
tory equipment for this course. Seniors, Second Semester.
PLANT PATHOLOGY
This course is designed primarily to connect the work of
Horticulture, Agronomy, Botany and Bacteriology, all of
which are prerequisites. Special attention will be given
to local fungus diseases of plants. Juniors. Second Semes-
ter.
Text: Duggar's Fungus Diseases of Plants.
BACTERIOLOGY
Methods of artificial growing of bacteria. The study of
their development .in animals, plants, milk and water
Junors. First Semester.
Text: Conn's Agricultural Bacteriology.
ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY. Discussion of the more im-
portant injurious and beneficial insects on crops. Methods
of combating undersirable pests. Laboratory exercises in
field and gardens. Second Semester. Sophomore.
Text: Weed's Friends and Farm Foes.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY I. (Dairying.) This course in-
cludes lectures on the various breeds of dairy cattle, milk
and its composition, Babcock testing, separation and churn-
ing. Third year High School, First Semester.
Text: First Lessons in Dairying, Van Norman.





70 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY II.-Types and breeds of farm ani-
mals, with some judging practice; principles of breeding,
feeding and management of live stock. Third year High
School. Second Semester.
Text: Plumb's Animal Husbandry.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY.III. (Elements of Dairying.)
This is a general course dealing with the secretion, compo-
sition and properties of milk. Laboratory practice is given
in operating the Babcock test and lactometer, separation
of milk, and butter making. Second Semester. Freshmen.
Text: Wing's Milk and its Products.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IV. (Types and Breeds of Farm
Animals.) This course involves the study of the early
history and development of pure bred domestic animals;
also a sufficient study of herd books and pedigrees to ac-
quaint students with the leading strains and families of
the different breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and swine.
Second Semester. Sophomore.
Text: Plumb'sTypes and Breeds of Farm Animals.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY V. (Animal Breeding.) Lectures
and recitations on the general principles of heredity, var-
iation sex-limited inheritance and system of breeding and
the influence of pedigree and herdbook standards. First
Semester. Juniors.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY.VI. (Poultry Production.) Breed-
ing and feeding the various breeds of poultry, sanitary
house construction, and egg production will be discussed.
Second Semester. Juniors.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VII. (Feeds and Feeding.) Prac-
tice is given in the feeding, care, and management of
horses, cattle and swine. First Semester. Seniors.
Reference: Feeds and Feeding, Henry and Morrison.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIII. (Veterinary Science.) This
course is intended to teach the student the recognition of
disease, the principles involved in the preservation of
health, and the application of first aid in disease or acci-
dent of farm animals. Seniors. First Semester.
Text: Craig'sCommon Diseases of Farm Animals.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 71
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
The work in agricultural education is designed to meet
the demand for men trained in agricultural and allied sub-
jects, to teach in the High Schools and Colleges of the
State.
In the arrangement of this course the needs of the agri-
cultural teacher have been kept in mind. The practice
teaching is arranged to give the students of the Agricul-
tural Department experience in conducting class work,
laboratory and field exercises.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION I. (Methods of Teaching.)
The purpose of this course is the preparation of the student
for the teaching of agricultural subjects through a know-
ledge of the educational aims, and of the principles apply-
ing to the choice of subject matter. This course involves
a study of the recitation in part and the method of con-
ducting class work, making laboratory exercises and the
correlation of agriculture with other subjects. Juniors.
Second Semester. First Semester. Seniors.
Text: Vocational Education by Home Projects, Stimson.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.-(Organizations and Meth-
ods.) A course in which the aims, the functions, the meth-
ods of organization, and the relation of rural and urban
institutions are considered. Second Semester. Seniors.
RURAL ECONOMICS.-This course presents briefly the
fundamental principles of economics as related to the farm.
The aim of the course is to give a knowledge of the prin-
ciples that should guide the farmer in his work. Instruct-
ion is imparted by lectures, assigned readings, and reports.
Juniors. First Semester.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY.-A study of the rural conditions
and betterment. The relation of the society to the farmer.
Research work with Extension Bulletins, reports, etc.
Seniors, Second Semester.





72 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
SENIOR B. S.
Name. Postoffice County or State
Davis, Leonard E........Miami .........................Dade
Jackson, Victoria ........Sanford .................... Seminole
Scott, Robert M ..........Jacksonville ................ Duval
Smith, Elvira T ..........Greenland ...'................ Duval
Watkins, Ethel ..........Sanford ................... Seminole
Bisson, Wheelock A ......Key West ...................Monroe
JUNIOR B. S.
Currie, Samuel ..........Clearwater .................. Pinellas
Eaverly, Wallace ........Sanford ................... Seminole
Jenkins, Samuel .........Monticello .................Jefferson
Lewis, Samuel J ........Alachua ....................Alachua
Mayo, Lillie. C............Brooksville ................ Hernando
Rolf, Daniel Thomas .....Tampa ................ Hillsborough
Stark, George ........... Hawthorne ................ Alachua
Stark, Lancaster .........Hawthorne .................Alachua
Williams, George B ......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Williams, Nathaniel .....Clearwater .................. Pinellas
Stewart, Amy H. E .......Jacksonville ..................Duval
SOPHOMORE B. S.
Benton, Clem ...........Sanford ....................Seminole
Blake, Alfonso ...........Plant City .............Hillsborough
Curtis, Shirley ..........Clearwater .................. Pinellas
DeVaughn, Jauncy- .......Pensacola ................. Escambia
Pinkney, Eugene ........DeFuniak .................... Walton
Reid, Thomas ...........Key West ...................Monroe
Starks, Ida M ............Tallahassee ................... Leon
Thomas, Luther .........Quitman ....................Georgia
FRESHMAN B. S.
Baker, Carutha ..........Yazoo City ...............Mississippi
Baldwin, Jacob ..........Burbank ..................... Marion
Clements, Dewey ........Waycross ................... Georgia
Gordon, Frankie .........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Hendon, Fred ...........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Hicks, Leonard ..........,Orlando ................... Orange
Hudnell, Althea .........West Palm Beach ........Palm Beach
Jordan, John C..........Tuskegee ................. .Alabama
Lockhart, Adolphus ......Thomasville .................Georgia
Lundy, Jessie ............Jacksonville .................. Duval
if





