• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Summer school faculty
 Statement of operation
 Date of examination
 Credit toward graduation
 Regulations about summer schoo...
 Special review classes
 College grades
 Reservation
 Primary methods specialist
 Experimental high school class...
 Meeting of classes
 Description of courses
 Application
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Summer School Bulletin 1927; Ninth Annual Session, June 13th to August 5th. Vol. 9. Series 2.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000111/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College Summer School Bulletin 1927; Ninth Annual Session, June 13th to August 5th. Vol. 9. Series 2.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1927
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000111
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2651

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Summer school faculty
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Statement of operation
        Page 3
    Date of examination
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Credit toward graduation
        Page 6
    Regulations about summer school
        Page 7
    Special review classes
        Page 8
        Page 9
    College grades
        Page 10
    Reservation
        Page 11
    Primary methods specialist
        Page 12
    Experimental high school classes
        Page 13
    Meeting of classes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Description of courses
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Application
        Page 37
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
~~~:Ki-~~~~~~~
Volume 9 MAY 1u. 1927 Series 2 '
j i FOR NEGROES
THE SUMM PCHOOL
BULL TI
19i
I 19A \1
'a.
NINTH ANNUAL SESSION
One Ses.si.in Eight Weeks
' JrJune 13th to August 5th S"
STATE AUTHORIZED AND SUPPORTED
3 Entered a: see.:rld-class matter August 24, 1912. nt Post Office
at Tallalhasee, Florida. uiider the Act of
IIt I TAuaust 24. 1912
,' 'r-.! rlir r-llr,..: *, rin..,r .





FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
For Negroes
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Supported by the STATE OF FLORIDA, Authorized by the
BOARD OF CONTROL
STATE BOARD OF COjNTROL : .':
Hon. P. K. Yonge, Chairman, Peslac6la. ; '
Hon. E. L. Wartmlan, Citra.
Hon. A. H. Blandilg, Tamil;. : pa..
Hon. V. B. D.avis, Perry; -: ;'
Hon. E. W. Lane. Jacksonville'. -
Hon. J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee. .,,-N'
- ::' I
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION -
Hou. .ohn W. martin. Chairman, Governor. ':
Hon. H. Clay Crawrford. Secretary .of State.
-Hon. W. S. Cawthon. Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction.
Hon. J. B. Johnsun. Attomney-G-eneral.
Hon. J. C. Luling, State Treasuree Treasurer. : ''
. .:' ".: '':!
FOLLOWING COURSES OFFERED BY DEPARTMENTS
DURING THE REGULAR SCHOOL YE.\R
Agricultural-Degrees, 4 years. High Sehool, College, 2 -
years and 1 years. '
Academlic-High School. College, 4 years. Degree hi Edu-
cation or Science.
Honie Econoinicis-Nornal, 2 year-. College, 1 years. High
School. "
Mechanic Arts-High Schocol, College, Special Certificate.
Nurse Training--3 years. -
Normal Traiuing-2 years, Primary, Elenlenlary. 2 years,
Coniimeriial or Business.
For further information write
J. R. E. LEE. President.
: .





SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY
J. R. E. Lee, A. B., A. M., LL. D., President.
R. O'Hara Lanier, A. B., Director, and Professor of Edu-
cation.
A. L. Kidd, A. B., History, Civics and Constitution.
H. M. Efferson, A. B., Mathematics.
G. M. Jones, M. S., Assistant in Mathematics and Vocational
Education.
Rebecca L. Bloodworth, A. B., Instructor in English and
Education.
E. M. Mance, B. S., Mathematics, Geography, Assistant in
Education.
Maurice Lee, A. B., English and Dramatics.
A. P. Turner, A. B., English, Argumentation, Public Speak-
ing, Chaplain and Religious Adviser.
Anna B. Sawyer, Physical Education.
Brunetta C. Hill, Primary Methods.
C. B. Nasby, Drawing and Practic'
E. C. Weare, Librarian, Library A athods anc Story Telling.
Bernice E. Chism, B. S., Science, Plysics and College Chem-
istry.
E. E. Bradford, B. S., High School ience.
F. E. James, A. B., Public School Mhsic.
E. E. Matthews, B. S., 5th and 6th Grades, Class Manage-
ment, Principal of the Training Scedl.
Marion Britton, Writing, 3rd and 4t s.
Amy Jackson, Critic Teacher, lsAnd 2nd Grads, and Kin-
dergarten Education. \ \
I. L. Coleman, Domestic Science. \
Ethel M. Griggs, B. S., Sewing and Mi inery.
Ora Vann, Handicraft.
- Agriculture, Rural E cation and Nature
.St,,iy.
Jno. W. Wray, B. S., M. S., Agronomy adBo:t
B. L. Perry, Farm Management.
C. H. Chapman, Dairy and Animal Husbandry.
M. S. Saunders, B. S., Manual Training.
N. S. McGuinn, Dean of Women, Adviser for Women.
Major C. J. A. Paddyfote, Dean of Men, Commandant and
Instructor of Military Science, Physical Education, Adviser for
Men.
F. A. Byrd, A. B., Psychology and History, Director of Ath-
letics.





2
A. C. Breckenridge, Secretary to President.
K. T. Freeland, Sec'y to Custodian and Business Manager.
C. Emily Frazier, Registrar.
E. E. Drakeford, Bookkeeper.
Iva G. Hill, Bookkeeper.
J. R. E. Lee, Jr., A. B., Business Manager and Custodian.
M. Ormond Jones, Matron.
L. H. Washington, Matron.
Letitia Reid, Manager of Cafeteria.
Sylvia Thomas, Dietician.
Arnold W. Lee, Bandmaster and Orchestration.
Dr. L. H. B. Foote, Medical Director.
N. B. Cooper, R. N., Superintendent of Nurses.
O. A. M. Foote, R. N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses
and Drug Clerk.
SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR
R registration ........................ .....................................June 11-13
C lasses B egin .............................. ................. ............. Ju n e 14
O opening A ssem bly ..........................................................June 15
Inter-City Tennis Match (Singles) ................................June 29
D o u b les ........................................................................Ju n e 3 0
Summer School Community Sing .....................................July 1
Summer School Picnic and Field Day ...............................July 4
Summer School Debate..................................July 9
Mid-Summer Examination and Last Date for Filing
Certificates for Extension........................................July 15-16
Practice School Play .........................................................July 16
Summ er School Dram a. ........................... ..................July 28
Summer School Exhibit and Know Your Campus
Day, Farewell Social Night..................................... August 4
Summer School Commencement, Friday, 10 A. M.....August 5
GENERAL INFORMATION
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the
College was established in 1887 as a State Normal School.
