• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 State Board of Education
 Faculty
 Departments
 Courses of study
 General information
 Apparatus
 Suggestions
 Calendar for 1896 - 1897
 Back Matter






Title: Ninth Annual Catalogue 1895-1896; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
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 Material Information
Title: Ninth Annual Catalogue 1895-1896; Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students (FAMU)
DaCosta Printing and Publishing Co.
Affiliation: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students (FAMU)
Publication Date: 1896
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Bibliographic ID: AM00000085
Volume ID: VID00001
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    State Board of Education
        Page 4
    Faculty
        Page 5
    Departments
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Courses of study
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    General information
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Apparatus
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Suggestions
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Calendar for 1896 - 1897
        Page 56
        Inside back cover
    Back Matter
        Back cover
Full Text
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NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE
LOR RI DD
State Normal ad
Industrial College
FOR COLORED STUDENTS,
Tallahassee, = = FClorida.
.895=18960.
DACOSTA PRINTING AND PUBLISHING CO.,
JAdKSONVILLE, FLA.
1896.
. .





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.
iEx-:'lficio lBoard: of Trustees.)
\ '
Governor H. L. .MTlrrHELL. President.
Hon. W.; N. SHEATz, State Superintendent of Public
. Instr.,cti .n, Secretary.
H on. JOHN L..CR..\% FORD. Secretary'of State.
, I- Hon. WV. B. L.u,i kr, Attorne, -,.eneral.
Hon. C. B. COGLINS, TreasIrrr.
'S.
^" '.' -.*. / :
r -- .-- : '. .
;' : '' .. .. -" .-, .
'; to < ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-IS
' ~.' -





FACULTY.
T. DES. TUCKER, A. M., President.
Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy.
T. V. GIBBS, First Assistant and Secretary,
Professor of Mathematics.
ALEXANDER CUPPAGE,
Professor of Agriculture.
THOMAS. W. TALLEY, .. M.,.
Professor of Natural Science.
HARRY L. PHILLIPS,
Professor of Mechanic Arts and Drawing.
MISS ANNIE L. BLANCHARD,
Instructress in English.
P. A. VON WELLER,
Professor of Music and Instructor in English.
MRS. F. REINOLDS KEYSER,
Matron and Instructress in Pedagogy.
MRS. EMILY M. HOWARD,
Teacher of Domestic Science.
Miss MELINDA L. ANDERSON
Housekeeper.
MISS THERESA SMITH,
Teacher of Model School for '96-'y,9.





NORMAL DEPARTflENT.
SENIOR CLASS.
I, Baldwin, Christina E. Marshville, Marion Co
2.! Gaskin, Minnie L .... Pensacola, Escambia Co
:;3; Hall, Henry F ......Tallahassee, Leon Co
4., Richardson, Carrie D. Tallahassee, Leon Co
5. Stanley, K. Thomas,. So. Lake Weir P. O.,Sumter
: . . . . .. .. .Co
' This class graduated June 4, 1896.
JUNIOR CLASS.
Alexander, Edward I., Jr. Madison, Madison Co
Hall, Marietta E........Pensacola, Escambia Co
Long, Margaret B ...... Tallahassee, Leon Co
PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.
SENIOR YEAR.
(Owing to an extension of the course of study there
was no Senior Year Class in this department this year.)
').\ .- JUNIOR YEAR.
Claires, George S .. .. . Tallahassee, Leon Co
: Edwards, William H. Pensacola, Escambia Co
Pratt, M. Bertha Tampa, Hillsborough Co
. Williams, Julia V........ Tallahassee, Leon Co'
X -
S'; *1 .





ACADEMIC DEPARTMIENT.
THIRD YEAR.
I. Acosta, Catherine I. Jacksonville, Duval Co.
2. Burch, Lilian L ..... Pensacola, Escambia Co.
3, Coleman, Temll:.e!in,:u A. O0. Ticl;-...;, i!!e. Duvai Co.
4. Crenshaw, Alonzo H. Es.:ai-bi;i. Escambia Co.
5. Dennis, RLa:hlc:1 E. .Pcii.a:,:, E-,:ainbia Co.
6. Dudley, I-aac .. .. .. La!. City. Columbia Co.
7. Hurd, Lemuel G ...... Peniac-'la. Escambia Co.
8. Kelker, Ethel A. Ba:dad. Santa Rosa Co.
9. Meade, Minnie ... ..... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
Io, Os'I.:,:d, Alice B. i.... Mali-l, l:li..n Co.
II. Pinckney, John H ... .Tallaliaha-e. Leon Co.
12. Staley, Boyd D. .... Tampa. HillsbO:.,!':iih Co.
13. Welter;, Rosa Lee ..... Key West, Monroe Co.
.14. Wright. Sarah .. ... ... Palatka, Putman Co.
15. Yellolihair. Margrtaret .. Tallalhassee, Leon Co.
SECOND EA .R.
I. Burch, Augustus G Penvaco.:la, Escanibia Co.
2.' Garnett, Julia E. Tallahia-ce, Leon Co.
3. Hicks, Geo. W., .. ...
4. Hunter, iles P. .....
5. Jones, Caroline L ..... Jacl;:sl ilil. D)uvL al Co.
6. Moorer, Celia H. ... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
7. Riley, James B. "
8. Roberts, Ellen E .. Jacksonville, Duval Co.
9. Taylor, Early T. Lake City, Columbia Co.





*;- / STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 7
Io. Trent, Mary B. Fernaldina, Nassau Co.
I Wilson, Philip H .. Tallahassee, Leon Co.
i 2., Williams, Nicholas W. . Midway, Gadsden Co.
13. Young, Caroline A. .. Pine Mount, Suwannee Co.
FIRST YEAR.
I. Allen, Robert .......St. Marks, Wakulla Co.
2. Attaway, Alethea. Tallahassee, Leon Co.
3. Bagley, Emma L ...... Branford, Suwannee Co.
4. Booker, Hattie ...... Jacksonville, Duval Co.
5. Campbell, Esther O ..... Madison, Madison Co.
6. Crawford, Mary A ..... St. Marks, Wakulla Co.
7. Gainer, Lilly E . Milligan, Santa Rosa-Co.
8. Gainer, Ida J ....... Milligan, Santa Rosa Co.
9. Hargrett, Mary Lucy A St. Marks, Wakulla Co.
IO. Herndon, Olivia V . Tallahassee, Leon Co.
I I. Hilliard, Mittie C .. ... St. Marks, Wakulla Co.
12. Hopkins, Mary A .... Jacksonville, Duval Co.
13. Hughes, Margaret L .....Branford, Suwannee Co.
14. Jackson, Margaret N . Tallahassee, Le6n Co.
I5. Jamieson, Caroline S .. Jacksonville, Duval Co.
i6. Jenkins, Joanna A . Vernon, Washington Co.
17. Jones, D. J ........ Lake City, Columbia Co.
I8. Jones, Lucy ........ Tallahassee, Duval Co.
19. Livingston, Nettie Lee .. Marianna, Jackson Co.
20. McGrjfr, Ellen M ...... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
2I. Mitchell, Minnie ......... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
22. Mora, Frederic T .... Tampa, Hillsborough Co.
23. Thompson, Bessie Kate A Jacksonville, Duval Co.
24. Thompson, Bessie M ..... Quincy, Gadsden Co.
25. Washington, Frances Ashville, Jefferson Co.
26. White, Jacob ... .... Marianna, Jackson Co.
27. Wright, Annie L ...... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
2s. \Vright, Jennie .... Tallahassee, Leon Co.
"',,"-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 ,H.





