• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Calendar
 Faculty and officers of A. and...
 Committees - year 1925-26
 College department
 Normal department
 High school department
 Enrollment by counties
 General summary
 Bulletin
 Calendar and managing boards
 General information
 Outline of courses
 Program of studies
 Agriculture courses
 Description and explanation of...
 Description and explanation of...
 Description and explanation of...
 Social service
 Night school
 Index
 Application
 Back cover






Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes) Catalog, 1925-1926, Thirty-ninth Edition; Bulletin 1926-1927. Series XVII. No. 1.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000109/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes) Catalog, 1925-1926, Thirty-ninth Edition; Bulletin 1926-1927. Series XVII. No. 1.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1927
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000109
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3231

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Calendar
        Page 3
    Faculty and officers of A. and M college
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Committees - year 1925-26
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    College department
        Page 11
    Normal department
        Page 12
        Page 13
    High school department
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Enrollment by counties
        Page 22
        Page 23
    General summary
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Bulletin
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Calendar and managing boards
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    General information
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 36-a
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Outline of courses
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Program of studies
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 60-a
    Agriculture courses
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Description and explanation of courses in the mechanics art department
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Description and explanation of courses in home economics department
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Description and explanation of academic courses
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 96-a
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 120-a
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Social service
        Page 131
    Night school
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Index
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    Application
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Back cover
        Back cover
Full Text
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MR. T. D. TUCKER
First President A. & M. College
Born July 21, 1844





CATALOG
1925-1926





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CALENDAR
1925
Sept. 26 Saturday Boarding Dept. Opens
Sept. 28 Monday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 29 Tuesday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 30 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 26 Thursday Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 23-27 Wed.-Sunday Christmas Holidays
1926
Jan. 1 Friday Emancipation Day
Jan. 26-29 Tues.-Friday First Semester Examinations
Feb. 1 Monday Second Semester Begins
Apr. 23 Friday Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 7 Friday Oratorical Contest (Faculty Prize)
May 12 Wednesday National Hospital Day
May 18-21 Tues.-Friday Second Semester Examinations
May 23 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 24 Monday Home Economics Day
May 24 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 25 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 25 Tuesday Physical Training Exhibition
May 26 Wednesday Class Day
May 27 Thursday Commencement Day
SOME PROMINENT SPEAKERS AT THE CHAPEL
EXERCISES FOR THE YEAR
"Gypsy" Pat Smith ...................................March 17, 1926
Governor Ralph M. Brewster (Maine) ..........February 14, 1926
Mr. C. C. Spaulding, President of North Carolina Mutual
Life Insurance Company .................................. May 27, 1926
Dr. I. Garland Penn, Endowment Secretary M. E.
Church ..................................... January 21, 1926





4 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
FACULTY AND OFFICERS OF A. & M. COLLEGE
1925-26
J. R. E. LEE, A. B., M. A., Bishop College; LL. D., Wilberforce
University; Graduate Work, University of Chicago and
University of Wisconsin-President.
R. O'HARA LANIER, A. B. Lincoln University; Graduate
Work, Columbia University-Dean of College of Arts and
Science-Professor of Education.
A. L. KIDD, A. B., University of Michigan-Principal High
School-History, Psychology.
M. A. LEE, A. B., Morehouse College; Graduate Work, Chicago
University-Head of Department of English.
R. L. BLOODWORTH, A. B., Atlanta University-English.
EDWARD H. GOIN, A. B., Yale University-Latin and French.
EDWARD S. LEWIS, Ph. B., University of Chicago-Educa-
tion, History and Review Geography.
H. M. EFFERSON, A. B., Atlanta University, Graduate Work,
University of Minnesota-Head of Department of Mathe-
matics.
E. F. MANCE, B. S., Howard University-Mathematics.
A. P. TURNER, A. B., Morehouse College-Chaplain-Soci-
ology, Ethics and Public Speaking
J. O. JONES, A. B., Virginia Union; Graduate Work, Univer-
sity of Chicago-Head of Department of Science-
Chemistry.
B. S. CASSELL, B. S., Wilberforce University-Biology and
Physics.
*ODELL WALLACE, A. B., Ohio State University-Assistant
Education and English.
E. E. MATTHEW, A. B., Howard University-In Charge of
Model School.
J. E. JONES, A. B., Bennett College-Principal Junior High
School.
MARION BRITTON, Tuskegee Institute-Primary Methods,
Penmanship.
AMY JACKSON, A. & M. College; Special Work, Hampton
Institute--st and 2nd Grades Model School.
MARIE H. FORD, Chicago Musical College-Instrumental Mu-
sic, Voice Culture.
F. M. WILLIAMS, New England Conservatory of Music-Pub-
lic School Music.
C. O. BROWN, Hampton Institute-Acting Director Agricul-
tural Department.
B. L. PERRY, Tuskegee Institute-Superintendent of Farm.





CATALOG, 1925-1926 5
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Howard University, Cornell University,
Michigan Agricultural College-Animal Husbandry and
Dairying.- C ; G;-_ns b_-A m
*JOHN D. WRAY, A. & T. College, Greensboro-Agronomy,
Rural Education, Entomology.
C. B. MOON, Claflin University; Special Work, Columbia Uni-
versity-Acting Dean Home Economics Department.
C. B. NELSON, Wilberforce University; Special Work, Hamp-
ton Institute-Domestic Science.
I. L. COLEMAN, Spellman College-Domestic Science.
FLORENCE SHERMAN, Wisconsin State Normal School; Spe-
cial Work, Columbia University-Millinery and Handi-
crafts.
H. P. ELLISS, Pratt Institute, McDowell's School of Designing
-Domestic Art.
J. B. BRAGG, A. B., Talladega College-Dean Mechanic Arts.
R. S. STENNETT, Tuskegee Institute-Printing.
W. A. BALLARD, Tuskegee Institute-Carpentry.
ZEORA HERCEY, Tuskegee Institute- Engineering and
Plumbing.
S. L. THORPE, Tuskegee Institute-Electrical Engineering.
CHAS. H. HAYLING, Trade Training, Goodwill & Wilson, Ltd.,
Trinidad, B. W. I.-Tailoring.
C. B .NASBY, Geo. R. Smith College; Special Work, Chicago
Art School-Practical Arts, Freehand and Commercial
Drawing.
A. C. PHILLIPS, Tuskegee Institute-Masonry and Plastering.
EDWARD JONES, Hampton Institute-Painting, Decorating
and Wall Papering.
W. T. REED, Hampton Institute-Auto Mechanics.
J. W. KELLER, B. S., Howard University-Head of Commer-
cial Department.
C. E. MALLOY, A. & M. College; Special Work, Columbia
University-Assistant Commercial Department.
N. S. McGUINN, Hampton Institute-Dean of Women.
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Tsukegee Institute-Commandant.
E. C. WEARE, Washburn College-Librarian.
B. T. WOOD, M. D., Meharry Medical College-Resident Phy-
sician.
J. V. HILYER, R. N. Freedmen's Hospital, Superintendent of
Nurses.
O. L. BROOKS, R. N. Meharry Medical College-Nurse, Public
Health Work.





6 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
A. S. PRATER-STEWART, Cookman Institute, Hampton Insti-
tute-Physical Education for Girls.
LEANDER G. BLACKUS, B. S., Temple University-Athletic
Director.
A. W. LEE, Tuskegee Institute-Band Master.
J. R. E. LEE, Jr., A. B., Lincoln University-Business Manager.
E. E. BROUGHTON, B. S., A. & M. College; Special Work,
Madison College-Auditor and Bookkeeper.
LOTTIE M. JORDAN-Girls' Matron.
ANNIE M. HAWKINS-Girls' Matron.
A. M; BLOUNT-Girls' Matron.
A. D. PADDYFOTE-Boys' Matron.
LOTTIE PATTERSON-Clerk, Book Room.
G. W. PATTERSON-Landscape Architect.
*SYLVIA THOMAS-Dietitian.
C. T. FR-EELAND-Secretary to Business Manager.
E. D. DRAKEFORD-Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier.
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE-Secretary to President.
C. E. FRAZIER-Secretary to Deans.
*Part of year.
COMMITTEES-YEAR 1925-26
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
J. R. E. LEE, President.
R. O. LANIER, Dean of College and Supervisor of all Instruc-
tion.
J. B. BRAGG, Dean of Mechanic Arts Department.
C. 0. BROWN, Acting Dean of Agricultural Department.
E. E. BROUGHTON, Auditor.
J. R. E. LEE, Jr., Business Manager.
B. T. WOOD, Resident Physician.
J. V. HILYER, Superintendent of Nurses.
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
A. P. TURNER, Chaplain.
C. J. A. PADDYFOTE, Commandant.
SOCIAL COMMITTEE
E. M. Efferson, C. B. Moon, L. G. Blackus, M. H. Ford,
Prater-Stewart, Edward Lewis, C. B. Nelson, Eunice Matthew,
J. R. E. Lee, Jr., N. S. McGuinn, C. J. A. Paddyfote.





CATALOG, 1926-1926 7
RELIGIOUS COMMITTEE
A. P. Turner, R. O. Lanier, N. S. McGuinn, J. E. Jones, H.
M. Efferson, C. B. Nelson, Marion Britton, I. L. Coleman, J. R.
E. Lee, Jr., B. L. Perry, C. J. A. Paddyfote, Edward Lewis,
C. E. Malloy, J. W. Keller, Anita Prater-Stewart, A. L. Kidd.
COMMITTEE ON DELINQUENT STUDENTS
S. L. THORPE, I. L. COLEMAN, N. S. McGuinn, C. J. A.
Paddyfote, E. F. Goin, J. D. Wray, J. O. Jones.
CATALOG COMMITTEE
E. F. GOIN, W. A. BALLARD, Helena Elliss, C. E. Malloy,
J. D. Wray, J. W. Keller.
ENTERTAINMENT AND LECTURE COMMITTEE
R. O. Lanier, E. S. Lewis, R. L. Bloodworth, M. A. Lee,
J. O. Jones.
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
L. G. Blackus, Coach; J. B. Bragg, E. E. Broughton, J. R. E.
Lee, Jr., E. C. Weare, Edward Lewis, A. C. Breckenridge, C.
J. A. Paddyfote, J. W. Keller, Anita Prater-Stewart, B. S.
Cassell.
COMMITTEE ON INTER-COLLEGIATE AND INTER-CLASS
DEBATES
A. P. Turner, M. A. Lee, R. L. Bloodworth, R. 0. Lanier,
C. H. Chapman.
OUTLINE OF PRIZES AWARDED 1925-26
Faculty Oratorical Prize.
The Faculty Oratorical Prize is offered to the person of
College grade who writes and delivers the best oration. The
amount of $20 is divided into two prices, $12 and $8 dollars.
For the year 1925-26 awards were made as follows:
First Prize-Margaret F. Fitzgiles, C. '27.
Second Prize-Arimentha A. Neely, N. '26.
Declamatory Contest Prize.
The Declamatory Contest Prize of $10.00 is offered by the
Literary Societies of the College to the person in the High
School rendering the best declaration. Mr. John L. Webb,
Founder and President of The Woodmen of Union, gave $50.00
to the winner of the first prize, which happened to be a tie
L~~~~-~~~~-..i. 1---~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





8 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
between two persons. Third prize was $10.00 given by
Literary Societies of the College.
First Prize-Seth L. Gore, H. S.-'26; Hattie E. Mizell, H. S.
'27.
Third Prize-William Stewart, H. S. '26.
College Wits Prize, $5.00.
This prize by the College Wits is given to the young man
in the College Department who has attained the highest honors.
This prize was won by Eugene E .Bradford, C. '26.
Alumni Scholarship Prize, $10.00.
This prize was given by the Alumni for the two students
having the highest scholastic average in the College and
Normal classes.
First Prize-Eugene E. Bradford (College), '26.
Second Prize-Daphne B. Alexander (Normal), '26.
Pichard Lumber Company Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person making the most progress
in painting for the year.
Won by William Oscar Morgan, J. H. S. '28.
E. A. Pottsdamer Gold Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the girl making the best average in
Physical Education.
Won by Hazel E. Scotto, N. '28.
Maggie A. Yellowhare Gold Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person with the best carriage in
Physical Education.
Won by Helen C. Douglass, N. '27.
Armour Fertilizer Works Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person who made the most pro-
gress in Agricultural projects for the year.
Won by George Whitfield Conoly, C. '28.
C. C. Walker, Sr., Prize, $10.00.
This prize was given to the person making the best average
in Theory of Education, Method and Practice Teaching; equally
divided.
Won by Daphne B. Alexander, N, '26-Elementary Educa-
tion and Music.
Won by Lula Mae Williams, N. '26-Primary Methods, Les-
son Plans, Adaptability, Constant Application.
h..





CATALOG, 1925-1926 9
Federal Bakery Prize, $5.00.
Through the courtesy of the citizens of Tallahassee, business
men and other patrons, both white and colored, along with out-
of-town firms and business places. This Federal Bakery prize
was given to the girl in the Home Economics Department who
baked the best loaf of bread.
Won by Hazel E. Scotto, N. '26.
The A. E. Martin Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the boy making the best garment
and showing the most progress in Tailoring.
Won by William A. Jones, H. S. '26.
Chas. Williams Hardware Company Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person having the best record
and having done the most efficient work of the year in Machine
and Auto-Mechanics.
Won by Robert L. Beasley, H. S. '27.
Artcraft Printers Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person having done the most
efficient work in the Printing Division for the year.
Won by Junius J. Jones, H. S. '26.
Rhodes Hardware Company Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person making the most progress
in Carpentry and Woodwork for the year.
Won by James A. Jackson, C. '29.
Appleyard Printing Company Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person showing the most skill
with Job Press.
Won by William Sweet, H. S. '26.
Service Printing Company Prize, $2.50.
This prize was given to the best all-around among those
specializing in Printing.
Won by Jesse Meuse, J. H. S. '29.
Rosa Lee Butler Prize, $10.00.
This prize was given to the person making the best average
in the Music Department. Equally divided.
Won by Winnie B. Holley (Voice), H. S. '29.
Won by F. Derotha Williams (Piano), N. '27.
C. 0. Brown High School Agricultural Project Prize, $5.00.
This prize was given to the person producing the best Agri-
cultural Project work in the High School Department.
Won by Horace Lewis, J. H. S. '27.





10 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
DEBATING HONORS
Debating relations were re-established with Clark and Mont-
gomery. Dual debates were held 1925-26 at Atlanta, on April
9, 1926, debating the question: Resolved, That Each State
Should Establish a Court of Industrial Relations With Com-
pulsory Powers for the Settlement of Labor Disputes." (Con-
stitutionality conceded.)
Miss Daphne Alexander and Mr. Eugene Bradford won from
Clark at Atlanta-a 2 to 1 decision.
At Montgomery, on March 19, 1926, Miss Miriam J. Ander-
son and Miss Mercedes Richardson won from Alabama State
Normal in Montgomery on the subject: Resolved, That the
Volstead Act Should Be Repealed." Decision 2 to 1.
On the same date, and from the same school and on the
same subject, the Misses Elizabeth T. Davis and Arimentha
Neely won the decision at Tallahassee, 3 to 0.
On April 9, 1926, Miss Garriett Green and Mr. Everett Rolfe
won from Clark, in Jacksonville, the debate, decision rendered
2 to 1. Subject debated: Resolved, That Each State Should
Establish a Court of Industrial Relations With Compulsory
Powers for the Settlement of Labor Disputes.
BAND PRIZES
Through the generosity of Tallahassee citizens the following
band prizes were offered:
Progress Prize, for the student making the most advance-
ment on his instrument. Given to Oscar Yarn, High School '27.
Utility Prize, for the student who has proved to be the most
valuable to the band. Given to Marcus Verdier, High School '29.
Donors of the above named prizes including individuals and
business houses.





CATALOG, 1925 1926 11
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
SENIOR B. S.
Name- Postoffice County or State
Adderly, Quinten Jerome Lakeland Polk
Bradford, Eugene E. Pensacola Escambia
Fleming, Lollie Mae Jacksonville Duval
Hamilton, James Mack W' Tampa Hillsborough
Robinson, Bessie Lee Tallahassee Leon
Roundtree, Hosea Lee V- Perry Taylor
Smith, Eugene James Ocala Marion
Smith, Henry William I- Ocala Marion
JUNIOR B. S.
Austin, Charles Lewis West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Cady, Davis A. DeFuniak Springs Walton
Freeland, Hugh C. Tallahassee Leon
Freeman, Maude Madison Madison
Fitzgiles, Margaret F. Tampa Hillsborough
Jackson, Horace Smith Sanford Seminole
King, Emanuel L. Kissimmee Osceola
Mickens, James Kermit West Palm Beach Palm Beach
McFarlin, Novik M. Pensacola Escambia
McMillan, Marie Frankie Pensacola Escambia
McKissick, Lela M. Tallahassee Leon
Reese, Georgianna V. Daytona Volusia
COLLEGE SOPHOMORES B. S.
Anderson, Miriam Jackson Tampa Hillsborough
Bragg, Eugene James Tallahassee Leon
Conoly, George Whitfield Panama City Bay
Evans, St. Clair Perry Taylor
Gilchrist, James Franklin Lakeland Polk
Glover, Boysie G. Plant City Hillsborough
Griffin, M. Alphonso Ft. Pierce St. Lucie
Hall, John Lee Oviedo Seminole
Hamilton, Wm. McKinley Tampa Hillsborough
Kenon, Reuben Quincy Gadsden
Lewis, Alfonso Leroy Orlando Orange
Maxey, William Singleton Ocala Marion
Nixon, W. Verdier Madison Madison
Rolfe, Everett R. Tampa Hillsborough
Stirrup, Franklin E. W. Jr. Coconut Grove Dade
Whitehead, Anthony J. Jacksonville Duval





12 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
COLLEGE FRESHMEN B. S.
Name- Postoffice County or State
Bates, Winifred L. Palatka Putnam
Bell, Leslie A. Palatka Putnam
Delancy, Ellen Jane West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Deveauz, F. E. Marianna Jackson
Fleming, Lucius Samuel Jacksonville Duval
Hawkins, Godfrey William Orlando Orange
Henderson, Agnes C. Miami Dade
Jackson, James Augusta So. Jacksonville Duval
Johnson, Fred W. Palatka Putnam
Lockhart, John Wesley Tampa Hillsborough
Roulac, Oswald B. Chipley Washington
Stockton, John Quincy Gadsden
Thomas, Annie Mae Ocala Marion
Williams, Herschel Lee Tallahassee Leon
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR EDUCATION
Alexander, Daphine B. Orlando Orange
Davis, Elizabeth Tommie St. Petersburg Pinellas
Green, Garriette Lucile Delray Palm Beach
Jackson, Meltonia E. Jacksonville Duval
Moore, Sallie E. St. Petersburg Pinellas
Mullen, Leroy N. O'Brien Suwannee
Neely, Arimentha Augusta Key West Monroe
Rivers, Ruby Ernestine Jacksonville Duval
Roberts, Madelyn Enid Miami Dade
Williams, Hazel Cecil Quincy Gadsden
Williams, Lula Mae Pensacola Escambia
SENIOR COMMERCIAL
Jones, Eunice Clark Jacksonville Duval
SENIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Brown, Inez Juanita Jacksonville Duval
Evans, Lucretia Louise Palatka Putnam
Richardson, Mercedes Laura Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Leontine Lisbon Lake
JUNIOR EDUCATION
Anderson, Annie L. Plant City Hillsborough
Carter, Gladys Inez Apalachicola Franklin





