• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Errata
 Board of control
 Title Page
 Calendar
 State board of education
 Faculty and officers, 1904-190...
 Organization
 Support
 Admission
 General information
 Tabulated courses of study
 Descriptive statement of the academic...
 Descriptive statement of the mechanical...
 Descriptive statement of the agricultural...
 Enrollment, 1904-1905
 Alumni
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Eighteenth Annual Catalogue 1905-1906; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000091/00001
 Material Information
Title: Eighteenth Annual Catalogue 1905-1906; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
State Normal and Industrial School Press ( Printer )
Affiliation: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publisher: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publication Date: 1905
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000091
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2662
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Errata
        Errata
    Board of control
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Calendar
        Page 4
    State board of education
        Page 5
    Faculty and officers, 1904-1905
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Organization
        Page 8
    Support
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Admission
        Page 11
    General information
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Tabulated courses of study
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Descriptive statement of the academic courses
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Descriptive statement of the mechanical courses
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Descriptive statement of the agricultural courses
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Enrollment, 1904-1905
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Alumni
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Index
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text










ERRATA
PROMOTION.
A student receiving less than 60 i:: any subject (academic
or industrial) is conditioned it that subject'. No student
can be promoted with more than one condition However,
this regulation does not prevent the admission of a student
to a class on trial.
A candidate for graduation must remove all conditions be-
fore receiving a diploma.
I





Board of Control.
HON. N, P, BRYAN, Chairman -----------Jacksonville
HON. P, K, YONGE_-,.-_ -----------------. Pensacola
HON, A, L, BROWN, M, D. ------------------- Eustia
HON. T, B, KING-----------------------------Arcadia
HON, NATHANIEL ADAMS -------------, White Springg
HIN, J, G, KELLUM, Secretary,





D--Ai-Hrm--r E
D[TVAT, HA ^ MtMIC Bur1DIN.G.) THE PRESIDE ENCE.
^T ^*Y ^





EIGHTEENTH
ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE
FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
I' ^ AND
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
(FOR COLORED YOUTH)
TALLAHASSEE.
For The Year 1904--1905
AND
ANNOUNCEMENT
FOR 1905-1906.
TALLAHASSEE.
STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL PRESS.
1905.





CALENDAR.
1905.
SEPT.30 SATURDAY, BOARDING DEPARTMENT OPENS.
OCT. 2, MONDAY,
OCT. 3, TUESDAY | ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS.
OCT. 4, WEDNESDAY, FALL TERM BEGINS.
DEC. 23, SATURDAY, FALL TERM ENDS.
DEC. 26, TUESDAY, WINTER TERM BEGINS.
I906.
MAR. 17, SATURDAY, WINTER TERM ENDS.
MAR. 20, TUESDAY, SPRING TERM BEGINS.
MAY 25, FRIDAY, ANNIVERSARY OF LITERARY SOCIETIES.
MAY 26, SATURDAY, AGRICULTURAL & EDUC'L CONFERENCE.
MAY 27, SUNDAY, SERMON TO GRADUATING CLASS.
MAY 28, MONDAY, CLASS NIGHT EXERCISES.
MAY 29, TUESDAY, ANNIVERSARY OF PREPARATORY SCHOOL.
MAY 30; WEDNESDAY, COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES.
MAY 30, WEDNESDAY, ALUMNI BIENNIAL MEETING.





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.
(EX-OFFICIO BOARD OF TRUSTEES.)
His EXCELLENCY, The GOVERNOR, N. B. BROWARD,
President.
HON. W. HOLLOWA STATE SUPERINTENDENT
OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,
Secretary.
HON. H. CLAY CRAWFORD .. .SECRETARY OF STATE
HON. W. H. ELLIS ..... .ATTORNEY GENERAL
HON. W. V. KNOTT ........... TREASURER.





FACULTY AND OFFICERS.
1904--1905.
' NAT'HAN B. YOUNG, A. M., President,
Inliglishleviews, Pedagogy.
I F. C. JOHNSON, B. S., Supervisor Mech. Dept.
Manual Training, Physics, Bookkeepilg-
I MISS MARY E. MAELVIN, Preceptress,
Civics, History.
V/ \V. Iw A. HOWARD, A. B.,Colmmiandant,
Painting, Mathematics.
/GIEO. hi. SAMPSON,A. M., Secretary,
Matliematics.
V /ZACIIARY '. HUBERT, B. S.
Science, Ag culture.
V /CRAWFIOR 1I)I). MIeNA FIEr, Farm Supt.
Practical Agriculture.
V/MISS E. 0. PAIGE,
Plain Sewing, Dressmlaking.
1/ MISS ADI)A HAWES, A. B.
/ Latin, lEnglish.
/ MISS I,. M. 'CROPPER, Critic Teacher,
Geography.
I MISSVI. E. HALL,
Geographly, IEglish, Ailtlimletic.
/ EDWARD L. GORDON,B. S.
Assistant Science, Printing.
V JUBIE B. BRAGG.
Blacksiithinlg,Wheelwrlgllitng.
J A. E. MARTIN.
Tailoring.





*W. P. WELCH. B. S.
-IC. A. COLES,
Carpentry, Freelland & Alechanical Drawing.
VMISS M. A. BULKLEY, Matron,
Nurse Training, Housekeeping.
'AMIS.S M. E. JAMII;SON. /
I,alderiilg, Cookilng. C
/AIMRS. E. A. JOHNSON.
Alilli nerve
/ MRS. H. h. HO\'ARD,
Iiistruniienlta] Iusic.
- MISS 1). F. ATTAWAY,
In1 charge of the Launldry.
MRS. E. I. AYS,
House keeper.
PIT'IER BROWNE,
President's Secretary.
FACULTY COMMITTEES.
Prudential Committee.
NATHAN B. Y COI-NI, Chairman, X\. H. A. HOWARD,
(. M. S.\PsONx, Secretary, Miss MARY E. MEILVIN,
FIKEDnRICK C. JOHNSON, CRAWFORI) D. NMENAFEE.
Managers of Boarding Department.
NATHI-r. B. YoUtNG, Chairiiaii, ARs. F. .MAxs,
CRk\VIORI) I). MIFNAFEE, AIISS M. A. BULKI.EY.
Committee on Entrance Examinations.
G. MI. S.\AMPSON, Chairman, Miss LrrI,- CROPPER,
FREDERICK C. JOHNSON.
*Fill 'I'ernm.
t Winter and Spring Terms.





8 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
ORGANIZATION.
'The work of the School is organized into three depart-
ments-Academic, Mechanical, and Agricultural.
The Academic Department, in addition to a good secon-
dary course of study, has a preparatory grade for the bene-
fit of those who are not quite ready to enter upon the regu-
lar course, and also a two years course for teachers. In
connection with this course there is a real Model School
used as a school of observation and of practice teaching.
The Mechanical and Agricultural departments offer in-
struction in seventeen industries (see courses), and all stu-
dents are required to take one or more of them.
The general purpose of the school is to prepare the stu-
dents to take up the work of the life before them with good
hope and skill. To this end the school has been reorgani-
zed and enlarged along all lines, and the equipment and
facilities made among the best in the South.
HISTORY AND LOCATION.
The school was established in 1887. By constitutional
provision and legislative enactment it was located .. Talla-
hassee, with an annual appropriation of $4,ooo made for its
maintenance.
By action of the State Board of Education, ex officio
Board of Trustees, it was opened October 5, 1887, in charge
of T. deS. Tucker, Principal, and T. V. Gibbs, Assistant
Principal, with an attendance of fifteen pupils.
In i88i, the school, having outgrown its accommodations
in the city, was moved out to Highwood, in the suburbs of
Tallahassee.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 9
The school has a beautiful location within easy reach of
thi city. The grounds anc buildings are lighted by gas,
supplied with water from the city water-works, and connect-
el by telephone with the city. Comfortable and conven-
ient dormitory accommodations have been provided. These
dormitories are managed by the faculty, and except by
special permission of the President, all students not res-
idents of Tallahassee will be required to board at the school.
SUPPORT.
The School is supported by annual appropriations from
the Federal and State Governments. It was established -
and prior to 1891 maintained-by the State as a school for
the training of teachers. This feature of the work of the
school is still maintained.





_s ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~P
I i.
A.- f
GIBBS HALL (GIRLS' DORMITORY.)





