• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 State board of education
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Faculty
 Faculty committees
 General information
 Courses of study
 Industrial and household arts...
 The agricultural courses
 Catalogue of students
 Alumni register
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Twenty-fifth Annual Catalogue 1911-1912; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College, Tallahassee, Florida
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000102/00001
 Material Information
Title: Twenty-fifth Annual Catalogue 1911-1912; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College, Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1912
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000102
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB3230
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
        Page 1
    State board of education
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 6
    Calendar
        Page 7
    Faculty
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Faculty committees
        Page 10
        Page 11
    General information
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Courses of study
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Industrial and household arts courses
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The agricultural courses
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Catalogue of students
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Alumni register
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Index
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text










SERIES IV JULY, 1912 NUMBER 3
I EBULLETIN
OF
THE FLORIDA
- o. .'
-GSRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
COLLEGE
- FOR NEGROES .
Tallahassee
-, .. .1911-1
IAT m~UT
TL'E'Tr-FTLF IFTH ANNUA *S-TAIAOGUE





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
His Excellency, Governor A, W. Gilchrist. *
President
Hon. W. M. Holloway, Superintendent of Public In-
struction, Secretary
Hon H., Clay Cra.wf rd ereary of $tate
Hon. P. W. Trammel, Attorney General
Hon. J. C Luning,.Treasurer
. I --. F ,- .fi
BOARD OF. CONTROL
Hon. P. K. Yonge, Chairman Pensacola
Hon. A. L. Wartman ......Citra-
Hon. T. B. King. .. .Arcadia
Hon. W. D. Finlayson .... .. Old Town
Hon. F. P. Fleming ., Jacksonville
Hon. J. G. Kellum, Secretary....... Tallahassee
PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE
N. B. Young, Presidentof the College. Chairman
J. C.Wright, Dean of the Academic Department, Secre-
[tary
F. C. Johnson, Auditor, Director of the Industrial and
[Household Arts Department
F. H. Cardozo, Director of the Agricultural Depart-
*'' : 9 e [ment
W. H. A. Howard, Commandant t,
Miss M. E. Melvin, Dean of Women
J ~ ~ ~ -H





CONTENTS
BOARD OF EDUCATION 4
BOARD OF CONTROL -- 4
CALENDAR -
FACULTY 8
GENERAL INFORMATION -- 12
ACADEMIC COURSES 25-44
THE INDUSTRIAL AND HOUSEHOLD ARTS COURSES 37
THE AGRICULTURAL COURSES -- 56
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS -- 4
GENERAL& R.,S -...- 74
ALUMNI REGISTER 75
INDEX 80
* NJ'





-; -. --
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- i.
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*. eesspp~s-,~~; --md --
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A A





CALENDAk
1912
Sept. 26 Thursday Boarding Department Opens
Sept.27 Friday
Sept.28 Saturday Entrance Examinations
Sept.30 Monday,
Oct. 1 Tuesday First Semester Begins
Nov. 28 Thursday Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 25 Wednesday Christmas Holiday--
1913
Jan. 1 Wednesday Emancipation Day
Jan. Farmers Institute
Feb. 1 Saturday Second Semester Begins
Mar. 3 Monday Inter-Class Debate
May 23 A;.ddA -* .. ;
May 24 Saturday gricultural Conference
May 25 Sunday a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon
May 25 Sunday p. m. Annual Sermon to Religious
[Societies
May 26 Monday Anniversary of Literary Socie-
May 27 Tuesday Annual Musical Recital [ties
May 28 Wednesday Class Day
May 29 Thursday Commencement
A>:





'rr- r
'--. F.ACULTY
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M.. (Oberlin College) President.
Professor of Ecronomis atd Philosophy
FREDERICK. C. JOHNSON, B. S.,. (Armour Institute) Auditor.
Director of Dseparntmnt oflndustrial and household Arts
- Professor of Physics and Mathematics
JOHNt. WRIGHT; A. B,- (Oberlia Colege) Secretary.
Dean of;Aoadtlien-Department; .. -
, '- P-'ofssia;r tfJUga.sh and Latin ..
FRANCTS -H. CARD-OO.- C.Gbill agriculturall Colege)
D-- fiwtepf arforbseiaofAgriebdtrs,4 .
, P_.ro's. r.f--rCUitare ....:
MARY E. Mi turte) .Deaof ;
*W a ..Teai.chr We.t a i.h .4 *./i
WILLIAM I- A. t (f
* is- 8 --- oPaa act^or is
n-$ ... .p.Wfif .- -x .. ,,.---s ?t -.
*:1 fVJirTTe. JQiNES, B& S., j ELLEN O. PAiGE,. (Vienn S*io b' .:
na8tructor Nno ls>, ;;-* *.., .^r-,
LULA M.CROPPER; (Tuslkegee i'titute)I.brarian and oikg'iarr
Teacher of Erglsh ad.i Pedagogy '-.'.
JOHN F. MATHEUS,- A. B., (Western Reserve University)
:L;.2i f i;4Y,;lbiida4?; .ad MA. College) .
. -- fit- ..
'VlIGlt.-"F4Y"..:t'iki2 'k Aand Provident- Hospitals)
'. :S-pe'tlst-Jao atLt and
9 -... _,ae ._ ~ei. _. Training and Physiology
WILLIAM H.. CRiJTCHER, (Tuskegee Institute)
uncarc* 6r in $ckng and Farming
EVALENA A, DAVIS, 'Pra;tfinstitute)
. I'ructor in Cooking .
JESSIE F. STEPHENS A. B,- (OhioState.niversity,
.Ast. Profeqsor of Engl i





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL CuLLEGE 9
-BEATRICE M. HUDSON (Talladega College and Oberlin Conhstr-
Instructor in Music [vatoryof Muek-
THOMAS S. JOHNSON (Hampton Institute)
, Instructor in Wheelwrightitnq and Blacksmithing
WALTER A. ARMWOOD (Florida A. & M. College)
Instructor in Carpentry and Mechanical Drawing
EDNA M. JENKINS (Fisk University)
', Instructor in Englsh and Millinery
DENNIS A. STARKS (Tuskegee Institute)
Instructor in Animal Hubbandry
- NANCY ODEN, B. S. (Talladega College)
- Matron in charge of *Housekeeping ',
'CECELIA BRADLEY (Florida A. & M. College '
Matron in charge of Laudry.
ESTELLE JOHNSON (Wilberforce University)President's Secr-
Teacher oj Stenography and Typewriting. (tary.
RUFUS J. HAWKINS. A. B. (Howard University)
I nstructor in Mathematics.
OLIVE L. HARRISON (Florida Baptist Academy)
Instructor in Plain Scwing. ,
EDWIN F. ENS IL
. --. _, E_ ,. f ........ 1t'~,,,.,,,ig.
ANDREW D. MARTIN (Tuskegee Institute)
: Istructor in Printing.
BENNETTA COCHRAN (Spellman Sentnary);
Assistant Superintendent of Hospital
*ALICE M. GIBBS, B. S. (Florida A.-and M. College)
Instructor in English' -
FRANK C. ROBINSON (Florida A. and M. College)
Farm Demonstrator. : ,
A MA Student Assistants
PALMA E. HOLLOWAY, Bookkeeper, Presidents Office.
POPE B'-LLUPS, Stenographer. Auditor's Office. -
WALDENCE NIXON, Assistant, Chemistry Laboratory -
GILBERT B. RIVERS, Assistant, Painting





. -19. i TE FLORiA Aemtuv waa AT ND'MECRANICAL COLLEGE
FACULTY CMM, ITTEES
The aol the ColUeget ls-.Iimido ermb re allf acomuifteet
METAt8: N. E. Oden, Chairan E A. Davis, D A. Sbaks,
.-?,- *, .. .
LltV StcIrq. J.. bths,. Chairman, J. F. Stephenl
. D. .. Attaway r' r '-' -.' :.
_M : ,.NCEMEN- W ._ Ih.... .
- GJ3. EMEnIn ~ W'itte, -Chai:rman,J.F.Stpi enB B. M. HoBl n -.
INTER CO LEGIkWt ...A .E. 1a. r'
Matheus, J. C Wriglht.. -,
.-- ^^^^fi~_ltr4'4. .'_-ei.aSa'_. ; .-I -w. ~H.
A :- :.;i!l9.5Stbka ,a i Jnar^in- ^
.- ... = ;'. .. r ct'~ ~,_ .. .. '
ATLETICS: (Wei.),O D.EAZtadEEt;B Jodesm 0L.
flarrns.on ..--
COE. .C E RMS: E. B. Jones, Chairman, W. H.,A. Howard, A.D.
_ .= .--.- .' .. ..
~'~~ a"~~-~~~": "~~~-~-i~ '_J ,o~,,-,~... C. J. right
-t, c:an,. E.' -elv
' *. ta-ltinA Chkaan ataM. t harann,
*,e ; ^Cr sE- L ; r _.. Mt.---
^ ~LlB_~0 kt^ W _EX W:rB, E. Aer.swUi.
' ~LECTURCTfE E'enkins
F;:, F. ..i .
-, -'*.-"r' "





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 11
VISITORS: W. H. A. Howard, Chairman,N.E. Oden, D. A. Starks,
COMMUNIT WORK: E. B.Jones, Chairman, L. A. Cropper, D. E,
A.ttaway.
HOSPITAL: V. Hilyer, Chairman, W. H. A. Howard, M. E.Melvin,
SCHOJARSH!! J.C.Wright. Chairv,B I, E.Melvin,F.C. Johng.
r ...... ... .jr ;~





. u ..i. _. .-
... -'- ;"- -''..' ...,-- ,- .:
-;' p- Ai- ;Allti ~: Jidusri i
^:, a,,v s, .
r : ''' .-....,- ;. ,, .;. ', _,,i. x-. .
In 1881, the College was moved to its preset site,
:: t;: -/. ~,~ -/. _'-". -;-:~ ;~ )-*-'*fh
3 ...:.,,q..,- .-instituti o ...o
- nR-d bh-t-i'^Ar'1iw by
t-~; ~ .:5 j~. esdent ...;.
;'i~ 181 th C el iee waovedtoits Drse iwten
-res ie~ I. ,dPe siden-
:.: .-... '- .~:,-. '
~':;':?:~~~~~~~





'ih PLOBIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECRHANICAL COLLGE 13
: SUPPORT :
The College is supported by annual appropriations
from the State and Federal Governments. It wa- es-
tablished by the State as a training school for teachers.
This feature of its work is still maintained. (See de- -
scription of the English-Normal Course.
ADMISSION ,
Candidates for admission to any class must pass a
satisfactory examination in the subject of the nextlow-
er class, or if from another school, present cetiffiates
with transcript of- records made during last year. Ap-
plicants for admission to Grammar C class must be 15
years old, and must have a fair knowledge of arithme-
tic, English grammar, and descriptive geography, and
must also be able to tead intelligently and to write leg-
ibly. Applicants meiusl be of good reputation and, if
from another institution of learning, mustjbriDg a e-
tificat.. .
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the-College are few and simple,
appealing to the student's self-respeet'and personal re-
sponsibility. .
Students are not allowed to loaf, to use intoxica-.- -
ting liquors or tobacco.. in any iorA gamble, or to
bavepr use firearms. '
411 punishment is by demerits as follows:^ftve
denerits make one warning, or mark; ten demeits,
'~i .. In F-.





14 TiE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
twEo- warnings or marks; fifteen demerits, in any one
sesBii make a student liable to suspension, Suspend-
. *-':id e.ay be reiinstated by the Pruditial Co,-
- ihittee:'A.-ttd e t ft. '
a '^tin:'l ng 'iig-nstlie dofie in the College laundry,
and-' :" u in!i: nbt '- adlo'w& to have laundering g
done elsewierei e- 'ep; sp ereadieasjon from the
President. A11 qlpthing, must be marked, with TND L-
IBLE3 s --
Setll lhA vi ddthqnselres wFit!n a
r-.Sheee .' -: i ilt 0Wjr ?. : .-
, White S.hir Pi -..
*3. Co ;. .-l;GB ..- .. -;
'] '-. '~~,, .,.~..-.';avy Blue Hat .
^ ..l. .4,,e rmderdlirta are unneessary;
^^^ : Btw's Ltu" t'
. ,* ... .^;::... ....,S^ .. ..
3 -_f __.. -- i ---. C a id''-
6 W~iitg SCitats -.6iteN'injc-e
; _#t's,'-4 -.. .