8 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
RECAPITULATION.
(By Departments.)
Literary Department.
Males. Females. Totals.
Normal Course..... 3 5 8
Preparatory Course .. 2 2 4
Academic Course .... I6 40 56
Total 2. 2 47 68
Musical Department.
1Vales. Females. Totals.
Piano .. I I I 12
Harmony .. ....
Vocal Culture .. 3 3
Totil 2 4 i '
Industrial Department.
Males. Females. Totals.
Agricultural Course ..... 20 20
Mechanical Course ... 20 20
Dairying Course ... 20 21 41
Domestic Training. 47 47
'"' ..'' '.''~ ,1 1





;s ,A-- -,
'1 4
i'.
4-
J~~~~j~ ~ ~ -: ~,<>7--





L .. v





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 9
(By Counties.)
Males. Females T.:tals.
, .. 'Columbia. .... 3 3
Duval .. ........ 8 8
Escambia ........ 4 4 8
Gadsden ...... I I 2
' Hillsborougl ...... 2 I 3
Jackson ........ I 2
Jefferson .... I
Leon ... 7 5 22
Madison ........ 2 3
Marion ..... I
r Monroe ... ... I
N; assau .... i
Putnam .... I I
Santa Rosa ..... 3 3
Sumter ... I
Suwannee .. 3 3
,. \Vakulla ....... I 3 4
Var a i]illgt':.n ... I I
; 'Total 21 47' 68
i;. ,, _____ :. ,
COURSES OF STUDY.
ACAbErnUiC DEPART/lENT.,
FIRST, YEAR.
Arithmetic-Well'si Academic, to. Percentage. .
English (Grammar-Reed' & Kellogg's Higher Les- '
sons.
Geography-Frve's.. "
V: .
. ub ,.s; .1 .





10 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
History-Montgomery's Leading Facts in American,
Spelling-Reed's Word Lessons and Exercises.
Reading-McGuffey's Fifth Reader.
Penmanship-Spen ceria n.
SECOND YEAR.
Arithmetic-Well's Academic, Completed.
English Grammar and Composition-Reed & Kel-
logg's, Completed.
Geography-Frye's, Completed.
History-Montgomery's American.
Spelling-Reed's Word Lessons and Exercises.
Reading-Cathcart's Literary Reader.
Penmanship-Spencerian.
THIRD YEAR.
Arithmetic-Well's Academic.
Higher English-Grammar, Composition and Read-
ing. (Irving's "Sketch Book.")
Latin-Collar & Daniell's Beginner's Latin Book.
Physical Geography-Houston's (one Term.)
Botany-Wood's Botanistand Florist, (one Term.)
Herbarium of twenty-five pFecinienli required.
PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.
JUBIOR YEAR.
Alg-ebra-\\'ells' Academic.
Latin-Collar & Daniell's, Completed.
Rhlctoric-Kellogg's.
Anatomy. PFhysiology and Hygiene-Martin's" Hu-
man Body.'
Book-keepin ig-Rogers and William's.
.
is~~~~.# ~ ~





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 11
Greek-Gleason & Atherton's Greek Book, Hadley
and Allen's Greek Grammar.
Zoology-Steele and Jenks'.
Hi ;t.i '--.-Anderson's New General.
* -E i:l,-r. YE f;.
Algebra-Wells' Academic Completed.
Latin-Caesar, Allen and Greenough's.
Phy~ic--N.;:.rt,:, l's.
Greck--Glear-,:l & Atherton's (completed,) Hadley
and Allen's Grammar.
English.
NORRMAL DEPARTMENT.
JUNIOR YEAR.
Gi. nim-tr-\\Vells' Plane and S.,'liJ.
Latin-Ciccro's Orations.
Chemistry-Eliot and Storer's.
Greelk-- Anabasis.) Hadley & Allen's Grammar.
PolIitical Econoomy-Lau-1hlifn'.
Astr :momny-Steele's Descriptive; .
EiiLlish Literattrc-Kellogg's.
isEN[I',- YEAR.
Tlig, n ,-_mltr;'-\ Wells' Escrntials c.f.
Psycl h,.-:gy!-P. tna a';. : .
Geology-LeConlte's Compend. ; : :
AiMoral Phil,:,3oplih-Fairchil;';. i .:'
Science of Go,:v.-'rnment-T,:,: l; d's. '
Pedacgogies-\V white's Elements ol'Pedagogy, White's
School Manlagement. -: : --
Review' of Commlon School Branches.
3., ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~ .*-'
.-:L .
.
: '





12 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
ORGANIZATION.
The College as reorganized, consists of a Literary, an
Industrial, and a Musical Department.
LITERARY DEPARTMENT.
The Literary Department comprises the Model School
and the Academic, the Preparatory and the Normal
Courses.
THE MODEL SCHOOL.-At the opening of the next
session, September 30, I896, a Model School will be
opened to prepare children for the Academic Department.
Pupils' from abroad will be admitted from twelve years'of
age upwards. Parents desirous of sending their children
are assured of the care of an experienced matron ,and all
the comforts of a well regulated home-. They will be ex-,
pected to know how, to read and write fairly well and to
have a knowledge of arithmetic, through division of simple
numbers. ._
No student from abroad will be admitted who. does not
board in the school dormitories.
THE ACADEMIC COURSE is composed of three divisions,
to be known as the First, Second and Third Years.
To be entitled to admission to this department appli-
cants should have, a l;no' ledge of arithmetic, through
fractions, and a fair proficiency in'English grammar, geog-
raphy and United States history, be able to write legibly,
and be of good moral character and sound health. This
course covers a period of three years, and is designed only
for those u hose previous opportunities may have been
limited, or whose acquirements may prove, in the prelimi-
nary examination, to be superficial.
THE PREPAR.TOR' COURSE is composed of two divis-
ions, to be known as the Junior and Senior Years. It is
' .,
;v, -
.:~.i,'.' .