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 11
ADMISSION.
Applicants for admission to this school must Ie i6 years
old, and must have a fair knowledge of arithmetic, English
gram'n:,i, descriptive geography, and must also be able to
read intelligently and to write legibly. Applicants must be
of good moral character, and, if from another institution of
learning, must bring a certificate of honorable dismission.
Applicants who are non-residents of Florida must pay a
tuition fee of two dollars, ($2.00), per month.
REGULATIONS.
The regulations of the school are few and simple, appeal-
ing to the student's s, If respect andpersonal responsibility.
All loafing on the streets, or around places of public or
questionable character is prohibited.
Students are not allowed to use intoxicating liquors, or
tobacco in any form.
Profanity, playing cards, and everything of an immoral
tendency ale strictly forbidden. Keeping, or using fire
arms on the premises is forbidden, also hunting during the
school year.
All punishment is by demerits as follows: Five demerits
make one warning or mark; ten demerits two warnings or
marks; and fifteen demerits in any one session suspend
from the school. Suspended students may be reinstated at
the discretion of the Prudential Committee.
No efforts will be spared to make the dormitory life of
the students healthful and uplifting.
All laundering will be done in the school's laundry, and
students will not be allowed to have laundry done elsewhere.
All clothing must be marked with indelible ink.





12 STATE E1ORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
Each student should provide himself with
4 Towels,
3 Sheets,
3 Pillow-cases,
I Blanket,
i Comfort or Quilt,
3 Table Napkins,
A Bible and a Dictionary.
All breakage must be paid for in cash.
Young women should bring overshoes and waterproofs.
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances
for students, to send money by money order, express order
or registered letter direct to the President. He will not be
responsible for money sent to him through students.
GENERAL INFORMATION.
Laboratories.
The school is especially fortunate in its physical and cheim-
ical laboratories. The following statement gives some idea
of their equipment:
The Physical Laboratory contains a complete set of appa-
ratus for the illustration of the properties of matter, and
principles of dynamics, simple machines, liquids, pneumatics,
magnetism, frictional electricity, thermo-electricity, sound,
heat, and light.
Chemical Laboratory.
The school is now provided with a thoroughly up-to-date
Chemical Laboratory. There are three long tables contain-
ing 48 lockers and drawers at which 24 students can work
easily at the same time. A full set of reagent bottles with
the chemicals is provided for each student, and the conven-
ient sinks and gas connections greatly simplify the problem
of individual student work. Twenty complete sets of appa-
ratus designed for use in connection with "Remsen's Briefer
Course" are in the laboratory, also a moderate supply of





TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA, 13
chemicals. Delicate chemical balances are on land for
exact work in analysis. An ample hood enables the stu-
dent to perform experiments with the poisonous gases with
impunity. In fact, it may be said that ample facilities are
provided for the student to acquire a working knowledge of
Elementary Chemistry.
Library and Reading Room.
The school has the foundation of an excellent library.
There are several hundred carefully selected bound vol-
unies and complete files of scientific government reports. In
the reading room can be found the leading daily papers of
the country, literary and educational magazines.
Religious Services.
Although the school is non-sectarian, yet it is intensely
Christian. The religious life of the school is all that can be
desired even by the most careful parent. In addition to the
usual preaching and Sunday School services on the campus
there is an active Y. M. C. A. for the young men, and Y. P.
S. C. E. for all the students and teachers. Each day's work
closes with a vesper service.
Literary Societies.
There are three active literary societies: the Acme Lite; a-
ry Society, the Douglass Debating Society for the young
men, and the T. deS. Tucker Literary Society for the young
women. These organizations meet weekly.
Public Rhetoricals.
The last Friday night in each month is given to public
rhetorical exercises. The students are thus trained in pub-
lic declamation.
Military Drill.
As a matter of discipline and physical training, the young
men of the school are given some military drill. They are
inspected'daily, and march in military order to-each meal.
This organization helps the officers of the school to keep





A ,. -
TUCKER HAIL. (BOyS' DORMIrO!WS ) TUCKER HA .L ANNEX.





TALLAIIXSSEE, FLORLDX. 1'5
,good order among the young men, aid at the same time
gives them that respect for authority that is necessary for
good citizenship.
UJniforms.
As a matter of economy and of good appearance, the
'students are required to Wear a uniform. The young wo-
meni's suit is made of blue percale and costs two dollars
($2. oo). For spring and fall, they xxear a blue sailor lhat
bound with a blue band that costs one dollar ($i.oo). The
young men's uniform is made of blue flannel alndvwith the
,cap costs ten dollars ($Io.oo).
These uniforms are male in tile school's shop and are
sold at actual cost. The patrons will therefore not buiy citi-
.sen's suitsfor their children, but send noney to e President
with which to buy the above unliformz suits. Upon application
samples of the girl's unniform will be sent.
Students bringing money above their immediate needs to
the school are required to deposit it with the President sub-
ject to their order,
Board must be paid monthly in advance. All bills run
from the first of tile month.
All non-residents must board at tne school, unless special-
ly excused by the President. ;
Expenses.
Tlere is no charge for tuition. Tle following is an esti-
mlite of the necessaryexpense for the full session:
Board and room rent(including lights and fuel) $7.00 per
lmonlth (35 weeks) .. ... ....57.25
Washing, etc., $r.oo per month .... .. 8.00
Books and stationery, about .... ....... 5.00
Incidental fee (for ordinary medicines, not medical
attention. .. . . .. .00
Total ....,.. $71. 25
$7 l. 25~~~~~~~~





16 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
Opportunity to Reduce Expenses.
A limited nuinlbr of earnest young men and women will,
upon payment in full of thirty-six dollars, ($36oo00), in cash
at the beginning of thesession, I.e allowed to work out the
balance of their board and laundry expenses. Api/lications
for this privilege must be made in writing and accepted be-
fo, e arrival. All extra work performed by student., will be
rated at five cents per hour, aud be placed to the credit, of
such persons.
Students who have the privilege of working out a part of
their expenses, will be required to perform sixteen hours
work each week.
The payment of fifty dollars, ($5o.oo), in cash at tile be-
ginning of the session, will constitute a scholarship, entit-
ling the holder to board for the entire session.
All money earned by students in performance of labor
in the institution shall be retained to be used only for de-
fraying their expenses while in attendance here at school.
All students axe required to work one hoar a day (or its
equivalent) for the school without remuneration.
Alumni Association.
It is the policy of the school to keep in close and sympa-
thetic touch with its graduates. The alumni have organi-
zed and are doing good work for their alma mater. Miss
A. B. Osgood of Madison, Fla., is the president, and Miss
M. E. Hall of Tallahassee, Fla., is the secretary.
Suggestions.
Students arriving on the trains are advised to notify the
school authorities of the date and schedule time-of their ar
rival. They can, on arrival at the station, easily walk to
the institution, as the buildings are within plain view of
the depot.





TABULATED
COURSES of STUDY.
The courses as outlined will be found on pages, I8-19 and
20. Also Descriptive Statement of the Academic, Mechan-
ical and Agriculturai Courses, will be found on pages, 21,36.





ACADEMIC SCHEDULE
PREPARATORY SCHOOL
FIRST YEAR
Arithmetic ....... .. ..,,,.. .
Geography . . .. . .. ..... . . .
Language .. . ... ....... SPECIAL
Reading . . . . . . . .. .
Vocal Music .................. ..... ........ PROGRAM
Spelling .... ... ... ... .. ... .
Periods
SECOND YEAR per Week,
F W S
Gra mmlnar .*.*......,......, .. 4 4 4
U. S. History ......... .. ... .. ... .... 2
Composition ...... .. .... ...... 2
Arithmetic ......... ........ ..... ......... 5..
Algebra .. .. .... . . . . . ..
Nature Study .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 3
Vocal Music ......... 2
*Fall, Winter and Spring Terms.





