• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Calendar 1907
 Board of control
 Faculty and officers, 1906-490...
 Faculty and committees
 Organization
 Support
 Schedule of academic courses
 Descriptive statement of the academic...
 Descriptive statement of the mechanical...
 Descriptive statement of the agricultural...
 Class lists - 1906-1907
 Alumni register
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Twentith Annual Catalogue 1906-1907; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Twentith Annual Catalogue 1906-1907; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students, Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students (FAMU)
Normal School Press
Affiliation: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publisher: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Publication Date: 1907
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000089
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2662
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PALMM Version

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Calendar 1907
        Page 2
    Board of control
        Page 3
    Faculty and officers, 1906-4907
        Page 4
    Faculty and committees
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Organization
        Page 7
    Support
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Schedule of academic courses
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Descriptive statement of the academic courses
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Descriptive statement of the mechanical courses
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Descriptive statement of the agricultural courses
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Class lists - 1906-1907
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Alumni register
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Index
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text










., .7
TWENTIETH
ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF
THE
FLORIDA STATE NORMAL
AND
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
"Colored Normal School "''
AT TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
I .
FOR THE S('CHOOL YEAR 1906-1907
WITH
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1907-1908
Normal Sch:,r,l Press
Tallalih ee
1. -





CALENDAR
1907
SEPT. 28, Saturday, Boarding Department Opens
SEPT. 30, Monday
Entrance Examinations
OCT. 1, Tuesday
OCT. 2, Wednesday, Fall Term Begins
DEC. 24, Tuesday, Fall Term Ends
DEC. 26, Thursday, Winter Term Begins
1908
MAR. 14, Saturday, Winter Term Ends
MAR. 17, Tuesday, Spring Term Begins
MAY 22, Friday, Anniversary of Literary Societies
MAY 23, Saturday, Educational and Farmers Conference
MAY 24, Sunday, Sermon to Graduating Class
MAY 25, Monday, Class Night Exercises
MAY 26, Tuesday, Anniversary of Preparatory School
MAY 27, Wednesday, Commencement Exercises
MAY 27, Wednesday, Biennial Meeting of the Alumni
I





BOARD OF CONTROL
HON. N. P. BRYAN, Chairman ..--.--.._ .------.---- Jacksonville
HON. P. K. YONGE___ _._....------.-.....-- ----..----.Pensacola
HON. A. L. BROWN ____. .---------------------... ...----. Eustis
HON. T. B. KING ---.------- .-- ....- -- ------------.-------Arcadia
HON. J. C. BAISDEN--------------------------- --------Live Oak
HON. J. G"KELLUM, Secretary -----------_--.. Tallahassee





FACULTY AND OFFICERS
1906-1907
NATHAN B. YOUNG, A. M., President
Ethics, Economics, Pedagogy
F. C. JOHNSON, B. S., Supervisor Mechanical Department
Manual Training, Physics, Bookkeeping
Miss MARY E. MELVIN, Preceptress
English, History
W. H. A. HOWARD, A. B., Commandant
Painting, Mathematics
GEORGE M. SAMPSON, A. M., Secretary
Mathematics
(To Be Supplied) ---------
Agriculture
CRAWFORD D. MENAFEE, Farm Superintendent
Practical Agriculture
- W. H. CRUTCHER, Assistant Superintendent
Dairying
Mss HATTIE E. NEWBERN, B. Pd.,
English Plain Sewing
Miss DAISY E. ATTAWAY,
Geography, English, Arithmetic
MISS ELIZA J. POWELL,
Geography, English, Arithmetic
JULIAN L. BROWN, Assistant Commandant
Printing
EVERETT B. JONES, B. S.,
Science
T. S. JOHNSON,
Blacksmithing, Wheelwrighting
ANATOLE E. MARTIN,
Tailoring
CHESTER A. COLES,
Carpentry, Freehand and Mechanical Drawin
MISS J. V. HILYER, Matron
Nurse Training, Housekeeping
' 2





MISS FANNIE A. THOMPSON,
Cooking
MRS. ELIZA A. JOHNSON,
Millinery
MISS JULIA A. TOWNSEND, A. B.
Instrumental Music
MISS CELIA BRADLEY,
Launde ring
MRS. ELIZABETH F. MAYS,
Housekeeper
RICHARD A. HIGHTOWER (Student)
President's Secretary
FACULTY COMMITTEES
Prudential Committee
NATHAN B. YOUNG, Chairman W. H. A. HOWARD
G. M. SAMPSON, Secretary Miss MARY E. MELVIN
FREDERICK C. JOHNSON CRAWFORD D. MENAFEE
Managers of Boarding Department
NATHAN B. YOUNG, Chairman, MISS HILYER
CRAWFOD D. MENAFEE, MRS.- MAYS
Committee on Entrance Examinations
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman F. C. JOHNSON
MIss E. J. POWELL
Literary Societies
A. E. MARTIN, Chairman T. S. JOHNSON
MISS E. J. POWELL MISS D. E. ATTAWAY
Commencement Exercises
. B. YOUNG, Chairman G. M. SAMPSON
MISS TOWNSEND





Farmers' Conference
C. D. MENAIEE, Chairman W. H. CRUTCHER
MISS F. A. THOMPSON
Athletics
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman C. A. COLES
J. L. BROWN
"Collegz Arms"
J. L. BROWN, Chairman W. H. A. HOWARD
MISS D. E. ATTAWAY
Music
MISS J. L. TOWNSEND, Chairman MISS H. E. NEWBERN
W. H. A. HOWARD G. M. SAMPSON
Religious Organizations
C. A. COLES, Chairman -W. H. A. HOWARD
MIss M. E. MELVIN
Student Organizations
F. C. JOHNSON, Chairman T. S. JOHNSON
MISS J. V. HILYER
Reception of Visitors
W. H. A. HOWARD, Chairman MISS J. V. HILYER
MISS E. 0. PAIGE MRS. E. A. JOHNSON
Course of Study
G. M. SAMPSON, Chairman F. C. JOHNSON
N. B. YOUNG MISS J. L. TOWNSEND
MISS E. J. POWELL
,~





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
ORGANIZATION
The work of the school is organized into three depart-
ments-Academic, Mechanical, and Agricultural.v
The Academic Department, in addition to a good sec-
ondary course of h:l.- has a preparatory grade for
the benefit of those who are not quite ready to enter
upon the regular course, and also a two years course
for teachers.
The Mechanical and Agricultural departments offer
instruction in seventeen industries (see courses), and all
students are required to take one or more of them.
The general purpose of the school is to prepare'the
students to take up the work of life before them with
good hope and with skill. To this end the school has
been reorganized and enlarged along all lines, and the
equipment and facilities made among the best in the
South.
HISTORY AND LOCATION
The school was established in 1887. By constitutional
provision and legislative enactment it was located at
Tallahassee, with an annual appropriation of $4,000
made for its maintenance.
By action of the State Board of Education, ex-officio
Board of Trustees, it was opened October 5, 1887, in
charge of T. de S. Tucker, Principal, and T. V. Gibbs,
Assistant Principal, with an attendance of fifteen pupils
In 1891, the school, having outgrown its accomoda-
tions in the city, was moved out to Highwood, in the
suburbs of Tallahassee. By Legislative enactment in 1905
the school passed under the management of the State
Board of Control.
7





CATALOGUE OF
The school has a beautiful location within easy reach
of the city. The grounds and buildings are lighted by
gas, supplied with water from the city water works, and
connected by telephone with the city. Comfortable and
convenient dormitory accommodations have been provid-
ed. These dormitories are managed by the faculty,
and, except by spatial permission of the president, all
students not residents of Tallahassee will be required
to board at the school.
SUPPORT
The School is supported by annual appropriations from
the Federal and State Governments. It was established
-and prior to 1891 maintained-by the State as a train-
ing school for teachers. This feature of the work of
the school is still maintained.
ADMISSION
Applicants for admission to this school must be 16
years old, and must have a fair knowledge of arithmetic,
and English grammar, descriptive geography, and must
also be able to read intelligently and to write legibly.
Applicants must be of good moral character, and if from
another institution of learning, must bring a certificate
of honorable dismission. The registration fee is one
dollar ($ 1.00.).
REGULATIONS
The regulations of the school are few and simple ap-
pealing to the student's self-respect and personal re-
8





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
l,,-,i-ililitfv. All loafing on the streets, or around
places of public or questionable character is prohibited.
Students are not allowed to use intoxicating liquors,
or tobacco in any form.
Profanity, playing cards, and everything of an im-
moral tendency is strictly f.i:,; 1 i -!!. Keeping, or us-
ing fire arms on the premises is forbidden, also hunting
*i i!'i',l the school year.
All punishment is by demerits as follows: five de-
merits make one warning or mark; ten demerits, two
warnings or marks; fifteen demerits in any one sess-
ion suspend from school,. -' u.;-,'l- l students may-be
reinstated at the ii--!-;:.t!! of the Prudential Commit-
tee, or of the president.
No efforts will be spared to make the dormitory life
of the students healthful and uplifting.
. All l:i.iol.Clrii2' will be done in the school's laundry,
and students will not be allowed to have laundering
done ei -\-,.l.-.,:. All clothing must be marked with in-
delible ink.
Each student should provide himself with
4 Towels,
3 Sheets,
3 Pillow-cases,
1 BEla.neiit.
1 White Spread,
1 C nof.,rt or Qniilt.
3 Table Napkins,
A Bible, and a Dictionary.
All breakage !'!llst ibe p:id in cash.
Y' l !i' women should bring overshoes and waterproofs.
Parents anl guardians are advised, in making remit-
tan:ee- for students, to send money by postal money or-
der, express money order, or-registered letter direct to
the PrIe ilt- t. He will not be responsible for money sent
t.