CATALOG, 1925-1926 13
Name- Postoffice County or State
Castello, Theresa Theda Jacksonville Duval
Clark, Marie Apalachicola Franklin
Dickerson, Marie Scott Jacksonville Duval
Douglas, Helen Clarke Orlando Orange
Fossett, Verdie Lee Sanford Seminole
Hall, Clarissa Marionette Live Oak Suwannee
Lewis, Ella Louise Jacksonville Duval
Miller, Bernice Colleen Tampa Hillsborough
Pinkney, Theresa Jacksonville Duval
Steward, Ernestine Ramona Orlando Orange
Story, Franklin J. Jacksonville Duval
Watson, Eunice Elzore Plant City Hillsborough
Wimberly, Rebecca Lottie Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Fannie Derotha Port Tampa Hillsborough
JUNIOR COMMERCIAL
Colston, Callie Mae Winter Park Orange
Daniels, Castella Acosta Jacksonville Duval
Edwards, Alzada Pensacola Escambia
Rozier, Nellie Virgilina Sanford Seminole
JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Grady, Cornella Palatka Putnam
Hart, Leona Jacksonville Duval
Hughes, Helen Jacksonville Duval
Kennedy, Corine Mildred Fernandina Nassau
Rolfe, Pansy W. Tampa Hillsborough
Scotto, Hazel Elizabeth Oakland Orange
Wilkie, Annie Miami Dade
Wilson, Vashti Deerfield Broward
SENIOR NURSE TRAINING
McGinnis, Josephine Doris Tarpon Springs Pinellas
Norwood, Mattie Lou Ocala Marion
JUNIOR NURSE TRAINING
Arnold, Cora Atlanta Fulton
Lundy, Emmette Alve Gainesville Alachua
Nash, Dorothy Ethel Tallahassee Leon
Singleton, Fannie M. Newberry Alachua
Sweet, Nordica Ora D. Bartow Polk
Thomas, Mable Catherine Jacksonville Duval
Williams, Maggie Palatka Putnam
L





14 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Third Year
Name- Postoffice County or State
Adderley, Julian Carlyle Lakeland Polk
Allen, Addie Mildred Tallahassee Leon
Anderson, Irene Reba Tampa Hillsborough
Bailey, Maurice M. Punta Gorda Charlotte
Blue, Theodore Roosevelt Tampa Hillsborough
Brooks, Flossie M. Oakland Orange
Brooks, Helen Julia Daytona Palm Beach
Calhoun, Frances Arcadia DeSoto
Ellison, Maude Miami Dade
Fields, Bertha Quincy Gadsden
Gainer, Allen Quincy Gadsden
Gore, Seth L. Tallahassee Leon
Goodman, Helen Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Grice, Minnie Lee Sanford Seminole
Hall, Lillie Sanford Seminole
Hoffman, Alphonso Ralph Sanford Seminole
Hargray, Alzeta St. Petersburg Pinellas
Jackson, Vivian Lucretia West Sanford Seminole
Jefferson, Annie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Jenkins, Alma Sanford Seminole
Jones, Disney Theodore Quincy Gadsden
Jones, Junius Benjamin New Smyrna Volusia
Jones, William Augustus Quincy Gadsden
Kirksey, Leander Alphonso Madison Madison
Mattox, Josie Lake City Columbia
Mattox, Viola Gertrude Tallahassee Leon
Merrit, Frank Marianna Jackson
Murray, Isaac C. So. Jacksonville Duval
McDonald, Stephen Jacksonville Duval
Nixon, Ulysses Grant Madison Madison
Norris, William Edgar Tallahassee Leon
Pemberton, Arabella Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
Pittman, Alfred Jacksonville Duval
Preston, Pollie Bell Quincy Gadsden
Price, Alverta Fort Myers Lee
Roberts, Edythe Mildred Miami Dade
Roberts, Winifred Elizabeth Key West Monroe
Rutherford, William Alfred Callahan Nassau





CATALOG, 1925-1926 15
Name- Postoffice County or State
Scott, Sarah Bernice Tallahassee Leon
Speed, Gladys Inez West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Stewart, William Jacksonville Duval
Sweet, William Bartow Polk
Thompson, Carl St. Petersburg Pinellas
Walden, James Sanford Seminole
Washington, Ruby Anadell Miami Dade
Wilson, Pollie Edna Quincy Gadsden
Wong, Hortense New Smyrna Volusia
White, Godfrey Quincy Gadsden
Second Year
Allen, Daisy Lillie Bell Tallahassee Leon
Allen, John Calhoun Tallahassee Leon
Anderson, Octavia Lugenia Tallahassee Leon
Barefield, Mary Jane Apalachicola Franklin
Beasley, Robert Lee Tallahassee Leon
Branham, Dorothy New Smyrna Volusia
Brown, Roberta Louise Jacksonville Duval
Cooper, Samuel Johnie Greenville Madison
Dean, Verdelle Lucile Miami Dade
Dobbs, David Henry Clearwater Pinellas
Frazier, Clarence Ferguson Sanford Seminole
Goosby, Marvell Tampa Hillsborough
Gollman, Lillian Punta Gorda Charlotte
Graham, Jessie Margaret Jacksonville Duval
Green, George Henry Delray Palm Beach
Grooms, Ida Olivia Ft. Myers Lee
Hadley, Vernese Tampa Hillsborough
Hall, Frank Henry Oviedo Seminole
Hargrove, Lawrence Gifford Indian River
Harris, Inez Lucretia Lakeland Polk
Hawkins, Jannie Orlando Orange
Jackson, Ethel Sanford Seminole
Jackson, George Benton Sanford Seminole
Jackson, Hallie Okeechobee Okeechobee
James, Willie Howard Madison Madisbn
Johnson, Ruth Rebecca Sanford Seminole
Jones, Maggie Lucile St. Petersburg Pinellas
Jones, Nannie Gunn Boulevard Leon
Kennedy, Blanche Gustavia Sparr Marion
Lawrence, Geneva Louise Miami Dade
Mahone, Godfrey Ernest Tallahassee Leon





16 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Name- Postoffice County or State
Martin, Dorothy Clearwater Pinellas
Miller, Lois Melba West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Mizell, Hattie Ernestine New Smyrna Volusia
Mounts, Bloneva Ivy Key West Monroe
Myrick, Alma Theora Tallahassee Leon
McClain, Anna Dolly Kissimmee Osceola
McCracken, Minnie Ella Tampa Hillsborough
McDonald, Robert Joseph Tampa Hillsborough
McGinnis, Iola Winnifred Tarpon Springs Pinellas
McKinnon, Estelle DeFuniak Springs Walton
Nixon, Jenethel Leon Madison Madison
Odom, Alice Gertrude Jacksonville Duval
Oliver, Martha Annie Lee Ocala Marion
Peak, Beranton James Lakeland Polk
Pinkney, Althea Marguarette Palatka Putnam
Portier, Rodney Henry Miami Dade
Ray, Eva Winter Park Orange
Robinson, Canary Deray Palm Beach
Robinson, Larlah Delray Palm Beach
Robinson, Wm. Henry Tallahassee Leon
Rogers, James Wm. Tampa Hillsborough
Sanders, Doretha Maberda Lakeland Polk
Sermons, Jessie Lee Lakeland Polk
Stroman, Carelle Tallahassee Leon
Verdier, Marcus Tallahassee Leon
Washington, Hattie Elzora Lakeland Polk
Wilson, Wilton Armetta Clearwater Pinellas
Williams, Mattie Palatka Putnam
Williams, Odessa Jenning Hamilton
Yarn, Oscar Samuel Clearwater Pinellas
First Year
Allen, Frank Wilkerson Tallahassee Leon
Armwood, Walter Adams Tallahassee Leon
Ayres, Samuel Willie Gifford St. Lucie
Bellamy, Hattie G. Dunnellon Marion
Brown, Ella Louise Lakeland Polk
Chappel, Pricilla Apalachicola Franklin
Chisolm, Gilbert Eugene Kissimmee Osceola
Cousin, Robert Kissimmee Osceola
Crosby, Gwendolyn Thelma Madison Madison
Crowell, Charles Leroy Palatka Putnam
Dallas, Ernestine Lula Orlando Orange





CATALOG, 1925-1926 17
Name- Postoffice County or State
Davis, Charles Cecil Lake Butler Union
Davis, James Athelyn Brunswick, Ga. Glenn
Denegall, James Sanford Seminole
Ford, Rebecca Thelma Tallahassee Leon
Giddens, Thelma B. New Smyrna Volusia
Gurley, David Tallahassee Leon
Hamilton, Harold Talladega, Ala. Talladega
Holly, Winnie Beatrice St. Petersburg Pinellas
Hough, Franklin James Lake Helen Volusia
Jackson, Geraldine Louise Sanford Seminole
James, Mamie Beatrice Apalachicola Franklin
Kennedy, Albert Lafayette Winter Haven Polk
Knox, Marie Tampa Hillsborough
Lester, Herbert Eugene West Tampa Hillsborough
Livingston, Annie Mae Apalachicola Franklin
Livingston, Lillian Clifford Marianna Jackson
Magbe, George Tallahassee Leon
Meuse, Jessie Sanford Seminole
Minott, Curby Louise Sanford Seminole
Murray, Frank Leavy So. Jacksonville Duval
Nims, Frank Tallahassee Leon
Norwood, Edwin Tallahassee Leon
McCall, Marion Lakeland Polk
McDaniels, Florine New Smyrna Volusia
McPherson, Joshua Sanford Seminole
People, Mildred Ocala Marion
Speed, Hisetta West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Stewart, Richie Belle Tallahassee Leon
Smith, Fred DeWeese Apalachicola Franklin
Smith, William T. Palatka Putnam
Taylor, Alberta Tallahassee Leon
Taylor, Alma Mary Ft. Myers Lee
Thompson, Enith Melita Coconut Grove Dade
Washington, Bernard Tallahassee Leon
Washington, Ruby Belle Tallahassee Leon
Williams, Katherine Bernice St. Petersburg Pinellas
Williams, Irene Dorothy St. Petersburg Pinellas
Williams, Cornette Margaret Lakeland Polk
Williams, Rachel Edith Quincy Gadsden
Wilkins, Oliver Madison Madison
Wilkins, Sheldon Madison Madison
Young, Geraldine Apalachicola Franklin





18 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Third Year
Adams, Beatrice Evelyn Florenceville Polk
Allen, Lacell Interlachen Putnam
Anderson, Louis Napoleon Palatka Putnam
Armwood, Levin Winifred Tallahassee Leon
Bellamy, Hester Lake Helen Volusia
Bentley, Patsey Lee Tallahassee Leon
Black, Henry Cheatham Greenville Jefferson
Bowden, Arleaser Tallahassee Leon
Bracy, Gladys Rebecca Sanford Seminole
Butler, Lindell Veromica Palatka Putnam
Campbell, Valdee Argyle Walton
Chism, William Lake Helen Volusia
Cofield, Ethel Lee Sanford Seminole
Collins, James Ernest Quincy Gadsden
Davis, Alvin Lake Butler Union
Davis, Ethel Sarasota Sarasota
Farmer, Arabella Octavia Wakulla Wakulla
Ford, Hollie Matilda Tallahassee Leon
Fort, Lamar Live Oak Suwannee
Ford, Sudella Tallahassee Leon
Gardner, Irma Louise Tampa Hillsborough
Gibson, Mabel Lo Coconut Grove Dade
Granberry, Sarah Louise Greenwood Jackson
Hall, Olivia Ester Lake Helen Volusia
Hawkins, Thelma Tallahassee Leon
Henry, Minnie Frye Apalachicola Franklin
Holmes, Gladys Oviedo Seminole
Holland, Theodies West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Holt, Fred L. Quincy Gadsden
Howell, Vernease Tampa Hillsborough
Jackson, John H., Jr. Tampa Hillsborough
Jamison, Agnes Corine Orlando Orange
Jefferson, Herbert Wm. Sanford Seminole
Jones, Hattie Mae Sarasota Sarasota
Keys, Allie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Martin, Anatole Emile Tallahassee Leon
Maxwell, Harold Orlando Orange
Martin, Felix Breaux Tallahassee Leon
Mays, Mildred Alexander Ocala Marion
Meeks, Moses Tallahassee Leon
Miller, Annie Elizabeth Tallahassee Leon





CATALOG, 1925-1926 19
Name- Postoffice County or State
Miller, Eloise Tallahassee Leon
Mills, Lucius Robert Tampa Hillsborough
Morris, Hilda Aldather Ft. Meade Polk
McCoy, Mary Annie Sarasota Sarasota
McDonald, David New Smyrna Volusia
McDowell, Elizabeth Dunnellon Marion
McFadden, Alphonso Harold Tallahassee Leon
McFadden, Ethel Beatrice Tallahassee Leon
McMeekin, Susie Alice Edgar Putnam
Nelson, Ruth Hannah Flora Home Putnam
O'Neil, Edna Mintie Jacksonville Duval
Purcell, Alice Lee Bartow Polk
Reese, Ruth Hannah St. Petersburg Pinellas
Reid, Ethel Sarasota Sarasota
Roberts, Ruby Mae Winter Park Orange
Shipp, Inez Florencevilla Polk
Speed, Elnora Odessa West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Speed, Lillie Louise West Palm Beach Palm Beach
Simmons, Lewis Tampa Hillsborough
Smith, Daniel Charles Punta Gorda Charlotte
Smith, Hoskis Harrel Tallahassee Leon
Williams, Jennette Eugenia Miami Dade
Williams, Henry Port Tampa Hillsborough
Wilson, Wesley O'Neil Leesburg Lake
Wells, Fannie Pearl Larkins Dade
Wells, Margaret Jacksonville Duval
Wong, Wee Young New Smyrna Volusia
Young, Sandy Arnell Apalachicola Franklin
Second Year
Allen, Gretwood Orlando Orange
Bailey, Maggie Leo Tallahassee Leon
Beale, Marion Darby Jacksonville Duval
Bragg, Jubie Barton Tallahassee Leon
Bragg, Rebecca Elnora Tallahassee Leon
Brooks, Ollie Veta Tallahassee Leon
Carter, James Sellie Quincy Gadsden
Carnegie, Thelma Miami Dade
Chester, Bertha Annie Tallahassee Leon
Crosby, Albert F. Madison Madison
Duhart, Laura Dora Tallahassee Leon
Ford, Algie Russell Tallahassee Leon
Ford, Sallie Mae Tallahassee Leon





20 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Name- Postoffice County or State
Hinson, Mary Ellen Fort Myers Lee
Howard, Mabel Olivia Wakulla Wakulla
Israel, Annie Bell Orlando Orange
Isler, Bernice Althea Tallahassee Leon
Jackson, Freddie Scott Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Henrietta Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Jessie Lee Tallahassee Leon
Johnson, Katie Florencevilla Polk
Lewis, Horace Pompano Broward
Lipscomb, Thomas Tallahassee Leon
Mann, Lu Ethel Midway Gadsden
Mickens, Leonie Key West Monroe
Mordica, Alfred Alexander Tallahassee Leon
Morgan, Wm. Oscar West Tampa Hillsborough
Moore, Wilbur Plant City Hillsborough
Pollard, Margaretha Tallahassee Leon
Reese, Myrtle Irene Tampa Hillsborough
Rolle, Joshua Caiphiss Pompano Broward
Stewart, Jennie Guerry Tallahassee Leon
Stewart, Rosa Theresa Orlando Orange
Smith, Queen Elizabeth Sebring Palm Beach
Thomas, Shellie Evelyn Madison Madison
Triplett, Mamie Wakulla Wakulla
Verdier, Lucinda Samuel Tallahassee Leon
Watson, Albert, Jr. Marianna Jackson
Watson, Christell Louise Marianna Jackson
Williams, Vera Mae Tallahassee Leon
First Year
Adams, Eddie Lee Winter Haven Polk
Armwood, John Holloman Tallahassee Leon
Bailey, Hazel Tallahassee Leon
Banks, Alice Rose Tallahassee Leon
Bryan, Mary Catherine St. Petersburg Pinellas
Bryan, Wm. Jennings, Jr. St. Petersburg Pinellas
Canty, Willie Mae St. Petersburg Pinellas
Cary, Lucile Key West Marion
Chavis, Ruby Lee Tallahassee Leon
Chester, Robert Tallahassee Leon
Combs, Theora Tallahassee Leon
Edwards, Marie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Farmer, Alice Geneva Wakulla Wakulla
Ford, Augusta Tallahassee Leon





CATALOG, 1925-1926 21
Name- Postoffice County or State
Frazier, James Plummer Tallahassee Leon
Frazier, Mary Laura Tallahassee Leon
Goodman, Nettie Annie L. B. Tallahassee Leon
Goodman, Victoria Tallahassee Leon
Harris, Emma Tallahassee Leon
Karnegay, John D. Hosford Liberty
Lawrence, Freeman Philander Jacksonville Duval
Lockett, Laura Jacksonville Duval
Maultsby, Allie Theresa Florenceville Polk
Murray, Walter Leroy Jacksonville Duval
McKinney, Harry Tallahassee Leon
McNeil, William Panama City Bay
Peaten, Essie Mae Tallahassee Leon
Philyaw, Osceola Margie Bainbridge, Ga. Decatur
Pollard, George Anthony Tallahassee Leon
Robinson, Dourest J. Daytona Volusia
Twine, Fannie Cecila Tallahassee Leon
Williams, Cleo A. Jacksonville Duval
Woodbury, Pearl Tallahassee Leon
Young, Louise Tallahassee Leon
SPECIALS AND NIGHT SCHOOL
Franklin, Eddie James Arrow Warker
Franklin, Frank Lake City Columbia
Glymph, James Ocala Marion
Harper, Willie Lake City Columbia
Holloway, Leroy Holme Flora Home Putnam
Jackson, James So. Jacksonville Duval
Langston, Thomas B. Arrow Warker
Lindsay, David Oviedo Seminole
Moore, Robert Leslie Tallahassee Leon
McCoy, Ernest Carbur Taylor
Smedley, Howard Columbia Pensacola Escambia
Stewart, Chas. James Orlando Orange
Thompson, Robert Tallahassee Leon
Verdier, Polly Tallahassee Leon
Watts, Phillip Lorenzo Flora Home Putnam
Wynn, Robert Tallahassee Leon