Under the principalship of Mr. T. D. Tucker, assisted by Mr. T.
V. Gibbs, it was opened at Tallahassee, October 5, 1887, with
an attendance of 15 students. In 1905 it passed from the
direct management of the State Board of Education to the
management of the Board of Control as one of the institutions
of higher learning. In 1909 its name was changed to that of
the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes
by the Legislature. It is supported mainly by State and Fed-
eral appropriation.





3
STATEMENT OF OPERATION
The summer school for teachers at Florida A. & M. College
is operated and under the direction of the Department of Edu-
cation of the State of Florida providing for the maintenance
and support of the Summer School.
STATE SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS
"That there is hereby created and established in this State
three Summer Schools to be located as follows: One in con-
nection with the University of Florida, at Gainesville; one in
connection with the Florida State College for Women, at Talla-
hassee; and one in connection with the Agricultural and Me-
chanical College for Negros, at Tallahassee.
That the Summer Schools created herein shall be in charge
of the State Board of Control, whose duty it shall be to hold
sessions of one or more of them each summer; the said sessions
to begin not later than June 28th and to continue for a period
of not more than ten weeks.
The Summer Schools hereby created shall be open to all
students who desire to graduate, and to undergraduates for
professional or vocational work of any character, and no
teacher shall be employed to teach therein who is not a
specialist and whose educational qualifications have not
thoroughly equipped him or her for high-grade work.
All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall be of
such character as to entitle the students doing the same to
collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore, and may be
applied towards making a degree."
EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES
All persons possessing any type of Florida Certificate may
have the same extended by attendance at the regular Summer
Session and making not less than "C's" in the major sub-
jects including some phase of English and some phase of
Teacher Training or Education.
EXPENSES
Registration fee is $5.00. Board and room, $6.00 per week.
When the eight weeks expenses are paid in advance, $43.00.
Books will cost about $4.00, which may be purchased at the
local college book store.





4
RULES AND REGULATIONS CONCERNING STATE CER-
TIFICATES are prepared by the State Department of Educa-
tion and are herewith presented for information:
"Every one who teachers in Florida must hold a valid
Florida certificate covering at least the subjects which he or
she teachers. Certificates issued in other States cannot be
transferred to Florida.
Schools usually open about September 1, and term runs
eight (8) to nine (9) months in high schools, while some
smaller schools and rural districts have shorter terms. Sala-
ries and length of term are fixed by County School Boards,
and therefore, vary in different counties.
DATE OF EXAMINATION
Three uniform examinations are held each year in each
county seat in the State, beginning on the first Thursdays of
February and June and on the third Thursday of August. We
issue the following grades of certificates upon examination;
Primary, Third Grade, Second Grade, First Grade, Profes-
sional and Special.
Subjects required for a Primary Certificate are Reading,
Arithmetic, English Grammar, Composition, Geography and
United States History, including the Constitution of the United
States, Nature Study, Drawing, Manual Arts, School Singing
and the elements of Psychology. The average grade required
for this certificate is 80, minimum 60. A Primary Certificate
is valid for teaching only the first, second and third grades
of a regular graded school of not less than four teachers. Life
of certificate is four years. Examination fee, $2.00.
The subjects for a Third Grade Certificate are Orthography,
Reading, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Composition, Geog-
raphy, United States History, including the Constitution of
U. S., Physiology, and Theory and Practice of Teaching. Aver-
age grade required, 70, minimum, 50; valid for one year.
Examination fee, $1.00.
Subjects for a Second Grade are those required for a Third,
and also Agriculture, Civil Government and Algebra to Quad-
ratics; the average grade required is 80, the minimum, 60. A
Third or Second Grade Certificate is valid for teaching in the
first eight grades only. Life of certificate, three years. Exam-
ination fee, $1.50.
The subjects included in a First Grade are those required for
a Second Grade, also Biology, Psychology, General History,
Rhetoric and Algebra quadraticss and beyond); average grade





5
required, 85, minimum, 60; valid for five years and for teach-
ing in the first ten grades. Examination fee, $2.00.
Subjects required for a Professional Certificate are those
included in a First Grade and also English Literature, Plane
Geometry, a Foreign Language, History and Principles of Edu-
cation, School Administration, and the School Laws of Florida.
Average grade required, 85, minimum, 60. This certificate is
valid for teaching in all grades of the high school only those
subjects named therein. Applicants must give satisfactory
evidence of having completed four years of high school work
unless they have held a Florida certificate prior to July 1, 1924.
Life of certificate, five years. Examination fee, $2.00.
Special certificates are issued upon examination in groups
of subjects as follows:
1. Mathematics: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and Trig-
onometry;
2. English: Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, English
and American Literature;
3. Science: Agriculture, Physics or Chemistry, Biology;
4. Foreign Languages: Latin, German, Greek, French,
Spanish (any two);
5. History: American, including the Constitution of the
United States, General, English and Geography;
6. Bookkeeping: Bookkeeping, Commercial Law, Commer-
cial Arithmetic;
7. Stenography: Shorthand, Typewrting, English Grammar;
8. Music: Harmony, Public School Music;
10. Home Economics: Domestic Science, Domestic Art.
Special Certificates are good for teaching in all grades of
the high school only those subjects covered by the certificate.
Life of certificate, five years.
An applicant for Special Certificate must give satisfactory
evidence of graduation from a four-year high school or its
equivalent, and of the completion of two years of additional
work in the subjects to be included in the Special Certificate,
unless the applicant held a Florida certificate prior to July 1,
1924. Examination fee, $2.00.
Examination questions are not based upon any particular
texts.





6
Principals of high schools must hold either a Graduate State
or a Professional Certificate.
