• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Calendar
 State board of education
 Faculty and officers, 1903-190...
 Admission
 General information
 Course of study
 Descriptive statement of the academic...
 Descriptive statement of the mechanical...
 Descriptive statement of the agricultural...
 Catalogue of students
 Alumni
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Seventeenth Annual Catalogue 1903-1904; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000090/00001
 Material Information
Title: Seventeenth Annual Catalogue 1903-1904; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
State N. & I. School Press
Affiliation: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publisher: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publication Date: 1905
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000090
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2662
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PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Calendar
        Page 6
    State board of education
        Page 7
    Faculty and officers, 1903-1904
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Admission
        Page 11
    General information
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Course of study
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Descriptive statement of the academic courses
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Descriptive statement of the mechanical courses
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Descriptive statement of the agricultural courses
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Catalogue of students
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Alumni
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Index
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Inside back cover
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text
FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
AND
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR COLORED youth
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.
1904.


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'lVA, HALL (ACADEMIC BuDiN ) THE PRESIDEN.s RESIDENCE.
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~DuvA HALL(ACAE~II BUIDT~G.T~tEPRE~lXN~' RESIENCE





SEVENTEENTH
ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE
FLORIDA STATE NOrmAL
AND
INDUSTrial school
(FOR colored YOUTH)
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA,
For The Year 1903-1904,
AND
ANNOUNCEMENT
FOR 1904-1905.
tALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA,
STATE N. & I. SCHOOL PRESS,
1904.


.


CALENDAR.
1904.
'OCT. 1, SATURDAY, BOARDING DEPARTMENT OPENS.
OCT. 3, MONDAY, Entrance Examinations.
,OCT. 4, TUESDAY,
OCT. 5, WEDNESDAY, Fall Term Begins.
DEc. 24, SATURDAY, Fall Term Ends.
DEC. 27, TUESDAY, Winter Term Begins.
1905.
MAR. 18, SATURDAY, Winter Term Ends.
MAR. 21, TUESDAY, SPRING TERM BEGINS.
MAY. 20, SATURDAY, Agricultural and Educ'l Conference.
MAY. 2(, SUNDAY, Sermon to Graduating Class.
MAY. 22, MONDAY, Anniversary of Preparatory School.
-MAY. 23, TUESDAY, Anniversary of Literary Societies.
2MAY 24, WEDNESDAY, Commencement Exercises.
ck





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.
(EX-OFFICIO BOARD OF TRUSTEES.)
HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR, W. S. JENNINGS.
President.
K STATE SUPERINTENDENT-
HON. W. N.SHEATS TATE SUPRITENDEN
OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,
Secretary.
HON. H. CLAY CRAWFORD ..SECRETARY OF STATE
HON. W. H. ELLIS ...... ATTORNEY GENERAL,
HoN. W. V. KNOTT ..........TREASURER.





FACULTY AND OFFICERS.
1903-1904.
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M., President,
English ZReviews and Pedagoi,-y.
FREDERICK C.'JOHNSON, B. S., Supervisor '.M N,: Dept.,
1Aanual Tiain'n, .7echa nical Di awing, Bookkeeping.
GEORGE M.SAMPSON, A. M., Secretary, j,
In challfg of NVormlal Schoo G an 4 iljallhclzalics.
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, PhB.,
Science.
MISS MARY li. MELVIN, Preceptress,
Cizics and Hislor'.
MISS ADA HAWES, A. B., Librarian,
I- GI-ul;Gramn zar, Rhefori andt Litera/trie.
' CRAWFORD D. MENAFEE, Farm Superinitendent,
Practi/carl griculltul e.
W. H. A. HOWARD, A. B., Commandant,
I lfhematics and Painting.
MISS ELLEN 0. PAIGE,
P a in Sewing and ]D essmnakinig.
MISS MAGGIE A. BULKLEY, Matron,
Housekeeping and N- urse T-raining.
JUBIE B. BRAGG,
Blacksmilhing and lWheelclri'yhtiing.
ISAAC S. CUNNINGHAM, B. S.,
Carpentry and F'reehand Di awing.
MIss LULU M. CROPPER, Critic Teacher,
In Change of Prepaal tozy, School, Geog aphy.
MISS MARIETTA E. HALL,
Reading, Language an Geog aphy.
MRS. HATTIE M. HOWARD,
Insh umnental .fusic.
Anatole E. MARTIN,
Tailoring.





MRS. ELIZA A. JOHINSON,
Al1i linel3y.
MISS ANNA A. SMIT:H, Assistant Matron.
Laundce ing and Cookilgf.
MISS DAISY E. ATTAWAY,
In (- of .School Laundiy.
ISHAM A. WHITE, Assistant to Farm Superintendent.
- P in tilg.
FACULTY COMMITTEES.
PRUDENTIAL COM IITTEE.
NATHAN B. YOUNG, Chai/rman, Vi. H. A. HOWARD,
G. M. SAMP3ON, Secl'etar', MISS MARY E. IMELVIN,
FREDERICK C. JOHNSON. CRAWFORD D. MENAFEE.
MANAGERS OF 2OARDING DEPARTMENT.
NATHAN B. YOUNG, Clarilman, MISS M A. BULKLEY,
'CRAWFORD D. MENAFEE, JOHN T. WILLIAMS.
COMMITTEE ON ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS.
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman, MISs LuLu M. CROPPER
FREDERICK C. JOHNSON.





VIEW
GI1BBS HAIj (GIRLS' DORMITORY.)





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCOOOL, 11
ADMISSION.
Applicants for admission to this school must e I6 years
old, and must have a fair knowledge af arithmetic, English
grammar, descriptive geography, and must also be able to
read intelligently and to write legibly. Applicants must be
of good moral character, and, if from another institution of
learning, must bring a certificate of honorable dismission.
Applicants who are non-residents of Florida must pay a
tuition fee of two dollars, ($2.00), per month.
REGULATIONS.
The regulations of the school are few and simple, appeal-
ing to the student's s, lf respect andpersonal responsibility.
All loafing on the streets, or around places of public or
questionable character is prohibited.
Students are not allowed to use intoxicating liquors, or
tobacco in any form.
All profanity, playing cards, and everything of an im-
moral tendency ate strictly forbidden. Keeping, or using
fir. arms on the premises is forbidden, also hunting during
the school year.
All punishment is by demerits as follows : Five demerits
make one warning or mark; ten demerits two warnings or
marks; and fifteen demerits in any one session suspend
from the school. Suspended students may be reinstated at
the discretion of the Prudential Committee.
No efforts will be spared to make the dormitory life of
the students healthful and uplifting.
All laundering will be done in the school's laundry, and
students will not be allowed to have laundry done elsewhere.
All clothing must be marked with indelible ink.