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 1:3
intermediate between the Academic and Normal Courses,
and is designed for those who have completed the Aca-
demic Course satisfactorily, or who have passed an examin-
ation satisfactory to the faculty in the required studies.
THE NORMAL COURSE covers a period of two years.
To enter this department applicants must be sixteen years
of age, be thoroughly grounded in all the common school
branches of study, pass an examination in all the interme-
diate studies of the Academic and Preparatory Courses,
and possess the requisite moral and physical qualifications.
Graduates from this course will receive regular dipl.-:ma; and
the degree of Licentiate of Instruction. No student will
be allowed to graduate without taking the full two years'
course. By act of the Legislature of I895, diplomas from
this school are made first-grade certificates, good in any
county in the State.
DEPARTIENT OP NATURAL SCIENCE.
Special attention is given to the instruction in the nat-
ural sciences. The services of an accomplished physicist
have been secured, and investigation in this rapidly widen-
ing field of human research is made a specialty. With a
well equipped laboratory at command and the skillful guid-
ance of a specialist, students have exceptional advantages..
In this department,three things are kept constantly' in
view: first, the giving to the student a thorough ground
work in the general principles of each science; second, the
implanting in him of a love for his work; and third, the be-
.:-- getting in him a desire 'to know more' and a disposition
toward research.'





14 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
Natural Philosophy.
We have the good fortune to have, for the instructing
in this branch, all the apparatus necessary for illustrating
the principles and general laws of Samotology, Mechanics,
Acoustics, Pyronomics, Optics, and Electricity; and experi-
*ments are conducted daily along with the recitations in or-
der that the student may see the principles and laws, which
he studies, in practical operation. In addition to this
problems are given involving the principles and laws,
and such lectures as will enable the student to grasp the
idea of the general worth of philosophical knowledge in
the common, every-day affairs of life.
Chemistry.
The Chemical Laboratory is supplied with the most
necessary chemicals for performing the experiments re-
quisite to the showing of the general principles of the
science. The experiments are nade. as far as possible, by
the students themselves. Every effort is made in the study
of the laws, etc., to bring under the pupil's eye the reality
itself and thus to teach him to observe and reason. From
time to time the work as laid down in the text is supple-
mented by the teacher as far as-the limits of the course and
our facilities'permit. .
~- -''Botany.
The airh in this branch is to i. e the .tident a knowl-
edge. of .structural Botany and Phyt,:lo.:g!. A limited
amount of instructions also(given in Physiological Botany.
Plants are analyzed and classifi-d daily. :From these the
students make up their herbariurms and while a herbarium
'of t\ent!y'fine specimens is that required for plr,:,nm.:i',n of
the student, there is rarely a h rbariumn presented with less
than twice that number. Students are encouraged to make
the largest possible collections. The department is fur-





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 15
nished with a high grade, compound microscope with which
may be shown all the intimate structure of the plant.
Physiology and Hygiene.
Realizing the need of a more extended physiological
and hygienic knowledge among those in whose interest the
school was founded, a special effort'is made in this branch,
not only to impart scientific knowledge, but also to point
out how to make a practical use of physiological and hy-
gienic principles in daily life and how to impress these
principles upon the masses. To this end a number of lec-
tures are given by the instructor in addition to the course
as laid down in the text. From time toetime a dissection
is made of some of the lower animals and through this a
pretty thorough knowledge of Anatomy is gained.
Zoology.
A general study is made of all the orders in the ani-
mal'kingdom. The student is encouraged to make and to
report observations made upon the animals in his sur-
roundings. The classes have access to a private collection
of correctly named insects, including all the commoner
species and many of the. rarer ones. Instruction is also
. given in the art of mounting and preserving insects and
birds, etc., so far as the time allotted to the study will allow.
A series of weekly lectures is given by the instructor upon
biological subjects by means of which the student gains
much knowledge not to be gotten from text books, and
obtains some idea of the vast fields of knowledge which lie
before him and with which he can become acquainted only
by a life's work.
Geology.
In this study much care is:taken to point out the natu-
ral agencies at their work in the present day, shaping and





16 NINTH ANNUAL CATALI:;:i.iE
changing the physical and chemical condition of the earth.
By seeing these, the student is 'helped to a conception
of the woric of these agencies upon, the earth in the past.
The classes have access to a private collection of rocks
and fossils. By a study of these, and by a comparison of
the fossils described in the text-not in stock-with their
modern representatives, the students are enabled to gaill a
pretty thorough idea both of the rock formations and the
life systems of the past.
THE PURPOSE*AND SCOPE OF THE DEPARTMENT
OF LANGUAGES.
In an age in which the merit of a mental acquisition is
determined by the most good it confers, a study which
does not directly tend to the useful, may rightly be ques-
tioned in a place in a college curriculum.
The study of the ancient classics has greatly, and with
much show of reason, declined in the latter part of the pres-
ent century. The varied wants of man in the intensely
practical civilization of our time, are being evolved by
social and domestic causes far more freely than by reason-
ings from the master minds of antiquity, M\uch of the
conclusion, in research, of past ages, has become worn out
lumber stored away'in the literary garret of the annals of
the race to be drawn upon only for use in certain times of
need.' But while such is the fact, it is equally true that so
long as the classic languages contain much of the matter
which forms the basis of the intellectual activities of our
day, so long shall it be necessary for the teacher to know,
more or less, the language through which the. great races
of the past thought and spoke.
'i;'' '





STATE NOCRMAL AND INDUSTRIAL C*:-'LL EGE. I.
L :
He who would be a full rounded teacher cannot afford
' to be wholly ignorant of the fountain sources of thought at
' which the masters of his pro:,fessi,:n have drank c0pi.:,'.isl\
to enrich the text books and the treatises relating to mind
culture.. He cannot be indifferent to a knowledge of the
' dead language-4 unless he is to stand self-convicted of ig-
r' norance of the bountiful fields of intellectual richness 6o
. which success, specially in the arts of his work, depends..
' Believing then that the classics must. needs enter into
the curriculum'of the teacher, they have been incorporated
' into the series of studies in the Normal College.
r With the egro:th :1f thnt the eminent writers
" ol'the Greek and'Latin will be carefully studied. For the
pr.rrent the Lat;n embrace. a reading of:.-'nly four books of
' Cresar's Commenitaries and Cicero's t.rations, while the'
Grr.ek include- parts of the Anabasis and the I;.:ur Gospels.
One ol' the modern languages ; ill be added to,.the
." course.
.
. .. .....
DEPARTMENT OF rfATHErIATICS. -
The \;crk- :,f this department both guages and pro-
-niotes the development of the reas.:ning. fac:ulties of the
stu.ident mind. In all 'iell!-:.rdered sccho.:ls, standing in
,- mathematics is considered :one of the best criteria of the.
,.pupil's advancement; while all unilbrm o:,r general examin-
. nations sho&\ it to be the severest rest of th' e exainee's
:mental strength. Realizing the importance, therefore of
this branch of study, e\ery en;:rt is made to give thorough,
:con-cientiois training and to secure painstaking untlag-
{:ging work. constantly' \-idening horizon gives an ever-
rbrgadening vmiew, lending interest and zeal to the search for
-truth. Pupils aie required to deduce their own rules, ex-
; .' '.; '