22 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES
Alachua .................................................................................. 2
B a y .......................................................................................... 2
Broward .................................................................................. 3
Charlotte .......................... ..................................................... 3
Colum bia ................................................................................ 3
Dade ...................................................................................... 14
Decatur, Ga. .......................................................................... 1
Duval ...................................................................................... 35
DeSoto .................................................................................... 1
Escam bia ................................................................................ 6
Franklin ................................................ 10
F u lto n .................................................................................... 1
Gadsden .................................................................................. 13
Glenn, Ga. .............................................................................. 1
Hillsborough ...................................................................... ... 32
Ham ilton ........................................ ............................... 1
Indian River ............................................................................ 1
Jackson ............................................................
Jefferson ................................................................................ 1
L a k e ...... .................................................................................. 2
Liberty ...... ................................................................. ... 1
L ee .........................................................................................
Lanier, Ga. .............................................................................. 1
L e o n ........................................................................................ 9 0
M adison .................................................................................. 12
M o n ro e .................................................................................... 6
M arion ............................................................................. ... 13
N a ssa u .................................................................................... 2
Orange ................................................................................... 18
Osceola .................................................................................... 4
Okeechobee ............................................................ 1
Palm Beach ........................................................................... 15
Putnam .......................................................................... ..... 17
Pinellas .................................................................................. 18
P o lk ....................................................................................... 1 9
Sarasota .................................................................................. 4
Suwannee ........................................ ................................. 3
Sem inole ................................................................................ 26
St. Lucie ................................................................................ 2





CATALOG, 1925-1926 23
Talladega, Ala. ...................................................................... 1
T a y lo r ...................................................................................... 3
Union ...................................................................................... 2
Volusia .................................................................................... 13
W akulla .................................................................................. 4
W alker .................................................................................... 2
W alton .............................................................................. 3
W ashington ........................................................................... 1
Grand Total.................................................. 424
SUMMARY BY STATES
Alabam a .................................................................................. 1
G eo rg ia ................................................................................... 3
Florida .................................................................................... 420
424





24 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
GENERAL SUMMARY
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Men Women Both
S eniors ............................................ 6 2 8
Juniors .................................... 6 6 12
Sophomores ................................ 15 1 16
Freshm en ...................................... 10 4 16
37 13 50
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
Seniors in Education..................... 1 10 11
Juniors in Education...................... 1 15 16
Seniors in Home Economics.......... 0 4 4
Juniors in Home Economics.......... 0 8 8
2 37 39
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
Seniors, Third Year ................. .... 22 26 48
Seniors, Second Year................... 19 42 61
Seniors, First Year ............. ....... 26 27 53
67 95 162
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Juniors, Third Year........................ 25 44 69
Juniors, Second Year...................... 14 26 40
Juniors, First Year .......... ............ 11 23 34
50 93 143
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
Seniors .............................. 0 1 1
Juniors ...................................... 0 4 4
0 5 5
SPECIALS
Night School .............. ................. 15 1 16
NURSE TRAINING
S eniors ............................................ 0 2 2
Jun iors ........................................ 07 7
0 9 9





CATALOG, 1925-1926 25
NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF SUMMER SCHOOL
STUDENT TEACHERS-1925
Name Place
1. Adderly, Mrs. N. L.....................................Lakeland, Fla.
2. Allen, Miss Corene..................................Sopchoppy, Fla.
3. Anderson, Miss H. G......................................Lisbon, Fla.
4. Baldwin, Miss Isabella...................................Burbank, Fla.
5. Blake, Mrs. C. E...............................................Miami, Fla.
6. Bowers, Mrs. Georgia................................Havana, Fla.
7. Bowks, Miss Leola...........................................Tampa, Fla.
8. Brazzell, Miss R. M...........................................Eustis, Fla.
9. Brown, Mrs. C. 0......................................Tallahassee, Fla.
10. Burnett, Miss Verdier.................................Pensacol,a Fla.
11. Burnett, Mrs. M. C....................................Pensacola, Fla.
12. Carter, Miss Louise..................................Apalachicola, Fla.
13. Cason, Miss Bessie B......................................O'Brien, Fla.
14. Childs, Miss Roberta............................St. Petersburg, Fla.
15. Clark, Miss Marie..............................................Miami, Fla.
16. Clark, Miss Lela D..................................Apalachicola, Fla.
17. Colston, Miss Callie................................Winter Park, Fla.
18. Cooper, Mrs. Alice...................................Palatka, Fla.
19. Corley, Mr. Chas. H....................................Cottondale, Fla.
20. Crump, Mrs. Pearl...................................Tallahassee, Fla.
21. Davis, Miss Dovie................................... Midway, Fla.
22. Drew, Miss Emma......................................Tallahassee, Fla.
23. Fogartie, Mrs. Holland............................Jacksonville, Fla.
24. Fisher, Mrs. M. A.......................................Webster, Fla.
25. Ford, Miss Sudella....................................Tallahassee, Fla.
26. Foster, Miss Estella ........................................Alachua, Fla.
27. Foster, Mrs. Anna S.......................................Tampa, Fla.
28. Gavin, Miss Queen..........................................Wakulla, Fla.
29. Gavin, Miss Mabel ..........................................Wakulla, Fla.
30. Glover, Miss Lorene B................................Plant City, Fla.
31. Goldwire, Miss Verdille ................................Griffin, Ga.
33. Gore, Mr. Seth ..........................................Tallahassee, Fla.
34. Gonzalez, Mrs. J. M..........................................Tampa, Fla.
35. Hamilton, Mrs. Katie M ...................................Seffner, Fla.
36. Hannibal, Miss Costella R .........................Key West, Fla.
37. Harris, Miss Margaret............................Winter Park, Fla.
38. Hector, Mrs. C. B ...........................Lakeland, Fla.
39. Henry, Miss Mary Ella .....................Jacksonville, Fla.
40. Hill, Miss Vivian L .......................Jacksonville, Fla.
41. Houston, Mrs. S. B....................................Jacksonville, Fla.





26 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Name Place
42. Hughes, Miss Helen .................................Jacksonville, Fla.
43. Hughes, Miss Florence........................St. Petersburg, Fla.
44. Jackson, Miss Ruth....................................Pensacola, Fla.
45. Jackson, Miss Dezora ................................Gainesville, Fla.
46. Jackson, Mr. F. M......................................Cottondale, Fla.
47. Jackson, Mr. M. J......................................Cottondale, Fla.
48. Johnson, Mrs. Bertha...................................Lakeland, Fla.
49. Kennedy, Miss Corene..............................Fernandina, Fla.
50. Lee, Mrs. J. R. E......................................Tallahassee, Fla.
51. Lewis, Mrs. S. H ......................................Sanord, Fla.
52. Livingston, Miss O. L..................................Marianna, Fla.
53. Lundy, Miss Jessie.................................East Orange, N. J.
54. Madison, Mr. Wm...................................Jacksonville, Fla.
55. Mance, Mrs. Emma D.......................................Tampa, Fla.
56. Mayo, Miss Corene ..................................Brooksville, Fla.
57. Meadows, Mrs. L .......................................Tallahassee, Fla
58. Meirelez, Mrs. Maria........................................Tampa, Fla.
59. Mills, Mrs. Polly ........................................Pensacola, Fla
60. Mimms, Mrs. J. E .......................................Ft. Myers, Fla
61. Mitchell, Mrs. S. B.......................................Leesburg, Fla.
62. Mitchell, Miss Bessie ........................................Tampa, Fla.
63. Mobley, Prudence (Mrs.) ...........................Leesburg, Fla.
32. Goodman, Miss Hillon ...............................Tallahassee, Fla.
64. Mullen, Mr. Leroy N.... ....................................O'Brien, Fla.
65. McCleary, Miss Lucinda..........................Lake Wales, Fla.
66. McFadden, Miss Ethel..............................Tallahassee, Fla.
67. McGhee, Miss Allie W................................Tallahassee, Fla.
68. McMahon, Miss Georgia......................................Ocala, Fla.
69. Pate, Mrs. Lizzie .................................. Dunnellon, Fla.
70. Patterson, Mrs. Laura................................Ben Haden, Fla.
71. Potts, Mrs. Jessie..............................................Raleigh, Fla.
72. Rainey, Miss Estelle....................................Lakeland, Fla.
73. Reed, Mrs. J. W. C...................................Tallahassee, Fla.
74. Reed, Mrs. Eva L......................................Jacksonville, Fla.
75. Rollins, Mrs. Emma....................................Tallahassee, Fla.
76. Ross, Miss Catherine...............................Tallahassee, Fla.
77. Roulhac, Miss Eliza..........................................Chipley, Fla.
78. Roundtree, Mrs. Eugenia ..................Tarpon Springs, Fla.
79. Rozier, Miss Nellie..........................................Sanford, Fla.
80. Scott, Miss Sarah......................................Tallahassee, Fla.
81. Scott, Mrs. Julia ........................ .... Tampa, Fla.
82. Shootes, Mrs. M. V...................................Tallahassee, Fla.
83. Simms, Mrs. Carrie.....................................Pensacola, Fla.





CATALOG, 1925-1926 27
Name Place
84. Simmons, Miss Lilian ..................Altemonte Springs, Fla.
85. Simmons, Miss Mabel .................Altemonte Springs, Fla.
86. Small, Mrs. Carrie............................................Quincy, Fla.
87. Speed, Miss Hisetta........................West Palm Beach, Fla.
88. Stirrup, Miss Lilian............................Coconut Grove, Fla.
89. Sunday, Miss Idell E .........................Pensacola, Fla.
90. Taylor, Miss Letitia.................................Tallahassee, Fla.
91. Thomas, Miss Marion................................Tallahassee, Fla.
92. Thompson, Miss Enith.......................Coconut Grove, Fla.
93. Thorpe, Mrs. E. S. B ...........................................Ocala, Fla.
94. Tyson, Mrs. Fannie L ...........................Jacksonville, Fla.
95. Watkins, Mrs. H. W ..................................Clearwater, Fla.
96. Whitfield, Miss Clementine....................Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
97. Whitfield, Mrs. Samantha................................Bartow, Fla.
98. Welters, Miss Romaldo ......................... Tampa, Fla.
99. Wesley, Mrs. Amanda ..........................St. Petersburg, Fla.
100. Weston, Mrs. Lula B ....................West Palm Beach, Fla.
101. Williams, Mrs. M. E .......................... Jacksonville, Fla.
102. Williams, Mrs. Katie L...............................Pensacola, Fla.
103. Williams, Miss Leontine....................................Lisbon, Fla.
104. Williams, Miss Dorothy A .......................Tallahassee, Fla.
105. Williams, Mrs. Alice A...........................Tallahassee, Fla
106. Williams, Mrs. H. E ......................... Tallahassee, Fla.
107. Williams, Miss Mabel H .......................... Waycross, Ga.
108. W ilson, M iss M aud ........................................Bartow, Fla.
109. Wilson, Miss Evelyn .......................... Jacksonville, Fla.
110. Wyatt, Mrs. susie...................................Apalachicola, Fla.
111. Daniels, M iss Olene.......................................Bessm er, Ala.
112. Coleman, Mrs. Lucile.............................Jacksonville, Fla.
113. Simmons, Mrs. Ethel H...........................Jacksonville, Fla.
114. Stephens, Mrs. Helen L. D...................Jacksonville, Fla.
115. Bland, Miss Bertha H .......................Jacksonville, Fla.
116. Whitaker, Mrs. Mary Ann ...................Tallahassee, Fla.
117. Martin, Miss Annie E ...................................Dunellon, Fla.
118. Alexander, Miss Mamie ...............................Dunellon, Fla.
119. Nims, Master Frank .................................Tallahassee, Fla.
120. Williams, Mr. H. C ...................................Gainesville, Fla.
121. Twine, Miss Elease ..................................Tallahassee, Fla.
122. Jones, Mrs. J. E.......................................Tallahassee, Fla.
123. Jones, Mrs. F. B.........................................Tallahassee, Fla.
a





Ik
I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





Florida A. & M. College
BULLETIN
FOR
1926-1927





I





CALENDAR
1926
Sept. 25 Saturday Boarding Dept. Opens
Sept. 27 Monday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 28 Tuesday Enrollment and Classification
Sept. 29 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 25 Thursday Thanksgiving
Dec. 7-9 Tues.-Thurs. Demonstration Agents' Annual
Meeting
Dec. 9 Thursday Annual Farmers' Conference
Dec. 22-27 Wed.-Monday Christmas Holidays
1927
Jan. 1 Saturday Emancipation Day
Jan. 25-28 Tues..Friday First Semester Examinations
Jan. 31 Monday Second Semester begins
Mar. 2-3 Wed.-Thurs. Leon County Boys Club Meeting
Apr. 22 Friday Declamatory Contest (High School)
May 6 Friday Oratorical Contest (Faculty Prize)
May 12 Thursday National Hospital Day
May 17-20 Tues.-Friday Second Semester Examinations
May 22 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 23 Monday Home Economics Day
May 23 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 24 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 24 Tuesday Physical Training Exhibition
May 25 Wednesday Class Day
May 25 Wednesday Class Play
May 26 Thursday Commencement Day
MANAGING BOARDS
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Hon. JOHN W. MARTIN, Chairman, Governor.
Hon. W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction.
Hon. H. CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State.
Hon. J. B. JOHNSON, Attorney General.
Hon. J. C. LUNING, State Treasurer.
STATE BOARD OF CONTROL
Hon. P. K. YONGE, Chairman ,Pensacola.
Hon. E. L. WARTMAN, Citra.
Hon. W. B. DAVIS, Perry.
Hon. A. H. BLANDING, Tampa.
Hon. E. W. LANE, Jacksonville.
Hon. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee.





32 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
FACULTY AND OFFICERS OF FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
School Year, 1926-27
J. R. E. LEE, A. B., M. A., Bishop College, LL. D. Wilberforce
University. Graduate work, University of Chicago and
University of Wisconsin-President.
R. O'HARA LANIER, A. B., Lincoln University. Graduate
work, Columbia University. Dean of College of Arts and
Sciences-Professor of Education.
E. S. LEWIS, Ph. B., University of Chicago-History and
Education.
A. L. KIDD, A. B., University of Michigan-Principal High
School, Instructor Psychology, Business, Bookkeeping and
Accounting.
F. E. JAMES, A. B., Wiley University-Principal of Junior
High School, Instructor in History, Civics and English.
EDMUND D. WASHINGTON, A. B.; University of Indiana.
Graduate work, University of Indiana-College English,
Head of Department.
R. L. BLOODWORTH, A. B., Atlanta University. Graduate
work, Columbia University-High School English, As-
sistant to the Head of Department of English.
DOROTHY C. JACKSON, Ph. B., University of Chicago-
Ancient and Romance Languages.
H. M. EFFERSON, A. B., Atlanta University. Graduate work,
University of Minnesota-College Mathematics, Head of
Department.
E. F. MANCE, B. S., Howard University-High School Mathe-
matics.
A. P. TURNER, A. B., Morehouse College-Chaplain,
Sociology, Public Speaking, Moral and Religious Edu-
cation.
BERNICE CHISM, B. S., Howard University-College Science,
Head of Department; Chemistry, Biology.
E. E. BRADFORD, B. S., A. & M. College. Graduate work,
University of Chicago-General Science, High School
Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory Assistant College
Chemistry.
E. E. MATTHEWS, A. B., Howard University-Critic Teacher,
5th and 6th Grades; in charge of Model School, Instructor
School Management.
MARION BRITTON, Tuskegee Institute-Critic Teacher 3rd
and 4th Grades; Assistant Practice School, Instructor
Penmanship.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 S3
AMY JACKSON, A. & M. College, Special Work Hampton
Institute-Critic Teacher 1st and 2nd Grades, Model
School, Kindergarten Methods.
ANNIE L. BROWN, Conservatory, Washington, D. C., Cole-
ridge Taylor College of Music-Instrumental Piano,
Musical Appreciation.
IDALENE STRANGE, American Conservatory-Vocal and
Public School Music, Music Appreciation.
C. O. BROWN, Hampton Institute-Acting Director Agricul-
tural Department, Professor of Vocational Agriculture,
Farm Projects, Husbandry.
M. E. THOMASSON, B. S., Iowa State Agricultural College-
Teacher Training Agricultural Education and Science.
CHAS. H. CHAPMAN, Howard University, Cornell University,
Michigan Agricultural College-Animal Husbandry and
Diarying.
MARY C. LEWIS, B. S., University of Chicago-Junior High
School, Mathematics and English.
JOHN D. WRAY, B. S., A. & T. College, Greensboro, N. C.-
Agronomy, Rural Education and Entomology.
J. C. BALDWIN, B. S., A. & M. College-Extension Farm
Agent and Demonstrator, Agricultural Statistician.
GERTRUDE C. DAVIS, A. & M. College, Alcorn, S. T. Taylor's
School of Dressmaking and Designing, New York-Acting
Director Home Economics Department, Sewing and
Millinery.
C. B. NELSON, Wilberforce University. Special work, HIamp-
ton Institute-Domestic Science, Teacher Training.
I. L. COLEMAN, Spellman College-Domestic Science in High
School.
HATTIE BRITT, Tuskegee Institute-Handicrafts, Elementary
Manual Arts.
H. P. ELLISS, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn-McDowell School of
Designing, Sewing and Domestic Art.
J. B. BRAGG, A. B., Talladega-Dean Mechanic Arts, Pro-
fessor of Vocational Education.
R. S. STENNETT ,Tuskegee Institute-Printing.
M. S. SANDERS, B. S., A. & T. College, Greensboro, N. C.-
Carpentry.
ZEORA HERCEY, Tuskegee Institute-Engineering and
Plumbing.
S. L. THORPE, Tuskegee Institute-Electrical Engineering.
CHAS. C. HAYLING, Trade Training, Goodwill & Wilson, Ltd.
Trinidad-B. W. I. Tailoring.





