• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Bulletin committee and committee...
 Foreword
 Teacher-training course in home...
 Shop course for teachers 1
 Shop course for teachers 2
 Shop course for teachers 3
 Shop course for teachers 4
 Shop course for teachers 5
 Shop course for teachers 6
 Shop course for teachers 7
 Two-year course for teacher training...
 Back Cover






Title: The Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes. Series XI. No. 2.
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000105/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes. Series XI. No. 2.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1918
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000105
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB0044
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Bulletin committee and committee on vocational education
        Page 2
    Foreword
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Teacher-training course in home economics
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Shop course for teachers 1
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Shop course for teachers 2
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Shop course for teachers 3
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Shop course for teachers 4
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Shop course for teachers 5
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Shop course for teachers 6
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Shop course for teachers 7
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Two-year course for teacher training in vocational agriculture
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
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SERIES Xi DECEMBER, 1918 No. 2
BULLETIN
OF THE
Florida Agricultural & Mechanical College
FOR. NEGROES
TALLAIMASSEE
(ISSUED QUARTERLY)
Teacher-Training Courses in Vocational
Education
Entered as Second Class Mail Matter August 24, 1912, at the
Post Office at Tallahassee, Florida, under the Act of August
24, 1912
Florida A. & M. College Press
Tallahassee.
* l'





Bulletin Committee
B. F. Bullock W. H. A. Howard
Homer Thomas E. A. Davis
Committee on Vocational Education
N. B. YOUNG, PRESIDENT
W. H. A. HOWARD, DIREC. MECHANIC ARTS
E. A. DAVIS, DIRECTOR HOME ECONOMICS
B. F. BULLOCK, DIRECTOR OF AGRI(CULTURE





FOREWRD
Under the Smith-Hughes Act, enacted February 23,
1917, provision is made for co-operation between thle
Federal Government and the several States in the pro-
motion of vocational education in the fields of agricul-
ture, home economics, and trades and industries.
This Act provides for two funds: (1) For salaries
of teachers, supervisors, and directors of agriculture,
home economics, trades and industries; and (2) for
teacher-training in these branches of vocational educa-
tion.
The State Board for Vocational Education, co-operat-
ingwiththeFederal Board, has charged' this college
with the duties of traininll teachers of vocational edu-
cation.
This bulletin gives the outlines and descriptions of
the teacher-training courses offered by this college in
the discharging of its duties.





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Teacher-Training Course In Home Economics
(F. A. 8 M. College for Negroes.)
(1) Entrance requirements.
Graduates from a four year High School or equiva-
lent prepl;;lati,:n are admitted to the Teacher-Train-
ing course in Home Economics. The students who
enter this course for the most part receive their
ig lh School training at this institution and hence
have a background of two years of cookery and
four years of sewing.
(2) Length of course.
a. Two years.
b. Thirty-nine hours.
(3) (C':,Ioe -of Study:
Junior Year (Corresponding to Freshman in College)
FIRST SEMESTER
Credit
hours
Psychology and Pedagogy 3
Chemistry 5
Ph:, i,:)1logy' and Hygiene 2
Cookery 2
Physics 4
S. v.'in? 2
Household Administration 1
Physical Trainiig
Hand Work: 2
(Basketry, knitting
crocheting. etc.
21
Page Five





SECOND SEMESTER
Crelit
hours
Psychology and Pedagogy 3
Chemistry 5
Physiology and Hygiene 2
Cookery 2
Physics 4
Sewing 2
Care of the Home 1
(Serving and Marketing)
Physical
(same as first semester.)
21
Senior Year (Corresponding to Sophmore in College)
FIRST SEMESTER
Credit
hours
History of Education 5
Methods 2
Practice Teaching 2
Bacteriology 2
Fancy Cookery 1
Food Chemistry 2
Physical Training
Housekeeping 2
Hand Work 2
18
SECOND SEMESTER
Credit'
hours
History of Education 5
Methods 2
Practice Teaching 2
Page Six





Bacteriology 2
Fancy Cookery 1
Food Chemistry 2
Physical Training
School Gardening 2
Laundering 2
18
Percentage distribution of hours devoted to following
groups:
Home Economics Subjects 35.8 plus
Related Subjects 33. A
Professional Edllcational Subjects -30.8
(4) Observation and Practice Teaching.
(a) The students enrolled in the teacher training
course are required to take the course in Meth-
ods in Teaching Home Economics which in-
cludes practice teaching. The students in this
class will teach the class in the Elementary
School or Sub-High 2 hours per week each in
cooking and sewing for 32 weeks.
(5) Graduation Requirements.
(a) Practical Experience.
The practical experience required for gradua-
tion is approximately 12 hours per week of prac-
tical work done in the Model Cottage and in the
care of the Dormitories and personal laundry.
(b) The completion of the course of study as out-
lined including the practice teaching under sup-
ervision.
(6) Relation to Certification.
(a) A normal diploma is granted to graduates of
this co,.rse but students will have to pass the
State Teacher's examination before being per-
mitted to teach in the State.
Page Seven