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 73
Name. Postoffice County or State
McQueen, Robert ........Thomasville ................Georgia
Rolf, Olga ...............Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Smith, Henry ............Ocala ........................ Marion
Smith, Eugene ............cala ............ ..... Marion
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
'SENIOR CLASS
Name. Postoffice County or State
Fitzgiles, Emma .........Monticello ................. Jefferson
Jones, Josephine .........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Leggett, Blanche ........Key West .................Monroe
Love, Beatrice ...........Tallahassee ...................Leon
Spencer, Eldist ..........Tallahassee ................... Leon
MIDDLE CLASS
Brown, Nettie ...........Sanford ................... Seminole
Henry, Annie Lee........Delray ..................Palm Beach
Hill, Gertrude ...........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Jefferson, Para Lee .......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Maddox, Henry ..........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Mattox, Flossie ..........Water Town ............... Columbia
Nixon, Mabel ............Homeland ...................... Polk
Pettie, Altdmese .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
SENIOR H. E.
Fields, Gladys ...........Palatka ..................... Putnam
Tillman, Gladys .........Pensacola .................Escambia
MIDDLE H. E.
McMickens, Susie ........Edgar ......................Putnam
Martin, Marie ...........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Nixon. Minnie ...........Madison ....................Madison
Rogers, Josephine .......Tampa .................Hillsborough
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
FOURTH YEAR CLASS
Adderly, Quintin .........Waycross ................. Georgia
Andrews, Wallace ........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Bell. Albert .............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Boston, Angie ...........Oveido .................... Seminole
Bradford, Eugene ........Warrenton ................ Escambia
4





74 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Name. Postoffice. County or State
Butler, James ...........Tampa ................. Hilsborough
Conoly, Cora ............Bay Harbor ................. Bay
Dallas, Herbret ..........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Denson, Joseph ..........Arcadia .................... DeSoto
Dwight, Edith ...........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Edwards, Leah ..........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Espy, Henry .............Gifford ................... St. Lucie
Espy, Rosella ............Gifford .................... St. Lucie
Everette, Quintin ........Waycross ................... Georgia
Fletcher, Dorothy ........Gainesville ..................Alachua
Gaulding, Rosa ..........Kissimmee .................. Osceola
Gary, Mamie ............Valdosta ................... Georgia
Hamilton, James ........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Hill, Charles ............Bartow ........................ Polk
Hudson, Troy ...........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Johnson, Leonard ........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Green, George McEuen....Tampa .................Hillsborough
Loray, Leona ............Tampa .................Hillsborough
Malloy, Clyde ...........Palatka ..................... Putnam
Mitchell, Matthew .......Jacksonville .................. Duval
Nevills, Walter ..........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Pettis, Ernestine .........Tallahasse .................... Leon
Rambeau, Fleta .........Donaldsonville .............. Georgia
Robinson, Bessie .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Robinson, Rosa .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Rogers, Marie ...........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Roundtree, Hosea .......Perry ........................ Taylor
Silas, Carrie ............Kissimmee .................. Osceola
Sweet, Henry ...........Bartow ........................ Polk
Square, Annie ...........Bainbridge .................. Georgia
Sweet, Deloca ...........Bartow ........................ Polk
Tyson, Clarence .........Savannah ...................Georgia
Williams, Algie .........Tallahassee ............. ...... Leon
Williams, Joseph ........Quincy .....................Gadsden
W illiams, Rossie .........Lisbon ........................ Lake
Willis, Sallie ............Palatka ................... Putnam
-Winston, John ...........Detroit ................... Michigan
Yates, Iris .............. Jacksonville .................. Duval
Yates, Roland ..........Jacksonville ................. Duval
THIRD YEAR CLASS
Austin, Charles .........West Palm Beach ........Palm Beach
Austin, Hearl ...........Ocala ........................ Marion
Ayers, Carrie ............Gifford ................... St. Lucie
Baldwin, Isabella ........Burbank ..................... Marion
Burnett, James ..........Orlando .................. Orange
Burnette, Henry .........Orlando .....................Orange
Cady, Davis .............DeFuniak ................... Walton
Carter, Louise ...........Apalachicola ...............Franklin
Chapman, Ida ...........Longwood ................. Seminole
Celestine, Josie ..........Warrenton ............... Escambia
Coles, Robert ............Jacksonville .......... ..... Duval





