• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Board of control
 Officers of administration and...
 Faculty committees
 Calendar
 General information
 Admissions
 General statement regarding the...
 Description of the academic department...
 Description of the mechanic and...
 Description of the agricultural...
 Class lists for 1907 and 1908
 Register of the alumni
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Twenty-First Annual Catalogue 1907-1908; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000092/00001
 Material Information
Title: Twenty-First Annual Catalogue 1907-1908; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
School Electric Press ( Printer )
Affiliation: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publisher: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publication Date: 1908
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000092
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2662
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PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Board of control
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Officers of administration and instruction
        Page 7
    Faculty committees
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Calendar
        Page 10
        Photograph
    General information
        Page 11
    Admissions
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Photograph
        Page 15
        Page 16
    General statement regarding the work of each department
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Description of the academic department courses
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Description of the mechanic and domestic arts department courses
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Description of the agricultural department courses
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Class lists for 1907 and 1908
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Register of the alumni
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Index
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text





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TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL
CATALOGUE
OF THE
FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
AND
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
"Colored Normal School"
AT TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
FOR THE, ACADEMIC YEAR 1907-1908
WITH
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1908-1909
SCHOOL ELECTRIC PRESS
TALLAHASSEE
1902





CONTENTS
BOARD OF CONTROL 5
OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS 7
CALENDAR 10
GENERAL INFORMATION 11
Organization, History and Location, Support, Admission,
Regulations, Alumni Associaton, Errata
OUTLINES -17
ACADEMIC COURSES 20
MECHANICAL COURSES 31
AGRICULTURAL COURSES -- 37
CLASS LISTS 42
ALUMNI REGISTER -- 47
INDEX 50





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BOARD OF CONTROL
HON. N. P. BRYAN, Chairman ---------------..--Jacksonville
HON. P. K. YONGE .-------------.----.--Pensacola
HON. A. L. WARTMAN .-----._.--------.Citra
HON. T. B. KING ------ --------------Arcadia
HON. J. C. BAISDEN .-----------. -- Live Oak
HON. J. C. KELLUM, Secretary ............... Tallahassee





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OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND
INSTRUCTION -
PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M., (Oberlin College)* PRESIDENT
Pedagogy, Ethics, Economics
FREDERICK C. JOHNSON, B. S., (Armour Institute) DIRECTOR
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC AND DOMESTIC ARTS
Manual Training, Physics
GEORGE M. SAMPSON, A. M., (Western Reserve University)
DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT; SECRETARY OF FACULTY
Latin, Mathematics
WILLIAM H. A. HOWARD, A. M., (Georgia State Ind. College)
Painting, Mathematics [COMMANDANT]
MARY E. MELVIN, (Hampton Institute) PRECEPTRESS
History, Civics
F. HENRY CARDOZO, (Cornell University) DIRECTOR OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Science, Horticulture
OTHER INSTRUCTORS AND OFFICERS
EVERETT B. JONES, B. S., (Colgate University)
Science
ELLEN O. PAIGE, (Vienna Millinery and Dressmaking Schbol)
Dressmaking
ELIZA J. POWELL, (Florida State N. and I. School)
English
ANATOLE E. MARTIN, (Tuskegee Institute)
Tailoring
T. SIDNEY JOHNSON, (Hampton Institute)
Wheelwrighting and Blacksmithing
WILLIAM H. CRUTCHER, (Tuskegee Institute) FARM SUPr.
Practical Agriculture
CHESTER A. COLES, (Hampton Institute)
Carpentry and Mechanical Drawing
JULIA L. TOWNSEND, A. B. (Claflin University)
Instrumental and Vocal Music
* Parenthetical names indicate the institutions where the teachers did their ad-
vanced work.
7





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
JULIAN L. BROWN; (Hampton Institute) ADJUTANT
Printing
LULA M. CROPPER, (Tuskegee Institute) REGISTRAR; LIBRARIAN
English
DAISY E. ATTAWAY, (Florida State N. and I. School)
- English
HATTIE E. NEWBURN, B. PD.,(Clark University)
Plain Sewing, English.
EVELENA A. DAVIS, (Pratt Tnatitute'
Cooking
JENNIE V. HILYER, (Freedman's Hospital i MATRON
Nurse-Trainingv
(MRS.) ELIZA A.'JOHNSON, (Harnptoll Institute)
Millinery
SYLVIA LOTT, (Florida State Normal and Industrial School)
Housekeeper
CECELIA A. BRADLEY, (Florida State N. and I. School)
Laundierig
RICHA..DA. HIGHTO% ER
Pr .,idi t t' ri l, r.! adltl Bookkeeper
FACULTY COMMITTEES
MANAGERS OF BOARDING DEPARTMENT
N. B; YOUNG, Chairman JENNIE V. HILYER
W. H. CRUTCHER SYLVIA LOTT
EXAMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman MARY E. MELVIN
F. C. JOHNSON
LITERARY SOCIETIES
E. B. JONES, ('llj l.riElUt ELIZA J. POWELL
T. S. JOHNSO N DAISY E. ATTAWAY
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman HATTIE E. NEWBURN
E. B. JONES JULIA L. TOWNSEND
N. B. YOUNG
FARMERS' EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE
F. H. CARDOZO, Chairman SYLVIA LOTT
EVELENA A. DAVIS W. H. CRUTCHER





INSTRUCTORS
ATHLETICS
(Men)
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman J. L. BROWN
C. A. COLES A. E. MARTIN
(Women)
ELLEN 0. PAIGE, Chairman MARY E. MELVIN
DAISY E. ATTAWAY
THE COLLEGE ARMS
J. L. BROWN, Editor W. H. A. HOWARD, Bus. Mgr.
ELIZA J. POWELL Associate Editor.
MUSIC
JULIA L. TOWNSEMD, Chairman G. M. SAMPSON
W. H. A. HOWARD HATTIE E. NEWBURN
RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
C. A. COLES, Chairman EVELENA A. DAVIS
E. B. JONES W. H. CRUTCHER
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
F. C. JOHNSON, Chairman T. S. JOHNSON
DAISY E. ATTAWAY
RECEPTION OF VISITORS
W. H. A. HOWARD, Chairman MARY E. MELVIN
ELLEN 0. PAIGE ELIZA A. JOHNSON
COURSE OF STUDY
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman F. C. JOHNSON
N. B. YOUNG JULIA L. TOWNSEND
F. H. CARDOZO
LIBRARY
LULA M. CROPPER, Chairman A. E. MARTIN
E. B. JONES G. M. SAMPSON
MARY E. MELVIN
FACULTY ADDITIONS AND CHANGES-1908-9
HELEN L. JAMES, (Atlanta University) English Languageand Ziterature
DENNIS, A. STARKS, (Tuskegee Institute) Animal Husbandry
WALTER A. ARMWOOD, (Florida State Normal School) Carpentry
CHESTER A. COLES, (Hampton Institute) Freehand and Mechanical Drawing
9





CALENDAR
1908
SEPT. 28th, Monday, Boarding Department Opens
SEPT. 29th, Tuesday, Entrance Examinations
SEPT. 30th, Wednesday,
OCT. 1st, Thursday, Fall Term Begins
Nov. 26th, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day
DEC. 24th, Thursday, Fall Term Ends
DEC. 25th, Friday, Christmas Holidays
DEC. 26th, Saturday, Winter Term Begins
1909
JAN. 1st, Friday, Emancipation Exercises
MAR. 13th, Saturday, Winter Term Ends
MAR. 16th, Tuesday, Spring Term Begins
MAY 21st, Friday, Anniversary of Literary Societies
MAY 22nd, Saturday, Educatonal and Farmers' Conference
MAY 23rd, Sunday, Sermon to Graduating Class
MAY 24th, Monday, Class Day Exercises
MAY 25th, Tuesday, Musical Recital
MAY 26th, Wednesday, Commencement Exercises





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GENERAL INFORMATION '
ORGANIZATION
The worlk of the school is organized into three de-
partments. 'Academic, Agricultural, Mechanic and
Domestic Arts. (See descriptive statements)
Tbh purpose of the school is to prepare the students
to take Ap'the work of life before them with good hope
and efficiency. To this 'end, the school has been re-
organized, and, in a measure, its work redirected and en-
larged.
HISTORY AND LOCATION
The school was established in 1887. By constitu-
tional provision and legislative enactment it was locat-
ed at Tallahassee.
By action of the State Board of Education, ex-
officio Board of Trustees, it was opened October 5, 1887,
in charge of T. deS. Tucker, Principal, and T. V. Gibbs,
Assistant Principal, with an attendance of fifteen pupils.
In 1891, the school was moved to its present site,
in the suburbs of Tallahassee. By legislative enact-
ment in 1905 it passed under the management of the
State Board of Control, as one of the institutions of
higher learning.
The school is beautifully located within easy reach of
the city. The grounds and buildings are lighted by both
gas and electricity, and supplied with city water. Com-
fortable and convenient dormitory accommodations have
been provided for about two hundred, (200). These
dormitories are managed by the faculty, and except by
special permission of the president, all non-resident
students will be required to board in the school.
SUPPORT
The school is supported by annual appropriations
from the State and Federal governments. It was estab-
11





FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
lished by the State as a training school for teachers.
This feature of the work of the school is still main-
tained. (See description of English Normal Course).
ADMISSION
Applicants for admission must be 16 years old, and
must have a fair knowledge of arithmetic, English
grammar, and descriptive geography, and must also
be able to read intelligently and to write legibly. Appli-
cants must be of good character, and, if from another
institution of learning, must bring certificate of honor-
able dismission. The registration fee is one dollar
($1.00).
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the school are few and simple,
appealing to the students' self-respect and personal re-
sponsibility.
Students are not allowed to loaf, to use intoxicat-
ing liquors or tobacco in any form, to gamble, orto
have or to use fire-arms.
All punishment is by demerits as follows: five de-
merits make one warning, or mark; ten demerits, two
warnings, or marks; fifteen demerits in any one ses-
sion suspend from school. Suspended students may be
reinstated by the Prudential Committee, or the
president.
All laundering must be done in the school's laundry,
and students will not be allowed to have laundering
done elsewhere except by special permission from the
president. All clothing must be marked with i n d e i b I e
ink.
Students should provide themselves with the following articles:
GENERAL LIST
3 Sheets 1 Comfort or Quilt
3 Pillow-Cases 8 Table Napkins
12