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 15
Parents and guardians are advised, in mnnal ng re-
mittances for students, to send money by postal money
order, express money order or registered letter direct
to the President. He will not be responsible for money
sent to students. All request for students to come
home or to be withdrawn must be made to the President.
LIBRARY AND READING BOOM
The Carnegie Library has four thousand volumes
of reference works and textbooks and others selected
with regard to the needs of the College.
Twenty-five periodicals and twelve daily paies are
taken for the reading room.
A collection of pamphlet reports ad- government
documents are being selected and classified for the
shelves. ,
The aim of the institution is to make the library a
working center. Much of the class-room work is done
by teachers' assignments to the'library for reading and
study. -- :ffi? -
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Although the College is non-sectarian yet it' is
Christian. In addition to the daily devotions, preach-
ing and Sunday School services on the campus, there is
an active Young Men's Christian Association and a
Young Women's Christian Association.
LITERARY SOCETES -I
There are three litera eties: the Aerme fr
HigW School men, the Philomatean Debating Club -for
all Senior School students; and' the Tucker for the
young women.
. .~~~~~~





1' TBE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
The Grammar A and B classes have fortnightly
llter ei under direction' of the teacher of
EnigiiA^h;ction with classroom exercises.
- : K '
,.. ^-^-*-'"MS'"RiCALEXERCISES '
,. . A P -
' The lat Mon4y night in each month is given t6
. '"'" -s -" '- ,
-: .. ..-, ..-.t ,- ,,;;.8 .-. 1 .,
-. L,3 j1- .. .. .
~' .'-". :':.r'-'; '--' GC.. ;.': -';:-'- .' ..--*': '. '.' ; -
,t, .... ..' -.;.* '.. '-
r;b
command of4te ;ajor 'o'ie-i"' i. The -'lajir is
,*...~ A u'dtant..E.acb_.cownyi a command-
V 1*en most
."^-< ~': e,- i'oh. i.erLeete.. in order- to
A tZ &*t*tiitelhditrtlilttb
its o'T :i3 "d obedizene, as-well-as to give an
ner ^ ^-'Js6yand high regard
fori8:- ,fla.lnttaon meet in
eouvSFX~ Q'.s .. --stt...ertaining to
the Baclbt;|8bWeit js presided
od ver baty alionirM A-.
'n TheL r the battalion
a twmd comprising .fritfin :i'iru''m'sc.
I. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ,





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHArICAL COLLEGE 17
UNIFORMS
As a matter of economy and of good appearance,
the students are required to wear a uniform. "'lke
young women's suit is made of blue percale and codts
two dollars, ($2.00). For spring and fall,they wear a
blueready-to-wear hat. The.young men's uniform is
made of blue flannel. and with the cap, costs ten doL
ars and fifty cents. ($10.50) -
These uniforms are made in the College shops and
are sold at actual cost. The patrons are therefore urged
not to buy citizen's stIis for their children, but-:f wad
nhiey to the President with which to buy _.-" tf --I
bfrm suits. Upon application, samifpes' f the girls' uni-
fbrm goods wil. be sent. ..
- EXPENSES '
Tuition is free.
Board and room rent, including lights adf r .
latitdering, etc.,$t Sif' .".-. '.o.00
Hospital ffr. 25cts per day while sick in addition to board.
ltgistratioi Fee..._-......... ....... _. ---.... 2.00-
Breakage.. Students will pay according to valuation.
OPPORTUNITY TO REDUCE EXPENSES
A limited n-jnaer of earnest youfg men and young
women will be allowed t- work out apart of their.
board and laundry:- expenses. 4 t for tf k.'i
privilege must be mnader in 'wrtinav accepted before'
arrival. Jv ;
* -* -'* '* .





18 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
All money earned by students in the performance
of laborit.the institution will, be remained to be used
only fo^ifraiying their expenses while&' i'atterdance
here aColege.
-, '. .' .
." RIULES '-EGARDINGDEFFC ENT RECORDS
For Higb and Senior Schools
* .r--rMAierd i'below 60 in any subject are defieint. A
M dSefieik_.ner"d is a failure.if below r -anld aonSditioln
if abore 50a. A'- 4ai
-:: .l failures and onmditiols m tt*ff'#ent 'e .Wre a
* :'~-'--e .SoEatalogue :c~ia ita*'iioegg
natla'tiogws. -lub Ivi prevent
'-* grO adtiion. "- -.. ..-.
:' *'.i[ttr'a. *_ -._eat' -? subject
Ain'-ot Ws selew t 4 us- remfect
t-A tal. wee.,U. e., o ,. ..
'. -Ofd .ti rent,7'. qi- ~cB .ii'nation
which is giren within two wree's ater te begnnig of
f :~.~'~te(dle uilWl be o loed o too take o dy thuo
ff(;ti^ reMwiaSldfd'4 tjre'peatving the subject in class as
- W'g-as sched.i program --
- -i;~rwi rial tgOvfi"s'yeirnablea by the student's
.-peMW et^'sachA work as is designated by the instructor.
l* ':'-E'..-'l' g^i'slrekantfw$in wuil bei gra nted the
.*ut.nete fo8r. graduation for re-
* m~O4.:n..nS.et'ered.- duri_ :tnfe Seior Year.
theI o d^'A"-.0 jnt becomes deficient by
provondat its^ tOic in the sub-
' c





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 19
ject under some one approved by the President; otherwise
it is ranked as a failure; This special instruction must
cover the work done by the student's class during his ab-
sence.
Four is the maximum number of academic subjects a
sitdenit may take during anysemester, including repeated
subjects.
For Gramimar School
Grammar School Students making-a general average
of 65'% wiU be promoted provided that they do not fall
below .50% in any subject. ..... .
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
- It is the policy of the College to keep in close and
sympathetic touch with its graduates. 'The alumni have
organized and aredoing good work for their alma mater.
Mr. E. B. Jones, Tallahassee, Fla., is the President;
.Mr. J. Hi. Fraziket5- igt" "W"001044ra0 _*
dent; Mr J. H. Hargrett, Apalaehicola, Fla., is the Sec-
retary; Mrs. Adelaide Jackson, Tallahassee, Fla., is the
Treasurer.
LECTURES
During the year 1911-1912 the follow Iectures
were delivered before the students and tes in the
College Chapel: :-
1911 '
NOVEMBER 13 .- -- ..-..- International Peace interpreted
MR. J. F. MATHEUS, Asst. Professor of Economics and Physics
. :!





* TBn F LORIDA AORICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COzEGE
November l.1-7 s*si4 v----X-4-tr't 1- Sermon1
REV. S A L- Ms; Presiding Elder, JacksonviTle'bistict
December. J-....'-, Lectures
.M 1 HOLLOWAY, Secretary of the Y. W C. A.
De-e.. ''.; -', iir..n ., ._--.,^..Sermon
; R EV^te'z-mDi>'W ftb. dovi1tiI .
'S ------t ... .....-...... Enmerson's Value to the Student
...ersh --. ... .._-, .-': it ,. .: .
Dece .19. i .........l-.- ,..:a-Nie App-ioi4 N n o Emerson
_- -.. : oio '.' Db; ., l.Jacksonvile .
'*'.r-g -
. -. "."' ";. .'2 d* --S j' l. .;-. ,. ..
'e "! 6__ _-- --.--... Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking.
_'-:.. ....... q,_ M.C.A.;t'
, p~..-' ~ .i;,29iazi~j..':'t--~_?.; ^ -.,- r Paintings -of the Wirld
*Katie^*s "- *-f iw5a4DASong -Recital
......-,-?;~_.,- ..'^ L. ... W
March 1i,-: '.2-t.- .-,t- Song Reeital
March 30o. = .-. Q.,- : t 3,- hy of the Ocean
-N R. F. f-e.i theCollege
iify. ye G --- 3 Sr inw and Growth
iR:-W. H.A.HownAa,A,- efit i iics in the College
;'-''... . '* -
"" ', .' I' _- ', '~ "'.i.:-:"_'?*:---'





COURSES OF STUDY
GENERAL STATEMENT
The Academic Department offers three courses: An
English-Normal Course, a Scientific Course and a course
in vocal and instrumental music.
The Agricultural Departmentofferscourses indairy- :9
ing, truck-gardening, poultry raising,anint-Phisbadiy, .-
farm management,elementary agriculture, horticulture,
and school gardening, agricultural botany and agricul-
tural chemistry.
: The Department of Industrial and Household Arts of-
fers courses in wood and iron-working, manual training, -
drawing, painting, tailoring, printing, 'ooking, launder-
ing, millinery, nurse-training, plain sewing, dress.sak .
ing. sLQRO
OUTLINE OF ACADEMIC COURSES
: Grammar School .
- -..*,.' (GRADES)
C & B CLASSES .A CG p S
. Arithmetic Arithfrtic-5 *
Geography -U.: ptry-6
Grammar E
Reading Piyslogy-2
Physiology
* Arabic numerals indicate the number of recitations ,i-win
each s',fject per week. .."
._.* ..........- t y l~'





* --
3 *'^ie'xok& AGRICULTUrRAL AND MECHANiCAL C6LLEGE
.t .A ~-i ..
ENGLISH COUFi ? .- '''TSCfENTIFIC CGURSE
"-3' .- FIRST YEAR
ITt SEKEMEdSTE:2d SEMESEMTgR-:MTh.t-E:SE, Ed2 SEESTER
.Algebrai.-e'- Y1wr-T. i";_A, a i- Alebra I-5
. -A .- O,. t4 eivs Bp'a'y-5
r ..E -., .._ -. .:, .- .
Algebral-5.. [ea'-5 fa^ oGi-ety .
Nistory 1 Ph5i1 yolt J.-
English I' II5 n -,Jglish 4f lia;'''-1'-.'_ t ..
-".
-ENG.-NCIRMAL COURSE COLLEGE SCIENTIFIC COURSE
Pedag. "-.. Bio.'--.ilogy ..-
Hiwr Pbwfl .,Wjelar0 ir2. fa VL-2
E ; ngf1ish IUnt; Pedagogy -5- Ch.-fMtry 1-5
Ethics 14 V-5
i.gli.4 V-3.l.i n -
;-,~.-:':: ~'i.~~~~~~~~-;t .:~~:~ ...,''. ,
.: ':':' 'x~~~~~~~~~~~~~l~~~-.-;.: ";.' "'"..' o -





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 23
JUNIOR
Geometry II[--5 Geometry 111--5
The Cbemi&try 11-5 Chemistry 11-5
Physics 111--3 Physics III-3
English-Normal English VII--3 English VIi-3
Psycbology--3 Ethics-3
Course does not SENIOR
Chemistry III--5 Chemistry III-5
extend beyond Biology 11-5 Biology II--5
Economics II-5 Astronomy--3
the A Class. Geology-3 Geology--3
Sociology--2
OUTLINE OF AGRICULTURAL COURSES
Grammnar'School
1st SEMESTER 2nd SEMESTER
Elementary Agriculture--3 Elementary' Agriculture--3
Practical, Animal Husbandary--5 Practical Animal Husbandry-5
Practical Vegetable Gard'g--5 Practical Vegetable Gard'g--5
High School
ENGLISH--NORAAL AND SCIENTIFIC COURSES
1st SEMESTER 2nd SEMESTER
School Gardening--2 Agricultural Botany--5
School Gardening-2
SECOND YEAR
Horticulture I-5 Horticulture I--5
Senior School
FIRST YEAR A ;
Agronomy--3 airytry--3
.SECOND YEAs:. '
Horticulture II--3 Poultry .Husbandry--3





4 TiEn FLORIDA AGROCLTUiAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
OUTLINE OF INDUSTRIAL AND TOUSEHO.LD
' ,'' ARBS COURSES
.'- .f' .. ... ... ..
..I-,.'- .Grammar School' '" .
' -" 1. .-
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, -" i ^ a -* }
- *:'- '-., figh B Seiool .,, ',. ... r .-:
Trades .r^- .. l-.'e l.t : n -
MeCahiaeaJ'D'awib_ ... :... Eokifiw'if ..d-Urx ', ;? .
FreehgnA Dra:iV. 1., .
'r 4
, "" ':'~.- -"- ;,,~ s F j :- i *.' i--h.e -
_- *- ,,: t.-_. "-t'g- i ^ f;, ....c, : .-. -s. |" -
* A, A Freshman anabSooB more cIeasse p. '. -,
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"~~'~ ~~ ''","?~"--.',;~,,, ...