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 75
Name. Postoffice. County or State
Daniels, Claudia .........Jacksonville ..................Duval
Davis, Clara .............Homeland ...................... Polk
Dean, Marcus ...........Key West ...................Monroe
Debmon, Wilbur .........Waycross ................... Georgia
Drew, Emma ............Tallahassee ...................Leon
Ferrell, Alma ...........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Fitzgiles, Maggie .........Monticello ..................Jefferson
Ford, Geneva ............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Forest, Estella ..........Lake City .................Columbia
Freeland, Catherine ......Tallahassee ................... Leon
Freeland, Hugh .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Gavins, Cora ............Tallahassee ................... Leon
Gavin, Ruby .............Wakulla ....................Wakulla
Gilmore, Mattie ..........Fort Myers ......................Lee
Hamilton, William ......Tampa ................ Hillsborough
Hannibal, Costella .......Key West ...................Monroe
Harris, Maggie ..........Winter Park ................. Orange
Hawkins, Dorothy .......Orlando .................. Orange
Hollingsworth, Alberta ...Waycross ................... Georgia
Hudson, Idella ..........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Hunter, Elizabeth ...... Tallahassee ................... Leon
Johnson, Mattie .........Valdosta ................... Georgia
Johnson, Sarah ......... Tallahassee ................... Leon
Johnson, Claudia ........West Palm Beach........Palm Beach
King, Emanuel ..........Kissimmee ................ Osceola
Lightbourne, Margaret ...Tallahassee ....................Leon
McFarland, Novik .......Pensacola ................ Escambia
Maxey, William ..........Ocala ........................Marion
Mears, Willard ..........Key West ...................Monroe
Meginniss, Willie ........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Mickens, James K........West Palm Beach ........Palm Beach
Mickens, Mollie ..........Key West ...................Monroe
Moore, Nellie ............Stuart ................ Palm Beach
Murrell, Mattie ..........Orlando ...................... Orange
Nims, Fred ..............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Osborne, Alma ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Pecke, Inez ..............Ocala ........................M arion
Perkins, Marie ...........Fort Myers ......................Lee
Reese, Georgiana ........Daytona ...................Volusia
Rivers, Henrette ........ Tallahassee ....................Leon
Richardson, Herman .... Orlando ......................Orange
Roberts, Dewey .........Gainesville ..................Alachua
Rolf, Everett ............Tampa ............... Hillsborough
Simmons, Amelia ........Plant City ............. Hillsborough
Smith, Mabel ...........Ocala ........................Marion
Stratton, Annie ..........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Sweet, Charles ...........Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Sweet, Nordica ..........Bartow ........................Polk
Tompkins, Lottie ....... Jacksonville ................. Duval
Trapp, Frances ..........Miami ........................Dade
Williams, James .........Cairo ....................... Georgia
Williams, Mabel .........Waycross ...................Georgia
W illiams, Ruth ..........Miami ........................ Dade
Wilson, Veresta .........Quincy ....................Gadsden





76 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR CLASS.
Name. Postoffice. County or State
Anderson, Marion ........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Anthony, Sandy .........Kissimmee .................. Osceola
Bell, Alma ..............Denmark .............South Carolina
Conoly, George ..........Bay Harbor ............... Bay
Davis, Elizabeth ........ Jacksonville .................. Duval
Espy, Theodore ..........Gifford .................... St. Lucie
Evans, St. Clair ..........Perry ........................Taylor
Everette, Thornton ......Jacksonville .................. Duval
Gilchrist, James .........Lakeland ....................... Polk
Green, Genette ...........Delray .................. Palm Beach
Griffin, Macoe ...........Fort PieCce ..............St. Lucie
Haines, Carrie .......... Columbus ................. Georgia
Hall, John Lee ...........Oveido .....................Seminole
Hall, John R .............Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Hardon, Thelma .........Quincy .....................Gadsden
Headley, Harold .........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Hill, Clem ...............Arcadia .......... .......... DeSoto
Jackson, Meltonia .......Jacksonville ......:........... Duval
Jones, Augustus .........Quincy .....................Gadsden
Joseph, Edwards ........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Kennedy, Blanche .......Srarr .......................Marion
Lockhart, John ..........Waycross ................... Georgia
McLarin, Maryland ......Jacksonville .................. Duyal
Mitchell, Henry ..........Jacksonville .................. Duval
Nelson, Alvia...... Quiny Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Nixon, Alice ............Homeland ......................Polk
Nixon, Alma ............Homeland ...................... Polk
Nixon, William V ........Lake City ................Columbia
Oxendine, Frank .........Oviedo ..................... Seminole
Rooks, Milton ........... Clearwater ..................Pinellas
Roulhac, Oswald ........Chipley ................Washington
Saunders, Charlie Mae....Plant City .............Hillsborough
Scott, Clara Belle.........Tampa .................Hillsborough
Smith, Mammie .........Sparr ....................... Marion
Stirrup, Franklin ........St. Augustine .............St. Johns
Stirrup, Lillian ..........St. Augustine .............St. Johns
Washington, Julia .......Pensacola ................. Escambia
Washington, Willie ......Pensacola ................. Escambia
Whitehead, Anthony .....Jacksonville ..................Duval
Williams, Learntine......LisbonLisbon .................. Lake
Williams, lazel.........uincy ..................... Gadsden
FIRST YEAR A CLASS
Adams, Flossie ...........Oviedo .....................Seminole
Allen, Corine ............Sopchoppy .................Wakulla
Bradshaw, Rosa .........Kissimmee .................. Osceola
Brown, Edna G...........Sanford ................... Seminole
Bryant, Theodore ........New Smyrna ................Volusia
Buchannan, St. Clair ....Clearwater ..................Pinellas
Butler, Mercedes ........Tampa .................Hillsborough





