• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Calendar
 Managing boards
 Officers of instruction and...
 Faculty committees
 General information
 Courses of study
 Description of courses
 Mechanic arts courses
 The agricultural courses
 Catalogue of students
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). 1917-18. Series X. No. 7.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000107/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (for Negroes). 1917-18. Series X. No. 7.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1918
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000107
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3230
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Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Calendar
        Page 5
    Managing boards
        Page 6
    Officers of instruction and administration
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Faculty committees
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    General information
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Courses of study
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Description of courses
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Mechanic arts courses
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The agricultural courses
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Catalogue of students
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Index
        Page 103
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
i










/





Florida A. & M. College Press
Tallahassee
; ~-





BULLETIN
OF THE
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
COLLEGE (FOR NEGROES)
TALLAHASSEE,
I,
* ,['
THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL CATALOG
1917-'18










CALENDAR
Pept. 8 Saturday tefectory Opens
Sept. 0Q Monday
] ntrance Egaltatioia
pet. 1 Tu.esday
Oct. a ,Wednesday First Semester Begins
.oov. 28 Thprsday Th'aaksglvlng Day
Dec. 9-12 Mon. Thurs. Farmers' Institute
pee, g Wednesday Christmons Holiday
1919
Jan. 1 Wednesday Emancipation Day
Feb. 1 Saturday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 7 Friday Inter-Class Debate
May 23 Friday Oratorical Contest
May 24 Saturday Senior Chapel
May 25 Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon
May 26 Monday Annual Music Recital
May 27 Tuesday Alumni Day
May 28 Wednesday Class Day
May 29 Thursday Commencement





MANAGING BOARDS
STATE BOARD. OF EDUCATION
HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR SIDNEY J. CATTS, President
HON. W. N. SHEATS, Supt. of Public Instruction, Secretary
HON. H. CLAY CRAWFORD, Secretary of State
HON. VAN C SWEARINGEN, Attorney General
HON. J. C. LUNING, Treasurer
BOARD OF CONTROL
HON. J. L. EARMAN. Chairman, Palm Beach
HON. E. L. WARTMAN, Citra
HON. T. B. KING, Arcadia
HON. J. T. DIAMOND, Milton
HON. J. B. HODGES, LakeCity
HON. BRYAN MACK, Secretary, Tallahassee
PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President of the College, Chairman
*JOHN C. WRIGHT, Dean of Academic Department,
*HOMER THOMAS, Acting Dean of the Academic Department
W. H. A. HOWARD, Director of Mechanic Arts Department
MISS L. M. CROPPER, Dean of Women
B. F. BULLOCK, Director of Agricultural Department
R. J. HAWKINS, Dean of Men
MISS E. A. DAVIS, Director of Home Economics Department
MISS VIRGINIA HILYER, Superintendent of Sanatorium
*JOHN F. MATHEUS, Secretary
*Part of year
[ ~





OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION
Except the President, arranged in order of length of service.
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M., Litt. D., President
Professor of Philosophy and Economics
ELLEN O. PAIGE,
Dressmaking and Millinery
W. H. A. HOWARD, A. M., Director of Mechanic Arts Dept.
Assistant Professor Mathematics, Painting
LULA M. CROPPER, Dean of Women
Geography, Physiography
ANATOLE E. MARTIN,
Tailoring
VIRGINIA HILYER, Superintendent of Sanatorium
Nurse Training, Physiology
CECELIA A. BRADLEY, Matron in charge of Laundry
Laundering
WILLIAM H. CRUTCHER,
Trucking and Farm Crops
EVERETT B. JONES, B. S.,
Professor of Chemistry and Biology
THOMAS S. JOHNSON,
Wheelwrighting and Blacksmithing
EVALINA A. DAVIS, Director of Home Economics Department
Cooking .
DENNIS A. STARKS,
Animal Husbandry
*JOHN C. WRIGHT, A. B., Dean of Academic Department
Professor of English
WALTER R. LIVINGSTON, B. S.,
Carpentry, Drawing (Leave of Absence)
RUFUS J. HAWKINS, A. B., Dean of Men
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
JOHN F. MATHEUS, A. B., Acting Auditor
Professor of Latin and English
MRS. ELIZA P. JONES, In charge of Children's School
Primary Methods





8 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
JOSEPH D. AVENT, A. B,,
Professor of English
HOM EP. THQMAS, A. M., Director, Summer School for Teachers
Professor of Edugation, Acting Dean of Academic Dept.
JUl IA A. CALVIN,
librarian, Iiq-ishanr
MRS, MARGARET H, ROBiNSON.
; nigrat.'ll, y and Ti,'- .' rifi':g
.:I: I,, : .(BINStN, B O, B. S,,
Laboratory Ausiat ptt
8ARA Al J-.NrKNiNS, B. S.,
r:,rt.rr,ll' 1 an4 Physical Culture
ALMInEDIA L. BUIWEI.L, A, B,,
Music
ItEOLA I-HI'DI3N. A .B,,
Chedmstlry, Cooking,
CORINE BRYANT, Matron in charge of Dining Room
EnplJh,
BERTHA A. ARRINGTON, Matron in charge of Refectory
S. LENORA HARGRAVE, Asst, Supt. of Sanatorium
Nurse Training
G. W. AUSTIN,
L fll tll t llll .
BENJAMIN F. BULLOCK, B. S., Director of Agricultural Dept.
Professor of Agriculture
LUCY H. WARE, Matron
Housekeeping
LECKWOOD W. BLACK,
Dairying, Poultry Raising
MARY E. CORDIN, President'a Secretary
SARA A. THORNE, A. B.,
Mathematics and English
ARNETTE RAMBEAU, Commandant
Painting
L. H. PERSLEY, B. S.,
Mechanical and Freehand Drawing





FACULTY 9
CLARA B. MOON,
Plain Sewing
MATTIE E. LEWIS,
Assistant Sewing and English
*OLIVE A. SASPORTAS, A. B.,
Assistant Professor of English
W. J, GUNN, M. D.,
College Plysitiata,
AGRICULTURAL AGENTS,
(States .Relatign a4d Smith-Lever Activities)
FRANK C. :RODI:N;3N,
Farm Collaborator,
A. A. TURNER,
Farmers' 'i;", Orgatlizer
STUDENT ASSISTANTS.
JOHN A. SIMMS, Acting Instructor in Printing
WILLIAM MURRELL, Acting Instructor in Carpentry
ALVA W. McKINNEY, Engineering.
ARTHUR FLOYD, Animal Husbandry.
NAPOLEON CAMPBELL, Assistant Instructor in Agriculture
JAMES A. ESPY, Printing.
EUNICE BROWN, Student Accounts
JAMES A. WILLIAMS, Library
JOSEPH SHEFFIELD, Auditor's Clerk
JOSEPH HILSON, Horticulture
* Part of year.
!^ *





Io THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
FACULTY COMMITTEES
The President of the College is an ex-officio member of all committees.
1. Prudential-IHoward, Hilyer, Hawkins, Davis, Cropper. Bul-
lock, *Wright, *Thomas.
2. Music-Burwell, Avent, Thorne, Moon.
3. Refeetory--Mattheus, Arrington, Davis, Bryant, Crutcher,
Hargrave.
4. Social Service--Paige, Mrs. Jones, Robinson.
5. Reception-Ware, Bryant, Hawkins.
6. ]ibrary-Calvin, Cropper, Persley.
7. Debate-Hawkins, Waites, Thorne.
8. Matriculation- (a) Advisory-Jones, Paige, Crutcher, Martin.
(b) Cla.siHial.ioln- V right, Calvin, Jenkins. *Thomas
9. Bulletin-Bullock, Howard, Davis, *Wright, Jones. *Thomas
10. College Arns-Jones, Hudson, Robinson.
11. Curricula,*Wright, Ioward, Bullock, Davis. *Thomas.
12. Sanatoriuim-Hilyer, Hawkins, Cropper.
13. Round Table--(a) Literary-Mattheus, aMartin, Cordin,
Persley, Mrs. Jones.
(b) Social-Ist Semester-Avent, Jenkins,
Mrs. Robinson, Burwell, Black.
2nd Semester-Thomas, Persley,
Bradley, Bryant.
14. Extension Aetivities-(a) Agricultural-Bullock, Turner,
Robinson, Crutcher.
(b) Home Economics-Davis, Paige,
Hilyer.
15. Leeture-Howard, Johnson, Ware, Starks, Mrs. Robinson.
16. Graduation-*Wright, Howard,Davis,Bullock, Moon, *Thomas





COMMITTEES ix
17. Student Activities:
Dramatics-*Wright, Thorne, Persley, Moon, *Thomas.
Athletics-(Men) Avent, Austin, Waites.
(Women) Jenkins, Cordin, Burwell.
Y. M. C. A.-Thomas, Black, Crutcher.
Y. W. C. A.-Bradley, Arrington, Ware.
Class Organization-Martin, Calvin, Storks.
Literary Soeieties-Waites, Jenkins, Black.
Soceials-Ware, Cordin, Ram'beau.
Bible School-Hawkins, Bullock, Hargrave.
18. Puiblc Speafkinl-*Wright, Jones, Hudson, *Sasportas
Remark: Executive Committee composed of Chairmen of the
various sub-committees.
*Part of year





I





General Information
ORGANIZATION.
The work of the College is organized into four depart-
ments: Academic, Agricultural, Mechanic Arts and
Home Economics. (See descriptive statement.)
HISTORY, LOCATION AND SUPPORT.
By constitutional provision and legislative enactment,
the College was established in 1887 a. a State Normal
School. Under the principalship of Mr. T. deS. Tucker
assisted by Mr. T. V. Gibbs, it was opened at Tallahassee,
October 5, 1887, with an attendance of fifteen students.
In 1891 the College moved to its present site. In 19Q5
it passed from the direct management of the State Board
of Education to the management of the Board of ControlI
as one of the institutions of higher learning. In 1909 its'
name was changed to that of The Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical College for Negroes by the Legislature.
It is supported mainly by State and Federal appropria-
tion.





14 IHE FLORIDAAGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Buildings and Equipment
DORMITORIES.
There are five dormitory buildings: three for men and
two for women with a capacity to accommodate about
250 students. Those for the young women are equipped
with toilets and baths, are steam4heated and electric-
lighted. Those for the young men are comfortlthbl, equip-
ped, having shower baths an sanitary toilets,
* .- COTTAGES.
* -. Thiereji fivre cottages ud .fQr teachers' residenlce '
DUVAL HALL.
Duval Hall is a frame building located to the South
of the main approach to the campus. It has two stories
and a basement and is divided by a broad central corri-
*- dor and stairways into two wings, each containing seven
.: large, well-ventilated class rooms. The building is so
.. constructed as to place every room except two on a cor-
ner, thus insuring an abundance of light and air.
The rooms on the two main floors are used as recitation
rooms for academic classes and as work rooms for the
Freehand Drawing. The college printing office, is
located in the basement. Two small rooms opening off
-the main hall in the rear of the building on both first and
second floors are useAd, the one as an office for the Dean
of the.Department, tlie other as a work room for-thee
Freehand Drawing.
_ .. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~a~~~~~~





BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT ts
The physics laboratory is located in a well-lighted room
in Duval Hall and is equipped both for individual labor-
atory work by the students and for demonstrations by
the instructor.
It is supplied with a large lecture table and storage
cabinet and tables for the use of students. Gas, water,
and el4trioity are provided,
'Prominent among the pieces of lecture table apparatus
are the following: I Geryk air pump, and plate, 1 labor,
tory clook with electric attachment, I U, S. standard
barometer, 1 aneroid barometer, 1 spinthariscope, 1 X ray
tube and fluoroscope, 1 demonstration induction coil, 1
dessectible dynamo, 1 lamp rheostat, 1 electrolytic recti.
tier, 2 combined ammeter, voltmeter and galvanometer, 1
Kolbe light apparatus, rotating machine with accessories,
I sonometer, 1 thermoscope, 1 transformer, 2 parabolic
reflectors, 2 telephone transmitters and receivers, 1 Wims-
hurst static machine with accessories.
For the use of the students in performing the 35 experi.
ments constituting the laboratory course, there are pro.
vided among other apparatus -:- _ais-aw apparatus,
electric bell, batteries of various types. Wheatstone's
bridges, balances, equal arm and spring, resistance coils,
galvanometers, lenses, meter sticks, pulleys, photometers,
stop watches, etc,
e a SCIENCE HALL.
'Science Hall is a one-story building comprising six
rooms and one large hall, and contains the recitation
rooms and laboratories of the chemical and biological
sciences.
Room 1 has seating accommodation for forty students
and has an up-to-date equipnelt for lecture and demon-





i6'THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
station work in general chemistry and qualitative analy-
sis.
Room 2 is the laboratory for general inorganic chem-
istry. It is provided with desks and individual work
lockers for twenty-five students working in sections. This
laboratory has gas and water for the individual student;
also the necessary apparatus and appurtenances for em-
phasizing the underlying principles in chemistry.
Room 3. This room is equipped for the work in quali-
tative analysis. It is provided with individual desks for
twelve (12) students working in sections.
The work of the course is intended to give the student
a working knowledge of the systematic examination of
inorganic compounds; including metals and acids in solu-
tion, and blowpipe analysis. The work is supplemented
from time to time with practical experiments on the ex-
amination of food-stuffs and other compounds used in
every-day life.
Room 4 is the laboratory for quantitative analysis.
The equipment for the laboratory has been recently in-
stalled, and is in every respect up-to-date. Individual
desks and lockers are provided for ten (10) students
working in sections. This course emphasizes the general
principles and the more important methods for the quan-
titative examination of the more common chemical com-
pounds.
Room 5 is equipped for laboratory work in general
biology and histology.
(a) The general laboratory has tables for the accom-
modation of twenty-five students working at one time.
The equipment comprises water and gas, twelve com-
pound microscopes, six dissecting microscopes and suffi-
cient animal and plant forms, fresh, dried and preserved,





BUILDIXGS AND EQUIPMENT 17
to lay a broad foundation-in the development of animal
and plant life. Special emphasis is placed on the forms
comunon to our own State and section.
(b) Another portion of this room is equipped for work
in advanced biology.
(Histology). Individual tables are fitted up for six
(6) students working in sections. This laboratory is
provided with the necessary apparatus for the prepara-
tion and microscopic study of the principal structure of
animal tissues.. The purpose of the course is to give the
student a thorough knowledge of ultimate structure of
animal and plant life and thili bring him into a larger
relationship with the life about him, thereby rendering
him better able to grapple with the forces of nature in his
every-day activities.
Room 6 is used for weighing purposes and is fitted up
with two pairs of Sartorius balances for the work in
quantitative analysis.
Room 7 is used as a general store room for chemicals,
etc.
Room 8 is the class ilomu fur bI-th eheisritl and
biology.
AGRICULTURAL BUILDING.
The building three stories, brick veneered, is lighted
with electricity, is heated by the best wood stoves ob-
tainable, has city water connection, oiled floors, is ce-
mented plastered throughout, and the interior wood-
work has a dark mission finish.
The basement is really a full floor having a ten-foot
ceiling, full ,length doors and windows, cement floor
throughout, hallways, and staircase leading to first floor.





is THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHATICAL COLLEGE
Basement.
DAIRY MILK AND BUTTER ROOM.
The division of the basement is fitted up with Sharples,
De Laval and United States separators, Cooley cream
tempering vats, Bestor milk cooler, iron wash sinks,
steam boiler (1 1-2 H. P.), best modern butter churns,
butter workers, large and small Howe and Fairbanks
scales, butter prints, sanitary milk pails, cream cans,
white tables, etc.
MILK TESTING ROOM.
This is fitted up with two, four, and ten bottle Bab-
cock milk testers, cream scales, all the different tests
for cream and milk, iron wash sink, blackboards, dairy
pictures framed, specially stained laboratory tables, glass-
ware, electric stove, etc.
GARDEN TOOL ROOM.
A full assortment of all improved garden tools, wheel
plows, garden water hose, spraying apparatus, work bench
complete, etc.
THE INCUBATOR ROOM.
Equipped with Cyphers, oil and electric incubators,
egg .testers, revolving egg cabinet, Cyphers brooder,
tables, shell and bone grinder, spray pumps, etc.
STORE RooM.
A place for nails, lime, cement,- spraying machines, dis-
infectants, oil, etc.





BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 19
First Floor.
On this floor, we find the following rooms: head office,
lecture room, the general laboratory, store room, and hall
leading to front porch.
OFFICE.
This office is equipped with desk for the Director, and
tables for the bookkeeper, and for research work of special
students; a large bookcase of assorted and selected bul-
letins on agricultural subjects, charts, framed pictures,
pedigrees, etc.
This room also serves as headquarters for the corre-
pondence course in agriculture for teachers and as depart
ment library.
LECTLuR ROOM,
This is the largest room in the building and is furnish-
ed with oak armchairs, t eb sk'.biotany and horti-
cultural wall charts, frai mcpl nre' mi agricultural sub-
jects, stereopticon, tables-' and shelves for flowers, black-
boards, etc. This room is connected with the general
laboratory.
GENERAL LABORATORY.
Furnished with one large laboratory desk with wash
sink, large and small dark-stained tables for individual
work, two stools to each table, blackboards, wall charts.
framed pictures, many varieties of seeds, bottled labeled
samples of soils from local community and State, corn
racks, seed corn tester, shelves for flowers, complete set





20 THE FLORIAA -AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
of all kinds of modern pruning saws and shears for each
student taking courses in horticulture, budding. knives,
grafting chisels, two compound microscopes, fifty magni-
fiers, needles, tweezers, glassware, complete apparatus
for soil study, etc.
Second Floor.
This floor has four rooms',and a wide hallway. The
largest of these rooms is a class room for agriculture,
fitted with' oak armchairs, teacher's table, shelves for
flowers, charts, table for class experiments, a closet for
app.ratns, blackboards, and a case of veterinary instru-
meats and medicine for live stock;
AGRICcLTURAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
This laboratory is equipped with' the most improved
apparatus for doing analytical work in soils, fertilizers,
insecticides, foods and dairy. products. Each student has
in his desk a private set of apparatus which is supple-
mented by the general laboratory equipment, thus allow-
ing individual work. Balances are adjusted to the fourth
decimal place for accurate weighing. Electric heaters and
dry ovens, microscopes for minute physical analysis, hot
water ovens, and a distilled water apparatus make the
larger part of the general equipment. Both the equip-
ment and the location of this laboratory contribute to its
desirability for study in this subject.
This room is used for the subject of agricultural chemis-'
try, and is well supplied with desk space and all neces-
sary glassware, apparatus, etc. (See course in this sub-
ject). City water connections, with waste pipes have been
installed for this purpose. The course in this subject has
started during the College year of 1912-18.





E!"LD!Cs ASBD ZIPMENT t
Of the other two reoms on this floor, the smaller
(12x15) is used as an office for the two inttrnitroit itf the
department, and the other (1fx20) a an aR gieultural lab-
oratory and museum.
TERrEOPTICON.
The DepartPment ig 4ulppliod with a total of 273 slides,
divided up among the subjects of farm management, cot-
ton boll ireevil, botany, and general horticrlltre.
Web.elieve heartily in the idea of teaching by pictures
and thigh is the reason for :'.I1.nnmber of framed pictures
and charts throughout the buildio; princi!ally on srb-
jects relaxin; to thle farm.
MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING.
The Meechanic 'Arts Building is a brick-veneered b.ild-
ing two ftbrici in height. .Only about two-thirds of the
complete structure bas Irbun erected.
That part of the building already constr leted provides
.norkrooms for tue ,najniily;_o.f:.e.'s indistrie. On
the first.floor are 1he bench an niel acine rooi'n< nf the
carpentry dMirsion. the wheelwright shlfp, blacksmlithl shop,
"nrinpt'n ri dvis:on, departmental office. On the second
floor are located the paint shop, tailor shop. mechanical
drawing room and dark room -for- taking prints.
In ti'r,;npinz the division of the Maehariac Arta De-
partment the' College has considered the' vocational a.
well ab the educational phases of liandw'-lk and has fur-
nished such equipment as.will-develop skill of hand and
a working knowledge'of.sucht ordinary appliances as are
found in the shops, :nirlrk;ooii -and' homes in' which the
sftudet will find employment, the ultimate object' being~





22 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
to give the student the opportunity to acquire as much
useful knowledge from a vocational view-point as is con-
sistent with the purely educational phase of handwork
curricula.
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING
The Home Economics Building, one of the latest
additions to the plant, is a two story frame structure
designed and built especially for and given entirely to
the girls' industries.
The first floor is occupied by the Dressmaking, Plain
Sewing and Millinery Divisions and the Directors Office.
On the second floor is the Domestic Science Division,
which is composed of one large kitchen for class work,
a reception room, model kitchen, model dining room
and model bed room.
All these rooms and furnishings are specially de-
signed according to the latest ideas in Domestic Science
activities.
The building is lighted by electricity and is fitted
with gas for cooking purposes. The plumbing fixtures
are of the highest quality and have, been installed in
accordance with modern plumbing specifications.
In design and equipment nothing has been spared
to make its instructional possibilities equal to the best
In the basement are the lavatories and a well
appointed room fitted up as a chemical laboratory.
LIBRARY.
The library, a two;story brick-veneered 'building donat-
ed to the College by Mr. Andrew Carnegie, occupies a cen-
tral position on the campus, and is being stocked with





BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT a3
carefully selected books. At present there are 8,000
volumes which are classified according to the Dewey sys-
tem. It is also designated as a depository for govern-
ment documents. There are also a large number of educa-
tional documents from other States.
The reading room contains thirty-seven (37) periodicals
ten (10) daily papers and a large number of weeklies.
The building is steam-heated and lighted by electricity.
SANATORIUM
The sanatorium was designed and built especially for
the accommodation of both male and female student
patients and has a separate entrance for each.
This building is two-story with a large attic lighted-
with dormer windows.
The first floor contains the office, drug room, men's
ward, three private rooms, dining room, kitchen, bath and
toilet, and nurses' workroom. The upper floor contains
the women's and private rooms and bath, a linen room,
a lecture room, an operating and sterilizing room, sur-
geon's lavatory and nurses' hedroioms. The superintend-
ent, matron and nurcrses are hpd t.he sauntoriuu. The
building is steam-heated a'" 0e4 t'ed throughout.
LAUNDRY.
The laundry, erected at a cost of $3,000, is modernly
equipped for laundry work. Electricity is used in operat-
ing the machinery and for lighting.
BARNS.
There are two barns; a dairy barn and a horse barn
modernly equipped for the proper care of live stock.





4THr FLOQIDA -.r ;I-rLT :.I, A.?D IF,:.I ''!C' .L C L[Ir-'-
POULTRY YARD.
The poultry yard 11hg modern ,,hn'ion at rainrnirmnt- for
poultry.
LABORATORIES.
For general chemistry and hil,.,_ laboratories see de-
scription of Science Hall. Fur physics laboratory ,ee de-
scription of Academic Building.
REGULATIONS.
The regulations of the College are few and simple, ap-
pealing to the student's self-respect and personal respond,
sibility.
Students are not allowed to loaf, to use intoxicating
liquors or tobacco in any form, to gamble or to have or
use firearms,
All punishment is by demerits as follows: five demerits
make one warning, or mark: ten demerits.two warnings
or marks; fifteen demerits in any one session make a
student liable to suspension. Suspended students may be
reinstated by the Prudential Committee or the President.
All laundering must be done in the College laundry,
and students will not be allowed to have laundering done
elsewhere except by .special permission from the Presi-
dent. All clothing must be marked with INDELIBLE
INK.
Students should provide themselves with the following
articles:
GENERAL LIST.
3 Sheets 1 Quilt or Comfort
3 Pillow Cases 8 Table Napkins





4 Towels 4 White Sproad
1 Blanket 1 Bible
I Bottle of Tidelible Ink. 1 Dirtionar -.
Gml8' LisT. ..
1 Woolen Navy Blue Uni- 1 Pair High Shoes
form 1 Pair Rdbbers
2 Percale Navy Blue Uni- 1 Waterproof Coat
forms 1 Tmbrel!a
2 Tucked White Lawn Shirt 3 Colored Waists
Waists -2 Laundry Bags
1 Thick Shirt. Waist With Gingham Aprons
-long sleeves 1 Ready to Wear. Navy
@ Changes Winter Under-
wear
The yonng women are required to put on high shoes and
winner underwear November 1st. White underskirts are
ullneeess.ary,.
Bo-s' LIsT.
8.Night lirtf i 1-iS 'ib andl B'ash
4 NeSligce Shirts I Shre Polishing Outfit
6 White. Standing Collars 6 Wlit.e Napkins
4 Pairs White Cuffs Underclothing sufficient
3 Clothes Bags for three weeks
1 Pair Overalls
Parents and guardians are advised in making remit-
tances for students, to send money by postal money order
or express money order or registered letter direct to the
President. He will not be responsible for money sent to
students. All requests for students to come home or to
be withdrawn must be made to the President,





26 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
LITERARY SOCIETIES.
There are six literary societies: Acme and Forum, for
High School men; Tucker and Lyceum, for High School
women; The College Wits Debating Club, for College
men; and the Athenaeum, for Normal School and
College women. These societies meet fortnightly.
RELIGIOUS EXERCISES.
Although the College is non-sectarian, yet it is Chris-
tian. In addition to the daily devotion, Sunday preach-
ing, and Bible study courses, there is an active Young
Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Chris-
tian Association.
ATHLETICS.
Through the Hlloway Athletic Association, the young
men carry forward the usual athletic activities,.
The young women, in addition to daily walking exer-
cises, are engaged in basketball, croquet and lawn tennis.
The policy of the College is to encourage athletic activ-
ities.
RHETORICAL EXERCISES.
Part of the- Chapel hour each Thursday is given to
public rhetorical exercises.
An annual declamation contest is held in which one
representative from each of the literary societies com-
petes for prizes of ten dollars and five dollars offered by
societies.,
The oratorical faculty prizes are competed for by the
students of the college department.





MILITARY ORGANIZATION 27
MILITARY ORGANIZATION.
The young men except those in the College are organ-
ized into three Cadet Companies in charge of a Com-
inandant. Each company is commanded by a Cadet Cap-
tain and has its full complement of Cadet officers selected
from those students who have been most exemplary in
conduct and soldierly bearing.
The organization is maintained to complement study
and to help in the well rounded physical, mental and
moral development of the boys. It is also intended to
cultivate habits of neatness, punctuality, obedience, and
to give an erect, healthy, manlybearing and a high regard
for law and order.
In addition to Company and Battalion drill a course
of military Calesthenics or Gymnastics is given in the
open air.
A band composed of young men of all departments
using twenty instruments is organized in connection with
the Battalion.
UNIFORMS.
As a matter of economy and of goid appearance the
students are required to wear a uniform. The young
women's suits. are made of blue percale and cost two
dollars ($2.00). For spring and fall they wear a blue
ready-to-wear hat.
The young men's uniforms are made of blue flannel or
blue serge and with the cap cost from $10.50 to $12.00.
These uniforms are made in the college shop and are,
sold at actual cost. The patrons are therefore urged not
to buy citizen's suits for their children, but to send money
to the President with which to buy the above uniform





aS THS V-QRIDPA AVIRICULVTRAt, ANB (CCH.',-!C.'L r ?I. *:+
suits. Upon application samples of the girls u form
goods will be sent.
Satisfactory arrangements for the uniforms is one of
the requirements for matriculation of young men. The
regulation Is--ll n inrnl auits, caps, blrck shoes and white
gloves,
B H OARDING DEPARTMENT.
The Boarding Department, equipped with both dry and
steam cooking facilities, rPl'i. n p ip ptoi 3at di-nuz ser-
vice,
Expenses.
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights and fuel,
per month, $9.00; 8 months .................. $72.00
Laundering, etc., l1.'IIl per month ....... ........ 8.00
Hospital fee, 25cts. per day while sick in addition
to board.
Registration Fee for men- -------- 2.50
Registration Fee for women- .. ---------. 2.25
OPPORTUNITY TO REDUCE EXPENSE.
A limited number of earnest young men and women
will be allowed to work out a part of their board and
laundry expenses. Application for this privilege must
be'made in-writing- and accepted before arrival. Moner
thus earned will be applied to the bn;ialing account tf
the student





RULES 29
RULES REGARDING DEFICIENT RECORDS
All records below 60 in any subject are deficient. A
deficient record is a failure if below 50 and a condition
if above 50.
All failures and conditions must be removed before a
student can have advanced catalogue classification.
A failure or a condition in any subject will prevent
graduation.
A failure is removable only by repeating the subject
in class as soon as scheduled inf program. .This subject
takes precedence over all other subjects.
A condition is removable by special examination which
is given within twco weeks after the beginning of each sem-
ester. A student will be allowed to take only'two special
examinations to remove a condition. If a student fails
in both examinations, the condition becomes a failure re-
movable only by repeating the subject in class as soon as
scheduled in program.
An industrial cJndiiti.n is removable by the students'
performing such work as is designated by the instructor.
An extra special eJaJ-,,iat;r al. iill be granted the fi st
tceek in Mau to candidates for' i .aduatio, for removal
of coaiditiohs i.Riti'red during the Senior year.
A passing record in any subject becomes deficient by
the withdrawal of a student and is ranked as a condition,
provided the student takes special instruction in the sub-
ject under some one approved by the President; otherwise
it is ranked as a failure. This special instruction must
cover the work done by the student's class during his ab-
sence.
Four is the maximum number of academic subjects a
student may take during any semester, including repeated
subjects.





so THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
A student will be given zero in an examination, if
after being notified respectively by the Registrar, the
Dean of the Academic Department and publicly in
Chapel by the teacher offering the examination, he fail
to take said examination, unless excused by the Dean
of the Academic Department.
A student failing to enter school at the beginning of
a semester loses his class standing which may be regained
only by passing an ea'tra written examination in the sub-
jects covered by the clase during his absence,
LECTURES AND SERMONS.
I t is the policy of the College to bring before the stu-
dents monthly a lecturer and a preacher. During the
year lectures and sermons were delivered as follows:
1917 ., ,
Oct. 15th ...................... .................. Lecture
Dr. C. H. Morris, Norfolk, Va.
Oct. 25th Addresses
l Oct. 25th ........ ................................... Addresses
Mrs. Mary MoCrorey, Charlotte, N. C.
Rev W. H. Hollowayj Talladega, Ala. I
'Oct. O8th ....... ........... ........ .... Lecture
Mr. J. C; Wrighr, De.n of the College
.Nov. 1st ........... ... ..a-6d... ....... ... Lecture
Rev;, Harold Kingsley, TallhIad.e, Ala.
Nov. 4th, 5th ................. ................. Lectures
Mrs. Frances Preston, National Organizer
W. C. T. U., Jacksonville, Fla.
Nov. 11th ................,.............. ... .. Sermon
Rev. G. C. Bledsoe, Tallahassee, Fla....
Nov. 18th .....,,,.. ............ ....,, Lecture
Mr. B. L. Waits
! '._ __!_ -.~ll~il-h i





LECTURES AND SERMONS 31
Dec. 5th ........................................... Lecture
Dr. A. P. Holly, Miami, Fla.
Dec. 6th.................................. ....... Lectures
Miss Agnes Harris, Dept. of Agri., Washington, D. C.
Mr. C. K. McQuarrie, Gainesville, Fla.
Dec. 7th ...................................... ..... Address
His Excellency Sidney J. Catts, Governor,.
State of Fla.
Dec. 9th ................................. ....... Sermon
Rev. T. R. Carter, Jacksonville, Fla.
Dec. 16th .................... .............. ....... Sermon
Rev. C. L. Russell, Tallahbas-ve, Fla.
Dec, ....................................... Lecture
Mr. T. J. Calloway, Washington, D. C;
Jan. 1st ............................................. Address
Rev. T. R. Carter. Jacksonville, Fla.
Jan. 3rd .......................................... Lecture
IMr. W, T. B. Williams, Hampton, Va.
Jan, 20th .......: ...........io-:............. Sermon
Rev. Win. Wood. Palatin. Fin.
Feb. 5th .... .;........................ ..... Lecture
Rev. C. H. Tobias, Augusta, Ga.
International Y. M. C. A. Secretary
Feb. 10th ............................................ Sermon
Rev. R. J. McCann, Thomasville, Ga.
Feb. 10th .......................... .......... Lecture
Mr. A. M. Traywick, Y. M. C. A.
Feb. 16th ...................................... Sermon
Rev. P. H. Williams, Tallahassee, Fla.
Feb. 19th ................. ................... .... .. Recital
Mme. Anita Patti Brown, Chicago, Ill.
Feb. 26th,, .....................................;... Lecture
Mr. M. N. Work, Tuskegee, Ala.