12 TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.
Each student should provide himself with
4 Towels,
3 Sheets,
3 Pillow-cases,
i Blanket,
i Comfort or Quilt,
3 Table Napkins,
a Bible and a Dictionary.
All breakage must be paid for in cash.
Young women should bring overshoes and waterproofs:
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remittances.
for students, to send money by money crder, express order
or registered letter direct to the Pv)esident. He will not be
responsible for money sent to him through students.
GENERAL INFORMATION.
* LABORATORIES.
The school is especially fortunate in its physical and chem-
ical laboratories. The following statement gives scme idea
of their equipment:
The physical Laboratory contains a complete set of appa-
ratus for the illustration of the properties of matter, and
principles of dynamics, simple machines, liquids, Fneumat-
ics, magnetism, fractional electricity, thermo-electricity,
sound, heat, and light.
The Chemical Laboratory contains apparatus and chemi-
. ca-ls-ifor.'o{k~tinlu anialysi.saiiA''de'niciit rat ioii- iii the sttuJy of
that science, ,and for such analysis of.soils, fi-rtihzers, etc.,
as may be incidental to agricultural experimentation on
the farm.
LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.
The school has the foundation of an excellent library.
*The Agricultural Building containing the laboratories was destroyedby fire
April ni, 19o4. It is b-ing rebuilt and improved.





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, L3
"There are several hundred carefully selected bound vol-
umes and complete files of scientific government reports. In
the reading room can be found the leading daily papers of
the country, literary and educational magazines.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
Although the school is non-sectarian, yet it is intensely
Christian. The religious life of the school is all that can be
desired even hy the most careful parent. In addition to the
usual preaching and Sunday School services on the campus
there-is an active Y. M. C. A. for the young men, and Y.
P. S. C. E. for all the students and teachers. Each day's
-work closes with a vesper service.
LITERARY SOCIETIES
There are three active literary societies: the Acme litrea-
ry Society, the Douglass Debating Scciety for the young
men, and the T. deS. Tucker Literary Society for the
young women. These organizations meet weekly.
PUBLIC RHETORICALS.
The last Friday night in each month is given to public
rhetorical exercises. The students are thus trained in pub-
lic declamation.
MILITARY DRILL.
As a matter of discipline and physical training, the
young men of the school are given some military drill.
They are inspected daily, and march in military order to
each meal. This organization helps the officers of the school
to keep good order among the young men,, and at the same
time gives them a respect for authority that is necessary
for good citizenship.
UNI FORMS.
As a matter .of economy and of good appearance, the
students are required to wear a uniform. The young
women's suit is made of blue percale and costs two dollars





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.7 _
r~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TCEHA9( B S D R TO. .. .
TUCKRHLLB oS' DoRMI~OR~S 0 TIl





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 15S
($2.oo0. For Spring and Fall, they wear a blue sailor hat
bound with a blue band that costs one dollar (.i .co). The
young men's uniform costs eight or ten dollars '' co or
$ro...o) made of blue uniform flannel, andcap costs one dol-
lar ($I.oo).
These uniforms are limade in the school's shop and are
sold at actual cost. Th2e lz.atlols will therefore not bzty citi-
zen's suits fo/r fteir c/LildifCre, bit sezd zmoTney, o fo e President
with which to buy the above uniform sits.
Students bringing money above their immediate needs to
the school are required to deposit it with the President sub-
ject to their order.
Board must be paid monthly in advance. All bills run
from the first of the month.
All non-residents lmust board at the school, unless special-
ly excused by the President.
EXPENSE.
There is no charge for tuition. The following is an esti-
mate of the necessary expense for che full session:
Board and room rent (inculding lights and fue;) at $7.co
per montli (35 weeks) ............. $57.25
Washing, etc., $.oo per onth ...... .. S. oo
Books and stationery, about ... .. .. .5. oo
Incidental fee (for ordinary medicines, not medical
atten-tion) ... ......... ..... .00.
Total ... ......... 7I.25
OPPORTUNITY TO REDUCE EXPENSES.
A limited number of earnest young men and women will,
upon payment in full of thirty-six dollars, ($36.co), in
cash 'at beginning of session, be allowed to work out the
balance of their board and laundry expenses. Applications
for this privilege must be made in writing and accepted
before arrival. All extra work performed by students will
be rated at five cents per hour, and be placed to the credit
of such persons.
Students who have the privilege of working out a pact of





16; STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
their expenses, will be required to perform sixteen hours
work each week.
The payment of fifty dollars, ($5o.co), in cash at the be-
ginning of the session, will constitute a scholarship, entit-
ling the holder to board for the entire session.
All money earned by students in performance of labor in
ihe instituttion shall be retained to be used only for defray-
ing their expenses while in attendance here at school.
All students are required to work one hour a day (or its
equivalent) for the school without remuneration.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION.
It is the policy of the school to keep in close and sympa-
chetic touch with its graduates. The alumni have organized
and are doing good work for their alma mater. Miss A. B.
Osgood of Madison, Fla., is the president, and Miss M. E.
Hall of Tallahassee, Fla., is the secretary.
SUGGESTIONS.
Students arriving on the trains are advised to notify the
school authorities of the date and schedule time of their ar-
rival. They can, on arrival at the station, easily walk to
the institution, as the buildings are within plain view of
the depot.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 1T
*COURSE OF STUDY.
PREPARATORY SCHOOL.
FIRST YEAR.
FALL TERM. WINTER TERM. SPRING TERM-
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
Geography Geography Geography
Language Lessons Language Lessons Language Lessons
Reading Reading Reading
Freehand Drawing, Freehand Drawing, Freehand Drawing,
Manual Tiaining, Manual Training, Manual Training,
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Sewing, Sewing, Sewing,
Cooking, Cooking, Cooking,
Laundering, Laundering, Latindering,
SECOND YEAR.
Arithmetic, Arithmetic, Algebra,
U. S. History, U. S. History, History,
Grammar, Grammar, Grammar,
Nature Study, Zoology, Botany,
Physiology,
Freehand Drawillg, Freehand Drawing, Freehand Drawing,
Manual Training, Manual Training, Manual Training,
or or or
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Sewing, Sewing, Sewing,
Cook ing, Cooking, Ccoking,
Laundering, Laundering, Laundering,
NORMAL SCHOOL.
FIRST YEAR.
PALL TERM. WINTER TERM. SPRING TERM.
Algebra, Algebra, Algebra,
Technical Grammar, Composition, Composition,
Civics, American Literature, American Literature,
Elementary Chemistry, Civics, Book-keeping,
Elementary Chemistry, Agricultural Chemistry,
Tad raining, rades Training, Trades Training,
or or or
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Mechanical Drawing Mechanical Drawing Mechanical Drawing
Sewing, Sewing, Sewing,
Cooking, Cooking, Cooking,
Laundering, Laundering, Laundering,
*See descriptive statement of courses.