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 77
Name. Postoffice. County or State
Butler, Marie ............DeLand ...................Volusia
Calhoun, Frances ....... Arcadia ......................DeSoto
Carr, Ruth ..............Tallahassee .......... ........Leon
Clemens, Wadell .........Tampa ......... .... Hillsborough
Coleman, Etta ...........Dunnellon ................. Marion
Coleman, Emma ..........Clearwater .................. Pinellas
Colston, Callie ...........Winter Park ................. Orange
Deveaux, Fleuonoy .......Marianna ................... Jackson
Ellerbe, Edward .........Palatka ................... Putnam
Faulk, Annie ............Pensacola ................ Escambia
Forest, Joseph ...........Lake City ................. Columbia
Fossit, Verdie ...........Madison ............. ......Madison
Fossit, Ruby .............Madison ................... Madison
Franklin, Joseph ........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Gibson, Samuel ..........Titusville ................... Brevard
Glover, Howard ....... ..Plant City ..............Hillsborough
Glover, Boysie ...........Plant City ............ Hilsborough
Hargray, Alzeta .........t. Petersburg ............... Pinellas
Hayes, Roderick .........Arcadia ......................DeSoto
Henry, Mary Ella ....... Jacksonville ..................Duval
Howard, Oscar .......... Miami .........................Dade
Jefferson, Oscar .........Oakland ..................... Orange
Jessie, Marietta .........Jakin ....................... Georgia
Johnson, Lottie ..........DuPont ..................... Georgia
Johnson, Walter .........Kissimmee ..................Osceola
Jones, Ruth .............Foort Myers ....................Lee
Jones, Disney ...........Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Jones, Harold ........... acksonville ..................Duval
McPherson, Mary ........anford .................... Seminole
Maxey, Admiral .........Santoas ......................Marion
Miller, Bernice ..........Tampa ......... ...... Hillsborough
Mitchell, Bessie .........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Oliver, John, .............Tallahassee ......... .........Leon
Philjaw, Rhodel .........Tallahassee .......... .......Leon
Philaw, Alphonso ........Tallahassee ....................Leo
Pinder, Hugh ...........Tampa .................Hillsboroughl
Price, Marie .............Dothan ......................Georgiar
Rogers, James ...........Tampa .................Hillsborough.
Rozier, Nellie ............ anford ....................Seminole
Saunders, Willie .........Fort Myers ....................Lee
Scott, Sarah ...........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Scotto, Hazel ............Oakland ....................Orange
Simmons, Carrie .........Plant City .............Hillsborough
Simmons, Willie .........Madison ....................Madison
Smith, Haywood .........Sparr.....................Marion
Stewart, William ........Jacksonville .................. Duva
Stewart, Harry ..........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Stirrup, Louise ..........Cocoanut Grove ................Dade
Stockston, John .........Quincy .....................Gadsden
Twine, Alease ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon.
Twine, Hazel ............Tallahassee ........... .......Leonr
Ward, Elizabeth .........Punta Gorda ...............Charlotte-
Webb, Margarette .' ......Apalachicola ...............Franklin
Fra- klir





78 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Name. Pcstoffice. County or State
W illiams, Tully ..........Tallahassee ....................Leon
W imbley, Eigar .........Ocala ........................Marion
Young, Julia ............Tallahassee ...................Leon
Young, Marion ...........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
FIRST YEAR B CLASS
Allen, John, .............Sopchoppy .................. W akulla
Gray, Fred ..............Marianna ................... Jackson
Green, Dorothy ..........Quincy .................... Gadsden
Harris, Delphia .........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Haile, Blonese ...........Gainesville ..................Alachua
Holloman, Vivian ........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Inmon, Willie ...........Bessemer ..................Alabama
McHardy, Charles ........Stuart .................. Palm Beach
Mattox, Viola ............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Lester, Herbert ..........Tama ................. Hillsborough
Littlejohn, Joe ..........Clearwater ................ Pinellas
Price, Alberta ...........Fort Myers ......................Lee
Roberts, Mary ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Robinson, Raleigh .......Lakeland ....................... Polk
Thomas, Fred ...........Waycross ................... Georgia
Thompson, Carl .........Leesburg ......................Lake
Turner, Lowell ..........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Vaughn, Edward .........Lake City ..................Columbia
Wilkins, Annie ..........West Palm Beach........Palm Beach
W illiams, Annie .........Southport .......................Bay
Williams, Willie Mae .....Quincy .....................Gadsden
Yarn, Oscar .............Clearwater .................. Pinellas
FIRST YEAR C CLASS
Allen, Daisy .............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Anderson, Octavia .......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Banks. Ernest ...........Bainbridge .................. Georgia
Branch, Reohailer ....... acksonville .................. Duval
Goolsby, Elmer ..........Waycross .................. Georgia
Curley, David ...........Tallabassee ....................Leon
Hicks, Annie ............Tallahassee ....................Leon
James, Legre ............Waycross ...................Georgia
Johnson, Frances ........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Jordan, Richard ........ Tallahassee ....................Leon
Laster, Minerva .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Marshall, Ivory ..........Sparr ....................... Marion
Norman, Ruby ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Pittman, Ernestine ......Tallahassee ................... Leon
Pittman, Robert .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Robinson, Henry .........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Robinson, William ......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Verdier, Marcus .........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Young, Frank ...........Tallahassee ................... Leon





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 79
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
HARMONY
Dwight, Edith Watkins, Ethel
Hall, John R., Jr. Young, Julia Buckley
Murrell, Mattie
VOCAL
*Edmondson, Albertine T. Malloy, Clyde
*Hailey, Mrs. Lilly P. Nixon, Alma
Lewis, Samuel Powell, Mary Ella
Murrell, Mattie Washington, Julia
PIANO
Anderson, Miriam J. Johnson, Frances
Baldwin, Isabelle Jones, Ruth
Bradford, Eugene Martin, Marie
Butler, Marie Mickens, Molly
Butler, Mercedes Mitchell, Bessie
Carter, Louise Moore, Nellie
Carr, Ruth, Manley, Martha,
Colston, Gallie M. Washington, Julia
Davis, Clara Murrell, Mattie
Daniels, Ioona Malloy, Clyde
Expy, Rosella Miller, Berniece
Ferrell, Alma McPherson, Mary
Fosett, Veride Lee Mebane, Alberta
Frazier, Mary Laura Nelson, Alvie
Green, Garriette Olga, Rolf
Gordon, Frankie *Perkins, W. R.
Harden, Margaret Pecke, Inez
Hall, John R., Jr. Robinson, Rosalie
Harden, Thelma Robinson, Raleigh,
Haile, Blonese Rozier, Nellie
Hailey, Mrs. Lilly P. Starks, Thelma
Hanniball, Castello Stirrup, Louise
Hill, Clem Smith, Mabel
Holloman, Vivian Scott, Carrie Bell
Howard, Harriett Turner, Arthenia
Hollingsworth, Alberta Turner, Ellen
Jackson, Meltonia Watkins, Ethel
Jackson, Louise Wilkins, Annie
Johnston, Walter Young, Julia Buckley
*Not counted more than once.
J