32 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGe
March 1st ............................................ Lecture
Rev. Charles Stewart, Chicago, Illinois.
March 9th ........................................... Address
Captain Richmond Pierson Hobson
March 12th ......................................... Address
Hon. W. H. Harrison, Oklahoma
March ISth .......................................... Lecture
Prof. Giddens, Columbia Univ., New York
1March 19th ......................................... Recital
Rev. David Cincore, Philadelphia, Pa.
March 22nd ......................................... Lectures
Dr. C. A. Vincent. Washington. D. C.
Dr. Chas. McFarland. New York, N. Y.
March 24th .......................................... Sermon
Dr. G. W. Moore, Nashville, Tenn.
April Sth ......... ............................ Sermon
Rev. C. A. Lyman, Atlanta, Ga.
April 11th ....... Lecture
Dr. J. E. Hunter, Lexington, Ky.
April 15th ........................................... Sermon
Rev. G. H. Brown, Palmetto, F.a.
Al;rii 27th ................. ....................... Addresses
Hon. F. T. Myers, Tallahassee, Fla.
Hon. J. W. Henderson. Tallahassee, Fla.
Major J. H. Woodside, British Army.
M ay 11th ............................. ............. Address
Captain Guest, British Army
May 26th ............................... Baccalaureate Sermon
Bishop I. B. Scott. D. D., Nashville, Tenn.
May 2h ....................... Sermon to Religious Societies
Rev. W. H. Marshall, Pensacola, Fla.
May 28th ................................... Alumni Address
Mr. G. B. Rivers, Tuskegee, Ala.
May 30th .............................. Baccalaureate Address
Hon. Jas. Weldon Johnson, Litt, D., New York.





COURSES OF STUDY 33
Courses of Study
General Statement
The college offers the following courses: High School
Course, Normal Course, College Course.
For admission to the Normal Course and College six-
teen units of, I-'.iaIr;Ila,,I iork shall be offered, dis-
tributed as foll',i': i 3:ugii:il, units; Mathematics, 3
units; Foreign Language, 3 liii; Science, 1/2 units;
iHist-ory, 21 units; Vocational Training, 3 units. Total
16 units.
In high school work, a unit is a subject pursued for
five i,,v;:: Ive minute or fifty minute periods per week
throughout the entire school year.
Reqziremients for B. S. Derfee in terms of Units or School Hours
For gradduatlion from the College course seventy-two
units of work are require;l.
(See description .t cirsw.:sl ..Serv-ilty-two units in-
s!lead of the usual itrv fiir ;iL I;'l qui[i-dl because the
school hour is only fifty minutes -long.
A unit, or school hour, is a fifty-minute recitation
period or a hlinlr:1pi minute laboratory period. Eighteen
such periods per week during two semesters constitute a
full year's work.
Retirements for Admission to the High School.
For admission to the High School, applicants must
furnish evidence of having satisfactorily completed the
work of the eighth grade. For advance standing in the
High School, applicants must furnish additional evi-
dence either by examination or by credits from accredited
schools, guaranteeing such standing.





34 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Conditions for Admission to the College
For admission to the College, the applicant must be at least
fifteen years old, of sound health and of good reputation and must
also be able to enter the High School. (See requirements for
admission to High School on page 33.)
To provide for those of admission age whose academic training
has been irregular, a special class will be organized to fit them for
admission to the High School. Permission to enter this class must
be secured from the President of the College.
OUTLINE OF COURSES
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
English I ............. 5 English I .............. 5
Aleba I .......... 5 Algebra I .............. 5
Physical Geography ...... 5 Physical Geography __.__-___.5
Vocational Training and Vocational Training and
Drawing .......... 5 Drawing ............. 5
SECOND YEAR
English II ............. English II .............. 5
Algebra II ............. 5 Algebra II ............. 5
Latin I, or English Hist... 5 Latin I, or English Hist. .. 5
Vocational Training and Vocational Training and
Drawing ............. 5 Drawing ............. 5
THIRD YEAR
Geometry I ............ 5 Geometry II ............ 5
Latin II, or Agriculture I.. 5 Latin II, or Horticulture II. 5
English III .. ...... 5 English III ............. 5
Vocational Training and Vocational Training and
Drawing ............. 5 Drawing ............. 5





OUTLINE OF COURSES 35
FOURTH YEARi
COURSE A, SCIENCE.
Physics I ............... F Physics I ............... 5
Botany I, or Biology I..... 5 Botany I, or Biology I..... 5
Latin III ............... Latin III ............... 5
U. S. history and Civics.. 5 U. S. History and Civics.. 5
COURSE B, FEDAGOGY
Physics I .............. 5 Physics I .............. 5
Rhetoric. ............ 5 Pedagogy I ............ 5
Agronomy I ............ 5 Arithmetic .............. 5
U. S. History and Civics... 5 U.. S. history and Civics... 5
NORMAL SCHOOL
JUNIOR CLASS
Pedagogy II ............ 3 Pedagogy III ........... 3
Chemistry I ............ 5 Chemistry I ............ 5
English IV ............. 5 English IV ............. 5
Geo. Review .. ............ 5 Economics I ........... 5
SENIOR CLAS.%S
Pedagogy IV ........... 5 Pedagogy V ............5
English V .............. 3 Ethics I ............... 5
Agricultural Pedagogy ... 5 English V .............. 3
Freehand Drawing .---- --. 2 Freehand Drawing---------- 2
Manual Training ---.-------. 3 Manual Training ---------.--_ 3
COLLEGE
COURSE LEADING TO B. S.
FRESHMAN
Chemistry I ........... 5 Chemistry I ............ 5
Triponometry ........... Surveying ............ 5
Spanish I ._-_------------_ 5 Spanish IT .._h.---... -.____- 5
English VI ........... 3 English VI ............. 3





36 THE FLORIDA' AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SOPHOMORE
Chemistry II ........... 5 Chemistry II ............5
Analytic Geometry ....... 5 Analytic Geometry .......5
English VII ............ 3 English VIII .......... 3
Spanish III -.... .... 5 Spanish IV --- -----. -5
JUNIOR
Chemistry III ........... Chemistry IV .......... 5
Physics II .............. 6 Physics II .............. 5
Psychology ............. 5 Ethics II .............. 5
English VIII .... ........ 1 English VIII ............ 1
Astronomy or Calculus --_ 3 Astronomy or Calculus---.3 3
SENIOR
Philosophy --- -. 5 Sociology .--- ..... 5
Economics II .......... 5 Modern History.-- ... 5
Biology II ............ 5 Biology III ............. 5
Geology ............. 3 Geology ............... 3
Mechanic Arts Group
FRESHMAN
Algebra II .---..--- 5 Algebra II .1---- ... 5
English VI ..----------- 2 English VI 2
Chemistry 1 .-. 5 Chemistry I .. .-.. 65
History of Civilization I History of Architecture ---.
Descriptive Geometry ----. 2 Descriptive Geometry ----3
Carpentry ----... 2 Carpenttry ---.----.---.-..5-
SOPHOMORE
Trigonometry ---------- 5 Trigonometry & Surveying_ 5
English VII .-- ------- 3 English VII- .... 5
History of Architecture .-- 1
Perspective .....- ------ 2 History of Architecture.. 3
Shades & Shadows -. __ 2 Architectural Drawing .. 2
Graphic Statics ---.---- 2 Wood Turning .--- 5
Carpentry --. ._.-..... -- 2
JUNIOR.
Geometry III.............. 5 Geometry III ............. 5
Physics III ............... 5 Physics II ............... 5
Economics ............. 3 Blacksmithing ............ 3





OUTLINE OF COURSES 37
Masonry ................. 3 Ethics ................... 3
Architectural Design...... 3 Architectural Design..... 3
SENIOR.
Calculus .................. 5 Calculus ................. 5
Heating & Ventilation.... 2 Sanitary Engineering...... 1
Specifications & Estimates. 2 Steel Construction......... 2
Strength of Materials.... 2 Thesis .................... 7
Business Law............. 2 Electri'c Wiring & Illumination 2
Architectural, Design ...... 3
Plumbing .... ....... 3
COURSE LEADING TO B. S. IN
AGRICULTURE
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
English VI ............. 2 Pin lish VI ............. 2
Chemistry I ............ i Chemistry I ............ 5
Trigonometry ........... 5 'rigonometry ...........
Botany II .............. 5 Botany 11 ............ i
SOPHOMORE
Chemistry II ........... 3 Chemistry II ........... 3
Agronomy II ........... 3 Agronomy II ........... 3
Citrus Fruits ........... 3 Citrus Fruits ........... 3
Geology ................ 3 Geology ................
Farm Machinery ........ 2 Farm Machinery ........ 2
English VII ............ 3 English VII ............ 3
JUNIOR
SpanisSpanishI IT Spani -- II ..--- 5
A agricultural Chemistry ... 3 Agricultural Chemistry .... 3
Dairying I ............. 3 Dairying I ............. 3
Animal Husbandry II .... o Animal Husbandry II .... 2
Economic Entomology .... 3 Economic Entomology .... 3
Olericulture ............ 3 Architectural Drawing or
Zoology II ........... 3





38 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SENIOR
Agricultural Pedagogy ... 3 Animal Husbandry III .... 3
Physics III ............. 5 Pnysics III .............. 5
Bacteriology ............ 3 Plant Pathology ......... 3
Genetics .......... 3 Rural Sociology or Educa-
Psychology II, or Eco tion II ............... 5
nomics .......... 5 Ethics II or Astronomy... 5
Course Leading to B. S. in Education
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
English VI --- -------- 2 English VI---. -----_ 5
Spanish I.-- --------.---- 5 Spanish II.__.-.-_5-----...- 5
Education I ------ .------ 6 Education II.. 5
Chemistry I------------- 5 Chemistry IIf-5- ._...... .... 5
SECOND YEAR
English VII ----------- 3 English VII .....------- 3
SpanishIII -..-- ----..--. 5 Spanish IV_---------.-------- 5
Education III _.---------- 5 Education V 5
Biology I----------- 3 Education VI 5
Education IV.......... 5 Biology II...----- 3
THIRD YEAR
Sociology----- ---.--.--- 3 Sociology-----_ ..----- 3
Education VII- -..----- 5 Education IX --- 5
Education VIII-------. 5 Education X---5_. .----- 5
Geology I .-------.. .---- 3 Geology I --.--.--.--- 3
FOURTH YEAR
Education XI ----- --.--.- 5 School Laws of the South 3
Education XII-------------- 5 Practice Teaching -.....-- 1
School Laws of the South._ 3 Music II -.....- .2.-- 2
Practice Teaching.-------- 1 Ethics -..-----_._.--. 5
Review in Psychology----- 5 The Art of Story Telling.-- 3





OUTLINE OF COURSES 39
HOME ECONOMICS GROUP LEADING TO B. S.
COURSE 1.
FRSESHIMVAN.
First Semester. Second Semester.
Chemistry I .............. 5 Chemistry I .............. 5
English VI ............... 2 English VI ............... 2
Botany II ................ 5 Botany II ................ 5
Spanish I ..---.----.__..__ 5 Spanish II___ _..___-- .-- 5
Home Economics I ....... 1 Home Economics ......... 1
SOPHOMORE.
Chemistry II ............. 5 Chemistry II ............. 5
Iome Economics I ....... 1 Home Economics I ....... 1
Home Economics II ...... 2 Home Economics II ...... 2
Physiology II ............ 2 Physiology II ............ 2
Spanish III--..-.5---.---. 5 Spanish IV .--. ..- 5
Home Economics III ...... 1 Home Economics III ...... 1
English VII .............. 3 English VII .............. 3
JUNIOR.
Chemistry III ............ 5 Chemistry III ............ 5
Physics II ................ 5 Physics II ................ 5
English VIII ............. 1 English VIII ............. 1
Bacteriology ........... 3 Dieteticp- __-- -.--.-8
Household Administration Household Administration
(a) ..................... I (b) .................... 1
Home Economics IV .... 2 Home Economics IV (a) .. 2
Home Economics V ...... 2 Home Economics V ...... 2
Home Economics VI A... 1 Home Economics VI ..... 1
SENIOR.
Household Chemistry ..... 4 Household Chemistry ..... 4
Home Economics V ....... 4 Horne Economics V ....... 4
Household Administration Methods and Practice
(c) .................... 1 Teaching ............... 1
Home Economics VI (a) .. 4 Home Economics VI (a) .. 4
Home Economics VI (b) .. 2 Home Economics VI (c) .. 2





40 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLESG]
COURSE LEADING TO B. S.
IN HOME ECONOMICS
COURSE II.
FRESHMAN
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry I ............. 5 Chemistry .............. 5
Latin IV ............. 5 Algebra ................ 5
Algebra II ............. 5 Latin .................. 6
English IV ............. 2 English .... ........ 2
Plain Sewing ........... 2 Model Sewing .......... 2
Msecn. Drawing .......... 1 Mech. Drawing .......... 1
SOPHOMORE-
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry ............. 6 Chemistry............... 5
Latin ........... ..., 5 Latin .......... ....... 5
English. ................ 3
Art Needle Work ........ 2 Millinery .............. 2
JUNIORS
First Semester Second Semester
CGeometry III ........... 5 Geometry III ..........
Chemistry II ........... 5 Chemistry III ...........5
Art (Home Decorations and Art (Home Decorations and
Constructions )........ 2 Constructions ) .......
Dressmaking .......... 3 Dressmaking ...........3
English VIII .......... 1 'English VIII ...........
Cutting and Fitting;.. 2 Cutting and Fitting ...... 2
SENIOR
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry IV ........... 5 Chemistry IV .......... 5
FTistorv of Education ..... 5 History of Education.... 5
Practice Teaching ....... 4 Practice Teaching ...... 4
"est akng ............ 5 Dressmaking ............
Textiles. Costume Designing





OUTLINE OF COURSES 41
COURSES FOR TEACHERS
These courses aim to train teachers of domestic science
and domestic art. The number of schools in which
domestic art and science are being taught is rapidly in-
creasing, and the demand for well trained teachers of
these subjects is greater than ever before.
Qualifications for admission. Graduates from a four
vecar's high school course or its equivalent I.r l,,i;ti is required for admission to these courses.
HOME ECONOMICS GROUP
TEACHERS COURSE I.
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Psychology and Pedagogy. Psychology and Pedagogy.
Chemistry. Chemistry.
Physiology and Hygiene. Physiology and Hygiene.
Cookery. Cookery.
Physics. Physics.
Sewing. Sewing.
Household Administration. Care of Home (Serving and
Physical Training, Marketing.
Hand-work, Physical Training and Hand-
work.
SENIOR YEAR.
First Semester Second Sen:ester
History of Education. History of Education.
Methods. Methods.
Practice Teaching. Practice Teaching.
Homer and Social Economics. Home and Social Er-nomics.
Bacteriology. Bacteriology.
Fancy Cookery. Fancy Cookery.
Food Chemistfy. Food Chemistry.
Physical Training, Physical Training
Housekeeping. Housekeeping.
Handwork. School Gardening.
Laundering.
.. ,-