NORMAL SCHOOL.
Periods per Periods p er
Week. Week.
FIRST YEAR F W S THIRD YEAR F W S
Grammar ............ 4 Methodology .. 3 3 3
Civics ........... .. 4 4 Latin or English Literature .. 4 4 4
American Literature ....... 2 2 2 Composition .. ,.,. 2 2 2
Composition ........... 2 2 2 Vocal Music .,.., ,; l I 1
Vocal Music ...... 2 2 2 Trigonometry .. ... 5 5
Algebra ... ......... 5 5 5 Physics .. .,,... 5
Physiology. .......... 3 3 3
SECOND YEARFOURTH YEAR
Latin or General History .. 4 4 Pedagogy 3
English History.Reviews .. 5 5 5
English Literature....2 Rhetoric ..2 2 2
Composition . .. .. 2 2 2
Vocl Masic ical M .......... I
Plane Geometry.. .. ... 5 Chemistry ......... .. 5 5 5
Zoology .......... 5 Bookkeeping .....3 3
Botany. .... .. .
5 j





INDUSTRIAL SCHEDULE
Periods
.PREPARATORY SCHOOL per Week
F I W S
Freehand Drawing ................ .............2.. 2 2
Manual Training(First year Boys) .......... ..... ... io ro o1
Trades Training(Second Year Boys) 10 10 o o
Cooking, Sewing and Laundering(First and Second Year Girls) ... .. . o Io
NORMAL. SCHOOI.
Mechanical Drawing(Boys) .................... 4 4 4
Agricullture. ............................. I I
TradesTrailiniig Boys) ... ... .... .. ... .... .... .. .... i6 1 6
Cooking, Sewilng andt, Iaunderiiig(First & Second Year Normal Girls) ........ o 10o o1
Dressmla king or Milliner- (Third & Fourth Year Normal Girls) ...... o 10





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 21
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
ACADEMIC COURSES.
Tlhe work of this department covers six years )two in pre-
paraftory school, and four in the normal school), beginning
with the sixth grade. It is equivalent to a good high school
course, with stress upon English and Science. An addi-
tional course in Pedpgogy is offered to the third and fourth
year normal classes, to fit in a practical way those llho may
teach as a vocation or an avocation.
Science-Messrs. Hubert and Gordon.
The growing importance of the sciences in industrial,
commercial, and professional life makes it necessary that
we place special stress on this line of academic work For
a correct appreciation of nature and her workings, some
exact knowledge must be had, as well as a natural or ac-
quired habit of observation. If the courses here outlined
suffice to make of the students careful, thoughtful, critical
observers, much will have been accomplished.
CHEMISTRY-One year at present is given to the study of
this subject. The plan is for the student to acquire in the
first two terms of the year a working knowledge of ele-
nmentary inorganic chemistry. In the last term the boys
will be given as far as possible the principles of agricultural
chemistry, and the girls industrial chemistry as applied in
their line of work.
A large part of the work is in the form of experiments
actually performed by the students, for which our new labo-
ratory affords excellent facilities. Records of the experi-
ients are made by the students from day to day, and the
correctness, full ess, and appearance of these records deter-
mines largely tlle student's class standing. It is on the.ba-
sis of individual work, and to obtain credit the experiments
must be performed. The student's work will be supplimen-
ted by lectures and demonstrations by the instructor.
TEXT-BOOK-'Remsen's Briefer Course" and the reports
of the "Association of Official Agricultural Chemists."





22 STATE N'OREMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
PHYSICS-The work in this course lasts one year and
covers the ground of general physics. Special stress will
be placed on Mechanics, Dynamics and the physics of farm
inipleiments.
The course will be conducted by lectures, recitations and
laboratory work. The school has a good supply of appa-
ratus for laboratory work.
TEXT-BOOK: Wentworth and Hill's P/ysics. King's Phv-
sics of Agriculture will be supplied as a reference book
BIOLOGY-This generel course embraces the subjects of
Human Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, one year; Zo-
ology, one term and Botany.
PHYSIOLOGY-It is the aim in this course to make this
subject as practical as possible. Therefore, the human body
is studied as a working organism and its various functions
are worked out by scientific observation and experiment.
For this purpose, the dissection of an animal and the micro-
scopic examination of sections forms a part of the work,
Hygiene is especially enlplhasized.
TEXT--BOOK: Blaisdell's Practical Physiology and 3lais-
dell's Our Bodies.
ZOOLOGY-Following the study of the human body it is
intended that this course should acquaint the student more
broadly with the various forms of animal life. The life histo-
ry, habits, and the various stages of developemient of useful
animals claim the attention and study. The domestic ani-
mals, and the invertebrates of Economic Entomology divide
the time.
NATURE STUDY-This course is given in the spring term.
The bulk of the work is done ii the field. It is devoted to
the different types of soil; their preparation for plants; the
kinds and uses of fertilizers; and the anatomy'and pliysiolo
gy of plants.
TEXT BOOK: Real Things in Nature.
Mathematics-Messrs. Sampson and Howard
The purpose of this course is to give to the student a
knowledge of mathematical principles and the ability to use





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 23
them in actual service in the shop. Stress is laid on the cul-
tivation of correct habits of thought. The work is guaged
to stimulate independent thought and to promote confidence
in the student of his ability to undertake successfully more
advanced branches. During the year, lectures will be given
on the history of mathematics.
ARITHMETIC-Studen ts who enter the preparatory school
are supposed to have a knowledge of the fundamental prin-
cipals: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and
factoring. TlI, work is meant to begin at Factoring contin-
uing through Fractions, Measures, Percentage, and Interest.
The course is arranged for two years.
TEXT--Book: Young and Jackson.
ALGEBRA-In this course, which covers five terms, the
aim is, not alone to acquaint the student with a knowledge
of the subject through quadratics, but to develop facility
in grasping combinations, accuracy in statement and gen-
eralization for arithmetical methods.
TEXT-BOOK: Well's Academic Algebra.
GEOMETRY-This course extends to solids, giving special
attention Lo original problems and to the application of
principles in mensuration.
The following points are always held in view: The process
of reasoning; The separation of numerical relation; A clear
notion of magnitude; The development of individual power.
TEXT-BOOK: Philips and Fisher's Elements of Geometry.
TRIGONOMETRY-This course extends through the solu-
tion of the oblique triangle, involving the elements of Plane
Surveying.
TEXT-BOOK:Wentworth's Plane Tr.qonometry.
English-Miss Hawes
GRAMMAR-The fall term will be devoted to a thorough
and systematic review of Euglish grammar.
TEXT-BOOK: Arnold and Kitridge's The .Mother Tongue,
Books I and II.
COMPOSITIoN-During the winter and spring terms, the





24 STA\TE NOInIAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.
students will be required to write at least two themes a week,
for the most part based upon the American authors and
their works, the aim being to acquaint the students with
American literature and at the same time to give them drill
in composition. Part of the time will be devoted to letter
writing.
TEXT-BOOK: Mead's Piactical Conmposition and Rhetoric.
HISTORY-The first half of the year will be devoted to
the study of English History. The aim of this course will
be to acquaint the students with the important English in-
stitutions and customs and with the movements that have
take place in England, tracing their influences upoil the
history of this country. Students will be required to con-
sult other authorities (on assigned subjects and to hand in
written reports. This course will also serve as preparation
for the study of English Literature which follows. This
fact will be kept in minil throughout the course.
TEXT-BOOK:Higginson and Channing's English History
for Americans.
LITERATURE.-The last half of the year will be devoted
to a study of some of the masterpieces of noted poetry and
prose writers of English.
'TEXT-BOOK:Painter's American Literature and Painter's
English Liierauzere.
Latin- Miss Howes
The course in Latin embraces, besides the study of Cice-
ro's Catalinarian Orations and Vergil's uEneid, class study
of the Gracchi to the establishment of the empire. As far
as possible, the student is made to compare Latin and Eng-
lish words formed from the same root. It is judged advisa-
ble to delay the study of Latin until the student has reached
the Normal II class, because, by that time, he has laid a
foundation in English grammar which will enable him to
grasp the Latin more readily and hence make more progress
than by taking the two contemporaneously.
Normal II will be required to take Latin or Ancient His-