CATALOGUE OF
to students. All requests for students to come home or
to be withdrawn must be made direct to the President.
Laboratories
The school is especially fortuate in its physical and
chemical laboratories. The following statement gives
some idea of their equipment.
The physical laboratory contains apparatus for the il-
lustration of the properties of matter, and the principles
of dynamics, simple machines, liquids, pneumatics,
magnetism, electricity, sound, heat, and light.
The school is now provided with a thoroughly up-to-
date chemical laboratory. There are threat long table con-
taining 48 lockers and drawers at which 24 students can
work easily at the same time. A full set of reagent'bot-
tles with the chemicals is provided for each student,
and the convenient sinks and gas connections greatly
simplify the problem of individual student work. Twen-
ty complete sets of apparatus designed for use in connec-
tion with. "Romsen's Briefer Course" are in the labor
tory, also a moderate supply of chemicals. Delicate bal-
ances are on hand for exact work in analysis. An ample
hood enables the student to perform experiments with
the poisonous gases with impunity. In fact, it may be
said that ample facilities are provided for the students
to acquire a working knowledge of elementary chemis-
try.
The biological laboratory contains the following appa-
ratus:
4 Dissecting Tables; 2 Compound Microscopes; 5 Dis-
secting Microscopes; 3 sets pf Mounted Slides, Vegetable
Zoological, Physiological; 1g Dissecting Sets; 1 Human
Skeleton; 1 Model Human Eye.
10





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
In addition to these there are some specimens of ani-
mals of the immediate vicinity collected by students.
Most of the material for class room work is procured
from near-by places as being more economical and at the
same time more beneficial to the students.
Library and Reading Rooms
Mr. Andrew Carnegie has given the school a magnif-
icent library building. When completed and stocked with
books and periodicals it will be one of the best in the South.
Religious Services
Although tne school is non-sectarian, it is intensely
Chlri stain. The religious life of the school isallthatcan
l: de-sired, even by the most carefill parent. In addi-
tion to the daily devotions, preaching, and Sunday School
services on the campus, there is an active Y. M. C. A.
for the young men, and Y. P. S. C. E. for all students
ani teachers.
Literary Societies
There are four active literary socieies; the Acme
Literary Society, and the Douglass L el:latiing Society for
the young men, the T. deS. Tucker and the Emma
Garrett Literary Societies for the y,:,uiig women. These
organizations meet weekly.
Public Rhetoricals
The last Friday night in each month is given to public
rhetorical exercises. The students are thus trained in
public declamation.
11





CATALOGUE OF
Military Drill
As a matter of discipline and physical training, the
young men of the school are given daily military drill.
This organization helps the officers of the school to lie-p
good order among the youngmmn, and at the same time
gives the students that respect for authority that is nec-
essary for good citizenship.
Uniforms
As a matter of economy and of good appearance, the
students are required to wear a uniform. The-young wo-
men's suit is made. of blue percale and costs two dollars,
($2.). For spring and fall, they wear a blue ready-to-wear
hat. The young men's uniform is made of blue flannel
and with the cap costs ten dollars and fifty cents ($10.50)
These uniforms are made in the school's shop and are
sold at actual cost. The patrons will therefore not buy
citizen i's suits for their children, but -end money to the
President with which to buy the above uniform suits. Upon
application, samples of the girl's uniform will be sent.
Students bringing money above their immediate needs
to the school are required to deposit it with the President
subject to their order.
Board must be paid monthly in advance. All bills run
from the first of the month.
All non-residents must board at the school, unless ex-
cused by the President.
Expenses
There is no charge for tuition. The following is an es-
timate of the necessary expense for the full session:
12





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Board and roam rent (including lights and fuel)
$7.-00 per month (35 weeks) ...-- ___.- ------$57.25
Washing, etc., $1.00 per month ..-.. .. -8.00
Booksand stationery, about ..-_____.----------5.00
Incidental fee (for ordinary medicine, not med-
ical attention) -- -__-_____-------- -------1.00
Total ---..--.. ------ $71.25
Opportunity to Reduce Expenses
A limited number of earnest young men and women will
be allowed to work out part of their board and laundry
expenses. Applications for this privilege must be made in
writing and accepted before arrival. All extra work per-
formed by students will be rated at five cents per hour,
and placed to their credit.
Students who have the privilege of working out a
part of their expenses, will be required to perform six-
teen hours work each week.
All money earned by students in performance of labor
in the institution will be retained to be used only for
defraying their expenses while in attendance here at
school.
All students are required to work one hour a day (or its
equivalent) for the school without remuneration.
Alumni Association
It is the policy of the school to keep in close and sym-
'pathetic touch with its graduates. The alumni have or-
ganized and are doing good work for their alma mater.
Mr. E. B. Jones, Tallahassee, Fla., is the president,
and Miss A. B. Osgood, Madison, Fla., is the secreta-
ry, and Mrs. Annie Fitzgiles-Mancher, Live Oak, Fla.,
is the treasurer.
13





CATALOGUE OF
Suggestions
Students arriving on the trains are advised to notify
the school authorities of the date and schedule time of
their arrival. They can, on arrival at the station, easily
walk to the institution, as the buildings are in plain
view of the depots.
14





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
SCHEDULE O7 ACADEMIC COURSES
FALL TERM WINTER TERM SPRING TERM
GRAMMAR SHOOL
C CLASS
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
Geography Geography Geography
Grammar Grammar Grammar
Reading Reading Reading
B CLASS
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
Geography Geography Geography
Grammar Grammar Grammar
Reading Reading Reading
A CLASS
Arithmetic Arithmetic Arithmetic
U. S. History U. S. History U. S. History
Grammar Grammar Grammar
Reading Reading Reading
HIGH SCHOOL
1st YEAR
Algebra Algebra Algebra
Civics Civics Civics
Grammar Physiology Physiology
Literature Grammar Grammar
Literature Literature
2nd YEAR
Algebra Algebra Geometry
English History Geometry Botany
Literature English History Latin or
Latin or Literature Gen. History
15





CATALOGUE OF
General History Latin or
General History
3rd YEAR
Geometry Geometry Geometry
Physics Physics Physics
Latin or Latin or Latin or
Rhe oric Rhetoric Rhetoric
SENIOR SCHOOL
SENIOR B
Plane Trig-onometry Plane Trigonometry Surveying
Pedagogy Pedagogy Pedagogy
Latin or Latin or Latin or
U. S. Constitutional U. S. Constitutional Physical
History History Geography
SENIOR A
Peda'gogics Pedagogics Pedagogics
Ethics Economics Astronomy
Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry
Courses in vocal music, penmanship, freehand draw-
ing, orthography, and nature study will be given in all
the classes of the Grammar School.
Courses in vocal music and freehand drawing will
be given the 1st Year High School.
Two lessons a week in agriculture will be given the
2nd Year High School during the entire year.
Two lessons a week in book-keeping will be given
the 3rd Year High School during the entire year.
All italicized words are for half term.
16





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
SCHEDULE OF INDUSTRIAL COU2SES
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
MEN WOMEN
Manual Training (B & C. Classes) Plain Sewing
Trades Training (A Class) Cooking
Freehand Drawing Laundering
HIGH SCHOOL
Trades Training or Plain Sewing
Agriculture Cooking
Mechanical Drawing Laundering
SENIOR SCHOOL
Trades-Training or Dressmaking
Agriculture Millinery
Mechanical Drawing Freehand Drawing
17
* ~ ~ ~ ~~~~l