42 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECIIANICAL COLLEGE
TEACHERS COURSE II.
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Chemistry (Industrial). Chemistry (Industrial).
Psychology and Pedagogy. Psychology and Pedagogy.
English Composition. English Composition.
Mech. Drawing. Meca. Drawing.
Plain Sewing. Art Needle Work.
Model Sewing.
SENIOR YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
History of Education. I-Istory of Education.
Practice Teaching. Practice Teacning.
MilliMillinery. Millinery.
Cutting and Fitting Cutting and Fitting
Dressmaking. Dressmaking. -
COMMERCIAL INSTRUCTION
The College offers'courses in business to a limited num-
her of high school students, both boys and girls. It is
the purpose to :give training in the ordinary methods
of transacting business and to make records therefrom.
The work is so mapped out that the students may choose
between the two or four year courses. The entire work
includes tyvpewriting, stenography, bookkeeping and
their correlated subjects.
COURSES LEADING TO CERTIFICATE
IN COMMERCIAL INSTRUCTION
FIRST YEAR
English ................ 5 Spanish I.----------------..- 5
Commercial Arithmetic ... 5 Drawing (Boys )......... 2
Bookkeeping & Penmanship Domestic Science (Girls).. 2
or Typewriting & Stenog- Physical Training ....... 2
raphy ............... 5
For Pupils who elect a two-year's course:





OUTLINE OF COURSES 43
SECOND YEAR
English ................ 5 Select one:
Bookkeeping & Penmanship European History ..... 5
or Typewriting & Stenog- Algebra .............. 5
raphy ............... 5 Spanish II ._-.... _.5..._ __ 5
Local Industries () ..... 5 Vvood Work (Boys) ...... 2
Commercial Geography Domestic Art (Girls)..... 2
(/ ) ................ 5 .; .
THIRD YEAR
English ................ 5 Geometry or Business Al-
Commercial Law -----------.5 gebra .............. 5
Select two Physics ............... 5
History of Commerce (i) 5 Spanish III --.-_--_.__--- 5
Stenograph & Typewrit- Drawing ................ 2
ing ................. 5 Physical Training ....... 2
FOURTH YEAR
English ................ 5 U. S. History & Civics.... 5
Economics ............. 5 Chemistry ..............5
Select two: Spanish IV----------. .....- 5
Stenography & Typewrit- Drawing ............... 2
ing ................. 5 Physical Training ....... 2
NOTE--Studies requiring no previous class prepara-
tion such as drawing, cooking, sewing, shop and labora-
tory work, are to be counted as half time studies in
determining the necessary number of credits for gradua-
tion.
SHORT COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS
This course is established especially for those young
-men who wish to lay a foundation in the fundamentals
of a trade, and for those also who wish to spend a mini-
mum of time at the academic branches of study and a
maximum in the shops. It will be open to those men who
have had limited school advantages, and has been so
planned as to meet their requirements. After a student
completes this course, he is fitted to pursue more ad-
vanced work in the college if he so desires. A certificate
will be given to those finishing the short course.





44 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TWO YEAR COURSE
(TRADES)
FIRST YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Arithmetic (Req.) ....... 5 Arithmetic (Req.) ....... 5
English or Civics........ 5 English ................ 5
Drawing and Plan Read- Drawing (Req.) ......... 5
ing ................ 5 Manual Tr. (Metal).
manual Training (Wood).. 2 Hygiene (Req.) ......... 2
Shop Work (Req.).-
SECOND YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
History of English (Req.). 5 Geography (Req.) .......5
Algebra (Req.) ......... Algebra ................ 5
Drawing tceq.) ...,.... 5' Estimates .............. 2
Shon Work (Pratical) Shop Work (Practical).
(Req.).





ACADEMIC COURSES 45
Description of Courses
Chemistry
Chemistry I. (For Junior Normal Students and
Freshmen.) This is a one-year course. Its design is to
give the student a knowledge of the fundamental prin-
ciples underlying inorganic chemistry, and an acquaint-
ance with the more common elements, their compounds
and industrial application. (Three units of recitation
and two units of laboratory work).
Text Books-McPherson & Henderson's Elementary
Chemistry; Laboratory Manual accompanying the above.
Chemistry II. For Sophomores: This course
covers a period of one year. The first Semester is devoted
to a preliminary study of the reactions of metals and
acids in solution, and systematic work in blow-pipe analy-
sis. Tile second Semester is devoted to a systematic study
of metals and non-metals, metallic groups and their sepa-
ration. The work includes the practical analysis of sev-
eral important commercial products. (5 Units).
Text Books-McGregary's Qualitative Analysis; Al-
lyn's Applied Chemistry.
Chemistry III. (For College Juniors). Only
students who have completed Courses I. and II. or their
equivalents are permitted to pursue this course. The
work is intended to give the student the fundamental
principles of QuantitativeAnalysis. gravimetric and volu-
metric and a working knowledge of the methods used in'
Analytical Chemistry. ( Five Units). The work is con-
ducted by lectures.
Experiments references.
REFERENCE BOOKS Olsen's Quantitative Anaiysis;-
Olsen's Pure Foods.





46 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Chemistry IV. (For College Juniors). This course
covers a period of one year. It is intended to give the
student the fundamental principles underlying organic
compounds and laboratory practice in the analysis of a
few of the simple compounds. (Elective) Five units.
Text-To be selected. ,,
Biology I. (Zoology). A choice is offered between
Zoology and Botany in the fourth year of the High
School. This course covers a period of one year and
has for its purpose the development of fundamental prin-
ciples underlying animal life. The work is pursued as
follows: Study (1) Invertebrates.. (2) Vertebrates. (3)
Economic importance.
The type fnrm of the more important animals is
studied s.stiaitic;Il!l. Careful dissections and draw-
ings are made.. Class and laboratory work is supple-
mented with collateral reading on the types studied and
their economic importance. Five hours a week.
Text Book-Lindville and Kelly's Elementary Zoology;
Lindville and Kelly's Laborntory Guide.
Biology II. (For College Seniors). This course
covers a period of one-half year, and is intended to give
the student th, fuirlamentfl principles in the structure of
animals and their comparison with plants. Five Units.
Text Book-Conn's Practical Biology.
Biology III. Thiis course covers one half year and is
intended -) give the student--the general methods and spe-
cial technique used in Histology. The laboratory work
consists of the preparation and completion of slides of the
principal tissues of a lower vertebrate form and the study
with the microscope and drawings of the same. The lab-
oratory work is supplemented by conferences and refer-
ence work.
Text Book' Guyer', AIlirnal Ml1ierology. -





ACADEMIC COURSES 47
Physics I. Required of all students of the fourth year
High School class. This course is designed to give the
student a thorough knowledge of simpler physical
phenomena and ii<1,luhe-s a study of the fundamental laws
of the mechanics of solids and fluids, heat, sound, light,
magnetism and electricity.
Laboratory experiments performed by the student him-
self accompany this course and supplement the demon-
strations given by the instructor. Special stress is placed
upon mechanics and the solution of mathematical prob-
lems involving the laws of the several departments of the
subject. Textbook- First prtnlcir:l,;K of Physics, Car-
hart and Chute. Laboratory Guide, Carhart and Chute.
Physics II. This course will consist of a deeper
study of mechanics, thermodynamics and electricity than
can be given in Course I., and will be conducted by
means of lectures, laboratory and textbook work.
Textbook:-Carhart's College Physics.
(Required of all College Juniors.)
Astronomy. This course concerns itself primarily
will the 1, iti.-i;til.;-ll I .-l:.u-l1ctin 1I uece'^-prv to a clear
inmderstan-inL- if the Io lair -.vqtem. .-:-corrll'rie1 by tele-
scopic observations and ;a -t''lv of the rriric-i'.il constel-
lations of the sidereal system.'
Textbook:-Todd's New Astronomy.
(Required of all College Juniors.)
Geology. The materials of the earth, its structure,
processes at work on its -ir'r. .e and the history of its
plant and animal inhabitants. Supplemented by the study
of the geology of the vicinity of Tallahassee, and three
surveys: one of the phosphate mines near Live Oak, one of
Lake Jackson and its environs, one of the gulf regions
near St. Marks. One year. General Science Seniors and
Sophomore Agriculture.
Text :--El,-!..iul. of CTPl-;!I'-, Blackwelder and Burrows,





4E TilE i .:'i .L-. AGRICULTURAL AND MECTI.NTC.\'.L COLLEGC
MATHEMATICS ,
Algebra I. (First year High School). This course is
given throughout the year. It covers the following
topics: Addition, siil lral ti.in, Multiplication, Iivision,
F.,t-,. ih:'. Fractio, L.:tti'i ;ai'i Proportion, and Simul-
taneous Equations of the First Degree. Five hours
credit. Text:- Weh;s aild.i- art's New High School
Algebra.
Algebra II. (Second year iigh School). This course
is glen r!h..:'ll,.-ut tle ;':t; it ,-:''s the following
t.opies: ..s:jlii' l -ri .- :,-tii..n. s. uare Roots and
Radicals, ui,'li.l; l-- I.,i].! lti..il. S^ i.:Ii- of Quadratics,
The Binomial l'i, u:.-, \Valial.il. a.i Fumlnctions, Arith-
metical and i', ,ql.t:Iital i'lil- c:r;iO'i>, Permutations,
C,:,!!:l.,:alii, inJl thie Fa.l .ir lit--reui. Five hours
C'..t Text:- \\'Wlls .iI.l llart's lI 'l' High School
Algebra.
Geometry I. Plane Geometry. (Third year High
School). This course gives considerable attention to
original problems and to lli,, ;I[.piio.Jioel of the prin-
ciples of plane geometry in niIh- nI lti..m. The following
points are always held in view; the process of reasoning,
lhe separation of numerical relation, the development of
individual power. Five hours during first semester.
Text: Wet;. t\'cT el- .S;rl, Fri.c ;irl. l -'it, Georretry.
Cer.ietiy 11. .tl,! <,: .ttrryv. i(TIird year High
S-F h'.-.i i. Tlie nirl,:-'?e o!f tlis ccuir.se is to-, bring vividly
,lre-It the *:tiil:cvnirq lh nic.-lan oft' pl-iines. lines and
't:!e 'U. ,aI ;ce a n'l t, -itIe- s tI [,Ir N. ti. 'I through the
1tutily ot' I'i'l. Ir:-.yi1i'j' \. yiin,'er, ,:r .-;es by an ex-
haiustivf. a ri:.liltil:,i i tli:- l'ji-.- i.,;--i ii the mensu-
iation (1' tth' :irne. Te:t: WE'ti;uorltli 'niiith Plane and
;-olid Gf-omntrv.
Trigonometry. (Required of all Fir ,hmluti. This is
a course in Plane and Sphereical Tril.,,n.i-mett- ;,ind sur-
veying. It-embraces a study of right and obli.eie plane





ACADEMIC COURSES 49
and spherical triangles and the theory of the construction
and use of tables of natural values of trivouimletrie func-
tions. Credit, five hours. Text Book :-Trigonometry
(Complete tables), Kenyon and Ingold.
Text in Surveying. To be selected.
Analytic Geometry and College Algebra. (Required
of all Sophomores). This course embraces a study of
Ithe straight line, circle, and conic sections. Credit, five
hours. Text Book:-Analytic Geometry and Principles
of Algebra.-Zuet and Hopkins.
ENGLISH
English I. Required of all students of the first year
in the High School. Five recitations per week through
out the year.
-It is the aim of this course to give the student the
essential steps in composition building and develop ease
and spontaneity of expression. Toward this end two
days in each week will be given to the study of com
position, and for material in composition building the
student will draw largely from the great wealth of
stories both mythological and le ellnary that form the
source from which great writers have drawn their
inli.iratirim.
I',.r I.erlonal and ii ltoriciIl sketches the student will
r,-il OhIll Te-.ta ileit narratives, Franklin's "Autobiog-
raphy" and Ivanhoe.
The main .stress in composition writing will be laid
on unity .and sequence of thought, paragraphing, punc-
tuation arnll spelling.
Summary of the Year's Work
Illiad, Pope's Translatioil weeks; Idylls of the King,
4 weeks .4 ieiit .lafitirr, 2 weeks; Bible Literature,
4 weeks; A ittobingralphy.i 4 weeks; Exposition, 3 weeks;
Ivanhoe, 9 weeks. Text: Brooks' English Composition.





So THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
English II. Required of all students in the second
year of the high school. Five recitations per week
throughout the year.
As an aid to the correct appreciation of the advanced
classics taken up in this course, the first ten weeks of the
school year will be spent in an intensive study and appli-
cation of rhetorical principles and effective diction.
The student will be introduced to the drama through
reading one of Shakespeare's plays, and to the essay in
simple form through the medium of the Decoverley Papers,
and in its most perfect style through Macauley.
The course will close with a character study of provin-
cial life in Silas Marner.
Summary of the Year's Work
Julius Caesar, 5 weeks; Pilgrim's Progress, 4 weeks;
Deco.erly Papers, 4 weeks; Addison, (Macaulay's Es-
say), 4 weeks; Silas Marner, 7 weeks.
Composition Text: Brooks' English Composition.
English III. Required of all students in the third
year of the high schlloil.- Five recitations per week for
one year. In this course a general survey of the
development of American Literature will he made through
a study of the works of the representative writers of each
period.
Macbeth and Burke's Speech on Conciliation will also
be read.
Summary of the Year's Work
American Literature 14 weeks; Burke's Speech on Con-
ciliation 10 weeks; Macbeth 8 weeks.
Text: Metcalf's American Literature.
English IV.-Rhetoric--This course aims primarily to famil-
iarize the tiiIleut 'with the fundamental prin.:ille of Rhetoric
an l C'ritiei-i. and to promote clearness and correctness of
-exsprie-l.!l t!!'i.iugh practice in the simpler kinds of compositions.
Five hours-First semester.





ACADEMIC COURSES 5r
English V. (Required of all Junior Normal Stu-
dents). This is a thorough review of English Grammar
with special emphasis upon sentence analysis and the
parts of speech. Three hours a week throughout the
year.
Text-book':-Allen's Review of English Grammar for
Secondary Schools.
English VI. (Required of all Senior Normal stu-
dents). This is a reading course in American Literature.
The year will be devoted to a careful study of the most
representative American authors with classroom lectures
in the History of American Literature. Three hours a
week throughout the year.
Text: American Literature and Reading, Pace.
English VII. Required of all Freshmen. The aim
of this course is to develop facility of expression. To
this end weekly themes will be required upon subjects
within range of the student's comprehension and experi-
ence. These themes will cover the four forms of compo-
sition, with special emphasis upon exposition. Two hours
throughout the year.
Text-Linn's The Essentials of En.lil;s h (frip.ns;l.
English VIEI. Oil-en to Sol:llioores. is a course in
alguumeuftaiou aud debate. Emphasis is placed upon the
principles of correct reasouirig. the collecting and weigh-
ing of evidence, the making of briefs and the construction
of the forensic. Each member of the class will be required
to draw up a brief, and write a forensic upon some
proposition of his own choosing. Three hours.
Textbook:-Baker- and Huntington's Piri;,ilh.'- of
Argu mentation.
English IX. Elective in the Senior College year. The
first semester will be devoted to a study of the great
prose writers of the Victorian age. During the second





52 THE FILORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
semester a study will be made of the poetry of the same
period. Credit, five hours. Texts to be selected.
LATIN.
The aim of the Latin Divsion, aside from the mental
training gained in translation and in the mastery of the
essentials of the language, is centered in the development
of a genuine appreciation for classic literature and in
the building of a wider and more expressive English
vocabulary. The courses -are made practical by frequent
lectures on Roman life and customs and the history of the
period, illustrated by a set of 100 slides with a stereopti-
con.
Latin I. This course is a study of the principles of
Latin grammar. In the reading lessons great importance
is attached at first to the literal rendering into English,
and then the students are required to employ the English
idiom which most clearly expresses the thought of the
Latin sentence. As far as possible in the first year, stu-
dents are made to compare English and Latin words
formed from the same root. Lectures are given through-
out the year to supplement the regular work.
Textbook:-D'Ooge's First Year Latin.
(For Second Year High School)
Latin II. Cicero classes are required to read at least
three orations, making a study of the history of the time
of Cicero's life. Drill in prose composition is given each
week. Lectures with the lantern are given during the
course.
Textbooks: Johnson and Kingery's Cicero; Allen and
Greenough's New Latin Grammar; Baker and Inglis'
Latin Composition. (For Third Year High School)





ACADEMIC COURSES 53
Latin III. Virgil. Classes read at least three books,
rendering into the best English possible. Considerable
attention is given to scansion and mythological references
are required to be explained throughout the course.
Illustrated lectures are given.
Textbook: Knapp's Virgil.
(Fourth Year High School, Science Course)
Latin IV. Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia.
First half year. Drill in sight reading is given here and
special attention to the discussion of Roman philosophy.
Textbook:-(a) F. G. Moore's De Scnectule and (b)
To be selected.
Latin V. Odes and Epodes of Horace. Second half-
year. In this course special study is made of the theory
of Latin prosody.
Textbook:-Bennett's Horace.
These courses are elective in the Freshman Year.
SPANISH
Aim. This Course is planned to give the student a working
Spanish vocabulary and such a knowledge of idioms, that he
will be able to read, write and converse upon general topics.
The direct method is used to create an interest in the language.
This is supplemented later with grammar and composition work
to combine the best features of these two modern language
methods.
Spanish I. Introduction to the Spanish pronunciation, building
a vocabulary foundation, use of verb forms in present and past
tense. (One semester).
TEXTS-"Worman's First and Second Spanish Books."





