• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Calendar and managing boards
 Officers of administration
 Officers of instruction
 Faculty committees
 General information
 Outline of courses
 Description of courses
 Mechanic arts courses
 Agricultural course
 Catalogue of students
 Index
 Copyright
 Back Cover






Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). Thirty-Seventh Annual Catalogue, 1923-24. Series XV. No. 4.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000108/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). Thirty-Seventh Annual Catalogue, 1923-24. Series XV. No. 4.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1924
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000108
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3230

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Calendar and managing boards
        Page 5
    Officers of administration
        Page 6
    Officers of instruction
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Faculty committees
        Page 9
    General information
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Outline of courses
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Description of courses
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Mechanic arts courses
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Agricultural course
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Catalogue of students
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Index
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Copyright
        Page 97
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
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TALLAHASSEE
1923-24
THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
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U
BULLETIN
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND
MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE.
THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
1923-24





I
I
I





CALENDAR
1924
June 9 Wednesday Summer School Begins
Sept. 27 Saturday Refectory Opens
Sept. 29 Monday Entrance Examinations
Sept. 30 Tuesday Entrance Examinations
Oct. 1 Wednesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 27 Thursday Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 8 Monday Farmers' Week Begins
Dec. 24-26 Wed.-Friday Christmas Holidays
1925
Jan. 1 Thursday Emancipation Day
Feb. 2 Monday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 2 Monday Inter Class Debate
Apr. 10 Friday Intercollegiate Debate
May 12 Tuesday National Hospital Day
May 15 Friday H. S. Declamatory Contest
May 22 Friday (Faculty Prize) Oratorical Contest
May 23 Saturday Home Economics Day
M:;i, 24 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 25 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 26 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 27 Wednesday Class Day
May 28 Thursday Commencement
MANAGING BCOA.RD
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Hon. CAREY A. HARDEE, Chairman, Governor.
Hon. W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary, Supt. Public Instruction.
Hon. H. CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State.
Hon. RIVERS H. BUFORD, Attorney General.
Hon. J. C. LUNING, State Treasurer, Treasurer.
7T- BOARD OF CONTROL.
Hon. P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Business, Pensacola.
Hon. E. L. WARTMAN, Planter, Citra, Fla.
Hon. J. C. COOPER, Jr., Lawyer, Jacksonville.
Hon. A. H. BLANDING, Bartow, Fla.
Hon. W. L. WEAVER, Banker, Perry, Fla.
Hon. J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee.





OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL OFFICERS
W. H. A HOWARD, Acting President.
EARL E. BROUGHTON, Auditor and Secretary.
MARY E. POWELL, Auditor's Secretary.
LUCILE V. MARTIN, President's Secretary.
ALMA H. RIVERS, Librarian and Registrar.
ETTA B. DAVIS, Stewardess.
JULIA A. DAVIS, Matron in charge of Dining Hall.
CELIA A. BRADLEY, Supt. of Laundry.
RICHARD FRAZIER, Custodian 'of Grounds and Bldgs. Man-
ager of Refectory.
*HOMER THOMAS, Dean of the College and School of Pedagogy.
*HY. F. COLEMAN, Dean of the College (Acting Dean).
W. A. ARMWOOD, Dean of Mechanic Arts School (Acting Dean).
E. 0. PAIGE, Dean 'of Home Economics School (Acting Dean).
N. S. McGUINN, Dean of Women.
VIRGINIA HILLER, Supt of Sanatorium.
A. J. SHOOTES, Dean of Men.
E. P. JONES, Principal of Training School.
*Part of the year.





OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION
(Arranged in Order of Length of Service)
WILLIAM H. A. HOWARD, A. B., A. M.,
Professor of Economics and Sociology.
ELLEN O. PAIGE,
Dressmaking and Millinery.
LULA M. CROPPER,
Associate Professor Physiography and Education.
VIRGINIA HILYER, R. N.,
Nurse Training.
EVERETT B. JONES, B. S.,
Professor of Chemistry and Biology.
ELIZA P. JONES,
Primary Methods and English.
*HOMER THOMAS, A. M.,
Professor of Education.
CLARA B. MOON,
Domestic Art.
EARL E. BROUGHTON, B. S.,
Commercial Instructor.
ALBERT L. MEBANE, B. Agr. M. S. A.,
Professor of Agr. (Smith-Hughes.)
JOSEPH D. BRYAN,
Agricultural Instructor.
RALPH A. EDMONDSON, A. B.,
Professor of Mathematics and Physics.
LILLIAN LATTIMER,
Domestic Science.
BENJAMIN H. CRUTCHER, B. S.,
Professor of Agriculture (Dairying).
WALTER A. ARMWOOD,
Instructor in Carpentry.
ANDERSON A. TURNER,
Farmers' Club Organizer.
AMY JACKSON,
Assistant Training School.
HARPIE M. SPENCER, B. S.,
Instructor in History and Mathematics.
HENRY F. COLEMAN, A. B,.
Professor of English.
A: J. SHOOTES, A. B.,
Psychology.
REBECCA L. BLOODWORTH. A. B.,
Assistant Professor of English.
MAURICE A. LEE, A. B.,
Latin and History.
HENRY M. EFFERSON, A. B.,
Assistant Professor of Science and Mathematics.
J. WYCLIFFE KELLER, B. C. S.,
Commercial Instructor.
EDNA J. GREEN,
Instructor in English.





8 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CLEMENTINE B. NELSON,
Home Economics.
IRMA L. COLEMAN,
Domestic Science.
EDWARD C. CAIN,
Printing.
ANITA S. PRATER,
Physical Education.
S. L. THORPE,
Engineering.
JUBBIE B. BRAGG, A. B.,
Instructor in Wheelwrighting and Blacksmithing.
GERTRUDE R. HAYES,
Nurse Training.
LUCILE V. MARTIN, Sect. to President,
Instructor in Typewriting.
MARY E. POWELL, Asst. to Auditor,
Instructor in Ti ,Im,, Il.
J.. R. DUPREE, B. S.,
Instructor in Agriculfture.
MAMIE V. SHOOTES,
Piano.
JOHN E. HUNTER, M. D.,
Lecturer.
O. A. CAMPBELL, M. D.,
College Physician.
HATTIE V. ARMWOOD,
Book Room.
STUDENT ASSISTANTS
JACOB BALDWIN, Dairying.
THOMAS R. REID, Laboratory Asst.
JAUNCY DeVAUGHN, Library Asst.
ALGIE WILLIAMS, Painting.
LOLLIE FLEMING, Office Asst.
*CLYDE MALLOY, Office Asst.
EUGENE BRADFORD, Commandant.
JAMES K. MICKENS, Library Asst.
JESSIE L. LUNDY, Junior High School.
EMMA A. FITZGILES, Junior High School.
CORA A. CONOLY, Primary School.
EUGENE PINKNEY, Tailoring.
*Part of year.





FACULTY COMMITTEES 9
FACULTY COMMITTEES
1923-24
1. PRUDENTIAL: Pres. W. H. A. Howard, H. F. Coleman, A. L.
Mebane, W. A. Armwood, Miss E. 0. Paige, Miss V. H. Hilyer,
Mrs. N. S. McGuinn, A. J. Shootes and E. E. Broughton
(Sec'y.).
2. REFECTORY: R. Frazier, Mrs. J. A. Davis, Mrs. E. B. Davis,
Miss C. B.-Nelson, A. J. Shootes and E. E. Broughton.
3. CURRICULUM AND GRADUATION: H. F. Coleman, W. A. Arm-
wood, A. L. Mebane, Miss V. H. Hilyer and Miss E. 0. Paige.
4. BULLETIN AND CATALOGUE: W. A. Armwood, H. F. Coleman,
A. L. Mebane, Miss V. H. Hilyer and Miss C. B. Nelson.
5. COLLEGE PUBLICATION: H. F. Coleman, H. M. Efferson, E. C.
Cain, J. W. Keller and Miss R. L. Bloodworth.
6. LECTURES AND SERMONs: B. H. Crutcher, S. L. Thorpe, Misses
R. L. Bloodworth, I. L. Coleman and L. Lattimer.
7. Music: A. J. Shootes, H. M. Efferson, H. F. Coleman, Misses
E. O. Paige, A. S. Prater, M. E. Powell, Mrs. M. V. Shootes.
8. LIBBARY: Mrs. A. H. Rivers, Misses L. M. Cropper, C. B.
Moon, L. V. Martin and R. A. Edmondson.
9. ROUND TABLE LITERARY: E. B. Jones, B. H. Crutcher, J. D.
Bryan, Miss H. M. Spencer and Mrs. N. S. McGuinn.
ROUND TABLE SOCIABLE: Mr. B. H. Crutcher, R. Frazier, Mrs.
E. B. Davis, Misses C. B. Moon and L. Lattimer.
10. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES: A. L. Mebane, H. M. Efferson, Misses
C. A. Bradley and L. Lattimer.
11. STUDENT ACTIVITIES: E. E. Broughton, J. B. Bragg, E. C. Cain
and Miss L. V. Martin.
(a) Boys' Athletics: J. B. Bragg, H. F. Coleman and H. M.
Efferson.
(b) Girls' Athletics: Miss A. S. Prater, Mrs. E. P. Jones and
Miss C. B. Nelson.
(c) Y. W. C. A.: Misses L. Lattimer, C. A. Bradley and I.
L. Coleman.
(d) Y. M. C. A.: H. M. Efferson, J. W. Keller and S. L.
Thorpe.
12. LITERARY SOCIETIES: R. A. Edmondson, W. A. Armwood, Mrs.
Hayes, Misses R. L. Bloodworth and A. S. Prater.
13. DRAMATICS: H. F. Coleman, S. L. Thorpe, Misses E. 0. Paige,
R. L. Bloodworth and C. B. Mbon.
14. -tELINQUENT STUDENTS' COMMITTEE; E. B. Jones, J. B. Bragg,
A. J. Shootes, Mrs. N. S. McGuinn and Miss L. M. Cropper.
15. SOCIAL SERVICE:. Mrs. E. P. Jones, Misses L. M. Cropper, A.
S. Prater, A. L. Mebane, R. Frazier and J. D. Bryan.
16. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: A. J. Shootes, Mrs. N. S. McGuinn,
J. W. Keller, W. A. Armwood and Miss I. L. Coleman.
17. FABMERS' CONFERENCE: A. L. Mebane, B. H. Crutcher, J. D.
Bryan, E. C. Cain, A. A. Turner, Mrs. J. A. Davis, Mrs. E. B.
Davis and Miss C. B. Nelson.
18. INTEBCOLLEGIATE DEBATES: H. F. Coleman, R. A. Edmondson,
Misses L. M. Cropper and R. L. Bloodworth.





10 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
19. ORATORICAL CONTESTS: M. A. Lee, W. A. Armwo'od, H. F. Cole-
man and Miss R. L. Bloodworth.
20. SPECIAL COURSE OF STUDY COMMITTEE: H. M. Efferson, E. B.
Jones, A. J. Shootes and Miss R. L. Bloodworth.
21. STUDENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE: E. B. Jones, Miss L. M. Crop-
per, J. B. Bragg, J. DI. Bryan and Miss C. B. Moon.
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY, LOCATION AND SUPPORT
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment,
the College was established in 1887 as a State Normal
School. Under the principalship of Mr. T. deS. Tucker,
assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was opened at Tallahassee,
October 5, 1887, with an attendance of fifteen students.
In 1891 the College moved to its present site. In 1905 it
passed from the direct management of the State Board of
Education to the management of the Board of Control as
one of the institutions of higher learning. In 1909 its
name was changed to that of The Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legislature.
It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropria-
tion.
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the College are few and simple, ap-
pealing to the students' self-respect and personal responsi-
bility.
Students are not allowed to loaf, to use intoxicating
liquors or tobacco in any form, to gamble or to have or
use firearms.
Punishment is by demerits as follows: Five demerits
make one warning, or mark; ten demerits two warnings or
marks; fifteen demerits in any one session make a student
liable to suspension. Suspended students may be reinstated
by the Prudential Committee or by the President.
All requests for students to come home or to be with-
drawn must be made to the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry, and
students will not be allowed to have laundering done else-





GENERAL INFORMATION 11
where except by special permission from the President. All
clothing must be marked with INDELIBLE INK.
Students should provide themselves with the following
GENERAL LIST
3 Sheets 1 Quilt or Comfort
3 Pillow Cases 6 Table Napkins
4 Towels 1 White Spread
1 Blanket 1 Bible
1 Bottle of Indelible Ink 1 Dictionary
GIRLS' LIST
1 Navy Blue Coat Suit 1 Pair Rubbers
2 Navy Blue Wash Dresses 1 Waterproof Coat
2 White Uniform Waists 1 Umbrella
4 Gingham Petticoats 3 Navy Blue Waists
4 Changes Winter Under- 2 Laundry Bags
wear 2 Gingham Aprons
2 Pair High Shoes 1 Large White Apron
The young women are required to wear high shoes and
suitable underclothing during the cold season. All shoes
are to be sensible and comfortable.
Navy blue waists are to be worn on school days and white
uniform waists on Sundays and Mondays. The white uni-
form waists may be purchased from the College Store. For
spring and fall blue ready-to-wear hats must be worn. No
articles of dress need be brought to school except those
named in above list.
BoYS' LIST
t N.,:g!;,e, Shirts 1 Comb and Brush
6 White Standing Collars 1 Shoe Polishing Outfit
3 Night Shirts 6 White Napkins
1 Pair Overalls Underclothing sufficient for
2 Clothes Bags three weeks
MILITARY ORGANIZATION
The young men, except those in the College are organ-
ized into Cadet Companies in charge of a Commandant.





12 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Each company is commanded 'by a Cadet Captain and has
its .full complement of Cadet officers selected from those
students who have been most exemplary in conduct and
soldierly bearing.
The organization is maintained to help in the well
rounded physical, mental and moral development of the
boys. It is also intended to cultivate habits of neatness;
punctuality, obedience, and to give an erect, healthy, manly
bearing and a high regard for law and order.
*I ~ ~ In addition to Company and Battalion drill a course of
military Calisthenics or Gymnastics is given in the open
air.
A band composed of young men of all departments is
organized in connection with the Battalion.
UNIFORMS
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or
blue serge and with the cap cost approximately $25.00.
These uniforms are made in the college shop and are
sold at actual cost. The patrons are therefore urged not to
buy citizen's suits for their children, but to send money
to the President with which to buy the above uniform suits.
Satisfactory arrangements for the uniforms is one of the
requirements for matriculation of young men. The regu-
lation is-uniform suits, caps, and white gloves.
REMITTANCE
Parents and guardians are advised in making remit-
tances for students, to send money by postal money order
or express money order or registered letter direct to the
President. He will not be responsible for money sent to
students.
LITERARY SOCIETIES
There are five literary societies: Acme-Forum, for High
School men; Tucker-Lyceum, for Jr. High School women,
and Philosophian, for Sr. H. S. women; The College Wits
Debating Club, for College men; and the Athenaeum, for
Normal School and College women. These societies meet
fortnightly.





GENERAL INFORMATION 13
PRIZES
High School Declamation Prizes, given by High School
Societies.
The Susan Black High School Prize.
The Avent Scholarship Prize.
Fourth Year High School Scholarship Prize (Loving
cup).
E. B. Jones Freshman Chemical Prize.
Faculty Oratorical Prizes.
The College Wits Scholarship Prize.
Alumni Scholarship Prize.
The John R. Scott Athletic Prize.
Willie Mitchell Prize (English and Mathematics).
Class 1922, Short Story Prize.
RELIGIOUS EXERCISES
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Christian.
In addition to the daily devotion, Mid-week Prayer Serv-
ice, Sunday School, Sunday Preaching, Vesper Services and
Bible study courses, there are active Young Men's Chris-
tian Association and Young Women's Christian Associa-
tion.
ATHLETICS
All athletic activities and teams are under direct man-
agement of a Governing Board, consisting of faculty and.
student members. The student members of this board are,
elected by the members of the Athletic Association, which
comprises the entire student body.
Inter-class and inter-collegiate sports are encouraged and
representative college teams are maintained in football,
baseball, basketball, and tennis. No student is allowed to
e(.rl,.l-':.- whose physical condition or class work is not satis-
factory.
No person shall participate in any inter-collegiate sport
unless he be a bona fide student doing full work in a regu-
lar or special course as defined in the curriculum of the
College.
No student shall participate in inter-collegiate athletics.
who is found to be delinquent in his studies to the extent
of more than one-third of his regular work.





'14 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES
A tri-state debate is held each year with Benedict Col-
lege and Clark University. This debate is under the super-
vision of a committee appointed by the President.
Each of the three colleges selects an affirmative and a
negative team, of three students each. On the second Fri-
day in April each college holds two debates, one with each
of the other institutions.
The Florida A. & M. College chooses her six tri-state
debators in a contest, or "try-out," open to every student
in the College.
RHETORICAL EXERCISES
Part of the chapel hour, bi-monthly, is given to public
rhetorical exercises.
An annual declamation contest is held in which repre-
sentatives from each of the High School literary societies
compete for prizes of ten dollars and five dollars offered
by the societies.
The oratorical faculty prizes are competed for by the
students of college rank.
BOARDING DEPARTMENT
The Boarding Department, equipped with both dry and
steam cooking facilities, offers an up-to-date dining service.
EXPENSES
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel,
per month, $15.00; 8 months ................. $120.00
Laundering, etc., $2.00 per month................ 16.00
Hospital fee, 25cts. per day while sick in addition
to board.
Athletic fee .................................. 5.00
Registration fee ............................... 2.00
Late registration, $1.00 additional.
A student who is not a legal resident of the State is re-
quired to pay tuition fee of $20.00 per year.





GENERAL INFORMATION 15
FACILITIES OF SELF-SUPPORT
A limited number of earnest young men and women
will be allowed to work out a part of their board and
laundry expenses. Application for this privilege must be
made in writing and accepted before arrival. Money thus
earned will be applied to the boarding account of the
student.
RULES REGARDING DEFICIENT RECORDS
All records below 60 in any subject are deficient. A
deficient record is a failure if below 50 and a condition if
above 50.
All failures and conditions must be removed before a
student can have advanced catalogue classification.
A failure or a condition in any required subject will pre-
vent graduation.
A .failure is removable only by repeating the subject in
class as soon as scheduled in program. This subject takes
precedence over all other subjects.
A condition is removable by special examination which
is given within two weeks after the beginning of each
semester. A student will be allowed to take only one spe-
cial examination to remove a condition. If a student fails
in this examination, the condition becomes a failure remov-
able only by repeating the subject in class as soon as sched-
uled in program.
An extra special examination will be granted the first
week in May to candidates for graduation for removal of
conditions incurred during the Senior year.
An industrial condition is removable by the students'
performing such work as is designated by the instructor.
A passing record in any subject becomes deficient by
the withdrawal of a student and is ranked as a condition,
provided the student takes special instruction in the sub-
ject under some one approved by the President; otherwise
it is ranked as a failure. This special instruction must
cover the work done by the student's class during his ab-
sence.
Four is the maximirm number of academic subjects a
student may take during any semester, including repeated
subjects.