CATALOGUE OF
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
ACADEMIC COURSES
The work of this department covers eight years, distrib -
uted through the following schools: Grammar School,
three years; High School, three years; and Se n i or
School, two years. The plan is to make it equivalent to
that of a first class secondary school in every particular,
with special stress on English, science and pedagogy.
Diplomas will be given only to those who finish the
prescribed work of the three schools.
Science
The growing importance of the sciences in industrial,
commercial, and professional life makes it necessary
that special stress be placed on this line of academic
work. For a correct appreciation of nature, some ex-
act knowledge must be had, as well as a natural or ac-
quired habit of observation. If the courses here out-
lined suffice to make of the students careful, thought-
ful, critical observers, much will have been accom-
plished.
CHEMISTRY-One year, at present, is given to the study
of this subject. The plan is for the student to acquire
in the first two terms of the year a working knowledge
of elementary inorganic chemistry. In the last term
all young men will be given, as far as possible, the princi-
ples of agriculture chemistry, and the young women in-
dustrial chemistry as applied in their line of work.
A large part of the work is in the form of experiments
actually performed by the students, for which our new
laboratory affords excellent facilities. Records of the
experiments are made by the students from day to day,
18





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
and the correctness, fullness, and appearance of these
records determine largely the student's class standing.
It is on the basis of individual work, and to obtain cred-
it the experiments must be performed. The student's
work will be supplemented by lectures and demonstra-
tions by the instructor.
TEXT-BOOKS : Newell's Descriptive C1,, it, i.ti and the
reports of the Association of Official Agricultural Chem-
ists.
PHYSICS-The work in this course lasts one year and
covers the ground of general physics. Special stress
will be placed on mechanics, dynamics, and the physics
of farm implements.
The course will be conducted by lectures, recitations,
and laboratory work. The school has a good supply of
apparatus for laboratory work.
TEXT-BOOK: Wentworth and Hill' s Physics.
BIOLOGY-This general course embraces the subjects
of human anatomy, physiology and hygiene, one year;
Zoology, one term and botany, one term.
PHYSIOLOGY-It is the aim in this course to make
this subject as practical as possible. Therefore, the
human body is studied as a working organism and its
various functions are worked out by scientific observa-
tion and experiment. For this purpose, the dissection
of an animal and the microscopic examination of sec-
tions form a part of the work. Hygiene is especially
emphasized.
TEXT-BOOK: Coleman's Elements of Physiology.
ZOOLOGY-Following the study of the human body it
is intended that this course should acquaint the student
more br-'l.,aly with the various forms of animal life.
The life hist:,ry, habits, and the various stages of de-
velopment of useful animals claim the attention and
19





CATALOGUE OF
study. The domestic animals, and the invertebrates of
economic entomology divide the time.
TEXT-BOOK: Colton's Descriptive and Practical Zoology.
BOTANY-This course is given in spring term. The
bulk of the work is done in the field. It is devoted to the
different types of soil their preparation for plants; the
kinds and uses of fertilizers ; and the anatomy and phy-
siology of plants. .
TEXT-BOOK: Bailey's Elements of Botany.
Mathematics
The purpose of this course is to give to the student a
knowledge of mathematical principles and the ability to
use them in actual service in the shop. Stress is laid on
the cultivation of correct habits of thought. The work
is guaged to stimulate independent thought and to pro-
mote confidence in the student of his ability to undertake
successfully more advanced branches. During the year,
lectures will be given on the history of mathematics.
ARITHMETIC Students who e n t e r the Grammar
School are supposed to have a fair knowledge of the
fundamental principles : addition, subtraction, multipli-
cation, division, and factoring. The work is meant to
begin at factoring, continuing through fractions, meas-
ures, percentage, and interest. The course is arranged
for two years.
TEXT-BOOK: Young and Jackson's Arithmetic.
ALGEBRA-In this course, which covers five terms, the
aim is, not alone to acquaint the student with a knowl-
edge of the subject through quadratics, but to develop
facility in grasping combinations, accuracy in state-
ment, and generalization for arithmetical methods.
TEXT-BOOK: Well's Academic Algebra.
20





STATE NORMAL'SCHOOL
GEOMETRY- This course extends to solids, giving
special attention to original problems and to the appli-
cation of the principles in. mensuration.
The following points are always held in view: the
process of reasoning; the separation of numerical rela-
tion; a clear notion of magnitude; the development of
individual power.
TEXT-BOOK: Philips and Fisher's Elements of Geome-
try.
TRIGONOMETRY-This course extends through the so-
loution of the oblique triangle, involving elements of
plane surveying.
TEXT-BOOK: Well's Complete Plane Trigonometry.
English
GRAMMAR-The fall term will be devoted to a thor-
ough and and systematic review of English grammar.
TEXT-BOOK: Arnold and Kittridge's The Mother
Tongue. Books I. and II.
COMPOSITION-During the winter and spring terms,
students will be required to write at least two themes a
week, for the most part based upon the American au-
thors and their works, the aim being to acquaint the
students with American literature and at the same time
to give them drill in composition. Part of the time will
be devoted to letter writing.
TEXT-BOOK: Lockwoods and Emerson's Composition
and Rhetoric.
HISTORY-The first half of the year will be devoted to
the study of English history. The aim of this course
will be to acquaint the students with the important Eng-
lish institutions and customs and with the movements
that have taken place in England, tracing their influences
21





CATALOGUE OF
upon the history of this country. Students will be re-
quired to consult other authorities on assigned subjects
and to hand in written reports. This course will also
serve as preparation for the study of English literature
which follows. This fact will be kept in mind through-
out the course.
TEXT-BOOK: Higginson and Channing's English History
for Americans.
LITERATURE. -The last half of the year will be devot-
ed to a study of some of the masterpieces of noted poet-
ry and prose writers of English.
TEXT-BOOK: Painter's American Literature and
Painter's English Literature.
Latin
The course in Latin embraces, besides the study of
Cicero's Catalinarian Orations and Vergil'sEneid, class
study of the Gracchi to the establishment of the empire.
As far as possible, the student is made to compare Latin
and English words formed from the same root. It is
judged advisable to delay the study of Latin until the
student has reached the 2nd year High School because by
that time, he has laid a foundation in English grammar
which will enable him to grasp the Latin more readily
and hence make more progress than by taking the two
contemporaneously.
High School II. will be required to take Latin or gen-
eral history. High School III. will be required to take
Latin or advanced English literature. Senior B will
be required to take Latin or constitutional history.
TEXT-BOOK: Collar and Daniel's First Latin Book and
Allen and Greenough's Vergil's AEneid
Pedagogy, Econmics, and Ethics
The .work in pedagogy covers the First and Second
22





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
years of the Senior School and its object is to prepare, in
a practical way, teachers for the common schools of the
state. The first year is devoted to the study of the theory
of education and school teaching. The second year is
given to teaching in the training school under the eye
of a' critic teacher. Sufficient attention is given to
the history of education to give the student teacher a
fair knowledge of the great educational movements and
leaders and to acquaint him with the leading educational
classics. .
TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS: Appleton's Eil,, t I; i,,nf1,
Series; White's School Government, White's Pedagogy
White's Art of Teachiug; Salisbury's Theory ('( Tac ;,l ig ;
Monroe's Educational Ideals; McMurry's General Method
and The Method of the Recitation. The students are re-
quired to read the current educational literature, a great
deal of which comesto the school's library.
The work in ethics and economics is based upon the
outlines given in the following texts: Davis' Elements of
Ethics and Ely and Wickers' Elementary Economics.
Bookkeeping
The work in bookkeeping is intended to give the stu-
dents a knowledge of the ordinary methods of transact-
iig business and of making business records.
TrEXT-BOOK: 20th Century Bookkeeping and Office Prac-
tice.
Geography
The purpose of this course is to give the student a
practical knowledge of the earth as the home of man
and to acquaint him with his environments.
TEXT-BOOK: Tarr and McMurry's Geography.
23