TlIE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 25
LHE ACADEMIC COUiSES'
The Academic Department offers two coui'i eex-
.tending through three schools as follows: The Granmar
School with the usual grammar schooll branches, the
High School with aft English-anda Scientific Course and
the Senior School with a two-year English-Normal
Course and a four-year College Scientific Course.
Courses in vocal music, penmanship, -orthography,
and nature study will be given in the Grammar SchooL
A course in freehand drawing will be given to the
girls of the High'School and all students of the ._Gra-
mar School.
Certificates will be given those who finish either of
the High School Courses, diplomas to those who finish
the English-Normal course, and the B. S. degree will
be conferred upon those who finish the Scientific Course.
A course in instrumental music is also offered.
-*
Chemistry L (For Senior Normal Students and
Sophomores.) This is a one-year course; its design is to
give the student a knowledge of the fundamental prim-
ciples underlying inorganic chemistry, and to quaint
him with the more common elements, theirbompounds,
and their industrial application. Th is' a five-unit ;i
course; three units of reeitation,- let and demon-
strations and two units of laboaorfk (equivalent
to four recitation units) per week.
Textbooks:-Newell's Descriptive Chemistry ad
Newell's Experimental Chemistr. .
S*





g 6 TRi FLORmBA AGAICULTURAL ANm MCitANm1CAL eLLEGE
- C -._ '.- :! :. :: .- ,
Cheni- et. For uJniomrs.)i TioT -is a one-year
-. _A- aS'eJ -if4ie tie foUlowiag: .T1 firat sanester
8 d'dSibgb aa6w... -..s: tions
'.. .... dedn
damental' k, i-
umetric analysis and a working knowledge dof tlie meth-
:-~ j | sa 1X1 W- .....
siial ca1benonf-
't
>~b~~~t~ l. .dht
Mal A-. '. W





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE W
-. Laboratory experiments performed by the student
. himself accompany this course and supplement the
' demonstrations given by the instructor.
, Textbook:-Gage's Introductio to Physieal Science.
- Physics II This is Physics I with stress upon me-
chanics and solution of the mathematical problems involve
ing the laws of the several departments of the subject.
Textbook:-Mann and Twiss' Physics and Nation-
al Laboratory Note Book. -
Physics IL Thi course will consist of a deeper
s tudy of mechanics, thermodynamics and electricity than
can be given in Course II., and will be conducted by
means of lectures and laboratory work. Five hours
through Junior year.
Astronomy. This course concerns itself primarily
^with the mathematical calculations necessary to a- clear
understanding of the solar system, accompained by
telescopic observations and a study of the principal con-
stellations of the sidereal system,. ...
Textb boofe----fcb'sf' 7' .-'*- ., '
Biology I. (For Freshmen.) This is course in
general. biology, and is pursued as follows:
:-' L ife (1) Invertebrates
Animal Life (2) Vertebrates
t (3) Economic Importance
. ...
X .a (1) Structure "' .
Plant Life (2) unietions A
(3) Economic Importance '
The type forms of each class animals arfsidied system-
atically; dissections and drawings of the sA*ie ae made.
Class work is vigorously supplemented with cdlitdiral
reading on the economic aspects of the subject. Three





f- Wts FolORLDA tCRlCnJLTTURAL AND MECHANWCAL COLLEGE
reactionn unit and t-v laboratory units. equivalent to
eifftCrw Tper.-week. ; .
Text ,.sis- ftV'TT' sleteeld. --(b)- N4t.nal
Loose,? 1#mtoa&,r
s^s&^.^~*mB Iratory'Gu;ide; -.
-,- .-er" S"' 't'rs )^' T.is -ourse
-..e ,~' --;V _l& -tei .ive 4t. "-
...1....P The, .- ^- .cf P,'t.tia 6ugk';tupf
ploration. Spec"ia'-" -~ift a .rnji: ::...'
*biase._h tim eAe. r l
is ap~dU~ii P en~aXW? m; W8g:
h -bk ene d :e
ploration. Special i....... e.:ti -ij.rl
;~ ~ ~ '- -"''-. '4 ; t li i a





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 3t
Surveying. This subject is taught during one sem-
ester and concerns itself with problems that naturally
arise from the topography in the region of the College.
Five hours.
Textbook:-To be selected.
ENGLISH
English A-I. This course covers the work in
grammar of the Grammar School, preparatory to English
I. and is based upon Arnold and Kittredge's Mother
Tongue Series, Books I and II
English A-II. This is a course in elementary com-
position designed to develop in the pupil the power of
observation, reflection, imagination, and self-expression,
to nourish and stimulate the.mind with a rich and varied
subject-matter.
Textbook:'-Frederick H. Sykes' Elementary Eng-
lish Composition.
English L Required of all students of the first
year in the High School. Five recitations per week
throughout the year.
It is the'aim of this course to develop ease and spon-
taneity.of expression. Toward this end constant practice
in theme-writing is given.t The student will draw-his
material for this purpose from the great wealth of stories,
mythological and legendary, which forms the source
from which great writers have drawn their inspiration.
The theme-writing will be developed along the narrative
and descriptive line, and some work in exposition will
be done in preparation for the work'of the second year.
As an example of straightforward -narrative, the stu-





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.... ~- .rig~::_a?-~' "'3Pi, -,ot.a ''
- ,EnAl Wwdn" is used as a..
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-.' -'~:;
fu n :i :,isi ':
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I h L Ih LORIDA AGRICULTRaAL ANEDW ICA-N1CAL CeLLE9E- 3S
SUMMARY OF THE, YEAR'S WORK.
History of the language, 10 weeks; Prologue of Canter--
bury Tales, 3 weeks; Twelfth Night, 5 weeks; Pilgrim's
Progress, 2 weeks; DeCoverley Papers, 4 weeks; Ad--
dison (Macaulay's Essay), 3 weeks; Burns (Carlyle's:
Essay), 4 weeks; Rhetoric, 3 weeks; Silos Marner, 4
weeks.
English III. Required of all students in the third
year of the high school. Three recitations per week for
one year.
In this course the student makes a more extended
study of the principles of rhetoric. The four forms of'
discourse receive special attention, and the work is illus-:
trated by reading American short stories. In connec-
tion with the work, students are taught how to gather.
material for a theme, and the development of the brief.
for argumentation. Burke's Speech on Conciliation
will form the basis for the study of argunlntation.
The student will then take up the work of formal de-
bate, and later conclude the year's work by formal
character study through the medium of Macbeth.
SUMMARY OF THE YEAR'S WORK
Rhetoric,- 4 weeks; Burke's Speeeh on Conciliation, 6
weeks; Debate, 3 weeks; Macbeth, 5 weeks.
English. IV. A general historical surveyofEnglish
literature. The most important facts in the lives of
the authors of the various periods are studied, in con-
nection with as careful and critical a study of one or.
more works of each as the time will permit. The stu-
dent is required to keep a notebook containing' outlines
of the different periods in English literature, history





34f THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
together with notes on classroom talks by the instruc-
tor, and special library work. Three hours throughout
the year. -
Textbook:-Painter's History of English L;tera't re
supplemented by Painter's Elementary Guide to Liter-
ary Criticism.
English V.- The first semester will be devoted to
a thorough review of English grammar, with special
emphasis upon sentence analysis, and the parts of
speech. The second semester will be devoted to a
study of the pedagogy of English.
This course is designed tobe of special service to
those who are preparing to teach, and is open to mem-
bers of the Senior A Class, English-Normal 'Course.
Three hours throughout the year.
Textbook:-Ailen's Review of Eiglish Grammar;
Carpenter, Baker and Scott's Teaching of English in
Secondary Schools.
English VI. Required of all Freshmen. The aim
of this course is to develop facility of expression. To
this end weekly themes will be required upon subjects
within the range of the student's comprehension and:
experience. These themes will cover the four forms
of composition, with special emphasis upon exposition.
Two hours throughout the year.
English VII. Open to Sophomores is a course in
argumentation and debate. Emphasis is placed upon the
principles of correct reasoning, the cllec ting and weigh-
ing of evidence, the making of briefs and the con-
struction of the forensic. Each member of the class
will be required to draw up a brief, anid write a forensic
upon some proposition of his own choosing. Three
hours.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 35
Textbook:-Baker and Huntington's Principles of
A rgumenltation.
English VIIL Open to Juniors, is a course in the
origin and development of the English'drama through
Shakespeare. The debt which English dramatic writ-
ers owe to the dramatists of antiquity, the influence of
the church upon the stage, the study and analysis of the
plays of the pre-Shakespearean dramatists, and a care-
ful study of some of the greatest plays of Shakespeare,
will be the work of this course. Three hours, through-
out the year.
Textbook:--To be selected.
LATLN
The aim of the Latin Division, aside from the
mental training gained in translation and in the mastery
of the essentials of the language, is centered in the de-
velopment of a genuine appreciation for classic litera-
ture and in the building of a wider and more expressive
English vocabulary. The courses are made practical
by frequent lectures on Roman.,life. and customs and
the history of the period, illustrated by a set of 100
slides with a stereopticon.
Latin 1., This course is a study of the principles of
Latin grammar. In the reading lessons great impor-
tance is attached at first to the literal rendering into
English, and then the students are required to employ
the English idiom, which most clearly expresses the
thought of the Latin sentence. As far as possible in
the first year the students are made to compare English
and Latin words formed from the same root. Lectures
are given throughout the year to supplement the regular
work.
Textbook:--Bennett's First Year Latin.





36 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Latin II. Cicero classes are required to read at
least three orations, making a study of the history of
the time of Cicero's life. Drill in prose composition is
given once each week. Lectures with the lantern are
given during the course.
Textbooks:-Bennett's Cicero's Latin Composition
and Bennett's Latin Grammar.
Latin III. Virgil. Classes read at least three books,
rendering into the best English possible. Considerable
attention is given to scansion and mythological referen-
ces are required to be explained throughout the course.
Illustrated lectures are given.
Textbook:-Bennett's Virgil. -
Latin IV. Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia.
First half year. Drill in sight reading is given here
and special attention to the discussion of Roman philos-
ophy.
Textbooks:-(a) F. G. Moore's De Senectute and
(b) To be selected.
Latin V. Odes and Epodes of Horace. Second
half-year. In this course special study is made of the
theory- of Latin prosody.
Textbook:-Bennett's Horace.
HISTORY
History A. This course, offered in the Grammar
School, is a study of U. S. History and covers a period
of one year.
Papers are required consisting mainly of biogra-
phiesofr,the great men of thel'eriod studied and a
foundation is laid for civics.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE S7
The work for the first semester covers the Colonial
and Revolutionary periods, to the establishment of the
republic.
--' In the second semester the period from the estab-
lishment of the republic to the present time is covered,
Especial attention is given to territorial expansion and
development.
' Textbook:-Montgomery's Leading Facts in
American History and The Ivanhoe Historical Notebook
Series, Part i.
History I. This is a study of English'history.
This course develops the narrative of English history
from the Roman invasion to the present time.. Especial
attention is given to the development of institutions
such as Parliament, the church, the central and local
organs of justice, the borough, contest of King and Par-
liament, the Puritan revolution and the advance of Par-
liamentary government.
Papers are required from time to time, and impor-
-tant parts of the study are historical geography and the
constant use of maps.
Textbook:-Higginson and Channing's English His-
tory for Americans and The Ivanhoe Historical Notebook
Series, Part V.
History II. Ancient History is the subject of this
course. It is required of all students who do not take
Latin.
This course takes the student from the earliest his-'*
torical period to the invasion of the Roman empire by
the northern barbarian.
The indebtedness of the present to the past is
made clear.





38 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Particular attention is given the ancient republics.
The effect of the introduction of Christianity is espe-
cially noted. Short papers are required from time to
time. -
Textbook:-West's Ancient World. The Ivanhoe '
Historical Notebook Series, Part III.
History II. This is an advanced course in Ameri-
can history.
Special study is made of the Federal constitution;
Federalist supremacy; Jefferson system; Rise of nation-
al spirit; Jackson on democracy; Development and in-
fluence of the West; Slavery and abolition; Parties and
party government; Civil war; Peconsttruction and south-
ern problems; Growth of municipality; Railway expan-
sion: Rise of corporations.
Textbook:-Montgomery's Students' AmericanHis-
tory. The Ivanhoe Historical Notebook Series, Part LI
PEDAGOGY
Pedagogy I, This-course is a brief discussion of
the human soul'with a view to finding and formulating
the principles underlying the method of teaching.
The study is based upon Wentzlaff's The Mental Man.
(See Psychology I.)
Pedagogy II. This course discusses the formal use
of the laws of mental development in teaching, gener-
ally knownas methodology. The methods derived from
the discussions are "tried out" in a practice school under
the direction of a critic teacher.
Textbook:-McMurray's Method of the Recitation.





T h FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 33
Pedagogy IIL The history of education, based up-
on Monroe's History of Education, will be studied. ~
The three courses seek to prepare the intending
!teacher for intelligent and practical service in the comn-
I;mon schools of the state.
PSYCHOLOGY
Psychology I This course proposes a careful
study, from a pedagogical viewpoint, of mental phe-
-6' nomena based upon Bett's Mind and its Education. -
It is open only to Senior B class.
Psychology II. In this course a more critical study
of consciousness is based upon Angell's Psychology.
This course is open to Juniors. Three hours.
LOGIC
This course,open only to the Juniors, seeks to give a
working idea of laws of thought with a view to giving
? .the student a notion of systematic thinking. It is based
on'Taylor's Elementary Logic.
ETHICS
Ethics I. This course is a practical discussion of
rights and duties as brought out in personal relations
with the view.to giving the student correct ethical con-
cepts as rules of conduct. This course is open to the
Senior A Class.
Textbook:-Thilly's Introduction to Ethics.





40' THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE.
Ethics II. -In this course there is a more detailed
discussion of ethical theories as set forth in Dewey and
Tuft's Ethics, This course is open to the Seniors..
ECONOMICS
Ecitomics I. This course opens an elementary dis-
cussion of mat's effort at making a living,. based upon
Ely and Wicker's Economics.
Eeonomics II..:'This.is a more advanced' course in
the study of economic theory with stress upon the dis-
tribution of wealth.
Textbooks:-Ely's Outlines of Economics;
CIVICS
This course has as its purpose good and intelligent,-
citizenship. It not only embraces a study.. f the forms
of government known to us, but also a review of the-
leading facts in the history of this goyernmeut.
Textbook:-Lansing and Jones' Government in:
the United States.
TEXTS USED IN THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL
Grammar C
Moore and Miner's Practical Arithmetic.
Arnold & Kittredge's Mother Tongue, Book I.
Tarr i& MeMurry's Complete Geography.
L. H. Gulick's Good Health.