16 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
A student failing to enter school at the beginning of a
semester loses his class standing which may be regained
only by passing an extra written examination in the sub-
jects covered by the class during his absence.
It will be the policy of this institution that whenever a
student's semester record shows more than one mark below
50% or more than two marks below 60%, that student's
case shall be brought before the Prudential Committee for
dismissal from school for the ensuing semester.
GENERAL STATEMENTS REGARDING CURRICULUM
The academic or literary activities of the College are car-
ried on in two schools: The High School and the College.
There is also a nucleus of a school of music. The voca-
tional activities are carried forward in five schools; the
Schools of Agriculture, of Mechanic Arts, of Home Eco-
nomics, of Health and of Pedagogy.
ADMISSION
For admission to the institution, applicants must be of
sound health and good reputation, and must furnish evi-
dence of having satisfactorily completed the work of the
sixth grade. For advance standing in the High 'School ap-
plicants must furnish additional evidence either by exami-
nation or by credits from accredited schools, guaranteeing
such standing.
For admission to the College Department sixteen units
of preparatory work shall be offered. These units must
include:
English ......................at least 3 units
Mathematics .................. at least 3 units
Foreign Languages ...........at least 2 units
History and Civics ............at least 2 units
Science ....................... at least 1 unit
Vocational Training ............ at least 1 unit
Additional to be chosen by the
candidate .................at least 4 units
Total ................................ 16 units
b. __





GENERAL INFORMATION 17
DEFINITION OF A UNIT
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a
secondary school, constituting approximately a quarter of
a full year's work. The definition assumes that the length
of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks and
that a period is from forty to sixty minutes in length, and
that the study is pursued for four to five periods per week.
It further assumes that "two hours of manual training or
laboratory is equivalent to one hour (or period) of class-
room work."
For admission to the four year course in Pedagogy see
requirements for admission to the College.
The requirements for admission to the vocational schools
are the same as for admission to the institution. Applicant
must be of good health and reputation, and be able to enter
the seventh grade or first year of the Junior High School.
Special requirements are found under the various de-
partments.
Students who complete the third year of a standard
High School may enter the three-year course in the School
of Pedagogy upon presenting twelve standard units.
ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
A student entering from any other college will be ad-
mitted with the advanced credit to which his previous
work entitles him. If he comes from a college whose en-
trance requirements and curriculum are equivalent to those
of the Florida A. and M. College, he will receive credit for
his past work, but will be obliged to take all the required
subjects in the course in which he wishes to enroll that have
not been covered in his previous work.
All advanced credits allowed must be considered pro-
visional, as the College reserves the right of revising and
altering them whenever the work of the student indicates
the necessity of such a change.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION IN TERMS OF UNITS OR
SCHOOL HOURS
The College unit is the standard unit of American Col-
leges and represents One Recitation Per Week for One
Semester. 120 units is the minimum amount of work re-
quired for graduation, of which at least 18 must represent





18 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
major work. The American sti,li,,l unit is based upon
not more than 18 recitations per week for teacher or pupil.
For graduation from the two-year course leading to the
degree L. I. in the School of Pedagogy sixty units above
the high school are required.
For graduation from the College course one hundred and
twenty units of work are required, of which at least 24
must be major work.
Requirements for graduation from the high school six-
teen units of secondary work shall be offered.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
The College urges very strongly that each student enter
a regular course and take the work as outlined for that
CouxseS-e.,eyean tggeQU h^ B^ B- h-qQfe 4 ila'nme.
Students are given special classification only when the age
and preparation of the applicant seem to render such ac-
tion necessary and expedient.
Applicants for admission to the freshman class without
condition must present sixteen units. Applicants who pre-
sent fourteen units may be admitted conditioned in two
units. One unit of such deficiency must be made up before
the beginning of the Sophomore year. All entrance condi-
tions must be removed by the beginning of the Junior year.
Single half units will be accepted only in the Sciences
and Civics. Less than two units of foreign language will
not be accepted in fulfillment of entrance requirements.
Standard collegiate credits from other institutions of
higher learning are accepted so far as these credits apply
on the curriculum to which the student is admitted.
MAJOR WORK
Every student for the degree of Bachelor of Science
must elect a major department and file application with
the Dean of the department, in which he wishes to do
major work, before February of the Sophomore year.
Each department prints the plans of its major work, but
these plans may be changed by the department to suit in-
dividual cases. A Major consists of not less than 18 units
or not more than 36 units, as indicated by the departments.
This work may all be done in one department, or part of
it may be in allied subjects in other departments, provided
that at least 18 units of the major work are taken in some
one department.





OUTLINE OF COURSES 19
OUTLINE OF COURSES
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Reading, alternating with Reading, alternating with
Sanitation .............. 3 Sanitation ............ 3
Mathematics I ............ 5 Mathematics I ............ 5
Grammar : ............... 5 Grammar ................. 5
Spelling .................. 5 Spelling .................. 5
Geography ................ 5 Geography ................ 5
History, alternating with History, alternating with
Writing ................ 3 Writing ................ 3
Singing ..... ........ Singing ..................
Vocational Training ....... 6 Vocational Training ....... t
SECOND YEAR
Reading, alternating with Reading, alternating with
History ............... 5 Spelling ................ 5
Geography ................ 5 Geography ............... 5
Physiology. alternating Physiology, alternating
with Agriculture ........ 5 Mathematics II ............ 5
Mathematics II ........... 5 Grammar ..................
Grammar ................. Singing 1
Singing ........... 1 Vocational Training ...... 6
Vocational Training ....... 6
THIRD YEAR
Required- Required-
English I ................. 5 English I ................ 5
Mathematics III .......... 5 Mathematics III.......... 5
Singing .................. Singing ................... 1
Vocational Training ...... 6 Vocational Training ...... 6
Select two- Select two-
Latin I .................. 5 Latin I ................... 5
Physical Geography ....... 5 General Science........... 5
Ancient History .......... 5 Ancient History .......... 5
Drawing ................. 5 Drawing ................





20 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
sENIT R, HIGH Sc'I1OOL
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Required- Required-
English II ................ 5 English II ............... 5
Mathematics IV .......... 5 Mathematics IV .......... 5
Singing ................. 1 Singing .... .............. I
Vocational Training ...... 6 Vocational Training ....... F
Select two- Select two-
Latin II ................. 5 Latin II .................. 6
English History ........... 5 English History ........... 5
Drawing ................. 5 Drawing .........:....... 5
SECOND YEAR
Required- Required-
English III ................5 English III ............... a
Mathematics V............ 5 Mathematics V ........... ,
Vocational Training....... 6 Vocational Training ....... 6
Singing .................. 1 S!hIi- ................... 1
Select two- Select two-
Physics or Chemistry I .... 5 Physics or Chemistry I..... 5
Zoology .................. .5 Zoology ................... 5
Latin III .................. 5 Latin III ................. 5
Modern Languages ........ 5 Modern Languages ........ 5
Drawing 5 ................ 5 Drawing ................. 5
THIRD YEAR
Required- Required-
English IV ............... .5 English IV ............... 5
American History and American History and
Civics ................. 5 Civics ..................
Vocational Training ....... !\ Vocational Training ....... t
Singing ..... ...... 1
Select two- Select two-
Latin IV ................. 5' Latin IV ................. 5
Physics I ............... 5 Physics I ................. 5
Modern Languages ........ 5 Modern Languages ........ 5
Education I............. 5 Chemistry I .............. 5
Chemistry I.............. 5 Social Science ............ 5
Mathematics VI .......... 5 Zoology .................. 5
Zoology ................... 5
N. B.-The figures indicate the number of 60-minute periods a
week. State adopted texts used in the High School, and also
State authorized courses.





r
4
OUTLINE OF COURSES 21
SCHOOL OF PEDAGOGY
SHORT COURSE LEADING TO L. I. DEGREE OR DIPLOMA
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Education Ib ............. 3 Education IIb ............
English V ................ a English V ................ 3
Physical Education ........ 1 Physical Education........ 1
Science (Chemistry II) .... 5 Science (Chemistry II) .... 5
Music .................. 1 Music ..................
Drawing ................. 3 Geography (Review) ...... 3
SENIOR YEAR
Education II.............. 3 Education II.............. 3
Education V .............. 1 Education V .............. 2
English VI................ 3 English VI ...............
Physical Education ........ 1 Physical Education ........ 1
Psychology ............... 3 Psychology ............... 3
Home Economics .......... 3 Mathematics 2A .......... 3
Elective ....... ........... 3 Elective .................. 2
LONG COURSE LEADING TO B. S. E.
FRESHMAN
English V ................ 3 English V ................ 3
Education Ib .............. 3 Education Ib ............. a
Science ................... 3 Science ................... 3
Mathematics VII .......... 3 Mathematics VII.......... 3
Elective .................. 3 Elective .................. 3
SOPHOMORE
English VI ............... 3 Education II .............. 3
Education II ........... 3 Education V .............. 1
Science .... ........ 3 Science ................... 3
Elective ............ 6 Elective .................. 6
English VI................ 3
JUNIOR
English VIII ............. 3 English VIII.............. 3
Education III ............ 3 Education IIIb............ ;
Science ......... ......... 3 Science ................... 3
Political Economy ......... 3 Political Economy......... 3
Elective ............ 3 Elective ..................3





22 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SENIOR
Education IV or VII....... 3 Education VI ............. 3
Sociology ................. Z Sociology ................. 3
Philosophy ............... 3 Philosophy ................ 3
History V ................ 3 History V ................ 3
Elective .................. 3 Elective .................. 3
NOTE-Electives in the Department of Education may be
chosen from the following subjects: Education IX, Home Eco-
nomics, Drawing, Manual Arts, Agriculture, Biology, Music.
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
PREMEDICAL COURSE
FIRST YEAR
Required, 6 Hours; Optional, 10 Hours.
Economics .................5 English VII............... 3
Geology .................. 5 Ethics or Psychology...... 3
Biology .................. 5 Chemistry ................5
SECOND YEAR
Required, 3 Hours; Optional, 13 Hours.
Sociology ................. 3 Philosophy ................ 5
English VIII.............. 3 Geology .................. 5
Physics ................... 3 Biology ................... 5
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
Prerequisite-Same as for College entrance.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English V ...... 3 English V ................ 3
Home Econ'omics V.-!. -.'.. 2 Home Economics V........ 2
Home Economics I..- .... 2 Home Economics I......... 2
Physiology I .............. 3 Rural Economics.......... 3
Chemistry II.............. 3 Chemistry II 2
Drawing ............... 1 Drawing ............. 1
Physical Training ......... a Physical Training .........%





OUTLINE OF COURSES 23
SOPHOMORE
English VI ....... 3 English VI ............... 3
Home Economics VI Home EconomicsVI .. 2
Home Economics II. t ..L. 2 Chemistry III ............ 3
V Chemistry III ............ 3 Education II .............. 5
V Education II .............. 5 Physical Training .........
Physical Training .........
JUNIOR
History IV................ 3 Education VI 3
Chemistry VI ............. 3 Home Economics VIIrW <;
Education VI ............. 3 Home Economics IX fW 4
Electives ................. o Electives ................. 6
History IV................ 3
SENIOR
Education VII .... Education X.: ............ 3
Home Economics VIIItQ(da4 Home Economics VIII .4
Home Economics XlA.-.44 Home Ecbnomics X..-
Sociology ........... ..... 3 Sociology ................ 3
Electives ................. 4 Electives ................. 4
NOTE-Electives may be chosen from the following subjects:
English, Philosophy, Home Economics IV, Drawing, Agriculture
and Manual Arts, Biology, Music.
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
Prerequisite-Junior Normal offered in the Fourth Year of the
High School
MIDDLE
First Semester First Semester
English V................. 3 English V ................3
Home Economics V.ti..... 2 Home Econ'omics V........ 2
Home Economics 4 5-. 2 Home Economics I......... 2
Home Economics" VIl .. 5 Chemistry II.............. 5
Physiology I .............. 3 Rural Economics.......... 3
Chemistry II.............. 5 Home Economics IX....... 2
Physical Training .........% Physical Training .........
IL~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~<





24 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SENIOR
English VI .............. 3 Home Economics VI..2..... 2
Home E s ome Economics I .'. .II....... 2
Home Econ'omics II ........2 Home Economics VII.... 1
Chemistry VI ............ .3 Ethics ................. 3
Home Economics X........ 2 Home Economics X .........2
Physical Training ......I... l'.!!i-!. :i T3ji!i," ......:..%.
Electives ................. 3 El.. i .. .............. 3
NOTE-Electives may be chosen from the ,1r wl.;!!. subjects:
Home Economics IV, Drawing, Bacteriology, I..'llar. .!! IV.
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS
COURSE. LEADING TO B. S. IN ARCHITECTURE
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics VII........... Mathematics VIII ........ 5
English V ............... English V ........... 2
Chemistry I (B) .......... 5 Chemistry I (B).......... 5
Elements of Arch.......... 1 History of Arch........... 2
Mathematics XI .......... 2 Mathematics XI........... 2
Shop Laboratory .......... 2 Shop Laboratory ........ 2
SOPHOMORE
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics X ............ 5 English VI ...............
English VI................ 3 Architectural Drawing .... 3
History of Arch ........... 1 History of Arch............ 3
*Perspective ............... 2 Wood Turning............ 2
Shades and Shadows....... ; Freehand Drawing ........ 2
Physics II ................ 2 Physics II................ 3
Freehand Drawing ........ 2
JUNIOR
Mathematics IX .......... Arch. Design .............. 5
Modern Language ......... 3 Heating and Vent......... 2
Economics ............ .. 3 Specifications and Est.... 2
Arch. Design ............ 3 Building Cons ...... .... 2
Graphic Statics ........... 2 Business Law ............ 2
Building Cons ............ 2 Plumbing ................ d
r;;
Y





OUTLINE OF COURSES 25
SENIOR
Mathematics IX .......... 5 Mathematics XII .......... 4
Arch. Design ............. 4 Sanitary Eng. ............. 2
Rendering ................ 3 Building Cons. ............ 2
Ethics II ................. 3 Illumination and Wiring... 2
Water Color Drawing...... 3 History of Art............. 1
Metal Work .............. 2 *Thesis .................. 7
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics VII ......... 5 Mathematics VIII ........ 5
Chemistry Ib ........ .... ) Chemistry Ib ............. 5
English V ................ 2 English V ................ 2
Mathematics XI .......... 2 Mathematics XI .......... 2
Laboratory III ........... 3 Laboratory ............... 3
SOPHOMORE
Mathematics VII .......... 2 Power Plants ............. 2
General Physics ........... 3 Mechanical Drawing ...... 3
Elementary Mechanics ..... 5 Machine Design .......... 2
Steam Engines ........... 2 Graphic Statics ........... 2
English .................. a Laboratory ............... 5
JUNIOR
Applied Mechanics ........ 3 Gas Engines .............. 2
Economics ................ Strength of Materials ...... 1
Fuel and Oil Tests......... 1 Thermodynamics .......... 2
English ................... 3 Machine Design .......... 3
Laboratory ............... 3 Hydraulics ............... 2
SENIOR
Direct Current Systems.... 3 Alt. Current Systems...... 3
English ................... 3 Cost Accounting........... 3
Power Tests .............. 2 Automobiles .............. 3
Public Speaking .......... 2 Thesis ....................
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Mathematics VII .......... 5 Mathematics VIII......... 5
Chemistry I (B).......... 5 Chemistry I (B)........... a
English V ........... 2 English V ................ 2
Mathematics XI........... 2 Mathematics XI .......... 2
Laboratory ............ 3 Laboratory ............... 3





26 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SOPHOMORE
Mathematics VII ......... 3 Power Plants ............. 2
General Physics........... 4 Structural Drawing ....... 3
English VI ............... 3 Elementary Mechanics .... 4
Electricity I .............. 4 Mathematics VII.......... 3
Laboratory .............. 3
JUNIOR
Applied Mechanics ........ 3 Alt. Current Machines..... 3
Elem. of Elec. Engineering; 3 English ................. 3
Economics ................ 3 Hydraulic Tests .......... 3
Direct Current Machines... 3 Types of Engines.......... 2
SENIOR
Costs and Estimates....... 2 Contracts and Specifica-
Illumination .............. 3 tions .................. 2
Alter. Current Machines.... 2 Telephone and Radio....... 2
Electric Railways .......... 1 Gas Engines .............. 3
Tbesis
*A thesis covering the work 'of each full school year will be
required.
English V. Chemistry I (B), English VI, Physics II, Modern
Language, Economics, Surveying and Analytic Geometry are
courses the same as in the College of Science.
In each semester one elective will be allowed. This is to be
taken with at least three assigned subjects.
TWO YEAR COURSE
(Trades)
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Arithmetic (Req.) ........ 5 Arithmetic (Req.) ........ 5
English or Civics.......... 5 English ...................5
Drawing and Plan Read- Drawing (Req.) .......... o
ing ..................... 5 Manual Tr. (Metal)....... 2
Manual Training (Wo'od).. 2 Hygiene (Req.) .......... 2
Shop Work ............... Shop Work ..............
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
History or English (Req.). 5 Geography (Req.) ......... 5
Algebra (Req.) ........... 5 Algebra .................. 5
Drawing (Req.) .......... 5 Estimates ................ 2
Shop Work (Practical) Shop Work (Practical)
(Req.) (Req.)