18 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
SECOND YEAR.
:FALL TERM. WINTER TERM. SPRING TERM.
Algebra, Plane Geometry, Plane Geometry,
English History, History, English Literature,
Ancient History, Ancient History, English Literature,
or or or
:Latin, Latin, Latin,
Physiology, Physiology, Biology,
Biology,
Trades Training, Trades Training, Trades TrainiNg,
or or or
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Mechanical Drawiug, Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Drawlng, 1l
:Sewing, Sewing, Sewing,
Cooking, Cooking, Cooking,
-Laundering, Laundering, Laundering,
THIRD YEAR.
Solid Geometry, Plane Trigonometry, Plane Trigonometry,
Pedagogy, Pedagogy, Pedagogy,
English Literature, English Literature, English Literature,
or or or
Latin, Latin, Latin,
Physics, Physics, Geology,
Geology,
Trades Training, Trades Training, Trades Training,
or or or
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Drawing,
Dressmaking, Dressmaking, Dressmaking,
Millinery, Millinery, Millinery,
FOURTH YEAR.
Commercial Geography, Economics Ethics,
Pedagogy, Pedagogy, Pedagogy,
Arithmetic, Grammar, t. S. History,
Trades Training, Trades Training, Trades Training,
or or or
Agriculture, Agriculture, Agriculture,
Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Drawing, Mechanical Drawing,
Dressmaking Dressmaking, Dressmaking,
or or or
Millinery, Millinery, Millinery,





TIALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 19
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
ACADEMIC COURSES.
The work of this department covers six years ( two in
preparatory school, and four in the normal school), begin-
ning with the sixth grade. It is equivalent to a good high
school course, with stress upon English and Science. An ad-,
ditional course in Pedagogy is ..ffi;e-l1 to the third and
fourth year normal :1. --. -, to fit in a practical way those
\\h.-: I ,, teachlas a vi:*. a li,' or an avocation.
SCIENCE.
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Instructor.
Since the school is established on an Agricultural and
Mechanical foundation, Chemistry, with kindred subjects,
and Physics will be the basis of all work in this department.
Stress will be placed on the practical side of the work.
CHEMISTRY--The work in Chemistry will cover a period
of one year and is intended to be the basis of the work in
scientific Agriculture. The first two terms will be devoted
to elementary inorganic Chemistry; the last term to applied
Agricultural Chemistry. The course will be conducted by
lectures, recitations and laboratory work. The laboratory
work is intended especially for students of Agriculture
and will include analytical work in soils, fertilizers, feed-
stuffs and dairy products.
TEXT-BOOKS: Williams' Introductcon to Chemical Science
and Coleman and Addyman's Agriczltulral Chemis/ty.
PHYSICS-The work in this course lasts two terms and
coecr- the ground of general physics. Special stress will
be placed on Mechanics, 'Dynamics and the physics of farm
implements.
The course will be conducted by lectures, recitations and
laboratory work. The school has a good supply of appa-
ratus for laboratory work.





20 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
TEXT-BOOK: Wentworth and Hill's Physics. King's
Physics of Agriculture will be supplied as a reference book.
GEOLOGY-The work in this subject one and a half terms.
Dynamical, Structural and Historical Geology will be dis-
cussed; also the relation of Geology toth- soil. The work
will be carried on by recitations and field excursions.
TEXT-BOOK : Lecont's Compend.
PHYSIOLOGY-It is the aim in this course to make this
subject as practical as possible. Therefore, the human body
is studied as a working organism and its various functions
are worked out by scientific observation and experiment.
For this purpose, the dissection of an animal and the micro-
scopic examination of sections form a part of the work.
Hygiene is especially emphasized. The school is supplied
with an elaborate anatomical chart
TEXT-BOOKS : Blaisdell's Practical Physiology and Blais-
dell's Our Bodies.
ZOOLOGY-This course is intended to extend the work in
practical physiology as better preparation for the same and
to acquaint tke student with familiar animal form. Equal
time will be devoted to invertebrates and vertebrates. There
will be field work as well as recitations.
TEXT-BOOK : Packard's Zoology.
NATURE STUDY-This course is given in the spring term.
The bulk of the work is done in the field. It is devoted to
the different types of soil; their preparation for plants; the
kinds and uses of fertilizers; and the anatomy and physi-
ology of plants.
No text-book is used.
BIOLOGY--The object of this course'is to show the broad
characteristic phenomena and laws of life as they are illus-
trated by a thorough comparative study of a series of plants
and animals taken as representative types; and to -he.\% that
all the varied phenomena which may come under the stu-
dent's observation are due to the properties of matter in the
living state. In this work special stress will be placed on
the general physiology of the plant and animal and their re-





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 21
nation to each other.
TEXT-BoOK : Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology.
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY.-The fundamental object of
this course is to show the student wherein lies a country's
wealth, the monetary value of mining and farming products
and how prices are regulated, and to give general informa-
tion of thi' commercial condition of the country. The work
will '., i:;lrrircl on by recitations and discussions. For gener-
al reading on the subject the Review of Reviews and the
World's Work will be supplied.
TEXT-BOOK: Adam's A Conmmercial Geography.
MATHEMATICS.
G. M. SAMPSON, Instructor.
The purpose of this course is to give to the student a
knowledge of mathematical principles and the ability to use
them in actual service in the shop. Stress is laid on the cul-
tivation of correct habits of thought. The work is guaged
to stimulate independent thought and to promote confidence
in the student of his ability to undertake successfully more
advanced branches. During the year, lectures will be given
on the history of mathematics.
ARITHMETIC.-Studefits who enter the preparatory school
are supposed to have a knowledge of the fundamental prin-
ciples: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and
factoring. The work is meant to begin at Factoring contin-
uing through Fractions, Measures, Percentage, and Interest.
The course is arranged for two years.
TEXT-BOOK: Well's Academic Aritllmetic.
ALGEBRA.-In this course, which covers five terms, the aim
is, not alone to acquaint the student with a knowledge of
the Il-,j.-::t through quadratics, but to develop facility in
grasping combinations, accuracy in statement and gen-
eralization for arithmetical methods.
TEXT-BOOK: Well's Academic Algebra.
GEOMETRY.-This course extends to solids, giving special
attention to original problems and to the application of prin-
ciples in mensuration.