18 NINTH AN-NUAL CATALOGUE
pressed in their own words, under the criticism of class and
'teacher. Principles, not solutions, are the ends sought and
no problem is cons idercd to be satisfactorily solved
until all the principles involved are understood and eluci-
dated. This necessarily involves much of original work
andl the elementary study of the philosophy of the laws of
mathematical science.
The course embraces the elements of written and men-
tal Arithmetic, through operations involving the metric
system, mensuration, percentage and proportion; Alerbra.
through quadratics, the progressions, and logarithms;
Geometry, Plane and Solid; and Plane Trigonometry,
through the solution of ohbliqule triangles, in\ lvoing- the
elements of Plane Survey ing, concluding with a review of
common school arithmetic, in the senior year, to enable the
student to bring to a deeper study of the simpler rules of
arithmetic the strength of mind gained in the higher
mathematics.
The department is fortunate in having all the necessary
apparatus for illustration and demonstration- including a
fine engineer's transit, a surveyor's vernier compass, and,
for the use of tie class in Astronomy, an achlroniatic tele-
scope of very satisfactory power.
I.. r .
Department of Pedagogy.
A fair idea of the science of mind lies at the very founda-
tion of the fitness to teach. The study of Psycholog?
therefore forms the basis of work in this department. This
is lfllo\ed by a study of the Theory of Teachin., of
Methods of Imparting Instruction, and of School Manage-
ment. Actual teaching is done by the pupil-teachers
under the eye of a skilled instructress. The best teacher





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 19
are visited for observation and comnparnon of methods, and
child-study is conducted under the most favorable condi-
tions.
This department is under the charge of a graduate.of
the Normal College of the city of New York, and is con-
ducted with all the advantages of equipment, competency
and experience.
- musical Course.
The Musical Department, both vocal and instrumental,
is under the care of a th:ll,.r.:i :I! y practical and' successful
teacher, a graduate from En landl trained in the Queen's
private chapel, St. James, in London. Pupils may receive
a partial or full course, the latter, of which covers a period
of four years and embraces instruction in Thorough Bass,
Harmony, Orchestration and Composition. Certificates
and diplomas will be given to graduates only. Candidates
for the partial, or short course certificates, must have a
thorough ; n.:'n led.ge of the theory of music, at least.
Instructions, in vocal music is irce. By the adoption of
the c,:.nscrat:, ry plan, the cost of lessons on the piano or
or.an is brought down to about two dclllars per month. A
nominal cliar.e of twenty-five cents per month is charged
for the use of instrunicnts in practice.
The Co:llee e Orchestra, under the Director of Musiic,
affords to members of this depa.rtmnlnt a fine cl.i',.rt.i nitv
for orchestral practice.
INDUSTRIAL COURSE.
This course .:,mn-pris,-: at present the Mlecl.tnical,
Agricultural. Dairy and D.-mest.: Sc.inc-e .l:-,artn. int_ .
. .
i4..
I, ~~~~~ '* II~~~~~..





20 NTNTT-T ANNLUAL L:'A r- 1ALc:' U E.
THE 'MECIHANICAL DEFAK MEN '.
This department i~ I indcr tll, c_-nt!rol ci a tlh:.rc:i u.lil'
edt,-atd:l and .l;i!L.d me:li:ini.: anld an expc:ience:ld teaC:lI r.
The course of studl a.lnd practice :.:,\ver; a periri..: .:' tlir. c
years. 'The training includes exe!ci;cc in iarl.entrlt. .lbi-
1ii'et-mIlla1;i-:hl, v',',, l-ttriiniiin i:':ti. !'!- I ':l1-:inciL etc. Tlhe c'.,re
also embraces a niiml:b.:r :l 'illi >h.:l .irti.:!,.
The .,:l.[ipnlI:lit':I tIliis d ['i...ertl'.tm lt i: s f:i!.-w':
i Io-horse -,-,*vr l-rl-i;z:'tal : :r inl. and boiler.
I Circular saw.
I Band saw.
I I i' saw.
I Gi l:M:t',ne.
I Planing !ni lin .
I ii int[_e r cli .
I, bT:,*ee:l lathe, I2-f-i't edl i4-iinc:l -_ .in .
';' ;i:-'. ;l lathes, 3-foot beds. :-!nil;h : -I In.
I lie- t.-ll-:-. in.l i:;i:-c.tt't -.
:, ali t iit1 1.,l': ,'1 L: i :-,,.11-
1[: -!.:1i .m ti.irll q il _l: '*.*l .! t -.-lt .- -e;--. !1 I1.._
A LutiCh :i t:.' IuIr itiihc in .1-c in til i :h.-.'l i- m. .le in
thi : l1',::.tA O'R:-t.
ITIECHANICAL COiRSE.
First sear-First -eran.
The .,' .n: c il .- :.1'- o l-,- .. ... .....:l-,\ -. rl:ln 2- t -a ,: I.
Tle fenlerarl Fj:,il,!._-c,-,l-.. : ..:.'l.' -,,'l:,n-. i.if i_,T a 'lIiin;-,.
drivin .,,l_ :,, .-o ,e--. m--' l h';l 1,.ri, n',:,rti:!ns :. h-d -
iln ,. Iite Ii,' I.:I- I.-.lh _.-t_.et,:1 ;-.lt.e
c, ra,[-.t Ix, I-- J,:l. lat-r; .ltl'.:tIll I ,eillts. t;abI-,s
slwh ss .-- l,_l :l I:iii !.,Z:rl r:l:,,ir \V..rl; t iiidiii- ;tiic
',,I',.tti, t:,:l U7e ,:, t I:' :,ut.tl : t,:t ',','ilc.
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STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 21
Making of working drawings from which the exercises
are made.
First Year-Second Term.
Use of turning lathe, following a set of exercises.
Parquetry-the making of drawings for all exercises.
Second Year-First Term.
First steps in pattern-making. Fancy turning,
Making of dra\ ings of the exercises followed.
Second Year-Second Term.
.j Advanced pattern making. Filing saws. Construct-
ive dra\ ing.
Third Year-First Term.
Use of the band and jig saws, planing and shaping
machines. Pipe cutting and the use of taps and dies.
Third Year-Second Term.
Advanced drawing. lettering, sectioning, line-shading,
'tracing, blue printing, tinting and architecture.
Care of the engine and boiler, throughout the three
rs.
-: .'A handsome bronze medal and a diploma were awarded
d this department. by the World's Fair Commission, for
t'eTexdleelt woodd work exhibit displayed at the Interna-
thal Exposition held in Chicago in I893.
M...-: ,,. r ,
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!y W:a' -? .o f _