80 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SPECIALS
NURSE TRAINING
Name Postoffice County or State
Anderson, Florida .......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Anderson, Henretta ......Crescent City ........... Hillsborough
Brown, Sessie ...........Valdosta ....................Georgia
Brown, Ethel ............Brunswick ..................Georgia
Goff, Beatrice ............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Keeling, Eileen ..........Pensacola ..................Escambia
Hale, Rosa ..............Gainesville ................ Alachua
Missouri, Theooro ........Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Thompson, Essie .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
BUSINESS INSTRUCTION
Baker, Katie Mae.........Yazoo City ...............Mississippi
Friall, Gladys .......... Jacksonville .................. Duval
Gray, Luther ............Marianna ................... Jackson
Jones, Ruth .............Tallahassee ....................Leon
McKinney, Viola .........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Manley, Martha .........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Powell, Mary ............Pensacola ................. Escambia
Redding, Lottie ..........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Robinson, Lucile (H.E.)..Tallahassee '. ................Leon
Smith, Daisy ............Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Grant, Bertha ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
MECH-ARTS
Foree, Albert ............Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Jackson, Willie ..........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Dallas, Alphonse .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
GENERAL SUMMARY
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Men Women Both
Seniors ................. .......... 3 3 6
Juniors ............................. 9 2 11
Sophomores ......................... 6 2 8
Freshmen ........................... 10 4 14
28 11 39





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 81
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
Men Women Both
Seniors ............................. 0 5 5
Middle .............................. 0 8 8
Senior, H. E. ....................... 0 2 2
Middle, H. E. ............... ........ 0 4 4
0 19 19
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
First Grade ......................... 5 71 76
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
Fourth Year ........................ 23 21 44
Third Year ......................... 20 45 65
Second Year ........................ 22 19 41
First Year A........................ 29 35 64
First Year B........................ 12 10 22
First Year C........................ 12 7 19
118 137 255
Specials ........................... 4 19 23
Total ........................ 412
Names counted more than once in above 73
Total, not including duplicates.... 339





82 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
NUMBER BY COUNTIES
Summer Regular
School Term
Alachua ....................... 13 7
Bay ........................... 1 3
Bradford ....................... 2 0
Brevard ........................ 0 1
Calhoun ....................... 1 0
Charlotte ...................... 1 0
Columbia ...................... 10 5
Dade .......................... 2 5
DeSoto ........................ 1 4
Duval ........................ 28 27
Escambia ...................... 12 10
Franklin ....................... 0 2
Gadsden ............ .......... 3 13
Hamilton ...................... 3 0
Hernando ...................... 0 1
Hillsborough ................... 2 39
Holmes ........................ 1 0
Jackson ....................... 5 3
Jefferson ....................... 1 3
Lake .......................... 5 3
Lee ....... ..................... 0 5
Leon ........................... 42 65
Levy ........ ....... ..... ..... 1 0
Madison ....................... 1 4
Marion ........................ 5 15
Monroe ........................ 4 7
Nassau ........................ 3 0
Orange ........................ 13 10
Osceola ........................ 0 6
Palm Beach .................... 1 9
Pinellas ....................... 3 9
Polk ........................... 4 10
Putnam ........................ 4 5
St. Johns .....................: 0 2
St. Lucie ....................... 1 5
Seminole ...................... 0 13
Sumter ........................ 1 0
Suwannee ...................... 3 0
Taylor ......................... 0 2
Volusia ........................ 6 3
Wakulla ....................... 4 3
Walton ........................ 1 2
Washington ..................... 0 1
184 304





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 83
SUMMARY BY STATES
Summer Regular
School Term
Florida ........................ 184 380
Alabama ....................... 0 2
South Carolina ................. 1 1
Georgia ........................ 2 26
Michigan ...................... 0 1
Mississippi ..................... 0 2
187 412
Total......................... 599
Names counted more than once...... 73
Total, not including duplicates.. 526
FACULTY OF TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS
Nathan B. Young,
President.
Everett B. Jones,
Director, Science,
John F. Matheus,
Auditor.
Clarence C. Walker,
Mathematics.
Lulu M. Cropper,
Geography.
Albert L. Mebane,
Agriculture.
George M. Sampson,
Latin.
Alberta H. Beverly,
English.
Ruby B. Glenn,
Primary Methods.
Clara B. Moon,
Domestic Art.
Bessie M. Hawkins,
Home Economics.
Bayetta R. Dent,
Domestic Science.
Celia A. Bradley,
Matron.
Mrs. Etta B. Davis,
Stewardess.
Albertina T. Edmondson,
Acting Auditor.
Juanita M. Gilbert,
Secretary.





84 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
GENERAL STATEMENT
The Florida A.&M. College Summer School was provided
for by the "Summer School Act" passed by the Legis-
lature of 1913.
The entire equipment of the College is at the service of
the faculty and students of the Summer School. The
library, laboratories, dormitories, and dining hall are open
during this session.
Board and lodging (including lights) will be offered at
$4.50 per week, payable in advance. Those occupying
dormitory rooms must, however, furnish their own pillows,
bed linen and towels.
Attention is directed to the following section of the
"Summer School Act": Credit towards Normal and
College Degrees.
Sec. 5. "All work performed at the said
Summer Schools shall be of such character as
to entitle the students doing the same col-
legiate, normal or professional credit there-
for, and may be applied toward making a
degree."
EXTENSION OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
Laws of the State of Florida-Chapter 6835, Section 6:
"All teachers attending any of the Summer Schools here-
in created, and whose work entitles them to work therefore,
upon making proof of the same to the State Superinten-
dent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one
year's extension on any Florida teacher's certificates they
may hold and which has not fully expired, and such cer-
tificate may be extended one year for each succeeding
session attended by the said teacher."