'CATALOGUE OF
Ancient History
High School II will be required to take Latin or An-
cient History. The aim of this course is to give the stu-
dents an opportunity .to acquaint themselves with the
great steps in human progress, the discoveries, ploliti-
cal and social changes, advances in thought, and skill
that have carried forward civilization and the better-
ment of man.
TEXT-BOOK: Myer's Ancient History.
American History
In addition to giving the students a knowledge of the
leading men and events of this country, the plan of
the course is to have them so appreciate the institu-
tions of their country as to become patriotic and law-
abiding citizens.
TEXT-BOOK: Montgomery's Leading Facts in American
History.
Reading and Spelling
These subjects are given systematic attention. The
aim is to have the student acquire the ability of rapid
and accurate interpretation of the written page, and to
spell and pronounce the words of his increasing vocab-
ulary correctly.
TEXT-BOOK: Hazen's Graded Speller.
Music
For a number of years in the past the pupils in piano
forte worked along a certain line without being graded
24





STATE NOIRMAL SCHOOL
but the school now offers to its pupils a four years course
of systematic piano forte work by which the students are
to be graded and promoted.
The course is so planned as to enable a student to play
good music well, and with addition of the Elements of
Harmony" to be able to enter a conservatory after
having completed the work here laid down. At the com-
pletion of this course, certificates of proficiency will be
given.
'The students in music are required to attend the recit-
als which are held once during each month. These ex-
ercises are of two-fold value ; in giving pupils practice
in playing before others and in granting them the rare
opportunity of listening to well prepared music from the
best composers.
Students taking music must practice at least one hour
each day.
Instruction is given at the reasonable charge of two
dollars and twenty-five cents ($2.25) for eight lessons
of twenty minutes each. This fee also includes the use
of the music and instrument for practice.
FIRST GRADE
TECHNICS:
Major scales in one and two octaves, hands seiparatt,
tonic triads in close position.
STUDIES:
Landon's Foundation Studies; Matthew's Graded
Studies, Book I; National Graded Studies; Emery's
Foundation Studies; Koehler op. 162 and 190; easy com-
positions of Behr, Gurlitt, Bruneur, Lichner, etc.
SECOND GRADE
TECHNICS:
Major scales in three octaves. Harmonic minor scales
25





CATALOGUE OF
in one and two octaves, hands separate. Broken major
and minor triads.
STUDIES:
Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II, (1st half) ; Spind-
ler, op. 273, Books I and II; Loeschorn, op. 66, Book I
and II; Gurlittop. 82, Books I and II; Spindler op. 44.
Selections from Merkel, Lange, Schumann, Clementi,
Lichner, Ritter and others.
THIRD GRADE
TECHNICS:
Major and harmonic minor scales in four and five
note rhythms. Study and broken triads, (continued).
STUDIES:
Matthew's Graded Studies, Book II, (2nd half) ; Burg-
muller. op. page 100, Books I and II; Koehler, op. page
157.
PIECES:
Selections from Kullah, 62; Grade op. 36 ; Mozart, No.
I, Low; Lichner, op. 49; Emery, Spindler, and others.
FOURTH GRADE
TECHNICS:
Major and melodic minor scales in six and eight note
rhythms.
Arpeggios formed from diminished seventh chords in
various rhythms.
STUDIES:
Matthew's Studies, Book 3; Koehler, op. 130; Heller,
op. 47; Czerny, op. 636 and op. 718.
PIECES-Wilm, op. 12: Schytte, op. 66; Bohm, op. 327,
No. 2; selection from Haydn, Kerchner, Whilenhaupt,
Heller, Scharwencka, Schumann, and Lack.
26





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Vocal Music
The purpose of this course is to give the student an
elementary knowledge of sight singing.
The student is first allowed to sing by note and is led
oobserve differences in pitch, tone, and relative dura-
on of sounds made. This is followed by the use of
otid names and an accurate distinction of each. Dai-
ydrills are given. After this has been accomplished,
study of various keys begins.
The course is given to all members of the grammar
lasses. High school and senior school students are
allowed to join the Musical Union where they receive
special instruction in sight reading and the l:-.-st stand-
rd musical works. The Solfeggio system is used.
27





CATALOGUE OF
DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT OF THE
MECHANICAL COURSES
The work of the mechanical department has two pha
es: (1) Manual Training, (2) Training in the specific
work of the various industries the school has in opera
tion.
The manual training precedes the industrial training
and prepares the student both mentally and physicalii
to perform the work at the trades more satisfactorily b;,
giving him correct mechanical ideals and a certain a
mount of skill which can be put to immediate use in hi
later work. This is in addition to the well known edu
national value of manual training.
Constant effort is made to correlate the work of th
academic and the mechanical departments.
Each department helps the other, and the student i
made to feel the truth that the two departments arl
not separate e and distinct, but are component parts o
one great whole.
Whenever possible in the mechanical courses the stu
dent makes his own drawings and works from them.
Each student is expected to spend at least two year
in any division to which he may be assigned.
Letters certifying the nature and amount of work done
in each division will b3 given to the student by the in-
structor upon application.
Manual Training
This course is in the form of work in wood and iro
and is given to all young men of the grammar school
except those studying agriculture. The first year's
work comprises the construction of the various article
from the student's own working sketches, bringing i
28





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
the use of the or..linary \\,:o-,l dwi.l j' tools: the plane.
saw hammer, chisel etc. The early-part of the second
year is devoted to bent iron work and tha latter part to
elementary blacksmithing.
Mechanical Drawing
The work in mechanical drawing is designed to give
the student such knowledge of the subject as will en-
'able him to make correct working drawings for his own
use in the shop and to read the drawings and blue
prints made by others.
The course begins with. simple working drawings
which are made from free hand sketches. The sketch-
es are made and the measurements taken from objects
by the student himself. Later the student draws from
the sketches of others and finally takes up the work of
designing.
.As far as possible the class of objects from which the
student drawsris determined by the industry at which
he works; for instance, the drawing of the young men
who work at carpentry tends toward the planning of
buildings, that of the young men working at wheel-
wrighting is directed toward carriage drafting and
design.
Printing
In the first year the student learns the cases, com-
position, care of press, care of type, names and uses of
printers' materials.
Lectures on job work, transferring of matter, use of
press, and correcting proofs take up the second year.
Making up newspaper forms, job work in colors
29





CATALOGUE OF
general press and book work is the work of the third
year.
Most of the printed matter used by the school is the
work of the young men of this division.
The setting up of the school paper "The College
Arms," is a part of the regular work.
Carpentry and Cabinet-Making
This course is intended to give the student an elemen-
tary knowledge of house and shop carpentry and cabi-
net making.
It begins with elementary bench work, introducing
the student to the more simple tools and the prominent
characteristics, of timber. This is followed by a study
of house building, beginning with framing and then
taking up door and window frame construction and out
side finishing, floor laying, and inside finishing, stair-
building.
The foregoing takes up the first two years. During
the third and fourth years the time is occupied by cab-
inet-making, the study of the first principles of the
trades which, together with carpentry, are employed in
the erection of buildings, and a bird's eye view of the
work of the architect in their design and in the superin-
tendence of their construction.
Throughout the course it is planned that the student
shall, as far as possible, actually go through the various
processes about which he hears from the instructor in
his talks to the class.
Painting
Instruction in this division includes a study of the
painter's brushes and other tools; paints and the differ-
ent classes of painting; colors and their harmony and
80





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
contrasts; interior and exterior house-painting; wagon,
and carriage painting; besides glazing, cutting, frosting,
staining, and embossing glass; sign-writing and fresco-
painting.
Blacksmithing and Wheelwrighting
BLACKSMITHING- The student in the first year is taught
to make fires and the use of blacksmithing tools in the
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting,
punching, cutting off, scarfing and welding of staples,
hooks, collars, and chains.
The second year is given to the ironing of wheel-
barrows, push carts, and wagons and the welding and
setting of wagon tires.
In the third year the work of the previous year is con-
tinued and the study of horse-shoeing is begun.
Horse-shoeing and general repairing constitutes the
work of the fourth year.
The above work will be done from blue prints as far
as possible.
WHEELWRIGHTING-In this course exercises in planing,
nailing, boring, sawing, glueing, and making spokes,
bellows etc. give the student a knowledge of the use of
the bench and general tools of the wheelwright. He is
taught to make and to assemble the parts of wheel-
barrows, push carts, one and two horse farm wagons,
delivery and milk wagons, buggies. and carriages.
,
Tailoring
The aim of this department is to give the young men
such a knowledge of tailoring as well as equip them for
positions as journeymen. Due attention is given to bush-
31