Graduate State Certificates are issued upon record of grad-
uation from standard Universities, Colleges and Normal
Schools. A blank application for a certificate upon diploma
will be sent you upon request. These certificates are based
on the following law:
"Any regular graduate of a standard University, College or
Normal School, requiring a four year course for graduation,
or of a standard Normal School requiring a two-year course
for graduation, desiring a teacher's certificate, shall file an
application on the form prescribed by the State Superintendent
of Public Instruction, which form shall contain, with other
matter, a complete transcript of the applicant's college record
showing the branches pursued and completed and the grades
on the same. The transcript shall show that the applicant
devoted at least three-twentieths of his time to the study of
Psychology and Education; provided, that in lieu of such time
devoted to these subjects a teaching experience of twenty-four
months may be accepted. The certificate issued shall authorize
the applicant to teach all subjects upon which he specialized
in his College or Normal course, *provided that a certificate
issued to a regular graduate of a Normal School requiring a
two-year course for graduation shall not be valid for teach-
ing above the tenth grade in a high school. To an applicant
satisfying these requirements and filing satisfactory testi-
monials as to health and moral character, with a fee of three
($3.00) dollars, a Graduate State Certificate shall be issued,
valid for five years from the date of issue."
* The completion of at least six session hours in the College
is required in each subject or department.
*All applicants for Florida Certificates will be required to
pass a satisfactory examination on the Constitution of the
United States before the certificate can be issued.
CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATION
Any student having finished a regular 12 grade standard
high school course attending the Florida A. & M. College Sum-
mer School for six (6) consecutive summers, or its equivalent,
having followed the course of study laid down by the College
and Normal Departments, passing a standard Normal and Col-
lege examination in the fundamental subjects, pursuing the
study of the Florida School Laws, Civics and Constitution of
the U. S., is entitled to become a candidate for graduation from
iL





7
the Normal Department. Twelve (12) summers are required
for graduation from College with B. S., or A. B. degree. This
time may be shortened by Extension and Correspondence work,
joining any Extension class making arrangement for credit.
No grade of less than "C" is accepted, or its equivalent, 70 to
79.
REGULATIONS ABOUT SUMMER SCHOOL
Students entering two (2) weeks late will lose one-third of
their grade unless previous arrangement has been made cover-
ing a specific amount of work which must be done during
absence and after entering.
Teachers will be expected to report to all classes promptly
and regularly. Six absentees forfeit right of Extension and
credit in any one subject. Three tardies count as one absentee.
Regular attendance at daily assembly, 11 to 12 A. M., College
chapel. Six (6) absentees from this assembly may cause the
loss of the right to Extension and full credit.
CREDIT-COLLEGE AND NORMAL
Any course taken five (5) times per week with at least
fifteen (15) conferences through a period of eight (8) weeks
will carry with it, providing a grade of "C" is made, three
semester hours credit (3). No person will be allowed credit
for any Science course which is not accompanied by manual,
note book and double periods for laboratory work. Double
periods, that is two hours (2) will be required in the follow-
ings subjects.
All phases of Domestic Science, Domestic Art, Manual Train-
ing for Teachers, Drawing, Demonstration and Observation in
Primary Methods and Elementary Education, Handicrafts,
School Gardening and Library Methods.
SIZE OF CLASSES
Courses will not be operated and offered for classes of less
than six (6). They will be limited to thirty (30).
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT
Any high school course offered and operated eight (8)
weeks, five times a week with fifteen (15) specific two-hour
library assignments or conferences under group leadership, will





8
carry with it one-half unit high school credit. No more than
four (4) of these courses may be taken during any one session.
SPECIAL REVIEW CLASSES
In cases where teachers come merely to prepare for the State
Teacher's Examination special classes will be operated for
groups of ten or more to cover this specific work.
SUMMER I
1. English VI. Rhetoric, Composition.
2. Public School Music 1.
3. Plays and Games, Physical Education 1.
4. Education 1.
Electives: Drawing, Primary Methods, Home Economics,
Handicrafts, Manual Arts and Agriculture.
SUMMER II
1. Education II.
2. English-Word Study or English VI-B continued, provid-
ing a grade of B was not made. Spelling, Vocabulary
Building for Teachers.
3. Public School Music 2.
4. Manual Training for Teachers.
Electives: Art and Drawing, Home Economics, Handi-
crafts, Manual Training, Primary Methods.
SUMMER III.
1. Education III.
2. English Literature for Teachers.
3. Review Geography.
4. Nature Study for Teachers, Elementary Agricultural School
Garden Work.
Electives: Advanced U. S. History, H. E. Physical Educa-
tion, Dairying, Handicrafts, Millinery.





9
SUMMER IV
1. Health Education-Physiology and Hygiene.
2. Methods in Geography and Projects.
3. Review Grammar.
4. Advanced American History and Civics.
5. Writing Methods.
6. Education IV.
Electives as above, and Home Nursing.
SUMMER V
1. Oral and Silent Reading. Education F-Methods.
2. Review Methods in Arithmetic.
3. Handicrafts and Manual Art.
4. Observation-Practice Teaching.
5. Education V.
Electives: Practical Art II and III, Home Economics,
Dressmaking, Education V-A and a combination English
and American Literature for Teachers.
General Science for Teachers, Primary Methods.
SUMMER VI
1. Psychology-General or Child.
2. Observation and Practice Teaching.
3. Lesson Planning, Systematic Reviews.
4. Ethics, Moral and Religious Education.
5. Story Telling and Musical Appreciation.
6. Applied Industries.
7. Citizenship, School Law and Study of Constitution.
8. Education V.
Electives: Art II and IV.
Education, Millinery, Home Economics, Advanced Agricul-
ture, Handicrafts and other subjects.





10
General Electives in College Mathematics, Science, Lan-
guage, English History and Geography and Civics group may
be taken so as to cause the person, providing six-session hours
are taken in any one group, to get special graduate state men-
tion of credit on certificate to teach the major through the
10th grade in Junior High School.
The above and included outlines are so arranged in order that
teachers may finish the Normal Department within six summers
of eight (8) weeks each or its equivalent of four (4) winters
of Extension and Correspondence work and four (4) summers
of eight (8) weeks each.
All of this depends upon presentation of High School
Diploma from an accredited twelve (12) grade high school
along with credentials properly signed from school principal
or county superintendent.
COLLEGE GRADES
Qualified persons may register for college work, but no per-
son after 1928, will be graduated from the College Depart-
ment who does not spend one year of eight (8) or nine (9)
months in residence at the institution exclusive of summer
work. The remainder of the work may be done by Extension
and Correspondence. Persons finishing from the two (2)
above courses may secure Graduate State Certificate, good
for five (5) years after passing an examination in the Con-
stitution of the United States.