22 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT.
The Department of Agriculture is comprehensive in
its scope. embracingJhe culture of all the semi-tropical field
crops, gardening, fruit-,gow ing, dairy husbandry, and rear-
ing of live stock.
This department, in all its branches, is under theim-
-: mediate supervision and direction of the Professor of Ag-.
riculture, and affords the best facilities to illustrate by ac-
' tual practice the theories taught in the class room. Agri-
culture in its several branches. is taught as an applied
science. 'Lectures by the Professor of Agriculture upon
the science of agriculture are delivered to the sections
daily. The students are also taken to the field, where the
practical applications of the scientific principles taught are
demonstrated by object lessons.
Farm labor is intended as educational, not only in
~- teaching the student how to vork, but in broadening his
understanding and making him familiar with the various
industrial operations of the farm.
- As a means of illustration, cofn, cotton, oats, rye, su-.
gar cane, potatoes, (Irish and sweet), cassava, melons, to-
matoes,'pinders, chufas, sorghum, field peas, forage plants
and various grasses and clovers are grown upon the farm.
The students are brought into immediate contact with the
live stock in attending to4the milking and the care of the
animals, also for the purpose of feeding and comparing the
,':- *'different points. For the purpose of illustrating differences
between the breeds of cattle, thoroughbred Jerseys, Jer-
seygradeand native cowsarekept on tile farm. The students
become faniliarwith all of these.and to them is intrusted the
feeding, the niilking and care of the herd.
Poland-China and Berkshire hogs are reared on the
farm, where the superiority of these breeds over the native
i :w. : .
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STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 23
hogs is daily noticeable. A large amount of meat is raised
by this department and the killing, dressing, and curing of
meat is made educational.
*A full and complete outfit of farm machinery and im-
plements is provided on the place, including an ensilage
cutter, mower, tedder, horse rake, harrows, sulky plow,
two-horse plows and all the one-horse plows and farming
tools necessary for practical use.
Experiments are constantly conducted with new and
improved varieties of field and garden seeds, with various
kinds of fruit and with foreign grasses.
Soil tests are also conducted to ascertain the relative -
value of commercial fertilizers and barnyard manure. Se-
ries of experiments are conducted with composts and com-
petitive experiments are made to ascertain the most eco-
nom ical and remunerative system of fertilization, by the ap-
plication to the soil of the element of plant food, in which
it is most deficient, and the application of the proper fer-
tilizer to the various plants for their most complete devel-
opment.
A course of lectures is given upon the care of domes-
tic animals in health and disease,-Anatomy, Pathology
a nd Jlai'r ia Medica, are taken up in this course sufficiently to
enable an intelligent st udenlt to successfullytreat the common
ailments of live stock. There are usually a sufficient num-
ber of animals coming in for treatment from the outside to
enable these lectures to be very interesting and practical.





24 NINTH ANNUAL CATAL'WIrTE "
DAIRY DEPARTIlENT.
Special attention is givrea.l'the course of lectures to
dairj husbandry, covering the tblcy in breeding dairy
stock, raising otc'alv-es, fecdin- foor milk and butter, and of
the care and handling of milk, cream, butter and cheese,
and the practical method% of dairy work in different sections
of the country. Special facilitt.ie are, offered the dairy stu-
dents, and every encouragenlent.is a:tirded t!o: make them
proficient in the art of dairying. Those becoming well
'versed in this course cait readily command permanent and'
profitable situAati6ffs. .Al resident students, male and !e-
male, receive practical, instruction in butter making. The
excellent buttr''used 'on the tables of our dining hall is all
made b;':.lie students.'
' Te, course in .iriculture extends over a period of
three years wit.h. lectures as follows:
' '. ...First Year.
-:'[ :'", '.., FLRIS- TERM.
, :r 's Soil-its d'rigin and composition kinds of soil. Im-
. prbvement of soil, drainage, terracing and manuring. Ro-
' taSon and culfi-ation of field crops. ,
. .. SECOND TERNM;
;". *W iatmlng---nlilk and cream, its. compiasition, care, man-
agon'rent and'peeuli 's&r
Practical bt i .f tthe dairy. Care, liandling
and judging of d&iry sto&ic.; Breeding dairy' stock. and
raising calves for dairy purposes.
Principles of. animal nutrition-feeding of domestic
animals and compounding feedirig rations.
P- '
~~- ~ ~ 1''





COOKING SCHOOI, VIEWS.
- *- -F '. .
.* '










STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. '25
Second Year.
FIRST TERM.
Domestic animals-their anatomy. Nature, cause and
treatment of disease in domestic animals.
SECOND TERM.
Materia Medica, or Veterinary Pharmacology.
H~~~~. ~Third Year.
FIRST TERM.
The different breeds of cattle, sheep and hogs, and
th,:ir distinctive features.
*Principles underlying the breeding of improved live
stock.
SECOND TERM.
Poultry breeding and management.
Propagation of Plants- grfting and budding. Spray-
in g plants and spraying mixtures.
Some idea of the instruction given in this department
may be gleaned from the subjoined examination papers:
First Year. -
I. Explain how plowing conserves soil moisture?
II. (a) Mention three elements of fertility in stable
manure.
(b) How does manure improve the soil besides
adding direct fertility ?
III. (a) What are the principal elements of fertility in
w vood ashes?
A. -i(b) In Nitrate of soda ?
E' IV. Explain how leguminous plants improve the soil.
;. .-- V. What is the most suitable temperature for churn-
4 ing in summer and winter? -
(b) How much salt should be added to butter ?
~F -F.
i' ,