OUTLINE OF COURSES 27
COMMERCIAL COURSE
First Year-First Semester Second Year-First Semester
Bookkeeping I ............ 5 Bookkeeping III, IV ....... 5
Penmanship .............. 3 Business Organization and
Commercial Arithmetic .... 5 Office Training ......... 5
English .................. 5 Commercial Law ......... 5
Typewriting .............. 3 Two electives:
One 'of the following electives: Electives
Modern Language ......... 5 Office Management ....... 5
Stenography ............. 5 Insurance ................ 5
Drawing ................. 5 Real Estate Business ...... 5
Second Semester Geometry ................. 5
Bookkeeping II ........... 5 Second Semester
English Composition ...... 5 Business Ethics ........... 5
Typewriting .............. 5 Salesmanship .............
Spelling (Commercial) .... 5 Economics ............... 5
Civics and History .......' 5 Two electives:
One of the following electives: Electives
Stenography .............. 5 Modern Language ......... 5
Physics .................. 5 Banking and Accounting... 5
Chemistry ................ 5 English ................... 5
Typewriting .............. 5 Stenography .............. 5
Practice Work in Office ... 5
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN AGRICULTURE
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English (V) .............. 3 English (V) .............. 3
Chemistry (II) ............ Chemistry (II) ............ 5
Mathematics (VII) ....... 5 Mathematics (VII) ....... 5
Animal Husbandry (III).. 3 Animal Husbandry (II1).. 3
Electives .................. 5 Botany II ................ 3
Electives ................. 2
SOPHOMORE
English (VI) ............. 6 English (VI) ............. 6
Chemistry (III) ........... 5 Chemistry (III) ........... 5
Entomology ............... 2 Horticulture II ........... 2
Animal Husbandry (IV)... 4 Animal Husbandry (IV)... 4
Agronomy (II) ........... 4 Agronomy II ............. 4
Electives ................. 3 Electives ................. 3
I





28 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
JUNIOR
Economics (II) ........... s Ethics ................... 3
Bacteriology .............. 3 Physics (IV) ............. 3
Chemistry (IV) ........... 3 Chemistry (IV) .......... 5
Geology ................... 3 Botany (III) ............. 3
Animal Husbandry (V) .... 3 Animal Husbandry (VI)... 3
Psychology ................ Methods of Teaching....... 3
Electives ................. 3 Electives ................. 2
Supervised Project Work
SENIOR
Chemistry (V)............ 3 Chemistry (V)............ 3
Biology ................... 5 Biology .................. 5
Animal Husbandry (VII- Organization and Methods.. 3
VIII) .................. 5 Plant Breeding ........... 3
Agronomy (IV-V) ......... 3 Rural Sociology ........... 5
Electives ................. 3 Practice Teaching ......... 3
Supervised Project Work
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
FIRST YEAR
First Semester
English (Review) ................................... 3
Botany ............................................. 2 (1% )
Chemistry ......... .. ........................ 5 (3)
History of Education ................................. 5 (3)
Physiology and Hygiene .............................. 2
Veterinary Science .................................. 1 (1)
Applied Mathematics ................................ 2 (1Y%)
Animal Husbandry I................................. 2 (2)
Soils ........................................ 2 (2)
Farm Mech. (Wood Shop) ............................ 1 (Y2)
Second Semester
English (Literature and Composition) ................ 3 (2)
Agricultural Botany ................................. 2 (1/2)
Agricultural Chemistry .............................. 5 (3)
Vocational Education ................................ 5 (3)
Farm Sanitation .................................... 1 (Y)
Veterinary Science .................................. 1 (1)
American History and Civics .......................... 3
Animal Husbandry II................................ 2 (2)
General Horticulture ................................ 2 (2)
Farm Mach. (Forge Shop) ........................... 1 ()





OUTLINE OF COURSES 29
SECOND YEAR
First Semester
Argumentation ...................................... 2 (1%)
Entom ology ........................................ 3 (2 )
Physics ........................................ 5 (3)
Educational Psychology .............................. 5 (3)
General Economics .................................. 5 (3)
Field Crops I ........................................ 2 (2)
Farm Engineering and Machinery ..................... 2 (2)
Practice Teaching ................................... 1 (1)
Second Semester
Public Speaking ..................................... 2 (1%)
Plant Pathology and Bacteriology ..................... 3 (21)
Farm Management and Accounts ...................... 3 (2Y2)
Rural Economics and Sociology....................... 5 (3)
Agricultural Pedagogy ............................... 3 (2Y%)
Field Crops II ................... ................... 2 (2)
Farm Dairying ..................................... 1 (1)
Farm Poultry ....................................... 1 (1)
Practice Teaching ................................... 1 (1)
At least two years of actual Farm Life and Practice will be
required before graduation.
Candidates for this course must be graduates from a four-year
high school course.
NURSE TRAINING
COURSE
JUNIOR
Physiology ........ ................................. 2 (8)
Anatom y ............................................ 2 (8)
H ygiene ............................................. 2 (8)
Medical Nursing ................... ....... 1 (34)
Surgical Nursing, Gynaecology ........................ 1 (8)
Dietetics ............................................ 2 (34)
Ethics of Nursing ................... ................ 1 (4)
MIDDLE
M ateria M edica ..................................... 2 (8)
Bacteriology ......................................... 2 (6)
Pediatrics ............... .......................... 2 (7)
Obstetrics ................... ...................... 1 (6)
Urinalysis ........................................... 1 (4)
Medical Nursing Con ................................. 1 (8)
Surgical Nursing Con ................................ 1 (8)





30 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SENIOR
Obstetrical Nursing ................................ 1 (8)
Nervous Disease (Lectures) .......................... 5
Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat (Lectures) .................... 6
History of Nursing ................................... 2 (8)
Numbers in parenthesis indicate the number of weeks the sub-
ject is pursued.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
STATEMENT
The aim of the Music Department of the Florida Agri-
cultural and Mechanical College is to create in the student
body as a whole a love and proper appreciation for the
beautiful and uplifting in the broad field of music; to af-
ford ample opportunity for individual development of a
technique and power of interpretation of the best in music,
both instrumental and vocal; to encourage and foster cre-
ative ability.
The course of public school music including Sight Sing-
ing, Ear Training, Music Appreciation and Chorus Work,
open to all High School Students, gives opportunity for
development of true and correct musical concepts. Students
of the First, Second, Third and Fourth Years are required
to take this course.
The Choral Union is open to all students and affords
opportunity for acquaintance with the best sacred and
secular music.
Piano work is divided into three departments: Begin-
ners', Intermediate and Advanced. Beginners' work is
essentially that of establishing fundamentals in technique
and hand culture; thorough acquaintance with and associa-
tion between keyboard and notes; and establishment of
sense of rhythms. The intermediate work embodies ad-
vanced technic, study of compositions and etudes of vari-
ous masters for cultivation of different touches, phrasing
and interpretation. Scales are taught with a view of secur-
ing velocity and legato. The advanced course continues
previous work and in the latter part of the course training
in concert work is given.
The student is required to present at the end of his
course a recital of selected numbers. A certificate of grad-
uation is given for satisfactory completion of this course.





ACADEMIC COURSES 31
Vocal culture includes correct breathing, posture, tone
quality and production. Exercises and etudes from dif-
ferent composers are studied. Exercises in phrasing and
sight-singing form a part of the course. A recital, upon
the satisfactory completion of this course looking towards
a certificate, is required in the senior year.
The course in Theory includes Harmony, General
Theory, Musical History and Appreciation. This course
is designed primarily to acquaint the student with the
origin and meaning of terms, to teach principles of part-
writing and to furnish a general knowledge of music with
which every student should be familiar.
The methods of teaching are those following our present
day principles of Psychology and Pedagogy. The student
is led to think and work out logically the problems arising
from his or her work. Students in all stages of advance-
ment are received and credit given for work done. Stu-
dents who desire to pursue courses in music are permitted
to select them.
A prize of $10.00, given by Mrs. Rosa W. Butler, is of-
fered for the student showing greatest improvement in
either Vocal or Instrumental work for the year.
TUITION :-$4.00 per month.
CREDIT:-A student taking a regular course either Piano
or Vocal, practicing one hour each day, with two lessons
weekly receives one unit for work done.
COURSE
FIRST GRADE
TECHNICS: Major scales in one octave, hands separate
Tonic triads in close position.
STUDIES: Landon's Foundation Studies; Matthew's
Graded Studies; Book I; National Graded Studies;
Emery's Foundation Studies; Koehler, op. 162 and 190;
easy composition of Behr, Gurlitt, Brumeur, Lichner, etc.
SECOND GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and harmonic minor scales in one and
two octaves, hands separate. Broken major and minor
triads.





32 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II. Spind-
ler, op. 273, Books I and II; Ioeschorn, op. 66, Books I
and II; Burlitt, op. 82, Books I and II; Spindler, op. 44;
selection from Merkel, Lange, Schomann, Clementi, Lach-
ner, Ritter and others.
THIRD GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and melodic minor scales. Studies in
broken triads (continued).
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book III; Burg-
muller, op. 100, Books I and II, Koehler, op. 157.
PIECES: Selection from Kullah, op. 62; Gade, op. 36;
Mozart, No I. Low; Lachner, op. 49; Emery, Spindler,
and others.
FOURTH GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and minor scales.
STUDIES: Matthew's Studies, Book IV; Koehler, op.
130; Heller, op. 47; Czerney, op. 636 and 713.
PIECES: Wilm, op. 12; Schytte, op. 68; Bohm, op. 327,
No. 2; Selections from Haydn, Kerchner, Wollenhaupt,
Heller, Scharwenka, Schumann and Lack.
FIFTH GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and minor scales in contrary motion.
Three and four octaves in 3rd, 6th, 18th.
STUDIES Heller, op. 46; Czerney, op. 78; Bach, Twelve
Little Preludes. Kullak School of Octave Playing.
Matthew's Studies, Book V.
PIECES: Mendelssohn't Song Without Words, Chami-
nade, Gard, Nevin, Schytte, Jensen.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY (I) ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY: A recitation
and laboratory course for beginners. Instruction is given
by recitations, laboratory work, examinations and reports.





ACADEMIC COURSES 33
Students are required to use note book for the systematic
recording of all laboratory work. Such work is to be
turned in to the instructor on the completion of each ex-
periment. Required for all second and third year senior
high school students. First and Second Semester five
hours.
CHEMISTRY (II). GENERAL CHEMISTRY: A lecture
course. Instruction is given by means of experimental lec-
tures with frequent oral and written examination in the
fundamental theories and laws of chemistry and a careful
study of the elements and their compounds. In addition
to text books, students are required to provide themselves
with suitable note books, and to take notes especially on
the experiments shown, as the description of experiments
will be required on examination. For all Normal Junior
and Freshmen students. First Semester five hours.
CHEMISTRY (III). QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: A lecture
and laboratory course including the study of simple reie-
tions in the analysis of simple solutions, the separation of
metals and acids in solution, blowpipe analysis and analy-
sis of solid mixtures and alloys. First and Second Semes-
ters three hours. Text: Bivins Qualitative Analysis.
(Wiley's Technical Series.)
CHEMISTRY (IV.) QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS: A laboratory
course including simple determinations and separations of
the common metals and acids by gravometric and volu-
metric methods. Instruction is carried forward by confer-
ences, oral and written quizzes and laboratory work. Open
to Juniors and those who have pursued course three. First
and Second Semesters three hours. Text: Quantitative
Analysis (Wiley's Technical Series).
CHEMISTRY (V). ORGANIC CHEMISTRY: A lecture
course with laboratory work. Three lectures and two lab-
oratory periods a week. Will be given the first semester
and two lectures and three laboratory periods a week, the
second semester. This course is elective for students ex-
pecting to study professional agriculture or medicine.
First and Second Semester, five hours. Text: Remsen's
Organic Chemistry, Laboratory Guide.
CHEMISTRY (VI). HOUSEHOLD CHEMISTRY: This course
covers a period of one year and is given after one year of
General Chemistry. The purpose of this course is to give
the students a knowledge of the composition and food
values of food materials, adulterations in foods and simple
2-A. & M.





34 FLORII)A AGRICTLTU-RAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
methods for their detection, soap making and a study of
the chemical processes involved in Laundering. Lectures
and supplementary readings as well as Laboratory experi-
ments form the course. This course is open to students
specializing in Foods and Nutrition.
BIOLOGY
BIOLOGY (I). ELEMENTARY ZOOLOGY: A recitation and
laboratory course for beginners, includes a study of the
principal animal types, their structure and habits and
mode of life. A systematic record of all laboratory work
is required of each student. Work must be turned in to the
instructor on the completion of each exercise. Required of
all second and third year, senior high school students First
and Second Semesters, five hours. Texts: (State Adopted).
BIOLOGY (II). GENERAL BIOLOGY: Recitations, confer-
ences, oral quizzes, laboratory work and reports are ar-
ranged so as to give an introductory knowledge of plant
and animal substance, and of the fundamental principles
and phenomena of the living world. The relation of or-
ganisms to the environment, the common structure of or-
ganisms, their common elementary activities, heredity and
variation, and the dynamic values of organisms, particu-
larly from the standpoint of man, are the principal topics
of discussion. For Freshman and all others who have com-
pleted course (1) First Semester, three hours. Text: Ele-
mentary Biology (Conns).
BIOLOGY (III). MAMMALION ANATOMY: This is a
careful study of the more important system of a typical
vertebrate (mammal). The laboratory work consists of the
dissection of a cat or other mammal, a study of the impor-
tant systems, a record of the work by drawing, and oral
and written examinations. All students who have com-
pleted course (2) Second Semester, three hours. Text:
Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology.
BIOLOGY (IV). ANIMAL HISTOLOGY (VERTEBRATE): In
this course the student is expected to gain an elementary
knowledge of the minute structure of animal tissues. He
is also expected to obtain a working knowledge of the
methods of preparing material for study and identification
with the microscope, by killing, fixing, imbedding and
staining and sectioning tissues. Elective for Juniors and
Seniors. Second Semester, four hours.





ACADEMIC COURSES 35
PHYSICS
PHYSICS I. Open to all students of the fourth year High
School class. This course is designed to give the student
a thorough knowledge of simpler physical phenomena and
includes a study of the fundamental laws of the mechanics
of solids and fluids, heat, sound, light, magnetism and
electricity.
Laboratory experiments performed by the student him-
self accompany this course and supplement the demonstra-
tions given by the instructor.. Special stress is placed upon
mechanics and the solution of mathematical problems in-
volving the laws of the several departments of the subject.
Text Book: First Principals of Physics, Carhart and
Chute.
PHYSICS II. This course will consist of a deeper study
of mechanics, thermodynamics and electricity than can be
given in Course I, and will be conducted by means of lec-
tures, laboratory and textbook work.
Textbook: Carhart's College Physics.
PHYSICS III. (Physics and Household Mechanics.)
This course is planned to give the girl a better under-
standing in the use of electricity and electrical appliances
in the home. It involves a study of wiring, plumbing,
minor repairs, the mechanism of the sewing machine and
various labor saving devices. The purpose is to increase
efficiency in the home by the reduction of unnecessary
labor and expense.
PHYSICS IV. This course will deal with the soils and
their moisture retention, effect of deep and shallow culti-
vation, road making, ventilation of farm buildings and the
draft of plows and wagons. Experiments will be per-
formed to show the rate of perculation of water through
the different kinds of soils, the effect of mulches, the de-
termination of the specific gravity; and the mechanical
analysis.
TEXT:-Agricultural Physics-King, Juniors, Second
Semester.
(Required of all College Juniors.)
ASTRONOMY. This course concerns itself primarily with
the mathematical calculations necessary to a clear under-
standing of the solar system, accompanied by telescopic





36 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
observations and a study of the principal constellations of
the sidereal system.
Textbook:-Todd's New Astronomy.
GEOLOGY. The materials of the earth, its structures,
processes at work on its surface and the history of its oiant
and animal inhabitants. Supplemented by the study of
the geology of the vicinity of Tallahassee, and three su;r-
veys; one of the phosphate mines near Live Oak one of
Lake Jackson and its environs, one of the gulf regions near
St Marks. One year. General Science Seniors and Scpho-
more Agriculture.
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
The aim of the department is to give the student a thor-
ough drill in the use of Mathematical formulae, to assist
the student in handling the intricate problems of life in.
a mathematical manner, and to aid him in correlating
mathematical principles to the more practical problems of
the kindred sciences. It is our belief that a thorough
training in Mathematics is essential as a working basis to
a better understanding and to higher appreciation of the
physical sciences. With this belief uppermost in the minds
of the teachers and faculty the following courses are
offered:
JUNIOR HIGH SCIIOOT
MATHEMATICS I and II. Milne's Progressive Arithmetic
3. These courses cover Factoring, Fractions, Percentage,
Interest, Industrial Problems and the application of simple
algebraic equations to the solution of simple problems.
Pursued through the first and second years of the Junior
High School course.
MATHEMATICS II-A. A review course in arithmetic re-
quired of all seniors in the L. I. degree course.
MATHEMATICS III. Elementary Algebra. This course
comprises the study of Elementary Algebra to Quadratics,
covering the four fundamental operations: Factoring; de-
termination of H. C. F. and L. C. M. by factoring; linear
equations, both numerical and literal, containing one or
more unknown quantities; problems involving linear equa-
tions; radicals; evolution, and exponents, both fractional
and negative.
Text: Wells and Hart.