34 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
C. B. NASBY, Geo. R. Smith College. Special work, Univer-
sity of Chicago, Chicago Art School-Practical Arts, Free-
hand and Mechanical Drawing.
A. C. PHILLIPS, Tuskegee Institute-Masonry and Plastering.
EDWARD JONES, Hampton Institute-Painting, Decorating
Wall Papering.
CLYDE E. BRADFORD, A. & M. College-Commercial De-
partment Shorthand and Typewriting, Business English.
N. S. McGUINN, Hampton Institute-Dean of Women.
E. C. WEARE, Washburn College-Librarian, Instructor in
Library Methods, Reading and Story Telling.
W. T. REID, Hampton Institute-Auto Mechanics.
To Be Supplied-Resident Physician and Medical Director.
N. B. COOPER, R. N., Meharry Medical College-Superin-
tendent of Nurses.
*MAURICE A. LEE, English, A. B., Morehouse College, Study-
ing at the University of Chicago, Ill.
*B. L. PERRY, Professor of Farm Management, studying at
the Iowa State Agricultural College, Ames, Iowa.
A. S. PRATER-STEWART, Coolman Institute, Hampton In-
stitute, Physical Education for Girls, Instructor in Physi-
ology and Hygiene.
FRANZ JAZZ BYRD, A. B., Lincoln University, Pa., Law
Student Columbia University, Athletic Director.
A. W. LEE, Tuskegee Institute-Band Master.
J. R. E. LEE, Jr., A. B., Lincoln University-Business Manager.
E. E. BROUGHTON, B. S., A. & M. College. Special work,
Madison College-Auditor and Bookkeeper.
MARY F. OVERBY-Girls' Matron.
M. ARMAND JONES-Girls' Matron.
A. D. PADDYFOTE-Boys' Matron.
SYLVIA THOMAS-Dietitian.
C. T. FREELAND-Secretary to Business Manager.
E. D. DRAKEFORD, Assistant Bookkeeper and Cashier.
A. C. BRECKENRIDGE-Secretary to President.
C. E. FRAZIER-Secretary to Deans.
G. W. PATTERSON-Landscape Architect.
LETITIA I. REED-In Charge of Laundry.
*On leave of absence.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 35
GENERAL INFORMATION
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment, the
College was established in 1887 as a State Normal School.
Under the principalship of Mr. T. D. Tucker, assisted by Mr.
T. V. Gibbs, it was opened at Tallahassee, October 5, 1887,
with an attendance of 15 students. In 1891 the College moved
to its present site. In 1905 it passed from the direct manage-
ment of the State Board of Education to the management of
the Board of Control as one of the institutions of higher learn-
ing. In 1909 its name was changed to that of The Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legis-
lature. It is supported mainly by State and Federal appro-
priation.
BUILDINGS
In addition to the 15 main buildings, which are used for the
activities of the institution, the last Legislature made provision
for the erection of an administration building (brick) to cost
$150,000, and an additional girls' dormitory (brick) to cost
$100,000. The latter is now in course of erection.
In addition to these new buildings, provision was also made
for completing our new dining hall, new science building, me-
chanic arts building and a sewerage and water system. With
these new buildings and the completion of those just mentioned
we shall have the very best facilities for the young men and
women who may take advantage of the opportunity to study
at the A. & M. College.
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the College are few and simple, appealing
to the student's self-respect and personal responsibility. Pun-
ishment is by demerits, as follows: Five demerits make one
warning, or mark; ten demerits, two warnings or marks; fifteen
demerits in any one session make a student liable to suspension.
Suspended students may be reinstated by the Executive Com-
mittee or by the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be withdrawn
must be made to the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry. Cloth-
ing must be marked with indelible ink. Students should provide
themselves with the following:





36 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
General List for All Students
4 Sheets 6 Table Napkins
4 Pillow Cases 2 Bed Spreads
6 Towels 1 Bible
2 Blankets 1 Bottle Indelible Ink
1 Pillow 1 Dictionary
Girl's List
Navy Blue Coat Suit Raincoat
Navy Blue Wash Dresses Umbrella
White Uniform Blouses Navy Blue Blouses
Pair Rubbers Navy Blue Dress Skirts
Laundry Bags (3) pleated or plain
White Voile Social Blouses
Boy's List
Negligee Shirts Pajamas
White Collars Underclothing sufficient for
Pair Overalls three weeks
Laundry Bags Comb, Brush, Toothbrush
6 Table Napkins 1 Shoe Polishing Outfit
MILITARY ORGANIZATION
The young men are organized into Cadet Companies in
charge of a Commandant. The officers of the Cadet Com-
panies-commissioned and non-commissioned-are chosen from
the young men in the College classes.
The organization is maintained to help in the well-rounded
physical, mental and moral development of the boys. It is also
intended to cultivate habits of neatness, punctuality, obedience,
and to give an erect, healthy, manly bearing and a high regard
for law and order.
In addition to Company and Battalion drill, a course of mili-
tary calisthenics or gymnastics is given in the open air.
BAND
A band composed of young men of all departments is organ-
ized in connection with the Battalion. Young men and women
who can play any wind or string instrument should become
members of the band or orchestra.





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BULLETIN, 1926-1927 37
UNIFORMS
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or blue
serge, and with cap cost $20.00.
These uniforms are made in the College shop. Payment for
a uniform is required for matriculation of a young man. The
regulation is uniform suits, caps and white gloves.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances
for students, to send money by postal money order or express
money order or registered letter direct to the President. He
will not be responsible for money sent to students.
LITERARY SOCIETIES
There are five literary societies: Acme-Forum, for High
School men; Tucker-Lyceum, for Junior High School women;
Philosophian, for Senior High School women; the College Wits
Debating Club, for College men; and the Athenaeum, for Nor-
mal School and College women. These societies meet fort-
nightly.
PRIZES
High School Declamation Prize, given by High School so-
cieties.
The Susan Black High School Prize.
The Avent Scholarship Prize.
Faculty Oratorical Prize.
The College Wits Scholarship Prize.
Alumni Scholarship Prize.
RELIGIOUS EXERCISES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian.
In addition to the daily devotion, mid-week prayer service,
Sunday School, Sunday preaching, Vesper services and Bible
study courses, there are active Young Men's Christian Associa-
tion and Young Women's Christian Association. The Chaplain
of the College preaches every Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
ATHLETICS
All athletic activities and teams are under direct manage-
ment of a Governing Board, consisting of faculty and student
members. The student members of this Board are elected by
the members of the Athletic Association, which comprises the
entire student body.





38 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES
It is the purpose of the College to re-establsih tri-state de-
bates, which were formerly participated in by the students of
the institution.
RHETORICAL EXERCISES
Public rhetorical exercises are held at regular intervals.
An annual declamation contest is held in which representa-
tives from each of the High School literary societies compete.
EXPENSES
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel, per
m onth, $15.00; 8 m months ..............................................$120.00
Laundering, etc., for boys, per month, 8 months............ 16.00
Hospital fee, 25 cents per day while sick, in addition to
board.
ENTRANCE FEES AS FOLLOWS WILL BE PAID BY ALL
STUDENTS
Registration fee, per year ..................................................$ 2.00
Resident physician's service for the year (25c per
m onth) ............ ............................................................. 2.00
Entertainment fee (25c per month) per year................ 2.00
Breakage fee, per year...................................................... 1.00
A athletic fee, per year....................................................... 5.00
Total entrance fee........................................................$ 12.00
Tuition fee for all out-of-State students, per year........$ 20.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional.
PAYMENT OF BILLS
All bills are payable not later than the fifth of each month.
In all cases where students have not paid their bills by the fifth
of the month they will be required to give up school and do
such work as the school may assign them until the bills are
paid. During the time they are out of school for non-payment
of bills, the work which they will do will only pay for their
board for that time.
FACILITIES OF SELF-SUPPORT
A limited number of earnest young men and women will be
allowed to work out a part of their board and laundry expenses.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 39
Application for this privilege must be made in writing and
accepted before arrival. Money thus earned will be applied to
the boarding account of the student.
STATEMENT OF ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted to the Florida A. & M. College for
Negroes upon the basis of two requirements: 1. Scholarship
qualifications. 2. Personal qualifications. Candidates must
present satisfactory recommendations as to personal character
and must offer and file application on date of or previous to
entrance. Proper application blanks will be furnished upon
request.
SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted to all of the schools and departments
upon presenting:
1. Letter of honorable dismissal from institution last at-
tended.
2. Diploma, certificate, Record of Promotion card from last
school attended.
For advanced standing, exact duplicate of work here must
be produced.
3. In lieu of proper written record, a written examination
in all subjects is required for advanced standing. This might
be supplemented by standard and intelligence tests.
A. College Entrance Examination questions as outlined by
the College Entrance Board with an average of 75 and no mark
of less than 70, or C, will be accepted.
Approved High Schools, Academics and Preparatory Schools.
-At present no complete list of Approved High Schools and
Academies is available, but graduates of the High School De-
partments of the following schools will be admitted to College
upon diploma: Florida A. & M. College High School; Bethune-
Cookman College; Edward Waters College; Lincoln High
School, Gainesville, Fla.; Central Academy, Palatka; Washing-
ton High School, Pensacola; Lomax High School, Tampa;
Florida Normal and Industrial Institute, St. Augustine, Florida;
Florida Memorial College, Live Oak, Florida; and Stanton High
School, Jacksonville.
Students coming from Junior High Schools and entering our
other classes will be required to produce equivalent credits by
record or examination.





40 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
ENTRANCE WITH CONDITION
A student may enter with one condition the High School
Department, College, or receive advanced standing, but will be
classed in lower class until condition is removed. No trans-
ferred record is valuable or valid unless same is signed by
Principal or Record officer, bearing seal, giving name of text-
books, number of hours pursued and grades. Credit for High
School, Science or College Science must be accompanied with
note-books.
SPECIFIC ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS-COLLEGE
High School Subjects
The following is a list of High School subjects ordinarily
accepted for admission to the Freshman class. The number of
units after the subject indicates the maximum credit allowed
for entrance in these subjects, either as required, elective, or
both. (Example: Four units is the maximum number of cred-
its in English allowed for admission-three are required, and
one may be an elective.)
English .... 4 History ........ 4 *Greek ...... 3 *French .... 4
Economics .... 1 *Latinish .... 4
Civics ...... Italian ...... 4
Citizenship.... Y *German .... 4
Algebra .............. 1 Physics ................ 1 Drawing ......... 1.. 1
Adv. Algebra ......% Chemistry ............ 1 Domestic Art...... 2
Plane Geometry .. 1 Botany ................ 1 Domestic Science. 1
Solid Geometry....% Zoology .............. 1 Fine Arts ............2
Trigonometry ...... 2 Astronomy .......... 1 Industrial Arts .... 2
Composite or Gen- Physiology .......... V2 Stenography ...... 2
eral Mathematics General Science.. 1 Bookkeeping ...... 2
(9th grade) ...... 1 General Biology.. 1 Typewriting ........ 1
Physiography ...... 1 Commercial
Geology .............. 1 Geography ..... .
Agriculture ........ 1 Manual Training.. 1
*Not less than two units accepted in this subject.
SYSTEM OF GRADES
A-90-100; B-80-90; C-70-80; D-Condition; F-Failure.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 41
RULES REGARDING DEFICIENT RECORDS FOR HIGH
AND SENIOR SCHOOLS
Any High School student failing in any three Major subjects
must repeat the entire year's work. Incomplete records are not
transferred.
All records below 70 in any subject are deficient. A deficient
record is a failure if below 60, and a condition if above 60.
All failures and conditions must be removed before a student
can receive advanced catalogue classification.
A failure or condition in any subject will prevent graduation.
A failure is removable only by repeating the subject in class
as soon as scheduled in program. This subject takes prece-
dence over all subjects.
A condition is removable by the student's performing such
work as is designated by the instructor.
An extra special examination will be granted the first week
in April to candidates for graduation for removal of conditions
incurred during the Senior year.
A passing record in any subject becomes deficient by the
withdrawal of a student, and is ranked as a condition, provided
the student takes special instruction in the subject under some
one approved by the President; otherwise it is ranked as a
failure. This special instruction must cover the work done by
the student's class during his absence.
Students who have been absent in the High School a total of
15 times in Major subjects, or more than 6 times in any sub-
ject, lose one-third of the final grade.
When College students over-cut they lose ONE-HALF credit
or get no credit.
Five demerits equal ONE MARK or WARNING. THREE
marks or FIFTEEN demerits suspend a student from school.
Suspended students may be reinstated at the discretion of the
Executive Committee upon written application of parent or
guardian and student to President Lee and the Executive Com-
mittee.
Any student failing in three subjects under three different
instructors may be asked to withdraw from the institution, and
will be re-admitted only upon special permission from President
and Executive Committee, by written application from student
and guardian or parent.
COLLEGE CUT SYSTEM
A strict account will be kept of all College and High School
absentees. In cases where actions warrant it, a student's credit





42 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
may be cut by the Dean for going over limit of absentees. He
will receive only half credit when he goes over the limit.
1-hr. Course- 3 absentees ....................... 6-No credit at all
2-hr. Course- 6 absentees ........................10-No credit at all
3-hr. Course- 8 absentees........................14-No credit at all
4-hr. Course-10 absentees........................16-No credit at all
5-hr. Course-12 absentees .......................18-No credit at all
Three tardy marks count as one absence.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND MILITARY DRILL
No excuses are accepted for missing Battalion formation and
drill, and Physical Education for girls. An absence without
permission brings action by demerit committee. Student ap-
pearing without uniform is absent on assigned days.
In case of death, sickness and hospital certificate (no excuse
allowed for dormitory illness without physician's certificate)
and compulsory absence from campus, any of the above rules
might be reconsidered if the student has a general daily average
of 80, or B; otherwise all rules will hold. They will be enforced
by Faculty and Executive Committee action. High School and
Junior High School absentees will be checked by their respec-
tive principals.
HIGH SCHOOL CUT SYSTEM
If at any time a student gets more than six absences in any
one subject he will have one-third of his final mark or grade
deducted. This rule will be enforced, and in case this does not
hold, 15 absentees call for a repetition of subject.
DEFINITION OF A UNIT
A unit of secondary work represents a year study in secon-
dary High or Preparatory School constituting approximately %4
(one-fourth) of a full year's work of not less than 120 clock
hours in recitation. Two laboratory, drawing, industrial, agri-
cultural project, or H. E. periods are regarded as the equivalent
of one recitation period.
SPECIFIC UNITS
Students desiring to take Normal and College, H. E. are ad-
vised to present two (2) units-Domestic science, sewing or
handicraft. Mechanic Arts one (1) unit for mechanical draw-
ing; two (2) units math, one (1) unit manual training or in-
dustries. Agriculture-two (2) units composed of the follow-
ing: High School, dairying, general agriculture and farm pro-





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 43
ject work. A. B. two (2) units of Latin or Greek, two (2)
history, social science. B. S. three (3) units of science, two
(2) units modern language. Requirements of Education stu-
dents-Language and general College entrance subjects.
ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
A student entering from any other college will be admitted
with the advanced credit to which his previous work entitles
him. If he comes from a college whose entrance requirements
and curriculum are equivalent to those of the Florida A. and
M. College he will receive credit for his past work, but will be
obliged to take all the required subjects in the course in which
he wishes to enroll that have not been covered in his previous
work.
All advanced credits allowed must be considered provisional,
as the College reserves the right of revising and altering them
whenever the work of the student indicates the necessity of
such a change.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The School is organized on the semester basis, with the hope
of quarterly organization by change. One semester hour is the
credit allowed for any College course pursued 16 or 18. weeks,
one recitation per week. If pursued for a year, becomes two
(2) semester hours, 1 year hour, College credit or unit; 64
semester hours or 32 year hours or credits are required for
Normal, Junior College, graduation; 124 semester hours for
College graduation B. S. or A. B. Physical education is re-
quired. One unit is allowed for any High School course oper-
ated five times or recitations per week, with a total of not less
than 120 clock hours of recitation.
GENERAL STATEMENTS REGARDING CURRICULUM
The academic or literary activities of the College are carried
on in two schools-the High School and the College. There is
also a nucleus of a school of music. The vocational activities
are carried forward in four schools-The Schools of Agricul-
ture, of Mechanic Arts, of Home Economics, of Health and of
Pedagogy, Divisions of Correspondence and Extension, Physi-
cal Education, Business Practice and Social Service.
ADMISSION
For admission to the institution, applicants must be of sound
health and good reputation, and must furnish evidence of hav-
ing satisfactorily completed the work of the sixth grade; pro-





44 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
vided, however, that students 15 years of age and over, who
have not had the opportunity of an elementary education, de-
sire some special work. They may enter in any grade below
the seventh hfor special preparatory work. *Such students may
specialize in trade work. For advance standing in the High
School, applicants must furnish additional evidence either by
examination or by credits from accredited schools, guaranteeing
such standing.
*Night school students who have not finished elementary
schools might enter for this work.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
The College urges very strongly that each student enter a
regular course and take the work as outlined for that course,
even though he can stay but for a limited time. Students are
given special classification only when the age and preparation
of the applicant seem to render such action necessary and ex-
pedient.
Applicants for admission to the Freshman class without con-
dition must present sixteen units. Applicants who present
fourteen units may be admitted conditioned in two units. One
unit of such deficiency must be made up before the beginning
of the Sophomore year. All entrance conditions must be re-
moved by the beginning of the Junior year.
Single half units will be accepted only in the sciences and
civics. Less than two units of foreign language will not be
accepted in fulfillment of entrance requirements.
Standard collegiate credits from other institutions of higher
learning are accepted so far as these credits apply on the cur-
riculum to which the student is admitted.
MAJOR WORK
Every student for the degree of Bachelor of Science, or
Bachelor of Arts, must elect a major department and file
application with the Dean of the department in which he
wishes to do major work before February of the Sophomore
year.
Each department prints the plans of its major work, but
these plans may be changed by the department to suit in-
dividual cases. A Major consists of not less than 18 units
or not more than 36 units, as indicated by the departments.
This work may all be done in one department. or part of it
may be in allied subjects in other departments, provided that
at least 18 units of the major work are taken in some one
department.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 45
OUTLINE OF COURSES
PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SEVENTH GRADE
First Semester Second Semester
Weekly Weekly
Periods Periods
Hours Hours
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
Reading .......................... 5 English, Grammar, Spell-
M them atics .................... 5 ing ................................
History and Civics............ 5 Reading .......................... 5
Geography ...................... M them atics .................... 5
M usic .............................. 2 History and Civics.......... 5
Drawing, W riting............ 5 Geography ......................
Nature Study and Sanita- Music ......................... 2
tion; Vocational Studies 5 Drawing, Writing ............ 5
Home Economics (girls) 6 Nature Study, Sanitation
Pre-Vocational Guidance Vocational Studies...... 5
Manual Training (boys).. 6 Home Economics (girls) 6
Physical Education.......... 2 Pre-Vocational Guidance
Manual Training (boys).. 6
Physical Education.......... 2
EIGHTH GRADE
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
English Grammar ............ 5 English Grammar ............ 5
Spelling, Reading ............ Spelling, Reading ............
Mathematics ................... 5 Mathematics .................... 5
History and Civics............ History and Civics.........
Geography ...................... 5 Geography ...................... 5
Physiology, Hygiene........ Physiology, Hygiene........
General Agriculture ........ General Agriculture ........ 5
Drawing, Writing ............ 5 Drawing, Writing ............
M usic ........ ..................... 2 M usic .............................. 2
Vocational Studies .......... Vocational Studies ..........
Pre-Vocational Guidance Pre-Vocational Guidance
Manual Training (boys).. 6 Manual Training (boys).. 6
Physical Educational........ 2 Physical Educational ........ 2
NINTH GRADE
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
English ........................... 5 English ............................ 5
Mathematics (Algebra) .. 5 Mathematics (Algebra) .. 5





46 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
First Semester Second Semester
Weekly Weekly
Periods Periods
Hours Hours
General Science ............. 5 General Science .............. 5
M usic .............................. 2 M usic .............................. 2
Drawing, Writing ............ 5 Drawing, Writing ............ 5
Literature, Spelling ........ Literature, Spelling ........
Supervised Study, Latin.. 6 Supervised Study............ 5
Vocational Studies .......... Vocational Studies..........
Physical Educational ...... 2 Physical Education.......... 2
Home Economics (girls).. 6 Home Economics (girls).. 6
Manual Training (boys).. 6 Manual Training (boys).. 6
Students having proper English prerequisites and an average
qf B in reading, spelling and English grammar may elect Latin
in the 9th grade instead of drawing, except in cases of Mechan-
ical Arts students, who are required to take mechanical draw-
ing.
Explanations:
Required Units Per Subject:
1. Three units of English.
2. Three units of mathematics, one unit being algebra.
3. Two units of the social studies, either history, geography
or civics.
4. Three units of home economics (girls).
5. Three units in trade (boys).
6. One unit in physical education.
7. Three units in science.
Content of Courses:
1. All courses will use the State prescribed books.
2. Vocational agriculture will follow the State course as
outlined by the State Supervisor of Agriculture.
3. Special classes formed for teaching of penmanship and
spelling, remedial and hospital classes.
4. Pre-vocational and vocational guidance will be used in
these grades.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 47
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
For the Senior High School of the Florida Agricul-
tural & Mechanical College
1926-1927
TENTH GRADE
First Semester Second Semester
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
1. English .................. 5 hrs. 1. English ................ 5 hrs.
2. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs. 2. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs.
3. Biology ................ 5 hrs. 3. Biology ................ 5 hrs.
4. Social Study.......... 5 hrs. 4. Social Study ........ 5 hrs.
5. Physical Educ........ 2 hrs. 5. Physical Educ....... 2 hrs.
6. M usic .................... 1 hr. 6. M usic .................... 1 hr.
Required Electives: Required Electives:
Practical Arts............ 6 hrs. Practical Arts............ 6 hrs.
(a) Agriculture (a) Agriculture
1. Animal Husbandry 1. Animal Husbandry
(b) Mechanic Arts (b) Mechanic Arts
1. Bricklaying 1. Bricklaying
2. Plastering 2. Plastering
3. Printing 3. Printing
4. Machine Shop Prac- 4. Machine Shop Prac-
tice tice
5. Carpentry 5. Carpentry
6. Auto Mechanics 6. Auto Mechanics
7. Painting 7. Painting
8. Electricity 8. Electricity
9. Plumbing 9. Plumbing
10. Tailoring 10. Tailoring
11. Freehand Drawing 11. Freehand Drawing
12. Mechanical Drawing 12. Mechanical Drawing
(c) Home Economics (c) Home Economics
1. Sewing 1. Sewing
2. Cooking 2. Cooking
3. Handicraft 3. Handicraft
4. Millinery 4. Millinery
Electives: Electives:
Foreign Languages.... 5 hrs. Foreign Languages.... 5 hrs.