TALLAIIASSEE, FLORIDA. 25
tory. Normal III will be required to take Iatin or Advan-
ced English Literature.
TEXT-BooKS:Collar and Daniel's First Latin Book and
Allel and Greenough's Veigil's zEncid.
Pedagogy-President Young; and Miss Cropper, Critic
Teacher.
'his work covers the third and fourth years of the Nor-
nal School and its object is to prepare inl a practical way
teachers for the common schools of the state. The first
year is devoted to the study of the theory of education and
of school teaching. The second year is given to teaching in
the training school under the eye of a trained critic teacher.
Sufficient attention is given to the history of education to
give the student teacher a fair knowledge of the great edu-
cational mlovemenlts and leaderss and to acquaint hinl with
the leading educational classics.
TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS: Appleton's Educational Se-
ries, White's School Government, White's Pedagogy, and
White's A t of Teaching, Smith's Systematic Methodology,
Monro's Educational Ideals, Mc Murray's Genel al Met/hod and
The MAethod of the Recitation. The students are required to
read the current educational literature, a great deal of which
comes to the school's library.
Bookkeeping-Mr. Johnson
The work in bookkeeping is intended to give the students
a knowledge of the ordinary methods of transacting busi-
ness and of making business records.
TEXT-BOOK: 20toh Celntuy Bookkeepiizng tnd Office practice.
Geography
The purpose of this course is to give the student a practi-
cal knowledge of the earth as the home of man and to acquaint
him witli his environments.
TEXT-BOOK: ~t'r (tnd McSlfurray's.
American History and Civics
In addition to giving the student a knowledge of the lead-





26 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
ing men and events of this country, the plan of the course is
to have them so appreciate the institutions of their country
as to become patriotic, law-abiding citizens.
TEXT-BOOK: Montgonieiy's Leading Facts in American
History, Townsend's Shorter Course in Civil Government.
Reading and Spelling
These subjects are given systematic attention. The aim
is to have the student acquire the ability of rapid and accu-
rate interpretation of the written page, and to spell and pro-
nounce the words of his increasing vocabulary correctly.
TEXT-BOOK: Hazen's Graded Speller.
Music- Mrs. Howard
During the past three years the pupils in piano forte have
been doing work along a definite line without being graded.
This year the school offers to its pupils a four years course
of systematic piano forte work by which the students are to
be graded and promoted.
The course is so planned as to enable a student to play
good music well, and with the addition of the "Elements
of Harmony" to be able to enter his conservatory course
after having completed the work here laid down. At
the completion of this course certificates of proficiency will
be given.
lThe students in music are required to attend the recitals
which are held once during each month. These exercises
are of two-fold value; in giving pupils practice in playing
before others and in granting them the rare Opportunity of
listening to well prepared music from the best composers.
Students taking music must practice at least one hour
each day.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two dol-
lars and twenty five cents ($2.25) for eight lessons of twen-
ty minutes each. This fee also includes the use of the mu-
sic and instrument for practice.
FIRST GRADE.
TECHNICS:
Major scales in one and two octaves, hands separate,





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 27
tonic triads in close position.
STUD ES:
Landons' Foundation Studies; Matthew's Graded Studies,
Book i, National Graded Studies, Emery's Foulndation Stu-
dies, Koeller op 162 and 19o; easy compositions of Behr,
Gurlitt, Brunter, Lichner etc.
SECOND GRADE.
TECHNICS:
Major scales in three octaves. Harmonic Minor
scales in one and two octaves, hands separate. Broken Ma-
jor and Minor triads.
STUDIES:
Matthew's Graded Studies, Book 2,( Ist half); Spind
ler, op. 273, Books i and 2; Loeschorn, op. 66. Book land 2
Gurlitt, op. 82 Books i and 2; Spindler, op. 44.
Selections from Merkel, Lange, Schumaun, Clementi,
Lichner, Ritter and others.
TH I RD GRADE.
TECHNICS:
Major and Harmonic Minor scales in four and
five note rhythms. Study of broken triads,(continued).
STUDIES:
Matthew's Graded Studies, Book 2, (2nd. half)
Burgmueller, op. Ioo. Books : and 2. Koehler, op. 157.
PIECES:
Selections from Kullak op. 62; Gade op. 36; Mo-
zart, No. I Low; Lichner op. 49; Emery, Spindler and oth-
ers.
FOURTH GRADE.
TECHNICS:
Major and Melodic Minor scales in six and eight
note rhythms.
Arpeggios formed from diminished seventh chords in va-
rious rhythms.





28 STATE NORIIAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.
STUD IES:
Matthews Studies, Book3; Koelller op. 130; Heller
op. 47; Czerny op. 636 and op. 718.
Pieces from Wilm op. 12; Scllytte op. 66; Bohni, op 327;
No. 2 Haydn; Kerchler, Whilenhanpt, Heller, Scharwen-
ka, Sclhumann and Lack.
\





. 7
.MZCHANIC ARTS BUILDING AND CLASS IN BLACKSMITHING.
fCr^*





JDO STATE T. OhflAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,.
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
MECHANICAL COURSES.
RThe work of the Mechanical Department has two phases:
(I) Manual Training, (2)'Training in the specific wcrk of
the various industries the school has in operation.
The manual training precedes the industrial training,
and prepares the student both mentally and physically to
perform the work at the trades more satisfactorily by giv-
iug him correct mechanical ideals and a certain amount of
siilI which can be put to immediate use in his later work.
Tilis i's in addition to the well known educational value of
manual training.
Constant effort is made to correlate the work of the Aca-
demic and the Mechanical Departments. Each department
thus liel}> the other and the student is made to feel the
truth that the two departments are not separate and distinct,
but are component parts of one great whole.
Whenever possible in the mechanical courses the student
makes his own drawings and works from them.
Each student is expected to spend at least two years in
any division to which he may be assigned.
Letters certifying the nature and amount of work done
it each division will be given to the student by the instruc-
tor upon application.
Manual Trainirg-Mr. Johnson
This course is in the form of work in wood and iron and
is given to all the young men of the preparatory school ex-
cept those studyinglagriculture. The first year's work com-
prises the construction of various articles from the student's
own working sketches, bringing in the use of ll:e ordinary
woodworking tools: the plane, saw, hammer, chisel etc.
The early part of the second year is devoted to bent iron
work and the latter part to elementary blacksmithing.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORID A. 3
Mechanical Drawing-Mr. Coles
The work in Mechanical Drawing is designed to give the
student such knowledge of the subject as will enable himi to
-muake correct working drawings for his own use in the shop
and to read the drawings and blue prints made by others.
The course begins with simple working drawings which
are made from free hand sketches. The sketches are made,
and the measurements taken from objects by the student
himself. Later the student draws from the sketches of
others and finally takes up tie work of designing.
As far as possible the class of objects from which tile stu-
dent d iaws is determined by the industry at which le works;
for instance, the drawing of the young men who work at
carpentry tends toward the planning of buildings, that of
the young men working at wheelwrighting is directed to-
wards carriage drafting and design.
Printing-Mr. Gordon
In the first year, the student learn the cases, composition,
care of press, care of type, name and use of printers materials.
Lectures on job work, transferring of matter, job work
Use of press; Correcting proof, takes tip the second year.
Lectures on Art of Printing, job work in colors.
Making up newspaper forms, general press and book
work. Lectures on styles, is the work of the third year.
Most of the printed matter used by the school is the work
of tile voting umnen of this division.
The setting up of the school paper "The College Arms"
is a part of the regular work.
Carpentry and Cabinct-Making-Mr. Coles
This course is intended to give the student an elementary
knowledge of house and shop carpentry and cabinet making,
It begins with elementary bench work, introducing the
student to the more simple tools and the prominent character-
istics of timber. This is followed by a study of house build-
ing, beginning with framing and then taking up door and
window frame construction and outside finishing, floor lay-
ing and inside finishing, stair building etc.