Shop Course For Teachers 1
(CARPENTRY)
FIRST YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Arithmetic for Carpenters 3 "
Forestry 2 "
Manual Training (Knife wood work) 2
Drawing 1 "
English 3 "
Theory of Administration of
Vocational Education 1 "
SECOND YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Geometry for Carpenters 3 "
Elements of Architecture 2 "
Drawing 2 5 "
Manual Training (Bench Work) 3 "
Industrial History 2 "
Methods of Teaching in Industrial
Schools 2 "
Practice Teaching 1 "
SHOP WORK: '
The Shop Work Course is intended to give a definite
knowledge of those exercises in joinery and construc-
tion that are essential to practical commercial products.
Applications will be made of these exercises in the ac-
tual building of models adapted to use. The course also
includes a number of lessons in wood turning. The Shop
work will grow out of the detail drawings which in all
cases must proceed the actual bench practice.
ARITHMETIC:
The work in this course will be based upon Dale's
Arithmetic for Carpenters and is intended to give the
Page Eight





pupil the mathematical view point of the carpenter, as
well as to make more certain the mathematics- underly-
ing the problems of the shop.
FORESTRY:
This is an elementary course embracing the subjects
of lumbering, sources of common woods in the l,.iillin,
trades and the differentiation as to use. In this course
the finishing of the various woods will be given consid-
eration. Stile...q and importancewillbe laid upon the
study of native woods.
MANUAL TRAINING:
The methods employed in presenting this subject to
students will receive attention. Those taking the shop
course for teachers will have an opportunity to do ac-
tual practice teaching both in the shops and in the
manual training clasaes of the practice school. The
course includes both knife and bench work.
DRAWING I:
All ;.t\\-i ,',.' in this course must be of the models and
objects to be made in the -hi.i ui'- must precede them.
Th1e .:-.I:j.ct is to have each student work in the shop
from his drawings ;,!: i. ,,i., made, and thus have him
become more familiar with the correlation in these
lines of work.
ENGLISH:
This is a parallel course to the same subject pursued
in the 'lhlil.l Year High School. Its purpose is to stress
the subject from a teaching point of view.
THEORY:
This is-a course in administration and is ilt.>!i.:.'1 to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in organization and
supervision in vocational cl:is>.
Page Nine





GEOMETRY FOR CARPENTERS:
This subject does not differ essentially from the
plane and solid geometry. It is pitched so as to have
it applied to the problems worked out at the bench.
ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE:
This course is designed t3 acriluaint those pursuing
the Shop Course for Teachers in Carpentry with the
first principles in architecture and thus prepare them to
comprehend the more advance orders.
DRAWING II:
This is a somewhat advanced course which involves
the geometrical problems, elementary prlojections and
simple house rlallnning.
INDUSTRIAL HISTORY:
This is a lecture course based upon the current prac-
tice in the field of carpentry, and is intended to ac-
quaint the pupil with a knowledge of this practice and
the sources of information concerning this work.
METHODS OF TEACHING IN VOCATIONAL
SCHOOLS:
This course comprises the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods.in the class room with those
who are engaged in the trade work.
Page Ten





Shop Course For Teachers II
(MACHINISTS)
FIRST YEAR
Machine Shop Practice I 15 hours per week
Mathematics (Related to Mach. Shop) 3 "
Physics
(Dealing with machinists' problems) 2
Mechanical Drawirg
(For machinists) 5 "
English I 3 "
Economics 2
Theory of Administration 1
SECOND YEAR
Machine Shop Practice II 15 hours per week
Mathematics (advanced) 3 "
Chemistry
(Relatell to Machinist work) 2
Mechanical Drawing
(For Machinists) 5
English TI 2 "
Meth,:.ls of Teaching 2 "
Practice Teaching 1 "
DESCRIPTION OF COURLSES
SHOP PRACTICE:
This course is established to teach the funi:la.neltals
of Machine Shop Practice. It comprises a system of
exercises involving hand tools, lathe work, and other
machine tools; also exercises in gear cutting.
MACHINE SHOP PRA(TICE II:
A continuation of Machine Shopl Practice including
the more advanced use of machine tools; the prepara-
tion of bearings, eccentrics, crank shafts, complex gear-
ing, running driving and shrink fits and the repair of
machinery.
Page Eleven