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT
Persons may be allowed to finish from the High School when
they have finished sixteen (16) units of high school work; four
(4) of these units may be in Education and Teacher Training
providing the person has had at least four (4) years of teach-
ing experience.
SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL
In order that the Theory in Primary Methods, Elementary
Education and High School Education might be correlated with
actual observation and demonstration lessons, a practical school
with critic school is operated during the summer session, where
demonstration lessons, special exhibits and applications of
Educational Theory are carried out daily during the summer
session.





11
RESERVATION
Teachers desiring reservation should send in their Regis-
tration Fee of five dollars ($5.00) with application blanks
properly filled out.
STUDENT HEALTH
Two members of the Department of Physical Education;
one (1) resident physician; two (2) graduate nurses have been
retained for the summer session to look after the health of the
teachers. It is highly desirable that each teacher avail him-
self or herself of the opportunity to take some form of Physi-
cal Education: Tennis, Volley Ball, Medicine Ball and Swim-
ing are some of the sports in which teachers may engage.
Free clinic for examination and medical advice will be given
at the hospital once every week. Wednesday's from 10:00 to
12:00. All persons should avail themselves of the opportunity
to have a physical examination and get advice at this time.
RELIGIOUS ATMOSPHERE
Prayers once a day. Mid-day assembly. Sunday School
Teacher Training Class. Mid-week prayer meeting. Sunday
preaching service. The school is non-denominational but op-
portunity is afforded for the person to enjoy a religious at-
mosphere.
COURSES TO BE OFFERED
A detailed explanation of courses may be found in other
parts of this bulletin, but the courses to be offered cover the
following general fields: Agriculture, Art, Civics, Continued
:tr i:.:i .!l in Education, Ethics, English, French, Geography,
History, Home Economics, Handicrafts, Library Methods,
Latin, Mathematics, Music (public school and instrumental),
Manual Training, Observation and Theory, Primary Methods,
Practice Teaching, Physical Education, Science, Sociology and
Social Service, Short Courses for Home Demonstration Agents
and Farm, Home Nursing and Wood-turning.
Every person is required to take some phase of English and
one out of the following eight (8):
Physical Education.
Handicraft.
Domestic Arts.





12
School Gardening.
Agriculture.
Manual Training for Teachers.
Home Economic or Vocational Education.
PRIMARY METHODS SPECIALIST
A special course in Primary Methods handled by a specialist
is offered for the benefit of those desiring special work in par-
ticular branches. A general course is offered of general value
to the rural teacher of a one-room school, a first course and for
principals and general elementary teachers.
REDUCED RAILROAD RATES
Reduced railroad rates have been granted from points in
Florida at one and one-half fare for the round trip. Those
who wish to take advantage of these rates must secure a certifi-
cate which will be furnished by the school. These certificates
can be secured on application to the President's office. Tickets
on sale June 9-15, final return limit, August 12.
EARLY REGISTRATION BY MAIL
It is advised that as many as possible register by mail, re-
serve rooms and pick out courses in advance.
BUILDINGS
The new girls' dormitory and three others, namely: Tucker,
Clark Halls and Melvin Lodge, are open for Summer School
students. Men's Union for men.
THE LIBRARY
The Library which contains about 18,000 volumes, exclusive
of Government documents, files of magazines, daily news-
papers, current magazines, encyclopedias and year books. It
furnishes a splendid opportunity for teachers to do simple re-
search work and gather much material for use in communities
where they do not have library facilities. The Library will be
open as follows: 7:30-11:00 A. M., 1:30-5:30 and 6:30-10:00
P. M., daily except Saturday and Sunday. Saturday hours,
9:00-11:00 A. M., 2:00-5:00 and 8:00-10:00 P. M. Sunday
hours, 2:30-5:30 and 7:00-10:00 P. M.





13
EXPERIMENTAL HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES
There are also conducted special observation classes in high
school subjects for teachers of high school subjects. Special
courses for Principals, Supervisors and School Trustees cover-
ing School Administration, School Law, Primary Methods for
Principals and Supervisors, School Organization and Manage-
ment.
SPECIAL FEATURES
Moving pictures every Saturday night. Special educational
lectures by authorities in the field of education. Band con-
certs, carnivals and picnics.
DEMONSTRATION CLASSES
The practice school of six (6) grades offers splendid oppor-
tunity for observation and demonstration teaching. Critic
teachers handle the grades under direction of a primary
specialist.
GENERAL INFORMATION
CONFERENCES
Conferences after regular school hours are required, and
constitute a most important part of the work.
MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM NUMBER OF CLASSES
No person will be allowed to take less than two content or
prifet<-iolral courses and not more than four content or profes-
sional courses. Credits will not be given under the above unless
special permission is granted.
TEXT BOOKS
Notebooks, class material. Text should be provided. All
persons are required to get the necessary material for classes,
whether in art, drawing, gymnasium costume, scientific instru-
ments or vocational education.





14
MEETING OF CLASSES
Classes will meet daily five times per week unless otherwise
stated. The Science, Home Economics, Industrial Art, School
Gardening and Dairying classes will meet for double periods,
two hours in length; all other classes, one hour in length.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE
There will be no changes in the schedule after three days of
the date of registration. Record in office must be changed
officially by the director of the summer school session. Posi-
tively no credit will be given for unassigned classes. Where
course is dropped without giving proper notice, a grade of "F"
is recorded; where course is taken without proper assignment,
the grade of "I" or incomplete is recorded.
WHAT TO BRING
Teachers should bring their own sheets, at least four in
number; pillow cases, at least three in number; bed covers;
spreads; one blanket or quilt; one gym costume; bloomers and
middies; soft bottom shoes, rubber or composition soles and
little furnishing for the room, such as scarfs, curtains and rugs.
Laundry facilities are provided at the institution where teachers
can do their own laundry if they desire.
TEACHERS WITH CHILDREN
Teachers having children are advised that they must make
special arrangement for the handling of the children before
coming. It is advised that teachers stay in the city or use sev-
eral vacant cottages which the school has for disposal. How-
ever, if a letter is written, special information can be given
concerning the same. No person is advised to come with
children without giving proper notice. Full board is charged
for children over five years old, $6.00 per week.
NOTE EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES NOTE
Teachers are advised to bring all certificates which are to be
extended, diplomas, credit blanks, and any information which
might help with the proper classification of the summer school
student.
PLEASE BRING YOUR CERTIFICATES AND CREDEN-
TIALS WITH YOU.