48 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
EXPLANATION OF COURSES
The English course for the tenth grade shall consist of a
thorough study of rhetoric and composition throughout the
whole year. Weekly and daily themes will be required.
The Mathematics course shall consist of a detailed study of
Algebra II.
The Biology course will be divided into two distinct parts on
the semester basis. The first semester's work will consist of a
study of invertebrate zoology, while the second semester will
be consumed in a study of botany. A zoology notebook will
be required and a herbarium will have to be acquired by each
student.
The Social Study course will consist of a study of European
history. This will be a rather comprehensive course given to
afford the student a background for the further study of his-
tory.
The foreign language given in the tenth grade is Latin. The
text used is Caesar's Gallic Wars.
Music and physical education are required of all students.
ELEVENTH GRADE
First Semester Second Semester
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
1. English ................ 5 hrs. 1. English ................ 5 hrs.
2. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs. 2. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs.
3. Science ................ 5 hrs. 3. Science ................ 5 hrs.
4. Languages ............ 5 hrs. 4. Languages ........... 5 hrs.
M usic ........................ 5 hrs.
Physical Education ............... 2 hrs.
(a) Latin (a) Latin
(b) French (b) French
Required Electives: Required Electives:
Practical Arts ........... 6 hrs. Practical Arts ........... 6 hrs.
(a) Agriculture (a) Agriculture
1. Dairying 1. Dairying
(b) Mechanic Arts (b) Mechanic Arts
1. Bricklaying 1. Bricklaying
2. Plastering 2. Plastering
3. Printing 3. Printing
4. Machine Shop Prac- 4. Machine Shop Prac-
tice tice





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 49
First Semester Second Semester
5. Carpentry 5. Carpentry
6. Auto Mechanics 6. Auto Mechanics
7. Painting 7. Painting
8. Electricity 8. Electricity
9. Plumbing 9. Plumbing
10. Tailoring 10. Tailoring
11. Freehand Drawing 11. Freehand Drawing
12. Mechanical Drawing 12. Mechanical Drawing
(c) Home Economics (c) Home Economics
1. Sewing 1. Sewing
2. Cooking 2. Cooking
3. Handicraft 3. Handicraft
4. Millinery 4. Millinery
'Electives: Electives:
Social Study Social Study
Teacher Training Teacher Training
EXPLANATION OF COURSES
The English course for this grade shall consist of a study of
grammar and composition and the History of English Litera-
ture.
The Mathematics course shall consist of a study of plane and
solid geometry.
The Science course offered in this grade is chemistry (intro-
ductory).
Either French or Latin may be taken in this grade. One
requirement in the language work is that two years must be
taken of any one language in order to allow credit for the same.
The Social Study work offered in this grade is elementary
economics.
The Teacher Training course is preparatory to the Normal
work in teacher training.
TWELFTH GRADE
First Semester Second Semester
Required Subjects: Required Subjects:
1. English ................ 5 hrs. 1. English ................ 5 hrs.
2. Physics ................ 5 hrs. 2. Physics ............... 5 hrs.
3. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs. 3. Mathematics ........ 5 hrs.
4. History ................ 5 hrs. 4. History ................ 5 hrs.
5. Physical Educ....... 2 hrs. 5. Physical Educ....... 2 hrs.
6. M usic .................... 1 hr. 6. M usic .................... 1 hr.





50 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
First Semester Second Semester
Required Electives: Required Electives:
Practical Arts............ 6 hrs. Practical Arts............ 6 hrs.
(a) Agriculture (a) Agriculture
1. Poultry 1. Poultry
(b) Mechanic Arts (b) Mechanic Arts
1. Bricklaying 1. Bricklaying
2. Plastering 2. Plastering
3. Printing 3. Printing
4. Machine Shop Prac- 4. Machine Shop Prac-
tice tice
5. Carpentry 5. Carpentry
6. Auto Mechanic 6. Auto Mechanics
7. Painting 7. Painting
8. Electricity 8. Electricity
9. Plumbing 9. Plumbing
10. Tailoring 10. Tailoring
11. Freehand Drawing 11. Freehand Drawing
12. Mechanical Draw~ig 12. Mechanical Drawing
(c) Home Economics (c) Home Economics
1. Sewing 1. Sewing
2. Cooking 2. Cooking
3. Handicraft 3. Handicraft
4. Millinery 4. Millinery
Electives: Electives:
Foreign Languages.... 5 hr. Foreign Languages ... 5 hr.
Teacher Training...... 5 hrs. Teacher Training...... 5 hrs.
EXPLANATION OF COURSES
The History course in the twelfth grade is a study of Amer-
ican history.
Both Latin and French are included in the twelfth grade
language work.
The second half of the history course will be taken up in a
study of civics, community and U. S., State constitutions.
The Mathematics consists of solid geometry, first semester;
plane trigonometry, second semester.
ADDITIONAL EXPLANATIONS OF COURSES
1. Those students who elect a course in mechanic arts must
take either freehand drawing or mechanical drawing.
2. Those students who are in the teacher training course are
not required to take mathematics.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 51
3. Agricultural students must have at least four (4) hours
a week in project work.
4. A notebook and manual is required in all science courses,
especially those courses carrying laboratory work. Credit for
these courses cannot be gained without manuals and notebooks.
5. Those students who are specializing in mechanic arts are
required to take only three academic subjects and spend the
remainder of their time in applied scientific work in prepara-
* tion for the School of Mechanic Arts and Engineering.
6. All sciences carry TWO DOUBLE PERIODS for labora-
tory work.
7. More than six absentees in any one High School subject
calls for a deduction of one-third of the final grade.
8.. No High School student will be allowed to carry more
than three academic subjects, one of which may be condition,
except by special permission and a general average of A. Only
one condition may be allowed. Student having two conditions
will be classified in the same class until these are removed...
OUTLINE OF COURSE OF STUDY
College-B. S. in Education
Major (a)-In High School Education and Teaching
Major (b)-Elementary School Teaching and Supervision.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 5 E english .............................. 5
Science Science
General Chemistry ............ 4 General Chemistry ............ 4
Education ....................3 or 4 Education ....................3 or 4
Continued Industries ........4 Continued Industries ........ 4
M mathematics ...................... 4 M mathematics ...................... 4
Physical Education Physical Education
Electives come in the choice of Languages and Education for
Minor.
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
English ..................... 5 English .............................. 5
Physics ..................... 4 Physics .............................. 4
Education ...................3 or 4 Education....................3 or 4
Continued Industries ........ 4 Continued Industries ........ 4
Mathematics Mathematics
Electives-Chemistry, Language, Economics, Sociology,
Ethics, Agriculture.





52 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English ............................. 4 English ............................. 4
Science ........ ...................... 4 Science ........ ...................... 4
Biology Biology
Language .......................... 4 Language .......................... 4
Continued Industries ........ 4 Continued Industries ........ 4
Electives-History, Advanced Sociology, English, Education,
Psychology, Agriculture, Entomology, Rural Education.
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Education .......................... 4 Education .......................... 4
Continued Industries ........ 4 Continued Industries ........ 4
Psychology ........................ 4 Psychology ........................ 4
Electives-English, Mathematics, Science, Agriculture, His-
tory,'Logic and Language.
Explanation of Continued Industries:
Vy continued industries means a general survey by labora-
tory practice and theory of the various trades with the view
of using industries as vocational guidance, believing that all
future teachers, school principals and supervisors should have
a general knowledge of industries, pre-vocational and voca-
tional guidance; for women, some phase of Home Economics,
Handicraft, Millinery, Ladies' Tailoring, Home Nursing or
Eugenics for Family Makers.
B. A.-With Major in Education, Political Science, History,
English, Social Sciences and Mathematics.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
L atin .................................. 4 L atin .................................. 4
E english .............................. E english .............................. 5
M them atics ......................4 M mathematics ...................... 4
Education ......................... 4 Education .......................... 4
Electives
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
Latin ............................ .. 4 Latin .................................. 4
E english ............................. 5 E english .............................. 5
Physics .............................. 4 Physics .............................. 4
History or Sociology.......... 4 History or Sociology.......... 4
Mathematics .................... 4 Mathematics ...................... 4
Electives Electives





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 53
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 4 English .............................. 4
Political Science ................ 4 Political Science ................ 4
E this ................................ 4 E this ................................ 4
- Modern Language ............ 4 Modern Language ............ 4
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 4 E english .............................. 4
Education .......................... 4 Education ......................... 4
Psychology ........................ 4 Psychology ........................ 4
Economics ........................ 4 Econom ics ........................ 4
Electives Electives
Explanation-In case that Education is elected as a Major,
eight hours of Manual Training and Agriculture for teachers
is required. The purpose of the A. B. course is to prepare
teachers in Latin, English, History, Social Sciences and Mathe-
matics, as well as general preparatory course for the study of
Law and the Social Service graduate courses.
OUTLINE OF NORMAL COURSE
LICENTIATE OF INSTRUCTION IN EDUCATION
Required for Graduation-64 Semester Hours.
No grade of less than C accepted for degree, others receive
Diploma in Education.
L. I. in Education.
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 5 E english V ........................ 5
Education I. ..................... 3 Education II. .................... 3
Review Arithmetic and Review Algebra, Methods
M ethods ........................ 3 of Teaching ................ 3
Review Geography ............ 3 Methods of Teaching
Art and Drawing................ 2 Geography .................... 3
Public School M usic.......... 2 ............................................ 2
G general Psychology............ 4 ........................................... 2
* Manual Training for Child Psychology ..............4
Teachers ........................ 4 Agricultural Nature Study 4
H E .................................. 2 H E ................................. 2
Physical Education Physical Education
Practice Teaching Practice Teaching
Practice teaching of at least 16 lessons in all subjects and
grades required-4 hours each week.





54 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
School Gardening .............. 2 School Gardening and
Word Study ...................... 3 Elementary School
Review Grammar and Project Work
Spelling for Teachers.... 2 Literature for Teachers.... 5
Advanced American His- Advanced Civics and
tory and Methods.......... 3 Government, Constitu-
Education, 2 and 3............ 3 tion and Method............ 3
General Science for Education, 4 and 5............ 3
Teachers ........................ 3 H andicraft ........................ 3
W writing A rt II ................................ 2
Methods ............................ 2 Tests, Measurements ........ 4
Physiology, Hygiene and Physical Education
Methods of Teaching Practice Teaching
Health Instruction ............ 4
Physical Education
Practice Teaching
Electives
Electives-Special Primary Methods I, II, III, IV, Elemen-
tary School Methods I and II, Intermediate study Junior High
School Education I and II, Languages, Political Science, Social
Sciences, Physical Education, Public School Music, Argumen-
tation, Public Speaking, Agrono my,Wood Turning, Industries,
H. E., Agriculture.
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
Prerequisite-Same as for College Entrance
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English V .......................... 4 English V .......................... 4
Mathematics .................... 4 Mathematics ................ 4
Chem istry .......................... 4 Chem istry .......................... 4
Language .......................... 4 Language ......................... 4
(French or Spanish) (French or Spanish)
Home Economics I............ 4 Home Economics I............ 4
Home Economics VI.......... 4 Home Economics VI.......... 4
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
English VI.......................... 3 English VI ......................... 3
Physics .............................. 4 Physics .............................. 4
Language .......................... 3 Language .......................... 3
Home Economics II............ 4 Home Economics II............ 4
Home Economics VII........ 4 Home Economics VII........ 4





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 55
Electives- Electives-
Ethics Ethics
Chemistry Chemistry
Economics Economics
History-and Major History-and Major
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
E english .............................. 3 E english .......... ............ ..... 3
Psychology ........................ 3 Psychology ........................ 3
Home Economics VIII...... 4 Home Economics V.......... 4
Home Economics III.......... 4 Home Economics VI........ 4
' Physical Education............ 1 Physical Education............ 1
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
: E english .............................. 3 E english .......... ........... ...... 3
History ............ ........... 3 History ....... ..... ........ 3
Home Economics IX.......... 2 Home Economics VII........ 2
Home Economics XII........ 2 Review Home Ec. II ......... 2
Drawing. .......................... 2 Review Home Ec. VI........ 2
Physical Education .......... 1 Drawing ...................... 2
Review Home Ec. II .......... 2 Physical Education............ 1
Review Home Ec VI.......... 2
TWO-YEAR TEACHER TRAINING COURSE FOR HOME
ECONOMICS
(Smith-Hughes)
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Home Economics II.......... 4 Home Economics II.......... 4
Home Economics VI.......... 4 Home Economics VI.......... 4
English V .......................... 4 English V .......................... 4
Household Chemistry....... 4 Home Economics XI.......... 3
Education .......................... 3 Household Chemistry........ 4
Physiology ........................ 3 Education I........................ 3
Psychology ........................ 3 Physiology ........................ 3
Physical Education............ 1 Physical Training.............. 1
Psychology ........................ 3





56 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Home Economics II.......... 4 Home Economics II ............4
Home Economics VII........ 4 Home Economics VII ........ 4
Home Economics X.......... 4 Home Economics IX .......... 4
Home Economics VII........ 4 Home Economics VII ........ 2
Home Economics XII........ 2 Household Physics ............ 4
Home Economics III.......... 4 English VI ......................... 3
English VI.......................... 3 Rural Economics................ 3
Physical Education............ 1 Physical Training.............. 1
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN VOCATIONS
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics VII............... 5 Mathematics VIII.............. 5
Chemistry I-v ................... 5 Chemistry I-b ....................5
English V ...........5................ English V............................ 5
Mathematics XI.................. 5 Mathematics XI ................. 2
Laboratory 'III................... 3 Laboratory III.................... 3
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
M mathematics VII................ 2 Power Plants...................... 2
General Physics.................. 3 Mechanical Drawing.......... 3
Elementary Mechanics...... 5 Machine Design ................. 2
Steam Engines .................. 2 Graphic Statics.................. 2
English .............................. 3 Laboratory ....................... 5
English ........ ................... 3
JUNIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Applied Mechanics ............ 3 Gas Engines ..................... 2
Economics ........................ 3 Strength of Materials........ 1
Fuel and Oil Tests............ 1 Thermodynamics .............. 2
English .............................. 3 H ydraulics ........................ 2
Laboratory ........................ 3 English ....................... 5
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Direct Current Systems.... 3 Alt. Current Systems........ 3
English .............................. 3 Cost Accounting ................ 3
Pow er Tests........................ 2 A utom obiles ...................... 3
Public Speaking ................ 2 English .............................. 2





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 57
Vocations: Electrical, Mechanical, Tailoring, Bricklaying,
Printing, Auto Mechanics, Machine Shop Practice, Carpentry
and Construction.
TWO-YEAR COURSE-SMITH-HUGHES
(Trades)
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
-Arithmetic (required) ...... 5 Arithmetic (required) ...... 5
English ..............................5 English .............................. 5
Drawing and Plan Reading 5 Drawing (required).......... 5
Manual Tr. (Wood).......... 2 Hygiene (required) .......... 2
Shop W ork ........................15 Shop W ork ........................15
,SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
History .............................. 2 Geography (required)...... 5
: Algebra (required) ............ 5 Algebra ..............................5
Drawing (required) .......... 5 Estimates .......................... 2
Shop Work (Practical) Shop Work (Practical)
(Required) ....................15 (Required) ....................15
English .............................. 3 H history ................... ..... 2
Persons who finish this two-year course are given certificates
'in the various trades.
COMMERCIAL COURSE
First Semester (First Year)
Courses- Hours
Bookkeeping I ........................................ ....... 5
English and Penm anship ................................................ 5
Typewriting and Stenography.......................................... 5
Com m ercial A rithm etic .................................................... 3
Spanish .............................................. 5
Electives--
Psychology I
Economics I
Second Semester (First Year)
Courses- Hours
B ookkeeping II ................................................................ 4
-English Composition ...................................5... 5





58 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Typewriting and Stenography .......................................... 5
Spelling (Commercial) ................................................... 2
Spanish ........................................ ............ 5
Economic Geography ............................................ 4
25
Electives-
Psychology II
Economics II
Business Problems
First Semester (Second Year)
Courses- Hours
Accounting I ........................................ 3
Business Organization and Office Training.................... 3
Commercial Law and Business Training ........................ 5
Typewriting and Stenography ........................................ 5
Business English ........................................ .... 5
Electives .......... ........... ................... ............ 4
25
Electives-
Insurance
Money and Banking
Real Estate
Second Semester (Second Year)
Courses- Hours
Accounting II ........................................ .... 3
Typewriting and Stenography ........................................ 5
Public Speaking and Argumentation.............................. 2
Advertising ................................................................... 2
Current Events ....................................... ..... 1
S ociology .......................................................................... 2
Electives ........................................ ........... 10
25
Electives-
Teaching of Commercial subjects
Business Ethics
Personnel Administration
Salesmanship