ACADEMIC COURSES 37
MATHEMATICS IV. Intermediate Algebra. This course
embraces the study of quadratics, including simultaneous
quadratics, equations in quadratic form, and covers ratio
and proportion, the progressions, the binomial theorem for
positive integral exponents, and logarithms.
MATHEMATICS V. Plane Geometry-Wenthworth-Smith.
This course gives a proof of many of the formulae met with
in Algebra and Arithmetic and aims to give the student a
background for more abstract reasoning. Plane figures are
taken up in order of their intricacy and discussed; as far
as possible, the concrete illustrations are first introduced
so as to enable the student to more easily grasp the ab-
stract. In the course, numerous theorems are demon-
strated, but special stress is laid on the solution of original
problems and their application to the practical problems
of life.
MATHEMATICS VI. This is a continuation of Mathe-
matics V and is elective for students in all classes who have
completed Mathematics V. This course takes up the men-
suration of solid figures or figures that do not lie wholly
in the same plane. It is a prerequisite for the further suc-
cessful pursuance of Mathematics.
COLLEGE
MATHEMATICS VII.. Plane Trigonometry-Bauer and
Brooks. This course leads to the solution, by trigonometric
functions, of the right and the oblique triangle, manipula-
tion of the slide rule and the application of Logarithms to
the solution of both the right and oblique triangle. The
four and five place Logarithmic tables are extensively
used. This course is required of all Freshmen in the Col-
lege of Sciences.
MATHEMATICS VIII. Analytic Geometry-Fine and
Thompson. This is an elective course for upper classmen
who have successfully passed course VII. It takes up the
algebraic equations of lines and the conic sections and the
application to Physics. It further treats of the line in
space and the general equations of the second degree.
MATHEMATICS IX. This course in Advanced Algebra,
embracing a study of Quadratic Forms, Theory of Equa-
tions, progressions, Continued Fractions, Permutations,





38 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Combinations and Chance. The course is intended for
Sophomores.
Text: Hawkes Advanced Algebra.
MATHEMATICS X. The subject of Descriptive Geometry
is treated from the standpoint of the draftsman. It includes
Orthographic Projections, Profile Plane, Assumption of
Points and Lines, Lines and Planes, Surfaces and their
intersections, Shades and Shadows.
Text: Elements of Descriptive Geometry, Ferris.
MATHEMATICS XI. This is a course in applied mathe-
matics, intended to cover exercises growing out of actual
shop practice. In its scope it embraces problems which
deal with Electricity, Machine Shop Practice, Carpentry,
Auto Mechanics, Mechanical Drawing, and Building Proj-
ects.
Text: Practical Trade Mathematics, Moyer.
MATHEMATICS XII. Differential and Integral Calculus
School of Engineering. In this course emphasis is laid
upon the derivation of the differential and the integrating
of standard forms, the development of the Calculus and the
application of Calculus to engineering and Physics.
ENGLISH
ENGLISH I. This course, prescribed for third year Junior
High School pupils, consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-A review of declensions, conjugations,
sentence analysis, and other special topics; (b) Composi-
tion-Letterwriting, oral and written themes, paragraph-
ing, unity, simple figures, punctuation, and capitalization;
(c) Literature-The study of from four to six of the fol-
lowing classics:
Sohrab and Rustum.
Deserted Village.
Lady of the Lake.
Treasure Island.
A Tale of Two Cities.
As You Like It.
Merchant of Venice.
The Odyssey.
The Last of the Mohicans.
Text: Lewis & Hosic: Practical English.
ENGLISH II.. This course, prescribed for First Year
Senior High School students, consists of the following:





/ ACADEMIC COURSES 39
(a) Grammar-Reviews, as found necessary; (b) Com-
position-A continuation of the first year's work with em-
phasis on narration and description, synonyms, antonyms,
and coherence as applied to sentence and paragraphs; (c)
Literature-Study of Julius Caesar, Idyls of the Kings,
House of Seven Gables, Silas Marner, The Ancient Mariner,
Evangeline and Old Testament Narratives.
Text: Lewis & Hosic: Practical English.
ENGLISH III. This course, prescribed for Second Year
Senior High School students, consists of the following:
(a) Gramnlar-A review of special topics; (b) Compo-
sition-Exposition, paragraph development, sentence
structure, the composition as a whole, unity, coherence,
emphasis, scansion and elementary argumentation; (c)
Literature-Study of text book on the History of Ameri-
can Literature, together with Washington's Farewell Ad-
dress, Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, Franklin's Auto-
biography, Wilson's Addresses and State Papers, and Se-
lected American Poems.
Texts: Brooks' English Composition, Book II.
METCALF AND HANDY'S READINGS IN AMERICAN
LITERATURE
ENGLISH IV. This course, prescribed for Third Year
Senior High School students, consists of the following:
(a) Grammar-A systematic review of fundamentals;
(b) Composition-Expository and argumentative themes,
brief drawing and forensics; (c) Literature-Study of
text book on the History of English Literature, together
with Macbeth, L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Lycidas, Comus,
Burke's Speech of Conciliation, Essays from Macaulay and
Carlyle, and selected English Poems.
Text: Brooks' English Composition, Book II.
METCALF'S ENGLISH LITERATURE
ENGLISH Va. This is a course in composition and is re-
quired of Freshmen. In addition to an intensive study of
and frequent practice in the various types of writing, the
course will deal with word study, sentence structure and
analysis, and paragraph development. The short story will
receive special emphasis.
Three hours throughout the year.
Text: To be selected.





40 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
ENGLISH Vb. Students who are unable to write with a
fair degree of mechanical correctness are detained in a
composition section, without credit, until they overcome
this difficulty.
ENGLISH VI. Debating and Public Speaking.
This course is required of Sophomores. The first part
consists of a text-book study of the principles of Argu-
mentation, together with the drawing of briefs and the
writing of forensics upon assigned propositions. The sec-
ond part consists of a study of the principles of public
speaking, followed by the writing and delivering of
speeches of various types. Three hours.
Text: Baker and Huntington's Principles of Argumen-
tation.
Text in Public Speaking. Phillips' Effective Speaking.
ENGLISH VII. English Literature.
This course will cover the history and development of
English Literature from its earliest times to the present.
It is essentially a course in the reading of the masterpieces
of prose and poetry, and not a mere study of the literary
history of England.
Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Text: To be selected.
ENGLISH VIII. Shakespeare and Elizabethan Drama.
This course is designed for those who wish to make an
intensive study of such of Shakespeare's plays as are
usually taught in secondary schools. The history of the
English drama will be traced, and the works of Shakes-
peare's contemporaries in the drama will receive attention.
Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Text: To be selected.
ANCIENT AND MODERN LANGUAGES
LATIN
The aim of the Latin Division, aside from the mental
training gained in translation and in the mastery of the
essentials of the language, is centered in the development
of a genuine appreciation for classic literature and in the
building of a wider and more expressive English vocabu-





ACADEMIC COURSES 41
lary. The courses are made practical by frequent lectures
on Roman life and customs and the history of the period,
illustrated by a set of 100 slides with a stereoptican.
LATIN I. This course is a study of the principles of
Latin grammar. In the reading lessons great importance
is attached at first to the literal rendering into English,
and then the students are required to employ the English
idiom which most clearly expresses the thought of the
Latin sentence. As far as possible in the first year, stu-
dents are made to compare English and Latin words
formed from the same root. Lectures are given through-
out the year to supplement the regular work.
Textbook: First Year Latin, Clark and Game.
(For Third Year Junior High School.)
LATIN II. Caesar. The reading of a minimum of three
books is required. Prose composition is given once per
week throughout the course.
Text: Walker's "Caesar," Baker and Ingles' "High
School Course in Latin Composition."
(For First Year Senior High School.)
LATIN III. Cicero classes are required to read at least
three orations, making a study of the history of the time
of Cicero's life. Drill in prose composition is given each
week. Lectures with the lantern are given during the
course.
Textbooks: Johnson and Kingery's Cicero; Allen and
Greenough's New Latin Grammar, Baker and Inglis' Latin
Composition.
(For Second Year Senior High School.)
LATIN IV. Virgil: Classes read at least three books,
rendering into the best English possible. Considerable
attention is given to scansion and mythological references
are required to be explained throughout the course. Illus-
trated lectures are given.
Textbook: Knapp's Virgil. (Third Year Senior High
School.)
LATIN V. Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. First
half year. Drill in sight reading is given here and special
attention to the discussion of Roman philosophy.
Textbook: (a) F. G. Moore's De Senectute and (b)
To be selected.





42 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
LATIN VI. Odes and Epodes of Horace. Second half
year. In this course special study is made of the theory
of Latin prosody.
Textbook: Bennett's Horace.
These courses are elective in the Senior High School.
MODERN LANGUAGES
Elective courses in French or Spanish may be offered
in the Senior High School as per course for State High
School authorized by Chapter 1910, Acts 1919.
HISTORY
HISTORY I. (Third Year Junior High School): This
is a course in Ancient History. It takes the student from
the earliest historical period to the invasion of the Roman
empire by the northern barbarians. The indebtedness of
the present to the past is made clear.
Particular attention is given the ancient republics. The
effect of the introduction of Christianity is especially
noted. Short papers are required from time to time.
Textbook: West's Revised Ancient World.
HISTORY II. This course offers a comprehensive study
of the history of England and its literature.
Especial attention is given to the development of insti-
tutions such as Parliament, the church, local organs of jus-
tice, the borough, the King's prerogative, and also to the
growth of English literature which reflects the social,
political and religious condition of the country.
Written reports on both historical and literary subjects
will be required from time to time.
Text: Andrew's Short History of England.
HISTORY III. (Third year Senior High School): This
course is a study of U. S. History and covers with civics a
period of one year. Papers are required consisting mainly
of biographies of the great men of the period studied.
The work for the first semester covers the Colonial and
Revolutionary periods, to the establishment of the republic.
In the second semester the period from the establishment
of the republic to the present time is covered. Especial
attention is given to territorial expansion and development.
Five hours throughout the year.
Text: Stephenson's American History.





ACADEMIC COURSES 43
HISTORY IV. Negro History: A study of the achieve-
ments and experiences of the American Negro both during
slavery and since emancipation.
Text: Brawley. "A Short History of the American
Negro." (Revised.)
HISTORY V. European History: Required of all Senior
College students during second semester. An introductory
course in which the history of the nations of Europe during
the medieval and modern periods will be dealt with in as
broad and comprehensive manner as is consistent with
thoroughness of knowledge and definiteness of outline.
Textbook: Robinson's History of Western Europe.
GEOGRAPHY
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY: The work in physical geography
covers one year. The aim is to give the pupils the facts
which determine the basis of human life. Observation and
study of the immediate environment is the first study,
showing how natural conditions determine the resources
and these in turn determine occupations of the people.
Text: New Physical Geography, Dryer.
EDUCATION
EDUCATION I. Introductory course in Psychology re-
quired of all students who elect special work in Pedagogy,
in the fourth year High School. The purpose of this course
is to give the student insight into the principal psycholog-
ical conceptions and methods.
Textbook: Averill's Psychology for Normal Schools.
Five hours second semester.
3EDTTCATION IB. A course in the principles of education.
Three hours, one semester.
EDUCATION II. Elementary Education. This course will
give a general survey of the problems, both educational and
administrative, of the elementary schools.
Emphasis will be placed upon the following topics: the
meaning of education; education for citizenship, character;
the child and its needs; conduct of the recitation; teaching
pupils to study; the project method.
Text: Davis's The Work of the Teacher; and Bonser's
Elementary School Curriculum.
Three hours throughout the year. Observation required.





44 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
EDUCATION JIB. Psychology of the Common School
Branches. Statement of fundamental laws of learning with
special application to elementary education. Three hours
one semester.
EDUCATION III. History of Education: This course is
intended to give the student a breadth of view by treating
the history of education as a vital part of the history of
civilization. Political and social theories in so far as they
affect educational progress will be emphasized. Three
hours one semester.
EDUCATION IIIB: Child Study. A course dealing with
the nature and development of the mind of the child, in-
stincts, and their treatment, faults of children, etc., with
special reference to the meaning of these facts to the
teacher.
Textbook: Norsworthy and Whitley's Psychology of
Childhood.
Three hours one semester.
EDUCATION IV. Rural School Problems. This course
aims to present an instructive preparation for intelligent
endeavor in rural education from the social point of view.
The rural education problem is presented in its historical
development and present status, rural home life and social
conditions of typical communities, the rural church, the
rural school, the teaching equipment, the reorganization of
rural education and later demands for reforms. Three
hours throughout the year.
EDUCATION V. The Art of Story Telling. This course
will attempt to give the students the best methods of telling
stories to children of primary or elementary grades. One
hour one semester.
EDUCATION VI. Mental Tests and Measurements. The
principles of mental measurement and mental tests stand-
ardization will be studied along with practical work in the
use of the various scales and tests. Three hours one
semester.
EDUCATION VII. Secondary Education. The aim of this
course is to give a practical introduction to the administra-
tive, instructional, and personal problems incident to the
work of the beginning teacher. Emphasis will be placed
upon the following topics: changing conceptions of secon-
dary schools; the organization of public education with
special reference to the high school; the technique of the
recitation, i. e., lesson assignment, drill, questioning, teach-
I





ACADEMIC COURSES 45
ing pupils how to study, the use of texts and supplementary
books; professional training of teachers.
Textbook: Inglis's S... 1, 7., ,, Education.
Three hours throughout the year.
SOCIOLOGY
PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY: This course aims at a sys-
tematic study of the underlying principles of social science.
The general plan followed is to begin with personal rela-
tions in their simplest and most direct form, proceeding
thence to the more complex forms of association. Historical
references are freely used, but the main purpose is a
rational interpretation of existing society.
HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY
An introduction to philosophy through the study of its
history. The problems of philosophy are studied in their
origin. The aim is to familiarize the student with the
fundamental problems and categories of philosophy, and
to prepare him to face present-day problems in the light of
the history of philanthropic thought.
Textbook: Russell's First Course.
Five hours-First Semester.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY: In this course a more critical study of
consciousness is based upon Angell's Psychology. This
course is open to Juniors. Credit five hours.
ETHICS
ETHICS I. This course is a practical discussion of rights
and duties as brought out in personal relations with the
view to giving the student correct ethical concepts as rules
of conduct. Required in Senior Normal year. Credit, five
hours during Second Semester.
Textbook: Guick's Mind and Work and Efficient Life.
ETHICS II. In this course there is more detailed discus-
sion of ethical theories as set forth in Durant Drake's
Problems in Conduct. Junior College, Second Semester.
Credit five hours.
J





4 FLORIDIA AIGICULTURAL & MECHANCICAL COLLEGE
ECONOIICS
ECONOMICS I. This course opens an elementary discus-
sion of man's effort at making a living, based upon Car-
ver's Rural Economics.
Junior Normal, Second Semester. Credit, five hours.
ECONO-iICS II. This is a more advanced course in the
study of economic theory with stress upon the distribution
of wealth.
Textbook: Carver's Political Economy.
Credit, five hours.
Civics
This course is with United States History in the Third
year of Senior High School. It has as its purpose training
in good and intelligent citizenship. It not only embraces a
study of the forms of government known to us, but also a
review of the leading facts in the history of this govern-
ment.
Text: Magruder's American Government in 1921.
MECHANIC ARTS COURSES
GENERAL STATEMENT
Through the School of Mechanic Arts the aim is to set
forth courses that will give such practical and theoretical
knowledge as will serve as a proper basis upon which more
advanced work along the lines of the various courses offered
may be placed.
The School of Mechanic Arts provides an opportunity for
its students to acquire a sensible outlook upon the active
affairs of life and thus equips them to take up in a serious
way the problems which will be theirs after completing
any one of its courses. Whatever instruction is given is
intended to enhance the students' value as a contributor to
the service of the State.
Students of the High School are assigned to classes in
the School of Mechanic Arts. A reasonable choice is given
them, but the Dean of the School uses his discretion in





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 47
making the assignments. Special courses are open to all
who can pass the requirements as set forth in the admis-
sion statements.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO COURSES LEADING TO
DEGREES
1. Every student who desires to enter upon one of these
courses must be:
(a) A graduate (or its equivalent) from an accredited
High School.
,(b) Must have completed one of the trade courses of-
fered by the College.
(c) Must major in the work of the School of Mechanic
Arts.
(d) Must be of good health and character.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO TRADE COURSES
Any student matriculating in the High School of the
College is eligible for assignment to one of the courses
offered. The admission requirements are the same as those
for admission to the High School.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO COMMERCIAL COURSE
For admission to this course, applicants must have com-
pleted the work of the second year of an accredited High
School. For advanced classification the student must meet
such requirements as will guarantee such standing as he
seeks. This might be done either through credentials or
examinations.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE AUTO MECHANIC
COURSE
Applicants should be physically and mentally able to do
the work required. While neither an absolute nor uniform
standard as to educational qualifications are fixed, pupils
failing to make normal progress in regular schools can be
entered in this course only upon probation.





4S FLO()ItIDA AG(;It('TI IRAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER TRAINING
COURSE (SMITII-HuGHES)
Students entering this course must be of advanced
scholarship standing. They must have spent two years
in trade experience, either as a journeyman or in trade
preparation in an accredited vocational school, and must
take the course in the light of the vocation they desire to
teach.
ADMISSION TO SHORT COURSE
Any one desiring an intensive trade course may be ad-
mitted to this work without regard to regular scholarship
standing; must be of sound health and have a desire to com-
plete this course satisfactorily.
DEGREES, DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES
(a) Upon completion of a College Course in the
School of Mechanic Arts the student will have either the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Mechanical
Engineering or Electrical Engineering conferred upon
him.
(b) A certificate will be given upon the completion of
the four year Trade Course taken in connection with the
four years' work of the High School.
(c) A diploma will be awarded to those students who
finish the two year Commercial Course.
(d) A certificate will be given upon the completion of
the course in Auto Mechanics (Smith-Hughes).
(e) Certificate will be given upon the completion of the
Teacher Training Course.
(f) Those finishing the two-year Short Course in a
trade will be given certificate showing that same was satis-
factorily done.
VOCATIONAL TRADE COURSES
1. Auto Mechanics.
2. Typewriting and Stenography.
3. Carpentry and Cabinet Work.
4. Machine Shop Practice.
5. Painting.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 49
6. Plumbing and Steam Fitting.
*Printing.
8. Tailoring.
9. Wheelwrighting.
10. Electricity.
11. Drawing.
*12. Tinning.
*13. Tinning.
*13. Bricklaying and Plastering.
*14. Shoe-making and Harness-making.
*Not organized.
AUTO MECHANIC COURSE
GROUP I.-Engine Types and Parts:
(a) Single and multiple Cylinder Engines.
(b) Knight slide valve motor.
(c) Types of cylinder construction.
(d) Valve systems.
(e) Piston crankshaft and Crankcase parts.
(f) Lubrication and engine systems.
GROUP II.-Power Transmission:
(a) Clutches-their forms and requirements.
(b) Change speed gearing.
(c) Types and operations.
(d) Gas and electric systems.
(e) Methods of transmission.
(f) Forms of driving gears.
GROUP III.-Fuels, Fuel Supply and Carburetion Action:
(a) Advantages and disadvantages of various fuels.
(b) Methods of fuel supply.
(c) Proper tank location.
(d) Ignition.
(e) Purpose of Carburetor.
(f) Types of feed.
(g) Methods of operation.
GROUP IV.-The Chassis:
(a) Types of frames and method of construction.
(b) Types of springs.
(c) Front axles and steering mechanism.
(d) Rear axles nomenclature, description of various
types.
(e) Differential, gear action, its purpose.
(g) Wheels, rims and tires, methods of repair.





50 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
GROUP V.-Starting and Lighting Systems:
(a) General talks upon modern systems, operation,
care, repair.
(b) Single wire lighting.
(c) Two wire lighting.
(d) Combination switch wiring.
(e) Single unit starting, starting switches, motor gene-
rators, directly connected and gear driven
starting.
GROUP VI.-Ignition:
(a) High tension magnetos.
(b) Low tension magnetos.
(c) Battery magnetos.
(d) Induction coils.
(e) Ignition switches.
GROUP VII.-Generator:
(a) Single unit.
(b) Magneto generation.
(c) Motor generation and ignition.
(d) Automobile cut-outs.
(e) Voltage and amperage regulation.
RELATED SUBJECTS TAKEN.IN CONNECTION WITH THE AUTO
jr MECHANICS THREE-YEAR COURSE
FIRST YEAR
English .................................. 4
Mathematics III ........................... 4
General Science .......................... 4
Drawing .................................. 3
SECOND YEAR
English ................................... 4
Mathematics IV ........................... 5
Physiology and Hygiene .................... 3
Drawing ........... ..................... 3
THIRD YEAR
Civics .................................... 3
Mathematics V ............................ 5
Trade Science ............................. 4
Drawing .................................. 3





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 51
SPECIAL COURSES
A. Driving Course:
(a) Instruction in care and operation of various types
of cars.
(b) Traffic rules.
(c) Actual driving experiences.
(d) Maintenance hints of value; suggestions for oiling.
Winter care of automobiles.
B. Storage Battery Course:
(a) Care, repair, charging.
(b) Lead burning.
It requires three full school years to complete the Auto
Mechanics Course, and eight months to complete one of the
special courses.
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE
(Vocational)
FIRST YEAR
GROUP I:
1. Development of vocational Education:
(a) In Europe.
(b) In the United States.
2. Teaching Principles:
(a) Learning.
(b) Essentials of the Lesson.
3. The Trained Teacher:
(a) Qualifications (personal).
(b) Trade knowledge.
(c) Education.
(d) Teaching ability.
GROUP II:
1. Trade Analysis:
(a) By text.
(b) By building a Trade Card Index.