54 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Spanish II. .The more difficult idioms will be studied. Com-
position will be given twice and reading and conversation three
times per week. (One semester).
TEXTS-"Spanish Grammar," Fuentes & Franeois.
"Spanish Reader," Supple.
Spanish III. Stress will be placed upon the rapid reading ol
standard Spanish plays. (One semester).
TEXTS-Probably "Zaragueta" by Carrion.
"El Si de las Ninas" by MoraUin.
"El Capitan Veneno" by Alareon.
Spanish IV. The study of Cerevantes and his masterpiece.
(One semester).
TEXTS-"Don Quijote"-Cerevantes-selections.-
HISTORY
History I. (First year High School). This is a
course in Ancient History. It takes the student from the
earliest historical period to the invasion of the Roman em-
pire by the northern barbarians. The indebtedness of the
present to the past is made clear.
Particular attention is given the ancient republics.
The effect of the introduction of Christianity is espe-
cially noted. Short papers are required from time to
time. Text-book:-West's Ancient World..
History II. This course offers a comprehensive study
of the history of England and its literature.
Especial attention is given to the development of in-
stitutions such as Parliament, the church, local organs
of justice, the borough, the King's prerogative, and also
to hie growth of English literature which reflects the
social, political and religious condition of the country.
Written reports on both historical and literary sub-
jects will' be required from time to time. Text:-An-
drew's Short History of England.





ACADEMIC COURSES 55
History III. (Fourth year High School). This
course is a study of U. S. History and covers with civics
a period of one year. Papers are required consisting
mainly of biographies of the great men of the period
studied.
The work for the semester covers the Colonial and
Revolutionary periods, to the establishment of the re-
public.
In the second semester the period from the establish-
ment of the republic to the present time is covered. Espe-
cial attention is given to territorial expansion and de-
velopment. Five hours thruout-the year.
Text-American History Adams and Trent(The West
Historical Series)
History IV. European History. Required of all
Senior College Students during second semester.- An in-
troductory course in which the history of the nations of
Europe during the medieval and modern periods will be
dealt with in as broad and comprehensive manner as is
consistent with thoroughness of knowledge and definite-
ness of outline.
Text Book:-Robinson's History of TWestern Europe.
GEOGRAPHY
Physical Geography. The work in physical geography
covers one year. The aim is to give the pupils the facts
which determine the basis of human life. Observation
and study of the immediate environment is the first study,
showing how natural conditions determine the resources
and these in turn determine occupations of the people.
Text:-New Physical Geography-Dryer.





56 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
EDUCATION
HIGH SCHOOL
Education I. Introductory course in Psychology re-
quired of all students who elect special work in Peda-
gogy, in the fourth year High School. The purpose of
this course is to give the student insight into the princi-
pal psychological conceptions and methods. Five hours
second semester.
Text:-Human Behavior,-Colvin and Bagley.
NOIMAL SCHOOL
Education II. (Required of all Junior Normals).
This course aims to apply the laws of psychology, as
learned in Education I, to the general methods of study
and.of teaching. Emphasis will be placed upon general
principles and teaching. Credit,five hours first semester.
Text:-Charters' General Method.
Education III. Special Methods. This course will
endeavor to find out the best methods in teaching the sub-
jects of the intermediate and grammar grades in the com-
mon schools. The value of the given subject in a course,
our purpose in teaching it, what portion should be taught,
use of text-books, etc., all these and other kindred matters
receive consideration. The various subjects receive con-
sideration as tabulated below.
English: Topics for discussion. The teaching of litera-
ture from the standpoint of both material and method.
The study of certain typical motherpieces, suitable clas-
sics to read in each grade, composition teaching consid-
ered as to aim and method of presentation. Grammar,
its place in the course, order of treatment.





ACADEMIC COURSES '
History: The course of study in the elementary school,
aims and values of history teaching, the point of view in
teaching history, and supplementary reading material for
children.
Geography: The scope and purpose of Geography,
point of view and method of presentation, relation of
geography to other subjects in curriculum, and equipment
for geography teaching.
Arithmetic: Arrangement of the material, use of men-
tal and oral arithmetic, and certain great principles in
teaching arithmetic.
Five credit hours second semester.
'Required in Junior Normal year
Education IV. School Management. The purpose
of this course is to furnish the prospective elementary
grade teacher with a fairly complete compendium of pre-
cepts for actual school management and to interpret such
precepts in the light of accepted principles of teaching.
Such subjects as the daily program, regularity of attend-
ance, school hygiene, order and discipline. The technique
of class-instruction, grading and examination. The teach-
er's relation to patrons, school-equipment and environ-
ment will receive consideration. Five hours. First
semester. -
Education V. History of Education. The study of
the leading educational reformers will be emphasized in
this course. The relation of these men to educational
movements will, to be sure, receive ample consideration;
but a thorough study of a few men, rather than an attempt
to cover the whole field of the history of education, will
be the aim. Each student will select, early in the course,
some one educational reformer for special study.
Five credit hours Second semester.
I





58 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Education VI Science of Education. This course
will attempt to give the students scientific grounds for
the art of teaching as determined by psychology, to show
that the science of education is founded in all the science
of man, and to show the relation between the educational
and national ideals. The place of the emotions. The will
and the religious aim of all education, will hold an impor-
tant part in the discussion. Five hours.
Education VII. Advanced Educational Psychology.
This study is a continuation of Education II and studies
the nature and needs of the adolescent. Five hours.
First semester.
Education V I II. Systems and Problems of Secondary
Education. This course will involve investigation and dis-
cussion of the chief problems in secondary schools in
America today. Some time will be given to 'the study of
the secondary school systems of Germany and France.
Five hours First Semester.
Education IX. Organization and Administration.
A study of maintenance, administration, direction and
supervision of schools. Five hours. Second semester.
Education X. Philosophy of Education. This
course will deal with certain biological, physiological, so-
cialogical, psychological, and philosophical facts bearing
on the educational problem. Five hours. First semester.
Education XI. Rural School Problem. This course
will deal with the rural school problem in all of its phases.
Five hours. First semester.
Music I. Notation and sight-singing. The work of
this course is required of all students for B. S. degree.
It aims to prepare students to teach vocal music in public
ri





ACADEMIC COURSES 59
schools. It includes a study of clefs, scales, signature,
and rhythm, sngiing of rote songs. Students will be en-
couraged to play a musical instrument and sing in the
choir or musical union of the college. Two hours. First
semester.
--;.il.ll1 Laws of the South. This course will offer a
study of some of the school laws of the South. Emphasis
will be placed on the school laws of Florida.
Education XE1L Selections in English. Transla-
tions from Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Ethics and
Politics.
Education XSIl The Art of Siory Telling. This course will
attempt to give the student the best methods of telling
stories to children of primary and elementary grades.
Required of Senior Normals.
SOCIOLOGY.
Principles of Scciogy.-This course aims at a systematic study
of the underlying principles of social science. The general plan
followed is to begin with personal relations in their simplest
and most direct form, proceeding thence to the more complex
forms of association. Historical references are freely used, but
the main purpose is a rational interpretation of existing society.
Five hours-Second semester.
H.ISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY
An introductory to philosophy through the study of its history.
The problems of philosophy are studied in their origin. The aim
is to familiarize the student with the fundamental problems and
categories of philosophy, and to prepare him to face present-day
problems in the light of the history of philanthropic thought.
Five hours-First semester.





60 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
PSYCHOLOGY.
Psychology II. In this course a more critical study
of consciousness is based upon Angell's Psychology. This
course is open to Juniors. Credit, five hours.
ETHICS.
Ethics I. This course is a practical discussion of
rights and duties as brought out in personal relations
with the view to giving the student correct ethical con-
cepts as rules of conduct. Required in Senior Normal
year. Credit. five hours during Second Semester.
Textbook:-Gulick's Mind and Work and Efficient Life,
Ethics II. In this course there is a more detailed dis-
cussion of ethical theories as set forth in Durant
Drake's Problems in Conduct. Junior College, Second
Semester. Credit, five hours.
ECONOMICS.
Economics I. This course opens an elementary dis-
cussion of man's effort at making a living, based upon
Carver's Rural Economics.
Junior Normal, Second semester. Credit, five hours.
Economics XI. This is a more advanced course in
the study of economic theory with stress upon the distri-
bution of wealth.
Textbook:-Ely's Outlines of Economics.
Credit, five hours.
CIVICS
This course is offered in connection with United
States History in the fourth year of the High School.
It has as its purpose training in good and intelligent





ACADEMIC COURSES 61
citizenship. It not only embraces a study of the forms
of government known to us, but also a review of the
leading facts In the history of this government.
Text:-Sanford's Civics, Florida Edition.
MUSIC.
The College offers to its pupils a five-year course In
systematic piano-forte work by which the students are
to be graded and promoted. This course is so planned as
to enable the student to play good music well, and, with
the addition of the elements of harmony, to be able to
enter a conservatory after having completed the work
here laid down. At the completion of this course certifi-
cates of proficiency will be given.
The students in music are required to attend the re-
citals, of which one is held each month. These exercises
are of two-fold value; namely, giving pupils practice in
playing before others, and granting them the rare oppor-
tunity of listening to well prepared music from the best
composers.
Students taking music must practice at leas one hour
each day.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two
dollars and twenty-five ($2.25) for eight lessons, twenty
minutes each.
This fee also includes the use of the music end instru-
ment for practice.
First Grade.
TECHNICS: Major scales in one and two octaves, hands
separate. Tonic triads in close position.
STUDIES: Landon's Foundation Studies; Matthew's
Graded Studies, Book I; National Graded Studies;





62 1THE LORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Emery'sFounldation Studies; Iehler, op. 162 ari 190;
easy compositions of Behr, Gurlitt, Brumeur, Lichner, etc.
Second Grade.
TECHNICS: Major scales in three octaves, harmonic
minor scales in one and two octaves, hands separate.
Broken major and minor triads.
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II.
Spindler, op. 273, Books I and II; Loeschorn, op.
66, Books I and II; Gurlitt, op. 82, Books I and II;
Spindler, op. 44; selection from Merkel, Lange, Schumann,
Clementi, Lachner, Ritter and others.
Third Grade.
TECHNICS: Major and melodic minor scales in six and
five-note rhythms. Studies in broken triads (continued).
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book I I
Burgmuller, op. 100, Books I and II, Koehler, op.
157.
PIECES: Selection from Kullah, op. 62; Gade, op. 36;
Mozart, No. I, Low; Lachner, op. 49; Emery, Spindler,
and others.
.u1. (4 Ab_.. : ... ..._......
- "..' Fourth Grade. ..""
TECHNICS Major and harmonic scales in four and
eight-note rhythms.
STUDIES: Matthew's Studies, Book IV; Koehler, op.
130, Heller, op. 47; Cz erney, op. 636 and 713.
PIECES: Willm, op. 12; Schytte, op. 69; Bohm, op. 327,
No. 2; Selections from Haydn, Kerchner, Wollen-
haupt, Heller, Scharwenlka, Sch nn, ann d Jack.
1I





ACADEMIC COURSES 6
Fifth Grade.
TECINICS: Scales in nine-note rhythms, scales in con-
trary motion.
STUDIES: Heller, op. 46; Cznerney, op. 7 8; Bach,
Twelve Little Preludes. Kullak School of Octave Play-
ing.
PIECES: Mendelssohn's Song Without Words, Chami-
nade, Gard, Nevin, Schytte, Jensen.
VOCAL MUSIC.
The purpose of this course is to give the student an
elementary knowledge of sight singing.
The student is first allowed to sing by note, and is led
to observe differences in pitch, in tone, and relative dura-
tion of sounds made. This is followed by the use of sound
names and an accurate distinction of each. Daily drills
are given. After this has been accomplished a study of
various keys begins.
This course is given to members of the Grammar
School; High School and Senior School students are
allowed to join the Musical Union where they receive
special instruction in sight reading and in singing the
best standard musical works. The Solfeggio system is
used.





64 TIEE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Mechanic Arts Courses
In the courses in Mechanic Arts it is the aim to give
the students some knowledge of the fundamental princi-
ples of one or more of the lines of handwork as a basis
for more extensive information and a larger measure of
skilled labor which they may select as a means of liveli-
hood after leaving this institution.
Every student must take instruction in one of the in-
dustries unless excused by the President.
In assigning the young men to the various industries,
the President and the Director of the Mechanic Arts De-
partment use their discretion, but at the same time, the
student is allowed some degree of choice.
The time devoted to the industries varies from fiffy-five
minutes to two and a half hours per day, except in case
of those pursuing the special and short courses and
who work longer in the chosen division.
In all divisions some study is made of the sources from
which the materials used are obtained as well as their
composition and the processes of manufacture.
Whenever possible in the Mechanic Arts courses the
student makes his drawings and works from them or
works from blue prints furnished him.
A certificate will be given to those who finish any one
course offered in the Department of Mechanic Arts, and
the Bachelor of Science degree will be conferred upon
those who complete the course in the Mechanic Arts
group of college subjects.
MANUAL TRAINING.
This is a course in elementary wood and metal working
also broom making occupying one year.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 65
The problems of construction in wood and metal are
such as require the use of the knife, plane, saw, hammer,
chisel and the equipment of the blacksmith-shop in their
material solution, and are worked out by the students
from sketches when practical.
This course is given to the young men of the Sub High
School, the First Year High School, and to those taking
the teachers' course, and does not include those studying
agriculture. It precedes the work in the various indus-
tries the college has in operation.
The result is the preparation of the young men both
mentally and physically to carry on the trade work more
satisfactorily than if they had not had this preliminary
training, for they bring to the work at the trades correct
mechanical ideas and some skill, both of which are neces-
sary to a satisfactory completion of any of the industrial
courses.
DRAWING.
The work in Mechanical Drawing is designed to give
the student such knowledge of the subject as will enable
him to make correct working drawings for his own use in
the shop and to read the drawings and blue prints made
by others.
This course begins with simple geometrical problems
and working drawings which are made from freehand
sketches. The sketches are drawn and the measurements
taken from the object to be represented, by the students
themselves. Later in the course the student draws from
the sketches of others, and finally takes up the work of
designing.
As far as possible the class of objects from which the
student draws is determined by the industry at which
he works, for instance, the drawing of the young men