MATHENITATICS I:
Tlhi. course is based upon Butnlln I:,!:t ll:T-mL:ti:c. for
.iaRIcal.i -t and embraces a study of such mathematics
as is consistent with practical I.ii,'l,:,li related to ma-
chine work.
MATHEMATICS II:
This cousse follows the work of the first year and
gives ol(.lI.,tllsit-ity to study the subject all-L.~' with ad-
vanced practical shop problems.
ENGLISH I AND II:
This course is to be i:',a!t,: to the English course in
the Third Year High School. Its purpose is to stress
the importance of the subject from a teaching view
point.
PHYSICS:
This is to be an elementary course in Physics cover-
ing the subjects of mechanics, heat, light, electricity
and magnetism. A,,'.mi'n.!-:i,! i it. is a laboratory course
consisting of about twenty experiments embracing ac-
curate measurements, proofs of certain laws of me-
chanics, and some experiments in heat and elet'tri.:ity.
ECONOMICS:
This is to be an elementary course in Economics
stressing the relations of capital and labor organiza-
tions.
CHEMISTRY:
This course is to be a st: 'i.; of lectures including a
generaldiscussion of fuels, water for industrial pur-
poses, oils, cast iron, steel, copper, icarl. cement, etc.
INEDUSTRIA.L HISTORY:
This course includes a series of lectur'.i on present
day methods of manufacture, system in the shop, and
current literatrue in technical magazines.
Page Twelve





DRAWING I:
This course coins>sts of sl.etchting and working draw-
ings. That is, the student will be required to make a
sketch of certain machine parts and from his sketch
make a working dra \. i ,i
DRAWING II:
This is a course in elementary drawing, the work be-
ing divided into class room and shop. work. The class
room work will consist of lectures on strength of ma-
terial and proportions. The shop work will consist in
figuring out and drawing ;1-. i'i.- in 1;e--p,;,' with condi-
tionsi i .! i, practical problems.
THEORY OF ADMINISTRATION:
This is a course in administration and is intended to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in i'ra;li:;l ;r', i and
supervision in vocational classes.
METHODS OF TEACHING IN VOCATIONAL
SCHOi:L'.S:
This course _.:, i 'l'i-x ; the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEAC 'FTNG:
'Ti .-e pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class room with those
who are en-s,&,.'i in the trade work.
Page Thirteen
-------------=-------!a = -^ -- __ .__~, .. ;- --- '! j





Shop Couse For Teachers III
(BLACI.. 'ITHiNG)
FIRST YEAR.
Shlop Work 15 hours per week
Shop Mathematics (Geometry) 3 "
Physics (related to Blacksmithing) 2 "
Drawing 5 "
English 3 "
Industrial History 2 "
Theory of Administration
of Vocational Education 2
SE',rOND YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Shop Mathematics (Mechanics) 3 "
Chemistry (related to Blacksmithing) 2 "
Drawing 5 "
Elementary Wood Work 2 "
Methodsiof Teaching in Ind. Schools 2 "
Practice Teaching 1 "
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
SHOP WORK:
FUNDAMENTALS
This work is based upon Swarzkoph's Plain and Or-
namental F':' inn! and embraces the folli,.'in- exer-
cises and lessons:
The forge, forge tools, blower, fuels, -building and
care of fire. The blacksmith's tools; the anvil, hand
and sledge hammers, tongs, top and bjot ,-,,m fuller, top
and bottom swage, set hammers, flatter, Ipunch, head-
ing tool, hardie, chisel, mandrel and vise.
PRACTICE EXERCISES
General Directions: Proper heat for working iron,
grip and use of hand hammer, 1st Exercise-hammer
wedge; 2nd Exercise--Dia. in, and forming iron; 3rd
Page Ft. ii,.. :