CATALOGUE OF
eling which constitutes a great part of the work of ev-
ery tailor shop.
'his course of study and practice comprises the vari-
ous operations in making coats, vests, and trousers, also
management of shop, economy in cutting, cleaning; re-
pairing, etc.
The system of drafting taught is the John J. Mitchell's
Standard System of Drafting.
Cooking
The work done in this division is practical, special
stress being laid upon the cooking of plain foads.
The first work taken up is the method of making and
caring for th3 fire, the care of the range, closet, sink,
and kitchen utensils. Then comes the making of corn
bread, graham bread, and muffins and the cooking of
vegetables, eggs, and meats. Considerable attention is
given to the making of soups, dressing and cooking
fowls and fish, laying of the table for and serving meals
invalid cooking, canning, preserving, pickling, and des-
serts.
Laundering
The object of this course is to give the young women
thorough training in the art and science of washing and
ironing.
A study is made of water, soap, and alkalies and prac-
tice given in the method of washing and ironing body
and table linen, flannel, silk, and colored articles.
Plain Sewing and Dressmaking
PLAIN _SEWING-This course gives training in the use
32





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
of the needle in the ordinary forms of sewing, such as
basting, overhanding, patching, darning, hemming,
backstitching, felling, gathering, sewing on buttons,
making buttonholes, etc.
A part of the time is given to practice in the operation
of the sewing machine and to drafting, cutting, and
putting together simple garments.
DRESSMAKING-The object of this work is to give a
thorough knowledge of the principles of dressmaking
with as much practice as time will allow. It is valuable
to those who wish to make their own dresses or to sup-
erintend the wcrk. With additional practice it is excel-
lent training for professional dressmaking. Three terms
of three months each are given to this course.
The first term is devoted to the making of unlined
waists and skirts of washable materials. The second
term is given to making skirts and waists of woolen ma-
terials. Outside garments and the matching of stripes
and plaids take up the time in the third term.
Drafting, cutting, and fitting form a part of the work
of each term.
Millinery
Thorough training in the practical and artistic princi-
ples of millinery is the object of this line of work.
The course embodies the drawing of untrimmed hats,
drapery, and bows, making buchram and wire frames
for hats, folding, binding, making bows, fitted and full
facing, puffed edges and practice in applying the prin-
ciples learned to making of hats, bonnets, toques, and
turbans. Instruction in color, form and line is given,
besides talks on the manufacture of straw and felt hats,
ribbon, crape, and silk.
Nurse Training
The nurse training department affords an opportuni-
33





CATALOGUEi OF.'
ty for young women to fit themselves, by practical ex-
perience, in the school's hospital, for the care of the
sick in their homes and elsewhere.
As a means of livelihood nursing stands next to the
profession of medicine.
The course as prescribes in this institution embraces
the following subjects: Anatomy, Physiology, Hygiene,
"Principles of Nursing," and Materia Medica.
The use of hospital appliances, application of baths,
care of wounds, and bandaging.
Kinds and use of disinfectants, administration of
drugs, their doses, and antidotes.
Only young women who are members of the high
school or of the senior school will be admitted, and those
who have completed the high school course or its equiv-
alent are preferred.
34





STATE NXoMAL SCHOOL
DESCRIPTIVE STAT MENT OF THE
AGRICULTURAL COURSES
The school is situated on about 180 acres of land. On
this land live stock, poultry, and various agricultural
p products are raised to teach the students practical farm-
ing in its various phases; such as plans and essential
features of farm buildings, fences, roads, water supply,
and the use and care of farm imple n3nt3.
In connection with the practical agriculture, a course
in theoretical agriculture, running through the -:, 1
year high school is given. The work is so distributed
throughout the years that upon graduation each student
will have a knowledge of the basic principles of agricul-
ture, and will be prepared to give instruction in the pub-
lic schools of the state. Indeed, the needs of the state's
public school teachers is foremost in mind in planning
this course,
Agrononmy
On the large school farm where the grasses, peas, and
other field crops are grown for stock feed, ample facili-
ty is afforded for observation and study of this subject,
Modern machinery is used in the planting, cultivating,
and harvesting of the crops.
Horticulture ;
The school has recently planted an orchard of peach:
es, plums, apples, and oranges as the beginning of an
extended effort in horticulture.
In the care and management of these tr ees, the
Students will have theoretical and practical work in hor-





CATALOGUE OF
ticulture. Pruning, grafting, spraying, and marketing
of fruits will be learned in connection with this work.
Market Gardening
In providing for this, one of the most profitable lines
of agriculture, the school has set aside about four acres
for raising such vegetables as are needed on the grounds
and can be marketed in the town. Students do all of
this work and the most practical and profitable experi-
ence is acquired in the growing of the crops and hand-
l'ng the products.
Poultry and Stock-Raising
The State Experiment Station has called attention to
the fact that stock-raising is a most profitable industry
in Florida. With this in view the school has a poultry
plant, including houses and separate runs and several
varieties of chickens. It has a commodious barn house-
ing the horses, cows, and hogs of the department.
Dairying
This division of the department is carefully provided
for. A laboratory with all the modern apparatus for
mechanical separation of milk, for testing and butter
making, and a large sink and heating apparatus are for
the use of the dairy student. An effort is being made
to replace the old herd with new registered stock, and
-the school now has three thoroughbred Jersey cows and
two heifers, besides several graded Holsteins and Jerseys.
Scoring and judging dairy cattle so that one may be able
to mark the good cow at sight is a part of the student's
work. The department hopes to have soon a modern
36





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
dairy barn where the most cleanly methods can be ob-
served irnJandlins therWilk and its products. .--,
Outline of Course in Agriculture
FIRST YEAR
The different soils; their handling ; origin; and adapta-
tion to various crops.
''Manures and fertilizers. Elementary work in dairy:-
ing ; farm -crops and crop rotation. ,
GUIDE :-Buirdett, Stephens and Hill's Agriculture'for,'
'Beginners.
SECOND YEAR
Systematic study of fruits, fruit harvesting, storing
and marketing.
.Pruning,: grafting, spraying.: plant breeding, and mar-
ket gardening. ;.
GUIDE :-L'L H. Bailey's Tie na'r. ry and' Vegetable
Gardening.
THIRD YEAR
The principles of animal breeding; a study of breed
of the various domestic animals; poultry raising etc.
GUIDE :-Shaw's Veterinary Elements and Animal:
Breeding. .
- FOURTH YEAR. -
' Feeds and feeding iicomposition of feeds and the ef-
fects of the balance ration. .:,
GUIDE:-Henry'S Ftees (oid F6c(,:lil. v -..,
PROMOTION : 'm ''
.,c, A student receiving less than 60 in any subject I aca-.
:! demic or industrial) is conditioned in that subject.
A candidate.for graduation rust remove all cond:litions
"bd balance'all accou nts 'lefoi;e 'receiving a diploma.
. .~~~~~>





Class Lists-1906-1907
SENIOR SCHOOL
A CLASS
Allen, Mary ------- Crescent City Robinson, Theresa R.-Fernaninad
Carter, Dallas_ .._.. ..-Quincy Stanley, Sarah O.-........Sanford
Gilbert, Bednie_ _...-.. Quincy Thompson, Elizabeth M.-_ Quincy
Perry, Cassie M.-----.Fernandina Wilkins, Rebecca .......Madison
B CLASS
Caldwell, ConstanceE.,StAugustine Thomas, Mary E...-.Apalachicola
Lewis, Mary -----...--Tallahassee Whaley, Saxton H. St. Augustine
Mulberry, Andy -.. --.Gainesville Thompson, Ketous ..-.. ... -----
Saunders, Ida--------- Tallahassee Pretoria, South Africa
HIGH SCHOOL
THIRD YEAR
Barnette, Callie D.. -- -- Pinetta Jenkins, Lucile ----.. .Tampa
Boyd, Charles -----W.Palm Beach Jenkins, William V. __Apalachicola
Carter, Thomas W. ---Tallahassee Lott, Melissa _-,.__---Live Oak
Daniels, Frederick O..-- Orlaudo Martin, Ethel A ..----Tallahassee
Gildersleeve, Eloise 0 ---------- Nettles, Lola A._ _-- ___..Sanford
West Palm Beach Osgood, Harry A. -------Palatka
Gibbs, Alice M._ -----Tallahassee Patterson, William A.. ---Palatka
Glass, Annie B.----_--.Gainsville Reid, Fannie B..------.Sanford
Hearst, William E....... onesville Stephen, Richard S.----Tallahssee
Henry, Nelson -------.----Delray Stough, CynthiaA Bradleyton, Ala.
Hightower, Richard A ----------- Twine, Jeanette E. ---Tallahassee
Montgomery, Ala. Thompson, Marion. ___Tallahassee
Houston, Walter L. ---- Glenwood Williams, Henrietta -.Tallahassee
Jones, Joseph N. ------Longwood Williams, Winter.-.-.-._- Pecks
38