66 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECH-ANICAL COLLEGE
working at carpentry tends toward the planning of build-
ings, that of the young men working at wheelwrighting
is directed towards carriage drafting and designing.
PERSPECTIVE DRAWING.
The study of perspective drawing is required in order
that the student may secure for himself and also give to
others a correct notion as to the appearance of the struc-
ture he designs.
SHADES AND SHADOWS.
A working knowledge of shades and shadows is a pre-
requisite to the successful rendering of architectural corn-
position and is acquired by the student through the solv-
ing of numerous problems ranging from the shadow cast
by a straight line to the complicated shading of and
(II"'h ~shadows cast by the more elaborately ornamented archi-
tectural features.
itS' ELEMENTARY PLANNING.
This course presents the principles of planning resi-
dcncti, apartment buildings, school buildings, office and
other public buildings, and consists of lectures and a
number of drafting board problems.
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.
The object of this course is to familiarize the student
with good architectural detail. To that end he is re-
quired to draw and render the classical orders and other
examples of good detail.
Ali:





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 67
ARCHITECTUAL DESIGN.
This work includes a study of the principles of design
and a large amount of practice in their application to the
solution of practical problems.
HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE.
In this course the student is made familiar with
ancient, medieval, and modern styles of architecture, and
the influence of the older upon the newer styles is studied
by descriptions, diagrams and pictures of the best exam-
ples.
DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY.
The work in descriptive geometry includes the usual
study of the relations of points, lines, planes and solids,
the interse-.tilFn ,f -oliids and Ille d-el l-l'iiinnt of surfaces.
The solution iif ir..-tiil I-lroblems forms a part of the
course.
The following snie':-tq are taken in' their connection
with the studies of the- Mechanic Arts group:
GRAPHIC STATICS.
This subject embraces the method of determining
stresses in framed structures, arches and beams by graph-
ical means.
MASONRY.
This is a course in the principles and practice govern-
ing the erection of masonry structures, from the simple





68 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
brick pier to the most complicated groined arch. The
decorative phase of the work is also given consideration.
WOOD TURNING.
This is a shop course complementing the course in car-
pentry, and is designed to teach the use of wood turning
tools and assist in developing aesthetic feeling by con-
structing beautiful as well as useful forms in the work-
ing out of the problems given for solution.
ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE
This course is designed to acquaint those pursuing
the B. S. in Mechanic Arts with the first principles in
architecture and thus prepare them to comprehend the
more advanced orders.
CALCULUS.
In this course an elementary study of differentiation
and intergation is made, involving applications to limits,
the determination of areas, and maxima and minima.
STRENGTH OF THE MATERIALS.
A study of the properties of the materials used in the
construction of buildings is made in this course. The
correct sizes and shapes of wooden, cast iron, wrought
iron and steel members for required work are discussed,
and the strength of arches, stone and cement work is
considered.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 69
STEEL CONSTRUCTION.
The construction of steel frame buildings is studied in
this course. The shapes employed and the methods of
joining and bracing are brought to the student's atten-
tion.
HEATING AND VENTILATION.
In this course the physical laws underlying the gener-
ation of heat, its propagation and the movement of air
and renewing the atmosphere in public buildings and
private dwellings, the design and installation of systems
are taken up in a practical way.
SPECIFICATIONS AND ESTIMATES.
This is a course which considers the writing of the sev-
eral clauses of the specifications including the descrip-
tion of the methods to be pursued by the contractor in
performing his work and the designating of the materials
to be used.
BUSINESS LAW.
This course of lectures is to acquaint the student with
the laws governing contracts, real estate, negotiable paper
and the methods of transacting business.
SANITARY ENGINEERING.
This study covers the entire field of conservation of the
health of occupants of buildings and their environs. It





70 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
deals with the construction of plumbing fixtures, sizes
of wastes, vent and supply pipes and fittings, the sources
of the water supply, the disposal of sewage and the prop-
er installation of systems.
PLUMBING.
Running parallel with the course in sanitary engineer-
ing is a practical course in plumbing which aims to firm-
ly implant in the mind of the student the principles gov-
erning the correct design and installation of plumbing
fixtures.
ELECTRIC WIRING AND ILLUMINATION.
Considered in this course are the proper intensity of
lights, their distribution, the kind, size and location of
wires and electrical accessories. Some practice is given
in designing and wiring.
CARPENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING.
This course is intended to give the student some knowl-
edge of the principles underlying house and shop carpen-
try and a moderate amount of practice in applying these
principles to some of the representative problems with
which the workers at this trade are most frequently meet-
ing.
At the beginning of the study the problems set for the
student are designed to be such as will, through an appeal
to his school or home life interests, enlist his best efforts,
so that by the end of the year he will have achieved suffi-
cient success in his work to encourage him to continue
the work in this division.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 7S
The work just mentioned is also given to the first year
wheelwrights.
The second year is given to the study of and practice
in erecting simple frame buildings, beginning with fram-
ing and then taking up door and window frame construc-
tion, outside finishing, floor laying, inside finishing and
stairbuilding.
Following this, in the third year, the time is devoted
to cabinet making, the more simple pieces of house furni-
ture being selected for this phase of the work.
The fourth year's work is a study of the first principles
if the trades which, together with carpentry, are employ-
ed in the erection of buildings, and a brief consideration
of the work of the architect in their design and the
superintendence of their construction.
Arithmetic for Carpenters by Dale, used as a supple-
mentary text.
WHEELWRIGHTING.
The first year's wu-lrk in this industry is identical with
that of the same plii.i,:.'l tihe carpentry course.
During the succeeding years the students come into
contact more specifically with wheelwrighting and the
use of tools peculiar to the vehicle-making trade. This
accomplished through the making of spokes and felloes
and the subsequent building of wheels, sears, buggies and
carriages of various descriptions.
All the vehicles used by the College are built conjointly
by the young men of the wheelwrighting and blacksmith-
ing divisions.
BLACKSMITHING.
The course in blacksmithing is intended to cover the
field of general blacksmithing operations and gives some





TirHE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLIG]
instruction in the ironing of vehicles and shoeing of
horses.
At the beginning of the course, study is made of fire-
making and incidentally some attention is given to the
characteristics of coals, the construction of forges and
chimneys and the action of fans and bellows.
Thereafter the student is introduced to the more simple
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting,
punching, cutting off, and welding as used in the shaping
of staples, hooks, and collars and the making of chains.
The above-mentioned work occupies the time for the
first year. During the second year, the young blacksmith
co-operates with the wheelwright through the ironing of
the wooded parts of wheelbarrows, push carts, wagons,
buggies, surreys and phaetons.
Vehicle ironing is continued for a portion of the third
year course, while the remainder of the year is devoted
to the elements of horseshoeing.
Advanced horeshoeing and general repairing consti-
tute the work of the fourth year.
Supplementary text: Forge Practice, Bacon.
PAINTING.
The division of painting affords an excellent oppor-
tunity to those desiring to become acquainted with the
more important phases of the painter's trade.
A study is made of the painter's brushes and other
tools; the source and manufacture of pigments, oils,
driers, varnishes, stains and the mixing of paints. Colors
t.nd laws of harmony and contrast are given consideration
and practically applied in the painting of vehicles and
the interiors and exteriors of buildings.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES 73
Glazing, including cutting, frosting, staining and em-
bossing glass, and sign writing are also taught.
Texts: House Painting, Sabin; Carriage Painting
To be selected.
PRINTING.
The college printer is equipped with two Chandler
and Price Gordon job presses, a two-revolution Campbell
cylinder press and enough printing materials to give the
typographer quite satisfactory notions as to the opera-
tion of a first-class job office.
The course of study and practice includes, in the first
year, the learning of the cases, simple composition, the
names, care and use of the more common type faces and
printer's materials. During the following year at on-
tion is given to the job work (in colors, fancy and plain),
primary stock cutting and estimating. Imposition, job
composition, estimating, and stock cutting are studied
the third year.
The student in this divi-i,:ln has the opportunity of
doing quite a variety of work, since the College printing
done during the eight month's session is the work of the
young men of this division.
Text; Progressive Exercises in Typo4aphy--Loomis,
TAILORING.
This division of the College's work is designed to give
the students such knowledge of the tailor's trade as will
enable them, with a little experience in a merchantile
shop, to hBcome cnmnptent journeyman.
Instruction is given in the making of pockets and other
details before the construction of finished garments is





74 TIHE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
undertaken. Trousers, vests, and coats are taken up in
the order of their difficulty and a study made of shop
economy in cutting. Cleaning and repairing are also
given due attention, since this class of work constitutes
a large part of that done in every tailor shop.
The John J. Mitchell Standard of Drafting is used.
ENGINEERING.
The course in engineering is designed to give a prac-
tical and theoretical basis upon which to build along any
of the following branches of engineering work: Electrical
engineering, plumbing, heating and ventilating, gas pip-
ing and gas fixture installation, machine installation and
machine shop practice.
The College places at the disposal of this division all
of the mechanical, metal and electrical equipment with
which it is fitted, for teaching purposes.
255 electric and 71 gas lights are used to light campus
and buildings. A system of clock-operated, alternating
current electric bells connect ten buildings. About 18,456
feet of electric lines connect these buildings for light,
power and signalling.
About 1,623 feet of under ground pipes conduct water
and gas for use over the campus. Four of these buildings
are heated with steam by individual plants and some of
them have modern plumbing fixtures installed and are
fitted with sanitary drainage.
Seven electric motors are in use ranging in power from
1/ H. P. to 5 H. P. (Single phase alternating current
machines) with one 8 H. P. gasoline engine.
On this material students get a liberal amount of
practice in installation, operation and repair.





MECHANIC ARTS COURSES ?5
The course in machine shop work is laid out to cover
work on bench and vise with hammer, cold chisel, files,
wrenches, screw drivers, rules, scales, calipers and other
hand and machine tools used in construction and repair.
This leads beginners up to the more advanced work on
Drill-Press, and Shaper, power saw, lathe and planer.
Outside repair and installation work in all the above
named branches is quartered in the shop, where daily
instrutcion is given in theory and practice and one hour
each week is given to lectures on work in hand and the
mechanical and physical principle underlying same.
BUSINESS INSTRUCTION.
Bookkeeping: The work in bookkeeping is intended
to give the student a knowledge of the ordinary methods
of transacting business and of making business records.
This course is Jopen only to students of the Third Year
High School and to those ifrlase.a above.
Shorthand: During the first year the principles of
shorthand, transcribing of notes and writing from dicta-
tion are taught.
In the second year, special attention will be given to
dictation work, reading of notes and acquiring speed. In
addition the student will have practice in reporting. The
system of shorthand used is the Benn Pitman.
Typewriting: In typewriting, information about the
care of the machines will be given. Correct fingering,
letter writing, copying, writing from dictation and tabu-
lating will be taught. Special attention will be given
to acquiring speed.





76 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGIE
Home Economics Department
The work done in the Department of Home Economics
is designed to give a girl high ideals and right standards,
to stimulate her towards the development of the highest
type of womanhood of which she is capable.
Every woman who expects to become the head of a
household should prepare herself with the knowledge
which will enable her to meet the many problems which
confront every housewife. So also should the girl who
intends to be a teacher of other girls be trained in the
science of-home making. The girl who can make excel-
lent bread, and knows the comparative value of different
kinds of food, who knows the good cuts of meat and how
to prepare and make nutritious and appetizing the tough-
er and cheaper cuts, and the cost of each, who under-
stands sanitation, and furnishing ,and the decoration of
the house, and the making of her own dresses and hats;
finds herself in a position to meet more readily and easily
her daily problems.
The young women of the Sub-High, and First and Sec-
ond Year High School must take elementary sewing, cook-
ing and housekeeping. The third and fourth I-gh School,
Junior and Senior Normal take dressmaking, millinery,
advanced cooking and business training.
HOME ECONOMICS II. ELEMENTARY AND MODEL
SEWING.
The aim of this course is to teach the fundamental prin-
ciples involved in hand-sewing, to make a set of models
involving the various steps in sewing which may be used
as illustrative material in teaching, to develop and to give
the students correct methods and appreciation for the
work.
A part of the time is devoted to practice in operating
the sewing machine. Upon completing this work satis-
factorily the student will be able to draft, cut, and make
,imple garments, also to use commercial patterns.





HOME ECONOMICS COURSES 77
HOME ECONOMICS III. HAND WORK.
This work includes the designing and making of simple
baskets in reed and raffia, and a study of the diagrams
and pictures of the best examples of baskets. Students
are also given instruction in crocheting, knitting and em-
broidering. This course is offered to those students
specializing in domestic science. One laboratory period
per week.
HOME ECONOMICS IV. MILLINERY.
Designing, making, trimming, and decorating fall and
spring hats, with a view of developing originality and
skill ,are the aim and purpose of this course. Stress is
placed upon the artistic side of the work by study of har-
mony, color, and line. The practical side is also taught
by emphasizing economy in the utilization of old materials
renovated.
HOME ECONOMICS VL.. (A) DRESS-MAKING.
The purpose of this course is to teach the art of dress-
making and the use of the Vienna Ladies Tailoring Sys-
tem by which patterns and designs are made, the design-
ing of ordinary garments, the use of lines, color, propor-
tion, adaptation of materials, to develop neatness, ac-
cuuracy, self-reliance, and high ideals in work. Com-
mercial patterns are also used. Lectures and class dis-
cussions are held on artistic and appropriate dress. Prac-
tice is given in variety by making dresses in the depart-
ment for teachers and students.
HOME ECONOMICS VI. (B) TEXTILES.
This course includes the history and development of
textiles, the study of fibers to processes of manufacture
and economic use of fabrics. A scientific study of the
composition and physical properties.





78 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANtCAL COLLEGE
HOME ECONOMICS VI. (C) COSTUME DESIGNS.
This course includes a study of the history of costumes,
proportion of the human figure and the application of the
principal of designing to gowns and hats,
A brief study is given to pinned paper models.
HOME ECONOMICS I. ELEMENTARY COOKERY.
Elementary cookery is especially designed to meet the
needs of those planning to become teachers of domestic
science. The training is given not only with the thought
of obtaining good results in laundering, housekeeping and
cookery, but also to think and work with the idea of teach-
ing the subject to others. Tests are made on foods to
learn the effect of heat and moisture upon them, and the
principles of cookery thus learned are applied in the cook-
ing of simple foods and combinations of foods. It is
planned to give a thorough understanding of the theory
and method involved in the cooking of the more funda-
mental foods, rather than to cover the entire field of cook-
ery. These processes are repeated until a fair degree of
skill is acquired in the- manipulation of utensils and ma-
terials. Four hours a week. The work includes:
I. Simple Carbohydrate Foods. Potatoes, cereals,
tapioca.
2. Seasonable vegetables. Tomatoes, spinach, root veg-
etables, egg plant, beans.
3. Preparation and'use of Dried Fruits and Vegetables.
Peaches, pears, apricots, prunes, beans, peas.
4. Study of Batters and Doughs. Popovers, griddle
cakes, muffins, cornbread, biscuits.
5. Fish. Fresh, canned, salt.
6. Selection and Cookery of meats and Poultry. Beef,
veal, mutton, lamb, pork, salt and smoked meats.
7. Eggs, Milk, Cheese. Combination of eggs, milk and
cheese.
8. Puddings. Custard and those with custard basis,
gelatine, batter.
. ... .~~~~~~~~~~~~~





HOME ECONOMICS COURSES 79
9. Salads. Fruits, vegetables, meats.
10. Beverages. Tea, coffee, cocoa.
11. Frozen Deserts. Ices, sherberts, creams.
12. Serving Simple Meals. Planning, laying of table,
waiting and serving.
13. Canning in glass and tin. Methods, principles in-
volved, practical work 'in canning available fruits and
vegetables.
HOME ECONOMIIC3 V. ADVANCED COOKERY.
This course is a continuation of Elementary Cookery
and gives practice in several phases of cookery. The pro-
cesses carried out are more elaborate than in the junior
year. Self-reliance on the part of the student in the plan
and execution of her work is encouraged.
The work includes:
1. Food Preservation. Canning fruits, making pre-
serves, jelly, pickles, different methods of canning fruits
and vegetables.
2. F-,ol preparatiii,. Pri'l-larati-li o:f vee-etables, fruits,
meats, lii.tl, e'akes,..pa.trii.s. >;dl. hi,,t deserts, ices,
sherbet- I:r,-,.II. :..
3. Invxalh,:l -t .,,,kry. Giu. l[,, lI,''eirages, brot-,li, eggs,
breads, laying tray, etc.
4. Menu. Planned to meet physiological needs with
available foods, cost of foods and economy in labor.
5. Marketing. Selecting of foods, methods of purchase,
methods of accounts.
6. Table Service. Forms, individual work in the serv-
ing of meals.
7. Cooking and Serving of Meals. Dining room prac-
tice.
8. Large Quantity Cooking and Serving. Class work
in preparation and serving of banquets for large numbers.
9. Demonstration Cooking. The use of cookery to il-
lustrate the lecture on principles and processes and cook-
ery. Four hours per week.