Exercise-meat hook; 4th Exercise-"S" hook; 5th Ex-
ercise-staple; 6th Exercise-forging nails, straighten-
ing and twisting square and flat iron.
Upsetting, offsetting, shouldering, drawing, forming,
bending. Hammer blows, forging operations and cal-
culating the requiredlength of stock for gate hooks,
square and hexagonal head bolts, bending circular
curves and bending square cornered angles.
WELDING
Definition, conditions necessary, welding fluxes, lap
weld, angle and "T" weld, lump or pile weld, jump
weld, butt weld, "V" weld, and welding steel and
iron.
FORGING EXERCISES
Forging bolts with square and hexagonal heads, forg-
ing nuts of standard size to fit bolts, beam anchors,
dogs, chain rings, links, flat bands, grab hooks, "C"
hooks,-soldering iron, spanner wrench, chain hooks
with swivel, engineer's wrench, blacksmithing tongs.
SHOP WORK (Second Year):
The work of this year is pitched so as to give advanc-
ed practice and knowledge in the following:
THE PROPERTIES OF STEEL
The Bessimer process, Bessimer converter, open-
hearth process tool steel, manufacture of crucible steel,
high speed steel. Annealing hardening and temper-
ing. Punches, tools, springs, case hardening.
TOOL MAKING
Center punch, cold chisel, cape chisel, lathe tools,
boring tools, hardie, punch, set hammer, riveting ham-
mer.
ADVANCED FORGING
Andirons, heavy .forging, connecting rod, crank
shaft, etc.
Page Fifteen
\





MATHEMATICS:
The courses in AI;.t:llai.zi,Li: I and II are based upon
Johnson's Pcactieal :-;'I )A Mzhnicsand Mathematics.
Besides giving an ':t!:' ,. .'tju.il' to make direct applica-
tion of mathematics to the problems being worked at
the forge or bench, it is intended to give specialized
pedagogical irn.,L',itr'i,,ln and training tih'':,iigh these
courses.
PHYSICS:
This course deals largely with the properties of iron
and the ;ilart ti,.il : ,. the many kinds to various pro-
jects. It is also directed to give definite information
concerning the evolution of the iron industry.
ENGLISH:
This is a parallel, course to the'same subject p. !isiie-.i
in the Third Year High School. Its purpose is to stress
the subject from a teaching point '.If viewx.
INDUSTRIAL HISTORY:
This is a lecture course based upon current practice
in the field of blacksmithing, and is intended to ac-
quaint the pupil with a knowledge of this practice and
the sources of information concerning this work.
ELEMENTARY WOOD WORK:
The wood working industry is closely allied to that of
Blacksmithing. For this reason an essential course in
wood-working covering a few necessary lessons is given
to those pursuing the Blacksmithing Shop Course for
Teachers.
DRAWING:
All drawing in this course must be of the methods
and objects to be made in the shop and' must precede
them. The purpose is to have the student work in the
shop from his own drawings lrt.,i 'i..sly made, and thus
Pag t Sixteen





have him become more familiar with the proper corre-
lation in these lines of work.
THEORY OF ADMINISTRATION OF VOCA-
TIONAL EDUCATION:
This is a course in administration and is intended to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in organization and
supervision of vocational classes.
METHODS OF TEACHING IN INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOLS:
This course comprises the pedagogy of teach-
ing. A careful study an comparison of usages in the
best schools are made with a view to adopting tried
methods that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class-room with those
who are engaged in the trade work.
Page Seventeen





Shop Course For Teachers IV
(WHEELWRIGHTING)
FIRST YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Arithmetic
(related to Wheelwrighting) 3 "
Forestry 2 "
Drawing I 5 "
English 3 "
Forge Work (elementary) 2 "
Theory of Administration
of Vocational Education 1 "
SECOND YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours pier week
Geometry
(related to Wheelwrighting) 3 "
Physics 2 "
Drawing II 5 "
Methods of Teaching in Ind. Schools ,2 "
Economics 3 "
Practice Teaching 1 "
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
SHOP WORK (First Year):
The first half of the first year's work in this course
will be making of exercises that will furnish valuable
training in the practical, and in the meantime many
things that will be of great use on the farm and in the
home: the buck saw, porch chair, clothes tree, wagon
jack, hammer handle, three horse evener, etc.
SHOP WORK (Second Year):
The course will cover enough wood turning to enable
the student to turn hubs and spokes to build a wheel,
and sticks for seats. It will also cover the making of
Page Eighteen
L 1 .. --





various joints used in the construction of carriage
parts, forms of tenons and mortises, seat corners, mak-
ing and fitting wooden axle beds, building plain wagon
and buggy parts, assembling of same.
ARITHMETIC:
This is a practical course intended to give the every
day information necessary to the computations and
measurements required of the wheelwright. In every
case the student will be required to understand the ap-
plication of the subject to the shop problems, and an
effort will be made to simplify the details of mathemat-
ical construction.
FORESTRY:
This is an elementary course embracing the subjects
of lumbering, sources of woods in common use it the
building trades and their differentiation as to use. In
this course the finishing of the various woods will be
given consideration. Stress and importance will be
laid on native woods.
DRAWING I:
-All drawing in this course must be of the models and
objects to be made in the shop and must precede them.
The object is to have each student work in the shop
from his own drawings previously made, and thus have
him become more familiar with the correlation in these
lines of work.
DRAWING II:
This course involves the geometrical problems, de-
tail drawings of wagon and buggy parts.
ENGLISH:
This is a parallel course to the same subject pursued
in the Third Year High School... Its purpose is to stress
the subject from a teaching point of view.
Page Nineteen