15
MUSIC
VIOLIN INSTRUCTION
Violin instruction may be secured at a very normal rate. It
is highly desirable that as many teachers as possible take ad-
vantage of this special instruction under a master teacher.
BAND INSTRUMENTS
Instruction in band instruments, saxophone, cornet and other
instruments may be had upon special request.
BAND CONCERTS
All teachers who have a little knowledge of reading music
are asked to bring their instruments with them and become a
part of the College Band and Orchestra. Concerts are given
by this group three times a week-Tuesday, Thursday and
Sunday evenings. This is a special part of the entertainment
for teachers.
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC
Teachers desiring to take piano lessons may do so by special
arrangements and payment of small fee.
SPECIAL BUSINESS CLASSES
Teachers desiring First and Second courses in Stenography
or Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping, Business Administra-
tion, Commercial Law and Accounting may have classes of 10
or more. They have the right to pay extra fee and secure the
same courses upon request.
BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT FOR TEACHERS
County Superintendents and presidents of many private
schools very often apply to the State Superintendent for teach-
ers; for this reason the school, through its Extension Division,
operates an employment division, and all teachers and graduates
of the institution may secure employment through this means.
No fee is charged. Teachers desiring to change employment
are asked to make application early upon entering the summer
school or the first part of June, so that proper credentials may
be provided.





16
ADDITIONAL RECREATION
There are many lakes in the vicinity of Tallahassee and we
are only 26 miles from the Gulf. Swimming instructors are
furnished through the Department of Physical Education.
GEOGRAPHICAL TRIPS
Tallahassee is located in the very historical part of Florida.
Besides being the Capitol, it is also near the dividing line of
Georgia and Florida, where there is a change in the strata of
the rock, the climate, the flora, the vegetation and plant life,
giving a chance for trips to sections of interest.
REQUIRED SEMI-ELECTIVES FOR EXTENSION OF
CERTIFICATES
Each person is required to take some phase of Education,
Psychology or Methods and a course in English. The following
semi-electives are highly desirable:
Physical Education.
Handicraft.
Practical Arts.
Home Economics.
Manual Training for Teachers.
CITY AND COUNTY CLUBS
Teachers coming from certain centers are asked to reorganize
these clubs and elect chairmen who will make arrangements for
special programs, cars and entertainments. The following clubs
by counties and cities were organized last summer.
ORGANIZED LAST SUMMER
Tampa-Hillsborough Club-Mr. A. J. Major.
Jacksonville-Du-ral Club-Miss Lillie Dawkins.
Miami-Dade Club-Miss Leila Roberts.
Marianna-Jackson Club-Mr. R. T. Gilmore.
Ocala-Marion Club-Miss Estelle Bellamy.
St. Petersburg-Pinellas Club-Mrs. F. A. Ponder.
Key Wesf-Monroe Club-Miss Costella Hannibal.
West Palm Beach-Palm Beach Club-Mrs. Lula B. Weston.
Orlando-Orange Club-Mrs. Leola Nixon.





17
Gainesville-Alachua Club-Mrs. A. Quinn Jones.
Tallahassee-Leon Club-Mrs. C. Livingstone.
Clearwater-Pinellas Club-Miss Hazel Williams.
Quincy-Gadsden Club-Mrs. Lucy Smith.
Lake City-Columbia Club-Miss Jones.
Fort Pierce-St. Lucie Club-Mr. Jas. Espy.
New Smyrna-Volusia Club-Miss Hortense Wong.
St. Augustine-St. Johns Club-Miss Nettie Holloway.
Pensacola-Mrs. Alice Williams.
Palatka-Miss Effie Sutton.
BELIEVERS IN THE FAMCEE SUMMER SCHOOL, 1927.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
AGRICULTURE
This will be a general course in Agriculture covering the
elements of Agriculture.
Text: Davis, Productive Farming.
Credit: One-half unit, High School.
Room 2, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Perry.
AGRONOMY
This is a simple study of field crops.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 1, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Wray.
HORTICULTURE
High School and College courses in Gardening and simple
planning.
Text:
Credit: One-half unit in High School; 3 semester hours in
College.
Room 2, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Perry.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
A special course in the raising of poultry. Special attention
i~L ~will be given to practical exercises in the beginning of small
poultry establishments.





18
Text:
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 1, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Brown.
DAIRY HUSBANDRY
A simple course involving the care of cows, milk, butter and
ice-cream making.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 8, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Chapman.
ASTRONOMY
This course will be offered for those desiring it. It gives
special attention to the use of the telescope and the study of
the heavens.
Text: Moulton, Introduction to the Study of Astronomy.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Efferson.
FARM MANAGEMENT
A practical course in the management of farms.
Text:
Credit: One-half unit High School.
Room 3, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Perry.
SCHOOL GARDENING
A special course in planning the gardens for school classes,
especially designed for teachers. Normal and College credits
three semester hours. This course is to be combined with
nature study. The State course of study in nature will be used.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 1, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Brown.
ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATING
This course covers the principles of argumentation, brief-
making and debating.
Text: Foster's Principles of Argumentation.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room, Library. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Byrd.





19
PRIMARY ART
This will cover the organization of materials for use in the
teaching of art in the first three grades.
Text:
Credit:
Room 12, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Nasby.
INTERMEDIATE ART
This will cover the organization of material to be used in
the grades 4-7.
Text:
Credit:
Room 12, Science Hall. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Nasby.
ADVANCED ART
This will cover clay modeling, applied design and stenciling.
(1) Free hand drawing. A special course will be offered in
free hand drawing for a class of ten or more.
Text:
Credit:
Room 12, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Nasby.
BACTERIOLOGY
Prerequisite: General Biology. It is primarily for Home
Economics, Agricultural and Pre-Medical Students.
Text: Buchanan.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 1, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 7:30. Instructor:
BOTANY
An advanced course in the study of plants, with special atten-
tion to the use of slides.
Text: Ganong.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 2, Agri. Bldg. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Wray.
HIGH SCHOOL BOTANY
This course is offered upon request. Elementary study of
plants.
Text:
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 2, Agri. Bldg. Hour, Instructor: Wray.





20
HIGH SCHOOL BIOLOGY
State adopted text.
Text: Gruenberg.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 7, Science Hall. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Bradford.
GENERAL BIOLOGY
An introductory course for College students.
Text: Burlingame, Heath, Martin and Pierce.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 7, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Bradford.