GENERAL INFORMATION $
4 Towels 1 White Spead
1 Blanket 1 Bible
1 Dictionary
GIRLS' LIST
1 Woolen Navy Blue Uniform 1 Pair Rubbers
2 Percale Navy Blue Uniform 1 Water-proof Coat
2 Tucked White Lawn Shirt Waists 1 Umbrella
I Tucked White Shirt Waist i Pillow
(with long sleeves) 2 Gingham Aprons
3 Changes Winter Underwear 1 Ready-to-wear Navy Blue Hat
1 Pair High Shoes 1 Bottle of Indelibe Ink
The young women are required to put on high shoes and winter
underwear November 1st.
BOYS' LIST
3 Night Shirts 1 Comb and Brush
4 Negligee Shirts 1 Shoe-polishing Outfit
6 White Standing Collars 6 White Napkins
4 Pairs of White Cuffs Underclothing sufficient for
2 Clothes Bags Three Weeks.
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remit-
tances for students, to send money by postal money or-
der, express money order, or registered letter direct to
the president He will not be responsible formoney sent
to students. All requests for students to come home
or to be withdrawn must be made to the president.
LIBRARY AND READING ROOMS
Mr. Andrew Carnegie has given the school a library
building which is being stocked with books and period-
icals.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Although the school is non-sectarian, yet it is
Christian: In addition to the daily devotions, preach-
ing, and Sunday Sunday School services on the campus,
there is an active Young Men's Christian Association
and a Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor.
13





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
LITERARY SOCIETIES
There are four literary societies : the Acme Literary
Society and the Douglass Debating Society for the
young men, and the Tucker and Emma Garrett Young
Literary Societies for the young women. These organ-
izations meet weekly.
PUBLIC RHETORICALS
The last Monday night in each month is given to
public rhetorical exercises.
BATTALLION ORGANIZATION
The cadets are organized into two companies under
command of the Major of the Battalion. The MAaj:r is
assisted in instruction in drill and in military discipline
by the Adjutant. Each company is commanded by a
cadet captain, and has its complement of cadet officers,
selected from those cadets who have been most exem-
plary in conduct and soldierly bearing.
The above organization 'is perfected in order to
complement study. It it also intended to cultivate hab-
its of punctuality and obedience, as well as to give an
erect and manly bearing to the body and a high regard
for law and order. The officers of the battalion meet in
council once each week. to discuss matters pertaining to
the Battalion Organization. Said Council is presided
over by the Major.
There is organized in connection with the battalion,
a band comprising fourteen instruments.
UNIFORMS
As a matter of economy and of good appearance,
the students are required to wear a uniform. The
14





THE BAND





EXPENSES
young women's suit is made of blue percale and costs
two dollars ($2.00). For spring and fall, they wear a
blue ready-to-wear hat. The young men's uniform is
made of blue flannel, and with the cap, costs ten dol-
lars and fifty cents ($10.50).
These uniforms are made in the school's shop and
are sold at actual cost. The patrons are therefore urged
noi to buy citizen's suits for their children, but send mon-
ey to the President with which to bug the above uniform
suits. Upon application, samples of the girls' uniform
goods will be sent.
EXPENSES
There'is no charge for tuition. The following is an
estimate of the necessary expense for the full session:
Board and room rent (including lights and
fuel) per month $7.00; 35 weeks-------- $ 57 25
Washing, etc., $1.00 per month ----------. 8 00
Books and stationery, about----------------- 5 00
Incidental fee (for ordinary medicine, not
medical attention) ..--. ..._.---------- 1 00
Total -..--------. $ 71 25
OPPORTUNITY TO REDUCE EXPENSES
A limited number of earnest young men and young
women will be allowed to work out a part of their
board and laundry expenses. Appilcations for this
privilege must be made in writing and accepted before
arrival. All extra work performed by students will be
rated at five cents per hour, and placed to their credit.
All money earned by students in the performance
of labor in the institution will be retained to be used
only for defraying their expenses while in attendance
here at school.
All students are required to work one hour a day
(or its equivalent) for the school without renumeration.
15
t





FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
It is the policy of the school to keep in close and
sympathetic touch with its graduates. The alumni
have organized and are doing good work for their alma
mater. Mr. E. B. Jones, Tallahassee, Fla., is thepres-
ident, Mr. J. H. Hargrett, Apalachicola, Fla., is the
secretary, and Mrs. Annie Fitzgiles-Mancher, Live Oak,
Fla., is the treasurer.
ERRATA
The text-book for Ancinet History, given on page 26 of this cat-
talogue, should not be West's Ancient Europe," but West's
Ancient World."
Line four, first column, in the table of regulations of dress for
girls, page 13, should be one THICK white waist (with long
sleeves.)
i~~~~~~~~~~~~1





GENERAL STATEMENT REGARDING THE WORK
OF EACH DEPARTMENT
THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT offers three courses: An English
Normal Course, a Scientific Course, and a course in Vocal and In-
strumental Music.*
THE AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT offers courses in dairying,
truck-gardening, poultry raising, animal husbandry, agronomy,
general agriculture, horticulture, and nature study.*
THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC AND DOMESTIC ARTS offers
courses in wood and iron working, manual training, drawing, paint-
ing, tailoring, printing, cooking, laundering, millinery, nurse-train-
ing, plain sewing, dress making, and general house-keeping.*
OUTLINE OF ACADEMIC COURSES
FALL TERM WINTER TERM SPRING TERM
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
B & C CLASSES
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
Geography Geography Geography
Grammar Grammar Grammar
Reading Reading Reading
A CLASS
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
U. S. History U. S. History U. S. History
Grammar Grammar Grammar
Reading Reading Reading
HIGH SCHOOL-ENGLISH COURSE
FIRST YEAR
Algebra I. Algebra I. Algebra I.
Civics Civics-Physiologyl Physiology
English I. English I. English I.
SECOND YEAR
Algebra I. Algebra I.-Geometry I. Geometry I.
*See descriptive statements of the courses of each department (pp. 20-30, 31-36,
37-40.)
1 All hyphenated subjects are for half term.
17





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
FALL TERM WINTER TERM SPRING TERM
History I. History I.-Botany Botany
English II. English II.-English III. English III.
THIRD YEAR
Geometry I. Geometry I.-Bookkeeping Bookkeeping
Physics I. Physics I. Physics I.
English IV. English IV.-History II. History II.
HIGH SCHOOL-SCIENTIFIC COURSE
FIRST YEAR
Algebra I. Algebra I. Algebra I.
Civics Civics-Physiology Physiology
English I. English I. English I.
SECOND YEAR
Algebra I. Geometry I. Geometry I.
History I. History I.-Botany Botany
Latin I. Latin I. Latin I.
THIRD YEAR
Geometry I. Geometry I.-Bookkeeping Bookkeeping
Physics I. Physics I. Physics I.
Latin II. .Latin II. Latin II.
SENIOR SCHOOL-NORMAL COURSE
NORMAL B
Pedagogy I. Pedagogy I. Pedagogy II.
History III. HistoryIII.-Ph._ Geography Ph. G'graphy
English V. Eng. V.-Review Arith. ReviewArith.
NORMAL A
Pedagogy II. Pedagogy II. Pedagogy III.
Ethics I. Economics I. Astronomy I.
Chemistry I. Chemistry I. Chemistry I.
SENIOR SCHOOL-SCIENTIFIC COURSE
FIRST YEAR
Geometry II. Geometr .II..-Algebra II Algebra II,
Latin III. Latin III. Latin III.
Biology I. Biology I.-II. Biology II.
SECOND YEAR
Trigonometry Trigonometry Surveying
18





OUTLINE OF COURSES
FALL TERM WINTER TERM SPRING TERM
German I. Germar I. German I.
Chemistry I. Chemistry I. Chemistry I.
THIRD YEAR
Geometry III. Geometry III.-Physics II. Physics II.
Chemistry II. Chemistry II. Chemistry II.
Psychology Psychology-Ethics II. Ethics II
German II. German II. German II.
FOURTH YEAR
English VI. English VI. English VI.
Economics II. Economics II.-Hist. IV. History IV.
Geology Geology-Astronomy II. Astronomy II
OUTLINE OF INDUSTRIAL COURSES
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
MEN WOMEN
Manual Training(B & C Classes) Plain Sewing
Trades Training (A Class)
Freehand Drawing Cooking and Laundering
HIGH SCHOOL
Trades Training or Agriculture Plain Sewing
Mechanical Drawing Cooking and Laundering
SENIOR SCHOOL
Trades Training or Agriculture Dressmaking, Millinery
Mechanical Drawing Freehand Drawing
OUTLINE OF AGRICULTURAL COURSES
MEN WOMEN
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
General Agriculture Nature Study and School Gard'ng
HIGH SCHOOL
Agricultural Botany Agricultural Botany
Horticulture (Fruit-Growing) Horticulture (Fruit-Growing)
Dairy Industry Dairy Industry
Poultry Husbandry Poultry Husbandry
SENIOR SCHOOL
Animal Husbandry Dairy Industry
Agronomy Agronomy
19