32 STATE :OI:MAiL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
Tlhe foregoing takes up the first two years. During the
tlird and fourth years the time is occupied by cabiiiet-mak-
ing, tle study of the first principles of the trades which to-
getllr with carpentry are employed in the erection of build-
ings and a bird's eye view of the work of the architect in
their design and in tle superintendence or their construction.
Throughout the course it is planned that the student shall,
as far as possible, actually go through the various processes
about which lie hears from the instructor in his talks to the
cl ass.
Painting-Mr. Howard
Instruction in this division includes a study of tile paint-
er's brushes and other tools: paints and tile different classes
of painting: colors and their harmony and contrasts: interior
and exterior house-paintiig: wagon and carriage painting
besides glazing, cutting, frosting, staining and embossing
glass, sign-writing and fresco-painting.
BIacksmithing and Wheelwrighting- Mr. Bragg
BLACKSMITH ING.-The student in tile first year is taught
to make fires and thle use of blacksmithing tools in tlhe opera-
tions of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting punching,
cutting off, squaring, scarfing, and welding of staples, hooks,
collars and chains.
The second year is given to the ironing of wheelbarrows,
push carts and wagons and the welding and setting of wagon
tires.
In the third year the wvrk of thle previous year is continu-
ed and the study of horse-shoeing is l egun.
Horse-shoeing andl general repairing constitutes the work
of thle fourth year.
The above work will be done from blue prints as far as
possible.
WHEELWRIGHTING-In this course exercises in planning,
nailing, boring, sawilng, glueing and making spokes, felloes
etc give the student a knowledge of the use of the bench
and general tools of the wlieelwriglt. He is taught to





1'ALLAIIASSEE, FLORIDA 33
make and then to assemble the parts of wheelbarrows, push
carts, one and two iorse farm wagons, delivery and milk
wagons, buggies and carriages.
Tailoring-Mr. Martin
'The aim of this department is to give the young men
such a knowledge of tailoring as will equip them for posi-
tions as journeymen. Due attention is given to busheling
which constitutes a great part of the work of every tailor-
shop.
The course of study and practice comprises the va-
rious operations in making coats, vests and trousers also
management of the shop, economy in cutting, cleaning,
repairing etc.
The system of drafting taught is the J. G. Mitchell's
Standard Ssflem of Drafting.
Cooking and Laundering-Miss Jamieson
COOKING-The work done in this division is practical,
special stress being laid upon the cooking of plain foods.
The first work taken up is the method of making and
caring for the fire, the care of the range, closet, sink and
kitchen utensils. Then come the making of corn bread,
graham bread, muffins and the cooking of vegetables, eggs
and meats. Considerable attention is given to the making
of soups, dressing and cooking fowls and fish, laying of the
table for and serving meals, invalid cooking, canning, pre-
serving, pickling and desserts.
LAUNDERING-The object of this course is to give the
young women thorough training in the art of science of
washing and ironing.
A study is made of water, soap and alkalies and practice
given in the method of washing and ironing body and table
linen, flannel, silk and colored articles.
Plain Sewing and Dressmaking-Miss Paige
PLAIN SEwING.-This course gives training in the use of
the needle in the ordinary forms of sewing,such as basting,
overhanding, patching, darning, hemming, back-stitching,





34 STATE NOIRMAL AND INDUSTIIAL SCHOOL.
felling, gathering, sewing on buttons, making buttonholes,
etc.
A part of the time is given to practice in the operation of
the sewing machine and to drafting, cutting, and putting to-
gether simple garments.
DRESSMAKING.-Tlhe object of this work is to give a
thorough knowledge of the principles of dressmaking with
as much practice as time w.ll allow. It is valuable to those
who wish to make their own dresses or to superintend the
work. With additional practice it is excellent training for
professional dressmaking.
The course includes drafting skirts, waists, jackets, and
gowns for home and street wear and practice in making
dress trimmings and finishing.
In addition, a study is made of color, form, line, and text-
ure of materials.
Admission to this course is granted to those only who have
taken the above work in plain sewing or its equivalent.
Millinery-Mrs. Johnson
Through training in the practical and artistic principles
of millinery is the object of this line of work.
The course embodies the drawing of untrimmed hats,
drapery and bows, making buckram and wire frames for
hats, folding, binding, making bows, fitted and full facing,
puffed edges and practice in applying the principles learned
to the making of hats, bonnets, toques and turbans. In-
struction in color, form and line isgiven, besides talks on
the manufacture of straw and felt hats, ribbon, crape and
silk.
This work is offered to those of the third and fourth year
normal classes who are able to pass a satisfactory examina-
tion in sewing.
Nurse Training- Miss Bulkley
This is the beginning of what is planned to be a full-fledged
Nurse-Training School. Only young women of the Nor-
mal School are eligible to admission upon application. For
fuller information, write the President.





TALLAIIASSEE, FLORIDA. 35
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
Messrs. Hubert ard Menafee
Thle school is situated on about I80 acres of land includ-
ing the grounds around the buildings. On this land the
object is to raise live stock, poultry, and various agricultu-
ral products. All this is done to teach the student practical
faring in its various phases; such as plans and essential
features ot farm buildings, fences, roads, water supply and
the use and care of farm implements.
In connection with the practical Agriculture, a course in
theoretical Agriculture, running through the fourth year
Normal work is given. Tile work is so distributed through-
out the y)ars that upon graduation each student will have
a thorough knowledge of the basic principles of Agriculture,
an 1 will be prepared to give valuable instruction when
teaching in the public schools of the state. Indeed, the
needs of the state's public school teachers is foremost in
mind in planning this course.
Agronomy
On the large school farm where the grains, grasses, peas
and other field crops are grown for stock eed ample facili-
ty is afforded for observation and study of this subject.
Modern machinery is used in the planting, tending, and
harvesting of the crops.
Horticulture
On the east side of the campus sloping toward the Bel-
lair Road, the school has recently planted an orchard of
peaches, plums, apples and oranges. This is the beginning
of what is expected to develop into a valuable orchard. In
the care and management of these trees, the students will
have theoretical and practical work in horticulture, Prun-
ing, grafting, spraying, gathering and marketing of fruit.
will be learned in connection with this Work.





36 STATE NOI3[rAL AND INDUSTIRIAL SCHOOL
Market Gardening
In'providing for this, one of the most profitable lines of
Agriculture, the school has set aside about four acres for
raising such vegetables as are needed on the grounds and
can be marketed in the town. Students do all of this work
and the most practical and profitable experience is acquired
in the growing of the crops and handlling the products.
Poultry and Stock -Raising
The State Experiment Station has called attention to the
fact that stock-raising is a most profitable industry in Fla.
With this in view the school has a poultry plaut, including
houses and separate runs, an incubator, brooder and several
varieties of chickens. A commodious l)arn houses the hor-
ses, cows and hogs of the department.
Dairying
This division of the department is carefully provided for.
A laboratory with all the modern apparatus for mneclhaii-
cal separation of milk, for testing and butter making and
a large sink and heating apparatus are for the use of the
dairy student. Al effort is being made to replace the old
herd with n:ew registered stock and the school now has
three thoroughbred Jersey cows and two heifers, besides
several graded Holsteins and Jerseys. Scoring and judging
dairy cattle so that one may be able to mark the good cow
at sight is a part of thestludent's work. The department
hopes to have soon a modern dairy barn where the most
cleanly methods can be observed in handling the milk and
its products.
Outlined Course in Agriculture
Tile growing importance of Agriculture ard Nature Study
as shown by the demands of the public schools as well as
the recent stimulus to scientific farming throughout the
South makes it advisable, if not imperative that teachers be
given systematic trailing in this line of work.
Agriculture, "tlhe Art of Kings," though old is compara-





TALI.AIASSiE, FLOR (IDA. 37
tively new as a science, and the.very rapid progress in re-
ceil, improve milichlinery, new and improved methods il
im tiageihant a:i1 increasedl production, are due to the efforts
of educated and energetic young menl whole have realized
tile profits as well as the beauties of rural life. This line of
work mnu:;t necessarily appeal to the sol er minded intelligent
Negro youth wheni he realizes what large percentage of his
people are farmers-for it is among this people amld for this
people lie hopes to work. To be able to help and reach them
most effectually he imlust be able to enter into and enlighten
them in what most concerns their welfare.
Tle course herewith outlined tor the students of the
State Normal School will combine theory and practice and
it is hoped will open tip for the student a broader field of
study and sufficient skilled operations for the practical
farmer.
During the first year, the first term is given to the study
of soils, their origin and adaptation to various cops; the
second term to fertilizers, manures and elementary work in
dairying; and the third term to farm crops and crop rotation.
In the second year systematic pomlology and fruit harvest-
ing and storing are studied the first term; pruning, graft-
ing, plant breeding and spraying in the second term and
market gardening during the third term.
Tlhe first term of the third year is devoted to the princi-
ples of animal breeding; the second term is taken up by a
study of breeds of domestic animals and poultry raising; and
the third term is given to veterinary elements.
The feeding of farm animals, a study of tile composition
of food stuffs, and the economical effect of the balanced ra-
tion in milk and beef production constitute the work of the
first term of the fourth year; dairying, embracing class-room
and laboratory work, with a study of dairy machinery is
the worklbf the second termi; and farm management, dealing
with location, labor and the market problem is considered
in the third term.