26 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
Second Year.
I. What is the nature of Osteo Porosis and Osteo
sarcomo ?
II. Give nature cause and treatment of Thrush in
horses and mules.
III. Give nature cause and treatment in Colic in horses
and mules.
IV. What is a "specific" in the treatment of Diure-
sis in horses ?
V. What is the medical dose for a horse of the fol-
lowing: Laudanum, Turpentine, Sweet Nitre, Aloes and
Calomel?
DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTPIENT.
Needlework
includes educational sewing, dressmaking (tailor system),
darning, household mending, etc.
The first year comprises instructions in all the differ-
ent stitches used in hand sewing, including patching and
darning. Practice is given in all the various stitches upon
small pieces of various materials which are furnished by
the school.
In the second year the pupils are taught the use and
care of sewing machines, also draughting, fitting and mak-
ing dresses.
Course of Study.
FIRST YEAR.
Method of threading needle, making knot, and using
thimble. Position of body while sewing. .Swedish mode]
for teaching the position of hands and needle in taking the
principal stitches. Running, basting, stitching, back stitching
K .^
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STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 27
and overcasting. Felling and turning hem by measure and
hemming. Putting in gussets, gathering, stroking gathers
and putting on bands. Making button-holes and eyelets,
sewing on buttons, darning on cassimere. Herring-bone
stitch on flannel, chain stitching. feather stitching, and
mitering corners.
SECOND YEAR.
Instruction in the choice of materials, cutting skirts
from measure, finishing skirt and hanging. Cutting waist
sleeves from pattern, basting, fitting, trimming, finishing.
Instructions in draughting close-fitting waists. Cutting
and matching striped or plaid waists. Cutting, basting,
fitting and pressing.
Cookery.
The Cookery course taught comprises the following
subjects: A general knowledge of the nature, use and
preparation of various kinds of meat, vegetables, cereals,
fish, soup, bread, food for invalids, etc., with practice in the
best and most economical methods of cookingthem. The
pupils are taught to prepare and clean everything and leave
all in nice order when work is finished.
Course of Study.
FIRST YEAR.
Making and care of fire, measuring, dishwashing and
care of kitchen, table laying, cereals and vegetables, meats,
eggs, sauces, batters, bread, pastry, cake, desserts, etc.
SECOND YEAR.
Salads, entrees, meats, soups, fancy desserts, creams,
boning chicken, turkey and fish, a breakfast, a luncheon, a
dinner.
Pupils are required to record in note books the in-
struction received at each lesson and written examinations
are given during the course.
: .
L _





28 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
Laundry Work
Embraces notes regarding laundry-work, location and
care of laundry, appointments, classification of articles to
be laundried. Talks upon different kinds of water, sodas,
soaps, bleaching, powders. bluings, scalding, rinsing, dry-
ing, folding and ironing.
Practice work in removing stains, starching, cold and
boiled starch. Washing of white linens, prints, flannels,
and fancy articles, silks, laces, etc.
The school laundry is fitted up with approved ap-
pliances, stationary tubs, hot and cold water pipes, sanitary
drainage, etc.
Industrial training for young ladies is a growing fea-
ture in the work of the school. The large and beautiful
dormitory hall recently completed for the young ladies of-
fers fine facilities in this direction. The school has been
exceptionally fortunate in securing the services of a matron
of rare qualifications-a lady of fine culture, ripe exper-
ience and thorough devotion to the work. Girls intrusted
to her care will be sure of careful, conscientious training.
The services of a skilled teacher of cooking and sew-
ing were secured during the last vacation, and in Oct., '95,
the school was started with a well organized and equipped
industrial department for girls. The work thus far has
been exceptionally successful, theyoung ladies taking great
interest in the department. ~db
No student, male or female who has neglected the in-
dustrial courses will be allowed to graduate from the liter-
ary course.
All students will be expected to give a certain
amount of work to the institution in return for the many
rare facilities afforded.





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 29
GENERAL INFORFIATION.
It is a duty devolving upon every true Floridian to
develop as rapidly as possible the educational resources of
our State. It is a well established fact that a large percent-
age of the young people who are sent out of the State to
be educated locate, when through with their studies, in
other States, not because of intrinsically superior advant-
ages but simply from the love of change inherent in the
young. Thus the State loses annually many of its bright-
est minds, as is evidenced by the large number of Florida
boys who have risen to prominencein other parts of the
country. These minds should, if possible, be encouraged
to remain at home to aid us in the great work of develop-
ing our citizenship. Ample facilities for higher education
are now offered to the young people of our race, and liberal
inducements are offered to attract thepatronage of colored
citizens.
In accordance with the settled policy of the State it is
believed, other things being equal, that a certain preference
will always be given in appointment to those holding
diplomas from a State institution. It is also-a well-known
fact that young persons leaving Florida, with its highly
favorable climatic conditions, are apt to be. affected un-
favorably in health by the changes to higher and colder
latitudes. Therefore, considerations of State pride, health
and economy. point to the propriety of patronizing this
school.
\\'hile the especial"object of the school is o fit persons
V\~ *





B '! I:' NI NTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
I:>r tih :,:r. -l:.-i.:.n of teaching, the literary course is so
arran'.?d a; t,:. prepare the student for any of the ordinary
l:,lrsiits o1' lit. n.-. requiring special training. The institu-
ti-:n tli .ref:i.rc, c,-:mmends itself particularly to such of our
v,:tIh l:,i h.-,tll -*xes as may desire to secure a thorough
En.,li !', t::tLti-.1n.
.k:t.iL. t,.a.:l.:.rs may enter the school at such times as
their ;I..i:tie ..-hool terms will allow, receiving credit
f.:r tlhe tilmi -I'-ct in the institution each year and their
diplo:ias and d,:l treess when the two full years required by
thie 1 il:ittiion1 hall have been spent in the school and the
Incccaa!ry cx.,linnations passed. Students are urged, how-
ever, to enter at the beginning of the session, as loss of time
places them at a serious disaidantlag in the examinations,
and very frequently causes them the loss of a whole year's
work.
HISTORY.
The College was established in I887, in accordance
i with co:nstititi',:,al provision (see Article XII, Section 14);
and, by legislative enactment (see La\s :,f Fl,:rila. Chapter
3,692), it was located at Tallahassee, with an annual ap-
propriation of $4,000.oo made for its maintenance.
By action of the State Board" of Education, it was
started October 5, 1887, in charge of T., DeS. Tucker,
Principal. and T. V. Gibbs, Asst-Principal, with an attend-
ance of fifteen pupils, who had succeeded in passing the
preliminary examination.
In 1891, the school ha\ in; outgrown, its accommoda-
tions in the city, was moved out to Hi:hw:..:,d, in the sub-
urbs of Tallahassee, where, on a large and historic plantation
of over a hundred acres, the State Ih.i mi, J. extensive
preparations to accommodate all who may c:,m.. The
number of teachers has been largely increased and the