TiF FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 41
Arnold & Gilbert's Stepping Stones to Literature,
--Book 5.
;'-' Hazen's Graded Speller, Book II. "
Slocum's Practical Penmanship, No. 5.
Grammar B
Moore & Miner's Practical Arithmetic.
Arnold & Kittredge's Mother Tongue, Book II.
F Tarr & McMurry's Complete Geography.
Arnold & Gilbert's Stepping Stones to Literature.
Book 6.
Hazen's Graded Speller, Book II.
Slocum's Practical Penmanship, No. 6.
Grammar A
Moore & Miner's Practical Arithmetic.
F. H. Sykes' Elementary English Composition.
* Montgomery's Leading Facts in American History
(Rev. ed.)
L. H. Gulick's Control of Body and Mind.
Burkett, Stevens & Hill's Agriculture for Begin-
ners.
MUSIC
The College offers to its pupils a five years' course
in systematic piano-forte work by which the students
are to be graded and promoted. This course is so planned
as to enable the student to play good music well,
and with the addition of the "Elements of Harmony"
to be able to enter a conservatory after having com-
pleted the work here laid down. At the completion of
this course certificates of proficiency will be given.





42 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
The students in music are required to attend the
recitals, of which one is held each month. These exer-
cises are of two-fold value; namely, giving pupils prac-
tice in playing before others, and granting them the
rare opportunity of listening to well prepared music
from the best composers.
Students taking music must practice at least one
hour each day.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two
dollars and twenty-five cents, ($2.25), for eight lessons
of twenty minutes each.
This fee also includes the use of the music and in-
strument for practice.
First Grade
TECHNICS: Major scales in one and two octaves,
hands separate. Tonic triads in close position.
STUDIES: Landon's Foundation Studies; Matthew's
Graded Studies, Book 1; National Graded Studies;
Emery's Foundation Studies; Kcehler. op. 162 and 190;
easy compositions of Behr, Gurlitt, Bruneur, Lichner,
etc.
Second Grade
TECHNICS: Major scales in three octaves, harmonic
minor scales in one and two octaves, hands separate.
Broken major and minor triads.
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II.
(1st hatf); Spindler, op. 27., Books I and II; Loeschorn,
op. 66, Books land /; Gurlitt, op. 82, Books Iand II;
Spindler op. 44; selections from Merkel, Lange,
Schumann, Clementi, Lichner, Ritter and others.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 4S
Third Grade
TECHNICS: Major and harmonic minor scales in
Recur and five-note rhythms. Studies in broken triads
(continued.)
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II(2nd
.half); Burgmuller,op. 100, Books land II; Koehler, op.
157.
PIECES: Selection from Kullah, op. 62; Grade, op.
36; Mozart, No. I, Low; Lichner, op 49; Emery, Spind-
ler, and others.
R^~'> ~ Fourth Grade
TECHNICS: Major and melodic minor scales in six
and eight-note rhythms.
STUDIES: Matthew's Studies, Book III; Koehler, op.
130; Heller, op. 47; Czerney, op. 636 and 718.
PIECES; Wilm. op. 12; Schytte, op. 69; Bohm, op.
.27, No. 2; selections from Haydn, Kerchner, Whiln-
haupt, Heller, Scharwenckar, Schumann, and Lack.
Fifth Grade
TECHNICS: Scales in nine-note rhythms, scales in
contrary motion.
STUDIES: Heller, op. 46; Czerney, op. 718; Bach,
Twelve Little Preludes.
PIECES: Mendelsohn'sSongwithout Words, Cham-
inade, Godard, Nevin, Schytte, Jensen.
VOCAL MUSIC
The purpose of this course is to give the student an
elementary knowledge of sight singing.





4 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
The student is first allowed to sing by note, and is
led to observe differences in pitch, in tone, and relative
duration of sounds made. This is followed by the' use
of sound names and an accurate distinction of each.
Daily drills are given. After this has been accomplished
a study of various keys begins.
This course is given to members of the Grammar
School. High School and Senior School students are
allowed to join the Musical Union where they receive
special instruction in sight reading and in singing the
best standard musical works. The Solfeggio system is
used.





T'HE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 45
INDUSTRIAL AND HOUSEHOLD ARTS COURSES
:'- In the courses in the industries, it is the aim to give
. the students some knowledge of the fundamental prin-
ciples of one or more of the lines of hand work as a bas-
.' is for more extensive information and a larger measure
obf skill in that particular kind of skilled labor which
-they may select as a means of livelihood after leaving
' this institution.
Every student must take instruction in one of the
industries unless excused by the President.
In assigning the young men to the variousindus-
tries, the President and Director of the Industrial Arts
Department use their discretion, but at the same time,
the student is allowed some degree of choice. In the
. case of young women, those who are members of the
four Senior School classes and the third year class of
the High School are allowed to take dressmaking or mil-
linery or business instruction, while the members of the
five classes lower than the third year High School are
assigned to cooking and plain sewing.
The courses in the last mentioned subjects are so
arranged that every young woman receives some in-
. struction in both of these important phases of work no
K- matter how short her stay here may be.
The time devoted to the industries varies from for-
ty-five minutes to two and a half hours per day.
In all divisions some study is made of the sources
from which the materials used are obtained as well as
their composition and the processes of manufacture.
Whenever possible in the Industrial Arts Courses
the student makes his own drawings and works from
them or works from blue-prints furnished him.





46 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
No special certificate is issued for work done in the .
Industrial and Household Arts Department courses, but
a statement as to the nature and amount of work done
in any division will be given to any student by the in-
structor upon application.
MANUAL TRAINING
This is a coursein elementary wood-working occu-
pying one year.
The problems of construction are such as require
the use of the knife, plane, saw, hammer, chisel etc.,
in their material solution, and are worked out by the
students from sketches.
This course is given to the young'men of the C and
B Grammar classes except those studying agriculture
and precedes the work in the various industries the
College has in operation.
The result is the preparation of the young men both
mentally and physically to carry on the trade work'
more satisfactorily than if they had not had this prelim-
inary training, for they bring to the work at the trades
correct mechanical ideals and some skill, both of which
are necessary to a satisfactory completion of any of the
industrial courses.
MECHANICAL DRAWING
The work in mechanical drawing is designed to
give the student such a knowledge of the subject as will
enable him to make correct working drawings,/for his
own use in the shop and to read the drawings and blue-
prints made by others.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 47
The course begins with simple working drawings
'which are made from freehand sketches. The sketches
are drawn and the measurements taken from the olbjecis
to be represented, by the students themselves. Later in
the course the student draws from the sketches of
others, and finally takes up the work of designing.
As far as possible, the class of objects from which
the student draws is determined by the industry at
which he works; for instance, the drawing of young
men who work at carpentry tends towards the planning
of buildings, that of the young men working at wheel-
wrighting is directed toward carriage drafting and
designing.
FREEHAND DRAWING AND ELEMENTARY
DESIGN
The course in freehand drawing is intended to de-
velop in the student an appreciation of the beautiful in
nature,training his eye meanwhile to see objects in their r
true form and color and his hand to represent them
with a fair degree of accuracy. In connection with
this work a short but complete course in decorative de-
sign is offered, developing skill, freedom and speed in
the use of pencil, pen and brush. Lettering, design
and ornament in general, in line and in wash are taken
up.
During the course, short lectures by the instructor
will be given in colors, their theory, mixture, harmony,
and their practical application. These talks will be il-
lustrated by blackboard drawings in color, phot ogra rl is
and examples of the work done by noted designers .,t'
this and other countries. This work leads up directly





48 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAt COLLEGE
to fashion designing and illustrating as carried on in
connection with the work in millinery, dressmaking
and plain sewing.
BLACKSMITHING
The course in blacksmithing is intended to cover
the field of general blacksmithing operations and gives
some instruction in the ironing of vehicles and shoeing
of horses.
At the beginning of the course, study is made of fire-
making, and incidentally some attention is given to the
characteristics of coals, the construction of forges and
chimneys and the action of fans and bellows.
Thereafter the student is introduced tothe more
simple operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending,
twisting, punching, cutting off, and welding as used in
the shaping of staples, hooks, and collars and the mak-
ing of chains.
The above-mentioned work occupies the time for the
first year. 'During the second year, the young black-
smith co-operates with the wheelwright through the
ironing of the wooden parts of wheelbarrows, push
carts, wagons, buggies, surreys, and phaetons.
Vehicle ironing is continued for a portion of the
third year of the course, while the remainder of the
year is devoted to the elements of horseshoeing.
Advanced horseshoeing and general repairing con-
stitute the work of the fourth year.
'! .





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 49
CARPENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING
This course is intended to give the student some
knowledge of the principles underlying house and shop
carpentry and a moderate amount of practice in apply-<
ing these principles to some of the representative prob-
lems with which the workers at this trade are most
frequently meeting.
At the beginning of the study the problems set for
thestudent are designed to be such as will, through an
appeal to his school or home life interests, enlist his
best efforts, so that by the end of the year he will have
achieved sufficient success in his work to encourage him
to continue the work in this division.
The work just mentioned is also given to the first
year wheelwrights.
The second year is given tothe study of and practice
in erecting simple frame buildings, beginning with
framing and then taking up door and window frame
construction, outside finishing, floor laying, inside finish-
ing and stair-building.
Following this, in the third year, the time is de-
voted to cabinet-making, the more simple pieces of
-house furniture being selected for this phase of the work.
The fourth year's work is a study of the first prin-
ciples of the trades, which, together with carpentry,
are employed in the erection of buildings, and a brief
consideration of the work of the architect in their de-
sign and in the superintendence of their construction.
PAINTING
The division of painting affords an excellent oppor-
tunity to those desiring to become acquainted with the
more important phases of the painter's trade.





50 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
(> ----
A study is made of the painter's brushes and other
tools; the source and manufacture of pigments, oils,
driers, varnishes, stains and the mixing of paints.
Colors and the laws of harmony and contrast are given
consideration and practically applied in the painting of
vehicles and the interiors and exteriors of buildings.
Glazing, including cutting, frosting, staining and
embossing glass, and sign writing are also taught.
PRINTING
The College printer is equipped with two Chandler
and Price Gordon job presses and enough printing ma-
terials to give the typographer quite satisfactory notions
as to the operation of a first-class job office.
The course of study and practice includes, in the
first year, the learning of the cases, simple composition,
the names, care and use of the more common type
faces and printer's materials. During the following
year attention is given to job work (in colors, fancy
and plain), primary stock cutting and estimating. Im-
position, job composition, estimating, and stock cutting
are studied during the third year.
The student in this division has the opportunity of
doing quite a variety of work, since the College print-
ing done during the eight months session is the work
of the young men of this division.
TAILORING
This division of the College's work is designed to
give the students such knowledge of the tailor's trade
as will enable them, with a little experience in a mer-
chantile shop, to become competent journeymen.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 51
Instruction is given in the making of pockets and
other details before the construction of finished gar-
ments is undertaken. Trousers, vests, and coats are
taken up in the order of their difficulty and a study
made of shop economy in cutting. Cleaning and re-
pairing are also given due attention, since this class
of work constitutes a large part of that done in every
tailor shop.
The John J. Mitchell Standard System of Drafting
is used.
WHEELWRIGHTING
The first year's work in this industry is indentical
with that of the same period of the carpentry course.
During the succeeding years the students come into
contact more specifically with wheelwrighting and the
use of tools peculiar to the vehicle-making trade. This
is accomplished through the making of spokes and fel-
loes and the subsequent building of wheels, seats, bodies,
and running gear of wheelbarrows, push carts, bug-
gies and carriages of various descriptions,
All the vehicles used by the College are built con-
jointly by the young men of the wheels righting and
blacksmithing divisions.
COOKING :
The aim of this course is to teah the best methods
of preparing and serving food so as to make even the
simplest dish appetizing and palatable. Thorough
training is given also in household economy of the
homes of families of moderate means.