SUMMER SCHOOL 85
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
AGRICULTURE
1. Agriculture A.-Field Crops. Lectures and text-
book. Considers the essentials of crop production as af-
fecting the cereal and forage crops of America.
2. Agriculture B.-The Teaching of Agriculture in
materials and methods available in the teaching of elemen-
tary schools. (a.) Detailed presentation of the agricul-
ture in elementary schools, with special emphasis on school
garden work. This course is planned for teachers in town,
village and rural schools.
EDUCATION
Theory and Practice.-The principles of teaching and
their application to the various subjects in the curriculum
of the elementary school will be treated in this course.
PSYCHOLOGY
1. General Psychology.-A beginner's course.
ENGLISH.
1. American Literature.-A general course in this sub-
ject.
Grammar.-Includes a careful review of grammar,
syntax, and sentence analysis and is to be especially adap-
ted to students who wish to prepare for teachers' examin-
ations.
HISTORY
American History.-Review course of the main histor-
ical events.
Civics.-Most of the time will be devoted to the Govern-
ment of Florida, with special reference to local conditions;
the administering affairs in Florida; how we are governed
by the laws of the City, County, State, and Nation.
1. A course in Physical Geography.
2. A review course in Political Geography.





86 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
MATHEMATICS
Arithmetic.-A rapid and thorough review of the prin-
cipal subjects of arithmetic will be made.
Elementary Algebra.-A beginner's course.
Advanced Algebra.-not open to beginners.
Plane Geometry.-A beginner's course.
SCIENCE
General Science.-A course in General Science will be
given.
PHYSICS:-A course in elementary physics.
PHYSIOLOGY
Teachers preparing for examination will find this course
suited to their needs.
PRIMARY METHODS
Drawing and singing and the theory of Primary teach-
ing.
SUMMER COURSE HOME ECONOMICS
Two courses will be given in the Home Economics De-
partment during the Summer Session.
COURSE I.-Normal Course extending over four sum-
mers and leading to a Normal Certificate. Prerequisite:
Each student entering this course must hold a High School
Diploma or have a training equivalent to a four years
High School Course.





SUMMER SCHOOL 87
NORMAL COURSE OF STUDY-COOKING
AND SEWING
JUNIOR
English Grammar ........ 5 School Management ,.... 5
Psychology ............... 5 English: Oral-Written Cor. 5
General Science .......... 5 Foods and Nutrition...... 4
Elementary Foods and Nu- Clothing and Textiles..... 4
triton ................. 4 Rural Economics ......... 4
Elementary Clothing ..... 4 Household Administration. 2
Physical Training ........ 1 Physical Training ........ 1
Elective Elective
M usic ................... 1 M usic ................... 1
SENIOR
History and Civics....... 5 Bacteriology ............. 3
Methods of Teaching H. E. 5 English .................. 5
Advanced Foods and Nu- Household Chemistry ..... 5
trition ................. 4 Practice Teaching ........ 5
Advanced Clothing ....... 4 Dietetics ................. 5
Elementary Chemistry ... 5 History of Education...... 5
Elective Elective
Physical Training ........ 1 Physical Training ........ 1
Music ................... 1 Music ................... 1
COURSE II.-This course is required of all students
entering Summer School for the first time. It is called
the Homemakers Course, and will include simple garment
making, use of commercial patterns, lessons in Planning
and Serving Meals, Marketing, Food Values, Canning,
Preserving and Household Adminstration.
All students electing Home Economics are subject to
the same routine for entrance outlined in the Summer
School Edition of the Bulletin, March 1921.
For detailed explanation of subjects offered refer to
catalogue. A limited number of students will be regis-
tered in both courses.





88 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SUMMER SCHOOL
Aaron, Maxey ....................................... Hamilton
Alien, Alice .................................... Hillsborough
Allen, Corine ...................................... Escambia
Anderson, Alberta ....................................Alachua
Anderson, Christiana .................................. Walton
Anderson, Mrs. Elizabeth ..............................Holmes
Anderson, M rs. T. S...................................... Polk
Ayer, Mrs. A. J ................... ................... Alachua
Baker, Mrs. Effie .....................................Jackson
Barco, Mrs. Dora .................................... Pinellas
Barnett, Arilena .................................... Suwannee
Bradley. Mammie .................................... Madison
Barnes, Essie ......................................... Duval
Barnes, Mrs. Luretta .................................... Lake
Berry, Mrs. Ada ...................................... Pinellas
Board, Mrs. M. A ...................................... Orange
Blacknell, E. L. ...................................... Putnam
Bland, Bertha M ........................................ Duval
Blye, Mrs. M. L ................... ...................... Duval
Brown, Ella ...........................................Marion
Brown, Mrs. Jessie ..................................... Duval
Brown, Mrs. Cecelia .. ......................... Leon
Brown, Beatrice ..................................... Columbia
Briggs, Corine L .......................................Monroe
Brookins, Mrs. Elzora ...................................Orange
Bryant, Mrs. L. E ................................... Columbia
Capehart, Jessie ........................... Duval
Caldwell, Mrs. Lettie ....................... Duval
Clayborne, Mrs. Arrie ...............................Orange
Conoly, Cora ............................................. Bay
Cooper, Mrs. Lettie .................................. Alachua
Cooper, Hannah .................................... Columbia
Crooms, Mrs. Annie .................................... Orange
Curinton, Arrie .....................................Columbia
Davis, Mrs. Nannie .................................... Duval
Davis, Phoeba ..................................... Leon
Dean, Marcus ......................................... Monroe
DeBose, Margie M. ...................................Alachua
Drew, Em m a .................................. .........Leon
Edwards, Marie ......................................... Leon
Edwavds, Mrs. Elizabeth ............................... Leon
Edwards, Leah .......................................... Leon
Edwards, Willie ............................Metcalf, Georgia
Forest, Estelle ...................................... Colum bia
Forest, Cecelia ..................................... Columbia
Frazier, Mrs: B. P. ................................... Leon
Frazier, J. H. ........................................Leon
Freeman, Mrs. A. L. ...................................Duval
Freeland, Catherine ..................................... Leon
Fuller, Annie ........................................... Leon
Frances. Mary ...................................... Hamilton
Gady, Donnie M. ..................................... Alachua