COMPARATIVE MAMMALIAN ANATOMY
Prerequisite: General Biology, covering special study of the
cat.
Text: Davison's Mammalian Anatomy.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 8, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Chism.
CIVICS-CONSTITUTION
Advanced Civics and Constitution, covering elementary study
of Government. General purpose of which is to prepare teach-
ers to take the State Examination on the Constitution.
Text: Young's The New American Government. South-
worth-Common Sense of the Constitution.
Credit: 3 semester hours, College.
Room 4, Science Hall. Hours, 9:30, 3:30. Instructor: Kidd.
COMMERCIAL
Special Commercial and Business courses will be given upon
request of class of seven or more, but a special fee will be
charged for the same.
Business English.
Typewriting.
Bookkeeping.
First and second years in Shorthand.
Elementary Business English.
Accounting.
Text:
Credit:
Room 9. Hour, Instructor: To be assigned.





21
HIGH SCHOOL CIVICS
A required course of study.
Text: Magruder's American Government, 1925 edition.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 4, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Kidd.
FLORIDA CIVICS AND CONSTITUTION COMBINED WITH
FLORIDA LAW
A special study of the Florida Laws and Constitution along
with School Laws of 1926.
Text: Gray's Civil Government of Florida.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 4, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Kidd.
COMMERCIAL LAW
This will be a special course in the study of Business Law
and its application. It will be offered upon special request of
ten or more and arrangement of fee.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
A-First Semester Course:
Text: Newell's College Chemistry.
Credit: 4 semester hours.
Room 8, Science Hall. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Chism.
B-Second Semester Course:
Text:
Credit: 4 semester hours.
Room 7, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Chism.
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
A-First Semester:
Text: Remsen and Ornndorff and Manual.
Credit:
Room 8, Science Hall. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Chism.
B-Second Semester.
Text:
Credit:
Room: Hour Instructor:





22
HIGH SCHOOL CHEMISTRY
A-First Semester:
Text: Black-Conant.
Credit:
Manual: Black Laboratory Experiments in Chemistry.
Room 5, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Bradford.
B-Second Semester:
Text:
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
EDUCATION I
Introduction to the study and principles of education. A
first course in Education designed especially for those who
desire a general review, in first principles and history, and for
those who have had no previous instruction in Education.
Texts: Frasier-Armentrout.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Cubberley-Introduction to the Study of Education.
Judd-Introduction to the Scientific Study of Education.
Room 1, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Lanier.
EDUCATION II
Problem Study, Technique and Class-room Management.
Text: Stark's Every Teacher's Problem.
Supplementary-Bagley's Class-room Management.
Sears-Class-room Management and Control.
Betts-Class-room Management.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Bennett-School Efficiency.
Room 10, Science Hall. Hour, 7:30. Instructor:
EDUCATION III
Methods of Teaching Elementary School Subjects.
Texts: Holley, Stormzand and Charters.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 10, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor:
EDUCATION IV
Principles of Secondary Education and Methods of Teach-
ing in High School.
Texts: Inglis-Principles of Secondary Education.





23
Credits: 3 semester hours.
Clement-Principles of Secondary Education.
Morrison-Principles of Secondary Education.
Room 10, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor:
EDUCATION V
Special High School Methods: Advance course in Methods
and Practice Teaching under supervision.
Texts: Douglas-Methods. Parker-Methods.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
EDUCATION VI
Principles of Junior High School Education coupled with
Public School Administration and Supervision.
Text: Cubberley-Public School Administration.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room, Library. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Lanier.
EDUCATION VII
Rural Education and Economics: A special course in Rural
Education for Jeannes Workers and County Supervisors and
Rural School Teachers.
Text: Pittman, The Rural School.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
ENGLISH I
Grammar and Composition rapid review course, preparatory
to the taking of an examination for State Certificate.
Text: Brooks English Composition, Book 1.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room6, Science Hall. Hour, 7:30. Instructor: Turner.
ENGLISH II
Advanced High School Composition with specific attention to
Letter Writing.
Text: Brooks English Composition, Book 2.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 6, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Turner.





24
ENGLISH III
American Literature and Readings.
A-First Semester Work. B-Second Semester Work.
Text: Metcalf-History of American Literature and Readings
in American Literature. Three classics will be read.
Text:
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 1, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Lee.
ENGLISH IV
English Literature and Readings.
A-First semester. Sec. 1.
Text: Metcalf's English Literature; Metcalf's Readings in
English Literature.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 1, Science Hall. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Lee.
B-Second semester. Sec. 2:
Text: Metcalf's English Literature; Metcalf's Reading in
English Literature.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
ENGLISH V
College composition, daily. Themes required, one theme
every day.
A-First semester:
Text: Royster Thompson, Practice Sheets.
Credit:
Room 1, Science Hall. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Lee.
B-Second semester. Con. of A:
Text: Rhetoric by Slater.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
ENGLISH VI
Review Grammar for Teachers.
Text: Curme's College Grammar.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor





25
ENGLISH VII
English Literature, Chaucer to Kipling. Special class.
Text: Cunliffe-Pryor.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 1, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Lee.
ENGLISH VIII
American Literature for College Students and Teachers.
History, Biography, Literature and writings of the New
England group from Hawthorne to Howells.
Text: Anthology of American Poetry, Boynton.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 10, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Lee.
MODERN LANGUAGE
Elementary French. Rapid review course for beginners and
for those having some knowledge of the subject.
Text: Fraser-Squair.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 10, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor:
ENGLISH IX
EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING
The art of public speaking. A special course for teachers
in the elements of public speaking and elocution.
Text: Phillips-Effective Public Speaking.
Credits: 3 semester hours.
Room 6, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Turner.
ETHICS
For College and Normal Teachers. A special course in Re-
ligious Education and Character Training for Teachers.
Text: Durant-Drake, Problems of Conduct.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 6, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Turner.
LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE
Course ( ) The Literature of the Old Testament.
Text: Moore.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:





26
GEOGRAPHY
Special review for examination.
Credit: High School, one-half unit.
Texts: Frye's Higher Geography; Dryer's High School
Geography.
Room 4, Junior High. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Matthews.
ADVANCED GEOGRAPHY AND METHODS
A special course giving attention to principles of Geography
and Methods.
Texts: Atwood Higher Geography.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Junior High. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Matthews.