[DESCRIPTI()N OF THE ACADEMIC DEPART-
IMENT COURSES
THE ACADEMIC IliP.\KIirt.i Nr .-'.lC! tI : C ...,,r- ll.i ,i -. .L1,-. In
instrumental music ,.:,i.ii lin .l l [r.! l ith! [ el -.:i ..l. .- t..ll.:..-: 1!
Grammar School with I,:- .-ti :,l C-r mnl:.! ir -..lih...:.] l. .,lv-:.-. IC Hi- 1i
School 1i.h11 : i'E]Llih l i 'l '{ qI:!-, iirI>, ii_ i .i t1' rh, !.i!.,r :i. ...!
with a two year Engli-hli N'.rrl l C .i'-- rir]l f:-ir '. -Jr ....-ltlrii:
Course.
Courses in vocal music, penmanship, freehand *r ,\ ll. or-
thography, and nature study will be given in all classes of the
Grammar School.
Courses in vocal music and freehand drawing will be given the
First Year High School Class.
Two lessons a week in ..'i Ii U!tr!--' will be given the Second Year
High School Class during the entire year.
Once a week the members of the Grammar School will assemble
for a period of forty-five minutes, at which time they will read com-
positions Declamations and music will also accompany this exer-
cise.
In the Grammar B Class Holden's "Real Things in Nature"
will beintrotuced asa text pi li iri! .:!, -'hysiology, while the other
jl:.i_,'-. treated in this bool: :.!ill I.': ti.: basis of reading and dis-
cussion.
Certificates will be given'those who finish either of the High
School Courses, diplomas to those who finish the English-Normal
Course, and the S. B. degree will be conferred upon those who finish
the Scientific Course.
SCIENCE
CHEMISTRY I. -The course covers a period of one
year and is d-siio-'el to give the student a working
knowledge of inorganic elementary chemistry. Stress
is put upon the actual experiments iif. 'Irnl by the
stl,-l-nt for which the new laboratory affords excellent
facilities. Records of the experiments are made from
day'to day, and the correctness, fLillin ;..s and appear-
ance of these notes based on the experiments per-
formed by each il:li,-ilutil student determine the class
standing.





DESCRIPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSES
The students' work is supplemented by lectures and
demonstrations by the instructor.
TEXT-BOOK :-Newell's Descriptive Chemistry.
CHEMISTRY II. This course covers a period of one
year and includes the following: (a) The first two terms
are devoted to a thorough study of the metals and non-
metals, the metallic groups and separation. Stress is
laid on individual laboratory work which includes the
determination of the meits and the acid radicals of
simple, unknown compounds in solution., (b) The
spring term is devoted to systematic work in blow pipe
analysis and the important methods used in quantitative
determinations.
TEXT-BOOK :--McGregory's Quantitative Analysis.
PHYSICS I. This course is designed to give the stu-
dent a thorough knowledge of the simpler physical phe-
nomena and includes a study of the fundamental laws
of the mechanics of solids and fluids, heat, sound, light,
magnetism, and electricity.
Laboratory experiments performed by the student
himself accompany this course and supplement the
demonstrations given by the instructor.
TEXT-BOOKS:-Mann and Twiss' Physics and Na-
tior~nl Physics Laboratory Note Book.
PHYSICS II. This course will consist of a deeper
study of mechanics, thermodynamics, and electricity
than can be given in course I, and will be conducted by
means of lectures, reference, and laboratory work.
TEXT-BOOKS :-(To be Selected)
ASTRONOMY
ASTRONOMY I. The Solar System, with attention to
the earth's motions, the moon's phases, accompanied
by telescopic observations and a study of the principal
21





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e:, urse.
| TE rT-BOOK( :--N,-'v':':,!'d.'' S E7( t..!f.~ ,' A .4.-_t,"l, .';,, .
A.SPrRI-iN'lMY II. T', :.-.h'anCle'l c',l.'>se in A.-tr-,.,-
Im ec':,icernits itself with tlie natI: matllI(l Cal.l.Uiil!ns
which .viill verify tile -tateieni ats ivlil .-re ail:A.lA ilI the
descri i:tiv.cC e')ol.ls.
tians oft the habits of iinveitlrlate air, 1mM lfI c:il ti-
ute tli.; Type ar et i for ia tly i
h '' .'ei. etc.
BBIOL,:G;Y ; I. Dra'wl-'V.-i'. 2 li seti .'ns,. il j .sr-x ti.t-
of vertebrate aiiI h ab lits ol a i.ert rrte a i tl wo i of tI-s
course thi. T ypl's s e eeleet-d for ssCial ci! stt, ly r T:.
rablblits. etc. '
TEXT-BO:I'I.S: --(To be .''l/:1,;I ;.i.)
PHYSICAL GEO;GR ..AF HY
Tn l:,lnnt till with the stii'ly of the te:ct-lblok. ob-
ser!.vvti:in les- .lns asfaras p:,acti able aLre t:.l;eni ,:n rock;.
stream ;. er.:.siil. 'stiatlicaeti on. soil tormati:!, an ll
plant life in the immeliat.e vi,.inity.
TEXT-BOOK ;-T:u '-;' P'!1Sr1 (G7 "''.j('/Ji7/.
GEOLOGY
The course comprises a c:,i: ,iptrensivt study of
Dyn,,amiieal; Strii.etuitil.. and Htist.ii;.:al Geology. A sys-
tematic study of rocks is made with the aid of speci-
mens in the s,:l',-:'s :,,l-ti,:in Field excursions are
made from time to time.
TEXT-b ,-"'i :--Norton's Ei., ,,: i f', : Geology.
22
I. ^ ^a





DESCRIPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSES
PHYSIOLOGY
PHYSIOLOGY. This subject is made as practical
as possible. The human body is studied as a working
organism, and its various functions are worked out by
scientific observation. To carry out this purpose, the
school is supplied with a human skeleton, a manakin,
a physiological chart, a model eye, heart, etc., pre-
pared slides of the principal tissues, and two compound
microscopes. That the student may observe the facts
thus studied first hand, a sufficient number of animals
are dissected and their nerves and tissues studied.
TEXT-BOOK :--Blaisdell's Practical Physiology;
Holden's Real Things in Nature.
MATHEMATICS
Here the purpose is to give the student a knowledge of mathe-
matical principles and the ability to use them in actual service in the
shop. Stress is constantly laid on the formation of correct habits of
thought. The work is guaged to stimulate independent thought
and to promote confidence in the student of his ability to undertake
successfully more advanced branches. During the year talks will be
given on the history of mathematics.
ARITHMETIC. For admission to the Grammar School,
students are required to have a fair knowledge of
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Be-
ginning at factoring, the course of three years continues
through fractions, measures, percentage, and interest.
TEXT-BOOKS -Moore and Miner's Practical Arith-
metic; Young and Jackson's Arithmetic Book II.
ALGEBRA I. In this course, which covers four
terms, the aim is, not alone to acquaint the student with
a knowledge of the subject as far as quadratics, but
also to develop facility in grasping combinations, accu-
racy in statement, and generalization for arithmetical
methods.
TEXT-BOOK :-Wells' Academic Algebra.
23





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
ALGEBRA II. This course, offered to students of
of the Scientific Course, embraces the study of Quad-
ratic Equations, the Theory of Equations, together with
Arithmetical and Geometrical Progression, Permuta-
tions,' Combinations, and Chance.
Considerable time will be given to the representa-
tion of equations by means of the graph.
GEOMETRY I. This course, extending to solids,
gives considerable attention to original problenls alnd to
the application of the principles of Plane Geometry'in
mensuration. The following points are always held in
view: the process of reasoning, the separation of nu-
merical relation, a clear notion of magnitude; the devel-
opment of individual power.
TEXT-BOOK:- Phillips and Fisher's Elements of
Geometry.
GEOMETRY II. In this course of three months, of-
fered only to students of the Scientiic Course, the study
of geometrical magnitude is continued.
TEXT-BOOK :-Phillips and Fisher's Solid Geometry.
TRIGONOMETRY. This course embraces the study of
Right and Oblique Triangles and prepares directly for
the study of surveying.
TEXT-BOOK:-Well's Plane Trigonometry.
SURVEYING. This subject is taught during one
term and concerns itself with the problems that natur-
ally arise from the topography in the region of the school.
TEXT-BOOK:-Robbin's Treatise on Surveying.
GEOMETRY III. This course in Analytical Geometry
is based on the study of Conic Sections as discussed in
Smith and Gale's Analytic Geometry.
LATIN
LATIN I. This course is a study of the principles
of Latin Grammar. In the reading lessons great impor-
24





DESCRIPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSES
tance is attached at 'first to the literal rendering into
English, and then the students are required to employ
the English idiom which most nearly expresses the
thought of the Latin sentence. As far as possible in
the first ) ear the students are made to compare Eng-
lish and Latin words formed from the same root.
TEXT-BOOK :-Collar and Daniel's First Year Latin.
LATIN II. Classes in Cicero are required to read
at least two orations, making a study of the history of
the period of Cicero's life.
TEXT- BOOK:-Bennett's Cicero.
LATIN III. Classes in Virgil read at least two
books, rendering into as elegant English as students of
the grade are able. Considerable attention is given to
scansion and mythological references are required to be
explained throughout the course.
TEXT-BOOK :- Bennett's Virgil.
ENGLISH
ENGLISH A. I. (Grammar) This course covers the
work in grammar of the Grammar School, and is based
upon Arnold and Kittredge's Mother Tongue Series,
Books I and II, preparatory to English I.
ENGLISH A. II. (Reading) This course of the
Grammar School embraces the reading of selections
from American and English Classics such as is usually
found in the advanced school readers, and is preparatory
to the more formal study of English and American lit-
eratures.
ENGLISH I. This is Technical Grammar with espe-
cial stress upon sentence composition and analysis.
TEXT-BOOK:-Whitney and Lockwood's Grammar.
ENGLISH II. This course consists of selections from
25