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 59
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
Course Leading to a B. S. Degree in Agriculture
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 5 English .............................. 5
Chemistry (General) ........ 5 Chemistry (General) ........ 5
L General Bacteriology ........ 3 Animal Husbandry ............ 3
Agronomy (Field Crops).. 3 (1 Lab. double period)
Animal Husbandry ............ 3 Poultry Husbandry............ 3
1 Lab. (double periods) .... Botany (Gen.) .................. 3
Poultry Husbandry............ 3 Horticulture ...................... 3
(Gardening)
SOPHOMORE
E english .............................. 3 E english .............................. 3
Chemistry (Qual.) ............ 3 Chemistry (Qual.) ............ 3
Geology (Gen.) ................ 3 Biology (Plant) ................ 3
Agronomy ........................ 3 Entom ology ...................... 3
(Soils) Principles of Dairying...... 2
Zoology .............................. 3 (1 Lab. double period)
Zoology.3 (1 Lab. double period)
Principles of Dairying ...... 2 Plant Breeding .................. 2
(1 Lab. double period) Seminar ............................ 1
Seminar ............................ 1 (Agri.)
: (Agri.)
JUNIOR
Taxonomy .......................... 3 Systematic Botany............ 3
Agri. Bacteriology ............ 3 Chemistry (Quan.)............ 3
Chemistry (Quan.) 3 ............Agronomy3
^ B Chemistry (Quan.)............ 3 Agronomy .......................... 3
Psychology ........................ 3 Farm Management............ 2
Methods of Teaching ........ 3 Methods of Teaching........ 3
(Practice Work) (Practice Work)
Butter Making.................... Marketing Milk.................. 2
(1 Lab. double period) (1 Lab. double period)
Sem inar ............................ 1 Sem inar ............................ 1
Electives Electives
SENIOR
Ethics ................................3 Agri. Econom ics................ 2
-Agricultural Survey .......... 2 Morphology ...................... 3
Rural So iology.................. 2 Horticulture ...................... 2
gr Physics......................3 Organization and Methods 2
" Horticulture ...................... 2 Floraculture ...................... 1
| Agri. Engineering.............. 3 Seminar ........................... 1
[Seminar ............................2 (Agri.)
(Agri.)
r~~~~~~~~





60 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Junior Electives, Group 1
History of Agriculture.
Advanced Animal Husbandry.
Forestry (care of Forest Trees, etc.)
Animal Biology.
Landscape Gardening.
Plant Physiology.
Senior Electives, Group 2
Agricultural Genetics.
Plant Anatomy.
Ecology.
Ice Cream Making.
Dairy Cattle and Milk.
Production.
THIRD-YEAR NURSE TRAINING COURSE
JUNIOR
P hysiology ........................................................................ 2 (8)
A natom y .......................................................................... 2 (8)
H yg iene ............................................................................ 2 (8)
Medical Nursing .............................................................. 1 (34)
Surgical Nursing, Gynaecology........................................ 1 (8)
D ietetics ............................................................................ 2 (34)
E this of N ursing .............................................................. 1 (4)
MIDDLE
Materia Medica ................................................................ 2 (8)
B acteriology .................................................................... 2 (6)
Pediatrics ............................................ 2 (7)
O bstetrics .......................................................................... 1 (6)
U rinalysis .......................................................................... 1 (4)
Medical Nursing Con........................................................ 1 (8)
Surgical Nursing Con........................................................ 1 (8)
SENIOR
Obstetrical Nursing ......................................................... 1 (8).
Nervous Diseases (Lectures) ........................................ 5
Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat (Lectures) ................................ 6
History of Nursing.................................. 2 (8)
Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of weeks the
subject is pursued.





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BULLETIN, 1926-1927 61
AGRICULTURE COURSES
DESCRIPTION AND EXPLANATION
The Department of Agriculture is made up of all the divi-
sions-in the school of agriculture, devoted to the various phases
of technical and practical work. The work of the various
divisions is closely related, and the purpose of all of them is
to train men and women for better service in the broad field
of agriculture.
Students who complete the various High School courses will
receive certificates, and the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture (B. S. A.) will be conferred upon those who finish
the College Department of Agriculture.
The Florida A. & M. College offers four courses in Agricul-
ture. They are as follows:
(1) A four-year course in Agriculture leading to the degree
of B. S. A.
(2) A two-year course in Poultry Husbandry leading to a
diploma.
(3) A two-year course in Horticulture and Vegetable Gar-
dening leading to a diploma.
(4) A two-year course in Dairy Husbandry leading to a
diploma.
These two-year courses are intended mostly for girls. Boys
may take them if they wish. For those who wish positions in
high schools or county training schools, or county supervision
work in the public schools, these three two-year courses offer
flattering opportunities. It means a good position at a good
salary for those who finish these courses, or it means bigger
i money for those who would go out and start a poultry farm
or engage in gardening or dairying. The opportunities for
such students are unlimited in the State of Florida.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
English in the Freshman and Sophomore years same as other
college English. No English in the Junior and Senior years.
(A) Chemistry-See Academic Chemistry.
Agronomy I.
(Field Crops)-Freshman year. Three hours per week, 2
credits, one semester.
A general course dealing with the fundamental principles of
crop production and soil management, also the adaptability,





62 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
distribution and use of the various field crops, seed selection,
preparation of the soil and other factors affecting the develop-
ment of field crops.
Agronomy II.
(Soil Management)-Sophomore year. Three hours per
week or 2 credits, first semester.
This course takes up an advanced study of field crop, such
as crop rotation, origin of the soil material and method of
cultivation, maintenance of soil fertility, conservation of soil
moisture. Also forage crops, legumes, and grasses, hay crops,
soiling crops, pastures and silage. It will also discuss fertilizers
and their uses.
Agronomy III.
Sophomore Year: (Crop distribution, plant breeding, and
special crops.) Three hours per week, 2 credits.
First Semester-A study of diseases affecting fields, gardens
and orchard crops (parasitic fungi).
The relation of economic plants to their environment includ-
ing a brief review of ecological factors, plant breeding and its
economic value, special crops, such as the student would be
especially interested in.
Agronomy IV.
(Soil Fertility)-Junior year. Three hours per week, 2
credits for one semester.
An advanced study of the influence of soil fertility, crop
yields, effect of crop rotation, the productions of various types
and classes of soil, comparison of different systems of cultiva-
tion, seed testing, identification of weeds and weed seeds, erad-
ication of pesemistic weeds, purity of field and garden seeds.
Agronomy V.
Farm Management-Freshman Year
Two hours per week, 1 semester credit.
A study of the location of farms, type of farms, farm build-
ing, organization, labor, its distribution and uses, farm credits,
general farm management, social and community organization,
including co-operative buying and selling.
Poultry Husbandry-Freshman Year
1. Farm poultry as a side line on the farm, breeding, varie-
ties, location and construction of buildings, feeding, incuba-
tion, care of baby chicks, adult birds and general management.





I ~ BULLETIN, 1926-1927 63
One semester, three hours per week, 2 semester credits.
Second Semester-Poultry Husbandry II, commercial poul-
try keeping. Two hours per week, 2 semester credits.
Incubation, breeding, rearing chicks. Spring and summer
work. Culling, a study of farm grown feeds, poultry pastures,
fattening and marketing.
Botany-(Botany I)
1. (General) Freshman year. Three hours per week or 2
semester credits.
A study of structure, form, development, function of seed
plants and ferns. The reproductive processes, principles un-
derlying plants, breeding, selection and development of new
forms, economic importance of plants, particularly as applied
to the State of Florida.
Botany II-(Plant Biology)
Sophomore year, three hours per week, 2 semester credits.
This course will treat the structure and physiology of seed
plants, seed algae, mosses, fern and the general classification
of the local flora, giving special attention to the flora of the
State of Florida. At least one laboratory period will be re-
quired per week.
Botany III-(Plant Breeding)
Sophomore year, two hours per week, 1 semester credit.
This course is intended to acquaint the student with the
principles of plant breeding as it applies particularly to farm
and garden crops. It will deal with the vitailty of seed, seed
selection, the advantages and disadvantages of crossing,
climatic effect upon plants, their distribution and adaptation
for farm purposes.
Botany IV.-(Agricultural Bacteriology)
Junior year, three hours per week, 2 semester credits.
Special attention will be given to micro-organisms, especially
those of plants, soils, milk and its products and the common
live stock diseases, prerequisite general bacteriology.
Botany V.
(Taxonomy seed plants). Three hours per week, 2 semester
credits. Prerequisite Botany I, II, III, IV.
Junior Year
A study of the principles and classification of important
group of plants which furnish our weed flora. A study of
local flora in fields with an opportunity given for collections
of specimens for preservation and a private herbarium.





64 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
l]/~~~~ ~~Botany VI.
;It~ (Systematic Botany). Three hours per week, 2 semester
E[i ~ ~ credits.
11j/I~~~~ ~Junior Year
I~~!I A course intended primarily to acquaint the student with
the Plant Life of Florida, both cultivated and will plants, also
to give him some definite idea of plant groups and their rela-
tionship. A broad knowledge of plant types and varieties will
be given as a basis of the most important plant production
work. Special consideration will be given plants in Agronomy,
,,,j ~ Horticulture and Forestry.
Botany VII.
(Morphology). Three hours per week, 2 semester credits.
Senior Year
:~' ~ A branch of Biology dealing with the forms and structure
fi1~ ~ of plants and animals, the science of structural organic types,
f' study of forms and relations, structural botany, plant organ-
isms, or organography, internal morphology or plant anatomy.
HORTICULTURE
Horticulture I (Including Gardening)-3 Hours per Week,
4I 2 Semester Credits
*I FRESHMAN YEAR
The fundamental principles of horticulture, horticultural
practice, propagation, pruning, spraying, training important
fruit and ornamental plants in the State of Florida, propaga-
tion of flowers, shrubs, etc.
At least one hour per week laboratory work. A study of
garden plants, their propagation, classification, origin and re-
lationship, varieties, cultural methods in different sections, fer-
l[&~i 'tilizer, irrigation, harvesting and marketing. Special attention
will be given the home garden.
!>:jr Horticulture II-2 Hours per Week, 1 Semester Credit
SENIOR YEAR
A study of commercial fruit growing, orchard practice,
pruning and spraying, selecting trees for both home and com-
*,q; ~ mercial orchard sites, setting orchard trees, small fruits and
their culture. General management; smugging for protection
against frost and freezes; packing and shipping, etc.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 65
This course will also include commercial trucking, care and
management of a commercial truck farm; varieties best suited
for market, packing, shipping and co-operative marketing.
Horticulture III (Floriculture)-2 Hours per Week,
I Semester Credit
SENIOR YEAR
A study of growing flowers upon the home and school
grounds, home and school decorations, cuttings, potting plants,
greenhouse crops, their cultural methods and requirements,
ventilating, heating, light, etc. Special attention will be given
both to hard and soft wood cuttings.
ENTOMOLOGY
Entomology I (Study of Insects).
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SOPHOMORE
.. applied Entomology based on structure, classification, life
history, recognition and general control of insects injurious to
.. agricultural crops, especially in the State of Florida. At least
one laboratory period will be required per week.
^*~- ~ GEOLOGY
Geology I (General).
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
iA study of the origin, material and structure of the earth
Ahad the many agencies involved in producing various geological
.changes. Special attention will be given to geology as it ap-
lies to general agriculture.
a:' ZOOLOGY
Zoology I (General).
. Three hours per week. Three semester credits.
^- SOPHOMORE YEAR
A study of the structure, function, relationship and evolu-
onary types of invertebrates and vertebrae.
' This course is intended to give the student a general knowl-
Widge of the animal kingdom.





66 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
PHYSICS I
(Agricultural Engineering)
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SENIOR YEAR
This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of
farm machinery, farm motor power, soils and heat as applied
in transportation on the farm, machinery, tractor, gas engines,
. Y -other motor power, for sawing wood, threshing machines, hay
bailers, pumping water and lighting up the farm premises.
PHYSICS I1 (Agricultural)
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SENIOR YEAR
A short course treating the elements of general physics with
emphasis on special problems relating to physics of agriculture,
machines, soils, weather, and the application of heat, light and
electricity on the farm.
PSYCHOLOGY
Same as Junior College psychology.
Methods of teaching and practice work. Three hours per
week. Two semester credits.
JUNIOR YEAR
Methods of Teaching. Three hours per week. Two semester
credits.
This course is designated for professional work in teaching
agriculture. The student is given the modern methods of teach-
ing agriculture; the lesson plan and presentation and actual
practice in teaching in connection with the course.
ECONOMICS ANI RURAL SOCIOLOGYAAgriculture)__
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SENIOR YEAR
This course is intended to acquaint the student with farm
and rural conditions generally. Rural life, co-operative mar-
keting, marketing farm products, movement of rural people,
agricultural credits, history of public land policies, social or-
ganizations and rural improvement generally.
ii. J





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 67
DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY
Course 4
Two hours credit.
One lecture and a laboratory per week.
This course considers the nature of bacteria and their rela-
tion to dairy work, including their sources, action on milk, but-
ter and cheese, and methods of controlling their growth; grad-
ing of milk, lactic acid, and gas-producing atia. ; '-,-'
the term closes.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
_ Dairy Herd Management
This course dealswith the feeding and management of dairy
herds. It includes a study of pedigree, handling, testing cows,
judging of dairy cattle, and other subjects pertaining to the
i successful management of dairy herds. The student will be
bi required to care for certain individuals in the herd.
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
English ............................. 3 English .............................. 3
Poultry Architecture ........ 2 Poultry Histology .............. 3
Pnultrv Survey.................. 1 Zoology .......................... 3
A TWO YEAR COURSE IN HORTICULTURE
(Boys and Girls)
A two-year course leading to diploma. Open to High School
graduates and Junior College students. Two year college
credits are given for the completion of this course.
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Course II-College De$.
Three hours per week.
: Laboratory double period.
A general outline of the principles of heredity as applied to
breeding of animals, with a study of animal forms, origin,
nation of breeds, crossing and grading.
~ An outline of the methods of registration, the study of rec-
s and pedigrees.





68 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
.,_,FEEDS AND FEEDING
I, -;^- Course III-College Dept.
Three hours per week.
Laboratory double period.
Classification, digestibility and functions of feed nutrients;
classification, sources and values of feeding stuffs; feed re-
quirements and calculations of rations for farm animals.
HIGH SCHOOL DAIRYING
bailers, pumping water and lighting up the farm premises.
PHYSICS II (Agricultural)
Three hours per week. Two semester credits.
SENIOR YEAR
A short course treating the elements of general physics with
emphasis on special problems relating to physics of agriculture,
machines, soils, weather, and the application of heat, light and,
electricity on the farm.
PSYCHOLOGY
Same as Junior College psychology.
Methods of teaching and practice work. Three hours per
week. Two semester credits.
JUNIOR YEAR
Methods of Teaching. Three hours per week. Two semester
credits.
This course is designated for professional work in teaching
agriculture. The student is given the modern methods of teach-
ing agriculture; the lesson plan and presentation and actual
practice in teaching in connection with the course.
ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY (Agriculture)
Course 2
Three hours credit.
Two recitations per week.
Laboratory a double period.
This course will take up the standardization of milk and
cream; effect of bacterial action on the quality of milk; cooling,
handling and general care of milk on the farm; judging milk;
scoring dairy barns.
h





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 69
Ice Cream Making
Course 3
Two hours credit.
One lecture per week.
Laboratory a double period.
Standardizing of mixtures and freezing of ice cream, sherbets
and other frozen products and the physical principles involved;
types of freezers, flavoring materials, fillers and binders.
This course begins the second week in March and lasts until
the term closes.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Dairy Herd Management
This coursedals with the feeding and management of dairy
herds. It includes asudy of pedigree, handling, testing cows,
judging of dairy cattle, and other subjects pertaining to the
successful management of dairy herds. The student-will be
required to care for certain individuals in the herd.
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 3 English .............................. 3
Poultry Architecture ........ 2 Poultry Histology.............. 3
Poultrv Surve .................. 1 Zoology .............................. 3
A TWO YEAR COURSE IN HORTICULTURE
(Boys and Girls)
.-- A two-yAar course leading to diploma. Open to High School
* graduates and Junior College students. Two year college
edits are given for the completion of this course.
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
7E english .............................. 5 E english .............................. 5
Farm Arithmetic .............. 1 Plant Biology .................... 3
Soils .................................. 3 Vegetable Gardening........ 4
.F'orage and Soiling Crops.. 3 Plant Physiology................ 3
ylVegetable Gardening ........ 4 Co-operative Marketing.... 2
minar ............................ 1 (Lecture Work)
den Practice Seminar ............................ 1
Garden Practice





70 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
English .............................. 3 English .............................. 3
Systematic Botany ............ 3 Agricultural Botany.......... 3
Bacteriology ..................... 3 Etomology ........................ 3
Horticulture ................... 3 Agric. Economics .............. 3
Vegetable Gardening ........ 3 Horticulture ...................... 3
Plant Disease...................... 3 Agricultural Chemistry.... 3
Seminar ........ .................... 1 Seminar ............................ 1
Forcing Work Garden Practice
Garden Practice Forcing Work
Electives (approved) Electives (approved)
DESCRIPTION OF COURSE
English-Three hours per week for standard High School
graduates, or two semester credits, and for Junior College stu-
dents who may graduate with B. S. A. degree, upon completion
of their course.
Mathematics I (Farm Arithmetic)-One hour per week, one-
PSYCHOLOGY
Same as Junior College psychology.
Methods of teaching and practice work. Three hours per
week. Two semester credits.
This course will be the same as Soils and Fertilizers, in
Sophomore College.
Agronomy II-(Forage and Soiling Crops)-Three hours per
week, two semester credits. Same as Forage and Soiling Crops
in Junior College.
Horticulture --(Vegetable Gardening)-Three hours per
week, two semester credits. Same as Horticulture I, second
semester Freshman College.
Botany I-(General)-Three hours per week, second semes-
ter. Courses same as General Botany in Freshman College.
Botany II-(Plant Morphology)-Three hours per week, sec-
ond semester; two semester credits. Course same as College
Botany VII, Senior College.
Horticulture 11-(Vegetable Growing and Co-operative Mar-
keting)-Three hours per week, two semester credits. Course
same as Horticulture II, Senior College.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 71
A TWO-YEAR COURSE IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY
(For Boys and Girls)
A two-year course in Poultry Husbandry leading to a diplo-
ma. For High School graduates and Junior College students.
(Florida A. & M. C. or equivalent.)
Two years college credits given for the completion of this
course.
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
E english ............................. 5 E english .............................. 5
Poultry .............................. 3 General Bacteriology........ 3
Farm Arithmetic................ 1 Poultry Culling.................. 1
Animal Nutrition .............. 3 (Lecture Work)
Poultry Research .............. 2 Incubation and Practice
W ork (Seminar) W ork .............................. 2
Incubator and Practice Seminar .......................... 1
W ork ............................ 2 Electives (approved)
Seminar
Electives (approved)
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
* E english .............................. 3 E english .............................. 3
Poultry Architecture ........ 2 Poultry Histology.............. 3
- Poultry Survey.................. 1 Zoology .............................. 3
Poultry Breed Comparison 2 Agricultural Economics.... 3
Crating, Fattening and Poultry Judging and Egg
Marketing Poultry Gardening .................... 2
(Lecture Work) ............... 2 (Lecture Work)
-Incubation and Practice Seminar ............................ 1
Work Incubation and Practice
Seminar ............................ 1 W ork
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
English I-(See Freshman College English)-Five hours per
-week, four semester credits. First year of special work.
Poultry II-(See Poultry Husbandry, Freshman College)-
Three hours per week, two semester credits. First year of
special work.
Mathematics I-(See Farm Arithmetic in First Year's Spe-
cial Course in Horticulture)-One hour per week, one-half
-semester credit. First year special work.
? ~ ~ ---------- --