52 FLORII)A AGIRICI-LTURAI & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
2. Teaching Processes:
(a) Aims.
(b) Lesson steps.
(c) Methods.
(d) Lesson planning.
GROUP III:
1. Organization of:
(a) Training groups.
(b) Trainiing conditions.
(c) Material.
(d) Subject matter.
SECOND YEAR
GROUP I:
1. Arranging effective instructional order.
2. Arranging effective instructional conditions.
GROUP II:
1. Practice Teaching.
(a) Observation.
(b) Records and reports.
GROUP III:
1. Trade science.
2. Trade drawing.
3. Trade mathematics.
DESCRIPTION OF DEGREE COURSES
COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE
The subjects for Freshmen are the same in all engineer-
ing courses. That is: Freshmen in A. E., M. E. and E. E.
are required to carry same Freshman schedule.
PERSPECTIVE DRAWING
The study of perspective drawing is required in order
that the student may secure for himself and also give to
others a correct notion as to the appearance of the structure
he designs.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 53
SHADES AND SHADOWS
A working knowledge of shades and shadows is a pre-
requisite to the successful rendering of architectural com-
position and is acquired by the 'student through the solving
of numerous problems ranging from the shadow cast by a
straight line to the complicated shading of and shadows
cast by the more elaborately ornamental architectural
features.
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
This work includes a study of the principles of design
and a large amount of practice in their application to the
solution of practical problems.
HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE
In this course the student is made familiar with ancient,
medieval, and modern styles of architecture, and the in-
fluence of the older upon the newer styles is studied by
description, diagrams and pictures of the best examples.
GRAPHIC STATISTICS
This subject embraces the method of determining stresses
in framed structures, arches and beams by graphical means.
WOOD TURNING
This is a shop course complementing the course in car-
pentry, and is designed to teach the use of wood turning
tools and assist in developing aesthetic feeling by con-
structing beautiful as well as useful forms in the working
out of the problems given for solution.
ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE
This course is designed to acquaint those pursuing the
B. S. in Mechanic Arts with the first principles in archi-
tecture and thus prepare them to comprehend the more
advanced orders.





54 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HEATING AND VENTILATION
In this course the physical laws underlying the genera-
tion of heat, its propagation and the movement of air and
renewing the atmosphere in public buildings and private
dwellings, the design and installation of systems are taken
up in a practical way.
SPECIFICATIONS AND ESTIMATES
This is a course which considers the writing of the sev-
eral clauses of the specifications including the description
of the methods to be pursued by the contractor in perform-
ing his work and the designing of the materials to be used.
BUSINESS LAW
This course of lectures is to acquaint the student with
the laws governing contracts, real estate, negotiable paper
and the methods of transacting business.
SANITARY ENGINEERING
This study covers the entire field of conservation of the
health of occupants of buildings and their environs. It
deals with the construction of plumbing fixtures, sizes of
wastes, vent and supply pipes and fittings, the sources of
the water supply, the disposal of sewage and the proper
installation of systems.
PLUMBING
Running parallel with the course in sanitary engineer-
ing is a practical course in plumbing which aims to firmly
implant in the mind of the student the principles govern-
ing the correct design and installation of plumbing fix-
tures.
ELECTRIC WIRING AND ILLUMINATION
Considered in this course are the proper intensity of
lights, their distribution, the kind, size and location of
wires and electrical accessories. Some practice is given
in designing and wiring.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 55
COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ELEMENTARY MFCHANICS
This is a lecture course embracing the study of Composi-
tion and Resolution of Forces, friction and motion.
STEAM ENGINES
In this course the student is led by scientific study into
a knowledge of methods employed in the production of heat
and power.
Lectures are given and assigned throughout the course.
POWER PLANTS
This subject is presented by lectures and is further
treated by assigned reading. Excursions are made to local
plants and the student is required to design a plant to
satisfy assumed conditions.
MACHINE DESIGN
A course including the study of machines with a view to
forming exact ideas as to size and parts by making sketches
and working drawings.
SHOP LABORATORY
The machine, Blacksmith and Wood Working Shops are
used in order to allow students in the engineering courses
an opportunity to apply principles and to make experi-
ments.
APPLIED MECHANICS
This course offers an opportunity to the classes, taking
it to apply the laws studied in Elementary Mechanics.
FUEL AND OIL TESTING
The determination of heating value by standard methods
of sampling and testing.





56 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
GRAPHIC STATISTICS
The student studies in this course composition and reso-
lution of forces, gravity, inertia, strain, dams and retain-
ing walls.
GAS ENGINES
This course deals with thermal problems of internal com-
bustion engines, gas producers, air compressors. Gas en-
gine design is correlated to emphasize the practical nature
of the course.
STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
Tests are made with cements, timber, metals. Lectures
form the basis of all experiments.
THERMODYNAMICS
This course embraces a study of gases, vapors and appli-
ances.
HYDRAULICS
Fluids, pipes, dams, canals, rivers, motors and pumps are
studied.
DIRECT CURRENT SYSTEM
Types of electric motors. Lectures upon electric circuits
and machinery:
POWER TESTS
Here is studied steam quality tests, boilers, engines, sub-
jects of calibration of gauges, thermometers and indicators
are studied.
PUBLIC SPEAKING
This is a course in argumentation and theme writing.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 57
ALTERNATING CURRENT SYSTEM
This is mainly a lecture course. Excursions to be made
to local plants.
COST ACCOUNTING
Lectures, references and problems will consume the time
allotted to this course. The purpose is to arrive at definite
policies in departmental bookkeeping.
AUTOMOBILES
Lectures will treat of the construction of Stan lard( ma-
chines. Tests to emphasize the action of engine and gearing
will constitute a part of this course.
COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICITY
This is an elementary course in electrical engineering,
embracing the subjects of magnetic circuits, continuous
currents and magnetism.
Lectures and references form a vital part of this course.
STRUCTURAL DRAWING
Here the student makes detail drawings of machines and
installation.
DIRECT CURRENT MACHINES
The object of this course is to acquaint the students with
the theory, construction and operation of D. C. Generators
and motors. Lectures involving the testing of these ma-
chines and their principles will be given as the work of the
course advances.





58 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CONTRACTS AND SPECIFICATIONS
This course is intended to put the student in touch with
the commercial features of electrical engineering, giving
of material and costs.
TELEPHONE, RADIO
This course includes a study of circuits, transmission and
construction of receivers, transmitters and amplifiers.
Text to be selected.
POWER DISTRIBUTION
In this course lectures will treat of transmission lines.
Generating apparatus, switch-boards, control systems and
protective devices will be studied.
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
This is a course taken in the light of Elementary Me-
chanics. It treats of dynamics, inertia, energy elastic solids
and the steam engine.
ELEMENTS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
This course treats of the basic principles of the subject.
A discussion of magnetic circuits, currents, electromag-
netism. A definite idea of the physical principles involved
is given and thus a broad knowledge is acquired.
ECONOMICS
This course is described in Architectural Engineering.
ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY
In this course study is made of generators, motors, rotary
converter, transformers and their characteristic. Practical
problems are considered through the best examples obtain-
able.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 59
ELECTRIC RAILWAYS
The purpose of this course is accomplished through lec-
tures which deal with types of the equipment used for trac-
tion purposes. Problems in surveying supplement this
work.
ENGLISH
This is a course in literature and is intended to give an
appreciation for the masters and their contribution to the
world.
HYDRAULIC TESTS
Here measurements of the flow of water are made by
standard device. A study of pipe friction and meters is
made. Pumps are also considered.
MATERIALS
An exhaustive study is made of materials used in connec-
tion with electrical construction, costs, estimates are made.
GAS ENGINES
This course is the same as that conducted in the mechani-
cal engineering. See same.
THESIS
Each student must write and submit a thesis of not less
than five thousand words upon an assigned subject or
experiment.
DESCRIPTION OF TRADE COURSES
CARPENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING
This course is. intended to give the student some knowl-
edge of the principles underlying house and shop carpen-
try and a moderate amount of practice in applying these





60 FLORIDA AGRICULTIRAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
principles to some of the representative problems with
which the workers at this trade are most frequently meet-
ing.
At the beginning of the study the problems set for the
student are designed to be such as will, through an appeal
to his school or home life interests, enlist his best efforts,
so that by the end of the year he will have achieved suffi-
cient success in his work to encourage him to continue the
work in this division.
The work just mentioned is also given to the first year
wheelwrights.
The second year is given to the study of and practice
in erecting simple frame buildings, beginning with fram-
ing and then taking up door and window frame construc-
tion, outside finishing, floor laying, inside finishing and
stairbuilding.
Following this, in the third year, the time is devoted to
cabinet making, the more simple pieces of house furniture
being selected for this phase of the work.
The fourth year's work is a study of the first principles
of the trades which, together with carpentry, are employed
in the erection of buildings, and a brief consideration of
the work of the architect in their design and the superin-
tendence of their construction.
Arithmetic for Carpenters by Dale, Shop Problems by
Burton, used as a supplementary text.
WHEELWRIGHTING
The first year's work in this industry is identical with
that of the same period of the carpentry course.
During the succeeding years the students come into con-
tact more especially with wheelwrighting and the use
of tools peculiar to the vehicle-making trade. This is ac-
complished through the making of spokes and felloes and
the subsequent building of wheels, gears, buggies and car-
riages of various descriptions.
All the vehicles used by the College are built conjointly
by the young men of the wheelwrighting and blacksmith-
ing divisions.
Text: Farm Shop Work, Brace and Mayne.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 61
BLACKSMITHING
The course in blacksmithing is intended to cover the
field of general blacksmithing operations and gives some
instruction in the ironing of vehicles and shoeing of horses.
At the beginning of the course, study is made of fire-
making and incidentally some attention is given to the
characteristics of coals, the construction of forges and
chimneys and the action of fans and bellows.
Thereafter the student is introduced to the more simple
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting,
punching, cutting off, and welding as used in the shaping
of staples, hooks, and collars and the making of chains.
The above-mentioned work occupies the time for the
first year. During the second year, the young blacksmith
cooperates with the wheelwright through the ironing of the
wooded parts of wheelbarrows, push carts, wagons, bug-
gies, surreys and phaetons.
Vehicle ironing is continued for a portion of the third
year's course, while the remainder of the year is devoted
to the elements of horseshoeing.
Advanced horseshoeing and general repairing consti-
tute the work of the fourth year.
Supplementary Text: Forge Practice, Bacon.
PAINTING
The division of painting affords an excellent oppor-
tunity to those desiring to become acquainted with the
more important phases of the painter's trade.
A study is made of the painter's brushes and other
tools; the source and manufacture of pigments, oils,
driers, varnishes, stains and the mixing of paints. Colors
and laws of harmony and contrast are given consideration
and practically applied in the painting of vehicles, auto-
mobiles and the interiors and exteriors of buildings.
Glazing, including cutting, frosting, staining and em-
bossing glass, and sign writing are also taught.
Text: House Painting, Sabin; Carriage and Automo-
bile Painting, Howard.





62 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TAILORING
This division of the College's work is designed to give
the students such knowledge of the tailor's trade as will
enable them, with a little experience in a mercantile shop,
to become competent journeymen.
Instruction is given in the making of pockets and other
details before the construction of finished garments is un-
dertaken. Trousers, vests and coats are taken up in the
order of their difficulty and a study made of shop economy
in cutting. Cleaning and repairing are also given atten-
tion, since this class of work constitutes a large part of that
done in every tailor shop.
The John M. Mitchell Standard of Drafting is used.
MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE
The course in machinery is designed to give a practical
and theoretical basis upon which to build along the follow-
ing engineering work: Machine installation and machine
shop practice.
On the machines and the material in use the students
get a liberal amount of practice in installation, operation
and repair.
The course in machine shop work is laid out to cover
work on bench and vise with hammer, cold chisel, files
wrenches, screw drivers, rules, scales, calipers and other
hand and machine tools used in construction and repair.
This leads beginners up to the more advanced on drill
press, milling machine, power saw, lathe and grinder.
One hour each week is given to lectures on work in hand
and the mechanical and physical principle underlying
same.
Text: Machine Shop Practice, Kahp.
HOUSEHOLD EIGINEERING
ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
The electric apparatus used for lighting and power pur-
poses in connection with the College are kept in adjust-





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 63
ment and repair largely by the aid of students of the elec-
trical division, under the guidance of the instructor in
engineering.
PLUMBING REPAIR
Many of the buildings of the College are fitted with
sanitary fixtures and some with gas for water heating,
cooking, etc. The pipe lines for water supply, the sanitary
drains, as well as the steam boilers for heating those build-
ings so fitted, are kept in repair and operated largely with
student labor under the instruction and guidance of the
instructor in Engineering.
The practical mechanics that may be learned through
this work will be a valuable supplement to the training
received in machinery.
*TINNING
In this work the student will be taught to make templets
and therefrom draft and build the ordinary utensils used
in culinary establishments. He will also be given instruc-
tion in building roofs, down-spouts, gutters and simple cor-
nices. In this work an opportunity will be given to make
practical application of conies and curved surfaces.
*BRICKLAYING AND PLASTERING
In bricklaying the usual types of piers, chimneys, rough
and pressed brick walls will be constructed, special atten-
tion being given to types of arches. Mortars will be
studied so that the student may be able to differentiate
between the kinds for specific purposes. The operations
in plastering will include lathing, scratch coats, second
* coats both sand and putty and the application of hard
surfacing plasters. Paving will be considered in its con-
nection with the work. Estimating will be given large
consideration.





64 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & ME.CHANICAL COLLEGE
*SHOE AND HARNESS MAKING
Before the student enters upon the actual making of
shoes he is required to be able to whole-and-half-sole shoes
both the pegged and sewed types. Patching and repairing
heels must also be a part of the preliminary work which he
must master. In taking up the actual making of the shoe
a thorough study of the foot along with measurements of
same must be made. In order the lasts, inner sole, vamps
and uppers are to be' considered. Special attention to
finishing will be given. A working knowledge of all hand
tools will precede the use of machinery.
The work in harness making will consist of repairs and
the actual making of bridles, blinds, collars, traces, saddles,
straps, yokes and bonds. As in shoemaking the use of hand
tools will precede that of machinery.
*These courses will not be offered during 1' -'. .
DESCRIPTION OF THE COMMERCIAL COURSE
BOOKKEEPING
The work in this subject is intended to give the student
a knowledge of the ordinary methods of transacting busi-
ness and making business records. The Twentieth Century
bookkeeping system is used and covers four sets as fol-
lows: Retail business, partnership, corporations and cost
accounting.
The course is open to a limited number of young men
and women.
TYPEWRITING
In typewriting, information about the care of machine
will be given. The touch method is used and emphasis
is placed upon correct fingering. Much attention is given
to correct typewriting forms, and in the meantime, speed
is developed.
Text: Touch Typewriting, Smith.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES C5
STENOGRAPIY
This subject is conducted for all students in the course.
It is based upon the Gregg system of shorthand, and it is
so taught that the student is able to learn with ease and
rapidity the fundamentals of a practical course.
AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course is the same as that taken in the Iigh School
English III.
ETHICS
The students in Commercial Instruction will pursue this
subject, Ethics I, with those students of the Senior Normal
Class. The course is a practical discussion of rights and
duties growing out of personal relationships.
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY
This course is intended to make the student intelligent
upon the following topics: (a) The country's resources;
(b) the manufacturing interests, and(c) transportation.
Text: Frye's Commercial Geography.
PENMANSHIP
The Spencerian method is used as prescribed by Zauer
and Bloser through the Business Education Magazine, stu-
dent penmanship edition.
COMMERCIAL ARITIL METIC
This is a course in which the time is spent in becoming
acquainted with Interest, Percentage, Stocks and Bonds,
Discount and other subjects related to business computa-
tion.
Text: Milne Progressive Arithmetic.
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
This course is intended to lay a good grammar founda-
tion for those pursuing the work in Commercial Instruc-
3-A. & M.