-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~9-
9|~~BB -
3 ivt] 111
* a a
A_.
- .. .H X _..
SCIENCE BUILPING,
_ ___~~~~~~





TA.I.LHI-ASST-:. IF.P.:DA 39
ENROLLMENT 1904--05
NOR'ML kT SCH3'),
.I1OURTH Y-EAR.
'AME POST ('FFlCE i. 'UY T
Armu ood, Walter A. T'amIp l, .... Hilsboro
Barnette, Anna J .... Pinetti, .. Madison
Barnette, Mary D .... Pi.e. tta, ..... Madison
Barnette, Charles H Pinltta, .. Madis,.i
Broonle, Tliomnas A.. Ocala, .. ....... Marionl
Btrney, Alonzo R .. O.ala, ... .> .. iariac
Browne, Peter E ..... Darien, (Ga.)
Burt, William J .,. Brooksville ... Hernando
Calhoutl, Harvis C .. Bartowv ......... Polk
Campbell, George W Lee, .... ..... Madison
Ford, LouisaE: ...., Tallahassee .... Leon
Gilbert, Sarah. ... ..Sai ford, .......Orange
Gillislee, Ethel ., Jacksollville, .... Duval
Gillislee, Arthur L .... Jacksonville, .. ... Daval
Howell, Leroy A .. Orlando,. Orange
Jones, Althea M..... Key West, ... AMoroe
Jones, Lucy ..... 'Tallahassee, .... Leon
Lancaster, RoySt. Elmo Fernandina ..... Nassau
Lott,. Sylvia ..... Live Oak ..... .Suwannee
McElvine, Mabel I. ... Gainesville, ........ Alachua
McDauiels, George T. Daytona, ..... Volusia
Moore, Eula L ..... Birniilgham,(Ala..)
Osgood, Alfred B. Madison, ...... Madison
Shellman, Lizzie B.. Pembroke, (Ga.)
Twine, Gertrude A Tallahassee, Leon
Walker, Mary E.... .Jacksonville, ..... Duval
Washington, Bertha .. Live Oak, ... Suwannee
Welters, Yulee C Key West ... Monroe
Wilson, Lavinia .. .Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Whitfield, Cupid A. .. Tallahassee, ... Leon
Yates, Edna E..... Jacksonville, ...Duval





40 STATIE O)IIMAL AND INI)USTRIAL S(CIIOI,,
THIRD YEAR
NAME POST OFF ICE COUNTY
Alexander, Camilla B.. Ocala, .. .... Marion
Alexander, Ievi, Jr..... Ocala, ....... Marion
-4-Attaway, Ethel ...... Tallahassee, ... Leon
Baker, Burris ... .. Ocllecsee ..... Calhoun
Bradley,Celia .......Greenville, .... adison
Chandler, Edward .v. A. Ocala .... ... Marion
Coleman, Samuel II. Jacksonville, Duval
Dickey, Elzora M.... .. Lee ........ Malison
Franklin, Rosanna .... Green Cove Springs, Clay
Graham, George H .... .Sanford. ...... Orange
Toward, Walter, L .... Gainesville. ..... Alachua
Jackson, Aniiie L ..... Aialacliicola, .. Franklin
Kershaw, Ella J. ... .Tallahassee, ......Leon
Kerslaw, \Villier E. .. Tallahassee, ..... Leon
King, James A.......Sanford ....... Orange
Mizell, Mary J ..... Lake City, ... Columbia
Rfoe, Ellen I .... ..Mill Creek ...St. Johns
Roberts, Erksine A. .. Key West, .....Monroe
Scott,John R. Jr.. .... .Jacksonville ..... Duval
Twine, James A Tallahassee, .... Leon
Whitley, Fairy B. ... Apalacicola, .. Franklin
White, Colbert B...Cottondale, .... Jackson
Wise, Minnie L ... .. allahassee, .......Leon
Wiles, Oliver F .....Green Cove Springs, .. Clay
SECOND YEAR
Allen, Mary E..... .Crescet Cit y .. Putnam
--Attaway, Mary ..... allahassee, ..... Leon
Bowman, Lilla .. .... Miami ........ Wade
Caldwell, Constance E.. St. Augustine,. St. Johls
Carter, Dallas ....Quinc, ...... Gadsden
Chaney, Oscar S..... .Jacksonville,. ... Duval
74ooper, Gussie M. .Gainesville ..... Alachua
Daniels, Frederick 0. Orlando,...... Orange
~>'Eraswards, Daisy E .. ...Jacksonville. ..... Duval





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 41
NAME. POST OFFICE. COUNTY
Edwards, James E ..... Tallahassee, ......Leon
Gilbert, Be.lni ..... Quincy ....... Gadsen
Hearst, William E .... Jonesville, ... Alachua
Henry, Mezepher .... Tallahassee, .......Leon
Hill, Daisy M ...... Lacrosse,. ..... Alachua
Lowe, Deborah... Tamp, ....... Hillsboro
-7Lewe, Loretta L. Tampa, ..... Hillsboro
Lott, Melissa ......Live Oak ..... Suwannee
/MeCray, Mary .... Gainesville,..... Suwannee
Mazon, Lavinia .... Ocala ........ Marion
Merricks, Lila .....Earleton, ....... Alachua
Mulberry, Andy A.. Mounteocha, ..... Alachua
Owens, Elouise I Tampa, .... ..Hillsboro
Perry, Cassie'M.... .Fernandina ...... Nassau
Raiford, William .... Aiken, (S. C.)
-Robinson, Frank C. Marianna, ...... Jackson
-,-t1binson, Celestine .Tallahassee ........Leon
Robinson, Theresa P... Fernandina ...... Nassau
-8a lley, Amelia ......Tampa ....... Hillsboro
Sanders, Ida .......Tallahassee, .......Leon
Stanley, Sarah .Sanford, ....... Orange
-SLeplien, Richard .... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Th'ompson, Ketous .Pretoria,(S. Africa)
Vickers, Joseph W.. .Thomasville, i Ga.)
Whaley, Saxton H .... St. Augustine, ... St. Johns
Williams, Rebecca E... West Farm, .... Jackson
FIRST YEAR.
Austin, William L. Key West ..... Monroe
Bacon, Roscoe E... .Jacksonville, ...... Duval
Barnette, CallieD ... Pinetta, .......Madison
Boyd, Charles ... West Palm Beach, ... Dade
Bryan, Richard .... Tallahassee, ......Leon
Bruce, Minnie E.... Tuscaloosa, (Ala.)
Carter, T. W. ..... Tallahassee, .......Leon
Chester, Effie B ..... Tallahassee, ...... Leon
Cobb, Madeline ..... Tallahassee, .... ... Leon





42 STATE NORMIAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY
Duncan. James E. St. Augustine, .St. Johns
Gainer, Kate M. Milligan, .... Santa Rosa
Gainer, Lula C. ... Milligan, .....Santa Rosa
Gibbs, Alice M. .... Tallahassee, ... ..Leon
Glass, Annie B. Gainesville, ... ..Alachua
Golden, Mary ..... Tallalassee, ...... ..Leon
Hamilton, Willie M. Bartow, ......... Polk
Hall, Horatio E .St. Nicholas, .. ...Duva!
Henry, Nelson .. Delray, ..... Dade
Hightower, Richard Montgomery, (Ala.)
J mlkins, Lucile ..... Tampa, .... .. Hillsboro
Jenkins, Willie V.... Apalachicola, ......Franklin
Jerry, Naomi V. Tallahassee ....... eon
Jones, Joseph N ..Longwvood, ...Alachua
Jones, Christina ... Lake City, Columbia
Kemp, Pearla .......Chipley, .... ashington
Knight, William ...Tallahassee, ....... Leon
Lester,Rachel ..... Maitland, ..... Orange
Mccoy, T. H. ...... ainbridge, (Ga.)
Mitchell, Lila H ......Talahassee .Leon
Moorer, Rebecca .... Tallahassee, ... .Leon
Mobley, Portia .....Madison ... ..Madison
Nettles, Lola A..... Sanford,... .. Orange
Newton, Alice ..... .Leesburg ..... ...Lake
O'Rourke, Henry S. .. Tuscaloosa, (Ala.)
Patterson, William A. .. Palatka ........ Putnam
Perry, Mary A ......Tampa, ....... Hillsboro
Pittman, Carrie Tallahassee, .......Leon
Quarterman Cora ... ..Ocala, ....... Marion
Reed, Fannie ...... Sanford, ...... Orange
Rhodes, Minerva .... Marianna, ...... .Jackson
Stockton, Luna .....DeLand, ....... Volusia
Stough, Cynthiq ... ..Bradleyton,(Ala )
Sn ith ct- cC Jarrette ... Jefferson
ri'hom as, Maude E .. Apalachicola ...Franklin
Thomas, Mary E.... .. Apalaclicola, .....Franklin
Thompson, Marion ....Tallahassee, ... .. Leon