FORGE WORK:
The close relationship existing between the black-
smith and the wheelwright makes it necessary for the
wheelwright to have fundamental knowledge of iron
work. To give this knowledge an elementary course in
Forge Work covering essential lessons is provided.
GEOMETRY:
This subject is the same as that required for those
taking the Carpenter's Shop Course for Teachers. The
necessity of its application to the problems in wheel-
wrighting arises out of the course itself.
PHYSICS:
This is a short course underlying the construction of
vehicles, and takes up the stress and strain upon ma-
terials required for same.
ECONOMICS:
This is to be an elementary course in the subject,
stressing the relations of capital and labor.
METHODS OF TEACHING IN INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOLS:
This course co prises the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class room with those
who are engaged in the trade work.
THEORY OF ADMINISTRATION OF VOCA-
TIONAL EDUCATION:
This is a course in administration and is intended to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in organization and
supervision in vocational classes.
Page Twenty





Shop Course For Teachers V
(PAINTING)
FIRST YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Mathematics (related to Painting) 3 "
Chemistry of Paints 2 "
English 3 "
Freehand Drawing I 5 "
Theory of Administration 1 "
Forestry 1 "
SECOND YEAR
Shop Work II 15 hours per week
Study of Types 3 "
Mixing of Paints 2 "
Drawing II 2 "
Kinds of Paints (their use) 2 "
Methods of Teaching in Ind. Schools 2
Practice Teaching 1 "
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
SHOP WORK I:
This course is intended to teach the proper care of
shop, tools, and to give a correct notion as to the com-
mon practice in the use of ordinary paints. Sufficient
work will be done to teach the proper application-of the
paints used.
MATHEMATICS:
In this course the intending painter will be taught
the mathematics underlying estimates; measuring of
surfaces of varied forms will receive attention.
CHEMISTRY:
This subject is pitched so as to give a knowledge of
the materials used in the manufacture of paints and
the chemical processes involved. Wherever possible
Page Twenty-one





illustrations of paint making will be shown upon a
small scale in the college chemical laboratory.
ENGLISH:
This course covers the work of a class in the 3rd'
Year High School. It is intended to emphasize the
correct use of language.
FREEHAND DRAWING:
Here the pupil is given work in the drawing of geo-
metrical figures as relate to the interior decoration and
such other ornamentation as is desired by painters.
THEORY OF ADMINISTRATION:
This course is intended to acquaint those pursuing it
with current policies. Its purpose is to give funda-
mentals in organizing and supervising a vocational
class in Painting.
FORESTRY:
This course for the painter is to acquaint him with
the various kinds of woods and the manner of prepar-
ing them for commercial use. A study of hard and
soft woods in their relation to paints adopted for use
upon them is made as the time will permit.
SHOP WORK II:
This course is built upon Shop Work I and proceeds
to carry practices to the more advanced stages of the
trade.
STUDY OF TYPES:
Here a correlation of the various phases of the
painter's art is made, and a differentiation of the class-
es is made. An exhaustive study of the types is also
carried out.
Page Twenty-two





MIXING OF PAINTS:
Here a study of pigments and carriers is pursued.
The hramony and contrast of colors is taken up. A
close and practical distinction of color, tints, hues,
shades is made. Matchingof the same receives con-
sideration.
DRAWING II:
This is a course of plan making and is intended to
give the information necessary to plan reading and
sketching.
KINDS OF PAINTS:
This course is to take up a study of all paints used by
the painter and classify them into their groups, desig-
nating those best adapted to house, sign, carriage and
car painting.
METHODS OF TEACHING IN VOCATIONAL
SCHOOLS:
This course comprises the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class room with those
who are engaged in the trade work.
Page Twenty-three