22 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
The following points are always held in view: The pro-
cess of reasoning; The separation of numerical relation; A
clear notion of magnitude; The development of individual
power.
TEXT-BOOK : Philips and Fisher's Elements of Geometry.
TRIGONOMETRY-This course extends through the solu-
tion of the oblique triangle, involving the elements of Plane
Surveying.
TEXT-BOOK : Wentworth's Plane T7igonomety.
ENGLISH.
Miss ADA HAWES, Instructor.
GRAMMAR-The fall term will be devoted to a thorough
and systematic review of English grammar.
TEXT-BOOK : Arnold and Kitridge's The otherr Tongue,.
BDoks I. and II.
COMPOSITION.-During the winter and spring terms, the
students will be required to write at least two themes a week,
for the most part based upon the American authors and
their works, the aim being to acquaint the students with
American literature and at the same time to give them drill
in composition. Part of the time will be devoted to letter
writing.
TEXT-BOOK : Mead's Practical Composition and Rhetoric.
HISTORY.-The first half of the year will be devoted to
the study of English History. The air: of this course will
be to acquaint the students with the important English in-
stitutions and customs and with the movements that have
taken place in England, tracing their influences upon the
history of this country. Students will be required to con-
suit other authorities on assigned subjects and to hand inr
written reports. This course will also serve as preparation
for the study of .Euglish Literature wnich follows. This.
fact will be kept in mind throughout the course.
TEXT-BOOKS: Higginsou and Channing's Eng-lish -His-
tort fbr Am ericans.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 2
LITERATURE.-The last half of the year will be devoted
to a study of some of the masterpieces of noted poetry and
prose writers of English.
TEXT-BOOKS: Painter's American Literature and Painter's
English Literature.
LATIN.
MISS ADA HAWES, Instructor.
The course in Latin embraces, besides the study of Cice-
ro's Catalinarian Orations and Vergil's sneid, a class study
of the period of Roman history from the-overthrow of the,
Gracchi to the establishment of the empire. As far as pos-
sible, the student is made to compare Latin and English
words formed from the same root. It is judged advisable to
delay the study of Latin until the student has reached the
Normal II. class, because, by that time, he has laid a foun-
dation in English grammar which will enable him to grasp.
the Latin more readily and hence make more progress than
by taking the two contemporaneously.
. Normal II. may elect Latin or Ancient History. Normal
III. may elect Latin or Advanced English Literature.
TEXT-BOOKS: Collar and Daniel's First Latin Book and.
Allen and Greenough's 'ergiil's :Encid.
PEDAGOGY.
NATHAN B. YOUNG, Instructor.
MISS LULU M. CROPPER, Critic Teacher.
This work covers the third and fourth years of the Nor-
mal School and its object is to prepare in a practical way
teachers for the common schools of the state. The first year
is devoted to the study of the theory of education and of
school teaching. The second year is given to teaching in the
training school under the eve of a trained critic teacher.
Sufficient attcnltin i is given to the history of education to
give the student teacher a fair knowledge of the great edu-
cational movements and leaders and to acquaint him with
the leading educational classics.





24 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS : Appleton's Educational
Series, White's School Government, White's Pedagogy, and
White's Art of Teaching, Smith's Systematic Methodology,
Monro's Educational Ideals, McMurry's General Method
and The Method of the Recitation. The students are requir-
ed to read the current educational literature, a great deal of
which comes to the school's library.
BOOKKEEPING.
F. C. JOHNSON, Instructor.
The work in bookkeeping is intended to give the students
a knowledge of the ordinary methods of transacting busi-
ness and of making business records.
TEXT-BOOK : Teller and Brown's Business Methods.
GEOGRAPHY.
The purpose of this course is to give the student a prac-
tical knowledge of the earth as the home of man to acquaint
him with his environments.
TEXT-BOOK: Frye's Conplete Geography-revised edition.
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CIVICS.
In addition to giving the student a knowledge of the lead-
ing men and events of this country, the plan of the courses
is to have them so appreciate the institutions of their coun-
try as to become patriotic law-abiding citizens.
TEXT-BOOK: Montgomery's Leading Facts in American
History, Townsend's Shorter Course in Civil Government.
READING AND SPELLING.
These subjects are given careful systematic attention.
The aim is to have the student acquire the ability of rap-
id and accurate interpretation of the written page, and to
spell and pronounce the words of his increasing vocabu-
lary correctly.
TEXT-BOOKS: Graded Literature Reader, Hazen's Grad-
ed Speller.





TALLAHASSEB, FLORIDA. 25
PENMANSHIP (vertical system), FREEHAND DRAWING
and VOCAL Music are taught in the Pieparatory School
grades.
MUSIC.
MRS. HATTIE M. HOWARD, Instructor.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two dol-
lars and twenty-five cents ($2.25) for eight lessons of twen-
ty minutes each. This fee also includes the use of the
music and instrument for practice. Five pianos and one or-
gan are owned by the institution.
A musical library has been started which will enable pu-
pils to pursue their music with a much smaller outlay than
they could do if they were obliged to purchase all the music
used while here.
Vocal music is required of all the Preparatory students.
Individual vocal instruction is given at the same cost as in-
strumental music. Chorus singing and the rendition of the
"Plantation Melodies" are among the special features of
this department.
A systematic course in instrumental and vocal music is
offered preparatory to admission to a regular conservatory
of music. Upon application to the instructor a statement of
the course can be obtained.





26 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
MECHANICAL COURSES.
The work of the MechanicalDepartment has two phases:
(i) Manual Training, (2) Training in the specific work of
the various industries the school has in operation.
The manual training precedes the industrial training,
and prepares the student both mentally and physically to
perform the work at the trades more satisfactorily by giv-
ing him correct mechanical ideals and a certain amount of
skill which can be put to immediate use in his later work.
This is in addition to the well known educational value of
manual training.
Constant effort is made to correlate the work of the Aca-
demic and the Mechanical Departments. Each department
thus helps the other and the st-ident is made to feel the
truth that the two departments are not separate and distinct,
but are component parts of one great whole
Whenever possible in the mechanical courses the student
makes his own drawings and works from them.
Each student is expected to spend at least two years in
any division to which he may be assigned.
Letters certifying the nature and amount of work done
in each division will be given to the student by the instruc-
tor upon application.
MANUAL TRAINING.
F. C. JOHNSON, Instructor.
This course is in the form of work in wood and iron and
is given to all the young men of the preparatory school ex-
cept those studying agriculture. The first year's work com-
prises the construction of various articles from the student's
own working sketches, 1,rinlkiii in the use of the ordinary
woodworking tools: the plane, saw, hammer, chisel etc.
The early part of the second year is devoted to bent iron
work and the latter part to elementary blacksmithing.





l,;2 *igs
-----iv----M--
,
4~~~~~~~~'r^





'28 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
MECHANICAL DRAWING.
The work in Mechanical Drawing is designed to give
the student such knowledge of the subject as will enable
him to make correct working drawing- for his own use in
the shop and to read the drawings and blue prints made by
others.
The course begin with simple working drawings which
are made from freehand sketches. The sketches are -iiade,
and the measurements taken from objects by the student
himself. Later the student draws from the sketches of oth-
ers and finally takes up the work of designing.
As far as possible the class of objects from which the
student draws is determined by the industry at which he
works; for instance, the drawing of the young men who
work at carpentry tends towards the planning of buildings,
that of the young men working at wheelwrighting is direct-
ed towards carriage drafting and design.
PRINTING.
I. A. WHITE, Instructor.
In the printing office the stu'deit Illi in- ilt .t ct and
distribute type, to care for the press and rollers and to take
and mark proof. He then studies the methods of making
up and locking forms, doing press work and using paper
cutter, stapler and pad-press.
Finally, estimating is taken up.
Most of the pm inted matter usld by the school is the work
of the young men of this division.
The setting up of the school paper "The College Arms"
is a part of the regular work.
CARPENTRY AND CABINET-MAKING.
ISAAC S. CUNNINGHAM, Instructor.
This course is iltclii.cd to give the student an elemen-
tary knowledge of house and shop carpently and cabinet-
making. It begins with elementary bench work, int'oduc-