8o TilE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
HOUSEHOLD ADMINIiSTRATION.
Household management gives chance to gather under
one head the numerous lines of instruction necessary to
administer a household. The aim of this course is to
show the relation of science, art, economics to the practi-
cal needs of the home. It is divided under three heads,
(a) Household Administration, (b) Household Adminis-
tration, (c) Household Administration.
tration.
HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTRATION (A).
Includes the following:
1. Household organization.
Necessity of system in the household.
Division of labor, daily and weekly schedule.
The house work, when, where and how it shall be done.
2. Household Expenditures.
Need of business management in the home.
Classification of expenditure, division of income.
Methods of purchase, keeping of accounts, paying bills.
Practical applications of the problems in the home.
1 hour a week for 1 semester. Text: Household Man-
agement by Terrill.
HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTRATION (B).
Includes:
1. House sanitation.
Woodwork: Construction and color, finished floors.
Location, site drainage water supply.
Heat, light, ventilation.
2. Selection of Furniture and Decoration.
Wall coverings: Plaster, oil paints, paper, cloth.
Hangings: Window curtains, portiers.
Experiments are tried with hanging in a model room.
Floor coverings: Rugs, carpets, matting, linoleum.
Furniture: Cost, construction and designs, stocks of





HOME IeCONOMICS COURSES 81
furniture are studied in shops, arrangement of furniture
applied in model rooms.
Pictures and picture hanging, bric-a-brac. 1 hour per
week.
1. Semester. Text: The House by Isabel Brevier.
HOUSEHOLD ADMINISTRATION (C).
1. Marketing.
2. Study of improved labor saving devices. Fireless
cookers, washing machines, carpet sweepers, vacuum
cleaners, etc.
3. Laundering. Hard and soft waters, and detergents.
Principles of washing and ironing.
Laundry equipment, order of work, methods of wash-
ing and ironing, home laundering.
Dietary Studies: It is the aim of this course to give the
student some idea of the fuel value of foods, food require-
ments, the construction of dietaries, as well as the pro-
cesses involved, in dietary calculationQ.
Credit-Two Laloira f6 rioij,:lds pr.r wee-k. One Sem-
ester Text Book, Ros'' La fi4;,-Alaual of Diete-
tics."
Physiology: This course is intended for students spec-
ializing in Domestic Science. It covers a period of one
Semester. The students are given work in the Digestion
of Food as applied to Domestic Science, and the various
functions of the different organs of the body. Laboratory
experiments performed by the students are a part of this
course.
Five credit hours-First Semester. Text book-Stiles'
"Nutritional Physiology."
Household Chemistry: This course covers a period of
one year and is given after one year of General Chemistry.
The purpose of this course is to give the students a knowl-
edge of the composition and food values of food materials,





82 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
adulterations in foods and simple methods for their de-.
tection, soap making and a study of the chemical pro-
cesses involved in Laundering. Lectures and supplement-
ary readings as well as Laboratory experiments form the
course. The course is open -to students specializing in
Domestic Science and to Senior Normal women.
Credit-5 units.
Text Book-"Blanchard's Household Chemistry La-
boratory Guide."
NURSE TRAINING.
The nurse training course has been rearranged into two
courses only. First. The home nursing course which
consists of the theory of nursing, which is confined to the
first and second year High School classes.
Second. The rgil.lr sanitorium course, which includes
the theory with practice in the wards and with the sick
in their homes. A lecture course by prominent physi-
cians, and the study of text books.
The sanitorium nurses wear a distinctive nurses uni-
form which consists of a plain blue gingham dress, cap
and apron which is furnished by the school.
Only six young women are taking the Special Course
this year, but this number will be increased to the limit,
which is ten. Young women who have finished the High
School course or its equivalent, will be given the prefer-
ence.
Applications to enter this department should be made
to the President of the Institution or direct to the Super-
intendent of the Sanatorium.
FIRST YEAR HIGH SCHOOL COURSE.
Definitions: Anatomy, physiology, hygiene, health,
diseases, nursing and nurse.
The Nurse: Duties, qualifications, responsibilities,
and relation to patient,





SOME ECONOMICS COURSES 83
Study of Human Skeleton: Boncs of the head,
bones of extremities, bones of trunk.
Joints: Kind and location.
Physiology: Muscles, cavities and contents, organs
and their function.
Study of: Pulse, temperature, respiration and use of
clinical thermometer.
General Hygiene: Foods, purity of, contamination
of milk, meats and vegetables.
Sanitation: Disposal of excreta and garbage, soil.
Personal Hygiene.
SECOND YEAR HIGH SCHOOL COURSE.
Lessons on the Skin.
Lessons on Bathing: Kinds of baths, preparation,
administration anlll crio. of hl, 11..
Bacteris: Kinl -.f '- leria a, tlheir-relation to health
and disease; how they multiply; how to destroy them;
how disease germs enter the body; how to resist disease;
disinfectants, anticeptics, and sterilization.
Lessons on Bandages: Material used for, kinds of,
use of, how to make and how to apply.
Apothecarie's Weight and Measures: Abbrevia-
tions and symbols. Prescription reading and writing.
Medicines and Their Administration: Classifi-
cation, physiological action, doses of common drugs, com-
mon poisons and antidotes.
Emergencies: What to do in case of fainting, hem-
orrhages, vomiting, fractures, nose bleed, wounds, drown-
ing foreign bodies in eye and ear.





84 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
THE AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
It is the aim of the College Department of Agriculture
to introduce the science underlying Agriculture, and
make it so interesting and vital to the student's daily
life, as to better win his or her respect for the farm and
country life generally.
The College farm and campus consisting of 250 acres,
is well stocked and provided with improved implements
and tools necessary to carry on the various lines of agri-
cultural and horticultural work involved.
The different courses are arranged in such a way as to
give nearly every class in the Normal Department, as
well as the College Department, some agricultural train-
ing, in order to inmpess it.- importance upon the students,
and also to produce young farmers and teachers of Agri-
culture, possessing a clearer and more interesting under-
standing of the Soil and its products. The regular de-
gree course in Agriculture follows.
BOTANY.
Botany I. The aim of this course is to lay a founda-
tion for the Economic and Agricultural courses that fol-
low, and to give the students a general elementary scien-
tific knowledge of the growth and development of Plant
life. One Year.-Fourth Year High School.
Text:-Coulter's Plant Uses.
Botany II. This subject takes up the structure, and
development of seed plants, their form, classification, and
evolution. The economic phase of the subject is stressed.
Freshmen, One Year. Text;-Bessey's Essentials of
College Botany.





AGRICULTURAL COURSI .... 8
r:--"i. -. GENETICS
A study of Heredity and Environment and their appli-
cations to the breeding of plants and animals.
Prerequisites Botany II, or Biology I. The green-
houses for propagation, will constitute part of the labo-
ratory equipment for this course. Seniors-First
Semester.
Text:-Coulter's Fundamentals of Plant Breeding.
"~'" ';^:" BACTERIOLOGY
Methods of artificial growing of bacteria. The study
of their development in diseases of plants and in milk;
their relation to the conservation of soil fertility.
Text:-Frost and McCampbells General Bacteriology.
,. PLANT PATHOLOGY
This course is d-leitnp ari!? to c.ounect the work
of Horticulture. A i:. li:ill inTms-anil Bacteriology,
all of which are prerequisites. Special attention will be
given to local fungus diseases of plants and to follow-
ing the government investigations of Citrus Canker.
References:-Duggar, Fungus Diseases of Plants;
Smith, Bacteria in Relation to Plant Diseases.
AGRICULTURE.
Agriculture I. The beginning subject in Agriculture
for students inThird year High School,-involving the
origin of soils, their management for various crops; live-
stock upon the farm; improving the appearance and gen-
eral value of the farm as a home. First Semester. Text:
Ferguson's Elementary Principles of Agriculture.





86 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Agriculture II. An elective course in Farm Prac-
tice, usinz the College farm and equipment as a labo-
atrory. One semester or one year, hours arranged.
Text:- Bartow's Soils and Crops.
HORTICULTURE.
Horticulture I. School Gardening. A specially
designed course to train young women how to conduct
small school gardens in connection with the State Public
Schools. The class room work consists of general garden
rules and nature study topics, as prove most interesting.
The Laboratory exercises involve the making, planting
and cultivation of individual flower and vegetable gar-
dens. One year. First year High School Girls.
Supplementary Text:-Hemenway's Hints and Helps
for Young Gardeners.
Horticulture II. Fruit Growing. A study of fruit
culture generally, nursery practice, diseases and injurious
insects treated, etc. Laboratory practice given in College
Community, Third Year High School, Second Semes-
ter. Text:-Maynardl's Swcccs.ftl Fruit Growing.
Horticulture III. The fundamentals of Citrus Fruit
Culture, the operations of propagation, tillage, the com-
bating of insects and diseases, and the handling and
marketing of various citrus crops. Sophomores-One year.
Text:-Humes' Citrus Fruits and Their Culture.
Horticulture IV. Practical Landscape Garden-
ing. Plant propagation, greenhouse management, the
improvement and planting of home and school grounds,
estates, etc. Care of lawns, walks, tree surgery, hedges,
flower beds, etc. Elective. Hours as may be arranged.
One year.
Orileculture. Practical Vegetable Garden-
ing. The culture of truck crops for local markets or for





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 87
shipping, and the theory and practice underlying such
work, taken up in order. Practice in the College Truck
Garden, one year. For Juniors, First semester. Elec-
tive for High School students, and hours as may be
arranged. One year.
Text: -Rolfs' Sub-tropical Vegetabls Gardening.
Economic Entomology. Discussion of the more
important injurious and beneficial insects on crops.
Methods of combating undesirable pests.
Laboratory exercises in field and gardens. First
Semester. -Juniors
Text:-Weed's Farm Friends and Farm Foes.
AGRONOMY
Agronomy I. Effects of heat, light, moisture on the
plant; planting; culture; pruning; propagating; lawn-
making; plant-breeding; evolution and the origin of
domestic races of plants. Practicums frequent. One
Year. Fourth 3 ear H-ig-i^Sjl1i.l
Text:-Clute's .\A ,-n,:,m-a. .IIr_
Agronomy II. Soils and Farm Management. A
study of water, atmosphere, and sunshine and their rela-
tion to soils the texture, nature and functions of soil;
capillarity, soil contents, drainage, physical effects of till-
age and fertilizer, etc. Laboratory experiments per-
formed. The selection of the farm, its equipment, farm
layout, fencing into plots, successful types of farming
throughout the world; farm accounts and their relation
to successful farming. One year, Sophomores.
Text:-Boss' Farm Management.
Reference Text:-Wilcox, Tropical Agriculture.
Agronomy III. Farm Machinery. The physics of farm
implements, improved machinery and power. Correct
operation of all available farm machines, etc. Farm roads,





88 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
drainage, irrigation, sanitation, correct culture, etc. So-
phomores, one year.
Text:-Davidson's Agricultural Engineering.
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY.
Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry. The study of
the general composition, properties and reactions of soils
and fertilizers, insecticides and fungicides, lead and
arsenic poisons, oils, etc. 1st semester.
Text:-And-rson's Inorganic Agr'l Chemistry.
Organic Agricultural Chemistry. The study of
the composition and Physiological processes of plants
and animals, foods and foodstuffs, alcohols, etc., 2nd
semester. Juniors and those admitted by special ar-
rangement.
Text:-Chamberlin's Organic Agricultural Chemistry.
Advanced Agricultural Analysis.
Special course for Seniors and those wishing to special-
ize in agricultural chemistry who have had the necessary
prerequisites.
Work based on the official methods adopted by the As-
sociation of American Agricultural Chemists, and the U.
S. Department of Agriculture.
Animal Husbandry I. Livestock Management.
The care of livestock generally, breeding, feeds and feed-
ing, methods of housing, necessary Veterinary practice,
etc. Elective. Hours as arranged. One year.
Animal Husbandry II. Principles of Breeding.
Lectures and recitations on breeds, the laws of heredity
and laws underlying the successful raising of fine ani-
mals; influence of various feeds in milk production, beef,
labor, etc., stock judging, animal parasites and dipping





AGRICULTURAL COURSES 89
vats. Ability to milk well required. One year. Juniors.
Text:-Harper's Animal Husbandry for Schools.
Animal Husbandry III. Poultry. Breeding and
feeding various breeds of poultry, sanitary house con-
struction, nests, egg production, pastures, prevention of
diseases and insects, markets, incubators, brooders. etc.
College Seniors, Second semester. Elective for High
School students, one year.
Dairying I. Lectures and recitations on methods of.
creaming, cream ripening, conditions of churning, acidity
of milk, milk inspection and sanitation, milk testing;
suitable practice in College dairy.
Juniors. One year.
Text:-Michel's Dairy Farming.
Dairying II. More extended practice in the general
care of a dairy, sepripatiuu o:f mill; butrv' making, milk
testing, eti. Sre. al--ep,.e iu w, iiii; .:I.ent. One
year. Elective--By a rm-lugn iI. ... .
Agricultural Education, A course of three lectures
or recitations per week, dealing with general and correct
methods of teaching particular subjects coming under
the head of agriculture. Laboratory exercises in Gardens
and Laboratories. First Semester. Senior Normals and
College Seniors.
Reference text:-Duggar's Agriculture for Southern
Schools. -. ... -..-.. -. .
Class text:--Pricker's Teaching Agriculture in the
High School.
Rural Sociology. A study of rural conditions and bet-
terment. The relation of society to the farmer. Research
work with Extension Bulletins, reports, etc. Lectures-
Second semester, Senior. .
\~*..|.





go THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CORRESPONDENCE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE.
The Department offers a seven months' study by corre-
spondence for teachers of the State and others who wish
it. The text book used is Duggar's Agriculture for South-
ern Schools-a book adopted by the State Superintendent
of Public Instruction, and used to prepare present and
prospective teachers for State examinations.
This course is free, with the exception of the cost of
text book and letter postage. Special questions answered
by mail.
SPECIAL SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURE.
This course will be opened to a limited number of
men who will be paid in cash, an amount more than ample
for their current school expenses for farm services. A
Night Class will be organized for them, so that they can
receive academic instruction along with their agricultural
training. Those desiring to take advantage of this
course should write to the President of the College or to
the Director of Agriculture for additional information.
ONE YEAR COURSE IN PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE
This course is designed to meet the needs of those who
can spend only a short time in school. The work is ar-
ranged so as to cover a full year of twelve months and to
follow the work of the Farm around the year according to
the seasons. The work will be given in lectures, labora-
tory exercises, library assignments, and actual perform.
ance of farm tasks along the latest and most approved
scientific methods. A certificate will be granted on satis-
factory completion of the course. Day school only.