52 'TH FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Included in this course of study are: food value and
cost; the composition of food materials; the preparing
of dishes of :various descriptions according to recipes
which illustrate the underlying principles of cooking;
the planning and serving of meals; and the proper care
of the dining room and kitchen. Practice is also given
in canning and preserving of fruit and some attention
is paid to the elementary chemistry of cooking.
LAUNDERING.
Instruction in laundering is given to the young
women, all of whom do their own washing and ironing
in the .CoIege laundry.
T -he course covers the sorting of the articles to be
washed, removing of stains,; study of hard and soft
water, soap, bluing and starch, besides the various
processes in washing and ironing body, table and bed
linen.
DRESSMAKING
The objt& S.;he .College's Work is to
give a thoroughii f the principles of dress-
majing with as P6 flice ai time will allow. It is
ae U to those to acquire the ability to make
the"ini dresses o perintend the work done for
theni' At is [ preliminary training for those
whe' _.ndto',t d.iressmaking as a vocation. The
fgrou ouv?~'yere'fie terms of three months each.
.~'term is^e vote, to the making of unlined
waists ani skirts ot washable material. The second





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEG L s
-term is given to making skirts and waists of woolen
-material. Outside garments and the matchingof stripes
and plaids occupy the time in the third term.
MILLINERY
Thojh training in the practical and artistic prin-
ciples of Aillinery is the object of this line of work.
The course embodies the drawing of untrimmed
hats, draperies, .ows and the making of buckram and
wire frames f lats, together with folding, binding,
and the maki f bows, fitted and full facings and
turbans. In ion in color, form, and line is given,
besides ta e manufacture of straw and felt hats,
ribbons, i k.
TRAINING
mgare 'lu -van-
tag e co u _o ered by this College.
By o doing tmore skilled in the care of
the sick, and arl ome makers.
The nurse _'theFlorida Agri-
cultural and Me n reorganized,
and better facile 'efficiency since
the opf ning of ihe new Hospital for the special
cate of the sick and training of t Thel-ospital
is a two-story building, contain a[I.i private;
rooms for mate and female patio It i ipped with
modern conveniences for the coort of patteii. -
facilitate the nursing.





. -.
^.. -- .
4e THE FLrRIDA ACRIAILTLRAL AND M'ECtAA.iIA. COLEGE
^, An ,peating room with surgeon's lvtatory 'ld- -
sterilizing rooms attached, a class room, ; ii aiof
fice, diningroom and kitchen tireprovided.- e ni M, *
the-matr n and superintendent are also housed is
Lbditi which is steam-heated and -ic-ligl
.- A course of lectures is'd&eered by p *nent
sicians and surgeons, during the year on th:folli "
J sbecsti anatomy, physiology, dietetics, Tateria me-
dica and therapeutics, bacteriology, surgery, g-naecolo-
gy, medical nursing in fevers and ohseics. The nurses
receive instruction in bed-making. _of rooms, dis-
infection, care of utensils and sinln giving the
differentkindsof baths, theadminist food and
medicnes, taking temperature. puls -iration,
hMire Jef .efworuds, band gng hnique,
c 'iarting, and invalid cooking.- o mrprizes
about three years and is divide t dd practice.
While a large number get th ea limited
number can practice. Thes e practice
li-e in the Hospital and do the a B_ sing.
Lecture Co
January 29-Febr bua ny and Physiology
- -..--- and Bacteriology
"-x .4. iA. S. Jerryv
April a '. -. Medical Nursing, Fevers etc.
April 2 ^-i -. ...--Surgery and G gy
." '-- -- -: S ... -.
- ',- _.=:.. [.:"~' $. Hills ./"' --





THE FLO.DJA AGRICULTI.iRAL AND 'ECHANiCAL COLLEGE 55
PLAIN SEWING
The course6f instruction in plain sewing is planned
to give training in the use of the needle in the ordinary
forms of sewing and consists of exercises in basting.
overhanding, hemming, backstitching, felling, gather-
ing, sewing on buttons, making buttonholes, patching,
and darning'
A part 'nin. e is devoted to practice in operat-
ing the sew machine. Upon completing this work
satisfactory dent will be able to draft, cut, and
putetog nts.
^ "' INSTRUCTION
subjects mentioned below will
be giain number of students of the High
School and the Senior School.
Bookkeeping. The work in bookkeeping is intend-
e .g, ive the students a lkn of the ordinary
. 70d-ro -of. A 111gMi -a of making busi-
ness records.
Shorthand. During the first year the principles
of s and, transcribing of notes and writing from
dic .etiaught.
:*l ,..._ cond year, special attention will be given
to d id ork, reading of notes and acquiring speed.
In as F;~ e student will have practice in reporting.
The system of shorthand used is the Benn Pitman.
Typewiting. In typewriting, information about
the care of the machines will be given. Correctfinger-
ing, iettei-iriting, copying, writing from dictation and
tabulating will be taught. Special attention we'll be
given to the acquiring of speed.
. i -\ -. '- -. -~U t :: ~ '~;- g j





56 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEG *
THE AGRICULTURAL COURSES
It is the aim of this department to introduce the'
science underlying practical agriculture, and make it so
interesting and vital to the students' daily life as to win,
their respect for the farm and what is to be found on
thlte farm.
The school farm of 250 acres is well stocked and
provided with implements, and a solen.ierience in
conducting a farm in the m.St, maan.nner is
given.
The courses are array .g~ ,^,ive
each class of the llege. sg inm
order to impress its import
It is the plan and hope tte from
the College will be so well infi de ieul-
ture that they will be able to teach itinie u l c'sehools
of the state. It is also the aim of the department to im-
prove and enlarge the theoretical and practical work
so as to produce first class farmers--men and women,
possessing clear understanding of the soil ag its pro-
ducts.
Appropriate reference s, reports"'n exp ri-
ment stations and from the Departmenu.? riculture
at Washington are used from time to n addition
to the regular textbook.
ELEMENTARY AGRICULTURE
This is the beginning subject for students' taking
up agriculture in the Grammar School, involving the
origin of soils, their management for various crops,
...:. ,^ ^ ^^ i^sL-: -., __ _





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGI 67
manures and fertilizers, injurious crop pests, farm
stock, and related subjects. Given to Grammar A
throughout the year.
Textbook:-Burkett's Agriculturefor Bt geineis.
PRACTICAL ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
An elementary-'-theory and practice class is held
five days per week, 10.S a. m.-12:20 p. m. throughout
the year for assigned Grammar School boys only.
These practice and theory classes come on alter-
nate days and are designed to give students a clear idea
of the proper care of herds of cattle, mules, horses and
hogs. The practical work involves a variety of subjects.
The breeding and raising of horses, cattle and hogs,
proper feeding, sheltering, common diseases and ail-
ments with various treatments are studied as.well as
the use of the -d'i l g _a g of- feriliztrs,
'./.. -: -..
PRACTICAL VEGETABLE GARDENING
An elementary theory and practice class is held
five dois per week, 10:40 am.-12:20 p. m. throughout
the yet.for assigned Grammar School boys only.
Theory and pr tctice classes held on alternate days.
Garden crops besm adapted to ce.-tain soils, weather con-
ditions, market requirements, etc. are considered.
Fall preparation of garden beds, and correct plant-
ing of seed, setting plants, protection of crops frem
insects, etc. ale given attention.
Learning how to use improved garden implements.





68 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Use of cold frames for spring planting; best meth-
od to be employed. Learning by theory and practice
how to conserve moisture, etc.
Keeping garden fences in repair; proper methods
of fence building for gardens; cultivating and harvest-
ing of early summer vegetables; best methods, etc.
HORTICULTURE
(1) Agricultural Botany:
This subject is given to students in the second se-
mester of the First Year High School, preparatory to
Horticulture (2), (3) and (4) and also answers a require-
ment of the Academic Department; The course treats
of the nature of plants, the relation of the plant to its
surroundings, and the practical phase of structural
botany. Assigned plant studies weekly and reports in
notebooks are required.
Textbook:-Bailey's Botany.
(2) School Gardening:
The class which takes this course is composed of
girls in the First Year High School. The classroom
work consists of taking notes on such gardening and
nature topics generally, as are interesting to them.
The field laboratory work involves the making and
cultivation of small and individual flower and vegeta-
ble gardens, supplemented by excursions to the farms,
woods and various parts of the campus for observation
and information in this line of study. This is given
throughout the year, as one of the afternoon courses.





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 59
(3) Fruit Growing:
This is specifically, theoretical and practical fruit
growing, or elementary pomology involving the geogra-
phy of fruit growing, the business side, location of or-
chard, choice of varieties, best plans to follow as to re-
gions, soils, nursery practice, laying out of the fruit farm,
setting of trees, plants, tillage, cover crops, fertilizers
of all kinds; principles of pruning and tools, general care
of fruit plantation, labeling, varieties, treatment of all
known orchard and vineyard diseases and insect pests,
harvesting and marketing of fruits of all kinds.
Textbook work is supplemented by field laboratory
exercises in the College orchard. This course is given
to the students of the Second Year High School class
throughouttheyear. Separate essay work is required.
Textbook:-Green's Popular Fruit Growing.
Public School Agriculture
For students of the Senior A class, first semester.
In addition to dhe Otexb k 'work, lectures will be
given in landscape gardening, floriculture, orchard
problems, plant breeding, etc., as they are thought to
help in the review work pursued. Students take notes
and present note books. Practice in orchard, garden,
campus, etc. Essay work required.
Textbook:-Duggar's Agriculture for Southern
Schools.
DAIRY INDUSTRY
In this course the care of dairy herds, breeds and
their importance, etc., the home dairy, its location,





60 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
equipment, and source of milk supply are considered in"
detail. Modern dairy apparatus in use is studied and
theoretical instruction given in detail concerning all
necessary dairy machinery. The art of butter making
and the principles underlying such work, the theory and
practice of milk'testing, milk inspection, and every- day
rules of the best practice in modern dairies of any size
or place are studied. The College dairy is well equipped
to afford practice to students in dairying. This
course is given in the second semester to the Senior B
class. Separate library research work is required.
Textbook:-Michel 's Dairj, Farming.
POULTRY HUSBAND.RY
In this course the locationwf'th'ie home poultry es-
tablishment, its proper construction, equipment, and
management, the classes and breeds of poultry and
their characteristics, the feeding of various classes of
poultry with balanced rations, the use of oyster shells,
ground bone, etc., in the egg production, involving the
use of improved machinery, and the best methods of
killing, dressing and mari.tia tded. Funda-
mental and helpful rulesWf t ing and treating
diseases, and parasites: the theory and practice in using.
the influence of heredity, prepotency, food variation,
natural selection, etc., in the raising of poultry, are al-
so considered. Practice is given in applying approved
methods in the improved poultry plant of the College.
Both oil and electric incubators are used for study and
practice.
This course is given in class through lectures,' rec-
tations and practicums. If desired to pursue as an





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 61
afternoon laboratory course, the subject may be given
through assigned library research work and practicump.
For one or two semesters as arranged. For special,
High School or Senior School students.
FARM MANAGEMENT
The course is designed to present to the student
correct and improved ideas in farm management, with
special application to needs of the southern United
States. The outline includes suggestions as to proper
farm layout, size of farms, the value of plotting, in-
fluence of forests, insects, successful types of farming
throughout the world, and the relation that types of
soils have to successful culture of the land. Field
studies taken frequently in the College vicinity. Given
in first semester to the Senior B class-through lectures,
lantern slides, practicums and library research work
Spplementalty textbook;: Alipton's Principles Od
Scientific AgriowA -
THE ANNUAL AGRICULTURAL CONFERENCE
In connection with the regular detail work of the
Department as previously outlined we endeavor to be of
service to Florida farmers by holding annually an Agri-
cultural and Educational Conference the last Saturday in
May at the College, This conference is well attended
and has been- productive of much good to all concerned.
Experienced speakers in and out of the State are
obtained to assist the instructing staff in agriculture
in the making of successful meetings.





62 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
THE FARMERS' MID-WINTER INSTITUTE
This division of departmental work in Agricultural
Extension is primarily to aid country farmers to become
more interested in conserving their resources in farm
lands, crops, livestock, health, etc. The Institute is
held for five days during the second week in January
each year, from 11:00 a. m. to 2.00 p. m. daily. Prom-
inent and successful educators. experimenters, farmers,
physicians, etc. are on program at this time.
CORRESPONDENCE COU. K IN AGRICULTURE
The Department offers a seven-months study by
correspondence for .ahrs of the State and others who
wish to pursue it. The-textbook us:iis Duggar's Agri-
culture for Southern Schools-a 6iki'didopted by the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction, and is used to
prepare present and prospective teachers forState exam-
ination. The course is free, with the exception of
the cost of textbook and letter postage.
ADDITIONAL COURSES IN AGRICULTURE
These are cOUtse' jftory peri-
ods for students who wish to specialize in generAl agri-
culture, and for which they receive special credit.
Students make their own notes and report regular-
lyeach week. Classroom apparatus is used by students
in both of the afternoon courses. One or two semesters
each as arranged.
(a) Soils:
Origin -and composition of soils; functions, kindi-,
texture, moisture; soil teniperaLure; enr;:e'::ieiit, dfain-