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 29
ing the student to the more simple tools and the promi-
nent characteristics of timber. This is followed by a study
of house building, beginning with framing and then taking
up door and window frame construction and outside finish-
ing, floor-laying and inside finishing,. stair building etc.
The foregoing takes up the first two years. During the
third and fourth years the time is occupied by cabinet-mak-
ing, the study of the first principles of the trades which to-
gether with carpentry are employed in the erecficn of build-
ings and a bird's eye view of the work of the architect in
their design and in the superintendence uf their construction.
Throughout the course it is planned that.the student
shall. as far as p, ,-il.le. asituill.! -I:, th,:, i h the various
iEr'.)ce-'-< about '\-whicl lie hears from the instructor in his
talks to the class.
PAINTING.
W. H. A. HOWARD, Instructor.
Instuction in this di\-i-~,i, includes a study of the paint-
er's brushes and other tools: paints and the different classes
of painting: colors and their harmony and contrasts: interior
and exterior house-painting: wagon and carriage painting:
besides glazing, cutting, frosting, staining and embossing
glass: sign-writing and fresco-painting.
BLACKSMITHING AND WHEELWRIGHTING.
J. B. BRAGG, Instructor.
BLACKSMITHING.-The student in this division is taught
how to make fires and the use of blacksmithing tools in the
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting
punching, cutting off, squaring, scarfing, and welding. This
is done in the making of staples, hooks, collars, chains, iron-
ing wagons, and setting and welding new tires.
WHEELWRIGHTING.-In this course exercises in plan-
ing, nailing, boring, sawing; glueing and making spokes,
felloes etc., give the student a knowledge of the use of the
bench and general tools of the wheelwright. He is taught





0 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
to make and then to assemble the parts of wheelbarrows,
push carts, one and two horse farm wagons, delivery and
milk wagons, buggies and carriages.
TAILORING.
A. E. MARTIN, Instructor.
The aim of this department is to give the young men
such a knowledge of tailoring as will equip them for posi-
tions as journeymen. Due attention is given to busheling
which constitutes a great part of the work of every tailor-
shop.
The course of study and practice comprises sewing on
buttons, the various operations in making coats, vests and
trousers of various kinds, also management of the shop,
.economy in cutting, cleaning, repairing etc.
COOKING AND LAUNDERING.
MISS ANNA A. SMITH, Instructor.
COOKING.-The work done in this division is practical,
special stress being laid upon the cooking of plain foods.
The first work taken up is the method of making and
caring for the fire, the care of the range, closet, sink and
kitchen utensils. Then come the making of corn bread,
graham bread, muffins and the cooking of vegetables, eggs
and meats. Considerable attention is given to the making
of sonps, dressing and cooking fowls and fish, laying of the
table for and serving meals, invalid cooking, canning, pre-
serving, pickling and desserts.
LAUNDERING.-The object of this course is to give the
young women thorough training in the art and science of
washing and ironing.
A study is made of water, soap and alkalies and practice
given in the method of washing and ironing body and table
linen, flannel, silk and colored articles.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 31.
PLAIN SEWING, AND DRESSMAKING.
MISS E. O. PAIGE, Instructor.
PLAIN SEWING.-This course gives training in the use of
the needle in the ordinary forms of sewing such as basting,
overhanding, patching, darning, hemming, back-stitching,
felling, gathering, sewing on buttons, making button holes,
etc.
A part of the time is given to practice in the operation of
the sewing machine and to drafting, cutting and putting to-
gether simple garments.
DRESSMAKING.-The object of this work is to give a thor-
ough knowledge of the principles of dressmaking with as
much practice as time will allow. It is valuable to those who
wish to make their own dresses or to superintend the work.
With additional practice it is excellenttrainingforprofes-
sional dressmaking.
The cousre includes drafting skirts, waists, jackets, and
gowns for home and street wear and practice in making
dress trimmings and finishings.
In addition a study is made of color, form, line, and text-
ure of materials.
Admission to this course is granted to those only who
have taken the above work in plain sewing or its equivalent.
MILLINERY.
MRS. E. A. JOHNSON, Instructor.
Thorough training in the practical and artistic princi-
ples of millinery is the object of this line of work.
The course embodies the drawing of untrimmed hats,
drapery and bows, making buckram and wire frames for
hats, folding, binding, making bows, fitted and full facing,
puffed edges and practice in applying the principles learned
to the making ot hats, bonnets, toques and turbans. In-
struction in color, form and line is given, besides talks on
the manufacture of straw and felt hats, ribbon, crape and
silk.





32 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
This work is offered to those of the third and fourth year
normal classes who are able to pass a satisfactory examina-
tion in sewing.
NURSE TRAINING.
MIss M. A. BULKLEY, Instructor.
This is the beginning of what is planned t, be a full-fledged
Nurse-Training School. Only young women of the Nor-
mal School are eligible to admission upon application. For
fuller information, write the President.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 33
-DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
GENERAL AGRICULTURE.
C. D. MENAFEE, Instructor.
The school is situated on about I80 acres of land includ-
ing the grounds around the buildings. On this land the ob-
ject isto raise live stock, poultry, and various agricultural
products. All this is done to teach the student practical farm-
ing in its various phases; such as plans and essential features
of farm buildings, fences,, roads, water supply and the
use and care of farm implements.
Included in the course of study are the following : The
composition and kinds of soil; irrigation, draining, tillage,
!plant growth, composition and n .-rmination of steds, fertiliz-
ers and their uses, fruit trees, ornainlut.l trees,;-and -shrub-
'bery.'sti'ck and lpultry r.,iikiin. plant di-ea-',. beneficial
and injurilouls insects and forestry.
Short courses in botany and agricultural chemistry are
given in connection with the academic work in scieniie.
DAIRYING.
I. A. WHITE, In Charge.
The course in dairying is very practical and deals with
'the breeds of cattle, composition of milk and butter, butter
making, cheese making and the use and care of the separat-
'ors, churns and other machines and utensils used in the
dairy.
PROMOTION.
A student receiving lt ., th ha 60 in any subject academicc
'or industrial) is couditioied in that 'ul.je.t. No student
-!canbe promoted with-more than one: condition. This figu-
lation does not prevent the admission of'a -tiidentto a
class on trial. .
A candidate for graduation must remove all conditions
*before receiving a diploma.





DAIRY BUIILDING. THE BARN.