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
SECOND YEAR
Allen, Eulise A. _. .-- Pensacola King, Williaml A. __--..-- Ashville
Arrington, Bertie A... --- Orlando Lqog;.Theodor-e ---,.-..Cottoudale
Bingham, George .-- Jacksonville Lowe, Lewis E --- ..---- T..nip
Burton, Gertrude ------Pensacola Livingston. Walter A... -Marianna
Bryant, Eva_ _--. ..---- Mandarin Lancaster, Clare H .-Jacksonville
Barnette, Lillie --__...----Pinetta Marlin, Fannie B..--.-Jonesville
Britt, Edward M. _...----Chipley Norton, Geo. F. _-._-----Tampa
Clarke, Beatrice_..-_ .__Eatonville Norton, Carl H. .______.__Tampa
Calvin, Julia A..._W. Palm Beach Nixon, Waldense C. --.-Madison
Childs, Hattie D.____--Jonesville Plummer, Wil:ie B. ---.Pensacola
Eaverly, Fannie E.--------Sanford Robinson, Frank C. .
Foster, Etta V.. -- ._ Warrington Greencove Springs
Gildersleeve, Elizabeth ___.-_ ... Saunders, Alice ______ Tallahassee
West Palm Beach Smith, Leroy _______ Jacksonville
Gibbs, Grace __-._.-- Tallahassee Sinms, Mollen ____ __. Marianna
Green, Henry P. -___- Delray Thomas, Jodie---. ___._- _Chipley
Hamilton, EthelThomasville, Ga. Thomas, Lula ---____ .. DeLand
Hall, Horatio E. -----St. Nicholas Thomas, Maude E.__ Apalachicola
Jerry, Naomi V.----- Tallahassee Wight, Rubie L. -----Tallahassee
Jackson, Celeste F.------Daytona Willie, Lillie G.GreencoveSprings
Jones, Avery W.-..Apalachicola Zimmerman, Hercules B___._.
Johnson, James. R. ..Tallahassee Port Tampa
FIRST YEAR
Armstrong, Susie 0.-,--. Sanford McDonald, Rosa_ --.Orlando
Allen, Capus ,-__.... Carrabelle Matthews, Mary_... Tallahassee
Armstrong, John H.__Tallahassee Martin, Osceola'B..-. --Gainesville
Bardwell, Bertha E. .. Pensacola Miller, Roberta. ------Eatonville
Butler, Franklin _- ._ Rockbluff Mason, Walter T._..-_. Pensacola
Caine, Edward _-...__-. .. Lawtey Nelson, Edith C. .----.Jacksonville
Demps, Amy-------- ---- DeLand Osgood, Vivian L.-__----.Madison
Dudley, Charles H. __,--Marianna Reddick, James G...W. Palm Beach
Davis, Albert E, ---Apalachicola Roundtree, Milton J. -----.Tampa
Debose, Julius._.. ----Gainesville Reese, Beartrice.--.---- Sanford
Geiger, Annie. ----._.... .Daytona Rambo, Gertrude,----------...
Hicks, Lelia J. ,'..-...Pensacola Donaldsonville, Ga.
Haile, Hattie---__ .._ Gainesville Stewart, Geneva. -._.... Sanford
Hogan, James D. _---- Sanford 'Spicer, Gertrude.._.. Tallahassee
39





.? .} ,- ( 7; ;.'2
CATALOGUE OF
Montgomery,'Ala. Thoiinp1son, Juanita M.-Tallahassee
Jenkins, Sadi .......p.:achliK1.i \a'.iuhn, Lhairl .h,... all.ilassc
Jerry, H r., e..... 'I d -llah .ec \\ 1 i.-, ..urcka. ........ dallah.liJ cc
Joie. Sillll '. -I- QuiIce .-. \\'iliidmi s. cIcrry S. ...... Autclla
; Le Ils. S Imp.ll ........Gle o.:l l\atl Albert J.. .... k :nu .JRcklill
_- -.. .I .
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
:'' ; :., G. .GRAMMAR A ..
Ar-ingtonl, Mary '..'. Orlando Leggett, Samuelf D.'. _'Key' West
r'i.,ley3, Mattie_'_' .---Greeuville McDaniels, Florine E. ---Daytona
Boyer, Reathet .---..-- Tallilhassee Nllm,. Ruth __- _'_ A'palachicola
Bryant, Ada B...._-_.____.Felkel McPherson, Mary ... Tallahassee
Blackstone, Phares __...-:'_ nincy Mizelle, AdaV. _______:Lake City
Crowell, Fannie--_ .Silver Springs Matthews,,Creola____ .-Tallahassee
Campbell, Ralph W. ...i -rct City McCall, Ernest -- M.a___ Madison
Caldwell, WilliamA St. Augustine Norman, Jane ____._- Tallahssee
Cole, Rachel ----------Lamont Norwood, Ernest _.._.___ Arcadia
Doyle, Sarah. :_ '.Tallahassee Orr, Vera _____Thomasville, Ga.
Daniels, Carrie ------ DeLand Paige, Ethel B. __-__'Tallahassee
Donald, Clara ..---------. Sneads Parramore, Dovey M..--- Quincy
Dawson, Lola E..--- --- Pensacola Pinder, .Beatrice ____ __Pensacola
r..tel; Eleeiora ____- Wa:rington Pawley, Silas W.--__. .__Leesburg
Fleming, James A -Key West Phillips, Burton W._._.. DeLand
Gordon, Jesse _---- Gainesville Poole, Edward --. ..Monticnella
Gerley, Fannie M.--Tallahassee Reid, Albert ..___--__. Sanford
Golden, Bettie ..----- Tallahassee Redd, Wm. M. Montgomery, Ala.
Hardon, Lillian M.__ --Tallahassee Refoe, Herman '___...' __ Sanford
H.iris,' Raiford B. ..._ : Tampa Russell, Elizabeth, Thomasville,Ga
Harris; Ruford B. ___----Tampa Richardson, John P .. __ Leesburg
Hutiter, Edwin __l- Apalachicola. Robinson, Helen __. Tallahassee
Hearn, Roberta -- Marianna. Spencer, Hattie. -____ Tallhaasse
Hdile, Lula C. .------ Gainesville Smith, Louisa ... Tallahassee
Isler, Clyde ---------. Tallahassee Sermons, Cora ____-___ ..Apopka
Jackson; Mabel _- ----T-alIahsseea Stafford, Sadie L. Tallahassee
Jackson, Jessie--:-'- 'fal.lahassee Smith, Albert -----.----__Quincy
Jenkins, Joseph ----' Dennellon Smith, Simeon .-____--_. DeLarid
Johnson, Arnette W. -Quincy :smith,'Allen __---------Quincy
Jenkins, *Frelerick. _. palTchicrola Thomas, Joseph B... Pensacola
Knight, Daiy .. .'ho'nianville, Ga Thonias, George Tanima
40