THE FLORIDA AGIICULTURAL AND MJCHANICAL COLLEGE 63
age, tillage, methods of cultivation; crop rotation, aera-
tion and relation of atmosphere to soils; relation to an-
imal and plant life; irrigations; crops best adapted to
certain soils by experiment, etc. Kinds of farm ma-
chinery for certain soils.
Collecting, classifying and labeling types and sam-
ples of soils in surrounding region; mechanical analysis
of soils and subsoils; microscopic examination of soils;
studying the productivity of soil and subsoil; capacity of
various soils to hold water; effects of humus and limes
on soils generally; weight of-soils and relation to seed
germination; soil water evaporation; testing for acidity
and alkalinity.
The above topics serve as a suggestive line of ex-
periments and observation studies carried on by the stu-
dent, with the aid of the instructor. Confined to students
of Senior School. Five times a week as arranged.
(b) Practical Horticulture.
A general study of the common fruits, and espec.
ially those best adapted 'to f-ifmediate territory; the
necessity of pleasant surroundings and how to obtain
them; the planting of fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs,
vines, and decorative gardens; inside decoration and
plant conveniences; growing strawberries, etc., for
profit; drawing plans for ornamental planting of rural
school grounds and for orchard and garden; the making
of hotbeds; cold frames; the making and spraying of
fungicides and insecticides on trees and plants in theJ.ol-
lege orchards and community. A closer study of the
insect and fungus troubles which cause spraying to be
done; starting and caring for a nursery. Five after-
noons per week as arranged.
Given to High School or Senior Schools





(4 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS
Notel -sAU failures and conditions must be re-
mov'ed before a student can have advanced catfilyle
classification.
Senior School
Scientific Course
SENIOR CLASS
Livingston, Walter ...............-..._.- Marianna
Lowe, Lewis ---.. ._.......... ......... Tampa
Nixon, Waldense --....- -__-._-- Madison
JUNIOR CLASS
Jenkins, Sadie --...........: .-'--.....Apalacliicola
Norton, Carl..----------- : .Tampa
Robinson, Frank -- __..... ..Marianna
SOPHOMORE CLASS
Wise, Eureka .... ...... ...........- Tallahassee
Armstrong, James -------... ........._..Tallahassee
Billups, Pope ......._......-......... .Jacksonville
Daniels, Samuel ...__ : _-.. .Orlando
Ponder, George -...- y- .' Jacksonville
Rivers, Gilbert-- .-" -------.. -.Jacksonville
Reddick, James -...._.. ......West Palm Beach
FRESHMAN CLASS
Cox, Codies ------.._- --..................Jacksonville
Jones, Allen ..-.-........-.........-_.__._ ..Quincy
Jones, Minna ---......._.. ..............-.-Aretna
Lumpkin, John ...-----Special---- .-...Bishop, Ga.
Nelson, Malvina -------.-----.------.- St. Augustine
Williams, Mabel ---.-......... ........--Jacksonville
Young, Benjamin -----------------.- -Tallahassee
I1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANCAL COLLEGE 65
Chandler, Edith .. ............--.-Port Tampa
Chandler, Annie P.--m p-------__ _Port-Tla
Hall, Alice ---.----_.------ -_Jacksonyi.e
Isler, Clyde .-------------- Tallahaissie
Orr, Vera ----------- Thohaillee, Ga.
Robinson, Essie- .,.'.allahas,
Stricklin, Ruby ----.l __ --------.....Jaksonvile
Thompson. Juanita -.-.---------------- Tantla
- SENIOR B ,' .
Bryant, Corrine---.....-..... ..-.......--- ORflando
Holloway, Alma ---.-.--- ..-------Savannah, Ga.
McPherson, Alzina----------- -T-------.--Tallahassee
Sheppard, John ----.--- .....-.--......-Talldhaiie
Steward, Leola ---.- -------. ...---.. Saiifoid
Spearing, Herman ....-- ..............Jacksotville
Willis, Sarah .- .G.. ..... irard,'Ala.
High School .-ruiiJ
Scientific Course e ?3 .
.THID YEAR ;,
Archer, Irma- __ -' --i s.^--_ Fern 'a
Call, Flraee ree ..--Pe.ii1a
Dixon, James -------..--------- ala
Dawson, Emma --------.--.MiH-ll'le
Eaverly, Julia-------- --------------...- --- Sariford
Goulden, William--- -------- ---- Pensac'la
Hunter, Sadie. ...-------------------..Apalachicola
Kelly, Ralnh .- -------...- ..-... .------- Fernandiia
Leggett, Samuel----------- --_ K... Key Wept
Lynch, Oscar ---- ._--- .Oconbe
Lucas, Lydia -.-------------- --------St. Augustine
Mattox, Georgetta-------- .----------.--- Lake City
Martin, Fred -------- --Sanford
McFadden, Herbert -----W across, Ga:
Myers, Eva -----------.-----------------Sanford
Rambo, Alma .------------.. .----Donaldsonville, Ga.
Thompson, Valeria --S.-- --St. Augustine
Taylor, Frank------------- ---- --------.--.Dunellon
N





46 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR
Bonner, Petrona ..-.......-- -------_______. Ocala
Armstrong, Elizabeth -.....-.....---.--_ Sanford
Alexander, Mellisa ..- ....-- ..........---Lake City
Alexander, William ----- ..........Tallahassee
Brown, Edward..------.---.-.----------. ainesville
Beach, Richard .....-...-----._. San Juan,Porto Rico
Campbell, James ---- _-___- --.. .____.-______Lee
Campbell. John. -_-----.---L___.--------.----Lee
Carter, Maggie-..- ---_----.-- __-- _____-Quincy
Childs, Ella ....- --___. ......___..Gainesville
Daniels, Pearl--_____ O--- ...._..______Orlando
Gardner, Catherine -......-........... Tallahassee
Hilyard, Walter.. -- Tallahi- s;ee
Hopps, Abraham -- ....-............ Mani in
Howard, W. H. L --....--- -- ..-..--- -- .- Palaika
iHogans, Iola ...-----.------.. --._. ..--- Sanftori'
Jackson, Romeo ........- .......-.......... Fteeponrt
Mitchell, Lula----------- ...------- --------Tarni,
Mcllean, Earnest--------- ...-----. Florence. Ala.
Martin, John-..-- --.___--.--_-.--- Dunnellon
Norton, Roberts-------------------- ----- KeyWe.-t
Odam, Edward.-----_____------- --------- Brewtonm
Purdee, Frances ------------------------._Marianna
Rould, Nellie ----------__---------.-___.--.Pensacola
Stewart, Robert P----- _---------- Pensacola
Stewart, George -----. ..--Birmingham, Ala.
Sampson, Marie ------------- Orlando
Simmons, Obbie -------------------------- --Waldo
Thomas, Benjamin -- __-- --- ---_---- .____Daytona
Thomas, Marie ..--....----.__O--_---- Orlando
Verdier, Robert ----Tl-_----__. ..__-- Tallahassee
Vickers, Lessie- ._- ----- .,----------.._ Apopka
FIRST YEAR
Alexander, Henry ...---------_----------O_--Ocala
Coward, Mabel .....--.------.- -------.---DunLnellon
Cochran, Ethel P..-....l---- ...--.. Pham, Ga.
Grawford, Carrie ..----------- De Funiak Springs





66 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
SECOND YEAR
Bonner, Petrona ..._--._------.--------..- ..Ocala
Armstrong, Elizabeth- .- .._--------------. Sanford
Alexander, Mellisa -.....__............Lake City
Alexander, William ------.-------.... ---.Tallahassee
Brown, Edward .-.. -----.... ..___G__Gainesville
Beach, Richard ......------._---.San Juan,Porto Rico
Campbell, James ..- ...-.---- ---_.-----_-_-Lee
Campbell. John.................Lee
Carter, Maggie --__-__Q... .-___ ---_Quincy
Childs, Ella ------- ------------------Gainesville
Daniels, Pearl ---___-----._----__--___-___Orlando
Gardner, Catherine ----------------------Tallahassee
Hilyard, Walter .. ---- ------- Tallah l-ee
HoppD, Abraham------. .. -.. ..Mar i m
Howard, W. H. L.-........----- ..-----Palalhk
Hogans, Iola. ..-----------.--.- ------ --- Sanford
Jackson, Romeo -.....- ...-- ---.-----...-- F-eeport
Mitchell, Lula ----- .. ----------------.Tampai
Mclean, Earnest -- -- ....------- Florence. Ala.
Martin, John ----------_.__._-__--___- D Dunnellon
Norton, Roberts .------- ..-------.-- -- Key\West
Odam, Edward .-------_---- --_------.--..- Brewton
Purdee, Frances ----------------------Marianna
Rould, Nellie --------__-------------.--.Pensacola
Stewart, Robert P --. ---------- Pensacola
Stewart, George .------------------Birmingham, Ala.
Sampson, Marie-- -- Orlando
Simmons, Obbie-------------------------- .Waldo
Thomas, Benjamin ----------------------Daytona
Thomas, Marie ---------..------._-------Orlando
Verdier, Robert-- ----.-----. ----.--- Tallahassee
Vickers, Lessie _- --- .----------------Apopka
FIRST YEAR
Alexander, Henry ....- --_----------- ._Ocala
Coward, Mabel-----.. -------- ------------Dunnellon
Cochran, Ethel-....-------- -----..Pelham, Ga.
Crawford, Carrie --D-----------De Funiak Springs





68 TiE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL ANB MECHANICAL COLLIEB
SECOND YEAR
Allen, Effie_- ------------------------ -Carrabelle
Butler, Mabelu-..-._ ------------------- .Ocala
Eaverly, J-inamie= S- anford
Hogan/ : .. -- ...-Freeport
Jacksa tiise -- F---.__; ---.--Freeport
Jo*-ie ---. .Sanford
K'f Alwlia-- --------- ------ Tallahassee
-E .ttSttie .------ = .-Tallahassee
Miclormick, Lewis_- - ---- -Jacksonville
.Mtasori, Addie---- -:; ._ -------Jacksonville
MECoby, Olive, n;r. u_ -- -------- -- Fruitland Park
Norman, Eliza ::-- -:..-f .... Tallahassee
Robinson, Helen ----------Taalabassee
Simmons, Alphonso --- ..te:Oak
- .. :, ... -
- _
Arrington, Mae------ ------- -.'. 'o
Barnes, Napoleon ..----------------------. .W '-
Bowers, Ina .---- -- ------ J e
Brown, Leila --------.---------------TallahMaee
Davis, Estelle---- .-----------. ------. Footenan
Dlubes. Oliver ---------- -----------.--- ---, .--Roy
GafIMn. (UQarenceW--,? --&*^ .;^ ^0i Ala,
Griffin, Laura ...--- nsacola'
Green, Jessie..-.'--_. Delray
' lo, Lillian.----------------Tallahassee
:.^ibhrey, Nevada --.---------- .-:- Madison
Je M ai.:eMeamie .-------- --.. Lake City
'tir ."l'_".eveland- ------.---...---------Ashville
..Bt -Raymond--- .Tampa.
i*esi'ohn..-- --------- ---Tallahasaee
Mat1i e- Fannie ------ -- __TallahasAee
Myer hon -------------- Port lampa
Moorer, i'a^- -- .-.------ Tallaiabsee
Robinson, -'Piarl .- ..---------- .D-----Daytona





- Th11O~ A AGmrGOLWKAL: AN Mca0i
,-~ ,..,,/";~ apf. ,. ...
a .
L 1D .'_c~ N
' --~-
'.. ., ...
. .d. -
E --~~. --'~.;:: .~.L.:'~' ~. ~ :~.-
~-'
% ... -....,
1~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ri
~) ,~-,.-. ..- :~.~''. ~
'. aft"':. ~, ,~ ,~' ~'"
'-:.~.. ~ ~ ~~C





70 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Lamar, Samuel -..- .....--------- ------ Starke
Lyles, Ruth .....-- .............West Palm Beach
Lane, Rossie --..................____.--Tallahassee
Lawyer, Mattie ------ .. ..Madison
McKinney, Stella ---- ------------- ..Madison
Myers, Julia --.------_-- ---.___Port Tampa
Mack, Leroy -.. ..................... Miami
Madison, John -......_ ......---- .--- Madison
McGruder, Angelo --- __ Elarbee
Myrick, Willie_ Tallahassee
Preston, Harriet-..___ Quincy
Perdoma, Mercy- __., __- .. _Key West
Rambo, Arnett.--_ ,.--.._-----_Donaldsonville, Ga.
Ross, Roley __--__.. ........._......._____Fernandina
Rivers, Beatrice- ...........Tampa
Sharp, Mary .. ..-- ..... Live Oak
Stewart, Irene-_- -- Tallahassee
Sloane, Wm.- .... ...--- ._........ ...-- Titusville
Smith, Alean-----____.._- .......----Quincy
Taylor, Clara -- ---- ....-- .. Dunneilon
Williams, Reather -- Tallahassee
Williams, Gertrude-------. --------------.-Quincy
Wiggins, Irene ,..... ----.-- Roy
Wade, Ozzie ...-----Bainbridge, Ga.
Williams, Herdie --_--------- JSteam Mill, Ga.
Washington, Dalton .-. --........ .Live Oak
Walker, Sarah ... --..........---- .-Tallahassee
Williams, Jefferson- ..----. .__ Fernandina
Wilkins, Albert-. .__...--- .....Ellaville
B CLASS
Ambrose, Mattie ---.--- ---------------Madison
Andrews, Flossie -------.. _----. -----Pensacola
Ashley, Edward-.-- ----_---_-__- -------.Marion
Bell; Maggie ------ .Tallahassee
Benjamin, Ralph-- ------ Fernandina
Butler, Lozzie __-----_. M_-..- _.....M- onticello
Burney, -L.-E.-- _----------------------.. --Monticello
Bond, John ------------ .- -.._Tallahassee
Bonner, Zula. ---.---------------- -----O.cala