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 31
equipment and facilities made among the best in the South.
SUPPORT.
The College is supported by annual appropriations
from the Federal and State Governments. It was estab-
lished, and, prior to I891, maintained by the State as a
school for normal and manual training of teachers. This
feature of the work of the school is still maintained as the
specific end and aim of the institution. The Morrill bill,
enacted into law August 30, 1890, by Congress, gave to
each State and territory the sum of fifteen thousand dol-
lars for the year ending June 30, 1890, and an annual in-
,crease of the amount of such appropriation thereafter for
ten years, by an additional sum of one thousand dollars
over the preceding year, and the annual amount to be paid
thereafter to each State and Territory shall be twenty-five
thousand dollars." The appropriation for Florida, by offi-
cial action of Governor Fleming, formally agreed to by the
State Board of Education and the trustees of the Agricul-
tural College at Lake City, and ratified by the Legislature
at the session of 189I, has been equally divided between
the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, for white
students, and the State Normal and Industrial College for
-colored students. The State continues its annual appro-
priations as its share of the support of the school.
By special consent of the State Superintendent, attend-
ance at this school will be counted in county examinations
the same as attendance at summer normal schools.
LOCATION.
Tallahassee, the seat of the institution, is the capital
of the State of Florida and the county seat of Icr.on county.
Itis located in the beautiful hill country of Middle Flor.
ida and is noted for its freedom from epidemics and its
general healthfulness. It is a town of about three thous-





:2 ') N IN I I1 ANNUAL CATALOGUE
and i ;,,:- i iillabit.ants, is the center of the finest agricul-
tLral se:ti.:.In ..!' the State,and is notably free from the vices,
p*:- attracti-.,iin and idan.irerous associations of the larger cities.
The c-'innllnity is heartily in sympathy with the Faculty
in its end-eav.',r to mnke the school a blessing of wide-spread
inrluten.: thir,_ugil the State, and co-operates willingly in
every effort to further its interests. Churches of the Prim-
itive and Missionary Baptist, A M. E., C. M. E. and Epis-
copalian denominations, under earnest pastors and Sabbath-
school superintendents, offer to the young such religious
training and influences as will promote their religious de-
velopment. Students are required to attend some church
service every Sunday. Daily morning and evening devo-
tions are conducted on the grounds. Weekly prayer meet-
.ings are conducted by 'the students themselves, assisted by
members of the faculty.
The school site is a magnificent property, with spa-
cious campus shaded by stately trees, and located within
easy reach of the.city, on a high hill overlooking the Gar-
den City; while on either side the well-tilled acres of the
college farm stretch away across the surrounding valley.
The grounds and buildings are lighted by gas, bountifully
supplied with water by the city water works, and connected
by telephone with the city. Comfortable and convenient
dormitory accommodations have been provided. These
dormitories are conducted and controlled by the Faculty,
and, unless excused by special permission of the President,
ALL STUDENTS NOT RESIDENTS OF TALLAHASSEE WILL BE
KRE,:i- i-.E:i' TO BOARD AT THE SCHOOL. This is an important
natter to students. It has been found by actual experience
that students constantly surrounded by the educative at-
mosphere of the school, show a much greater proportionate
impr,:> mncllt in a given time than students who are only a
part of the time in direct contact with its influences., The





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STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 3 .
constant associations with others having the same specific
aim, the social contact, the kindly criticism, and the. moral
support of teachers and fellow students, and more than afl,
the constant supervision such students receive, make it
highly advantageous to any student to lyve within college
walls. A large dormitory hall for the girls has been re-
cently erected.
APPARATUS.
The Physical Laboratory contains a complete set of
apparatus of about one hundred and fo: ty pieces for the illus-
tration of the properties of matter,. and principles of dy-
namics, simple machines, liquids, pneumatics, magnetism,
frictional electricity, thermo-electricity, sound, heat and
/light.
The Chemical Laboratory contains apparatus and
- chemicals for work in analysis and demonstrations in the
study of that science, and for such analysis of soils, fer-
tilizers, as may be incidental to the agricultural experimen-
tation on the farm.
The course in Physics and Chemistry embraces, be,
sides recitations from the text book, experiments by the
instructor, and as far as possible by the students, thus fix-
ing indelibly on their minds the principles taught as well as
developing their powers of observation to a wonderful
degree.
Among the apparatus may be mentioned-
I Toepler-Holti electric machine:
I Hydrostatic bellows.
I Hydraulic press.
I Inclination compass.
I Telegraph instrument.





34 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
I Set Geissler tubes.
I Savart's bell resonator.
,Octave of organ pipes from Ut, to Ut4.
I Siren of Cogniard La Tour.
, Pair of.Parabolih: reflectors.
I Acme compound microscope.
I Polariscope.
I Automatic air tester.
The Mathematical Department is supplied with a
carefully selected equipment of valuable apparatus con-
sisting of-
i Queen & Co.'s improved complete engineer's transit.
I Gurley's Vernier surveyor's compass.
I13-foot mahogany Philadelphia leveling rod.
i Grumman's 66-foot surveyor's chain.
I .Achr.:nmatic 54-inch telescope, 3} inch objective.
I Set blackboard mathematical drawing implements.
ISet Kennedy's dissecting mathematical blocks, etc.
SESSION.
The session opens on the last Wednesday in Septem-
ber, and closes on the last Friday in May. Commence-
ment exercises are held during the following week. The
first term of each session ends the last week in January,
and the second term begins the first Monday in February.
A short vacation is given during the holidays, and a re-
.ess between the ending of the first and the beginning of
the second term.
EXPENSES.
There is no charge for tuition. The following is an
approximate estimate of the necessary expenses for the
full session:





-'I'ATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. ,;5
Board and room rent (iinclui'liii' lights and fuel) at
$7.00 per in.,nth (36 weeks) .... .. S5, 75
X \\-a-lhin..' etc., Si E.' per month ........ 12 00
B,.:,ol; and stationary, about .... 5 '.:.
Tnci::rlital fee .. .. .. ....... 2 00
Total ....... ....... $76 75
(Tllideltall i:e in model ..:!,:.,I. Sl.oo.)
YT:,Lin. ladies who desire to do their own washing and
ironing can do so.
Each Student llIUSt p'o:v ide hiiu -elf with at least-
4 Towels.
3 Sheets (siiil!e-bed sheet).
I Pillow.
3 Pill:ow\ cases.
I PB!ul:l;t
I Comfort or quilt.
Table n:all>;is'.
LE< !i. ul:i i
'Lectures are given by members of t1i.: fc:ulty on such
social, i.tlii:al or economic topics as may seem -,l.,! ,:.p, iate..
Attendance at tilr -. ikctl. -. is compulsory. From time to
time, a- .'1:! i',t'ii nitv ill a!ll.-. I:,,blic. lectures by scholarly
and !.ji.inllnlt *- _.al:.r: will be given for the benefit of the
m ini]d.:l, cultured and moral i.iaul.l. ... 1 and n\.-,n.. i,,l ,_ in
the pupils.
MUSIC, DRAWING AND ELOCUTION.
Special attention is given to vocal :nll-ic alnd fri:e ia.'lid
dilai. inll. till I.rl, : .l t the course.
L