Shop Course For Teachers VI
(PRINTING)
FIRST YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Foundering 2
Engraving 3 "
Arithmetic (for printers) 4
English 5 "
Theory of Administration 1 "
SECOND YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Designing (related to printing) 5 "
Book-binding 4 "
Paper Making 2 "
Methods 2 "
Practice Teaching 2 "
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
SHOP WORK:
It is intended in this course to follow usages in
vougue in established printeries, taking up the study
of cases, type faces and sizes, setting, paper cutting,
etc.
FOUNDRY:
This course is pitched so as to give information con-
cerning metals used in type and the mechanical pro-
cesses used in the making of same. In, this connection
a study of the linotype, monotype and other type ma-
chines is made.
ENGRAVING:
This is a course embracing the study of the methods
employed in making cuts and ornaments used by the
printer.
Page Ewenty-four





ARITHMETIC:
A study of arithmetic in connection with the prob-
lems growing out of the shop work is made in this
course. It embraces phases of commercial as well as
technical branches of the subject.
ENGLISH:
This is a course in academic English. Its scope is to
cover the English required to make a practical and ef-
ficient proof reader. Spelling, punctuation, paragraph-
ing and sentence building receive first consideration.
THEORY:
This is a course in administration and is intended to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in organization and
supervision in vocational classes.
SHOP WORK II:
This course takes up the advanced phases of shop
practice such as composing, job work, and a careful
study of all printer's machinery.
DESIGNING:
This course is intended to take in the study of form-
making, ornamentation and arrangement. Its purpose
is to develop in the printer an idea of the true and
beautiful in this art.
BOOK-BINDING:
This is an elementary course embracing padding, tab-
let making and simple book making. Lectures will be
given so as to acquaint those taking this course with
the historic types of this art.
Page Twenty-five





PAPER MAKING:
This is to be a lecture course upon the processes of
paper making.
METHODS:
This course comprises the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class room while teach-
ing those pursuing the printers trade.
Page Twenty-six





Shop Course For Teachers VII
(TAILORING)
FIRST YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Chemistry (related to tailoring) 3 "
Textiles 3
Drafting 5
English 3
Theory of Administration 1
SECOND YEAR
Shop Work 15 hours per week
Mathematics (related to tailoring) 2
Chemistry II 2
Estimates 3
Designing 5
Methods 2
Practice Teaching 1
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
SHOP WORK I:
This is a course embracing practice in the various
stitching, model making and the preliminary combina-
tion of parts leading to the construction of trousers.
CHEMISTRY:
It is intended in this to course have the pupil learn
that branch of chemistry that will enable him to make
the ordinary tests of fabrics to ascertain their quality.
TEXTILES
A study of the manufacture of goods used; the sources
of materials and scope of this industry are promise ntl
brought forward in this course.
DRAFTING:
This course is calculated to give the principles of
drafting garments from measurements from life figures
and includes the trousers, waistcoat and coat.
ENGLISH:
This is a parallel course to that pursued in the 3rd
Year High School,
Page Twenty-seven





THEORY:
This is a course in administration and is intended to
acquaint those pursuing it with current policies. It is
intended to give the fundamentals in organization and
supervision of vocational classes.
SHOP WORK II:
This course presupposes that in Shop Work I. The
vest and coat occupy the time so that those taking the
course may become familiar with making them.
MATHEMATICS:
This course grows out of the conditions of work in
hand and is meant to augment the work in such courses
wherein a need for mathematics arises.
CHEMISTRY II:
This course takes up the matter of dyes and deals
with their chemical aspects. Under this course "run-
ning" and "fast" colors are definitely considered.
ESTIMATES:
A course in accounting of tha nature that will include
such business computations as are necessary to the
tailor's trade.
DESIGNING:
An advanced course in drafting intended to teach the
rules underlying the fashoning of garments for various
forms and sizes.
METHODS:
This course comprises the pedagogy of teaching. A
careful study and comparison of usages in the best
schools are made with a view to adopting tried methods
that have proved successful.
PRACTICE TEACHING:
Those pursuing this course are given an opportunity
to apply adopted methods in the class room in the
teaching of those pursuing the tailor's trade.
Page Twenty-eight