TKE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 71
Brooks, Alice -----------------------Quitman, Ga.
Brown, Leona ..----------------- ---Tampa
Brooks, Walter ----- ---------------Dunnellon
Cady, William ---------------De Funiaki Springs
Cooper, Marie ---' ------ --- -Panama City
Clark, Rubie ----------.. .--- Waycross,Ga,
Conley, Luberta ..----- .--.Point Washinton
Davis, Nancy -------------- ---.Mt. Pleasant
Donald, Lucinda .-.----- ---------------Sneads
Edwards, E. J -----.--------.--- -----.-. Tampa
Ellison, John--------------------------------------Greenville
Farmer, Daisy ..------ .-----..----.----St. Marks
Fitzgiles, Janie..-... .................Tallahassee
Fuller, George __------__--...._---- ----Tallahassee
Gibbs, Mifflin---------- .--- -------.___--Tallahassee
Green, Dozier --- ------.-----------. ...Quincy
Garvin, Allen --.--.----------_.-----..---Live Oak
Gilbert, Taylor .----------.- .-- ..-- ..Mims
Hawkins, Bertha .----------------- ---Greenville
Hargrove, Rosa ------ -------------Tallahassee
Harkins, Ella- .T- l---.--------------Tallahassee
Jackson, Raymond .-.............. .-.....-- Freeport
Johnson, Sarah. ..................... .........Tailahassee
Johnsn, Joihn..--.....--...-... .... .... Fernandina
Lewis, Ida ---.....-...- ... ......-.........a .l s.Tal:alaassee
L ang, John .------------ --------...--Jacksonville
Manley, Martha-----.---------- __-_. -- Tallahassee
Mashburn, Leila .---------------.----.- Quincy
Mai:tsby, Maggie-- ..--------------.- .Vernon
Madison, Isabella .- ------ --Dunneilun
flurry, Marian .-... ----------- Bronson, Ga.
McNeil, Diana.-- .-------.Nixon
Mitcbell, William--------- -----------New Smyrna
Mlcill, Mary---- .-----..Donaldsonville, Ga.
McDonald, Renaldo.------ ------------Fernandina
McPherson, Mattie ---- -------------Tall lhassee
McPherson, John .-----------------.-Tallahassee
McKinney, Timothy --... --------------. Live Oak
Mobley, Bessie-- ..---- .. ----- .--------S par;
Moore, Cleveland -----.------------.--.---Lovette





2 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Moorehead, Earnest ..--................... --.Monticello
Oats, Mary --. ...-... Freeport
Parris, ,0irt- t. ... -- ..........Fernandina
Presl.ysL....azel...................... St. Augustine
Robisein,: Essie ....-......-.. Tallahassee
Robi'fiih, Eddie ...-- -...------ ....--Chipley
ROJiasoii, Arthur ... ...-- ...--- .---.Narcoosee
Spencer, Arnett -...-..- .- ------- ....Tallahassee
Smith, Charles. -... ...--.. Alachua
Steward, Marshall .. --.........------- Dunellon
Taylor, Maxie-. ..---....-..---------.Lemon City
Thompson, Ardalia.. -.. .....--------..-- .Sneads
Vickers, Irene-- .-.... -- Key"West
White,.Annie ..... ,,_.- Wayross, .
NV I o ,6 t'slfhhssee
Wightt, Ho*ard. -----. --.--a : :_ Gainesville
Wooten, Eddie. --.--..-..- '-:-. -.Monticello
Williams, Flossie..-.------..-- .Wildwood
Wynn, James-- .........----- ..------na
C CLASS
Banks, Catherine -------- ----.-------Tallahassee
Bragg, Sallie--.-- .... ----- --.-- Tallahassee
Brown, Rosanna --------- -.4.nford
Blackstoh; Rosella .--,2 44;n-.- SV--- Quincy
Blackston, Henderson_ _:: ~L..S_:_ __Quincy
Barnes, Rosella ..--.---. .-. Marianna
rS'ie, Mary .-.--.--.--. -------...-- Monticello
Bbtts; Judsnn -------------------- ------.Argyle
cGadiaini --ilton .-----...----.-----Savannah, Ga.
C'Ooii] Lucile --- ..--- ------.. .---- Key West
ClMe'Nd, Eoscoe .--J-------- -J..- acksonville
C li -ilie --...---.---- Tamitpa
Coakld ee lvine .----- .--.------.----- Perry
Camp --l-s-; gnies .----- --. ----. Quincy
Oonley, Preston .. -.--.-- Point Washington
Daniels, Vera .------------------ De Funiak Springs
Dawson, William- .-------------.------Millville
Donaldson, York.--..-------- .. --Crawfordville





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 73
Dilworth, Benjamin_-- ------_ Tallahassee
-Denton, Edward ---- -------.- ---Dade City
Ellis, Alexander --,-- ------ -----. Dunellon
Ellis, Gladys .---- --. ----------.Monticello
Ecklis, Maceo -------- --- -------. Marianna
Ford, Eddie -- --- ...--..... Midway
Ford, Henrietta ------ --- ------.---Tallahassee
Gordon, Robert ------- .. Jacksonville
Gainey, Carrie --------------------Gainesville
Hopkins, Telious----. _--- ;__ Dunellon
Hodge, Samuel.----- ------ ..--. _-------- Ocala
Hargrove, Maud -------.----------------Tallahassee
Holmes, Ruby--- --- ----------- Waycross, Ga.
James, William__-__ ----- -----------Greenville
Johnson, Louisa----------------------------Pensacola
Lewis, Lula ----------___--- ------------Key West
Leggett, Frank -- __--------------- Key West
Leggett, Gilbert --.- -----------__ --------Key West
Long, Obadiah ---------------------------Cottondale
Mayne, Isaac --_- ----------------..--Tampa
Massenburg, Theodore_ ..-.__-Marianna
McMullen, Walter.---._.---..-.'----- Charleston, S. C.
Morgan, Joseph ---- -..,--- .. ----.. Monticello
Mosely, Isaiah-- ---.. _- .: .. ...Matrison
Nellicliff, Rachel_ .-_ -:. ^- '... Tallahassee
Pinkney, Eugene ._.... Freepoit
Petty, William --- ----------Tallahassee
Powell, William ---------.-----------Tallahassee
Paul, Wallace ---- -------------------- Quincy
Roper, Willie _--------- _-------- .....Titusville
Rountree, Sarah .--. ... ------------Perry
Robinson, Mattie Lee.. _--_---_--..----Molina
Quail, Arnett --------------- ..-_---.. __-----Quincy
Sanchez, Dagmar ----_-__. .... -------..-----Bonifay
Simmons, Samuel ----------------.----Jacksonville
Smith, Hiram. --..--. .H-----------High Springs
Steward, Otis .----_----------.- ------Fort Pierce
Smith, Clyde .-------------------------- Tampa
Spencer, Rosa Lee ,-------- ----- ---- ----Daytona
Williams, Minnie ---____---_-.___---_-________-Jasper
White, Christopher -..---.---------- Marianna





74 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Attendance by Counties
Alach ................ ................- Wauk a ........... ........ 3
B ker ........ ------------ .... Walton................... ...........11
Brevard -.....-.... ------... Waohington .............. ... --.......... -
Bradford _. ......... ....... ..- Voluia ............... ................
Columlb;-_ ---.-.. ..; 'Tnlor ........... ......................
. -A -- -------.------------- -----
Dade- I .-~ .'.~.. .....................l: ne. ......... ......... .. ...r........ 3
notl---.----.-------It Luc............... .. ... .
WONttf.-^o ... ...- ... ...... .........4-..
----- ------ -- uA n a ................... .. -- --...... 3
GfAG .. 3..S.. -
J :._ .................. -~I~b -~~ab~rin.~:...~...........-- .---?.
J tAon ;....... .... .. : ei... .. d e;...... ....... ....... ............1
' oli~ ... ... ......--_--------. --, -..- --- -.40 N=.,s ... .......................... 21
aelmon.....~.~-.;:~L~r;~'~'fi`;~i-. .l2.............
l ------ --- 'J-.'-----2 ----------------....
Je^erson Madison ......... ......... .. ........... 18
.". Total. ... ... 329
............ ?' -" '" : '-' -'-2a
Attendanoe.by States- :
-:..&,_-.. r'~' .....3
SENIOB SCHOOL Maim rFnics "jtai
mnr-------Sa --------- m......----........0......-... --.. ..
Juniori........................ 2.................. ..2 .. ..... ..-.4 ...
Sophoore.......-. -...-. ... 4..... o.-....:.-.. ..- .................. ----
Feishman-4................ ................ .. .. .........-.-.-... ....
Senior A...................... ................. --...............-- .. ......
.Sen-or-- ....-........ -:.. .............. -----
-" '-..
Second; ..... .....-....... ... ..---- -- .-- ...........
_* A ....... --- -------. ---_---- -- -- ----- 4 .. .......
HIGH SBOOL ..----------- :2-. .,-- ........
^ ^ r ,s~~.i--- --------2............. ....... I .......;....I:... ... ..-......
Third Y Sentific .... .-......... .10.-9............ ............. .. ..
S n ...... --- ---- ----- -- 15- - ............. ....2 ---
&- i .. ... .. .......... .................. ....... ........
.......... ....... ...... ..........4.. -- ........
s ..: .........-.-2-... ..------- G...-
. ::-.:.:"": :--:: :--. ...
:l 56 -' '
-otal2 .. ..





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE 7;
ALUMNI REGISTER
Officers of the Association
E. B. JONES, President
J. H. FRAZIER, Vie-President Janette Twine, Secretary
ADELAIDE JACKSON, Treasurer
1892
Stewart, Charles Henry, U. S. Mail Service, Ocala
Matthews, William Henry, Brick Mason, Pensacola
t Hall.Ida B..------------ ..-..-- ----------------
Tucker, E. V., U. S. Mail Service, Indianapolis, Indiana
1894
Jackson, Addie (Mrs.) Teacher, Tallahassee
Hargrett,James Hall,Principal, School, Apalachicola
Pope, Annie L., (Mrs. Frazier) Drug Store Business, Miami
Robinson, Simon Peter, Principal, Stanton High School, Jackson-
Tillman, Robt. Lee, Teacher, Adele, Ga. [ville
Toney, Beulah E., (Mrs. Nelson) Housekeeper, Toronto, Canada
1895
Evans, Elias G., Government Service,Washington, D. C,
Fitzgiles, Annie W.,(Mrs. Maneher) Housekeeper. Live Oak
Frazier, J. H., Asst. Principal, Lincoln High School, Tallahassee
Jones, Everett B., B. S.. (Colgate Univ.) Prof. of Chemistry
and Biology, Florida'A. and M. College, Tallahassee
Mitchell, Hattie L.,(Mrs. Chell) Teacher, Stanton High School,
Jacksonville
tNewton, Cornelius N.---- ..------------_-.
1896
Baldwin, Christina Ethel( Mrs. Hector) Teacher, Lakeland
Gaskin, Minnie Lee, Teacher, Pensacola
Hall, Henry F., Physician, Chicago, Ill.
Richardson, Caroline D., :Teacher, Tallahassee
1897
Alexander, E. I ,Lauyer, Chicago, Ill.
Hall, Marietta E., (Mrs. Hubert) Housekeeper, Jackson, Miss.
tStanley, King Thomas ----------------------. .....
1899
Chaires, George S., Principal,Warden Academy, St. Augustine
tPratt, Bertha M...-.__ ------------. ----
tDeceased





76 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
1900
Acosta, Catherine I., (Mrs. Daniels) Housekeeper, Jacksonville
Coleman, Temperance O., (Mrs. Dixon) Housekeeper, Ocala
Kelker. Ethel O., (Mrs. Wright) Housekeeper, De Land
Osgood, Alice R., (Mrs. Kirksey) Housekeeper, Pensacola
Welters, Rosa, (Mrs. Butler) housekeeper, Jacksonville
1901
Kerr. Caroline A., (Mrs. DeVaughn) Teacher, Fernandina
'- .- : 1902 : --'- .
Attaway, Daisy E., Teacher, F. A. and M. College, Tallahassee
Garrison,Bessie M., Woman's Horne Mission Work. South Atlanta,
[Ga.
tHurd, Bettie M.,(Mrs. Robinson) ....i.---- -.--.------
Lester, Herbert E., U. S. Mail Carrier, West Tampa
Powell, Eliza, (Mrs. Jones) Housekeeper, Tallahassee
Mitchell, Minnie L.. Teacher, Jacksonville -
Small, Phoebe A., (Mrs. Floyd) Hrusekeeper, Statesboro, Ga.
Whitehead, Anthony A., Dental 5fudent,Cleveland, O.
1903 -
Boyd, Willie E., (Mrs. Smith) Teacher, St. Augustine
tDavis, Julia -.............. ...............
tHopkins, Mary,(Mrs. Calhoun) ..--... '- .---........
Hopps, John L., Principal of School, Lake City
James, Susie E., (Mrs. Black) Teacher, Jacksonville
Jamison, Mary E., Teacher, Orlando
Jackson, Josie G., (Mrs. Green)Housekeeper, West Palm -Beach
Kershaw, A.J., Physician, Ft. Pierce
Lang, Theresa (Mrs.Kershaw) Housekeeper,;Ft. Pier ce
Mizell, Bertha (Mrs.DeVaughn) Housekeeper, Lake City
Reynolds,; LillyA., Teaiher,' Yonkers, 1N. Y.
Stiles, Geneva L., Teacher, Savannah, Ga.
White, Isham A., B. S., (Walden Univ.) Plysician, Jacksonville
1904
Butler, Robert W., Pharmacist, Jacksonville
Grant, Arthur R., Student, Howard Univ,, Washington, D1. C.
Hawkins, Rufus J., Teacher, F. A. and M. College Tallanassee
tLee, Rosa B...---...--- ---..-..---------------------.....- ..
Perry, Winnifred, Teacher, Fervandina
tMoore, Sarah G.--....-- ..... ...........-........ .. .......
Smith, Walter C., Railwtay Mil Clerl., .palachi.:ola
a q .Io lrAaahel