66 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
tion. Stress will be laid upon the proper use of the parts
of speech and upon careful sentence building.
Text: Hyde's English Grammar, Book II.
SPELLING
This means to be a rigid course in spelling, in which a
business vocabulary will be built up from words found in
newspapers, magazines and commercial books.
Text: The Word Speller, Sorelle.
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
The student will be required to write compositions which
will be criticized for spelling, sentence structure, proper
use of words, phrases, clauses and punctuation.
Text: Freshman English, Young.
COMMERCIAL LAW
This subject treats of the practical laws of business and
is taught so that every student in the course will have a
working knowledge of the subject.
Commercial Law, Burgess.
SALESMANSHIP
This course treats of the scientific methods of making
sales and of efficiency in general business transactions. It
is intended to develop business initiative in those taking
the course.
Text: Salesmanship, Knox.
OFFICE TRAINING; PRACTICE WORK; MANAGEMENT
This course is conducted in order to teach the duties of
the stenographer and secretary. It is directed to the end
that they may become efficient in this line of work. Letter
writing, filing, managing, and use of time are emphasized.
Text: Ruperd Sorelle.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 67
DRAWING
This is an elective course. It is intended to develop the
ability of the student, through Freehand Drawing, to make
ordinary sketches.
PHYSICS
This is a parallel course to Physics I in the School of
Science.
CHEMISTRY
This course is identical with Chemistry II in the School
of Science,
INSURANCE
This course is intended to make the students familiar
with the practice employed in handling insurance papers
and to teach them how to differentiate between the various
kinds of insurance.
REAL ESTATE
In this course special attention is paid to deeds, mort-
gages, sales, transfers and handling of the papers that
pertain to real estate matters.
GEOMETRY
This is a course in Plane Geometry covering at least the
first three books of the subject. Course parallel to the
same course in the High School.
ECONOMICS
This course is the same as Economics II in the School
of Science and covers one semester's work.
BUSINESS ORGANIZATION
In this course it will be the purpose to bring the lessons
offered in intimate relation to the business life of the com-





68 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
munity by covering such subjects as Proprietorship, Work-
ing Capital, Borrowing, Wages, Purchasing, etc.
Text: Business Organization and Administration, Hass.
BANKING
In connection with the work in Commercial Instruction
there is established a student bank in which those taking
this course might learn the principles of banking. The
purpose is to conduct the affairs of the bank upon rigid
lines so that in this manner the work will be as real as in
actual banking.
Text: Banking and Book Accounting, Morton.
DESCRIPTION OF TEACHER-TRAINING COURSE
This course is so designed as to embrace the following
teaching subjects: Training in the Plant, The Analysis
of Trade Knowledge, Establishing an Effective Instruc-
tional Order, Methods of Instruction, Lesson Planning,
Management, Organization and Use of Material in Instruc-
tion Training Classes.
Text: The Instructor, the Man and the Job, Allen.
DESCRIPTION AUTO-MECHANIC COURSE
The course in Motor Mechanics is organized in connec-
tion with the course in Machine Shop Practice and is
designed to afford a practical outlet through which trained
machinists may reach and fill the need for auto, truck and
farm tractor machines. Practical and theoretical work is
done on automobiles, trucks, tractors and gas engines for
farm use.
DESCRIPTION OF SHORT COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS
This course is established especially for those young men
who wish to lay a foundation in the fundamentals of a
trade, and for those who wish to spend a minimum of time
at the academic branches of study and a maximum in the
shops. It will be open to those men who have had limited
school advantages and it has been so planned as to meet





HOME ECONOMIC COURSES 69
their requirements. After a student completes this course
he is fitted to pursue more advanced work in the College
if he so desires.
DESCRIPTION OF PREVOCATIONAL TRAINING COURSE
This course is established to give the young men such an
idea of all the trades taught in the department as will
qualify them to make an intelligent selection of the one he
is best adapted to and wishes to follow in future life. The
course routes the student through all the shops and divi-
sions of the department for a special eight weeks' observa-
tion and training in each. In addition to helping the stu-
dent to find himself, the course is so planned as to teach
him to do correctly many of the simple things around the
home. This course is open to students of the Training
School, Junior High School and such others as are not
assigned to the regular shop courses. It also offers a field
for those in the Teacher Training course in which to prac-
tice teaching.
DESCRIPTION HOME ECONOMICS COURSES
The work done in the Department of Home Economics
is designed to give a girl high ideals of right standards,
to stimulate her towards the development of the highest
type of womanhood of which she is capable.
Home Economics is required in the Junior High, and
Tenth Grade. Those who wish to specialize may elect an
extra year in Clothing or Food and Nutrition, either in
the Eleventh or Twelfth Grades.
Two courses are offered in School of Home Economics
above High School grade; the Smith-Hughes Teacher
Training Course of two years, and a four year college
course leading to B. S. Smith-Hughes students are ex-
pected to have two years of vocational experience at home
during the summers and in the dormitories during the
school term before graduation.
HOME ECONOMICS I (Elementary Clothing). The aim of
this course is to teach the cutting and making of simple
garments. The use of commercial patterns and some
drafting are taught.





70 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HOME ECONOMICS II (Advanced Clothing). The pur-
pose of the course is to teach the art of dressmaking, draft-
ing, the designing of ordinary garments, the use of lines,
color, proportion, adaptation of materials, to develop neat-
ness, accuracy, self-reliance, and high ideals in work. Com-
mercial patterns are also used. Lectures and class discus-
sions are held on artistic and appropriate dress. Practice
is given in variety by making dresses in the department
for teachers and students.
HOME ECONOMICS III (Textiles). This course includes
the history and development of textiles, the study of fibers
to processes of manufacture and economic use of fabrics.
A scientific study of the composition and physical proper-
ties. This is given with Home Economics II and not as a
separate course.
HOME ECONOMICS IV (Millinery). Designing, making,
trimming and decorating fall and spring hats, with a view
to developing originality and skill, are the aim and pur-
pose of this course. Stress is placed upon the artistic side
of the work by study of harmony, color and line. The
practical side is also taught by emphasizing the economy in
the utilization of old materials renovated.
This course is elective and may be taken by the Home
Economics specials in connection with dressmaking.
IHOME ECONOMICS V (Elementary Foods and Nutrition).
Work in Elementary Foods and Nutrition consists of the
cooking of simple dishes, and the planning and serving of
simple meals.
HOME ECONOMICS VI (Advanced Foods and Nutrition).>
This course is a continuation of Elementary Foods and
Nutrition and gives practice in several phases of cookery.
The processes carried out are more elaborate than in the
junior year. Self-reliance on the part of the student in
the plan and execution of her work is encouraged. Plan-
ning and serving meals under home conditions, large quan-
tity cooking and serving are included in this course.
HOME ECONOMICS VII (Dietetics). It is the aim of this
course to give the student some idea of the fuel value of
foods, food requirements, the construction of the dietaries
as well as the processes involved in dietary calculations.
PHYSIOLOGY I. This course is intended for students
specializing in Foods and Nutrition. It covers a period
of one semester. Emphasis is placed upon the digestion





NURSE TRAINING 71
and assimilation of foods, nervous system, circulation and
respiration.
HOME ECONOMICS VIII (Household .Administration)
Household management gives chance to gather under one
head the numerous lines of instruction necessary to admin-
ister a household. The aim of this course is to show the
relation of science, art, economics to the practical needs of
the home. Organization of the household, household deco-
ration, marketing, budgeting, and laundering are taught
in this course. Practice work is given in the Model Apart-
ment.
HOME ECONOMICS IX. Special methods of teaching
Home Economics in elementary schools and junior high
schools are given two hours per week for one semester pre-
ceding Home Economics X.
HOME ECONOMICS X. (Practice Teaching). Thirty-two
supervised lessons in Foods and Clothing are taught by the
Smith-Hughes students and those completing the course
leading to a degree. Students from the Model School and
Junior High School are taught in these classes.
NITRSE TRAINING
STANDARD HOSPITAL
The Florida A. & M. College Health Department is of-
fering a three years' course in Nurse Training to young
women who are graduates of an accredited High School
course or its equivalent, who are of sound health and good
moral character, and have no physical defects or deformi-
ties. A limited number of young women, not to exceed
ten, can be accommodated at one time.
There are several vacancies to he filled for those who
can meet the following requirements:
1st. High School graduates are given the preference.
2nd. Good health and good morals.
3rd. Aadptability to the work.
4th. Age limit, from 18 to 30 years.
5th. A three-year course in training.
i___________________________________________^





/
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/
72 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
COLLEGE HELP
The school furnishes board, lodging and laundry to its
nurse students. Applicants are required to serve three
months on probation to test their fitness for the training.
At the expiration of the probationary period the appli-
cants may withdraw, or, the institution reserves the right
to accept or reject all probationers.
If accepted, the regular nurse's uniform of the school is
provided by the school and is worn at all times, with few
exceptions, throughout the course of training.
REQUIREMENTS OF NURSES
While on probation, only wash dresses and aprons, which
each probationer must furnish, are worn.
Nurses will need a change of comfortable, common sense
shoes, a pair of house slippers, a warm kimona; raincoat,
rubbers and an umbrella, as the dining hall and dormi-
tory are some distance from the Sanitorium.
Nurses are required to furnish their own text books. A
registration fee of $7.00 will be required and paid on en-
trance to the school.
Hours are allowed from duty for class recitation, recrea-
tion and half holidays on Sundays. Time lost on account
of illness or other absence from duty must be made up be-
fore finishing. Two weeks' vacation during the summer is
also given;
Nurses who are candidates for diplomas must reside on
.the campus where they are housed in a nurses' home, and
subject to rules governing such, and are responsible for
the cleanliness of the home.
EMPLOYMENT
Our graduated nurses find ready employment, and are
kept busy as institution nurses, private nurses and visit-
ing nurses. The future graduates will be more efficient
because of the increased capacity and enlarged facilities
for training. Graduates will be eligible for the title of
Registered Nurse.
Plans are being made for the erection of an annex for
contagious diseases and a modernly equipped nurses' home.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 73
AGRICULTURAL COURSE
The Department of Agriculture is made up of all the
divisions in school of agriculture devoted to the various
phases of technical and practical work. The work of the
various divisions is closely related, and the purpose of all
of them is to train men and women for better service in
the broad field of Agriculture.
Students who complete the various High School Courses
will receive certificates, and the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture (B. S. A.) will be conferred upon
those who finish the College Department of Agriculture.
(1) A four year course leading to the degree of Science
in Agriculture.
(2) Four year High School course in Agriculture lead-
ing to certificate.
(3) Smith-Hughes Teacher Training Course leading to
certificate.
(4) One year courses for women, in dairying, poultry
and gardening each leading to a certificate.
(5) Two year practical course.
(6) One week course for Extension Workers.
(7) Two days' short course for farmers.
DESCRIPTION OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSE IN
AGRICULTURE
FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
First Year-Botany and Field Husbandry.
BOTANY-
Plants-Structure, composition, growth and reproduc-
tion.
Seeds-Structure and germination.
Weeds-Identification, habits of growth and eradication.
BOTANY OF FARM CROPS (To be taken with the lectures
in the various crops).
Grasses and Cereals-Structure and growth.
Hay and Forage Crops-Classification, structure and
growth.
Seeds-Seeds of farm crops, pure seeds-its importance.





74 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FIELD HUSBANDRY-Chiefly of farm crops, some ele-
mentary work with soils, crop rotation, manures and fer-
tilizers.
Soils-Classification, origin, relation to air, availability
of plant food and how to maid it.
Manures 'and Fertilizers-Fertilizing elements required
by plants, how obtained, importance of manure on farm,
application of manure and fertilizers, green manuring.
Rotation of Crops-Why required, how applied, corn
and legume crop in relation to rotation of crops.
FARM CROPS-
Corn-Selecting and storing seed corn, preparation of
land, cultivating, harvesting and marketing.
Cereals, Hay and Forage Crops, Roots and Potatoes, etc.
-their use on the farm, sowing, cultivating, harvesting
and marketing.
Diseases and Insects Affecting Farm Crops-identificaa-
tion and combatment.
Laboratory and Field Work-Study soil, corn and other
crops in the field, pressing and mounting plants, germina-
tion of seeds and testing seed corn.
SECOND YEAR-ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Including Farm Stock, Dairying and Poultry Keeping
FARM STocK-The principal breeds of live stock on the
farm, beef and dairy cattle, heavy and light horses, mules
of different types, sheep and swine. The judging of stock,
feeding, care and management, principles of breeding.
DAIRYING-The dairy cow, her economic importance, se-
lection, feeding, care and stabling.
The making of butter and cheese, keeping of records, the
testing of milk.
Ventilation and sanitation of stables, construction of
barns, care of utensils.
POULTRY-Poultry on the farm, the town yard, feeding,
housing and general care of the flock. The principal breeds
of poultry, marketing of products. Grading eggs for mar-
ket and the production of winter eggs.
LABORATORY WORK-Composition of milk and foods, bac-
teria, their relation to milk and sanitation. Disease of
stock, testing of milk and cream.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 75
THIRD YEAR-HORTICULTURE AND SOILS
HORTICULTURE-
Fruit Growing-Suitability of the location to the raising
of different kinds of fruit and varieties of the same, loca-
tion of the site, selection of the soil.
Different Fruits-Cultivatioi, fertilization, care, har-
vesting, marketing. Selection of varieties of fruits espe-
cially adapted to Florida and the South. Selection of va-
rieties, planting, pruning and propagation.
Vegetable Gardening-The growing, storing and market-
ing of different varieties of vegetables. Fall, winter and
spring gardening will be given special attention.
The Garden-Farm, town, school-location, care, prep-
aration of soil, what to grow and how to grow it, and when
to grow it.
Insects and Diseases-Identification, control, insecticides
and fungicides.
Home Decoration-The laying of walks, planting flowers,
how to improve the surroundings of the buildings on the
farm, the lawn. The rural flower garden.
Forestry-The farm woodlot-how to maintain. Impor-
tance of forests to the farmer-relation to water supply.
Laboratory and Field Work-Propagation of plants,
grafting and budding of fruit trees and nursery stock, col-
lection and identification of injurious insects and diseases.
Soils, Manures and Fertilizers-A more advanced course
than that given in the first year, entering more fully into
the physical and chemical characteristics of soils, the con-
stituent of manure, the importance of conserving it and
the different classes of fertilizers, how to mix and apply.
Laboratory work will be given along with the course.
FOURTH YEAR-FARM MECHANICS, FARM MANAGEMENT,
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
FARM MECHANICS-
Farm Machinery-Use, operation and care, power on the
farm.
Construction of farm buildings, silos and cisterns.
Cement on the farm.
Roads-How to make, improve and maintain them.
Surveying of farms for laying out of field drains.





76 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Farm Management-Selection of a farm, lines of farm-
ing to follow, selection of stock suitable to locality, hand-
ling of labor.
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS-The farm community, the
rural school, rural problems.
Cooperation in production and marketing of products
and improving conditions.
A general review of those things especially adapted to
local conditions will be, given.
LABORATORY AND FIELD WORK-Surveying of the college
farm, surveying for and laying out of under-drains, ma-
chinery, also a collection of weed seeds will be required and
additional work given on them, at the same time placing
emphasis on pure seed.
SPECIAL COURSES FOR WOMEN
Because of the great demand for women to know and to
teach gardening, poultry and dairying, the following
courses are offered to them in the third year Senior High
School, Junior and Senior Normal classes.
VEGETABLE GARDENING
The first semester the class will take up the classification
of vegetables, planning the garden, manures and fertilizers
and garden planting. The second semester will be devoted
to garden cultivation, garden pests and combatment, hot-
bed, cold frames and outdoor work in the garden. Labora-
tory work will be required.
DAIRYING
The first semester this class will take up the following
work: Dairying as a business, the dairy stock, selection
and development of breed. During the second semester
management of a dairy, nutrition, ice cream making and
the study of forage crops will be taken up in details. Lab-
oratory work will be required.
POULTRY RAISING
FARM POULTRY-This course takes up the study of
breeds of poultry, the methods of housing, feeding, foods
and feeding and the production of winter eggs. During
the second semester marketing poultry products, hatching





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 77
and rearing chicks, diseases and parasites will be thor-
oughly studied in classroom aid in laboratory.
AGRONOMY
* AGRONOMY I (Soils and Fertilizers). This course deals
with the origin, formation, texture, composition and man-
agement of soils, to conserve moisture and liberate plant
food. Means of maintaining the fertility of the soil, the
use of barnyard manures. Green manures and commercial
fertilizers are also considered. Sophomore, First Semes-
ter.
Text: To be selected.
AGRONOMY II (Farm Crops). The various grain, fiber,
and sugar crops with respect to their habits of growth,
soil, adaptation, fertilizer requirements, general methods of
tillage and harvesting and the most profitable way of mar
keting them. Sophomore, First Semester.
Text: To be selected.
AGRONOMY III (Advanced Course in Farm Manage-
ment). The selection of a farm, the planting and arrange,
ment of farm buildings, etc. Various systems of farm rec-
ords and accounts are studied to acquaint the student with
the more practical methods. Seniors, First Semester.
Text: To be selected.
AGRONOMY IV (Farm Machinery). The physics of farm
implements, improved machinery and power. Correct op-
eration of all available farm machines. Farm roads, drain-
age, irrigation and sanitation will be thoroughly studied.
Second semester. Sophomore.
Text: Davidson's Agricultural Engineering.
HORTICULTURE
HORTICULTURE I (School Gardening). A specially de-
signed course to train young women how to conduct small
school gardens in connection with the State Public Schools.
The class room work consists of general garden rules and
nature study topics, as proved most interesting. Labora-
tory exercises will be given both in class room and on the
garden plots. Each young woman must plant and culti-
vate her own garden. One year. First year High School
Girls.





78 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HORTICULTURE II (Fruit Growing and Vegetable Gar-
dening). The study of fruit culture generally, nursery
practice, diseases and injurious insects treated. The cul-
ture of truck crops for local market, and the theory and
practice underlying such work will be taken up in order.
Second Semester. Sophomore.
HORTICULTURE III (Practical Landscape Gardening).
Plant propagation, greenhouse management, the improve-
ment and planting of home and school grounds, etc. Care
of lawns, walks, tree surgery, hedges and flower beds.
Elective.
PLANT PRODUCTION
BOTANY II. This subject takes up the structure, and
development of seed plants, their form, classification and
evolution. The economic phase of the subject is stressed.
Freshmen, Second Semester.
Text: Bessey's Essentials of College Botany.
GENETICS
A study of Heredity and its applications to the breed-
ing of plants and animals.
PREREQUISITES-Botany II, or Biology I. The greenhouse
for propagation will constitute part of the laboratory equip-
ment of this course. Seniors, Second Semester.
PLANT PATHOLOGY
This course is designed primarily to connect the work of
Horticulture, Agronomy, Botany and Bacteriology, all of
which are prerequisites. Special attention will be given to
local fungus diseases of plants. Juniors. Second Semes-
ter.
Text: Duggar's Fungus Diseases of Plants.
BACTERIOLOGY
Methods of artificial growing of bacteria. The study of
their development in animals, plants, milk and water.
Juniors. First Semester.
Text: Conn's Agricultural Bacteriology.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 79
EcoNoMIC ENTOMOLOGY. Discussion of the more impor-
tant injurious and beneficial insects on crops. Methods of
combating undesirable pests. Laboratory exercises in field
and gardens. Second Semester. Sophomore.
Text: Weed's Friends and Farm Foes.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY I. Types and breeds of farm ani-
mals with some judging practice; principles of breeding,
feeding and management of live stock. Second Semester.
Text: Plumb's Animal Husbandry.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY II (Elements of Dairying), This
is a general course dealing with the secretion, composition
and properties of milk. Laboratory practice is given in
operating the Babcock test and lactometer, separation of
milk, and butter making. Second Semester. Freshmen.
Taxt: Wing's Milk and Its Products.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY III (Types and Breeds of Farm
Animals). This course involves the study of the early his-
tory and development of pure bred domestic animals; also
a sufficient study of herd books and pedigrees to acquaint
students with the leading strains and families of the dif-
ferent breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and swine. Second
Semester. Sophomore.
Text: Plumb's Types and Breeds of Farm Animals.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IV (Animal Breeding). Lectures
and recitations on the general principles of heredity, vari-
ation sex-limited inheritance and system of breeding and
the influence of pedigree and herdbook standards. First
Semester. Juniors.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY V (Feeds and Feeding). Practice
is given in the feeding, care, and management of horses,
cattle and swine. First Semester. Seniors.
Reference: Feeds and Feeding, Henry and Morrison.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VI (Veterinary Science). This
course is intended to teach the student the recognition of
disease, the principles involved in the preservation of
health, and the application of first aid in disease or acci-
dent of farm animals. Seniors. First Semester.
Text: Craig's Common Diseases of Farm Animals.