72 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Animal Nutrition (Poultry)-Three hours per week, two
semester credits. First year's work in special course.
A general study of the principles of Animal Nutrition or
applied Poultry Husbandry (Poultry Nutrition), including the
physiology of the digestion, foods and their uses as nutrients
in the body, the standards of feeding, particularly as it applies
in the feeding of poultry.
Poultry (Research Work)-Two hours per week, one semes-
ter credit. A critical study and discussion of recent poultry
publications and experimental work of experimental stations
and other agricultural colleges, current, state and national
poultry discussions and problems, including the work of the
National Poultry Council of America and other poultry asso-
ciations of various problems in poultry husbandry.
Poultry (Incubation)-Two hours per week, one semester
credit. First year Poultry Husbandry.
A study of the construction and operation of incubators and
brooders. Each student must operate an incubator, hatch and
rear chicks, operate brooders and have general charge of the
care and management of the young chicks. They are to make
careful study of brooder houses and of green foods, pastures
and ranges for young chicks.
General Bacteriology-(See General Bacteriology, Freshman
College)-Three hours per week, two semester credits. First
year of special course.
Poultry (Culling)-One hour per week, one-half semester
credit. Practical demonstrations of Poultry Culling. Student
must do actual work in culling, study the types and different
breeds, their capacity for egg production, etc.
SECOND YEAR
English-(Same as Sophomore College)-Three hours per
week, two semester credits.
Poultry-(Poultry Architecture)-Two hours per week, one
semester credit. This is a course in which a student special-
izing in Poultry Husbandry will take at least two hours per
week in drawing and designing modern poultry houses, incuba-
tion and brooder houses. The State and National Government
Poultry House Construction Bulletins may be used as a text
for this course.
Poultry-(Survey Studies)-Two hours per week, one sem-
ester credit. For second-year special poultry work.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 73
This course consists of a field study of diseases, visiting and
taking data on neighboring poultry stocks, noting the breeds
kept, their methods of feeding, kind of food fed, and general
care; examination of external parasites, autopsies wherever
possible of birds that have died, examination for internal para-
sites and diseases. A study of the general health of flock,
sanitary conditions, cause of death and contagious diseases that
may have affected the flock for several years back.
- Poultry-(Breed Comparison)-One hour per week second
year; one semester credit.
A relative comparison of the various breeds of poultry, for
egg production, meat and egg production, show birds, prepar-
ing birds for exhibit.
Poultry-(Crating, Fattening and Shipping)-Two hours
per week, one semester credit. Second year of special work.
This course will be composed of practical work in fattening
*poultry for marketing, dressing fowls, co-operative shipping of
poultry (live weight), and other general information about
'such work.
Poultry-(Diseases)-Three hours per week, two semester
credits.
This course will have special references to diseases of baby
-chicks, such as may be found in an unsanitary brooder house,
unsanitary poultry plants, and how such diseases may be pre-
vented by sanitary quarters and eradicated in unsanitary
quarters. This will be done in connection with incubation and
practice work. This course will consist of a study of tissues,
cells, microscopic study of normal structures of fowls, includ-
Ing the various kinds of tissues from which the tissues of the
bird are made. Clasification of tissues, cells and organs.
Zoology-(General)-Three hours per week, two semester
credits. Second-year work. See College Zoology, Sophomore
ear.
- Agricultural Economics-(Same as Senior College)-Three
hours per week, two semester credits. Second-year work.
Poultry-(Judging and Egg Gardening)-Three hours per
week (lecture work). One semester credit-second year work.
A general lecture course, including demonstrations in judg-
various kinds of poultry and gardening eggs for market.
ie student will take practical incubation and brooder work
semester.





*74 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
A TWO-YEAR COURSE IN DAIRY HUSBANDRY
(Boys and Girls)
(Leading to a Diploma)
Open to standard High School graduates and Junior College
students. Two years college credits will be given for the com-
pletion of their work.
FIRST YEAR
English ............................ 5 English .............................. 5
Farm Arithmetic................ 1 Plant Biology .................... 3
Milk Composition and Dairying ........................... 3
Tests .............................. 3 Animal Husbandry ............ 3
Animal Husbandry............ 3 Seminar ........................... 1
Forage and Soiling Crops.. 3
Seminar ............................ 1
SECOND YEAR-(Special Course)
English .............................. 3 English .............................. 3
Butter M making .................. 2 M market M ilk ...................... 2
Dairy Cattle and Milk Dairy Cattle and Milk
Production .................... 3 Production .................... 3
Dairy Cattle Feeding........ 3 Dairy Cattle Feeding........ 3
Seminar ............................ 1 Dairy Bacteriology ........... 2
Dairy Bacteriology ............ 2
For further information see description on Dairying. Aca-
demic and Plant Biology same as college work; Farm Arith-
metic, see special course in Horticulture or Poultry Husbandry.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
Vocational Agriculture I (Plant Production).-A study of
the economic plants, their structure and activities, and the dis-
tribution of the field plants commonly grown in Florida. Each
student taking the course will be required to conduct a crop
project, in the conduct of which special attention will be given
to farm shop practice, farm implements, crop succession, the
cultural methods intended to increase production and cost
accounting.
Vocational Agriculture 11 (Animal Production).-A general
study of practical animal production with special reference to
Florida conditions. Special attention will be given to the prob-
lem of selection, feeding, management and marketing. Super-
vised practice work will be required, and students are en-
couraged to conduct ownership projects.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 75
OPTIONAL COURSES IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
Units
1. Dairy H usbandry........................................................ % or 1
2. Poultry Husbandry ................................................... % or 1
3. Sw ine H usbandry ........................................................ or 1
4. Fruit G row ing ........................................................... or 1
5. Beef Production. .... .............................. % or 1
6. V vegetable Gardening.................................................. or 1
7. Agricultural Engineering............................. ...... % or 1
8. Rural Economics and Farm Management ................ % or 1
Vocational Agriculture III (Horticulture).-A practical
study of the elementary principles of home and commercial
gardening and fruit growing, with special emphasis on Florida
conditions. Attention will be given to cultural methods, propa-
gation and pest control. Each student taking this course will
be required to conduct a horticultural project. Special atten-
tion will be given to problems of marketing the products.
Vocational Agriculture IV (Dairying and Poultry Produc-
tion).-In this course the student has an opportunity to study
the fundamental principles of practical dairying and poultry
production. Supervised practice work will be required, and
* students are encouraged to conduct ownership projects.
HIGH SCHOOL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
This is a standard High School course, so arranged as to give
four units in Vocational Agriculture, which will be accepted as
College entrance units. The Vocational work is based upon
the project plan of instruction and aims to prepare the student
to return to the farm with an increased earning capacity and
a deeper appreciation of the great opportunities of rural life.
Students who desire and are able to continue their education
after finishing this course will find it possible to enter any of
the standard colleges for a degree course.
The plan of the work of this course is so correlated with the
plans of the vocational schools of the State that the students
from those schools may enter this course without unnecessary
duplication of work.
OUTLINE OF COURSES
First Year-Five 90-minute periods per week. Plant Produc-
tion, Crops, Soils and Farm Shop. Two units.





76 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Second Year-Animal Production (Stock Judging, Care and
Management, Feed and Feeding, Breeding of Farm Animals
and Farm Shop).
Academic Work-
Third Year-Horticulture (Fruit Growing and Vegetable
Gardening.
Fourth Year-Dairying and Poultry Production.
DESCRIPTION AND EXPLANATION OF COURSES
IN THE MECHANICS ART DEPARTMENT
The aim of these courses is to give students practical train-
ing and to prepare them for specific places in the industrial
world.
The students are given practical problems and are required
to perform work the same as they will be asked to do in their
every day life after leaving school.
A certificate will be awarded to those who finish any one
of the four year courses offered in the high school, or those
finishing any one of the courses as special students.
Courses Offered
Mechanical and Architectural Drawing.
Brickmasonry and Plastering.
Carpentry.
Painting.
Applied Electricity.
Steam Engineering and Power Plant Operation.
Automobile Mechanics.
Tailoring.
Printing.
DEGREE IN MECHANIC ARTS
The Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanic Arts will be
conferred upon those who complete the course in college, and
doing major work in the Mechanic Arts Department.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
Students who do not wish to pursue a regular course, but
who wish to enter special courses, will be admitted as special
students.
The length of time for a student specializing in any trade
will depend entirely upon the individual. However, the course
I





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 77
will require about two years of work for the average student
who has had sufficient previous training and who is willing
to apply himeslf.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN STRUCTURAL
ENGINEERING
A young man entering the course of training for the
Bachelor of Science degree must have finished the four year
high school course as outlined for trade or its equivalent.
The work will be more technical than that of the high school
work. It will include plan reading; estimating; steel building
construction; materials of construction; mechanics and strength
of materials; cost analysis and contracts.
CARPENTRY
Young men entering a course of training for the carpen-
ter's trade must be able to learn the technical work as well
as the skill of the hands. The trade requires calculations of
many kinds and under many conditions.
In house carpentry the boy is changed to each of the various
jobs so that each boy does each kind of job before he has com-
pleted his course in carpentry.
The shop is equipped with one surface, one joiner, one rip-
saw, one band saw machine, one boring machine, and two turn-
ing lathes. Each machine is run by separate individual motors.
First Year
Care of tools and bench; form work; modeling; lock repair-
ing; study of common woods.
Second Year
The second year will include roughing-in, such as cutting
girders, studs, bridging, etc. The uses of the planer, and other
machines.
Third Year
Exterior covering and finishing; use of steel square in fram-
ing; roof framing; interior finishing; cabinet work.
Fourth Year
Stair building; cabinet work; estimating; plan reading and
specifications.





78 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
WOOD TURNING
This is a shop course given in connection with the course in
carpentry. It is designed to teach the use of wood turning
tools and assist in developing aesthetic feeling by constructing
beautiful as well as useful forms in the working out of the
problems given for solution.
MANUAL TRAINING
This course in wood working is offered to boys in classes
below the high school. Problems are given such that the
student should gain in an elementary way the following points:
1. The nomes, uses and care of carpenter's tools.
2. Kinds, uses and characteristics of woods commonly used.
3. Construction, uses and kinds of joints found in wood-
work.
4. Methods of fastening.
This course gives the students correct mechanical ideas and
a degree, of skill which enables him to further pursue his
training more satisfactorily than if he had not had this pre-
liminary training.
FOUR YEAR COURSE IN BRICKLAYING AND
PLASTERING
First Year
History of each trade.
Economics of each trade.
Hygiene and safety of each trade.
Making of mortars.
Foundation work.
Elementary wall construction.
Mechanical drawing.
Theory, 10 hours; Practice, 15 hours.
Second Year
Chemistry of mortars and soils.
Wall construction II.
Chimney construction I.
Tile construction.
Wall plastering I.
Shop mathematics I.
Mechanical drawing.
Theory, 10 hours; Practice, 15 hours.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 79
Third Year
Wall construction III.
Chimney construction II.
Wall plastering II.
Shop mathematics II.
Mechanical drawing.
Theory, 10 hours; Practice, 15 hours. *
Fourth Year
Arch building.
Arch and cornice plastering.
Ornamental building estimating.
Applied physics.
Mechanical drawing.
Instructions with the transit.
Theory, 10 hours; Practice, 15 hours.
Textbook: Bricklaying in Modern Practice, Schimshaw.
OUTLINE OF FOUR YEAR COURSE IN AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS
First Year
Principles of Automobile Construction: Frames, springs,
steering gears, front and rear axles, brakes, differentials,
clutches, transmissions, universals, power plants, power genera-
tion, engines, engine parts and their functions, oiling systems,
cooling systems, fuel systems, gasoline systems, carburetors and
carburetion, engine timing, soldering and driving.
Theory, 5 hours per week; Practice, 15 hours per week.
Second Year
Experiments and practical jobs in general repairing, body
repairing, top repairs, tractors, stationary motors, steam auto-
mobiles, machine tool work, fundamentals of blacksmithing,
and automobile accessories.
Theory, 4 hours per week; Practice, 16 hours per week.
Third Year
Fundamental electrical data, batteries, their care and re-
pairs, battery ignition, magnetos, magneto ignition, ignition
timing, starting motors, generators, wiring and lighting sys-
tems, tire care and vulcanizing, machine tool work, oxygen
acetylene welding and brazing.
Theory, 4 hours per week; Practice, 16 hours per week.





80 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Fourth Year
Garage shop repair methods, diagnosis of troubles, shop
systems, shop arrangements, cost keeping, estimates and
records; laws and regulations, care of cars.
Theory, 3 hours per week; Practice, 17 hours per week.
Related Subjects:
Mechanical Drawing.
Trade Mathematics.
Trade Physics.
COURSE IN AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING
First Year
First Semester:
Algebra II.
Geometry II.
Mechanical drawing, lettering and tracing.
Machine drawing I and sketching.
Business English.
Slide rule.
Automobile construction, design of engine parts I.
Second Semester:
Algebra III.
Solid Geometry.
Trigonometry.
Physics II.
Machine drawing II and advanced sketching.
Technical writing.
Design of engine parts II, carburetor design.
Second Year
First Semester:
College algebra.
College physics.
Machine drawing III and mechanism.
Machine design I.
Direct current electricity.
Automobile cooling systems, manifold design.
Clutches, transmissions, brakes and final drives.
Body and top design.
Second Semester:
Analytic geometry.
Mechanics of engineering.
Thermodynamics.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 81
Machine design II.
Machine drawing IV.
Direct current machinery.
Laboratory experiments in direct current machinery.
Frames and special types of drives, springs.
Tire construction, Ford car construction.
Aviation motors, tractors.
Third Year
First Semester:
Differential Calculus.
Machine Design III.
Alternating current machinery.
Laboratory experiments in alternating current machinery.
Electrical machine design.
Storage batteries, cells, separators, electrotype, hydrometer
tests, voltage tests, rectifiers, sulphating, gassing, charging
and discharging.
Temperature corrections.
Second Semester:
Principles of business administration and economics.
Materials of construction.
Structural drafting and design.
General inorganic chemistry.
Starting Motors-Types, design, counter E. M. F.
Tests, switches.
Generators-Fields, types, regulation, brushes, magnets.
Fourth Year
First Semester:
Integral calculus.
Heating and ventilating engineering.
Power plant engineering.
Alternating current machinery.
Welding-Oxygen-acetylene, electric arc.
Accessories, lamps, focusing, horns.
Second Semester:
Experiments in alternating current machinery.
Electric machine design.
Hydraulics.
Business law, contracts and specifications.
Electric automobile, steam automobile.





82 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
PRINTING
The course in printing covers a period of four years. The
present printing plant is in every respect a well-equipped job
plant, consisting of two Chandler & Price presses, sizes 8x12
and 12x18; one 30-inch paper cutter; one Boston wire stitcher;
one proof press; two large imposing stones; two double City
stands, with a large variety of choice type faces, rules, borders,
ornaments and other necessary composing room material and
the equipment.
The first year is given over entirely to the care and handling
of the platen press. Text: Manual of Platen Press Work. Dur-
ing the second year a student is taught the lay-out of the type
case and given instruction in straight composition and the
simple forms of job composition. Text: Practical Typography,
by George E. McClellan.
In the third year the study of type faces and their proper
use, designing, lay-out, and the higher forms of job composition
taken up.
Proof reading is also taken up during this period. Text:
Practical Typography.
DESCRIPTION OF AUTO-MECHANIC COURSE
The student makes a complete study of the Automobile and
all of its parts and accessories, learning the function of each
part and its relation to the whole. The ideas are carried to
the student by illustrations, by studying units, and by ex-
planations from the teacher.
In the shop he is first made a helper where he learns the
use of tools and the proper methods of procedure in assemb-
ling and disassembling cars. He is trained in careful and
efficient driving, is given a basic and thorough knowledge fo
prices, cost, and values, and as he becomes more proficient he
assumes more responsibility until finally given full charge of
repair jobs under the instructor's care. He is also required to
diagnose troubles in cars, make requisitions, handle stock and
keep records as part of training in general conduct and man-
agement of shop.
Related work in machine practice, blacksmithing and oxy-
gen-acetylene welding is also taught as part of the trade.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 83
OUTLINE OF COURSE IN AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING
First Year
First Semester-General preliminary survey, automobile
construction, explosion engines, cylinders, pistons, values, and
camshafts.
Second Semester-Connecting rods, crankshafts, crankcases,
carburetors, cooling systems, inlet and exhaust manifolds,
clutches.
Second Year
First Semester-Transmissions, rear axles, brakes, steering
gears, frames, springs and shock absorber, front axles and
bearing welding.
Second Semester-Wheels, tire construction and repairs,
rims, Ford car construction, aviation engines, tractors, motor-
cycles, shop information.
Third Year
First Semester-Ignition fundamentals, ignition systems,
ignition operations, motors, generators.
Second Semester-Batteries, electrical repairs, reading
wiring diagrams, Ford electrical equipment, electrical wiring
*diagrams and data.
Fourth Year
First Semester-Thermodynamics, machine shop work,
machine shop management, tool making, tool design.
Second Semester-Mechanism, forging, pattern making,
-foundry work, sheet metal work, dies and sheet metal stamping
PAINTING
This division offers a splendid four-year course to young
men of the High School to become efficient workmen along
the lines of house painting-taking in such fields as exterior
and interior decorating, furniture painting, glazing and kalso-
mining.
A thorough study of colors, color harmony as well as tools
are also taught.
Young men working towards a B. S. degree are also ex-
pected to spend four years at the study of sign painting;
covering such work as bulletin, glass work, and show card
writing.