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AIN MECEHANICAL COLLEGB 77
Wilkins, Maggie G., (Mrs. Smith) Housekeeper, Apalachicola
Yellowhair, Margaret A., Teacher, Tallahassee
Young, Walter T., Mulberry
1905
Armwood, Walter A., Instructor in Carpentry, F. A. and M. Col-
lege, Tallahassee
Broome, Thomas A., RailwayP. O. Clerk, Jacksonville
Barnette, Mary, (Mrs. Bonner) Housekeeper, Palatka
Barnette, Charles H., Railway Post Office Clerk, Jacksonville
Brown, Peter E., Deputy Revenue Collector, Jacksonville
Burney, A. R., Insurance Agent, Tampa
Calhoun, Harvis C., Carpenter, Ocala
Campbell, Geo. W., Carpenter, Jacksonville
Ford, Louisa, (Mrs. Nimms) Teacher, Tallahassee
Gilbert, Sarah, Dressmaker, Sanford
Gillislee, Ethel, (Mrs. Barnette) Housekeeper, Jacksonville
Howell, Leroy, Dental Surgeon, Orlando
Jones, Lucy, (Mrs. Caine) Jacksonville
Lancaster, Roy St. Elmo, Pullman Service, New York City
tLott, Sylvia.-------..- ---------- -----
tMcElvine, Mabel I ,.--.---.- -------- ----------
McDaniels, Geo. T., Physician, Raliegh, N. C.
Moore, Eula L., (Mrs. Moten) Housekeeper, Quincy
Shellman, Lizzie (Mrs. Jones) Housekeeper, Morristown, Ga.
Twine; Gertrude (Mrs.Hicks) Savannah, Ga.
Walker, Mary E., Teacher, Jacksonville
Wilson, Lavinia, Teacher, Secretary and Bookeeper, Tallahassee
Whitfield, Cupid A., D. D., Teacher, Edward Waters College
Jacksonville
Yates, Edna E., Teacher, Stanton High School, Jacksonville
1906
Alexander, Camilla, Teacher, Ocala
Alexander, Levi, Jr., Carpenter, Ocala
Bradley. Cecelia, Matron, F. A. and M. College, Tallahassee
Chandler, Edward M. A.,Student, Howard Univ.,Washington,D.C.
Graham, George H., Tailor, Sanford
Jackson, Annie L., Teacher, Apalachicola
tKing, James A. ----------.--------- ------------- --





78 THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
Mizellj Mary J., (Ms. Johnson) Housekeeper, Tallahassee
Roberts, Erskine, U. S. Census Bureau, Washington, D. C.
Scott, John R. Jr., Dentaital Srgeon, Miami
Coleman, Samuel H., Mail Carrier, Tallahassee
Whitley, Fairy B., Teacher, Bartow
Wise, Minnie L., (Mrs. Gardner) Teacher, Peek
Wiles, Oliver F., Principal, High School, Green Cove Springs
1907
Alien, Mary, Teacher, Apalachicola
Gilbert, Bednie, Mail Carrier, Pensacola
Perry, Cassie M., Teacher. DeLand
Robinson, Theresa, Teacher, Ocala
Stanley, Sarah 0., Teacher, Jackson College, Jackson, Miss.
Thompson, Elizabeth M., Teacher, Stanton School,Jacksonville
Wilkins, Rebecca, (Mrs. Richardson)y-Housekeeper, Valdosta, Ga.
1908 ...
Caldwell, Constance E., Teacher, Deaf and Blind Institute, Cedar
Springs, S. C.
Carter, Thomas W., B. D., Talladega lCollege, Talladega, Ala.
Lewis, Mary E., Teacher, Thomasville, Ga.
Mulberry, Andrew A-, -Teacher, Gainesville
Thomas, Mary E., Apalachicola -
Whaley, Saxton H., Poital-Clerk, St. Augustine
1909
Boyd, Chas. H., Student, Howard Univ., Washington, D. C.
Barnette, Callie D., Teacher, Pinetta
Daniels, Fred 0., Tailor. Gafney, S.C.
Gildersleeve, Eloise 0., Teacher, West Palm Beach
Glass, Annie B., Teacher, Gainesville '
Hightower, Richard A., Bookkeeper,Penny Saving Bank, Montgom-
Jenkits, Lucile, Teacher, Tampa [ery, Ala.
Jones, Joseph N.,U. S. Custom Eer-ice, Memphis, Tenn.
Nettles, Lola A., St. Andrews Hospital, Raliegh, N. C.
Osgood, Harry A., Business, Palatka
Patterson, William A., Medical Student, Meharry College, Nash-
-. //,> -~~~~~ [vville, Tenn.
Williams, Henrietta, Teacher, Tallahassee
Twine, Janette, Teacher, Tallahassee,
Thomas, Maud E., Seamstress, ApalacLicola
Reid, Fannie, Teacher, Sanford





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTUBAL ANB MECHANICAL COLLEGR 77
Wilkins, Maggie G., (Mrs. Smith) Housekeeper, Apalachicola
Yellowhair, Margaret A., Teacher, Tallahassee
Young, Walter T., Mulberry
1905 ..--.
Armwood, Walter A., Instructor in Carpentry, F. A. and M. Col-
lege, Tallahassee
Broome, Thomas A., RailwayP. O. Clerk, Jacksonville
Barnette, Mary, (Mrs. Bonner) Housekeeper, Palatka
Barnette, Charles H., Railway Post Office Clerk, Jacksonville
Brown, Peter B., Deputy Revenue Collector, Jacksonville
Burney, A. R., Insurance Agent, Tampa -
Calhoun, Harvis C., Carpenter, Ocala
Campbell, Geo. W., Carpenter, Jacksonville
Ford, Louisa, (Mrs. Nimms) Teacher, Tallahassee
Gilbert, Sarah, Dressmaker, Sanford ..
Gillislee, Ethel, (Mrs. Barnette) Housekeeper, Jacksonville
Howell, Leroy, Dental Surgeon, Orlando
Jones, Lucy, (Mrs. Caine) Jacksonville
Lancaster, Roy St. Elmo, Pullman Service, New York City
tLott, Sylvia--..-.-...... ........ .....--... --
tMcElvine, Mabel I ...........-..................
McDaniels, Geo. T.,. Physician, Raliegh, N. C.
Moore, Eula L., (M'rs. lbten) HouseeAepe, Quincy
ShelUman, Lizzie (Mis., Joneas);, e4 i p,' l-priAtown, Ga.
Twine, Gtcrrii, f sie 1iii&t v tb,'' ..
Walker, Mary E., Teacher, Jacksonville
Wilson, Lavinia, Teacher, Secretary and Bookeeper, Tallahassee
Whitfield, Cupid A., D. D., Teacher, Edward Waters College
Jacksonville
Yates, Edna E., Teacher, Stanton High School, Jacksonville
1906
Alexander, Camilla,' Teacher, Ocala
Alexander, Levi, Jr., Carpenter, Ocala
Bradley, Cecelia, Matron, F. A. and M. College, Tallahassee
Chandler, Edward M. A.,Studetl, Howard Univ.,Washington,D.C.
Graham, George H., Tailor, Sanford
Jackson, Annie L., Teacher, Apalaehicola
tKing, James A.--------------------.. --.
.j ......





W15
GM -G-i:
GibIes, Gemf4a~r~
Ea r >IS
de ~ ~ r We-~It~ai m;





THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND M ECHAICAL COLLEGE 79
. 1910
Arrington, Bertha R., Teacher, Orlando
, Allen, Eulise, Teacher, Pensacola
/ Bryant, Eva, Teacher, Molina
Burton, Gertrude, Teacher, Pensacola
. 'Foster, Etta V., Teacher, Pine Barrens
Jones, James, Teacher. Jakin, Ga. -
Jackson, Celeste, (Mrs. Bronson) Teacher, Tampa
King, William A.; Teacher, Quincy
Robinson, Frank, Farm Demonstrator, F, A. and M. College
Thompson, Ketous, B. S., Principal of School, Pensacola
1911
Allen, Caiaphas, Teacher, Chipley
Caine, Edward, Printer,
Cox, Codies G., Student, .F.A and M. College
Hogan, James, Tailor, Miami
Martin, Oceola, (Mrs. Hogan) Miami
Mason, Walter T., Chauffeur, Danville, Ill.
McDonald, Rosa, Teacher, Orlando
Nelson, Edith, Clerk, Jacksonville ; --
Osgood, Vivian, Seamstress, Madison
Rountree, Milton, Tailor, Birmingham, Ala.
Stewart, Geneva, Teabier, Goldsboro ..
Saunders, Alice, (Mrs. Richa:"s6 .tit;,ae gee' .
Gibbs, AlicehM.1 B.-i &-'AA i. 1 Coll e
Tallahassee
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B. S. DEGREE
IN TERMS OF UNITS OR SCHOOL HOURS
For graduation from the College Scientific Course.
seventy-two units of work are required (See description
-of Courses). Seventy-two units instead of the usual
sixty-four are required because the school hour is only
fifty minutes long.,
A unit. or school hour, is a fifty-minute recittij
period or a hundred-minute laboratory period. .-Eigh-
teen such periods per week during two semesters con-
stitute a full year's work.





80 tfi FLORIDA AGRICULTUTRA.L AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
INDEX
ACADEMIC CIOURdl.S ................. 44 Lecture Counre ............ .... ..-.. 1
Admission. ,. i.......... .......... 13 Librar;,- and Readirg Roo f ..... .,
Agricultuiraft'll tit} i g ............. Lterary Sodeties ir -.... f .. r-.-,z---- .....16
AuaC Ll Wf S^ -s6ss ............... 61 Manual Training ......... .i... .. .
Algebra.a 29 INDS,.. .................. I s A, CoUans..........
~Alu-a "_........................19 Mechanical Drawing. ...........
~AIl 7 --r ..................... ........ .... ...3......*.
A ri-- .. ....................29 i .. ... ........... ...... .. 41
M s .........-...........................- 7 NLtS Taining ................... 5.. ...53
-Sal^ QOjrgamniation ................... Opportunity to RKduce Expense ......l
_ l .- u' t ---. .- --......... -. -.7 ........-' -'..I Organiation ........................ 12
BoaBrd otControlthing .~~..;~..; :itn ......................
Board of Control ... Pedagogy ..............a............... ,
Calendar........7 Pe..... ..... 7 Pyriis. .:....
Economics ...... i..... .... .Phyvsl Geogaph .............
Elementary Agriculture ... ... .......... 6 Ph-iolop---.... ............ ....:.. -2
Practical Animal Husbalndry ...........57 PlainS inr.. .............. 6..- _155
Practical Vegetable Gardening ........57 Poultry Hasbndrl.. ...............
English ...... _........... .........Practical Hortdebti re ..... .. .d3
EtLiUs .....:?, -;_ .- .,.-9 Printing .. ,-.-5--' :'-.0
E _en.se L .. .......- ........ ...7 P bol ru ,^.- L.--.-- -
COlomnvidfthbea-.... ._ .........1to
TiMAiniial Agrieultoral Conference ...dlRe4 t tBiM_. 1;1
ThiF'mere Mid-Winter InAtliale...e 62 Sefe ..................... 22
............
Fruit Growing...... ...- o... .. horth::::: ........ ..
General Stat.ement .......- ........... 21 oil..........
Geology .............................. 2 Spr... t .... ....
Geometry ..................... ...............0 Sur e m .- .- .
History. ............ .......... Tailoring ......... ..... .-.. *
History and Location ....................12 Trigonometry.................- -5
Hirticultnre .......... .............Typewritingr.. .......... .... .......
Latin- ._._. -__..-.----- --.-.... 3. Vocal Music......... ...... 43
Laundering------ .L...-.._. .__--- 5 I Uniijrm .......................... ...- 17
Riquirnlenta for the B. SDegree ---79 Wheelwrigh .......... ........
' -r-' -r;,. "^ *^
* s** > *.. . ^




















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