TALLAIIASSEE, FLORIDA. 43
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY
Wade, Sarah B..... Tampa, ......Hillsboro
Welters, Edward .. .. Key West, ..... Monroe
Williams,Willie M ...Altamonte Springs, Orange
Williams, Winter .. Pecks, ... ...... Leon
Wooden, Edward C- .. Orlando ...... Orange





41 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
PREPARTORY SCHOOL.
SECOND YEAR
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY
Arrington, Bertie Rosa ..Orlando, ...... Orange
Ayer, Fannie E ...Ocala, ....... Marion
Baker, Tellius E .. Madison, Madison
Brewer, David .. ..Raleigh, ....... Levy
Britt, Edward M ... Chipley .... Washington
Brooks, Gertrude ....Tallahassee, ....... Leon
Bryant, Eva ... .. Mandarin, ......Duval
Calvin,Julia A...... West Palm ,eac, .... Dade
Campbell, Mary ... Forest City, ..... Orange
Certain, Elmer W ....Jacksonville, .......Duval
Childs, Hattie D... Jonesville, ..... Alachua
Clav, Eldiest.... Marianna ...... Jackson
Clinton, Henry G.. .. Tampa, .......Hillsboro
Davis Albert E...... Apalachicola, .... Franklin
Demps, Amy ..... DeLand, ...... Vo!usia
Dorsey, Bena ..... Tampa ...... Hillsboro
Dudley, Charles H .. Marianna,. ..... Jackson
Fields, Minnie H ... Pinemount, ....Suwannee
Findley, Lilla A..... St. Augastine, St. Johns
Foster, Etta V .... Warrington, ...Escambia
Greene, Henry P,. .. Delray ........ Dade
Harris, Ida May ....Bainbridge,(Ga.)
Houston, Josetta ... Quincy, .......Gadsden
Houston, Nellie ... River Junction, ... Gadsden
Jackson, Mabel E. ...Tallahassee, ....... Leon
Jerry, Horace P. C. .Tallahassee, .... ...Leon
Johnson, James R: Chicago, (11.)
King, William A. Ashville, Jefferson
Long, Theodore .....Cottondale, ...... Jackson
Lane Samuel .... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Lockridge, Lillian Milligan, .... Santa Rosa
McCray Ennie .. Gainesville, .....Alachua
McKee, Pearly .. Fruitland Park, .... Lake





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 45
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY
McElvin, George .... Gainesville, .... Suwannee
McKee, Gola .... Fruitland Park,.. Lake
McTeer, Zetta ... Tampa ........ Hillsboro
Martin, Fannie B.. Jonesville, Alachua
Martin, Willie A..... Miami ........ Dade
Norton, Carl .... Tampa, ..... Hillsboro
Norton, George .... Tampa, ... Hillsboro
Plummer, Willie B. Pensacola, .... Escambia
Price, Emma ...... Felkel, ....... Leon
Price, John O. ... Hinson, ....Gadsden
Rivers, Allen S .... .Apalachicola, ... Franklin
Saunders, Alice M. Tallahassee, ...... Leon
Sheppard, John H. .Tallahassee,. ..... Leon
Smith, 'Eva M ...... Tallahassee, ... Leon
Stephens, Maggie L. .Tallahassee ...... Leon
Thomas, Jodie .....Chipley .... Washington
Thompson, Ada B.. Apalachicola, ... Franklin
Tyson, Adrianna .... Live Oak ..... Suwannee
Vaughn, Charlott ... Tallahassee, ....... eon
Walker, John W.....Orange ....... Liberty
White Aniese L Warrington,..... Escambia
Wight Ruby L...... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Williams, Mattie .... Felkel. ........ Leon
Willie, Lillie G. Green Cove Springs, Clay
Williams, Cora .....Fernandina ...... Nassau
Wood, George .... Vernon ..... Washington
Youman, Catlerine Tallahassee, ...... Leon
FIRST YEAR
Arrington, Mary .. Orlando ....... Orange
Alexander, WilliamH, Jacksonville, ...... Duval.
Austin, Mary ...... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Benadee, Harold .... Jacksonville, ...... Duval
Benjamin, Bessie .. Pensacola,..... Escambia
Boyd, Olin ...... Reddick,....... Marion
Boyd, Alexander' .... Reddick ....... Marion
Bradley, Georgia .... Milligan, .... SantaRosa
L;





46 STATE NOlRMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME PoST OFFICE COUNTY
Bryant, Ada B- ... Felkel ...... ...Leon
Butler, Frank ..... Rock Bluff,. .. .. Liberty
Burnett, Mary .....Caryville, .... Washington
Cain, Eddie ... Lawtey, ...... Bradford
Carnes, Alberta .....Tallahassee' ..... Leon
Caldwell, William .... St. Augustine, ... St. Johns
Cook, Angeline G .. Wellborn, ...... Suwannee
Cooper, Hannibal .Bainbridge, (Ga )
Cox, Laura J. clarion, .. .... Hamilton
Cornelius Parthenia .. Tampa ... .. Hillsloro
Daniels, Htnry F. .Marianina,..... .. Jackson
Daw.oon, Iola E ..... Pensacola, .. Escanbia
Dickerson, Samuel J Jacksonville, ..... Duval
Doyle, Saral L .. .... Tallalassee, ..... Leonl
Edwards, Lillie ....BrookBville,..... Hernando
Flemining, James A. ... Key West, ...... Monroe
Ford, Catherine .... Apalaclicola, ... .Franklin
Gardner, Minnie .... Tallahassee, .... Leon
Gardner, Willie ... .lTallallassse, ....... Leon
Girtman, Mitchell .... West Palm Beach, ...Dade
Harrison, Mary .... Kissimmee, ...... Osceola
Harrison, Ella .... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Jackson, Jessie .....Tallalassee, ... ... Leon
Jackson, Lewis .....Hinson ...... Gadsden
Johnson, William A. ... Quincy, .... Gadsden
Jones, Alberta .... Tallallassee, ..... Leon
Lang, Lenora ... ... New Snyrna, ... Volusia
Law, Cleveland ... Ashville ...... Jefferson
Littleton, Jessie .... Buslhnell, ...... Sumlter
Long, Linnie M.....DeLand, .... .'.. Volusia
Lukes, Robert ... Tallallassee, .. Leon
McDonald, Ruby .... Apalaclicola, Franklin
McDuffy, Henry .. Ocala, .. .... Marion
McMullen, Ross .....Bushnell, .... Sunmter
Massey, John ... .Tallahassee ...... Leon
Mason, William ... Apal aclicola, .... Franklin





TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA, 47
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY
Minis, John W ....... Quincy, ....... Gadsden
Ming, Ruth A .... .Apalachicola .... Franklin
Mims, LeoraW. ... Tallalhssee, ..... Leon
Peacock, Eliza .... Madlson,. ..... Madison
Powell, George W.. Quincy, .... Gadsden
Powell, William A Quincy, ........ Gadsden
Poole, Edwin B... .. Monticello, ..... Jefferson
Price, Lula ....... Hinson .... .. Gadsden
Redden, Sarah-E.. .... Tallahassee, ....... Leon
Richburg, Sallie ..... Milton, .. .. Santa Rosa
Roberts, Louisa E... St. Marks ...... Wakulla
Roberts, Edward .... Oscilla, ....... Jefferson
Robinson, Ethel ... Lovett, ..... .Jefferson
Robinson, Plillip .... Marianna, ...... Jackson
Sanders, Sarah .....Cipley, .... Washington
Smith, Simeon T ... DeLand, ...... Volusia
Smith, Flossie V..... Green Cove Springs, ... Clay
Thomas, Joseph .. Pensacola, .... Escambia
Thompson, Wanita. Tallahassee, ....... Leon
Tillman, Alice ..... Drifton, ....... Jeffersan
Vaughn, Lucy ... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Verson, Kate ...... Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Watts, Albert J' .. Jacksonville, ..... Duval
Whitfield, Amanda J. Tallahassee, ...... Leon
Williams, Hamlie ....Quincy ...... Gadsden
Williams. Simeon .... Ocala, ... Marion
Wilson, Grace ..... .Tallahassee, ...... Leon