80 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
COURSES IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY
COURSE 1. This course is given throughout the year. It
is offered to the young women who have reached the Third
year Senior High School class. The study of breeds, vari-
ous strains; poultry house construction; feeds and feeding;
diseases of fowls.
COURSE II. Prerequisite Course I. This is a continua-
tion of Course I, treating the subjects of incubation, brood-
ing, care of stock, marketing poultry, including capons,
roosters and broilers.
COURSE III. Artificial Incubation and Breeding. This
course can only be taken by those who complete courses
I and II. In this course the students are required to set
up and operate incubators and brooders, make a systematic
study of the development of the chick in the egg. The
students are expected to feed and care for the chicks after
hatching them.
COURSE IV. Pen Management. This is a practical labor-
atory course. Students are required to care for a pen of
fowls, keeping accurate records of eggs produced, food con-
sumed, weather conditions, health of the fowls, and profit
and loss.
COURSE V. Poultry Management. In this course, a de-
tailed study of large poultry farms and equipment, .such
as bone cutters, feed cutters, etc. It includes the laying out
and planning of poultry buildings of all kinds, the mating
of fowls, and the preparing of birds for exhibition.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
The work in agricultural education is designed to meet
the demand for men trained in agricultural and allied sub-
jects, to teach in the High Schools and Colleges of the
State.
In the arrangement of this course the needs of the agri-
cultural teacher have been kept in mind. The practice
teaching is arranged to give the students of the Agricul-
tural Department experience in conducting class work, lab-
oratory and field exercises.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION I (Methods of Teaching). The
purpose of this course is the preparation of the student for
the teaching of agricultural subjects through a knowledge





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 81
of the educational aims, and of the principles applying to
the choice of subject matter. This course involves a study
of the recitation in part and the method of conducting class
work, making laboratory exercises and the correlation of
agriculture with other subjects. Juniors. Second Semes-
ter. First Semester. Seniors.
Text: Vocational Education by Home Projects, Stinson.
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.- (Organization and Meth-
ods.) A course in which the aims, the functions, the meth-
ods of organization, and the relation of rural and urban
institutions are considered. Second Semester. Seniors.
RURAL ECONOMICS.-This course presents briefly the
fundamental principles of economics as related to the farm.
The aim of the course is to give a knowledge of the prin-
ciples that should guide the farmer in his work. Instruc-
tion is imparted by lectures, assigned readings, and re-
ports. Juniors. First Semester.
RURAL SOCIOLOGY.-A study of the rural conditions and
betterment. The relation of society to the farmer. Re-
search work with Extension Bulletins, reports, etc. Seniors,
Second Semester.
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS
College Department
SENIOR B. S.
Name. Post Office County or State
Benton, Clem Cornelius... Sanford ....................Seminole
Blake, Alfonso William....Plant City ..............Hillsborough
Curtis, Shirley Wayne .... Clearwater .................Pinellas
DeVaughn, Jauncey.......Pensaeola ..................Escambia
Fitzgiles, Emma, Anna ..Tampa .................Hillsborough
Jones, Josephine..........Jacksonville ................... Duval
Jordan, John Charles Jr.. Maitland .....................Orange
Pinkney, Eugene Anthony.DeFuniak Springs ............Walton
Reid, Thomas Roland Jr..Key West : .................Monroe
Thomas, James Luther... Quitman ................... Georgia
JUNIOR B. S.
Baldwin, Jacob Cornelius. .Burbank ......... Marion
Hendon, Frederick WilliamJacksonville .................. Duval
iHi'cks. Leonard Jerry .....Orlando ..................... Orange
Lundy, Jessie Lee.........West Palm Beach ........Palm Beach
McQueen, Robert ..........Thomasville ............... Georgia
Maddox, Henri Brumick... Tampa ................Hillsborough
R'olfe, Olga Beecher.......Tampa .................Hillsborough
Smith, William Henry .....Ocala ... ................... Marion





82 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SOPHOMORE B. S.
Name I'ost Office County or State
Adderley, Quinten Jerome .Lakeland .......................Polk
Boston, Angle Mona .......Ovieda .....................Seminole
Bradford, Eugene .........Warrington ................Escambia
Crutcher, Mrs. Cleopatra. Tallahassee .................... Leon
Hadley, Wesley Hector ....Thomasville .................Georgia
Hamilton, James Mack....Tampa .................. Hillsborough
Robinson, Bessie Louise.. Tallahassee .....................Leon
Roundtree, Hosea .........Perry ........................Taylor
FRESHMAN B. S.
Austin, Charles Lewis .....West Palm Beach.........Palm Beach
Austin, Hearl James.......Ocala ........................Marion
Burnett, James William...Orlando ..................... Orange
Cady, Davis Alfonzo ...... DeFuniak Springs ............Walton
Cole, Robert Wilfred ......Daytona .....................Volusia
Edwards, Fleming........ Anniston ................... Alabama
Fitzgiles, Margaret FreddieTampa .................. Hillsbbrough
Fleming, Lollie Mae .......Jacksonville ...................Duval
Freeland, Hugh Caullie ... Tallahassee ....................Leon
Jackson, Horace Smith.....Sanford ....................Seminole
King, Emanuel Leonard... Kissimmee ................. Osceola
Longworth, Jackson C.....Bartow ........................ Polk
McMillan, Frankie Marie..Pensacola ..................Escambia
Maxey, William Singleton. Ocala '......................Marion
Mickens. James Kermit .... West Palm Beach........Palm Beach
Reese, Georgiana Victoria.Daytbna .....................Volusia
Richardson, Herman ..... Orlando ......................Orange
Sweet, Charles............Quincy ...................... Gadsden
Williams, Algie ...........Tallahassee .....................Leon
Williams, Joseph Wilson..Quincy ...................... Gadsden
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR EDUCATION
Conoly, Cora Ann..........Bay Harbor .....................Bay
Dickerson, Janie Sylvia....Jacksonville ...................Duval
Mickens, Mollie Irene .....Key West ................Monroe
Robinson, Annie Rosa Lee.St. Augustine ...............St. Johns
Rogers, Marie Elizabeth..-.Tampa .................Hillsborough
Sweet, Deloca Iva........Bartow ......................... Polk
JUNIOR EDUCATION
Carter, Louise Clarinda....Apalachicola ................Franklin
Celestine, Josie Mae ......Warrington ................Escambia
Ellison, Charlotte Elzetta. .Miami ......................... Dade
Forest, Bessie Estelle .....Lake City ..................Columbia
Freeman, Maude Lucile.;. Madison .................... Madisbn
McFarlin, Novik Mineola..Pensacola .................. Escambia
Smith, Mabel Winnifred ...Arcadia ......................DeSoto
Williams, Ruth Beatrice.. Miami .................... Dade





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 83
JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS
Name Post Office County or State
Baldwin, Sarah Isabella...Burbank ..................... Marion
Drew, Emma Wyneva ......Tallahassee ................... Leon
Gilmore, Martha JeannettaFort Myers ......................Lee
Harris, Margaret GertrudeWinter Park ................. Orange
Johnson, Pearl Odeal ..... Pensacola ................. Escambia
Moore, Nellie Beatrice ......tuart .................. Palm Beach
Pecke, Inez DeCastra......Ocala ........................Marion
Trapp, Frances Evelyn ... .Miami .........................Dade
Washington, Willie Belle..Pensacbla ..................Escambia
Williams, Mabel Helen ... Waycross ....................Georgia
Wilson, Veresta Arwilda...Quincy ......................Gadsden
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
THIRD YEAR
Alexander, Daphne BeatriceOrlando .....................Orange
Anderson, Miriam Jackson Tampa .................. Hillsborough
Bragg, Eugene James ......Tallahassee ..................... Leon
Burnett, Elizabeth ........Orlando ...................... Orange
Byard, Marie Eleanor .....Jacksonville ...................Duval
Conoly, George Whitfield..Bay Harbor .....................Bay
Davis, Elizabeth Tommie..St. Petersturg ...............Pinellas
Douglass, Clark Frederick.Jacksonville ................... Duval
Douglass, Helen Clark.... Orlando ......................Orange
Douglass, Phillip Middleton Jacksonville ................... Duval
Espy, Theodore Roosevelt.Gifford .....................St. Lucie
Evans, Lucretia Louise... Palatka .................... Putnam
Fossit, Verdie Lee ........Sanford ....................Seminole
Glover, Boysie Gilbert.....Plant City ..............Hillsborough
Greene, Garriette Lucile... Delray .................. Palm Be.ch
Griffin, Maceo Alphonso.. Fort Pierce ................ St. Lucie
Hall, John Lee ............Ovieda .....................Seminole
Hardon, Thelma Grace... .Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Headley, Harold Eugene.. Miami .......................... ade
Hamilton,WilliamMcKinleyTampa ................. Hillsborough
Hicks, Marie Geraldine... Sanford ................... Seminole
Jackson, Meltonia ElizabethJacksonville ...................Duval
James, Christina Evelyn...Ocala ........................ Marion
Johnson, Lottie Mae.......Bartow .........................Polk
Kenon, Reuben ............Quincy ...................... Gadsden
Lewis, Alphonso Leroy.... Orlando ......................Orange
McLaurin, M. Alexander...South Jacksonville.............. Duval
Mayo, Annie Lee ..........Sanford ................... Seminole
Merritt, Thedric Leslie ... .Sanford ................... Seminole
Mitchell, Henry Eugene... Jacksonville ................... Duval
Nixon, William Verdier... Madison .................... Madison
Oxendine, William Frank. Ovieda ..................... Seminole
Roberts, Dewey Arnett... .Gainesville .................. Alachua
Rolfe, Everett Richard JriTampa ................. Hillsborough





84 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Name Post Office County or State
Rooks, Milton Perry .......Clearwater ..................Pinellas
Smith, Mamie Hulda ......Sparr ........................Marion
Stirrup, E. W. Franklin..,Cocoanut Grove ............. Dade
Stirrup, Lillian Maude.... Cocoanut Grove .................Dae
Varnes, Christina ......... Seffner .................Hillsborough
Whitehead, Anthony J. Jr. Jacksonville ... ............. Duval
Wilkie, Charlie Mae...... Miami .........................Dade
Williams, Hazel Cecil.....Quincy ......................Gadsden
Williams, Leontine....... Lisbon ........................Lake
SECOND YEAR
Bethune, Mary Lauretta...Boyden ..................Palm Beach
Blackstone, Dorsey Emmet. Tallahassee .................... Leon
Burnett, John............ Orlando ...................... Orange
Butler, Marie ............ De Land ......................Volusia
Carr, Ruth Virginia .......Tallahassee .................... Leon
Carter, Gladys Inez .......Apalachicola ........F........Franklin
Clark, Lela Dorothy .......Apalachicola ..............Franklin
Clark, Marie ..............Apalachicola ................Franklin
Colston, Callie Mae .......Winter Park ..................Orange
Delancy, Ellen Jane.......South Palm Beach........Palm Beach
Deveaugh, Flenory ........Marianna ...................Jackson
Douglass, Harper Lamar..Orlando ............... Orange
Gibson, Samuel T.........Tallahassee ...................Leon
Gilchrist, James Franklin.Lakeland ................Polk
Hargray, Alzeta ...........St. Petersburg ...............Pinellas
Hawkins, Godfrey William.Orlando ......................Orange
Hawkins, Polonia......... Orlando ...................... Orange
Henry, Mary Ella ........Jacksonville ...................Duval
Hughes, Helen, Catherine. Jacksonville .............DuvaI
Jackson, Ruby Lee ........East Lake ...................Marion
Jones, Harold James ......Jacksonville ...................Duval
Jones, William Augustus...Quincy ............... Gadsden
Kennedy, Corine Mildred.. Fernandina .............Nassau
Lockhart, John Wesley.... Jacksonville ...................uval
Mattox, Josie Mae.........Lake City .................. Columbia
Maxey, Admiral Dewey... Ocala ... ................ Marion
Miller, Bernice Colleen... .Tampa .......... Hillsborough
Mitchell, Benjamin Jr.....Orlando .....................Orange
Mitchell, Bessie Marie.....Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Neely, Arimentha......... Key West ................... Monroe
Roulhac, Oswald ..........Chipley ..................Washington
Rozier, Nellie............ .Sanford ....................Seminble
Scott, Sarah ..............Tallahassee ............ ... Leon
Scotto, Hazel Elizabeth... Oakland .............. Orange
Stewart, Ernestine Rom'on. Orlando ... .. .........Orange
Stewart, William Blodgett.South Jacksonville ............Duval
Stirrup, Louise ...........,Cocoanut Grove .......:....... Dade
Stockton, John James....,Quincy ..................... Gadsden
Ward, Elizabeth .......... Punta Gorda ...............Charlotte
Watson, Eunice Elzora.....Plant City ..............Hillsborough
Williams, Fannie Dorotha..Port Tarpon ............Hillsborough
Wimberly, Edgar Van.....Ocala ........................Marion
I





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 85
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FIRST YEAR
Name Post Office County or State
Adderley, Julian Carlyle.. Lakeland .................... Polk
Anderson, Irene RheLa ....Tampa .................Hillsborough
Bailey, Maurice Marcellus.Punta Gorda ............Charlotte
Blue, Theodore Roosevelt..Tampa ................ Hillsborough
Bradham, Joseph ......... Jacksonville ...................Duval
Clemons, Waddell .........Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Childs, Lylburn ...........St. Petersburg ............... Pinellas
Conoly, Martha Belle ......Bay Harbor .....................Bay
Davis, James M...........South Jacksonville .............Duval
DeVaughn, Clara Vernelle.Pensacola ..................Escambia
Ellerbe, Edward Alexander.Palatka .............. Putnam
Gansy, Beulah Lee........Starke .....................Bradford
Gaulman, Lilian Louise... Punta Gorda ...............Charlotte
Goodman, Hilton B ........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Gore, Seth Leon ...........Tallahassee .....................Leon
Grice, Minnie Lee.........Sanford ................... Seminole
Inmon, William Earle .....Bessemer ...................Alabama
Jefferson, Annie Mae..... Tallahassee ................... Leon
Jefferson, Oscar Ernest....Oakland .............. Orange
Johnson, Claudia Batoria. West Palm Beach .........Palm Beach
Jones, Disney Theodore....Quincy ................ Gadsden
Jones, Junius .............New Smyrna ................ St. Lucie
Kirksey, Leander AlphonsoMadison .............. Madison
McGriff, Mae .............St. Petersburg ............. Pinellas
Martin, Francean Hortense.Green Cove Springs .............Clay
Mattox, Viola Gertrude.... Tallahassee ................ Leon
Mills, Luella ..............Bainbridge ...................Georgia
Murray, Isaac............ South Jacksonville ..............Duval
Nixon, Ulysses Grant ......Madison .................... Madison
Pierce, Walter James ......Fort Pierce ................. St. Lucie
Pinder, Hugh A...........Tampa ................ Hillsborough
Pinkney, Sarah Grace..... Fernandina ..................Nassau
Pittman, Alfred ...........Green Cove Springs ..............Clay
Presha, Arnold Wesley.... Jacksonville ........... Duval
Rogers, James William....Tampa ............. Hillsborough
Sims, Donald Kelley ......Cocoa .......................Brevard
Speed, Gladys .............West Palm Beach .........Palm Beach
Speed, Melvin, Cornell.....West Palm Beach .........Palm Beach
Thomas, Fred Henry ......Jacksonville ................... Duval
Thompson, Carl Limeas....St. Petersburg ...............Pinellas
Vaughn, Edward ..........Lake City ..................Columbia
Walker, Minnie Lee.......Sanford ................... Seminole
Washington, Leslie ........Madison .................... Madison
Washington, Ruby A ...... Jacksonville ...................Duval
Wilkins, Ann lfiza....... Pensacola ..................Escambia
Williams, Telley C........ Tallahassee .................... Leon
Williams, Willie Mae ......Quincy ......................Gadsden
Yarn, Oscar .............. Clearwater .................. Pinellas





86 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
THIRD YEAR
Name Post Office County or State
Adams, James Benjamin...Florence Villa ...................Polk
Allen, Daisy Lillie Belle.. Tallahassee .....................Leon
Anderson, Octavia Lugenia Tallahassee .....................Leon
Aarons, Ida...............Jasper .....................Hamilton
Bellamy, Hattie Gertrude..Dunellon ... .................Marion
Bragdon, Chalmers ........Tampa .................. Hillsborough
Burt, Gwendolyn Louise...Trilby .........................Pasco
Byrd, Byis Mae...........Bartow .........................Polk
Calhoun, Frances ..........Arcadia ...................... DeSoto
Calloway, Lottie Mae......Quincy ......................Gadsden
Campbell, Rosa Lee....... Tallahassee ................... Leon
Childs, Clinton ............St. Petersburg ...............Pinellas
Chisholm, John Charles...Jacksonville ..............Duval
Coleman, Ralph Lee.......West Palm Beach .........Palm Beach
Collins, Josephine Harriet.Aucilla .....................Jefferson
Cook, David Samuel ...... Clearwater .................. Pinellas
Cooper, Samuel ...........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Dickey, Rossie Evelyn.....Lee .........................Madison
Faulks, Annie May ........Pensacola ..................Escambia
Poster, Ruth............. Lake City ...................Columbia
Freeman, Alice Elizabeth. Jasper ..................... Hamilton
Gladden, Robert Lunce.... Ridgway ..............South Carolina
Graham, Jessie Margaret ..Jacksonville ................... Duval
Gripper, Thelma...........Jacksonville ................... Duval
Grooms, Ida Olivia ....... Fort Myers ......................Lee
Gurley, Jefferson Davis... Tallahassee .................... Leon
Hadley, Vernese.......... Tampa ............... Hillsborough
Hall, Thelma ..............West Palm Beach .........Palm Beach
Harris, Inez Lucretia..... Lakeland ................... Polk
Hatton, Frank .............Jacksonville ................... D val
Holly, John ...............Pensacola ..................Escambia
Hudgins, Bessie ...........Fort Meade .....................Polk
Jackson, Geraldine ........Sanford ...................Seminole
Jackson, Willie Belle .......ainbridge ................. Georgia
James, Howard........... Madison ................... Madison
Jones, Maggie............ St. Petersburg .............. Pinellas
Keller, Flossie B..........Starke ..................... Bradford
Kennedy, Albert LaFayette.Palatka ...... .... Putnam
McClain, Annie Dolly .....Kissimmee ...................Osceola
McDonald, Robert ........ Tampa ..................Hillsborough
Martin, Charles Edwin.... Sanford .............Seminole
Martin, Dorothy.......... Clearwater ................. Pinellas
Martin, Raleigh .......... Sanford ................... Seminole
Merritt, Frank ............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Mungen, Joseph Eugene... Daytona ...............Volusia
Myrick, Alma .............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Nelson, Alvie ..............Quincy ...................... Gadsden