AGRICULTURAL COURSES gt
FALL. Principles of Agriculture. Soils, Fertilizers,
etc. Harvesting and fall plowing Planting oats, rye.
WINTER. Farm machinery. Road building, farm
buildings. Drainage and irrigation. Dairying, Butter-
making. Animal Husbandry; Horses, Cattle, Swine. Feeds
and Feeding. Purebred Stock and Animal Breeding.
Poultry Raising and Incubator Practice. Trucking,-Hot
Beds and Cold Frames.
SPRING. Poultry Raising. House Construction and
Marketing. Plant Propagation. Citrus Fruits. Melons
and Garden Crops. Landscape Gardening. Corn Raising
and Pasture Management. Crop Rotation.
SUMMER. Crop Cultivation. Moisture Control. Silage
making and Threshing. Curing broom corn crop. Dairy-
ing,-Testing and Market Milk. Insect Pests and Plant
Diseases.
FARM FINANCE AND RURAL WELFARE.
THE FARMERS' MID-IWISEY INSTITUTE.
The division of departmental work in Agricultural Ex-
tension is primarily to aid County and State farmers to
become more interested in conserving their resources in
farm lands, crops, livestock, health, etc. The institute is
held for two days during the second week in December,
each year; sessions daily. Prominent and successful edu-
cators, experimenters, farmers, physicians, etc., are on
program at this time. The United States Farmers' Dem-
onstration Work under the auspices of this College is a
feature of the Institute. Also a County Fair showing the
exhibits of farmers and rural schools.
The Smith-Lever Extension Activities are also a vital
part of the School for Farmers, and Farm Makers' Clubs,
the latter meaning both Boys' and Girls' Corn and Tomato
Clubs. Prizes are awarded annually at the College.





92 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Catalogue of Students
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
SENIORS B. $, ,^...' -q"I' ru
Dabhey, Robert L ............. .................. Quincy
Dixon, Frederica E .......... .......... Tallahassee
*Dukes, Oliver L ....................S........ ..n.S eads
*Hiendricks, McKinley R .................. .Ashville, N. C.
McMilan, Edward J ...........................Pensacola
McNeil, Lucretia E ... .............Youngstown
Murrell, William H ........ (B.S. M. A.) ........Gainesvills
JUNIOR CLASS
Chandler, Gertrude R ......................Port Tampa
*Davis, Ira P ................................ Orlanda
Davidson, Ethel M.........(B. S. H. E.)....Thomasville, Ga.
Johnson, Elymas H ..............................Miami
Lopez, Burma E. .................................. Pensacola
McKinney, Timothy ......... .............. Live Oak
Richardson, Minnie L. ................. ... Apalachicola
Welters, Naomi A. ....... ...............St. Augustine
*White, Christopher C ...................... .Marianna
SOPHOMORE CLASS
Cochran, John D ............................Pelham, Ga.
Espy, James A ......... ............ ....... Daytona
Floyd, Arthur .......................S.... ... anford
*Jacob, Ephraim .........Quinc.......Y... Qincy
*Johnson, John F ................ .........Fernandina
King, Inez D. (B. S. H. E.) ..................... Tallahassee
Livingston, Leroy ............................. Marianna
*Massenburg, Theodore R .....................Marianna
Robinson, Essie F........ (B. S. H. E.)........ Tallahassee
Simms, John A .......... ............... .........Miami
Straughn, Ida M. (B. S. H. E.) ................... Pensacola
FRESHMAN CLASS
Cady, William G.. ................... DeFuniak Springs
Carter, Florence M. (B. S. H. E.) .................. Quincy
*Cherot, Adolph 0 ................ ...........Daytona.
Green, Ellis H..................................Tampa
Keller, Jacob W. ................................Starkl .





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 93
King, Ondria (B. S. H. E.) ...................... Tallahassee
Saunders, Harold C ............................Tampa
Sheffield, Joseph H ........................... Pensacoia
Sweet, Otis .................................. Bartow
Tyson, Mazie ................................... Jacksonville
Young, Garret E. ................................. Tallahassee
Zeigler, Willie A. (B. S. H. E.) ............... Apalachicola
NORMAL DEPARTMENT
SENIOR CLASS
Andrews, Rachel L .......................... Jacksonville
Jackson, Amy ............................. Tallahassee
Kimball, Edna S ................................ Bartow
Martin, Lucile V .......................... St. Augustine
Mattox, Lillian A. .................................. Lake City
Stanley, Bernice M. ............................. Sanford
JUNIOR CLASS
Barnett, Lela ......;........ ...................... Live Oak
Edwards, Irene ........ ................. Brooksville
McGhee, Allie W. ................................. Tallahassee
Romer, Catherine ......... ......................Tampa
SENIOR H. E.
Benson, Maggie S ....... 'i ... ......... Gainesville
Specials
SENIOR NURSE TRAINING.
Curry, Catherine E. ........................... Elberton, Ga.
Lomas, Edna .................................... Tallahassee
NURSE TRAINING.
Messer, Jennie .. ............................. Tampa
Middleton, Josephine ............................ Jacksonville
MECHANIC ARTS.
Banks, McKinley ................................. Tallahassee
Freeland, William ................................ Tallahassee
Ross, Worstell J................................... Tallahassee
Williams, Charles ............... ..... West Palm Beach
AGRICULTURE.
Quevedo, Sataro ................................ Havana, Cuba





94 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
JUNIOR H. E.
Brown, Eunice S ........................... .......... Ocala
Johnson, Hannah M. ................................. Miami
Stewart, Ruth C. ............................ Birmingham, Ala.
Pitman, Mammie E. ............................... Tallahassee
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
FOURTH YEARS.
Barnes, Carrie D. ........ ................... St. Petersburg
Bisson, Whilock A. .......... ....... .... Key West
Brown, Ella V. ........................ ................ Ocala
Cain, Emma ............................Blakely, Ga.
Cook, Gaston F. ................................... Gainesville
Davis, Leonard E ............................... Miami
Davis, Luther D. ............ ............. ....... Ocala
Farlana, Ida ........................................... Ocala
Felder, Bessie L. ....................................... Ocala
Hopkins, Irma E. .................................... Orlando
Jackson, Victoria ................................. Tallahassee
Jenkins, Samuel .............................Monticello
Leggett, Gilbert ..............................Key West
Presley, Inez H ................................ St. Augustine
Scott, Robert M ................................. Jacksonville
Thomas, Robert J. -... ........... ----.__.-___..... Ocala
Thomas, Ruth C ...........................St. Augustine
Twine, Sallie ..............................Tallahaesee
Watkins, Ethel M ...............................Sanford
Williams, James ............................... W. Palm Beach
THIRD YEAR CLASS
Bell, Daisy'D .............................River Junction
Bess, Bloneva ................................ New Augustine
Blackston, Matilda ................................ Tallahassee
Bolden, Mammie E ............ .......... West Palm Beach
Christian, Hubert B ..........................Pensacola
Daniels, Ruby L. ..................................... Orlando
Davis, Thelma E. .......................... .. Tallahassee
DeBose, Edward H .......................... Gainesville
Dixon, Anderson ............................ Birmingham, Ala.
Eaverly, Wallace T. ......... ................. Sanford
Espy, Naomi A. ............................. Daytona
Hale, Oneta ............... ........... ........... Gainesville
Hartsfield, Diana ...................... ... Marianna
Hawkins, Edith R. ................................... Orlando
Jenkins, Daniel H ..........................palachicola,





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 95
Jenkins, William .................. Clearwater
Larkins, William .................................... Tampa
McPherson, Mattie .............................. Tallahassee
Mayo, L. Corine ...........................Brooksville
Moore, Nancy L. .................................. Tallahassee
Pope, Sarah I. .................................... Tallahassee
Powers, Hershell ...................................... Ocala
Rochell, Cecelia D. .......... ............... Gainesville
Rochelle, Louise W .................. Gainesville
Spencer, Harpie M ........................Tallahassee
Starkes, George ................................... Gainesville
Starks, Lancaster ................................. Gainesville
Stewart, James R. .................. ..........Lakeland
Sweet, Deloka I. ...................................... Bartow
Taylor, Letitia ................................... Tallahassee
Thomas, Irma Roberta .............................. Pensacola
Thomas, Lawson E ...............................Ocala
Thomas, Lnther J. .............................. Quitman, Ga.
Tillman, Gladys E ................................. Pensacola
Twine, Victoria .................................. Tallahassee
Whaley, Lolnie H. ............................... Tallahassee
W1il1kins, Thelma A. ................................. Pensacola
W illiams, Clara N. ................................ Gainesville
Williams, Fannie M ....... .. .......... East Lake
Williams, George B ......................... Tallahassee
Williams, Nathaniel ................. Clearwater
Williams, Odessa E. ..... ................. Gainesville
Willie, Otis ...................:: .................. Jacksonville
W ooten. F, dward ................................... Monticello
Youman, Sarah ......,,..... .................. Tallahassee
SECOND YEAR CLASS
Baldwin, Jacob ................................Burbank
Barnett, Lela ._.-_. ---..---------..------_- --- ----. Live Oak
Blake, Alphonso W ............................... Plant City
Boom, Adlaid ........................................ Tampa
Campbell, Napolean ..........................._. Lees
Cole, Sarah E..................................Alachua
Curry, Samuel J ............................ Clearwater
Cameron, Philip E ........ ........ ... Port Tampa City
Crawford, Mable L. ............................ Foulstown, Ga.
Curry, Blanche F. ................................... Lakeland
Eaverly, Frank E .............................. Sanford
Fitzgiles, Emma A ......... .......... Tallahassee
*Granger, Alvin T. .............................. St. Augustine
Green, Naomi ........................................ Delray
Hill, Gertrude ,,, .. ,, ......,. Tallahassee





96 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
*Hearst, Edward ...........................Jacksonville
Ivey, Fred ................................. Grove Park
Jenkins, Annie C ............... ...... .... Clearwater
Laster, Reather ................... Tallahassee
Legget, Blanch ......... ........... ....... Key West
Lewis, Robert ............................Tallahassee
Lewis, Samuel .................................... Alachua
McMillan, Kirkland .................................... Mayo
McPherson, Mary E. .............................. Tallahassee
McVoy, Josie M. ................................... Pensacola
Malone, Arthur A ............................Lakeland
Miller, Martha .............................. West Palm Beach
Phoenix, Cleo E. ................................... Delray
Peterson, Leola ....................... Bainbridge, Ga.
Rambeau, Christopher B. ................... Donaldsonville, Ga.
Riley, Marion V ................................ Tallahassee
Roberson, Alberta II. .............................. Tallahassee
Russ, Labon ................................ Marlanna
Smith, Gussie E. ......... ............ West Palm Beach
Taylor, Pierce C ................ .......... Williston
Thomas, Odessa..................................... Lovett
Tnomas, Samuel D.... .............. Yazoo City, Miss
Thompson, Malichi ............................. St. -Augustine
Thomas, Irma -Ruth ............................ Quitman, Ga.
Williams, Algie ................................... Tallahassee
Wilson, Lela M .................................. Tallahassee
FIRST YEAR CLASS
Adams, Frank L. ............................. Quitman, Ga.
Alexander, Paris L. ....................... West Palm Beach
Allen, Cleveland ............................... Crescent City
Balford, Alberta ................................ Miami
Barker, Ricnard A ...........................Fort Myers
Barnes, Margarett ................... .......Jacksonville
Brice, Willie M .-----............. Valdosta,.Ga.
Benton, Clemton C. .............................. ... Sanford
Bethel, Jessie A ................................Miami
Blain, Charles ....................................... Mariana
Campbell, Senie B. ....................................... Lee
Clement, Dewy ................................. Waycross, Ga.
Coleman, Jennie E. ................................ Monticello
Colson, Elisha ......................................... Perry
Conoly, Cora ..................................... Bay Harlur
Curtis, Sherby W.............................. Clearwater.
Curtis, William ............................ Clearwater
Denefield, Oscar ...................................... Tampa
Duhart, Ale thea ............................Orlando
Edwards, Marie ...........................Tallahassee





CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 97
Faulk, George E. ................................... Pensacola
Finlayson, Thee. ............................... Tallahassee
Freeland, Jennie ............................Tallahassee
Glover, Lewis P. ........................... St. Augustine
Gordon, Frankie M. ................................... Tampa
Graham, Willie A .............................. Sanford
Gray, Luther ........................................ Mariana
Hadley, Marie 0. ........................... Thomasville, Ga.
Harden, Robert ................................. Quicy
Harris, Thelma L .............................. Sanford
Hankerson, Joseph ........................ Tallahassee
Hampton, Charles M .............................Ocala
Henry, Annie L. .......... .............. ......... Delray
House, Lewis W. ...................................... Sefner
House, Perry W. ....................................... Sefnei
Hunter, Elizabeth ..... ................. Tallahassee
Isler, Sarah ...... ................ Tallahassee
Jackson, Raymond C ............. ...... Freeport
Jefferson, Alonza ............................ Tallahassee
Jefferson, Parlee ............................ Tallahassee
Johnson, Joseph Q. .........................Hawkinsvllle, Ga.
Jones, Ethel ....................................... Pensacola
Jordan, Susie E ................. ...........Leesburg
Livingston, George .................. Marianna
McCray, George .......... .. Petersberg
McCray, Grant H. ..................; .......... St. Petersburg
McDonald, James R ........................Fernandina
McGee, Earle ................................Key West
McKinney, Alvah .......................St. Augustine
McMekins, Susie ..................................... Tampa
McMillan, Sara A. .............................. Tallahassee
McQueen, Robert ............................ Thomasville, Ga.
*Mack, Robert ...............................Birmingham, Ala.
Moore, James .............................. Apalachicola
Nixon, Mable H... ................................. Homeland
Paschal, Herman ............................... Waycross, Ga.
Parker, Lamar .................................. Valdosta, Ga.
Pinkney, Eugene ................................... DeFuniak
Plummer, Clara ................................ Waycross, Ga.
Pope, Johnnie 0. ................................. Tallahassee
Pope, Willie B ............................. Tallahassee
Preston, Harriet ........................... Tallahassee
Randolph, Viola M ...........................Tallahassee
Roundtree, Hosea L. ................................... Perry
Roundtree, Sara ...................P. :..:.. ...... Perry
,Rowland. T. l,,ie ....... .. ......., ...... s-Valdosta, Ga.
Ryan, Edit ... ........ .Tallahassee
Scott, Clara J ....... Tallabassee





98 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Silas Martin .................... ...... ......... Kissimmee
Simmons, Cecil J..................... Lakeland
Simmons, Benjamine J ............... ... Milledgeville, Ga.
Sihums, Thomas A. .......................... Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Smith, John F. .............................. West Palm Beach
Starling, Mildred ............................ Waycross, Ga.
Sullivan, Theodore F ............................Miami
Swift, Bertha C. .................................... Lakeland
Taylor, Catherine L. ........................Williston
Thomas, S. D ........................... Bainbridge, G a.
Thompson, Essie M. .............................. Tallahassee
Wells, Althea I. ............................... Waycross, Ga.
Wilson, Estelle .................................. Tallahassee
Williams. James Anthony ................. ..... East Lake
Young, Lula B ............... .............Tallahassee
SUB HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
SUB-HIGH I.
Adams, Annie L. M .............................. Tallahassee
Adkins, Jamima .................................... Williston
Aldridge, John L. -.- _. .... ........... _..Alachua
Brown, Viola V. ................ .. ....... Alachua
Buckley. Elrenia D. ...I. .............. ..... Orangeburg, S. C.
Childs, Ailh:.r R. .......................... ... Gainesville
Clay, Hildreth .................... ... .... Waycross, Ga.
Debmon, Wilborne ............................. Waycross, Ga.
Fitzgiles, Maggie F .............................. Tallahassee
Fletcher, Irene S. ............ ....... .......... Levy
Fuller, Annie J. ............... .......... ... Tallahassee
Hadley, Carnelia ................... Thomasville, Ga.
1-lendricks, Mattie L. ................R....K... ockledge
Love, Pannie. ..................................... Tallahassee
Livingston, Jacob ....... .............. .... Mariana
Madison, Lillian B. ........................ Pensacola
Nellicliffe, Samuel ...... ............ Tallahassee
Nixon, Alice J ...... .................... ..... Homeland
Nixon, Alma L. ................................... Homeland
Oliver, Bessie ...................................... Millville
Paramore, McKinley W .................... ......... Whigham
Pinkney, James L. ........................... Tallahassee
Poole, Rudolph ...................................... Wakulla
Pottsda'mer, Teresa ............................... Tallahassee
Powers, Theodore ...................................... Miami
Reddick, John M .............................. Waycross, Ga.
Riley, John G. Jr. ............................... Tallahassee
Robinson, Bessie L ............... ......... Tallahassee





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