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 89
Gavin, Cora .............................................Leon
General, Blanche ..................................... Marion
Gilmore, Mrs. Salena ................................. Jackson
Goff, Beatrice ........................................... Leon
Gordon, Mrs. Annie ................................... Duval
Gordon, Mrs. Rosa ................................. Duval
Guilford, Nancy ...................................... Calhoun
Haile, Rosa Lee ................................ .. Alachua
Harvey, Suwannee ...................................Wakulla
Hawkins, Mrs. Rosa E ................................Orange
Hayes, Ruby ........................... ................ Leon,
Hicks, Bella ................................... Escambia
Hill, Carrie .............................................Leon
Hill, Gertrude ........................................... Leon
Hill, Pearl ....................................... Bradforr
Hill, Rosa .................................. Orange
Honges, Mrs. Mammie........................Duval
Holmes, Mrs. Mary ............................... Palm Beach
Houston, Mrs. S. B. .................................... Duval
Howard, Georgia ...................................... Duval
Howard, Mrs. R. M. ............... ..................Volusia
Howard, Oscar ...... ..................... Dade
Hudgins, Mrs. Mamie ................................Escambia
Hunters, Elizabeth ................................... Leon
Jackson, Amy ....... ................................... Leon
Jackson, Mrs. Earl ..................................... Duval
Jarkson, F. M. ...................................... Jacgson
Jacgson, Mrs. Rebecca ............................ Escambia
ames, Mrs. Janie ................................Duval
Johnson, Mrs. F. G. ............................. .......Leon
Johnson, Annie ...................................... Nassau
Joiner, Beulah ......................... ................Leon
Johnson, Mrs. Minnie S. ................................ Duval
Jones, Annie ...................................... Columbia
Jones, Fannie ........ ..................... .. Alachua
Jones, Gertrude ......................................... Lake
Jordan, Rebecca .....................................Escambia
Keeling, Eileen .................................... Escambia
Keller, Josie .......................................Bradford
King, W. A. ......................................... Jefferson
King, Mrs. Nannie .................................... Duval
Lang, Mrs. Teressa .................................... Monroe
Leaver, Lillie ......................................... Volusia
Lewis, Berles .......................................Columbia
Livingston, Mrs. Celestine ................................Leon
Love, Beatrice ...........................................Leon
Mause, Mrs. Hattie ...................................Pinellas
Melvin, Mrs. Ida ...................................... DeSoto
Martin, Mrs. Viola ..................................... Leon
Meacgum, Mrs. Rosa .................................... Duval
Miller, Eliza ..................................... Escambia
M ills, C. V. ................... ......................Alachua
Missouri, Theora ................................... St. Lucie
Mitchell, Maud .................................... Suwannee
Mitchell, Minnie ...................................... Duval





90 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Murray, Mrs. W. K ............................ ..... Leon
Murrell, Mrs. Lucy ....................................Orange
Muse, Mrs. Cornelius ...................................Duval
M cClary, Lucinda ........................................Leon
McCutcheon, Temperance ...............................Duval
McDuffy, Mrs. Bertha .................................Marion
M cKinney, Viola ........................................Leon
McMickens, Susie ............. ................. Putnam
McNeil, D. S. ........................................... Polk
Patterson, Mrs. Nancy ................................. Duval
Patterson, Mrs. Artie .......... ............... Orange
Perry, Aleatha ...................................... Alachua
Price, M rs. B. B. ........................................ Lake
Poe, I.nez ............................................. Lake
Pottsdamer, Mrs. Pinkey .................................Leon
Purcell, Mrs. Bettie ..................................... Polk
Quall, Mrs. Ruth ........................................ Dade
Rawls, H. E. ...................... .................. Alachua
Rhue, Mrs. L. E. ........................................ Duval
Rollins, Mrs. Emma .................... ................. Leon
Rollins, Frances .................... ................. Wakulla
Roberts, Mary ........................................... Leon
Robinson, Bessie ........................................ Leon
Robinson, Mrs. Elizabeth ............................ Duval
Ross, Mrs. Catherine .................................. Leon
Roux, Maude ........................................ Hamilton
Rutland, Rosa Lee .....................................Marion
Sally, Amelia .................................... Hillsborough
Saulsby, Mary .................................. Columbia
Scott, Hazel ..................................... Orange
Sharp, Mrs. Lula ................................ .......Lake
Simms, Carrie. ................................... Escambia
Simpson, Lillian ........................ Gadsden
Simpson, Mrs. Lillie .................................. Jackson
Smith, Mrs. Florence .................................Marion
Smith, Mrs. Ollie .......................................Duval
Snell, Frances ..................................... Volusia
Smith, Virginia ...................................... Volusia
Smith, Mrs. Lucy .................................... Gadsden
Speed, Nancy ........................................Alachua
Spencer, Roberta ........................................ Leon
Spencer, Lillian ......................................... Leon
Spikes, M attie ...........................................Levy
Stephens, Mrs. Pearl ...................................Orange
Stroughn, Mary .....................................Escambia
Sunday, Leola ...................................... Escambia
Sunday, Idella ..................................... Escambia
Taylor, Mrs. Jannie .................................. Nassau
Taylor, Mrs. Phoebe .......................... ......... Leon
Thomnas, .Daisy ........................................Orange
Thomas; Emily .................. ...................Putnam
Thomas, Gertrude ................................... Jackson
Thomas, Mrs. Irene .....................................Leon
Thompson, Bessie .......................................Duval
Thompson, Perlina ............................ .. Wakulla
\