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Old English authors with a historical sketch of the
English language and literatures.
ENGLISH III. A study of selections from the early
American authors with a study of the beginning of
American literature is the extent of this course.
ENGLISH IV. This is a continuation of Courses II
and III into the field of modern English literature, and
embraces a study of general literature.
Reference texts for Courses II, III and IV:-George's
Chaucer to Arnold ; Master-pieces of American Litera-
ture; Painter's English and American Literature.
ENGLISH V. English reviews covering technical
grammar and composition will be taken up in this
course.
ENGLISH VI. Rhetoric, embracing a critical study
of English composition, logical discourse, and literary
criticism will be covered in this course.
TEXT :-Genung's Outlines of Rhetoric.
HISTORY
HISTORY A. (U. S. History.) This course, of-
fered in the Grammar School, embraces the leading
facts in the history as given in Montgomery's First Book.
HISTORY I. This is English History. TEXT :-Hig-
ginson and Channing's English Hiostry for Americans.
In the Second Year Scientific (High School), this subject
will be alternated with English Literature.
HISTORY II. Ancient History is the subject of this
course. TEXT:- West's Ancient Europe.
HISTORY III. This is an advanced course in Amer-
ican History based upon Montgomery's Students'
American History, with a special study of the federal
constitution.
26





DESCRIPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSES
HISTORY IV. The course embraces Modern History.
The Modern State as discussed by Woodrow Wilson's
The State and Robinson's Western Europe is studied.
BOOKKEEPING
The work in bookkeeping is intended to give the
students a knowledge of the ordinary methods of trans-
acting business and of making business records.
TEXT-BOOK :-Goodyear's Sixty Lessons in Business.
PEDAGOGY
PEDAGOGY I. This course is a brief discussion of
the human soul with a view to finding and formulating
the principles underlying the correct methods of teach-
ing. The study is based upon Salisbury's Theory of
Teaching.
PEDAGOGY II. This course discusses the formal use
of the laws of mental development in teaching, gener-
ally known as methodology. The methods derived
from the discussions are "tried out" in a practice
school under the direction of a critic teacher.
REERENCE TEXTS :-The McMurry Series and Salis-
bury's Theory of Teaching.
PEDAGOGY III. The history of Education based
upon Monroe's History of Education will be studied.
The three courses seek to prepare the intending
teacher for intelligent and practical service in the com-
mon schools of the State.
ETHICS
ETHICS I. This course is a discussion of rights and
duties as brought out in every-day life.
TEXT-BOOK :-Davis' Elements of Ethics.
ETHICS II. In this course there is more detailed
discussion of Ethical theories as set forth in Davis and
Magee's Ethics.
27
S





STATE NOR'MAL SCHOOL
ECONOMICS
ECONOMICS I. This course offers an elementary-
discussion of man's effort at making a living, based up-
on Ely and Wicker's Economics.
ECONOMICS. II. A more advanced course in the
study of Economic theory with -stress upon the Distri-
bution of Wealth.
TEXT-BOOK :-Bullock's Introduction to Economics.
PSYCHOLOGY
This course proposes a careful study of mental phe-
nomena and consciousness based upon James' discus-
sions. His school edition of Psych:llo,:,'y is the text used.
CIVICS
This course has as its purpose good and intelligent
citizenship. It embraces not only a study of the forms
of government known to us, but it also embraces a re-
veiew of the leading facts in the history of this govern-
ment.
TEXT-BOOK :-Lansing and Jones' Government in the
United States.
GERMAN I. The first work in German consists of
grasping the Grammar of the language, together with
reading of easy exercises in German and the transla-
tions of English sentences into German.
GERMAN II. This course consists of reading some
of the master-pieces in prose and poetry.
MUSIC
The school offers to its pupils a four years course in systematic
piano forte work by which the students are to be graded and pro-
moted.
This course in so planned as to enable the student to play good
music well, and with addition of the Elements of Harmony to be
28





DESCRIPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSES
able to enter a conservatory after having completed the work here
laid down. At the completion of this course, certificates of proficien-
cy will be given.
The students in music are required to attend the recitals which
are held once during each month. These exercises are of two-fold val-
ue, namely: giving pupils practice, in playing before others, and grant-
ing them rare opportunity to listen to well prepared music from the
best composers
Students taking music must practice at least one hour each day.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two dollars and
twenty-five cents ($2.25) for eight lessons of twenty minutes each.
This fee also includes the use of the music and instrument for practice.
FIRST GRADE
TECHNICS: Major scales in one and two octaves
hands separate, tonic traids in close position.
STUDIES: Landon's Foundation Studies; Mat-
thew's Graded Studies, Book I; National Graded Stud-
ies; Emery's Foundation Studies; Koehler op. 162 and
190; easy compositions of Behr, Gurlitt, Bruneur,
Lichner, etc.
SECOND GRADE
TECHNICS: Major scales in three octaves. Har-
monic minor scales in one and two octaves, hands sep-
arate. Broken major and minor traids.
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II,
(1lt half); Spindler, op. 273, Books I and II; Loeschorn,
op. 66, Books I and II; Gurlitt op. 82, Books I and II;
Spindler op. 44; selections from Merkel, Lange,
Schumann, Clementi. Lichner, Ritter, and others.
THIRD GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and harmonic minor scales in
four and five note rhythms. Studies in broken traids,
(continued)
STUDIES: Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II,
29





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
(2nd half) ; Burgmuller, op. page 100, Books I and II;
Koehler op. page 157.
PIECES: Selections from Ktillah, 62; Grade op. 36;
Mozart, No. I. Low; Lichner, op. 49; Emery, Spindler,
and others.
FOURTH GRADE
TECHNICS: Major and melodic minor scales in six
and eight note rhythms.
STUDIES: Matthew's Studies, Book III, Koehler,
op. 130; Heller, op. 47; Czerney, op. 636 and 718.
PIECES: Wilm, op. 12: Schytte, op. 66; Bohm op.
327, No. 2; selection from Haydn, Kerchner, Whilen-
haupt,. Heller, Scharwencka, Schumann, and Lack.
VOCAL MUSIC
The purpose of this course is to give the student an.
elementary knowledge of sight singing.
The student is first allowed to sing by note, and is
led to observe differences in pitch, in tone, and relative
duration of sounds made. This is followed by the use
of sound names and' an accurate distinction of each.
Daily drills are given. After this has been accom-
plished a study of various keys begins.
This course is given to all members of the Grammar
School. High School and Senior School students are
allowed to join the Musical Union where they receive
special instruction in sight reading and the best stand-
ard musical works. The Solfeggio system is used.
30





JOOHKD JAMYI1O" aTATK
PlESCRIPTION OF THE MECHANIC ANDDOMSTIC
ARTS DEPARTMENT COURSES
;, The work of the Mechanic and Domestic Arts Department has
phases: (I) Manual Training, (2) Training in the specific work
the various industries the school has In operation.
The manual training precedes the industrial training, and pre-
sthe student both mentally and physically to perform the work
the trades more satisfactorily by giving him correct mechanical ide-
iis anda certain amount of skill which can be put to immediate use in
l later work. This is in addition to the well known educative val-
f mauual training.
;; Constant effort is made to correlate thc work of the academic
d mechanical departments.
it..* Each department helps the other, and the student is made to feel
Xe truth that the two departments are not separate and distinct, but
component parts of one great whole.
Whenever possible in the mechanical courses, the student makes
-:.s own drawings and works from them.
' ach student is expected to spend at least two years in any divis-
/ion to which he may be assigned.
Letters certifying the nature and amount of work done in each
division will be given to the student by the instructor upon applica-
tion.
MANUAL TRAINING
This course is in the form of Work in wood and iron
and is given to all young men in the Grammar School
except those studying agriculture The first year's
work comprises the construction of the various articles
from the student's own working sketches, bringing in
the use of the ordinary wood-working tools: the plane,
saw, hammer, chisel, etc. The early part of the second
years devoted to bent iron work and the latter part to
elementary blacksmithing.
MECHANICAL DRAWING
The work in mechanical drawing is designed to give
the student such a knowledge of the subject as will en-
able him to make correct working drawings for his
31





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
owvn use in the shop, and to read the drawings and blue
prints made by others.
The course begins with simple working (1'a\ 'illgs
which are made fromnlfreelihand sketches. 'The sl;-tches
are made and the measurements taken from objects by
the student himself. Later the student draws from
the sketches of others and finally takes up the world of
designing.
As faras ipo:-sible the class of objects from which the
student draws is determined by the industry at which
he works; for instance, the drawing of the young nien
who work at carpentry .tends toward the planning of
buildings ; that of the young men working -at wheel-
wrighting is directed toward 'carriage drafting and
design.
PRINTING
In the first year the student learns the cases, com-
position, care of press, care of type, names and uses of
printer's materials.
Lectures on job work, transferring of matter, use of
press, and correcting proofs take up the second year..
Making up book forms, job work in colors, job compo-
sition, and general press work take up the third year.
All of the school's printing done during the school'
term is the wolr of this division. The printing and publi-
cation of the school's paper, "The College Arms," is
a part of the regular work.
CAR PENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING
This course is intended to give the student an ele-
mentary knowledge of house and shop carpentry and
cabinet-making.
It begins with elementary bench work, introducing
the student to the more simple tools and the prominent
characteristics of timber. This is followed by a study
32





DESCRIPTION OF MECHANICAL COURSES
? of house building, beginning with framing and then
taking up door and. window frame construction and out-
side finishing, floor laying, and inside finishing, and
?; stair-building.
The foregoing takes up the first two years. During
.' the third and fourth years the time is occupied by cab-
inet-making, the study of the first principles of the
trades, which, together with carpentry, are employed in
the erection of buildings, and a bird's eye view of the
work of the architect in their design and in the superin-
tendence of their construction.
Throughout the course it is planned that the student
shall, as far as possible, actually go through the various
processes about which he hears from the instructor in
his talks to the class.
PAINTING
Instruction in this division consists of a study of the
painter's brushes and other tools; paints and the differ-
ent classes of painting; colors and their harmony and
contrasts, interior and exterior house-painting; wagon,
and carriage painting; besides glazing, cutting, frosting,
staining, and embossing glass; sign-writing, and fresco-
painting.
BLACKSMITING AND WHEELWRIGHTING
BLACKSMITHING. The student in the first year is
taught to make fires and the use of blacksmithing tools
in the operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending,
twisting, punching, cutting off, scarfing and welding of
staples, hooks, collars, and chains.
The second year is given to the ironing of wheel-
barrows, push carts, and wagons, and the welding and
setting of wagon tires.
In the third year the work of the previous year is
continued and the study of horse-shoeing is begun.
33