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
Kirby, Alice ..-------- Sanford Walker, Joseph __________.-Tampa
King, Fred M. __W. Palm Beach Williams, Simeon ._____-___.cala
Kincy, John W. --------. Marianna Wade, Susie______ Bainbridge, Ga.
Long. Linnie E. --------DeLand Wilson, Grace --_____- Tallahasse
Law, Cleaveland ___-_-- Ashville Youman, Catherine ---_Tallahassee
Allen, Cornelia ________Carrabelle Vaughn, Lucv___ ___- Tallahassee
Wooden, Elizabeth .._Tallahassee
GRAMMAR B
Armstrong, Elizabeth __. Sanford Myrick, Mabel ______-._allahassee
Byrd, Bertha E. --------- Sanford Moorer, Dexter ____._Tallahassee
Benjamin, Elizabeth___. Pensacola Norman, Josephine ... Tallahassee
Young, Nathan B. Jr. __Tallahassee Norman, Eliza --.__. Tellahassee
Bentley, Nellie...____ --Itamonia Portlock, Eiizabeth _..-..-Sanford
Beale, Wesley 0. -----Plant City Parker, Lenna ___- ._ --Orlando
Blackston, George M. ..Quincy Powell, George______ Q_____Quincy
Coachman, Rosetta-. .______--. Powell, William ..------.... Quincy
Donaldsonville, Ga. Rambo, Josie- Donaldsonville, Ga.
Caldwell, Rosa.L..._- Tallahassee Robinson, Melita _____Kissimmee
Crompton, Gibbs__ ._Gainesville Reed, Mary ----___-____---Felkel
Doyle, Alena ____-- Tallahassee Stewart, Leola.--------__ Sanford
Duncan, Henry E.--------------- Shoates, Annie .____.____ Orlando
Montgomery, Ala. Smith, William __._._ Tallahassee
Dabney, RobertH. _____- Quincy Taylor, Louie B.---_._._Marianna
Glenn, Marie___ .-_Wewahhitehka Thomas, Lee.___________ Chipley
Graham, Mattie _________ Bonifay Williams, Annie_________ Smoak
Jones, Alberta _____-__Tallahassee Wallace, Hannah ____-._ Bonifay
Johnson, John S ---------Chipley Wilson, Gertrude ____- Midway
Leslie, Anthony -_____- Marianna Wyatt, Robert______ Apalachicola
GRAMMAR C
Alston, Clara __.-.-P_ Pensacola Kilpatrick, Rosa ___.- Tallahassee
Boston, Donald____ ._..-- -Chipley Kilpatrick, Clyde ... Tallahassee
Brooks, Alphonso- Jacksonville Lemon, Andrew __--Apalachicola
Bradwell, Celia____ _--- Quincy Long, Roberta -__._. ..Cottondale
Baker, Charlotte __.___.- Quincy Lane, Rosa L.------.7 Tallahassee
Bentley, Annie -________.lamonia Mitchell, Lula _... Felkel
Barnhill, Cleddie __._---Bonifay Myrick, John _______ Tallahassee
Caldwell, Ada .______ Tallahassee Moorer, Thomas. _____Tallahassee
Caldwell, Robert ___..Tallahassee Morgan, Rebecca ______-__Quincy
41





CATALOGUE OF
Campbell,Mary ....___.West Farm Myers, Lizzie-____. ... Cottondale
Combs, Mary-_-----_--Tallahassee Mobley. James G.--------Apopka
Donald, Jessie M. ------ Sneads Paige, Susie M. ____-__Tallahassee
Daniels, Georgia _______- Quincy Parker, Ethel -__.____-- Penaacola
Duncan, Norma A.--------------. Paul, Lottie E. -------Rockbluff
Montgomery, Ala. Powell, Richard ---------Quincy
Davis, Ruth A. ----- Tallahassee Reese, Iantlla -- Tarpon Springs
Doyle, Annie____.__ Tallahassee Robinson, Charles.----- Marianna
Dawson, Emma __....----Millville Roundtree, George .-___ .-Quincy
Green, Delia.-------------- --Roy Rose, Samuel R. .--___. Rockbluff
Gray, Eva _-____--__ Greenwood Stewait, Carrie ._ ..-.___.__ Roy
Gardner, James M. .---Blackcreek Sinnmon, Ora._..--_.Apalachicola
Golden, William A. --------Brent Todd, Jos..------.----_ McClenny
Golden, Mary----__-_ Tallahassee Thomas, Jno. H ..-.... Carrabelle
Hinton, Charles-___-_ Tallahassee Williams, Augustus _____ DeLand
Holley, Sadie.__- __. Blackcreek Williams, Pinkie -_---Tallahassee
Jones, Gertrude ____-___...Tampa Wilson, Annie -...___Tallahassee
Jenkins, Ethel ----_ _-Tallahassee Wanza, Addie ._______Tallahassee
Johnson, Peter ___--_- Tallahassee Williams, Mary---------- Chipley
Jons, Rosalie __----___- Quincy Wise, Lenton- __. ._Tallahassee
Johnson, LulaM.----------Quincy Wiggins, Ida ._-.....__.__. Roy
Edwards, J.__.. __--. Tallahassee Vaughn, Laurie .__-- Tallahassee
SUMMARY
SENIOR SCHOOL Gitls Boys Total
A Class 5 2 7
B Class 4 3 7
HIGH SCHOOL
Third Year 13 13 26
Second Year 23 I8 41
First Year 20 I8 38
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
Grammar A 43 33 76
Granlmar B 24 15 39
Grammar C 41 19 60
294
42





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
ATTENDAiNCE BY COUNTIES-FLORIDA
Alachua II
Baker I
Bradford I
Clay 2
Columbia I
Dade 8
Desoto I
Duval 8
Escambia 15
Franklin 15
Gadsden 22
Hillsboro 12
Holmes 3
Jackson 15
Jefferson 5
Lake2
Leon 80
Liberty 6
Madison 8
Marion 4
Monroe 2
Nassau .
Orange 28
Osceola I
Putman 3
St. Johns 3
Suwanee I
Volusia. I
Washington 7
Total 279
ATTENDANCE BY STATES
Alabama 7
Florida 279
Georgia 7
South Africa
.................. Total 294
4S





Alumni Register
.1892
Jackson, James Henry _____-. __-____.-- -__-_-____.__________ Tampa
Matthews, Wm. Henry ...-____Brick Mason. __-__________-- Tallahassee
tParker, Ida E. [Mrs. Hall] -- -- ----. --.-- -
Stewart, Charles Henry -------U. S. Mail Service ___________----Ocala
Tucker, Ernest V.___.---_ ___.U. S. Mail Service_________ Chicago, Ill.
1894
Hargrett, James Hall ....__.Teacher ________-__________Apalachicola
Jackson, Adelaide__ ----------Teacher __________.__._____. Talahassee
Pope, Annie I. [Mrs. Johnson] House Keeper ___________ __Jacksonville
Robinson, Simon Peter ..-_.._ Principal School .________. acksonville
Tillman, Robert Lee .......-..Teacher ...........-___ _Adele, Ga.
Tony, Beulah E. [Mrs. Nelson] Teacher ..-___ ...-.-.-- __- St. Augustine
1895
Evens, Elias G. --.....Medical Student .-. ..Washington, D. C
Fitzgiles, Annie W.------ ----Housekeeper ..-__ ____. __ Live Oak
[Mrs. Mancher]
Frazier, Jonas Henry .------.Teacher --------...-__-_.._ Tallahassee
Jones, Everett Booker ____-. .Teacher_. Normal School_ _Tallahassee
Mitchell, Hattie L. [Mrs. Chell]Teacher ---... ------------- Jacksonville
tNewton, Cornelius--- ----------------------
1896
Baldwin, Christians Ethel. ....Teacher .-------------------- Lakeland
Gaskin, Minnie Lee--- ----_-_Teacher .__----------------.- Pensacola
Hall, Henfy Franklin _--____.MedicalStudent ---.---Nashville, Tenn.
Richardson, Caroline D. __-...Teacher ______----------------Leon Co.
1897
Alexander, Edward Isaac Jr.__Lawyer -------------------Chicago, Ill.
Hall, Marietta Elizabeth _-_..--Housekeeper _-------------Atlanta, Ga.
[Mrs. Hubert]
Stanley, King Thomas ------Physician --------------Nashville, Tenn.
1899
Chairs, George S. --------..----Principal Warden Academy,St.Augustine
tPratt, Bertha...--- --------------------
tDeceased
44





STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
1900
Acosta C. I. [Mrs. Daniels] -...Teacher- ..-------------- St. Augustine
Coleman, Temperance- .._-__. Teacher _____.-_- --..-_. .Jacksonville
[Mrs. Dixon]
Keller, Ethel A. [Mrs. Wright] Teacher-----------------------_-DeLand
Osgood, Alice B. ----- -Dressmaker--------- _________-Madison
Welters, Rosa[Mrs. Butler] __Housekeeper .__----___-__ Jacksonville
1901
Kerr, C. A. [Mrs. DeVaugh]_-Teacher .-----------------_,Fernandina
1902
Attaway, Daisy E.-.----------Teacher ._Normal School__ Tallahassee
Garrison, Bessie Marie ------..-Student ....________ ....Atlanta, Ga.
Hurd, Bettie M.----. ---------Teacher.---____---________ __.Pensacola
[Mrs. Robinson]
Lester, Herbert E._.--------- Contractor and Builder __-_______ Tampa
Mitchell, Minnie L.-------.. .Teacher_______ .__-____ ----Jacksonville
Powell, Eliza J. ---.-_______-Teacher __ Normal School __ Tallahassee
Small, Phoebe A. [Mrs. Floyd] Housekeeper .____.__-_- Statesboro, Ga.
Whitehead, Anthony J.-------R. P. 0. Clerk _---_ __--- Jacksonville
1903
Boyd, Willie E. [Mrs. Smith] __Teacher ______-_________.. __-_ Daytona
Davis. Frances N..___------- __Teacher. ________.__ New Augustine
tDavis, Julia A..-- ..-__------------------
Hopkins, Mary -______--------.Teacher- ------------- Bartow
[Mrs. Calhoun]
Hopps, J. L.---------- ------Contractor and Builder __.-__-._Live Oak
James, Susie E ..- ......... -Teacher _-____----------_-Jacksonville
Jamieson, Mary E.-------- ---Teacher __ .....-._____ Lake Helen
Jackson, Josie G. [Mrs. Green] Teacher _________-__-West Palm Beach
Kershaw, A. J.----------...---_Physician-------------------.Tallahassee
Lang, Theresa I. .....Teacher ___________.__......-Key West
Mizell, Bertha[Mrs. DeVaughn]Housekeeper .L_......I....Lake City
Reynolds, Lillian C._ --- .__..Teacher _.- .....-----... _Savannah, Ga.
Stiles, Geneva L/..___----- ___Teacher __________.- ---- Savannah, Ga.
White, Isham A..__ ..---...- Medical Student -------Nashville, Tenn.
1904
Butler, Robert W.. ----------Medical Student _---Washington, D. C.
Cromartie, John A.------.- -------------------
Grant, Arthur R. ____-----_.-- Teacher, Cookman Institute, Jacksonville
45