SUM MARY.
NORMAL SCHOOL.
Boys. Girls. Total.
Senior ......... 14 17 31
Third Year ...... ro 21
Second Year .... 14 25 39
First Year ....... I9 33 52
PREPARATORY SCHOOL.
Second Year ...... 21 36 57
First Year ....... 34 41 72
113 162 275
Total enrollment from Florida .......... 263
Total from other states ...... ...... 12
Florida counties represented .......... 36
( '





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 49
ALUMNI.
IS92
Jackson, James Henry ............ .Tampa.
Matthews, Wm. Henry Brick-mason, Tallahassee.
*Parker-Hall, Ida E .................
Stewart, Charles Henry U. S. Mail Service, Ocala.
Tucker, Ernest V. ..Physician,.. Chicago, Ill.
1894
Hargrett, James Hall .Teacher, .. .Seffner.
Jackson, Adelaide .. .Teacher,.... Tallahassee.
Pope-Johnson, Annie L. Teacher...... Orlando.
Robinson, Simon Peter ......... Jacksonville.
Principal, Stanton Graded School.
Tillman, Robert Lee .. Teacher ....... Ashville.
Tony-Nelson E. Beulah Teacher, .. St Augustine.
I895
Evans, Elias G. Medical Student Washington,D. C.
Fitzgiles, Annie W. .. Teacher, ... Tallahassee .
Frazier, Jonas Henry Teacher,.... Tallahassee.
Jones, Everett Booker ......... Hamilton, N .Y.
Student, Colgate University
Mitchell-Chell, Hattie L. Teacher ..... Jacksonville.
*Newton, Cornelius .. ..... .......
1896
Baldwin, Christina Ethel Teacher, ....... Sparr.
Gaskin, Minnie Lee Teacher, ...... Pensacola.
Hall, Henry Franklin ....... Memphis, Tenn.
Richardson, Caroline D. Teacher ...... Leon Co.
1897
Alexander, Edward Isaac, Jr Law Student Chicago, Ill.
* Deceased





50 STATE ; (RVMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
Hall, Marietta Elizabeth ........... Tallahassee
Teacher, State N. & I. School.
Stanley, King Thomas Physician, .Nashville, Tenn.
1899
Clia:res,. George S .... ......St .Augustine
Priuiipal, Warden Academy.
*-Pratt, nei th Ii .. ... ... .
1900
D)aniels, C. I. (Acosta) .....Teacher, .. St. Augustine
Coleman,Dixon Temperance Teacher, .. Jacksonville.
Kelker, Ethel A .... Teacher, ..... Bagdad
Osgood, Alice B ... Teacher, .'. Madison.
Butler,. Rosa (Welters) ...... : ....... i.ni.
I901
DeValugl, Carolyn A.(Kerr, Teacher, .... Pensacola
.-'2- I .902
Attaway, Daisy E. ... .. Tallahassee
Assistant Matron State N. & I. School.
Garrison, Bessie Marie .Student, .. Atl.iit. .
Robinson, (Hurd) Bettie May Teacher, ... Pensacola.
Lester, Hei-hert E... .Teacher, HurIe' for.l" Academy
Eatonville. .
Mitchell, Minnie L. eacher' a. acksonillc.
Powell, Eliza J. .,. P.rillcipal Teacher, Marianna.
Floyd, Phoebe A. (Small) .. .. Statesboro, Ga;
Whitehead, Anthony J ... Teacher, .....Mclntosh.
1903
Boyd, Willee E.. teacher, .. Spl rr,
Davis, Frances N.... Teacher,-. Green Cove Springs
Davis, Julia M.... .. Teacher, .. Tallahassee.
Mamie A. Hopkins,. :.... Teacher,-. .. Leesburg.
Hopps, John L. ... Contractor and Builder, Live Oak.
James, Susie E.: .. Teacher, . Jacksonville.
Jamieson, Mary E. .Teacher, .... .Tallahassee.
State N. & I. School.
Jackson-Green, Josie G. Teacher, West Palm Beach





TALLAHASSEE: FL.I:It. I., 51
Kershaw, Albert J. Medical Student. Nashville, Tenn.
Lang, Theresa I Teacher, ....... Key West
Mizell, Bertha Teacher, ...... Lake City
Reynolds, Lillian C. Teacher ....... New Smyrna.
Stiles, Geneva L.. Teacher, ..... Ferllaltiiii.
White, I'hl ni ... .IMedical Student, ...... Ni-h'i1 Teinii.
1904
Butter, Robert W ... Business,. ...... .Mii.
Cromartie, John A. Student, ..... Atlanta :ni:i rilsty
Atlanta, Ga,
Grant, Arthur R... Principal New Augustine School,
New Augustine.
Hawkins, Rufus J. ...... Printer, .. ..Miami.
*Lee, Rosa B. .
More, Sarah G....... .Teacher, ...... Ormpd.
Perry, WinifredL... ..... Teacher, Fernandina
Smith, Walter C ...Teacher,.... .M:,uicellh, .
Wilkins, Maggie G.... Teach r, Ocala.
Yellowhair, Margaret A... Teacher,. Leon Co.
Young, Walter T. ... .Teacher. Bushnell





INDEX.
PAGE.
Admission ....... ................................... ........
A lg ebra .. ... .. .............................................23
Algebra. ** ** ** ** ** *23
Alumni Association- ...*.. ...........** .......*... .. ..... 16
A lum ni R oster ............................................. 43
Arithmetic ................................................ 23
Biology *....*.*.... **...*.*. .... ........ 22
Black i-m thing .. .......................... *. .............. ... 32
Board of Education ..................................... 5
B ookkeeping ................................................ 25
C alendar. .................................................... 4
Carpentry and Cabinet-making ............................3I
C hem istry .................................................. 21
Civics .***............. ....................................... 25
Commercial Geography ................................... 25
C om position ................................................ 23
C cooking .....................................................33
Ccurse of Study (Tabular View) ..................... ....17
Courses, Descriptive Statement of ...........................
Aacdemic Courses ................................. 19
Mechanical Courses ... ........................... 20
Agricultural Courses ............................... 35
Daiiying * ....................... .,36
Dressmaking ***.... ..3................................33
English- .. ...................................................23
Expense .....................................................
Faculty and Officers ........ .................................6
Faculty Committees ... ............ ..................
General Information .............................. ......... 2
Geology ........................................
Geometry ................................................. 23
Grammar **** ..... ................................... ........... 23
Grammar.23
History, American ...........................25
History, English- .. ................ ............... 24
History and Location ..............................





PAGE,
L laboratories ....... ...............................:.........I2
Latin ..**-... ......................................... .........24
* L aundering .................................................. 33
Library and Reading Room .. .. ..................... .. I3
Literary Societies ........................................... 13
Literature .. ................................24
Manual Training.: ........................................30
Mathematics .. ....................................22
Mechanical Drawing .................... ......... 28
Military Drill .............................................. 13
Mllinery ................... ............. 33
Music ......... ...............................................26
N ature Study ...............................................23
Nurse Training .......... ............................ 33
Opportunity to Reduce Expenses .*. ....................... 6
Organization .............. .................... 8
P painting .....................................................
Pedagogy ................................................. 23
Physics .............................. .........3.
Physiology ..................................... ...21
Plain Sew ing ................................................ 33
Printing ...................... ....................... 28
Promotion ......................... ..........
R leading .......... ...........................................26
R regulations ........... ................................ I
Religious Services ......................................... 13
Rhetoricals ........... ........................... 3
Science...... .....................................
Spelling -........ ................. 26
Students, Catalogue of .................................... 39
Suggestions .................................................. 6
Support ........................................... ............
Tailoring .... .................................. 33
Trigonom etry ...............................................23
T rustees......................................................2
U uniform s..................................................... 5
Wheelwrighting .............................................. 32
Zoology.....................................................22





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