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Horse-shoeing and general repairing constitute the
work of the fourth year.
The above work will be done in from blue prints as
far as possible.
WHEELWRIGHTING. In this course exei cis.e* in plan-
ing, nailing, boring, sawing, glueing, and making
spokes, felloes, etc. give the student a knowledge of
the use of the bench and general tools of the wheel-
wright. He' is taught to make and to' assemble the
parts of wheel-barrows, push carts, one and two horse
farm wagons, delivery and milk wagons, buggies, and
carriages.
TAILORING
The aim of this department is to give the young
men such a knowledge of tailoring as will equip them
for positions as journeymen. Due attention is given to
busheling which cori-'titute' a great part of the work of
every tailor shop.
This course of study and practice comprises the va-
rious operations in making coats, vests, and trousers,
also management of shop, economy in cutting, cleaning,
repairing, etc.
The system of drafting taught is the John J.
Mitchell Standard System of Drafting.
COOKING AND LAUNDERING
The aim of this course is to give thorough training
in household economy, to give such'lessons as it is possi-
ble to make use of in homes where the means are mod-
erate; to teach setting of the table and serving of the
food so as to make the simplest dish look appetizing
and palatable.
,The course includes: (1) selection of food materials
with regard to quality, food value, and cost; (2) study
34





-. DESCRIPTION OF MECHANICAL COURSES
composition and food material; (3) recipes which il-
' ate the underlying principles of cooking; (4)plaa-
g and serving of meals, and general care of dining
and kitchen; (5) correlation of subject with aca-
ce work; (6) canning and preserving; (7) fancy
during.
PLAIN SEWING AND DRESSMAKING
E PLAIN SEWING. This course gives training in the
e of the needle in the ordinary forms of sewing, such
s basting, overhanding, patching, darning, hemming,
: ickstiching, felling, gathering, sewing on buttons,
i:making button holes, etc.
A part of the time is given to practice in the oper-
ation of the sewing machine and to drafting, cutting,
and putting together simple garments.
DRESSMAKING. The object of this work is to give
a thorough knowledge of the principles of dressmaking
with as much practice as time will allow. It is valuable
? to those who wish to make their own dresses or to sup-
' erintend the work. With additional practice it is excel-
! lent training for professional dressmaking. Three
terms of three months each are given in this course.
The first term is devoted to the making of unlined
waists and skirts of washable materials. The second
term is given to making skirts and waists of woolen ma'-
terials. Outside garments and the matching of stripes
and plaids take up the time of the third term.
Drafting, cutting, and fitting, form a part of the
work of each term.
MILLINERY
Thorough training in the practical and artistic
principles of millinery is the object of this line of work.
The course embodies the drawing of untrimmed
35





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
hats, drapery, and bows, making buchram and wire
frames for hats, folding, binding, making bows, fitted
and full facing, puffed edges and practice in applying
the principles learned, to making of hats, bonnets,
toques, and turbans. Instruction in color, form, and
line is given, besides talks on the manufacture of straw
and felt hats, ribbon, crape, and silk.
NURSE TRAINING
The nurse training department affords an opportu-
nity for young women to fit themselves, by practical ex-
perience, in the school's hospital, for the care of the
sick in their homes and elsewhere.
As a means of livelihood, nursing stands next to
the profession of medicine.
The course as prescribed in this institution, embrac-
es the following subjects: Anatomy, Physiology, Hygi-
ene, "Principles of Nursing," and Materia Medica.
The use of hospital appliances, application of baths,
care of wounds and bandaging takes up a part of this
course. Attention is also given to the kinds and use of
disinfectants, administration of drugs, their doses, and
antidotes.
Only young women who are members of the High
School or of the Senior School will be admitted, and.
those who have completed the High School course or its
equivalent are preferred.
36





DESCRIPTION OF THE AGRICUTURAL DEPART-
MENT COURSES
It is the aim of this department to introduce the science under-
lying practical agriculture, and make it so interesting and vital to
the students' daily life as to win their respect for the farm and what
is to be fouud on the farm.
The school farm of i8o acres is well stocked and provided with
improved farm implements, and a splendid experience in conduct-
ing a farm in the most improved manner is given.
The courses are arranged in such a way as to give each class of the
school some agricultural training in order toimpress its importance
upon the students.
Itis the plan and hope that those who graduate from the school
will be so well informed in General Agriculture that they will be able
to teach it in the public schools of the State. It is also the aim of the
department to improve and enlarge the theoretical and practical work
so as to produce first-class farmers-men and women possessing clear
understanding of the soil and its products.
Appropriate reference books, reports from experiment stations,
and from the Department of Agriculture at Washington are used
from time to time in addition to the regular text-books.
GENERAL AGRICULTURE
This term is very broad in its meaning, but it is a
beginning subject for boys taking up agriculture in the
Grammar School, involving the origin of soils, their
management for various crops, manures, and fertilizers,
injurious crop pests, farm stock, and related subjects.
TEXT-BOOK :-Burkett's Agriculture for Beginners.
HORTICULTURE
(a) This is specifically, theoretical and practical
Fruit-growing, involving the classification of fruits,
the geography of fruit-growing, the business side, loca-
tion of orchard, choice of varieties, best plans to follow
as to regions, soils, nursery practice, laying out of the
fruit farm, setting of trees and plants, tillage, cover
crops, fertilizers of all kinds; principles of pruning
37





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
and pruning tools, general care of fruit plantation,
labeling varieties, treatment of all known orchard and
vineyard diseases and insect pests, harvesting and
marketing of fruits of all kinds.
TEXT-BOOK :-Bailey's Principles of Fruit-growing.
The text-book work is supplemented by field labor-
atory work in the school's orchard. This course is giv-
en to the students of the First and Second Year High
School.
(b) Nature Study and School Gardens:
The classes which, take this course are composed
principally of girls in the Grammar School. The class
room work consists in taking notes on such gardening
and nature topics generally, as are interesting to them.
The field laboratory work involves the making and
cultivating of small and individual flower and vegeta-
ble gardens, supplemented.by excursions to the farms,
woods, and various parts of the campus for observation
and information in this line of study. This is given dur-
ing the fall and winter terms.
(c) Agricultural Botany:
This subject is touched upon generally, during the
entire school year in the study of Horticulture, but it
is more fully covered and specified during the spring
term for High School students. It includes the na-
ture of the known plant itself, the relation of the plant
to its surroundings, and the practical phase of Structu-
ral Botany. It is given through lectures, with the taking
of notes by the students, and fully illustrated by the
students own efforts among plants and flowers of the
community.
(d) Where any class of students in the school show
aptitude for certain other subjects under the general
heading of Horticulture or Agriculture, not here enum-
erated, and such a course is practicable, classes may be
formed in Vegetable Gardening, Practical Landscape
Gardening, Floriculture, and Plant Breeding.
38





DESCRIPTIOO OF AGRCULTURAL COURSES
AGRONOMY
This subject is really that of farm management, and
and the study of cereal and field crops. For the pres-
ent the course is given primarily to those students who
have satisfactorily completed the other courses outlined
for the Agricultural Department, and also having com-
pleted the course in Elementary Chemistry of the
Academic Department. It consists mainly of correlated
lectures in General Agronomy, Elementary Agricultu-
ral Chemistry, and a close study of the subject of soils.
Reference work at the library will be assigned at times
during the year.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Course A
This course includes a study of breeds of dairy and
beef cattle, horses, sheep, and swine, their origin and
general purpose, adaptation to the South, the principles
of breeding live stock in general, involving inheritance,
natural selection and environment. The meaning of
pedigrees, general and constant individual improvement
of live stock ; physiology of the dairy cow, and other
live stock. These subjects are treated in detail.
Course B
This course treats the general subjects of feeding
and feeds for all kinds of live stock, and the care and
attention to be given Southern domestic farm stock,
medical care, etc., in detail, covering common stock dis-
eases, animal parasites, and injuries, as well as judging
and scoring of different farm stock.
Both of these courses, (A and B) consist of lectures,
implying the taking of notes by the student, and as-
signed library work-especially for the Senior Classes.
39





FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
DAIRY INDUSTRY
In this course the home dairy, its location, equip-
ment, and source of milk supply are considered. Mod-
ern dairy apparatus in use is studied, and theoretical
instruction given in detail concerning all necessary dai-
ry machinery. The art of butter making and the prin-
ciples underlying such work, the theory and practice of
milk testing and milk inspection, and everyday rules of
the best practice in modern dairies of any size or place
are studied. The school's dairy is well equipped to af-
ford practice to students in dairying. This course is
given throughout the year to the High School and Sen-
ior students as may be arranged.
TEXT-BOOK :-Wing's Milk and Its Products; supplemented
by lectures.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
In this course the location of the home poultry es-
tablishment, its proper construction, equipment, and
management, the classes and breeds of poultry and
their characteristics, the feeding of various classes of
poultry, with balanced rations, the use of oyster shells,
ground bone, etc. in the egg production, involving
the use of improved machinery, and the best methods of
killing, dressing, and marketing, are studied. Funda-
mental and helpful rules in preventing and treating di-
seases and parasites, the theory and practice in using
the incubator, influences of heredity, prepotency, food
variation, natural selection, etc., in the raising of poul-
try, are also considered as well as special treatment
for the turkey. Practice is given in applying approved
methods in the poultry plant of the school. This course
is given through lectures to the students of the High
School.
40





PROMOTION
A student receiving less than 60 in any subject (ac-
ademic or industrial) is conditioned in that subject.
A candidate for graduation must remove all condi-
tions and balance all accounts before receiving a diplo-
ma or degree.
Neither diploma nor degree will be given any stu-
dent who has not taken a course in the Agricultural or
in the Mechanic and Domestic Arts Department.
41 .:





CLASS LISTS FOR 1907 AND 1908
SENIOR SCHOOL
A CLASS
(Candidates for Graduation)
NAME P. 0. ADDRESS NAME P. O. ADDRESS
Caldwell, Constance E.---St. Augustine Mulberry, Andrew A.--------Gainesville
Carter, Thomas W.------- Tallahassee Thomas, Mary E. ----------Apalachicola
Lewis, Mary E.--------------Tallahassee Thompson, Ketous T. Pretoria, S. Africa
Lott, Melissa------------------ Live Oak Whaley, Saxton H.--------St. Augustine
B CLASS
Barnette, Calle D, ------------- Pinetta Jones, Joseph N.------------ Jacksonville
Bingham, George ---------Jacksonville Nettles, Lola A. ..------------Sanford
Boyd, Charles .-----West Palm Beach Osgood, Harry A.-- --------- Palatka
Daniels, Fred O. .--------------Orlando Patterson, Alonzo W.---- East Palatka
Gibbs, Alice M.. -----------Tallahassee
Gildersleeve, Eloise O.-West Palm Beach Reid, Fannie B. ------- --- Sanford
Glass, Annie B.-----------.Gainesville Stephen, Richard.-----------Tallahassee
Hall, Horatio E.------------ St. Nicholas Thomas, Maude E.-------- -Apalachicola
Hightower, Richard AMontgomery, Ala. Twine, Jeanette E.------- --Tallahassee
Houston, Walter L.---- ------ Glenwood Williams, Henrietta V. -----Tallahassee
Jenkins, Lucile ----------------Tampa Williams, Winter -------------Pecks
HIGH SCHOOL
THIRD YEAR CLASS
Allen, Eulise S. ----------Pensacola King, William A. ------- ..-Ashville
Arrington, Bertha-------------- Orlando Livingston, Walter R.-------- -Marianna
Barnette, Lillie M.---- --------Pinetta Long, Theodore -----------Cottondale
Britt, Edward M.. --------..Chipley Lowe, Lewis E.. ---.- ------ Tampa
Bryant, Eva -------------Mandarin Martin, Fannie B.------------Jonesviile
Burton, Gertrude L.-------- -Pensacola McPherson, Letitia M.------ Tallahassee
Calvin, Julia A..----- West Palm Beach
Eaverly, Fannie ------------Sanford Nixon, Waldense C --------.--.Madison
Foster, Etta V. ..--------Warrington Norton, Carl ------------.- Tampa
Gildersleeve,Elizabeth-West Palm Beach Robinson, Frank C._ Green Cove Springs
Jerrry, Naomi V.-____-----Tallahassee Smith, Leroy _--____- _- Jacksonville
Johnson, James R.---------- Tallahassee Twine, Mary P .------ --- Tallahassee
Jones, Minna --------------Quincy Wight, Ruble L.-----------Opelika, Ala.
Jones, William A. ..----Apalachicola Willie, Lillie G.------Green Cove Springs
SECOND YEAR CLASS
Adderley, NathanielC. -----Key West Martin, Osceola B.------.-------- Miami
Allen, Capus .-----------Carrabelle Mason, Walter J. ---------Pensacola
Armstrong, Susie 0. ----- -----Sanford Matthews, Mary E.---- --- Tallahassee
Armstrong, James H.----- Tallahassee Miller, Roverta -- ------ Eatonville
42





CLASS LISTS
NAME P. O. ADDRESS NAME P. 0. ADDRESS
Bardwell, Bertha E.-----------Pensacola McDonald, Rosa E.--------------Orlando
Bronson, Jessie M. ---------Sanford McDonald, Nancy -------------Alachua
Cain, Edward C....------------- Lawtey McLean, Edwin ------*-- Florence, Ala.
Cox, Codies G.._____..- Jacksonville Nelson, Edith --------------Jacksonville
Fells, Gussie C. ---Green CoveSprings
Gibbs, Grace E. ----------Tallahassee Osgood, Vivian L.------------ Madison
Glass, Alberta -.------------Gainesville Rountree, Milton P.--------------Tampa
Haile, Hattie E.. .- ------Gainesville Saunders, Alice M.----------Tallahassee
Hightower, DorsetteN.Montgomery,Ala. Spencer, Gertrude ----------Tallahassee
Hogans, James E. ----------Sanford Staples, John T..-----Montgomery, Ala.
Jenkins, Sadie------..__. -Apalachicola Steward, Geneva E.-------------Sanford
Johnson, Callie ----------------Sanford Vaughn, Charlotte A.-------Tallahassee
Jones, Simon P...-------------- Quincy Watson, Legirtha ------------ Pensacola
Lewis, Sampson ..-----------Glenwood Wise, Eureka ...------------Tallahassee
FIRST YEAR CLASS
Arrington, May ---------. Orlando Marvary, Alice --------------.Pensacola
Blackstone, Phares E......--.-- Quincy Matthews, Creola -----------Tallahassee
Campbell, Ralph W. .-------Maitland Ming, Ruth A.-----.. ---- -Apalachicola
Corker, Homer -.----Thomasville, Ga. Mitchell, Lillie B.----.... -------Ashville
Crowell, Fannie'L. ----Silver Springs McDaniels, Florine E.--------. Daytona
Daniels, Samuel ---------------Orlando McPherson, Mary L.--------Tallahassee
Daniel, Carry, E.-- -----.-- --DeLand Orr, Vera ___--____.- Bainbridge, Ga.
Dawson, Lola E. ------------Pensacola Parramore, Dovie M.--------.----Quincy
Donald, Clara L.-----------------Sneads Pawley, Silas ...--------.Leesburg
Gildersleeve, Pennie- West Palm Beach Pinder, Beatrice -------------Pensacola
Gillislee, Oswald L. ------ Jacksonville Quarterman, Jacob -------------.Ocala
Griffin, Laura F.---..-- ----- Pensacola Refoe, Herman -----------------Sanford
Gurley, Fannie M. -------Tallahassee Reid, Albert A.-----------------Sanford
Haile; I-la ----------------.-Gainesville Richardson, Isabella A. -----------Cocoa
Hardy, Aiiie B.------------ --Pensacola Richardson, John P.-..-.---- Leesburg
Hardon, Lillian M ----------Tallahassee Robinson, Essie L -----.----- Tallahassee
Harris, Raiford B..-.----------Tampa Robinson, Helen L.----------Tallahassee
Harris, Ruford B.---------------Tampa Russel, Bessie --------Thomasville, Ga.
Hern, Roberta ----------------Marianna Sermons, Cora -._________- Apopka
Isler, Clyde ----------------Tallahassee Smith, Louise .-....----- Tallahassee
Jenkins, Fred _.------__.Apalachicola Stafford, Sadie I ..-...........Tallahassee
Jenkins, Joseph-------------- Dunnellon Stallworth, Lottie --------Pensacola
Jerry, Horace P. ----. Tallahassee Wade, Susie --------. Bainbridge, Ga.
King, Blanche--------------- Pensacola Ward, Marion -------------. -Sanford
Knight, Daisy .-----Thomasville, Ga. Wilson, Grace --------------Tallahassee
Long, Linnie --- ..... ..----- Daytona Williams, Arthur F -----------.Lake City
Law, Cleveland ----.----------.Ashville Youman, Catherine -------- Tallahassee
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
A CLASS
Allen, Mabel --------------------Tampa King, Hattie E. .----______ Kissimmee
Armstrong, Elizabeth ---------Sanford Kirby, Alice-___ -- -Sanford
.43





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
NAME P. O. ADDRESS NAME P. O. AEDRESS
Beale, James, ------------Plant City Leggett, Samuel D.____------Key West
Beale, Wesley O ---------- --Plant City Myrick, May B.. -------Tallahassee
Benjamin, Bessie------------- Pensacola McCall, Ernest C.---------.-----Madison
Brown, Rosa -..-----___-..Pensacola McDaniels, Robert W.--------- Daytona
Brown, Lemuel A.----Montgomery, Ala. Parker, Lena ----.--------- --Orlando
Bryant. Ada B..--- -----Metcalf, Ga. Poole, Edward B.--------- _--Monticello
Cady, Jeremiah---.- -DeFuniak Springs Prince, Joseph F.------------.-Glenwood
Caldwell, Willie ....----__St. Augustine Rambo, Josie B.----- Donaldsonville. Ga.
Caldwell, Rosa L. --------Tallahassee
Canossa, Jose M.----------Havana, Cuba Robinson, Melita A.- -----Kissimmee
Coachman, Rosetta-Donaldsonville, Ga. Shoates, Annie E.--------------Orlando
Gulp, Julian P. _______ --Jacksonville Smith, Albert-__ __ ... -- Quincy
Doyle, Alena M._______- Tallahassee Steward, Lcola .---------..--- Sanford
Duncan, Henry E.---- Monlgomcry, Ala. Vaughn, Lucy ----------... Tallahassee
Edwards, Julia A..-_______ -- Cocoa Wallace. Fre( D --------- Jacksonville
Flemming, James A. --Key West Wallace, Hannah -------------Bonifay
Gandolfo, Albert A.-.-. ------Key West Warren, Ruth -..-------.-..aytona
Goulden, William L..-----. Pensacola Watson, Delilah --------------Pensaoola
Jackson, Jessie --------_---Tallahassee Young, Effie B.--------------------Lloyd
Jones, Alberta _______-..- .Tallahassee Young, Nathan B. Jr., ------Tallahassee
B CLASS
Allen, Ida S.-.--------.----. Tallahassee Lynch, Oscar A.--------------. -Oconee
Allen, Mary C. --------.-------- Tampa Mason, Addie B.------------ Jacksonville
Alston, Clara -----------...--Pensacola Mitchell, Lula R.----__._Beachton, Ga.
Baker, Charlotte ----------------Quincy Mobley, James G. .------------. Apopka
Beale, Georgia ---------------Plant City Moorer, Dexter ------------Tallahassee
Bentley, Annie D..-----------..Iamonia McFadden, Herbert ipley
Black, Leckwood W.--------Sanford McKinnon, Lena(Mrs.) D-- f, Sp'gs
Brown, NellieB. ------------Gainesville Norman, Eliza ----laassee
Butler, Mabel P. ..-----------.Ocala Paige, Susan M.------ allahassee
Caine, Matilda .-. ..-- Tallahassee Parks, Ethel M.--------------- Pensacola
Caldwell, Ada -- ._- -----Tallahassee Paul, Lottie E -------...-----Cove Mills
Campbell, Mamie -----------West Farm Powell, George W. .-----------.Quincy
Crompton, Gibbs ------.----Gainesville Powell, Bcssie M.---------.Jacksonville
Dabney, Robert -------------.. Quincy Powell, Clara --------------Jacksonville
Daniels, Georgia ------------.Q.. Quincy Furdee, Frances D ----.-- .--Mcarianna
Davis, Ruth A ----.--------Tallahassee
Dawson, Emma ------------M---Millvile Rcese, Iantha -------------Tallahassee
Donald, Jesse --------._-_-_._- Sneads Rose, Samuel R.-----------Rock Bluff
Doyle, Annette -------------Tallahassee Sherman, Frederick S..----Jacksoaville
Duncan, Norma E. ---Montgor ery, Ala. Simmons, Cra L... ---------Aialachicola
Ecklis, Lula --------------------Quircy Smith, Emiiy 3.------ --- Tallahassee
Gardner, James, --------- ---. Lloyd Stewart, Carrie------.... ------- Roy
Gray, Eva----------------- Greenwood Taylor. Louise B.------- ---Marianna
Green, Delia L.------.. --------.Roy Vickers, Lessie ----------- Longwood
*Hardon, Daisy .-------------.--.Quincy Verdier, Robert.-- ------Tallahassee
Harxis, Bessie.------------Ponce deLeon Wanza, Addie L.-- ------ Tallahassee
Jenkins, Esther-------.---- -Tallahassee Wiggins, Ida S -------------------Roy
Johnson, Lula M -... ------ ----Quincy Wilkins, Nathpnil --.. --.---4Madison
Jones, Rosa L.-.. ----------- Quincy Wilson, Horatio N.. ------Jack'sville
44