CATALOGUE OF
Hawkins, Rufus J. ----------.Student --------W.-Washington, D. C.
tLee, Rosa B. --... --------------------------.--------------.------
Moore, Sarah G._------..- ..- Teacher.-- ..---- ----------- Ormond
Perry, Winifred L.------------Teacher- ..-- .- -------.-Fernandina
Smith, Walter C. ----------.-Teacher .-----____.-----.--.--.Marianna
Wilkins, Maggie G..----------Teacher .-----.---. _---_-___- Marianna
Yellowhair, Margaret A..------Teacher ._.._---_----__-____.__... Ocala
Young, Wa ter T..-- ___.. ---- Teacher .---------.-----... .. Lakeland
1905
Armwood, W. A. .-.----- -.--.Government Service ---__.... ..__Tampa
Barnette, Anna J. _------.- Teacher ----.------.--___.--_.---Cocoa
Barnette, Mary I. ------------Teacher i-.--------- -________.___ Ocala
Barnette, Charles H..--------- Teacher .-.--__ -----------_ Cottondale
Broome, Thomas A. .----------.Tailor ..------------ ..-----_ Jacksonville
Browne, P. E._: ---------------.Teacher .-__-- _____.._- Anniston, Ala.
A. R. Burney----- .--- .--. Painter ------- .------- .Tampa
Calhoun, HarvisC. ---.-------- Teacher. -_--------------------- Bartow
Campbell, George W.-..--.. Carpenter .----___--_____-__ Live Oak
Ford, Louisa E..------------Teacher Lincoln Academy--Tallahassee
Gilbert, Sarah. --__---_-------Dressmaker-------------------- Sanford
Gillislee, Ethel -----------.--Teacher Edw.WatersCollege, Jacksonville
Howell, Leroy A. --------.--..Medical Student -___.. Nashville,Tenn,
Jones, Lucy------------------Teacher--_---------_ ..Washington Co,
Lancaster, Roy St. Elmo------Business .-,-----------_ Jacksonville
Lott, Sylvia _----- --------. Teacher --------.-. ....-----. Suwannee
McElvine, Mabel I. -----,------Teacher .---------------...-... Sanford
McDaniels, George T. ---------Teacher----- .. -_------__.__ Quincy
Moore, Eula L.---------------.Teacher------------- .__--____ Sneads
Shellman,LizzieB. [Mrs. Jones]Housekeeper ..-- --.__--- .._ Quincy
Twine, Gertrude A. .__----- .- Teacher,_LincolnAcademy__Tallahassee
Walker, Mary E. ----..----- Teacher .. ------------.--- Baldwin
Welters, Vulee C .------.---- Tailor .. --------------------Key West
Wilson, Lavinia __------.---Teacher --.-----------Washington Co.
Whitfield, Cupid A.. __------Preacher -----------------Mt. Pleasant
Yates, Edna E...---------- Teacher .---------------- Jacksonville
1906
Alexander, Camilla B. -------Teacher and Housekeeper. -------.-Ocala
Alexander, Levi Jr. -___.---- Carpenter ..-..- ------------- --Ocala
Chandler, Edward M. A. ------Teacher-- ..------- ----------.-Ocala
Coleman, Samuel H .------- Painter -..----------.-------Tallahassee
Graham, George H. _-..--------Tailor .....---- ------ ...---Sanford
46





STATE NO14 F:iL sCHOOL
Jackson, Annie L..---------- Teagher ..------------------- Carrabelle
King, James A. .------------.. Teacher. .__--_ ___._----- ---_ Sneads
Mizell. Mary J.. _...._......-..Teacher ...._-__ __._.---- Fernandina
Roberts, Erskine A. -_____ __,Tailor-..------ --- ---- -- __ Key Wst
Scott, John R. Jr._____- __ ...Business-- .------...---- Jacksonville
Whitley, Fairy B. -------- Teacher---.____---- Greenwood
White, Colbert B. ..._...._Teacher ------ Greenwood
Wise, Minnie L. .-----------Teacher -______---------- Pecks
Wiles, Oliver F.-, __; Teacher .. _-_- __-.- Greencove Springs
47





INDEX
Academic Course .- 1-------.-------------------. --.-18-27
Admission ---- ----------------...-----------__ .. ....8___ _8
Agricultural Course .- --------------------. _______-35-37
Agronomy -------------------.-- -.35
Alumni -3------------------------- ____i3
Alumni egister._____ ______________________________________.___ 44-47
Alumni Register .............-- --- 44.47
American History -------------------_ ------- --------25
Ancient History ------.-- --.- ------------- ---- 25
Blacksmithing and Wheelwrighting .....- ---_-----.- ----__.- 3I
Bookkeeping. .----- ------- ------. 23
Carpentry and Cabinet-making. .______________--- --.-------- 30 F
Cooking -----------------------------32
COURSES OF STUDY ---------------.------------------I8-27
Academic------------------------------. I8-27
Agriculture --------------------_-----.---_ __- 35-37
Mechanical-----------------------______---_ 28-34
Dairying ------......-- 36
English I.. ..--------------------. ---------21.....I
Expenses ...-------------------... ---.. .12
Faculty. ... .....- --________.__ -. __ ---------------------- .. -.4
Geography ..--________-..._.......---- .....-------__ --23
History and Location _.__....----______..._ .-___________-.. ______- 7
Laboratories -----__________ --______ ___-- --__-__-_...._-__.___.__-io
Laundering. ---.......-........ -- _-- __- --- ------------ 32
Latin ---_____________________...__.___......--__...__________. __.22
Library. -_----. ,........ II
Literary Societies ___.....-_.. --___.__________...__ _.______________I I
Manual Training .-----._________________ .______________ -_.---_28
Market Gardening ---------.----...........____________ 36
Mathematics............... ... 20
Mechanical Courses .._ ______________________________ .__.. ._ 28-34
Mechanical Drawing __---_____-.. __-._ ____________________..29
Military Drill.........-. ...- ...- -. 12
Millinery. _____..___.___________._._.................._____ __ __.._33
Millinery -------------- -- -33
Music ...------------ -------------------------... 24-27
Nurse Training ______________________________ -33
Opportunity to Reduce Expenses______________________________ ___ 13
Organization ._.--------------.. --.. ......._. -------.........7
Outline of Agricultural Courses ___________________________________ 36
Painting -______________________________________...- 30
Pedagogy ----.. .......-.--...................._.__.- -22
Plain Sewing and Dressmaking ...-__-- ___.---_--- ......... ----- 32
Poultry aud Stock Raising -______________--_______________ 36
Printing-------------------------------------------- ____ 29
Public Rhetoricals.-----------.--- ----------------- .__...II
Regulations---------------_-------------------------------- 8, 9
Religious Societies ------- .--- --.... 12
Scheduleof Academic Course -----.-- --i..-.-----..--- -I__ 5, I6
Schedule of Industrial Courses------.-------------------- I17
Science. --_..o- dustrial .Courses --------------...7---_I 18
Suggestions---.--------- ------------------ 14
Support--- ---------------------------------------.------- _- .8
Tailoring --------------------------------------- -- 31
Uniforms------------_________________.------__ __--_12
48





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