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 35
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS.
SESSION ENDING MAY 25, 1904.
NORMAL SCHOOL.
SENIOR CLASS.
NAME.. POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Butler, Robert W. ... Jacksonville ... .. Duval
Cromartie, John A... Elizabethtown, (N. C.)
Grant, Ai thur R. .. St. Augustine, St. Johns
Hawkins, Rufus J. ..Live Oak, .Suwannee
Lee, Rosa B....... Jacksonville, ..... Duval
Moore, Sarah G. ..... Daytona, ...... Volusia
Osgood, Alfred B. ... I ,-li-, ........ Madison
Perry, Winifrel L. Fernandina, .. .. Nassau
Smith, Walter C ..... Sparr, ....... ...Marion
Sye, Idella ....... Fernandina,..... .Nassau
Wilkins, Maggie G. .. West Farm, .... Madison
Yellowhair, Margaret A. Tallahassee,. .... Leon
Young, Walter T Bushnell, ... .Sumter
THIRD YEAR CLASS.
Armwood, Walter A. .. Tampa,. ....... Hilsboro
3arnette, Annie J. Pinetta,....... Madison
Barnette, Mary D. ... Pinetta, .... Madison
P. ... e, Thomas A ... Ocala, .. .. .Marion
Burney, Alonzo R. .Ocala, ..... .. Marion
Browne, PeterE. ... Darien, (Ga.)
Burt, W. Jackson .Brooksville, ...... Hernando
Calhoun, Harvis C. Bartow, .... ...Polk
Campbell, George W. .Lee ........ Madison
Crinl'::i;y, Jane E.. McIntosh,. .......Marion
Ford, Louisa E ... T.lll11;lh :c, .. Leon
Gilbert Sarah .... ..Sanford .......Orange
Howell, Leroy A .... Orlando, ..... Orange
Jenkins, Emma L. .. .Palatka ......Ptnam
Jones, Althea M. .. Key West, ... Monroe
'-> ; '. '~---.





36 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Jones, Lucy .... Tallahassee ......Leon
Kendrick, Ella E. .. Gainesville ..... Alachua
Lancaster, R. St. Elmo. Fernandina, ... Nassau
Lott, Sylvia ...... Live Oak, ...Suwannee
McDaniels, George T. Daytona, ..... Volusia
McElvin, MabelI.. .Gainesville, .... Alachua
Moore, EulaL ......Birmingham, (Ala.)
Shellman, Lizzie ... Pembroke, (Ga.)
Thompson, Bessie M. Quincy, .. ...Gadsden
Twine, Gertrude A. .Tallahassee ,...... Lton
Walker, Mary E. Jacksonville ..... Duval
Welters, Yulee C. Key West, Monroe
Wilson, Lavina S. .Tallahassee, ...Leon
SECOND YEAR CLASS:
Alexander, Camilla B.. Ocala, ....... Marion
Alexander, Levi Jr. .Ocala ......... Marion
Attaway, Ethel ... .Tallahassee .Leon
Baker, Burris .....Ocheesee ...... Calhoun
Barnette, Chas H .... Pinetta ....... Madison
Bradley, Cecelia .... Greenville, .... Madison
Bntler, Edna E. .. .Early Bird, ... Marion
Cephus, Frank L. .Bagdad, ....Santa Rosa
Chandler, Edward M. A. Ocala, ...... Marion
Coleman, Samuel H. Jacksonville, ......' Duval
Dickey, Elzora M. .. Lee, ........ Madison
Franklin, Rosanna Green Cove Springs, Clay
Gillislee, Ethel A. ... Jacksonville ..... Duval
Hargrett, Andrew J. .St. Marks, .... Wakulla
Howard, Walter L. Gainesville ..... Alachua
Hughes, Nellie E. ... Gainesville, ..... Alachua
Jackson, Annie L. Apalachicola, .. Franklin
Joiner, Murdock J.. Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Kershaw, Ella J ... Tallahassee ...... Leon
Kershaw, Willier E Tallahassee ..... Leon
Kiug, Jaehes A. .. .Sanford, .... Orange





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 3T
NAME. POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Kinsler, Annie L. .Martin, ....... Marion
Mizelle, Mary J .. .. Lake City, .....Columbia
Pindar, Sweet 0..... Tallahassee, .. ..Leon
Refoe, Ellen I...... Mill Creek, .... St. Johns
Roberts Erksine A. Key West, .. .Monroe
Robinson, Celestine .Tallahassee ...... Leon
Scott, John R. Jr ... Jacksonville, ...... Duval
Sival, Benjamin F. Lake City, ... .. Columbia
Steward, William C. Sanford ......Orange
Twine, James A .... Tallahassee ..... Leon
Vicars, Joseph W. .Thomasville, (Ga.)
Ward, Laura J ..... Martin, ..... Marion
Whitley, Fairy B. ... Apalachicola, .... Fi.,nklin
Woodward, Lura M ... Gainesville ...... Alachua
FIRST YEAR CLASS.
Allen, Mary F .... Crescent City, Putnam
Attaway, Mary Tallahassee ..... Leon
Bowman, Lilla .... Miami, .... ...Dade
Bryan, Rchard ..... Tallahassee, ..... .Leon
Caldwell, Constance E. St. Augustine, .. St. Johns
Carter, Dallas .....Quincy, ...... Gadsden
Cooper, Gussie M. Gainesville, Alachua
Daniels, Frederick 0... Orlando, ... ... Orange
Davis, Effie A....... Tallahacee ...... .Leon
Edwards, Daisy E. .rck,-invill .. .Duval
Edwards, James A.. .''all.h.l>c, ...... Leon
Fleming, Lula C. .St. Augutiiic, St. Johns
G'ill-ert. Bednie tin. Gadsden
Golden, Mamie T. .T.llih.ai--ec, .. ...Leon
Harrison, Nona R. ... Madison, ....... Madison
Hearst, William, E. Jonesville ..... Alachua
Henry, Merzepher Tallahassee ....Leon
Henry, Nelson ....Delray ....... .Dade
Hill, Daisy M. Lacrosse, ...... Alachua
Knight, William ....Tallahassee, ...... Leon
Lang, Herbert L. ... .Jacksonville, .. .. Duval





38 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME. PoST OFFICE. COUNTY.
McCray, Mollie ... Gainesville ..... Alachua
McLeary, Emma A... MadisMadison, ...Madison
Merricks, Lilly L. Earleton, ... ... Alachua
Moorer, Rebecca ....Tallahassee ....Leon
Nixon, Jessie E .... Jacksonville, ...... Duval
Quarterman, Cora A. Ocala, ....M arion
Raiford William A... .Aiken, (S. C.)
Robinson, Frank C. .Marianna,. .....Jackson
Salley, Amelia .... Tampa, ..... Hilsboro
Sanders, IdaR ..... ..Tallahassee, .. .. .Leon
Savelle, George L .. Jacksonville, ..... .Duval
Stanley, Sarah ....Sanford, ....... Orange
Stephen, Richard .... Tallahassee ......Leon
Thomas, Mary..... Apalachicola, ... Franklin
Whaley, Saxton H.. .St. Augustine, .. .St. Johns
Wiles, Oliver F. .. Jacksonville, ....Duval
Wilkins, Rebecca E. West Farm, .....Madison
Williams, Arthur F. Mt. Tabor, ... Columbia
Williams, Luberta Tallahassee, ..... Leon
Williamson, Lula B. .. Opelika, (Ala.





ITALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 39
PREPARATORY SCHOOL.
SECOND YEAR CLASS.
NAME. POST OFFICE. CUNTY.
Austin, William L. .. Key West, ... Monroe
Bacon, Roscoe E.... Jacksonville, ...... Duval
Bradley, Sabina ... Greenville, ..... Madison
Brooks, Gertrude. Tallahassee ...... Leon
Bruce, Minnie E... .. Tuscaloosa, (Ala.)
Carter, Theodore W. Madison, ... Madison
Davis Albert E .. .Apalachicola .... Franklin
Gainer, Kate M. ...Milligan, .... Santa Rosa
Gainer, Lula'C. Milligan. .... Santa Rosa
Hall, Horatio E .. St. Nicholas, ... Duval
Hicks, Julia A. Sanford, .. ..... Orange
Hightower, Richard A. Montgomery, (Ala.)
Hinson, History .... Hinson, ...... Gadsden
Houston, Walter A. Greenwood,. ... Volusia
Jvnlkili. Lucile L. Taiilp-.i, ..... Hilsboro
Jerry, Naomi V .. Tallahassee, ...... Leon
Jones, Joseph N. ... Longwood, ... .. Alachua
Kelker, Joseph I. .. Bagdad,: ..... Santa Rosa
Kenlp, Pearla .. Chipley,. . Washingtgn
Nettles, Lola A. Sanford ....... Orange
Newton, Alice .... .Leesbu.rg, ...... .Lake
O'R0pnke, Henry S. Greensboro," (Ala.)
Patterson William A ... Palatka ......Putnam
Perry, Mary A. .. Tampa, .....Hilsboro
Reed, Fanny .... .Sanford, ....... Orange
Rhodes, Minerva .. Marianna, .... Jackson
Sanders, Alice .. ...Tallahassee, ......Leon
Smith, Daisy Tampa, ...... .Hilsboro
Smith, Eva M ... Tallahassee, .. Leon
Smith Lucy A.. ...Jarrette, .. ...Jefferson
Stevens, Maggie L. .. Tallahassee, ..... .Leon
Stockton, Luna .. De Land ... Volusia
Slt,,ul l. Cynthia. Bradleyton, (Ala.)
Taylor, Jer.:ic- ..... Leesburg, ... .Lake
Weller-s. Edward A. Key West, Monroe
c" '





40 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME. POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Williams, Ella R. .Mt. Tabor, ... Columbia
Williams, Winter ....Pecks ......... Leun
Wooden, Edward C. Orlando, ..... Orange
FIRST YEAR CLASS.
Arrington, Bertha Orlando, ...... Orange
Austin, Nannie. ....Tallahassee, ...Leon
Baker, Abraham H... Marianna, ....... Jackson
Baker, Tellius E. ... Manilla, ....... Madison
Benedee, Harold Jacksonville, ..... Duval
Blackston, Phares E.. uincy .... Gadsden
Blanch, Edna ... Jacksonville, .....Duval
Bradley, Georgia .... Milligan, .. Santa Rosa
Britt, Edward ..... Chipley, ..Washington
Bryant, Mary C .. .Old Town, ......Lafayette
Butler, J Franklin Rockbluff, .......Liberty
Caldwell, William A. St. Augustine ...... St. Johns
Carnes, Alberta ...... Tallahassee,.... Leon
Certain, Elmer W. D. .Jacksonville,...... Duval
Clinton, Henry G. ..... Tampa, ... ...... Hilsboro
Daniels, Henry F. ..... Marianna, .... ..... Jackson
Demps, Amy ...... De Land, .... .Volusia
Dudley, Charles.... .. Marianna, ....Jackson
Edwards, Lulu ....Madison, ..... Madison
Fields, Minnie H. Pine Mount, Suwannee
Gardner, Emma ... ...Tallahassee, .... ..Leon"
Gardner, William ... .Tallahassee,.... .. Leon
Gardner, Minnie...... Tallahassee .....Leon
Greene, Gertrude Sampala, ..... Madison
Greene, Virginia'..... Sampala, ..... .. Madison
Greene, Henry P. .. Delray, ... .... Dade
Hanna, N. H.. Marianna,..... Jackson
Hanna, W. H ........ Marianna,........... Jackson
Harris, Ida M...... Bainbridge, (Ga.)
Harris, Prudence C. Tallahassee, ... Leon
Houston, Josietta Quincy, .... .Gadsden
Houston, Nellie E. River Junction .... Gadsden





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 41
NAME. POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Jackson, Jessie..... Tallahassee,........ Leon
Jenkins, Eliza ........Vernon ...... Washington
Jordan, Philomena .Winter Park, .. Orange.
Lang,Lenora ..... New Smyrna ........ Volusia
Lck ridl.r. Lillian M. .. Milligan ...... Santa Rosa
King, William A.....Ashville, ..... Jefferson
Long, Theodore ... Cottondale, ......Jackson
Mason, William .. Apalachicola, .... Franklin
Massey, John ..... Tallahassee, .... Leon
McDuffy, Henry .. .. Ocala, .. .... Marion
McMullen, Ross T. .Bushnell, Sumter
Mimms, John W.. Quincy, Gadsden
Norton, Carl ...... Tampa, .... Hilsboro
tindar, Minnie ... Tallahassee, Leon
Price, Emma ...... Sunny Hill, ... Leon
Redden, Sarah G.. F. ....Tallahassee, .. .Leon
Richburg, Sallie ... Milton ..... Santa Rosa
Rivers, Allen S .. Apalachicola, ....Franklin
Robinson, Shellie ... Madison ..... Madison
Savage, Franklin .... Tallahassee, .. Leon
Smith, Hortense M.- .. Apalachicola, .... Franklin
Starks, Frances E .Tallahassee .....Leon
Stephen, Josephine Miccosukee, ...... Leon
Steward Fannie E. Tallahassee, ......Leon
Thomas Jodie .. iCiey ..... Washington
Tillman, Wi:liam T. Poit Inglis, ... Marion
Verson, Kate ... .Tallahassee, .. ... Leon
Walker, Beuford C.. Wayside, (Ga.)
Walker, John W. Or.ii ...... Liberty
Watts, Albert J. Jacksonville, ......Duval
Wight, Ruby ..... Tallahassee, .... Leon
Williams Andrew, Columbia City, Columbia
Williams, Juanita J. Tallahassee, .. ..... Leon
Williams, Mattie .... Sunny Hill, ..... Leon
Wilson, Gracie, ... Tallahassee, ....Leon
Wood, George Vernon, Washington





42 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
NAME. POST OFFICE. COUNTY.
Wyche, Josephine Cherry Lake, Madison
Youman, Catherine Tallahassee, Leon
SUMMARY.
NORMAL SCHOOL.
Boys. Girls. Total.
Senior ........... 7 6 I3
Third Year ....... Io (8 28
Second Year ..... 1. 7 9 36
First Year ....... 17 25 42
PREPARATORY SCHOOL.
Second Year ...... 15 23 38
First Year ....... 31 41 72
97 132 229
Total enrollment from Florida ........ 216
Total from other states ............ 13
Florida counties represented ...... 33