HUMAN AND ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Principles of Human and Economic Geography with special
attention to industrial projects to be used in the elementary
schools.
Text: Jones-Whittlesey.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
HOME ECONOMICS
1.-Foods: Elementary. Advanced.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 7:30. Instructor: Coleman.
2.-Dietetics.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Coleman.
3.-Elementary Clothing.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Coleman.
4.-Plain Sewrig.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Griggs.
5.-Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Griggs.





27
6.-Millinery.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Griggs.
7.-Methods in Home Economics.
Text: Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
8.-Handicrafts: Beginners. Advanced.
Text: Credit:
Room, H. E. Hours, 9:30-1:30, 3:30-5:30. Instructor:
Vann.
AMERICAN HISTORY
Review for examination and high school.
Text: Stephenson's American History.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 9, Science Hall. Hour, 1:30. Instructor: Byrd.
ADVANCED AMERICAN HISTORY AND METHODS
Text: Hart, Essentials of American History; Johnson, Teach-
ing of History; Tryon, Method of Teaching History in Junior
and Senior High Schools.
Note: History of Florida upon request.
Text: State adopted text.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
EUROPEAN HISTORY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS,
Text: Vol. II, Hays.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 9, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Byrd.
NEGRO HISTORY
A required course for all of those finishing the regular
Normal Course; covering African background, slavery, eman-
cipation, reconstruction and present day facts about the negro.
Text: Woodson, The Negro in American History.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:





28
LIBRARY METHODS
Course "A"-
Organization of Elementary and High School Libraries. Be-
ginner's course in classification, organization, cataloging and
indexing.
Text: Dana's Library Primer.
Credit:
A study of Elementary and High School Bulletins. State re-
quirements for libraries.
Room, Library. Hour, 4:30. Instructor, Weare.
MANUAL TRAINING
A special course for teachers, including the making of
erasers, pointers, flower boxes and the technique of general re-
pairs around school.
Text: Credit:
Room, Mechanic Arts Building. Hours, 9:30-3:30. In-
structor: Saunders.
INDUSTRIAL ART
A special course in Handwork, Seat Work and Industrial
projects suitable for use in the elementary grades.
Text: Bonser and Mossman.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room, Mechanic Arts Building. Hour, 1:30. Instructor:
Saunders.
MUSIC
A. Primary, B. Intermediate, C. Sight singing, dictation and
ear training.
This is a special course for teachers in public school music,
covering both theory and practice.
Text: Progressive Music Series.
Credit: Two semester hours for each course.
Room 11. Hours, 7:30-9:30, 2:30-3:30, 10:30. Instructor:
James.
A-P. S. Music I.
B-P. S. Music II.
C-P. S. Music III.
Chorus group.





29
MATHEMATICS
Algebra I:
A. This is a first course in the study of Algebra and equiva-
lent to the first semester's work in Algebra and General Mathe-
matics, required of all the students in the third year Junior
High School.
B. A continuation of the above and beyond to quadratics.
Text: Wells-Hart; Shorling-Clark.
Credit: One-half unit each.
Room 3, Science Hall. Hour, 7:30-9:30. Instructor: Mance.
Algebra II:
A. This is a continuation of Algebra 1. Quadratics and be-
yond. The pre-requisite is Algebra 1.
B. For persons who desire special review in quadratics and
beyond.
Text: Wells-Hart, Algebra.
Credit: One-half unit each.
Room 2, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Mance.
College Algebra:
The regular course in College Algebra involving graphs, per-
mutations, probability and chance, and the adaptation of
Algebra to business charts, such as annuities.
Text: Siceloff-Smith.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 5, Science Hall. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Efferson.
Geometry: Plane.
Text: Wentworth-Smith.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 3, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Mance.
Geometry: Solid.
Text: Wentworth-Smith.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room 9, Science Hall. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Jones.
Trigonometry: Plane.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
Trigonometry: Plane and Spherical.
Text: Wentworth-Smith.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 5, Science Hall. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Efferson.





30
Arithmetic:
General and rapid review course preparatory to examination.
Text: Hamilton's Essentials.
Credit: One-half unit.
Arithmetic: Advanced with Methods.
This is a Normal course where types and projects are used
and special attention is given to method.
Text: Stone-Mills, Higher Arithmetic.
Newcombe's Methods of Teaching Arithmetic.
Credit:
Room 3, Science Hall. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Efferson.
Arithmetic: Primary.
Projects and presentation of Primary Arithmetic in the first
three grades.
Texts: How to Teach Primary Numbers, Stone.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Science Hall. Hours, 8:30-3:30. Instructors:
Efferson and Mance.
Analysis Mathematical.
A combination of higher mathematics especially designed for
Mechanic Arts Students and those who will not have a chance
to take all of the other courses in higher mathematics.
Text: Griffin.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 2, Science Hall. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Jones.
Descriptive Geometry.
Text: Kennison Bradley.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 9, Science Hall. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Jones.
Primary Arithmetic.
A simple course in number work covering the elements of
teaching number work to beginners.
Text: How to Teach Primary Numbers, by Stone. The
Teaching of Primary Arithmetic by Suzallo; Primary Number
Projects, by Losh-Weeks.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Junior High. Hour, 10:30. Instructor: Hill.





31
* SPECIAL PRIMARY COURSE FOR SCHOOL PRINCIPALS
A rapid review course of the elements of Primary Education
and the supervision of Elementary School subjects will be of-
fered to principals. Special attention will be given to the state
course of study and the program outlined for the public schools
of the State.
SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
A special course covering the organization of Training
Schools, Agricultural High Schools and the getting of Smith-
Hughes Funds, also designed for teacher-training in this work.
Texts: Allen-Wright, Prosser-Allen, Vaughn-Mays.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 2, Science Hall. Hour, 1:30. Instructor:
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
1. Primary Games.
2. Intermediate Games.
3. Folk Movements and Rhythmic Play.
4. Aesthetic Play and Movement.
Teachers are advised to take some of this work during the
summer.
Text:
Credit: 2 semester hours each double periods.
Room, Chapel. Hours, 10:30, 8:30, 7:30, 3:30, 2:30.
Instructor: Anna B. Sawyer.
Time Place
1.
2.
3.
>4.
NATURE STUDY
Special course in Bird and Nature Study offered at 6:00
o'clock in the morning. Most of the work is out door observa-
tion and covering the elements of Ornithology and common
Florida plants.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room, Campus and Farm. Hour, 6:00. Instructor: Wray.