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 87
Name Post Office County or State
Norwood, Edwin..........Tallahassee ................... Leon
Norwood, Ernest ..........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Pittman, Robert .......... Tallahassee ....................Leon
Porter, Rodney ...........Miami .........................Dade
Riley, Otis ...............Jacksonville ...................Duval
Robinson, William B......Tallahassee ....................Leon
Rowland, Bessie Beatrice. Madison .............. Madison
Sanchions, Ellis Coffee ... Rockledge ............ Brevard
Sanchions, Theodore R....Rockledge .................. Brevard
Stroman, Carelle ......... Tallahassee ....................Leon
Taylor, Ida Mae...........Miami .........................Dade
Thompson, Eugene Collie.. West Palm Beach.........Palm Beach
Vanderhorst, Fletcher D....Marianna ...................Jackson
Verdier, Alexander Joseph.Fernandina ..................Nassau
Verdier, Marcus ...........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Walls, Mary Louise .......Pensacola ..................Escambia
Ward, Renalder ...........Punta Gorda ...............Charlotte
Washington, Bernard.....Tallahassee .................... Leon
Williams, John Henry .....Sarasota ....................Sarasbta
Williams, John Wright...Miami .........................Dade
Williams. Mattie ..........Palatka .................... Putnam
Young, Marion ............Tampa ..................Hillsborough
SECOND YEAR
Armwood, Walter .........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Ayers, Samuel Willie ......Madison ....................Madison
Bush, Willie ..............Jupiter ..................Palm Beach
Butler, Ralph .............Tampa ..................Hillsborough
Cofield, Ethel Mae.........Sanford .................. Seminole
Crowell. Charles Leroy....Palatka .....................Putnam
Ford, Hollie Matilda ......Tallahassee .................... Leon
Ford, Lovie ...............Tallahassee ....................Leon
Harris, Delphia ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Hicks, Annie Mae.........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Howard, Harriet Cornelia.Tallahassee ........ ....... Leon
Jackson, Jesse............ Sanford ....................Seminole
James, Mamie Beatrice... .Apalachicola ...............Franklin
Keyes, Allie Mae ......... Tallahassee ....................Leon
McQueen, Ruby.......... Tallahassee ................... Leon
McQueen, Ruth ........... Tallahassee ....................Leon
Magbe, George ...........Tallahassee ....................Leon
Mebane, Alberta Elaine... .Tallahassee .............. Leon
Mayo, Ethel Blondell ..... Sanford .................... eminole
Mayo, Leola Beatrice..... ,Sanford ..'................ Seminole
Miles, Gladys .............West Palm Beach.........Palm Beach
Mobley, Cloretta ..........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Nims, Frank ..............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Norman, Ruby ............Tallahassee ..............: .....Leon
Pittman, Ernestine ........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Scott, Estelle ............. Tallahassee .................... Leon
Sessions, Louise ...........Tallahassee ................ ... Leon
Sessions. Mamie .......... Tallahassee .................... Leon
Speed, Hizetta............Tallahassee .................... Leon





88 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Name Post Office County or State
Spikes, Norman ..........Raleigh ......................... Lee
.Stewart, Richie Belle ..... .allahassee .................... Leon
Sunday, Clara ............ iliton ......................St. Rosa
Taylor, Alberta ........... allahassee .................... Leon
Washington, Ruby Belle...Tallahassee .................... Leon
Young, Benjamin......... Tallahassee ................... Leon
FIRST YEAR
Anderson, Louis N .........Palatka .................... Putnam
Armwood, Levin .......... Tallahassee .................... Leon
Ayers, Willie James .......Tallahassee .................... Leon
Black, Henry William .....Greenville ...................Madison
Daniels, Iona Princess... Jacksonville ...................Duval
Deboise, Sarah Elizabeth .Hawthorne ..................lachua
Dixon, Freddie Lee .......Sanford ................... Seminole
Bowden, Arleaser .........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Fitzgerald, Annie Viola... .Tallahassee ............. Leon
Ford, Rheaber ............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Ford, Sudella.............Midway ..................... Gadsden
Hall, Marie ...............Tallahassee .................. Leon
Hawkins, Thelma .........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Holloway, Leroy ..........Florahome .................. Putnam
Johnson. Vida Mae........Miami .........................Dade
King, Myrtle ..............Lakeland ....................... Polk
Martin, Breaux ...........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Martin, Emile .............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Miller, Annie .............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Miller, Eloise .............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Miller, Geneva ............Tallahassee .................... Leon
Mills, Lucius............. Tampa ................. Hillsborough
Nelson, Ruth Hannah .....Florahome .................. Putnam
Shootes, Alfred J. Jr ......Tallahassee .................... Leon
Turner, Arthenia LandoniaTallahassee ................... Leon
Turner, Ellen Mae........ Tallahassee .................... Leon
Verdier, Polly............ Tallahassee ................... Leon
SPECIALS
NURSE TRAINING
Anderson, Florida .........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Anderson, Henrietta .....Crescent City ................ Putnam
Arnold, Cora ............. Atlanta ...................... eorgia
Bailey, Cora Mabel ........Quitman .................... Georgia
Brown, Sessie Valorie..... Jacksonville ................. Duval
Davis, Emma Blanche.....Cross City .....................Dixie
Haile, Rosa Essie Mae ....Gainesville .................. Alachua
Maginnis, Josephine .......Tarpon Springs ..............Pinellas
Norwood, Mattie ..........Ocala ........................Marion
Sweet, Nordica Ora.......Bartow .........................Polk





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 89
MECHANIC ARTS
Commercial Course
Name Post Office County or State
FreEland, Catherine T .... Tallahassee ................... Leon
McKinney, Viola ..........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Malloy, Clyde Earla .......alatka ..................... Putnam
TAILORING
Crawford, Divello H .....Tallahassee .................... Leon
MUSIC
Alexander, Daphne B......Orland'o ......................Orange
Anderson, Irene Rheba ....Tampa ..................Hillsborough
Anderson, Miriam Jackson.Tampa ..................Hillsborough
Bailey, Maurice Marcellus.Punta Gorda ...............Charlotte
Boston, Angie Mona.......Ovieda .....................Seminole
Forest, Bessie Estelle .....Lake City ................. Columbia
Howard, Harriet Cornelia.Tallahassee ................... Leon
Jackson, Meltonia E .......Jacksonville ...................Duval
Rivers, Miriam ........... Tallahassee .................... Leon
Robinson, Annie Rosa Lee.St. Augustine ..............St. Johns
Scotto, Hazel Elizabeth... .Oakland ..................... Orange
UNCLASSIFIED
Adams, Rosa Annie .........Watertown ................. Columbia
Hayes, Julia.............. Tallahassee ............. ... Leon
Humphrey, Inez Freddie.. Plant City ..............Hillsborough
Ivy, Norman ..............Tive Oak ................. Suwannee
Lark, Arabella .............aldosta .....................Georgia
Shine, Richard Austin.... Jacksonville ............. Duval
Stratton, Annie Mae ......Tallahasse .................... Leon
Watson, Albert........... Marianna ................... Jackson
White, Matthew Herman.. irlando .....................Orange
Williams, Alberta .........Tallahassee .................... Leon
Williams, Arthur Alphonso.Orlando ... ..............Orange
Wilson, Gussie Lee........Perry ........................ Taylor
GENERAL SUMMARY
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
Men Women Both
Seniors ................................ 7 3 10
Juniors ................................ 5 3 8
Sophomores ........................... 5 3 8
Freshmen ............................. 16 4 20
Total ............................ 33 13 46





90 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
Men Women Both
Seniors ................................ 0 6 6
Juniors in Education.................... 0 8 8
Juniors in Home Economics ............. 0 11 11
Total ............................ 0 25 25
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
Seniors, Third Year .................... 21 22 43
Seniors, Second Year ................... 16 26 42
Seniors, First Year ..................... 29 19 48
Total ............................ 66 67 133
Juniors, Third Year..................... 35 34 69
Juniors, Second Year ................... 10 25 35
Juniors, First Year...................... 10 17 27
Total ......... ............... 55 75 131
SPECIALS
Nurses ................................ 0 10 10
Mechanic Arts ......................... 1 3 4
Music ................................. 1 10 11
Total ............................ 2 23 25
UNCLASSIFIED
5 7 12
Grand Total ............ .......................... 372
Names counted more than once ............................ 11
Total, not including duplications ..................... 361
ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES
Alachua ........................................ 3
Bay ....... ................................ 3
Bradford ................................... 2
Brevard ......................... .............. 3
Charlotte ...................... ........................ 4
C lay ....................................................... 2
Columbia .................................................. 5
Dade ...................................................... 11
DeSoto .................................................... 2
D ixie ..................................................... 1
Duval ..................................................... 29
Escambia ...................................... 12
Franklin ................................................... 5
Gadsden ..................................... 14





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 91
H am ilton .................................................. 2
H illsborough ............................................... 28
Jackson ................................................... 3
Jefferson .................................................. 1
L ake ...................................................... 2
L ee ....................................................... 2
L eon ...................................................... 75
M adison ..................................... ............... 10
M arion .................................................... 13
M onroe .................................................... 3
N assau .................................................... 4
O range .................................................... 19
O sceola .................................................... 2
Palm Beach ............................................... 16
Pinellas ................................................... 13
P olk ...................................................... 12
Putnam ................................................... 10
Pasco ..................................................... 1
St. John ................................................... 1
St. L ucie .................................................. 4
St. R osa ................................................... 1
Sarasota ................................................ .. 1
Seminole ................................................. 20
Suwannee .... .................................. 1
T aylor ..........................................'.......... 3
Volusia ................................................... 4
W alton ................................................... 2
W ashington ......................................... 1
SUMMARY BY STATES
Florida ....................................................349
A labam a .................................................. 2
G eorgia ................................................... 9
South Carolina ............................................ 1
Total ................................................361
N. B.-Enrollment records for the Summer.session of 1923 de-
stroyed when Duval Hall was lost by fire during October, 1923.
SUMMER SCHOOL
GENERAL STATEMENT
The Florida A. & M. College Summer School was pro-
vided for by the "Summer School Act" passed by the Leg-
islature of '1913.
The entire equipment of the College is at the service of
the faculty and students of the Summer School. The
library, laboratories, dormitories, and dining hall are open
during this session.





92 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Board and lodging (including lights) will be offered at
$4.50 per week, payable in advance. Those occupying dor-
mitory rooms must, however, furnish their own pillows,
bed linen and towels.
Attention is directed to the following section of the
"Summer School Act": Credit towards Normal and Col-
lege Degrees.
Sec. 5. "All work performed at the said Sum-
mer Schools shall be of such character as to entitle
the students doing the same collegiate, normal or
professional credit therefore, and may be applied
toward making a degree."
EXTENSION OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
Laws of the State of Florida-Chapter 6835, Section 6:
"All teachers attending any of'the Summer Schools herein
created, and whose work entitles them to work therefore,
upon making proof of the same to the State Superintend-
ent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one year's
extension on any Florida teacher's certificates they may
hold and which has not fully expired, and such certificate
may be extended one year for each succeeding session at-
tended by the said teacher."
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
AGRICULTURE
1. Agriculture A.-Field Crops. Lectures and text-
book. Considers the essentials of crop production as affect-
ing the cereal and forage crops of America.
2. Agriculture B.-The Teaching of Agriculture in ma-
terials and methods available in the teaching of elementary
schools, with special emphasis on school garden. (a) De-
tailed presentation of the agriculture in elementary
schools, with special emphasis on school garden work.
This course is planned for teachers in town, village and
rural schools.





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 93
EDUCATION
Theory and Practice.-The principles of teaching and
their application to the various subjects in the curriculum
of the elementary school will be treated in this course.
PSYCHOLOGY
1. General Psychology.-A beginner's course.
ENGLISH
1. American Literattfre.-A general course in this sub-
ject.
Grammar.-Includes a careful review of grammar, syn-
tax, and sentence analysis and is to be especially adapted
to students who wish to prepare for teachers' examina-
tions.
HISTORY
American History.-Review course of the main historical
events.
Civics.-Most of the time will be devoted to the Govern-
ment of Florida, with special reference to local conditions;
the administering affairs in Florida; how we are governed
by the laws of the City, County, State and Nation.
GEOGRAPHY
1. A course in Physical Geography.
2. A review course in Political Geography.
MATHEMATICS
Arithmetic.-A rapid and thorough review of the prin-
cipal subjects of arithmetic will be made.
Elementary Algebra.-A beginner's course.
Advanced Algebra.-Not open to beginners.
Plane Geometry.-A beginner's course.
SCIENCE
General Science.-A course in General Science will be
given.
Physics.-A course in elementary physics.





94 FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL COLLEGE
PHYSIOLOGY
Teachers preparing for examination will find this course
suited to their needs.
PRIMARY METHODS
Drawing and singing and the theory of Primary teach-
ing.
HOME ECONOMICS
The following courses will be offered during the Summer
Session in the Home Economics Department. Only a lim-
ited number will be taken in any of the classes.
FOODs I.-Elementary Foods. Planning, cooking and
serving breakfast, supper and luncheon dishes. Attention
is given to the preparation of food for infants, young chil-
dren, the sick and convalescent. Lessons in nutrition, mar-
keting and budgeting are also included in this course.
FOODS II.-Advanced Foods. Planning, cooking and
serving dinner dishes. Special attention is given to plan-
ning menus and table service for special occasions. Can-
ning, preserving, jelly making and pickling, vegetables and
fruits in season are given in this course.
CLOTHING I.-Elementary Clothing. Simple garments
are constructed in this course, such as simple blouse,
bungalo apron, slip, rompers or some simple garment for a
child and a simple, wash dress. The use of commercial
patterns and their alteration is taught. The use of the ma-
chines and attachments is also included.
CLOTHING II.-Advanced Clothing. A boy's wash suit,
a fancy blouse, wool dress and evening gown are among the
garments that may be made in this course. Color combina-
tions, adaptation of style to figure, designing, are included
in discussions and practical work.
CLOTHING III.-Millinery. This course includes the mak-
ing of a simple wire frame, making and trimming a sum-
mer hat, bow making, flower making and renovating of
hats and trimmings.





INDEX
Pages
Admission to Mechanic Arts Department.............................. 46-68
Admission to High School .............................16
Admission to College ......................................- ........16
Advance Standing .. ...........-...........-........... 17
Agricultural Courses .......................................... ...... 73-81
Agricultural Education ..........................-...... ....---80
Agronomy ................. ----..... --....-......... 77
Animal Husbandry ....................................................... 79-80
Athletics .- ..-..-------................. 13
Attendance by Counties ..............................................90-91
Auto Mechanic Courses -----.............................. 49-50
Bacteriology .........-....................... 78
Biology -----------...........................------------- -----------... 34
Blacksmithing -.................................61
Bricklaying and Plastering------............... ... 63
Board of Control .............---- ..... ----............. ... 5
Board of Education-----........... -- ---.. 5
Boarding Department .... ........... -14
Bookkeeping ..-............................. 64
Calendar .. .. .......................... ..................... ........ 5
Carpentry and Cabinet Making .....-..-----..... ....59
Catalogue of Students ............-- ----..... 81-91
Chemistry .......... ----- -.............. 32-34
Civics ...- ....- .. ....................46
Definition of Unit ................. --... -----. 17
Drawing ............................-..------ ...... 67
Dairying .......................-................. 76
Description of Courses ............... --........ 32-81
Degrees, Diplomas, Certificates.............. -----. 48
Description of Trade Courses ---.....................59-62
Description of Degree Course in M. A..................... 55
Description of Commercial Course .......... --..... ...... 64-68
Description of Teachers Training Course in M. A........ 68
Economics -----------...--.........-......... 46
Education .. -..................--... -----. 43
Engineering .................. --..----.. 62
English ..--....-.........---.............38-40
Ethics ........---- ......................45
Electricity .--.......--- ---.... --....... 57
Expenses ------ -----14
Faculty Committees ............................-9
General Information ............................. 10-18
General Statement Regarding Curriculum ..........-...... 16-18
General Summary -.....--------.............. 91
Genetics ...-..................--------. 78
Geology .........................-......-.36
Geography ................................43
History ... ..-......--.....-..............42-43
Home Economics Courses ........................- 69-71
History of Philosophy ..........................-45





INDEX.
~,, ~. .Pages
History, Location, Support: .......... ....................... ....10
H orticulture ....................................... .... ................................. 77-78
Inter-Collegiate Debates ........................................ ....... 14
Latin ......... ........ ................40-42
Literary Societies '..-.......................... ..... .. 12
Major W ork ....... ........................................-. .-.. .18
Managing Boards .....-.................................-... ---- 5
Mathematics ........................................................................... 36-38
Mechanical Arts Courses ...... .. ................................ 46-68
Military Organization ----...... .............................. 11-12
Modern Languages ..----... ....... ...................... 42
Nurses Training -....-.. ....................................... 71
Officers of Administration........................................... 6
Officers of Instruction .- .......... ................ 7- 8
Opportunities to Reduce Expenses ................. .......... ..... 15
Outline of Courses-.... ............................. ------- 19-30
Painting ...... ............................................. 61
Physics ............................. .... 35-36
Physics-,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,, 35-36
Plant Pathology ........ ....................................... 78
Plant Production .- ...... .. ...................... 78
Plumbing .......... ......-....-...---- ---- --...............-- 54
Prizes ........ ........... .............-- ............... 13
Psychology ......................... ...................... 43-44
Regulations ............. .......................................... 10
Religious Exercises ...-... -................ ................... 13
Remittance ...... ... .. .......................... ..... ........ 12
Requirements for Graduation..................................................... 17
Rhetorical Exercises ........................................ .................... 14
Rules Regarding Deficient Records -............................ 15-16
Sociology .--- ............................................ .... 45
School of Music .........:.......... .......... .... 30-32
Shoe and Harness Making ........... ...................... -64
Student Assistants ................................ ......... 8
Special Students ................ ....................... i8
Summer School Statement and Courses............................... 91-94
T ailoring ............ ............................. .................... 62
Teachers Training in Mechanic Arts................................. 51
Trade Courses .. ................................................ .. 46-50
U uniform s ................................. ................................ 12
W heelwrighting ......... .............. ...... ....................... 60
$ ptIA(- &aA d. 3Ji'





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