Two-Year Course For Teacher Training In Vocational
Agriculture
(The Arabic numerals immediately following the
name of the subject indicate the number of, times the
class meets a week, while the numerals in parentheses
indicate the number of college credits given for the sub-
ject.)
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
English (Review) 3
Botany 2 (1A)
Chemistry 5 (3)
History of Education 5 (3)
Physiology and Hygiene 2
Veterinary Science 1 (1)
Applied Mathematics 2 (10)
Animal Husbandry I 2 (2)
Soils 2 (2)
Farm Mech. (Wood Shop) 1 (i)
SECOND SEMESTER
Englisn (Literature and Composition) 3 (2)
Agricultural Botany 2 (1i)
Agricultural Chemistry. 5 (3)
Vocational Education 5 (3)
Farm Sanitation 1 (A)
Veterinary Science 1 (1)
American History and Civics 3
Animal Husbandry II 2 (2)
General Horticulture 2 (2)
Farm Mech. (Forge Shop) 1 (i)
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
Argumentation 2 (1i)
Entomology 3 (2A)
Physics 5 (3)
Page Twenty-nine





Educational Psychology 5(3)
General Economics 5(3)
Field Crops I 2(2)
Farm Engineering and Machinery 2(2)
Practice Teaching 1(1) I
SECOND SEMESTER
Public Speaking 2(1-)
Plant Pathology and Bacteriology 3(2)
Farm Management and Accounts 3(2)
Rural Economics and Sociology 5(3)
Agricultural Pedagogy 3(22)
Field Crops II 2(2)
Farm Dairying 1(1)
Farm Poultry 1(1)
Practice Teaching 1(1)
At least two years of actual FARM LIFE AND PRAC-
TICE will be required before graduation.
Candidates for this course must be graduates from a
four-year high school course.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
AGRICULTURAL SUBJECTS
Animal Husbandry I:-First year, first semester.
Class meets two afternoons a week. Lectures, re-
citations and laboratory. Two credits.
A study of the types and breeds of farm stock;
their origin, history and economic importance.
Animal Husbandry II:-First year, second semester.
Two afternoons a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two credits.
The importance of live stock on every farm; .the
general selecting, feeding, care and breeding of live-
stock. Some attention will be given to bookkeeping.
Veterinary Science:- First year, 1st and 2nd semesters.
One lecture period a week; some laboratory work
will be given in connection-with the course in Animal
Husbandry. Two credits.
Page 1h irl
L -





A study of the common diseases of farm animals;
their recognition, causes, prevention and eradica-
tion. The application of first aid in diseases and ac-
cidents of farm animals.
Farm Dairying:-Second year, second semester.
One afternoon a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. One credit.
A general course in farm dairying: the Babcock
test; the farm separator; farm butter making and
dairy sanitation; the selection, breeding, care and
feeding of the dairy herd.
Farm Poultry: -Second year, second semester.
One afternoon a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. One credit.
Feeding, housing and care of poultry on the farm.
A study of the problems of making a greater profit
from farm poultry.
Soils:-First year, first semester.
Two afternoons a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two credits.
A study of the soil builders, the nature and classi-
fication of soils and soil management.
Farm Mechanics:-First year, 1st and 2nd semesters.
One afternoon a week. Lectures and laboratory.
One credit.
Wood Shop first semester; care and use of wood-
working tools; reading of blue-prints; and some of
the elements of wheelwrighting and carpentry.
Forge Shop second semester; forging and welding
of iron, and such work that will be of actual value on
the farm.
Farm Engineering and Machinery:-Second year, 2nd
semester.
Two afternoons a week. Lectures, recitations, lab-
oratory. Two credits..
A study of the problems of drainage, terracing, ir-
rigation, surveying, fencing, etc.: and the mechan-
ism, operation, care and use of farm implements.
Page Thirty-one





Farm Sanitation:-First year, second-semester.
One lecture or laboratory period a week. One-half
credit.
Problems of ventilation, out-houses, sewage dis-
posal, caring for garbage, pure water, etc.
General Horticulture:-First year, second semester.
Two afternoons a week, Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two credits.
A study of such horticultural principles and prac-
tices as will make the farm home a more desirable
and better place to live. The possibilities of the gar-
den and orchard in furnishing the home with a more
varied and healthful diet. Some of the principles of
landscape gardening with a view of improving the
appearance of the farmstead,
Field Crops I:--Second year, first semester.
Two afternoons a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two credits.
A study of the most important crops of the South;
their history, cultivation, improvement, adaptability,
marketing; insect and disease pests, etc.
Field Crops II:-Second year, second semester.
Twoafternoons a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two credits.
A continuation of Field Crops I with more attention
to special crops.
Farm Management and Accounts:-Second year, 2nd
semester.
Three periods a week. Lectures, laboratory and
recitations. Two and one-half credits.
The business side of farming in general, agronomic
and economic; with special attention to the keeping
of farm records, not merely of the farm as a whole
but of each enterprise.
Agricultural Botany:-First year, second semester.
Two periods a week, laboratory or lecture. One
and one-half credits.
Page Thirty-two