*Offered upon request.





32
PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE
A review course in Physiology and Hygiene for Teachers,
touching with the state course of study and problems of health,
conducting of physical examinations and health instruction.
Text: To be selected.
Credit: Three semester hours.
Room, Hospital. Hour, 9:30. Instructor: Cooper.
Courses offer by the Sanatorium: Physiology and Hygiene.
Review for examination.
Text:
Credit: One-half unit hours, High School.
Room, Hospital Hour, 10:30. Insructor: Cooper.
HOME NURSING
Home Nursing and Child care. A special course in the ele-
ments of infant mortality and care. Especially designed for
H. E. students. Prospective mothers and those already having
children.
Text:
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room, Hospital. Hour, 3:30. Instructor: Cooper.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS
Rural Sociology-A special course in the application of the
principles of Sociology to rural life and conditions.
Text: Credit:
Room 3, Agricultural Building. Hour, 8:30. Instructor:
RURAL ECONOMICS
The application of the principles of Economics to Farm Life,
special attention to co-operative marketing, collective bargain-
ing and farm barter.
Text: Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY
The application of the principles of Sociology to the Science
of Education. A special study of the motivation and the use
of the gang spirit, play, fighting, sex and the development of
character through ideals.
Text: Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:





33
INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY
A specific study of the Science of Sociology as a first course.
Text: Credit:
Room, Library. Hour, 8:30. Instructor: Byrd.
ELEMENTARY ECONOMICS
A brief course in Economics for beginners with special at-
tention to the Laws and Principles.
Any of the above courses may be arranged for classes of
eight or more and upon request.
Text: Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
PSYCHOLOGY OF READING
A special course in the physiology and psychology of reading,
designed especially as a first course in the training of reading.
Text: O'Brien-Reading: Its Psychology and Pedagogy.
Stone-Oral and Silent Reading-Revised Edition.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
REVIEW PSYCHOLOGY FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
This is a course especially designed for teachers taking the
present pre-normal course in Education, covering the twelfth
grade High School Teacher Training course. It also allows a
brief course for those desiring to take an examination in psy-
chology for a certificate.
Text: Peters' Human Conduct.
Credit: One-half unit.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY
For those desiring a first study in Psychology.
Text: Seashore-Introduction to the Study of Psychology.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:





34
APPLIED EDUCATION AND CHILD STUDY
A combination course in the elements of Educational Psy-
chology and Child Study. Especially designed for Primary
teachers.
Texts: Freeman's How Children Learn. Gruenberg's Out-
lines of Child Study. Freeman's Psychology of Common
Branches.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
*INTELLIGENCE AND EDUCATIONAL TESTS
This course will be offered upon a request of ten or more de-
siring to take it. It will cover the elements of mental and
educational tests. A small fee will be charged for demonstra-
tion material.
Text: Suggestive, Freeman's Mental Test. Monroe, Devoss
and Kelley, Educational Tests.
Credit:
Room: Hour: Instructor:
*Upon request of 15 or more who are willing to pay for
special material and laboratory.
PRIMARY METHODS I
A general course in primary methods for teachers not de-
siring to specialize in primary work and wish for a general
course may do so. This course is designed to meet the needs
of two classes of persons: those who have had no primary
classes and have had all the subjects in the primary course;
for those who desire to take a course to teach the subjects.
The following outline serves as to what will be demanded in
this course.
' FIRST COURSE-PRIMARY METHODS
Subject- Weeks Periods Total
A-Reading in primary grades.......... 2 5 10
B-Language in primary grades...... 2 5 10
C-Arithmetic in primary grades...... 2 5 10
D-Drawing in primary grades........ 1 5 5
E-Writing in primary grades.......... 1 5 5
No prerequisites are required. In addition to the general
methods, an orientation course in the elements and principles
of primary education will be offered.
*Offered upon request only.





35
Text: Moore-The Primary School.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Jr. High. Hours, 7:30, 2:30. Instructor: Brunetta
Hill.
PRIMARY CURRICULUM AND PROJECTS
This is a special course covering the course of study, equip-
ment and primary education.
Text: Krakowitozer-Projects in the Primary Grades.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:
PRIMARY READING
Observation, material, remedial, diagnosis and remedies in
the teaching of reading.
Texts: Jenkins-Reading in the Primary Grades. Watson-
How to Teach Silent Reading to Beginners.
Credit:
Room 3, Junior High. Hour, 3:30. Instructors: Brunetta
Hill.
PRIMARY PHONICS
Text: The Teachers Book of Phonics by Darrows.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room 3, Junior High. Hour, 3:30. Instructors: Brunetta
Hill.
PRIMARY READING AND STORY TELLING
This course will cover story telling, reading for children,
language lesson and grammar.
Texts: Bryant-How to Tell Stories to Children. O'Grady-
Troop-Teachers' Story Telling Book.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Library. Hour, 2:30. Instructor: Weare.
PHYSICS
First Semester:
1-A. Mechanics, Sound and Heat.
Second Semester:
1-B. Light, Magnetism and Electricity.
Both of these courses carry with it four semester hours credit.





36
Five double periods will be used.
Text: Stewart's College Physics. Manuals to be selected.
Credit: 4 semester hours A. and B.
Room 8, Science Hall. Hour, 7:30. Instructor: Chism.
HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS
First Semester A. Second Semester B.
A rapid review course for those who have had no knowledge
of the subject and desire to meet high school requirements in
science. Six double periods per week.
Text: Millikan-Gale.
Credit: One-half unit A. and B.
Room 7, Science Hall. Hours, 7:30, 8:30. Instructor: Brad-
ford.
WRITING
A beginner's course in writing for those who desire to begin
with the Primary and Elementary writing.
Text:
Credit:
Room 2, Junior High. Hours, 2:30, 3:30. Instructor: Brit-
tian.
WRITING II
General methods course covering the history of writing and
special work leading toward the procuring of a certificate in
Palmer writing.
SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL AND CLASSES.
Six regular elementary school classes and kindergarten will
be operated daily for observation and demonstration purposes.
Practice teaching under supervision of experts will be de-
manded in the summer course as well as of others.
The following texts will be used for this work:
Project in Observation and Practice Teaching-Hand.
Observation and Practice-Maxwell.
Credit: 3 semester hours.
Room: Hour: Instructor:





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