TALLAASSEE, FLORIDA. 43
ALUMNI.
Class of 1892.
Jackson, James Henry ....... ... .Tampa, Fla.
Matthews, Wm. Henry Brick-mason, Tallahassee, Fla.
*Parker-Hall, Ida E ........... .. ..
Stewart, Charles Henry U. S. Mail Service, Ocala, Fla.
Tucker, Earnest V .....Physician, Chicago, Ill.
Class of 1894.
.Hargrett, James Hall Teacher, .... Seffner, Fla.
Jackson, Adelaide .. Teacher,. Tallahassee, Fla.
Pope-Johnson, Annie L. Teacher .... Orlando, Fla.
Robinson, Simon Peter. ..... Jacksonville, Fla.
Principal, Stanton Graded School.
Tillman, Robert Lee .Teacher, .. Ashville, Fla.
Tony-NelsonE. Beulah Teacher, St. Augustine, Fla.
Class of 1895.
Evans, Elias G ............ Key West, Fla.
U. S. Naval Service.
Fitzgiles, Annie W. Teacher, .Tallahassee, Fla.
Frazier, Jonas Henry Teacher, Tallahassee, Fla.
Jones, Everett Booker .........Hamilton, N. Y.
Student, Colgate University.
Mitchell-Chell, Hattie L. .Teacher, Jacksonville, Fla..
*Newton, Cornelius .. .... .........
Class of 1896.
Baldwin, Christina Ethel Teacher ..... Sparr, Fla.
Gaskin, Minnie Lee .. Teacher, Pensacola, Fla.
Hall, Henry Franklin ....... Memphis. Tenn.
Richardson, Caroline D. Teacher, .... Leon Co., Fla.
Class of 1897.
Alexander, Edward Isaac Jr. Law Student Chicago, Ill.
* Deceased.
C:'~~~~'-





44 STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL,
Hall, Marietta Elizabeth ........ Tallahassee, Fla.
Teacher, State N. & I. School.
Stanley, King Thomas Physician, Nashville, Tenn.
Class of 1899.
Chaires, George S. ........ St. Augustine, Fla.
Principal, Warden Academy.
*Pratt, Bertha .............. ...
Class of 1900.
Acosta C. I. (Mrs. Daniels), Teacher St. Augustine, Fla.
Coleman-Dixon Tempetance Teacher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kelker, Ethel A. .. .Teacher, .... Bagdad, Fla.
Osgood, Alice B. .. Teacher, ....Madison, Fla.
Welters, Rosa L. Music Teacher, Tallahassee, Fla.
Class of 1901.
Kerr, Carolyn A. .Teacher, .... Eden, Fla.
Class of 1902.
Attaway, Daisy Eulee ....... Tallahassee, Fla.
Assistant Matron, State Normal School.
Garrison, Bessie Marie ... Teacher, Gainesville, Fla.
Hurd, Bettie May ..... Teacher, Pensacola, Fla.
Lester, Herbert Eugene ....... .Eatonville, Fla.
Teacher Hungerferd Academy.
Mitchell, Minnie Lee Teacher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Powell; Eliza Javese Principal Teacher, Marian-na,Fla..
Small, Phoebe A. (Mrs. Floyd), .... Statesboro, Ga.
Whitehead, Anthony J. Teacher, New Augustine, Fla.
Class. of 1903.
bioyd, Willee E .......Teacher,.......... Sanford, Fla.
Davis, Frances V. N. Teacher,.. Green Cove Springs, Fla.
Davis, Julia M ....... Teacher,........... Leon Co., Fla.
Hopkins, Mamie A... .Teacher,.......... Leesburg, Fla.
Hopps, John L....Contractor and Builder, Live Oak, Fla.
James, Susie E...... Teacher,........ Jacksonville, Fla.
* Deceased.
.:\





TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA. 45
Jamieson, Mary E... Teacher,........... Eatonville, Fla.
Jackson-Green, Josie G. Teacher,..West Palm Beech, Fla,
Kershaw, Albert J... Medical Student, .. Nashville, Tenn.
Lang, Theresa I. ....Teacher, ..... Key West, Fla.
Mizell, Bertha M.... Teacher, .......... Lake City, Fla.
Reynolds, Lillian C. .Teacher, ...... New Symna, Fla.
Stiles, Geneva L. ....Teacher, ........Fernandina, Fla.
White, Isham A. ..................... Tallahassee, Fla.
Teacher, State Normal & Industrial School.





INDEX.
PAGE.
A dm mission ..***........... **************.................... 11
Algebra......................................................21
Alumni Association ......................................... 6
A lum ni R oster ........... .. ................................ 43
A rithm etic ...........* .... ....................................21
B iology ....** ...**********..................................20
Black .m thing .............. .............................. 29
Board of Education ................................ 5
B ookkeeping ............... *....********** ** ............... 24
Calendar ..... .. ............................. 4
Carpentry and Cabinet-making .............................28
Chemistry ......... 9.................................
C ivics ............... .................... ...24
Commercial Geography .................................... 2
C om position ....... .. ..................................... 22
Cooking *. .................................................. 30
Ccurse of Study (Tabular View) ... ... ............... 17
Courses, Descriptive Statement of .*.........................
Aacdemic Courses ....... ........................... 9
Mechanical Courses ......................... 26
Agricultural Courses ....-.....*................ ... 33
D ab y ing .....................................................1,33
Daib yingt * 3 3
D ressm making .............. ...................................3
English .................................... ............... 22
Expense .......................... ........................ 15
Faculty and Officers ......................................... 6
Faculty Committees .......................................... 7
General Information ........................................ 2
G eology .....................................................20
G eom etry .................................................... 2I
Grammar .. .................................................. 22
History, American ......................................... 24
H history, English ............................................ 22
History and Location .. ........................ ..............8





PAGE,
Laboratories -...*....12................................... 2
L atin .. .. .............................. .23
Laundering .*. .*...................................... 30
Library and Reading Room .................................12
Literary Societies ..........-...... ........................ 13
Literature....................................................23
Manual Training ...... ..... .......................... 29
Mathematics ... ..............................................21
Mechanical Drawing ...... ........................... 28
Military Drill .. ....................................13
Millinery ....................................................31
Music --.............................................25
N ature Study ...............................................20
Nurse Training .. ................................ ............32
Opportunity to Reduce Expenses ......................... 15
Organization ..... ........ ..................... 8
P painting .....................................................29
Pedagogy ...................................................23
Physics .................. ....................................r9
Physiology .................................................. 20
P lain Sew ing ................................................ 3I
Printing .....................................28
Promotion .... ...... ......... ..... ....... ............. 33
R leading ......................................................24
Regulations .................................................. i
Religious Services ...1.................3.........
Rhetoricals .......................................13
S cien ce .. ....................................... 19
Spelling ............................... ..................... 24
Students, Catalogue of ..................................... 35
Suggestions .................................................. 6
Support .. .... ... ................ ...... .............. ..9
Tailoring ..................... ........ ....... .30
Trigonom etry .... .*.. *.... ................................ 22
T trustees .................................................... .5
U uniform s ................... ......3........................ I3
W heelwrighting ............................................29
Zoology ..................................... .20















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