84 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Automobile painting is also added to this course as well as
a more intensive study of colors and color harmonies.
No one will be admitted to this division unless he has had
four years of the High School course or four years training.
equivalent to such. If previous training is received elsewhere
the student must pass an examination before entering for a
B. S. degree. In all cases the student must be willing to work
and be submissive to instructions.
Specialization is offered in either course granting only
certificates.
ELECTRICITY
The course in applied electricity is designed to cover four
years of High School work. It aims to give the student a good
working knowledge of the principles of electricity and prepares
him to pursue the more advanced degree course (B. S.) elec-
trical engineering.
OUTLINE OF FOUR YEAR COURSE IN APPLIED
ELECTRICITY
First Year
First Semester-Electricity and magnetism; conductors and
insulators; effects of a current in a wire around an iron core;
fundamental units; electrical units of E. M. F.; current and
resistance; Ohm's law; units of work; energy, quantity, power.
Magnetic fields, action of fields on each other; Cello; internal
and external resistance, methods of connecting cells. Heat-
ing effect of current, magnetic and chemical effects; elec-
trolysis.
Second Semester-Proof of Ohm's law by simple experi-
ments. Experiments on resistance in series and parallel; in-
terior wiring rules; bell wiring and annunciator installation;
repair jobs. Care of street lights, laying out simple electrical
circuits; study of electrical materials. Theory classes practical
work and mechanical drawing during the year.
Second Year
First Semester-Brief review of first year's work. Study
of the rules of the National Board of Fire Underwriters; in-
terior wiring, including open and concealed conduit work; the
incandescent lamp; wiring rules and tables; fundamental prin-
ciples of a dynamo; field poles and their construction; effect





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 85
of a moving conductor or coil in a magnetic field. The direct
current dynamo; its part and function of each part; armature
windings; methods of exciting a D. C. generator, electrical and
commercial efficiency of generators.
Second Semester-Study of direct current measuring in-
struments; switchboard and their construction; protective
devices; circuit breakers, lightning arresters; incandescent
lighting from constane potential mains; wire splicing; solder-
ing and toping; installation of bells on 110 volt circuits, bell
ringing transformers.
Theory classes, practical work, and mechanical drawing dur-
ing the year.
Third Year
First Semester-Alternating current; fundamental principles
of same; sine curve; flow of alternating current through im-
pedance, reactance and resistance; the A. C. generator, single
phase, two phase, and three phase; calculating efficiency and
power factor; operation in parallel; star and delta connec-
tions; potential transformers, construction, regulation and
care of same; single phase transformers on three phase lines,
the induction motor.
Second Semester-The A. C. switchboard including A. C.
measuring instruments; oil switch, relays, voltage regulators,
ground detectors, installation and operation of electrical
machinery; care of same; estimates on jobs; practice work;
the K. W. H. meters, its construction and reading.
Theory classes, practice work and mechanical drawing dur-
ing year.
Fourth Year
First Semester-Induction motors, starting of same, speed
control, motor generator sets, efficiency of motors, mechanical
power of motor, comparison between generator and motor.
Series and shunt wound motor, tongue, position of brushes
on a motor, motor wiring, motor curves.
Second Semester-Arc lamps, their construction, special
forms of arc lamps, incandescent lamps, lamp filaments, effi-
ciency and life of a lamp, incandescent lamp circuits, wiring'
calculations, two and three wire systems.
Theory classes, practical work and mechanical drawing
during year.





86 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Textbooks and Magazines
Note: Swoope's Lessons in Practical Electricity used as a
textbook, supplemented by Hawkin's Electrical Guides and
Encylopedia of Applied Electricity as references.
Trade Magazines: "The Electrical World," and "Power and
the Engineer."
The course in Electrical Engineering covers four years and
leads to the degree of B. S.
It aims to give a thorough training in the fundamental prin-
ciples of electrical engineering so that the graduate may apply
his knowledge and training in the successful practice of his
profession.
The remarkable advance which has been made in the appli-
cation of electricity to modern problems has made Electrical
Engineering one of the greatest professions. The sources of
electric power are almost limitless, and new uses for this power
are constantly being discovered.
The training of the Electrical Engineer is such as to pre-
pare him to render the highest service in this field of endeavor.
Freshman Year
Free-hand drawing, pattern making, use of tools and
machines, construction of simple patterns from working draw-
ings. Mechanical drawing of machine parts, such as pulleys,
bolts, nuts, etc. The principles of construction of machine
tools. Work on lathe, drill press, shaper planer, grinding
machine, boring machine, milling machine, problems in descrip-
tive Geometry, recitations and lectures.
Sophomore Year
Forging, starting and maintaining a fire, heating and its
effects on different metals, machine drawing, bearings, spur,
level and worm gears. Cutting key ways, drawing the more
complicated parts of machines. Types and general construc-
tion of engines, boilers, feed water heaters, pumps, mechanical
stokers, separators, super-heaters, and other power plant
equipment. General physics, heat, electricity and magnetism,
sound and light, the use of the tape, compass, level transit,
survey of small area, plotting.
Junior Year
The elements of electrical engineering; theory and tech-
nical applications of electricity and magnetism, including the
fundamental laws of electric and magnetic circuits and electro





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 87
magnetic induction-A. C. Circuits Elementary Electrical Lab-
oratory: Experiments and problems illustrating the fundamen-
tal laws of electric and magnetic circuits and electro-magnetic
induction. Mechanism; motion of machine parts, geometry of
same. Direction and velocity of motion, velocity and accelera-
tion, gears, shafts, belt drives, steam engine indicators, applied
mechanics of forces, thermodynamics, measurements of thermal
properties of bodies and quantities of heat, electrical resistance,
current and E. M. F. induction, hysteresis. Laboratory: Ex-
periments with electrical machinery, measuring instruments,
etc. Electrical Engineering Literature-Reports from same,
materials of constructions, applied mechanics, strength of ma-
terials, stresses and strains due to change of temperature, de-
sign of girders and bridges, reinforced concrete beams, expan-
sion and contraction, the steam turbine, refrigeration.
Senior Year
Theory of A. C. circuits transmission and distribution cir-
cuits, calculations of same. Design of direct and alternative
current apparatus generators, motors, rotary converters, trans-
formers, etc. Testing and operation of generators, motors, in-
struments, both A. C. and D. C. Dynamics of machinery, work,
energy, power, friction, efficiency of machines, power trans-
mission, dynamometers, hydraulics, hydrostalics, flow through
pipes, orifices, tubes, water power, water wheels, water tur-
bines, water supply, pumps and pumping machinery, gas and
gas engines, steam boilers, safety valves, steam gauge, steam
piping, insulation, engine indicators, electric railway design,
power plant design and management, storage batteries, illumi-
nation, communication of intelligence, telegraphy, telephony,
radio, public utility service 'cost, rates, business, organization
and administration methods, estimates, specifications, reports.
STEAM ENGINEERING AND POWER PLANT OPERATION
First Year-First Semester
Boilers
The Construction and Different Types of Boilers.
A. Materials used in construction.
B. Riveting and flanging plates.
C. Welded joints and staying.
D. Tubes and flues.
E. Boiler designing.
F. Horse power.





88 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
G. Different droughts.
H. Heating surface.
I. Water level.
J. Strength of boilers.
First Year-Second Semester
Boiler Accessories
A. Boiler setting and supporting.
B. Furnaces and grates.
C. Smoke prevention.
D. Mechanical stokers.
E. Fusible plug.
F. Steam, vacuum and water gauges.
G. Check, safety and reducing valves.
H. Feed water heaters.
I. Boiler piping.
J. Explosions.
K. Fuels.
L. Boiler room operation.
Second Year-Second Semester
Pumps
A. Principles of action.
B. Lifting and force pumps.
C. Centrifugal and reciprocating pumps.
D. Valves.
E. Pump room piping.
Second Year-Second Semester
A. Single, duplex and triplex pumps.
B. Condenser pumps.
C. Air pumps.
D. Compound pumps.
E. Vacuum pumps.
F. Pump room operation.
Third Year-First Semester
Engines
The Steam Engine.
A. Parts.
B. High and low-speed engines.
C. Vertical and horizontal engines.
D. Rotary and slide valve engines.
E. The steam turbines.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 89
Third Year-Second Semester
A. Valve gearing.
B. Engine room operation.
C. Engine designing.
Fourth Year-First Semester
A. Freezing agents.
B. Evaporation.
C. Bryne coolers.
D. Compression.
E. Valves.
F. Fittings.
G. Purging and pumping out.
Fourth Year-Second Semester
A. Operating ice making plant.
B. General power plant designing.
PRACTICAL ART
The main objective of the study in practical art is its service
in the actual uses of daily life.
First Year
Still life and sketching in pencil, pen and ink, colored cray-
ons, charcoal and water colors. Paper cutting and furniture
making.
Second Year
Still life and sketching in pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, water
colors and lettering. Designing and decorating.
Third Year
A. Sketching in pencil, charcoal, water colors and oils.
B. Clay modeling, designing.
C. Commercial drawing and history of art.
MECHANICAL DRAWING
A two-year course is given to all young men from the third
year Junior High School up to and including those of the third
year Senior High School. This course will be relative to the
various trades they are taking.





90 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
DESCRIPTION AND EXPLANATION OF
COURSES IN
HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Junior High School-First Year
First Semester-Home Economics I-V, 4 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics I-V, 4 hours.
Second Year
First Semester-Home Economics I-V, 4 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics I-V, 4 hours.
Third Year
First Semester-Home Economics I-V, 8 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics I-V, 8 hours.
Senior High School-First Year
First Semester-Home Economics I-VI, 8 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics I-VI, 8 hours.
Second Year
First Semester-Home Economics V, 4 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics V, 4 hours.
Third Year
First Semester-Home Economics II-VI, 4 hours.
Second Semester-Home Economics II-VI, 4 hours.
The work done in the Department of Home Economics is
designed to give a girl high ideals of right standards to stimu-
late her towards the development of the highest type of woman-
hood of which she is capable.
Home Economics is required throughout the Junior and
Senior High Schools.
Two courses are offered in Home Economics above the high
school grade: the Smith-Hughes Teacher Training of two years,
and a four-year college course leading to B. S. Smith-Hughes
students are expected to have two years of vocational expert
ence at home during the summers and in the dormitories during
the school terms before graduation.
Home Economics I (Elementary Clothing).-The aim of this
course is to teach the principles of sewing. Study of machines
and parts. Cleaning machines. The cutting and making of
simple garments, as cooking outfits, children's clothes, middy
blouses, cotton dresses and lingerie waists. Also the study of
the growth and manufacture of cotton flax and wool.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 91
Textbook: Clothing and Fabric-McGown & Wait.
Home Economics II (Advanced Clothing).-The purpose of
this course is to teach the art of dressmaking, drafting, the
designing of ordinary garments, the use of lines, color, pro-
portion, adaptation of materials, to develop neatness, accuracy,
self-reliance and high ideals in work. Commercial patterns are
also used. Lectures and class discussions are held on artistic
and appropriate dress. Practice is given in making dresses in
the department for teachers and students. Some time is also
given to the study of textile. The study of fibers as to pro-
cesses of manufacture and economic use of fabrics.
Home Economics III (Millinery).-The aim of this course is
to present the underlying principles of good millinery with a
fair amount of technical knowledge; to cultivate a taste for
what is good and suitable in millinery. Stress is placed upon
the artistic side of the work by study of harmony, color and
line. The practical side is also taught by emphasizing economy
in the utilization of old materials renovated.
Home Economics IV (Handicraft).-The aim of this course
is to teach the girls how to utilize the material around them.
Such as pine needles, corn shucks and rags. In this course
they are taught how to make beautiful as well as serviceable
baskets, trays, mats and rugs. They are also taught how to
cane chairs.
Home Economics V (Elementary Foods and Nutrition).-A
- course of cookery based on a study of food principles, designed
to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles, of
cookery and the most attractive method of serving meals.
Textbooks: Food Study, Wellman; Dietetics for High
'Schools, Williard and Gillette.
Home Economics VI (Advance Food and Nutrition).-This
course is a continuation of elementary food and nutrition and
gives various phases of cookery. The processes carried out are
more elaborate than in the previous years. Self reliance on
the part of the student in the plan and execution of her work
is encouraged. Planning and serving meals under home con-
ditions, large quantity cooking and serving are included in
the course.
References:
Boston Cooking Book, Farmer.
Food Serving and Preparation, Bailey.
Food and Nutrition, Bevier.
Foods and Their Adulteration, Wiley.





92 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Home Economics VII (Dietetics).-It is the aim of this
course to give the student some idea of the fuel value of foods,
food requirements, the construction of the dietaries as well
as the processes involved in dietary calculation.
Textbook: Feeding the Family, Rose.
Reference: Diet in Relation to Size and Activity, Thompson.
Home Economics VIII (Household Administration).-House-
hold management gives the chance to gather under one head the
numerous lines of instruction necessary to administer a house-
hold. The aim of this course is to show the relation science,
art, economy to the practical needs of the home. Organiza-
tion of the household, household decoration, marketing, bud-
geting and laundering are taught in this course. Practice work
is given in the model apartment.
Textbook: Successful Family Life, M. Aleel.
Reference:
Home and Its Management, Kittredge.
House in Good Taste, Wolf.
Home Economics IX (Home Nursing and Child Care).-
Arrangement and care of sick room; bed making, emergency
remedies, medicines and preparation for suitable foods for
invalids are phases upon which special emphasis is laid. Special
attention is given to the study of the first ten years of a
child's life as to food, recreation, growth and development
along all lines.
Home Economics X (Bacteriology).-This course aims to
give the fundamental facts of bacteriology. The study of
dust and its organism, molds, yeast, bacteria; bacteria of food
and diseases. Methods of sterilization and disinfection. Some
laboratory work is required.
Home Economics XI (Special Methods).-Special methods
of teaching Home Economics in elementary schools and Junior
High Schools are given two hours per week for one semester
preceding H. E. XII.
Home Economics XII (Practice Teaching).-Thirty-two su-
pervised lessons in home-making are taught by the Smith-
Hughes students and those completing the course leading to a
degree. Students from the Model School and Junior High
School are taught in these classes.





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 93
THE NURSE TRAINING DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
The professional course of nurses offered by this hospital
extends over a period of three years-twelve months each-
two weeks in the first and second years being allowed for vaca-
tion. This course leads to the professional title of Registered
Nurse, obtained by successfully passing an examination held
annually by the various State Nursing Boards.
All applicants of this course must be above grammar grade,
must have finished a two-year high school course or its equiva-
lent. Age limit, not less than 18 or more than 35 years old.
When accepted, will serve three months on probation.
The probation period is of three months' duration. The
qualifications of pupils for the work and the propriety of re-
taining or dismissing them at the end of their probationary
term is determined by the Training School Committee. The
Training School Committee can also dismiss any pupil for cause
at any time.
In sickness the pupils are cared for gratuitiously, but all
time so lost must be made up.
Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Any student nurse
having more than 10 per cent unexcused absence in any one
subject will not be allowed to take the examination in that
subject.
The probationers should come provided with three blue wash
dresses, four aprons, two pairs of black, sensible, comfortable
shoes with rubber heels, a watch with second hand, and plenty
of plain underwear. Samples of measurements of aprons and
dresses will be submitted upon request. All garments must be
plainly marked with the full names in indelible ink on the
bands.
The duty hours for the day staff, from 8 A. M. to 8 P. M.,
and 8 P. M. to 8 A. M. for the night staff. The day nurses have
two hours off each day besides their meal hours, one-half day
each week, and will also be excused from duty a part of each
Sunday. They shall be granted a two-weeks' vacation each of
the first two years.
Nurses reside in the dormitory and are subject to rules gov-
erning the same. Hours are allowed for recreation, class reci-
tations and half-holidays.
A registration fee of twelve dollars ($12.00) is paid on en-
trance. Nurses furnish their own text-books (which to begin
with cost $20.00) and their own bedding.





94 FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
HOSPITAL-SANATORIUM AND HEALTH
F. & A. M. College offers opportunity for young women to
become trained nurses. There is an increasing demand for
colored nurses throughout the South and North.
It is arranged that those who want to continue their literary
studies and take the nurse training course at the same time
may do so by dividing their time between the Academic De-
partment, either in the day or night school, and the Nurse
Training School. Such division, however, requires a longer
time to finish the course, but it has the advantage of furnish-
ing literary development to those who are not far enough in
advance to devote their time to Nurse Training.
Opportunity is also offered to persons who can on examina-
tion equal to that given for the Third Year Senior High School
in the Academic Department to become special students in the
Nurse Training Department.
Special students have the privilege of finishing their course
in Nurse Training in three years. Applicants should be be-
tween 18 and 30 years of age, and of average height and
weight.
Our Hospital building is lighted by electricity, heated by
steam, and has modern sanitary arrangements.
The Theoretical Course is as follows:
Juniors-Materia medical, anatomy, physiology, chemistry,.
therapeutics, practical nursing, including preparation of food
for the healthy as well as the sick.
Middlers-Review of first-year anatomy, physiology, material
medical, practical nursing, hygiene, urinolysis, bacteriology,
theoretical nursing.
Seniors-Practical theoretic and private nursing, anaesthe-
sia, surgical, obstetric and gynacologic nursing, massage.
COLLEGE HELP
The school furnishes board, lodging and laundry work to its
nurse students. Applicants are required to serve three months
on probation to test their fitness for the training.
At the expiration of the probationary period the institution
reserves the right to accept or reject all probationers.
REQUIREMENTS OF NURSES
While on probation, only wash dresses and aprons, which
each probationer must furnish, are worn.
Nurses will need a change of comfortable, common-sense





BULLETIN, 1926-1927 95
shoes, a pair of house slippers, a warm kimona, raincoat, rub-
bers and umbrella, as the dining hall and dormitory are some
distance from the hospital.
Nurses are required to furnish their own textbooks. A regis-
tration fee of $12.00 will be required and paid on entrance to
the school.
Time lost on account of illness or other absence from duty
must be made up before finishing. Two weeks' vacation during
the 'summer are given.
The superior advantage made possible by the employment of
a resident physician will enable us to give a much more thor-
ough course in training to a larger number of nurses.
EMPLOYMENT
Our graduated nurses find ready employment. Thirty nurses
have graduated from this institution and are kept busy as in-
stitution nurses, private nurses and visiting and public health
nurses. Graduates are eligible for the title of Registered Nurse.
Plans are now definite for the erection of an annex for con-
tagious diseases and modernly equipped nurses' home.
CLINIC FEATURES
Physical examination for all students. Free clinic for moth-
ers; baby clinic. Free examination and operation at stated
times.
DESCRIPTION AND EXPLANATION OF
ACADEMIC COURSES
COURSES OF STUDY CORRELATED WITH ALL OTHER
DEPARTMENTS
(a) Pre-Medical course of two years.
B. S. in Home Economics.
Supervisory course in Home Economics.
Supervisory course in Teacher Training H. E.
Supervisory course in Domestic Science and Art.
Majors in Millinery, Homecrafts, H. E. Applied Science, H.
E. Chemistry.
B. S. in Education with Major.
(a) Secondary Education. High School Principals, Junior
and Senior High School Teachers with minors in History; Lan-
guages, English and Foreign; Mathematics; Science, 5-year
.Professional Graduate State Certtificate covering Majors
granted.





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