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 91
Thompson, Essie Mae .................... ................ Leon
Thornton, E. T. ...................................... Volusia
Turnbull, Annie ...................................... Duval
Thompson, Ida ...................................... Wakulla
Thomas, Lola ....................................... Suwannee
Turner, Mrs. A. A. ......... ........................ Leon
Washington, Salena ................................. onroe
Watson, Mrs. Laira ................................. Escambia
Whitaker, Mrs. Mary .................................... Leon
White, Lillie .........................................Alachua
Whitem, D. E. ....................................... Alachua
Wiggins, Mrs. Lucinda ............................... Gadsden
Williams, Fannie .................... ................. Putnam
Williams, Mrs. Margaret .......................Due West, S. C.
Williams, Mrs. Victoria ................................Volusia
Williams, James ................................ Cairo, Georgia
Williams, Rosa .......................................... Leon
Williams, Mrs. Ella .................... ................Orange
Williams, A. W ...... .............................. Columbia
Williams, Mrs. Mattie ....................................Polk
Williams, Mrs. Lillie .................................. Sumpter
Williams, Elnora .......................................Duval
Wilson, Lottie ........................................... Leon
W hitfield, Nettie ................... ........ ...........Nassau
Winston, John ...................................... Leon
Wooden, Mrs. Ethel ................................... Orange
Woodberry, Mrs. Ethel ................................... Leon
Young, Julia ......................................... Leon










INDEX
Page
Admission to Mechanic Arts Department ................ 46, 47
Admission to High School .............................. 17
Admission to College .................................... 17
Advanced Standing ...................................... 18
Agricultural Courses .................................... 67-71
Agricultural Education .................................. 71
Agronomy ......... .... ...................... ........ 67
Algebra ................................................ 37
'Animal Husbandry...................................... 69, 70
Astronomy ............................................. 36
Athletics ............................................... 14
Attendance by Counties ................................. 82
Auto Mechanic Courses ........... .... ................ 48,49
Bacteriology ....................................... 69
Biology .............................................. 34, 35
Blacksmithing ........................................ 55
Bricklaying and Plastering .............................. 58
Board of Control ........................................ .
Board of Education ..................................... 6
Boarding Department ................................... 15
Bookkeeping ........................................... 59
Botany ........................................ 68, 69
Calendar ........................................ 5
Carpentry and Cabinet Making .......................... 54
Catalog of Students............................... 72-83, 88-91
Chemistry ............................................. 33, 34
Civics ................................................. 45
Costume Design ........................................ 66
Definition of U nit ....................................... 17
Drawing ............................................... 52
Dairying ............................................... 70
Description of Courses .................................. 33-77
Degrees, Diplomas, Certificates .......................... 47
Description of Trade Courses ............................ 54-5
Description of Degree Course in M. A .................... 51-53
Description of Commercial Course....................... 59-62
Description of Teacher Training Course in M. A.......... 62
Econom ics ............................................. 45
Education ............................................. 43
Engineering ............................................ 58
English ................. ............................... 38-40'
Ethics ................................................. 44
Electricity ....................... .. .................... 57
Expenses .............................................. 15
Faculty Committees..................................... 9, 10
General Information .................................... 11-18
General Statement Regarding Curriculum ................ 17-19
General Summary ........................... ........... 81
Genetics ................... ............................ 69





INDEX
Page
Geology ............................................... 36
Geography ........................................ 42
G eom etry ............................................ 38
History ................................................ 41,42
Home Economics Courses ............................... 63-67
History of Philosophy................................... 44
History, Location, Support .............................. 11
Horticulture ........................................... 68
Household Administration .............................. 65
Inter-Collegiate Debates ................................ 15
Latin .................................................. 40,41
Literary Societies ...................... ............... 13
M ajor W ork ......................... ................ 19
M managing Boards ....................................... 6
M annual Training ........................................ 63
Mathematics ...........................................36, 37
Mechanic Arts Courses ................................. 45-64
Military Organization ................................... 12
Millinery ............................................... 66
Modern Languages ..................................... 41
Nurse Training ...............................30,66
Officers of Instruction ............................... 7- 9
Opportunities to Reduce Expenses ....................... 16
Outline of Courses ..................................... 20-30
Painting ............................................... 55
Physics ............................................... 35,36
Plant Pathology ......................................... '69
Plant Production ........................................ 68
Plumbing .............................................. 57
Printing ............................................... 56
Prizes ................................... ........... 14
Psychology ........................... ................ 44
Regulations ............................. .............. 11
Religious Exercises ..................................... 14
Rem ittance ............................................ 13
Requirements for Graduation ............................ 18
Rhetorical Exercises .................................... 15
Rules Regarding Deficient Records ....................... 16,17
Sociology .......................................... 44
School of Music ........................................ 30-33
Shoe and Harness Making.............................. 58
Student Assistants ...................................... 10
Special Students ........................................ 19
Summer Faculty ........................................ 83
Summer Students .......................................88-91
Summer School Statement and Courses .................84-87
Tailoring .......................................... 56
T extiles ................................................ 65
Teacher Training in Mechanic Arts ...................... 50, 51
Trade Courses ......................................... 47,48
Trigonom etry ......................................... 38
T inning ............................................... 58
U uniform s .............................................. 13
W heelwriting ........................................ 54















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