GENERAL SMMARY
NAME P. O. ADDRESS NAME P. O. ADDRESS
Lane, Rossie ..------------ Monticello Wilson, Gertrude ...---------Midway
Long, Roberta --------------Cottondale Young, Toney -....-----. Tallahassee
C CLASS
Anderson, Major ---.. ----------- Lloyd Houston, Matilda C. ----------Glenwood
Barnhill, Cleddie ------------- Bonifay Hunt, Sarah E. .- ----------Freeport
Boston, Donald -----------------Chipley Jaekson, Louisa ___-_______Freeport
Bowens, Elizabeth ----------------Lee Leonard, Jane-_________ L------Lloyd
Bradwell, Celia ---------------- Quincy Lewis, Mattie--_______.. Tallahassee
Brooks, Alphonso -----. Jacksonville Mitchell, Malcolm -------.St. Augustine
Bryant, Eddie..--------------- Ocilla Myrick, John..- ----------- Tallahassee
Butler, Corinne.---------..-- Quincy McCormick, LewisSantaFe, Isle of Pines
Caldwell, Robert W.---------Tallahassee Norwqod, Lucinda -------O---cklocknee
Carter, Maggie L. -----------Quincy Payne, Sarah,--------- -----Tallahassee
Chestnutt, Lillie (Mrs.) DeFuniak Sp'gs Pharaoh, Willie --....- ---------Chipley
Chisholm, Tennie L. .-------Caryville Phillips, 7enobia -----Birmingham, Ala.
Cockfield, Henry H. ----------Wacissa Powell, Richard A.------.------- Quincy
Conyers, Naomi _..-----------Greenville Powell, Florence F.---- --- Jacksonville
Combs Fletcher.---------- Tallahassee Randolph, Lillie F. ____ .---- Metcalf
Combs, Mary E.------------- Tallahassee Saunders, Robert L.-------.- Tallahassee
Cruise, Leola -. ..... ---- Chattahoochee Simmons, Alphonso------------ Live Oak
Daniels, Ada M .-....--- Ponce deLeon Smith, James H.-. --__-------.-...- Lee
Duling, Robert G.--------- -Tallahassee Smith, John- .Q_______. __ ..uincy
Fields, Arthur ...-__.--_----. --- Quincy SAnith, Frank ----. ----.Jackson, Ala.
Fields, Annie L.--..----------. -. Quincy Thomas, Rosa L....- ----Fowlston, Ga.
Gaines, Alfred -------------- .Hampton Vaughn, Laurie ------.. __. Tallahassee
Gaines, Arthur -..- ----------- Hampton Verson, Elnora ----.-- __----Tallahassee
Gilbert, Rosa L..--- -----.-- Quincy Wallace, William H ..----- Bonifay
Golden, Mary L..__--........ Tallahassee Watkins, Julia ---------------Pensacola
HafNa Ella----. ------ Tallahassee Williams, Alice E.------Bainbridge, Ga.
Hin a------._____- Tallahassee Williams, Fannie L.--------------Quincy
Hogans, -----------------Freeport Wilson, William-------- Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Hopps, Aleirt A...- --------- Marion Wilson, Gertrude .---------..---Madison
GENERAL SUMMARY
SENIOR SCHOOL
Girls Boys Total
A Cass 4 4 8
B Class 11 10 21
29
HISH SCHOOL
Third Yr. Class 15 12 27
Second Yr. Class 22 13 35
First Yr. Year 36 18 54
116
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
A Class 24 19 43
B Class 46 15 61
C Class 37 21 58
162
TOTAL --------------.... .--- 307
45





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES-FLORIDA
Alachua ______________________......--- 9
Bradford --- ________________________ __----- 3
Brevard ---______________.____________ .... 2
Clay' -------8.----------..--------.--- 8
Columbia -.. -----------------... ----------- ---- 1
Dade ---_---- ________..________.-_ ._- 6
Duval _.___________________... ..i.......... 18
Escambia ---------------------..---------.__.---- 19
Franklin -.. .........--_-_----------- 8
Gadsden ------__ .......................----- 24
Hamilton----..... .._--______.......- 1
Hillsboro __-________ ...-________ ._______- 11
Holmes ----------- .... ... 5
Jackson ----- ---.........- 9
Jefferson---- ......-----_ ._____._.-- ._.-__- 6
Lake--.._. .........--..-.-.........---...._---___ 2
Leon .--. -----------------. .......__........____ __ 71
Leon -,____- 71
Liberty --------_________.............. .. 5
Madison_____ ....._______ ____ ___.____. 11
Marion -----------. --------_-__..------- 4
Monroe________ .._--________.____ .__ 4
Orange ----------___._ .............. -------____ 28
Osceola ------______-__.__________------- 2
Putman --......_____0_. .__.______. __. __- 2
St. Johns ----.-------_-__._______.._____._._- __- 4
Suwannee-----...._...- _...................- 2
Volusia----.--.-.-. _____-._......_.. .... .......-- 9
Walton -----.-...... ------.6______..______. 6
Washington ____-...........-_-...___.- -______--_ 6.
TOTAL .._------._. ..- ____._ 281
ATTENDANCE BY STATES
Alabama ----------------------------..-__.... 11
Cuta ---------------._ .._____....-.--.----- 1
Florida ------------------.- --____-__..--_.. --- 281
Georgia ---------------------.-- -..........----..- 12
Isle of Pines ----. ..-- .1...-.........-1
South Africa ----------.-------- .---.-- -1
TOTAL ------ ..... ..---- 307
46





REGISTER OF THE ALUMNI
1892
Jackson, James Henry ____-____...________________________ ...Tampa
Matthews, William Henry _____...- Brick Mason .-----------------Pensacola
tParker, Ida E. [Mrs. Hall] ______. ___________________..___
Stewart, Charles Henry ..-......_-.U. S. Mail Service .----------------Ocala
Tucker, ErnestV. .--______.U. S. Mail Service.---------- -Chicago, Ill.
1894
Hargrett, James Hall- ----------------Teacher ------ ____________Apalachicola
Jackson, Adelaide ---_______-__._- Teacher .-___--_--_______-- Tallahassee
Pope, Annie I. [Mrs. Johnson] -------Teacher. -._____________________. Miami
Robinson, Simon.Peter ...- ........Principal Stanton School-------- -Jacksonville
Tillman,Robert Lee------- _______-_ Teacher.-_____-____-________- Adele, Ga.
Tony, Beulah E. (Mrs. Nelson) --- Teacher__________ St. Augustine
1895
Evans, Elias G.-------______-.-- Medical Student H'w'd Uni. Washington,D.C.
Fitzgiles, Annie W. [Mrs. Mancher] -Housekeeper._--___-_____.----_ Live Oak
Frazier, Jonas Henry------------.-. Teacher -__________._____ Tallahassee
Jones, Everett Booker --------.--.--- Teacher -----.Normal School -----Tallahassee
Mitchell, Hattie L. [Mrs. Chell] .----Teacher --.---------------- Jacksonville
tNewton, Cornelius ----.__-----------___-________--_________--__
1896
Baldwin, Christiana Ethel ------------Teacher. __________Lakeland
Gaskin, Minnie Lee .- -----------Teacher -____..._.__.____. _- Pensacola
Hall, Henry Franklin ---------------. Medical Student------------ Nashville, Tenn.
Richardson, Caroline D.- ---------..Teacher-..-______.___ ------Leon County
1897
Ale'jier, Edward Isaac.__ ._----- Lawyer ------3217 Wabash Ave., Chicao, Ill.
Hall; Elizabeth [Mrs. Hubert]Housek'p'r_356 S. Humphreys St., Atlanta, Ga.
Stanley, Thomas-_____-._ -Physician ---------------- Nashville, Tenn.
1899
Chaires, George S.._______. .Principal Warden Academy ----St. Augustine
tPratt, Bertha ._......... ------------------------------------
1900
Acosta, C. I. [Mrs. Daniels] ----.- Teacher -------.--------- St. Augustine
Coleman, Temperance [Mrs. Dixon]-_Teacher ------ ------Jacksonville
Kelker, Ethel A.(Mrs. Wright)-__.Teacher--________-__________- DeLand
Osgood, Alice B.________ ----Teacher ____________.__. Madison
Welters, Rosa [Mrs. Butler] ----.-- Housekeeper -----------.--------Key West
1901
Kerr, Caroline A. (Mrs. De Vaughn) _Teacher .--------------Thomssville, Ga.
1902
Attaway, Daisy E. -___________. --Teacher ----Normal School _- Tallahassee
Garrison, Bessie Marie ---------------Woman's Home Mission Work -Atlanta, Ga.
Hurd, BettieM. (Mrs. Robinson) ----Teacher------------- -- Pensacola
t Deceased
47