Seed structure, germination and growth of agricul-
tural plants. Identification of weed seeds, and meth-
ods of control. Purity and germination tests of agrie
cultural seeds, and the importance of pure seeds.
Some attention will be given to the seed laws of the
State.
Agricultural Chemistry:-First year, second semester.
Five periods a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Three credits.
The composition and chemistry of the growth of
plants and animals; and the application of general
chemistry to the farm in relation to soils, fertilizers,
etc.
Plant Pathology and Bacteriology:-Second year, 2nd
semester.
Three times a week. Lectures, recitations and lab-
oratory. Two and one-half credits.
A study of plant diseases due to fungi and bacteria;
sources and modes of infection; life history, preven-
tion and control. Some of the elementary principles
of bacteriology will be given from a practical view-
point.
GENERAL SCIENCE SUBJECTS.
Applied Mathematics:-First year, first semester.
Two periods a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. One and one-half credits.
A study of the first principles of algebra and geom-
etry, and their practical application to the' computa-
tion of areas, volumes; problems of building, etc. will
receive some attention.
Botany:--First year, first semester.
Two periods a week, lecture, or laboratory. One
and one-half credits.
A study of the external organs of flowering plants,
roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds, their
relation to each other and to the environments.
Page Thirty-three





Chemistry:-First year, first semester.
Five times a week. Lectures, recitations and lab-
oratory. Three credits.
General descriptive chemistry, including the fun-
damental chemical theories and laws.
Entomoiogy:-Second year, first semester.
Three periods a week. Lectures, recitations and
laboratory. Two and one-half ceedits.
The general structure and classification of insects,
with special attention to the structure of mouth parts;
the life history and habits o' ecunumic insects; insec-
ticides.
Physics:-Second year, first semester.
Five times a week. Lectures, recitations and lab-
oratory. Three credits.
The fundamental laws and principles of physics
and their application to the common things of life
including a study of solids, fluids, heat, sound, light,
magnetism and electricity.
Physiology and HygiBne:-First year, first semester.
Two periods a week. Lectures and recitations,
A study of the anatomical sturcture and physiolo-
gical functions of the human body; a careful study of
the factors of health will be included.
HUMANISTIC SUBJECTS.
English, Review:-First year, fi! st semester.
Three class periods a week. A thorough review of
English Grammar.
English, Literature and Composition:-First year,
second semester.
Three class periods a week. Two credits.
A study of literary principles and some master-
pieces of literature, with the view of developing an
apprecition for the best in literature. Frequent
compositions will be required.
P'aye Thi rty-fovr





Argumentation: -Second year, first semester.
Two class periods a week. One and one-half
credits.
A study in reasoning, briefing, defending proposi-
, tions; methods of collecting and classifying material;
class room practice will be given in defending special
agricultural propositions.
Public Speaking:-Second year, second semester.
Two periods a week. One and one-half credits.
The fundamentals of eff:ect;'e public speaking and
practice in delivering extemporaneous and short ad-
dresses.
American History and Civics:-First year, 2nd semester.
Three periods a week.
A re,'iew of American History and Government,
e'ith special emphasis on the state of Florida.
General Economics:- Second year, first semester.
Five class periods o week. Three credits.
A study of the elementary principles of economics,
and their application to existing conditions and pro-
blems.
Rural Economics and Sociology:-Second year, second
semester.
Five class periods a week. Three credits.
Historical sketch of modern agriculture, factors of
agricultural production, distribution of the agricul-
tural income, and problems of rural social life.
PROFESSIONAL SUBJEGTS
History of Education:-First year, first semester.
Five periods a week. Three credits.
A study of the leading educational reforms.
Vocational Education:-First year, second semester.
Five periods a week. Three credits.
A brief history of vocational education; provisions
for agriculture' education in this and other states
Page Thirty-five





and countries; types of secondary schools of ag-
ricu'ture; etc.
Educational Psychology:-Second year, First semester.
Five periods a week. Three credits.
A study of the general principles of psychology
and their application to educational methods.
Agricultural Pedagngy:- Second year, second semester.
Three periods a week. Two and one-half credits.
Organization, equipment an'd administration of
agricultural schools; organization of the course of
study and the methods of presentation.
Prcatice Teaching:-Second, year, first and second
semester.
One afternoon a week. Two credits.
Supervised practice in teaching, or the professional
laboratory. The work will include actual teaching,
observation, criticism and reports of class exercises.
Page Thirty-si3










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