3'f6 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
LITERARY SOCIETY..
"TH E LYCEUM" is an active organization of the
.tudents. of both sexes, connected with the institution. Its
meetings. held weekly, are full of interest and offer ex-
cellent opportunities for literary endeavor. It is officered
and controlled entirely by students. Public exercises are
given from time to time. Its annual exhibition is one of
the features of Commencement week.
LIBRARY.
An excellent library has been formed,' quite a number
of valuable books having been contributed to the school
by its friends, or purchased through a special fund set aside
for that nurll'.se. These works, b;,th for reference and
general reading, are free for the use of students. Choice
.periodicals are regularly received and placed at the disposal
of members of the school.
EXAMINATIONS.
At the close of each term, the classes are examined in
the studies of that term; and at-the end of the session there
are general examinations in all del-,arntmtnts. Every recita-
tion and examination is marked, and a record kept by the
faculty of the attainments of each stlldcnt. Every student,
falling below 70 in his annual average Will be required to
take the year's work over a a.in.
MEDALS.
A handsome medal has been offered by the' Talla-
hasseean, one of the leading newspapers of the State, to the
young man sho\iin. greatest k ill in the Industrial De-
partment. A similar medal is ,offred to the young ladies
for excellence in the Doime.tic Sciencl e Department,
by another friend of the Instit,,ti:.ln. Information con-
cerning his progress and deportment is, when requested,
communicated to the parent orguardian. Examinations





YOUNG LADIES' DORMITORY HALL.





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STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. >7
will be held on the M\onday and Tuesday preceding the
opening of the fall term (Sept. 28 and 29, 1896, for the
benefit of all applicants who wish to enter the school and
for such students as may have been conditioned at the an-
nual examination in JunIe, '96.
REGULATIONS.
The regulations of the school are few and simple, ap-
pealing to thli student's self-respect and personal responsi-
bility; but all the students will be required to pledge
before admission, unqualified submission to those regula-
tions.
Students from abroad will be required to abstain from
all social or public gatherings held at night, except by ex-
press permission of the President; and to spend their
evenings in their rooms in study-Friday evenings
excepted, when they may, to such an extent as will not
interfere with the prosecution of the work for which they
are here, participate- in social and other innocent recreation,
w.ith th e klno\'led:e and consent of the President.
All idlin, on the streets, or around places of public
or quLr-ti:,nable character, is strictly prohibited.
The student in each department pursues his studies in
his priatr: ro .,nm and meets with his class for recitation and
general exercises in the school room. No arrangement is
made for those who have not sufficient maturity and self-
control to study under these conditions.
<*- .- .





38 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
SUGGESTIONS.
Students arriving from abroad are advised to notify
the school authorities of the date and schedule time of
their arrival that the wagon may meet them to convey their
luggage, free of charge, to the college. In case they ar-
rive without having given such 'i:tiicatioln, they can easily
walk to the institution, as the buildings are within i:l.lin
sight of the depot. Their baggage can then be sent for.
Some of the leading railroads in the State have kindly
offered, as an incentive to regular attendance, to all stu-
dents who shall spend the entire term in school, transpor-
tation homeward at the close of the school year free of
charge, upon the certificate of the President or Secretary
that such students paid full fare over those roads coming
to the school. It is therefore suggested that all students
who expect to avail themselves of this generous offer
should 1paY ll fare coming to Tallahassee, It is further
suggested that all students, before coming to Tallahassee,
write to the Secretary of the school for a blank certificate
to be signed by the station agent selling them tickets when
coming to school. This is important, as free transporta-
tion will not be given to those at the end of the term who
have no certificates.
Every student should bring what text books he may
already have touching the ground he expects to cover dur-
ing the year. These books need not be of the exact kind





STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. :1
mentioned in the'curriculum. They will prove iusefl1 fr:,i
reference.
Each stidclenlt I!..,uld: own a small standard dlicti:ianiy.
All text books required in th>, regular course of stuid! can
be secured at tih Tallahassee book stores at the reuLlar
market prices.
Students should be provided with such plain, substan-
tial clot:hin. g ii, mays bI neces.aryv f:r cleanliness and health,
but the) are adi:ised again.-t cxtrava.-gan:we or display in
matt-erl of dress. Ncatiinrs,. not gaudd and glitter," should
be the standard.
Young ladies should come provided with overshoes
and waterproofs.
Parents and guardians are advised, in making remit-
tances for students, to send money by money order or
registered letter direct to the Secretary. All such remit-
taln,:ce will be receipted for by the Secretary immediately.
He will not be responsible for money sent unregistered by
ordinary course of mail; nor will he be responsible for
money sent to him by parents through students.
All money sent tor music should be sent to the Sec-
retary yho will receipt for same anld ]Jecp .an account with
the ,n .i cal de[.laltltmet.
. ,lI tdlt; bringing money above their immediate needs
to the school are advised to deposit it with the Faculty, or
in one of the city banks.
Board must be paid monthly in advance; z. e., the
board bill for. each month must: be paid before the month
commences. All bills run from the first of the month.
All l:'n-rc>ident students must board at the school,
unless specially excused by the President.
Parents are requested not- to send eatables to students
> !~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





40 NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE
in the dormitories .except upon the receipt of the written
permission of the President to the student to receive such
eatables. Any eatables sent in disregard of this request
will be used for the students' tables in the dining hall.
For further information or catalogue, address,
T. V. GIBBS,
Secretary State N. & I. College,
P. O. Drawer 523, Tallahassee. Fla.





STATE N'I-:MALr AND I[NLI;-T[ilAL COLLEGE. 41
CALENDAR FOR 1896=1897.
Tenth Exan-linati.',n of applicants for admission to the
school, S. ltt nbcr 28 and 29, 1896.
Tenth Annual Session commences September 30, (first
W-:ln._:id i, I896.
T!h.iink. in4 Day, N,:\ emibel 2', 1896.
Christmas Vacation, December 24, i896, to Tantuary 4,
IS..,7.
Semi-Annual E\aminati.'n. Jaunary 25-28, ].S7.
First Term end- .aIITal.*' 2.S I-i'.
'.>.c.-:i.>t Term c,-,m ince. F.:bru.l)y I, I897. *
Annual Exaniinati.I.ns. May 24-28, I897.
Ainulal Exliibiti:-in :of the Lyceum, Tuesday, June I,
Exhibition Day (of Jnduitrial Depaltmcintc \\'edne,-
da\, une 2, IS;,,.
Annual A,.:.lress, \V ,:dleJay, June 2, IS..7.
.A-,i1nn, Di\, \\'e.l..ne-d.., IiHle 2, I897,
raJ,,atin.: Ex ..:ises ThUrlay, June 3, 1897.,
ilMo:ntlll Iectures, f.:.iuth Friday in each month.
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