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Lester, Herbert E. -------------Mail Carrier------.. ..--------- Tampa
Mitchell, Minnie L.-________ Teacher ----------_______.-Jacksonville
Powell. Eliza J.--______________..Teacher ---.Normal School --Tallahassee
Small, Phoebe A. (Mrs. Floyd) -----_ Housekeeper .---------_ Statesboro, Ga.
Whitehead, Anthony J.- ____________ Ry. MailClerk __________ Pensacola
1903--
Boyd, Willie E. (Mrs. Smith) ----Teacher.-___ _________ Daytona
Newbern, Frances V._-----._____-_Teacher --------------------New Augustine
tDavis, Julia A.- -----.--- ------------- ---
tHopkins, Mary (Mrs. Calhoun)...___-------- ________-____________..____
Hopps, John L.-- _____-_------- Contractor and Builder ----------Live Oak
James, Susie E .----------------Teacher --- ------- -----Jacksonville
Jamieson, Mary E. --__-__------Teacher --- ------------- Live Oak
Jackson, Josie G. (Mrs. Green) ---- Teacher -- -------- .._ West,Palm Beach
Kershaw, A. J. -----._----- .Physician ---.--._ ----. Live Oak
Lang, Theresa I.------ _____Teacher -----------Key 'Wit
Mizell, Bertha (Mrs. De Vaughn) _-- Housekeeper _.. ------------ Lake C1iry
Reynolds, Lillie C. _------- ------ Teacher -___- -------- ---- Delaware, Ga.
Stiles, Geneva L. ---------____ ..-Teacher-_St. Stevens Church, Savannah, Ga.
White, Isham A. -----------__-___-- Physician ------- -Murffresborough, Tenn
1904
Butler, Robert W.---- ..------ Medical Student- HowardUni ~Va -.lhi-;r,.n
Cromartie, John A. r,,.,-r L. .. !rn lir.: i. Pa.
Grant, Arthur R.------------------Teacher -----Cookman Institute, Ja. 1: :n;- -lie
Hawkins, Rufus J. --------------- Student --- Howard University, vi.h,;,rF-ton'
tLee, Rosa B..-.... ______._----- ________.-- ._-- -______--
Moore, Sarah ( T-.:.. r...f... ...... Dyr
Perry, Winifrel I ... ....r. a.:......... rh-rr s..
Smith, Walter-' M ....... !-i 'rk ................-... M
Wilkins, Maggi- I- i.. ..-hlrr.,
Yellowhair, MsE. i.- '............ -i-.. -.-,
Young, W aiter T ... .. .. .. ............ -
Armwood, Walter A-- ----------------Carpenter ------------------------ Tampa
Barnette. Anna J .-------------------Teacher-------------- Green Cove Springs
Barnette, Mary D.------. -_____.-----Teacher- --------------------_.------- Ocala
Barnette, Charles H. -B----- ---- -Ry. Mail Clerk -- ___.----------- Ocala
Broome, Thomas A.--- ____________Ry. Mail Clerk -- ------- -- -- Jacksonville
Browne, Peter E ------... -----.Teacher ---- ---------- Anniston, Ala.
Burney, A. R..-____..... ------------... Painter _--------------------- -Tampa
Calhoun, Harvis C.------ ------..-Teacher --..------- Bartow
Campbell, George W.----- ------ __Carpenter ---------_ -----Titusville
Ford, Louisa (Mrs. Nimms) ---------Housekeeper--- Tallahassee
Gilbert, Sarah ----------------Dressmaker ---------- -_ Sanford
Gillislee, Ethel _- ...----------- Teacher Edward Waters College, Jacksonville
Howell, Leroy ------------------------Medical Student ------------Nashville, Tenn.
Jones, Lucy A ..- -------------Teacher .---------------------Chipley
Lancaster, Roy St. Elmo ------------- Business -_ -------------Jacksonville
Lott, Sylvia--- -------------------Housekeeper ---.Normal School -Tallahassee
McElvine, Mabel I .---------Teacher-----------_ --------- Sanford
M^Daniels, George T.----------------Teacher -------------------Quincy
Moore, Eula L. (Mrs. Moten) ----------Housekeeper ------------------- Quincy
t Deceased
48





r
ALUMNI
Shellman, Lizzie B, (Mrs. Jones) --- Housekeeper .. ----------------Quincy
Twine, Gertrude A. ------. ..--_ ---- Teacher ---_Lincoln Academy_- Tallahassee
Walker, Mary E.B- -------- Teacher ____-------------_ Baldwin
Welters, Yulee C. -.---------- Teacher .-------------Key West
Wilson, Lavinia ---- ------- Teacher -- -------------- Tallahassee
Whitfield, Cupid A. -Preacher ----------------------------Quincy
Yates, Edna E.__--_____-----.-- Teacher -------_ 317 State St., Jacksonville
1906
Alexander, Camilla B.. ---------. -- Teacher --------------------------Ocala
Alexander, Levy, Jr. -- ------ Carpenter-------------- ---------Ocala
Bradley, Cecelia A .--------------.Teacher ----Normal School-- ---Tallahassee
t. Chandler, Edward M. A .--------Tailor -----------------------Ocala
Graham, George H-. ---------Tailor ---------------------- Tallahassee
Jackson, AnnieL.--- ---__-_ _---Teacher -- -- ---.- Apalachicola
King, James A. -. -------- .Teacher -- .------_ ---_ Ocala
Mizell. Mary J. -------- -- Teacher _----- ---- ---DeLand
I foberts Erskine A. .---- -----_ Tailor __---------.----- Key West
Scott, John R. Jr ___--.----_----Student.---- Meharry ---- Nashville, Tenn.
Whitley, Fairy B. _------------- Teacher ---------------------Apalachicola
White, Colbert B. .Teacher -- --. ------------ Cottondale
Wise, MinnieL. (Mrs: Gardner) ----Teacher -----------.----- -- Pecks
Wiles, Oliver F. -.. --------- Teacher------------------ Green Cove Springs
_ -.' 1907
Allen, Mar.- .--.-- -- -. Teather-Mt.--lf --------- Metcalf, Ga.
Gilbert, BePilr.t ...... -........ lFater e-------------------- Quincy
Perry, Cassie M -.--- Teacher ------------- Marianna
R..t.-ir-,u. lheTrc : a ...................- T h r--......--. --. ----------- DeLand
tLar!.e, Sarah I.) ....... e.....e----- T ........... .... r
ITh..n.,.r-n El_ s.lta ert M..... ..e. T.ea,.htr, .......................... -. -.,
xx.in~r~ain ,,Lrn~crr hi.. ~_..~.'r.-.:R~,~(a~.l.............................
-%lo 1 .;I Reemta - -. -a1'-2^ -P rea *r. ---r West Farm
- - --- - - -
49





IND EX
Academic Courss, outline of --- 17 Geometry; y _------___-,---_ 24
Academic Courses, description of- 20 German ..... 28
Admission ------.-------- 12 History _- --s---_----------- 26
Agricultural Courses, outline of-_ 19 History and Location_ ------- 11
Agricultural Courses,descriptionof 39 Horticulture ----- 37
Agronomy :----- --- ------ 39 Latin '__. -- _- 24
Algebra ----------23-------- 23 Library and Reading Rooms--. 13
Alumni Association -----.----- 16 Literary Societies __-----.-- ._ 14
Alumni Register --------.--- 47 ManualTraining. ------:.''' -31
Animal Husbandry------.------ 39 Mlecanrl:al t :.u!e' .J-:crirl-ir'n of t 31
Arithmetic --------------- 23 Mei bancal C<-.,lure outlrlr.e ilf.... 19
Astronomy ----- ---------- -21 Nin hanital Drav-in ......... ...... 31
Battalion Organization .. 14 Millinery :_-:..;_:__..... __''_: .'56
Biology ._----_.- ...._- .. 22 M.............................. ........
Blacksmithing andWh'lwrightin --- 33 Mu.,. i., I.al ..... ...... .. .......-"
Board of Control -----.... .......--- 5 Nure- Trrinrg.................... 'Si
Bookkeeping _-- __. __--- ----2T Op....*turhr,-r.:. Redu- e Exper-es.. -
Calendar ........................ -10 Or'arnz-o --.. ................. 1
Carpentry and Cabinet-maaking -- 32 Pu.-nrr-.r .. .................. 3
Chemistry--- ......----- ----. 21 P'ia -:, ...........,- .............
Civics -------- --.- ..-... 28 Pr., ,c; ............. ........... 23
Class Lists .. --------- 42 P-h i.. !. i. ,i, -- .............. '*2
Cooking and Laundering------- 34 FPh.- .c-! G-pohy. ............ 2
Dairy Industry ----. -- --- 40 Pr,r.ng ..... ............. -32
Economies ----------=------ 27. Pr.: ...r.:n ..-., -..
English-- --------- 25 =.-...: -- ..... .........- --'
English 25 p ,1 .. ;., T,,. .................... .2'
Errata----------------------- 16 ,bl.<. R .b lerl.ealj ............... I1
Ethics ---------- 27 R_-.,lar, r!. ............ .
Expenses ..- ------------. 15 Rel.,:.u Siec-----.........-.. Ic !.
Faculty Additions for 1908-9 9 en..' ......... ...
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