• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Preface
 Prologue
 Conception 1918-1919
 Embryo 1920-1929
 Burping 1930-1939
 Crawling 1940-1949
 Standing 1950-1959
 Toddling 1960-1969
 Walking 1970-1978
 The tree of abundant living (our...
 Epilogue
 Bibliography
 Appendix A
 Appendix B
 Appendix C
 Appendix D
 Appendix E
 Appendix F
 Appendix G
 Appendix H
 Appendix I
 Appendix J
 Appendix K
 Appendix L
 Appendix M
 Notes
 The author
 Back Cover






Title: Brief History of the Division of Health, Physical Education and recreation at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University from 1918 through 1978 (60 years)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000058/00001
 Material Information
Title: Brief History of the Division of Health, Physical Education and recreation at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University from 1918 through 1978 (60 years)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bartley, Lua Stewart
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1979
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000058
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA1688

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
        Inside front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Dedication
        Page i
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Preface
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Prologue
        Page 1
    Conception 1918-1919
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Embryo 1920-1929
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Burping 1930-1939
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Crawling 1940-1949
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Standing 1950-1959
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Toddling 1960-1969
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Walking 1970-1978
        Page 27
    The tree of abundant living (our service program)
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Epilogue
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Bibliography
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Appendix A
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Appendix B
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Appendix C
        Page 50
    Appendix D
        Page 51
    Appendix E
        Page 52
    Appendix F
        Page 53
    Appendix G
        Page 54
    Appendix H
        Page 55
    Appendix I
        Page 56
    Appendix J
        Page 57
    Appendix K
        Page 58
    Appendix L
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Appendix M
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Notes
        Page 63
    The author
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text







A Brief History of
The Division of
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University
from 1918 through 1978
(60 years)

by o

Lua Stewart Bartley










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A Brief History of
The Division of
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University
from 1918 through 1978
(60 years)


by

Lua Stewart Bartley


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Dedicated to the Memory
of
Mrs. Anita Prater Stewart
who taught at this University
for 46 years,
33 of which were

is.Divisn
this.Division.


























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"No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter ofphysical training; it is
his duty as a citizen to keep himselfin good condition, ready to serve his
country at a moment's notice."
-Socrates (Scholasticus)

"There is no better way to teach a man to be honorable than to give him an
opportunity to play and re-create normally with his fellows."
--Charles Evans Hughes

"All work and no play is a motto not carried into the life of this school. We
believe in seasons of play not to the extent that either suffers. Neither is
sacrificed fr the other."
-Nathan Benjamin Young, President
State Normal and Industrial College
for Colored Students
1901-1923

"The only people capable of teaching physical education are those who have
been trained in physical education."
-John Robert Edward Lee, President
Florida A and M College
1924-1944

We must have good facilities so as to be first-class citizens in sickness or in
health."
-William Herbert Gray, Jr., President
Florida A and M College
1944-1949

"The Rattlers will strike, strike and strike again; but remember that total
success is paramount at this University."
-George William Gore, Jr., President
Florida A&M University
1950-1968

"Whenever we can find the best qualified teachers available we will endeavor to
get them at this University."
-Benjamin Luther Perry, Jr., President
Florida A&M University
1968-1977
"A sound body, built by proper physical activities, is as important as a sound
mind. FAMU has a great tradition in the areas of health, physical education
and recreation of which we should be justly proud."
-Walter Lee Smith, President
Florida A&M University
1977-

















Foreword


This year, 1978, is the sixtieth that physical education has been taught at
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. During the earlier years of the
State Normal and Industrial College for Colored Students it was called physical
culture, later physical training, then physical education; now it is a Division of
Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
As we embark upon the last decade prior to the Centennial Celebration of
the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, it is befitting to review the
past and become more zealous about the program in the years ahead.


















Teachers


Students


Facilities/Curricula


_ ____ __ __


6'





Table of Contents


Page
iii


FOREWORD ....

PREFACE.....

PROLOGUE ...

CONCEPTION

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Tachers
The Students
Miscellany ..

EMBRYO 192(

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
Miscellany .

BURPING 1931

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
Highlights...

CRAWLING 1!

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
ighighlights...

STANDING 19

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
Highlights...


1. .. . . h ..................... . .
..9..... .................. .. ....... .. .. .... .. .


1918-1919 ..................................


-1929 . . ..............................


-1939 .... ......... .... ...... .... ... ..


94-1949


50-1959


ALI


vii

1

2

2
2
2
2
3

4

4
4
5
5
5

6

6
7
8
9
9


..................................... 11

+ + . . . . d b & d + 1
S. P............ .. ........ 12
..................*.................. 12
..................................... 12
+.......................+ + .. ....... 4 14
.. . . . . . . ..... 14


I I +d kA... .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ...* d .. .4 1 7

. .I 4 .. 4 P 4 h 4 4i. 5 4 P 4. 4 P 4 4. I + 9 + 17
. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 17

..................................... 19







TODDLING


The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
Highlights .


WALKING 197

The Facilities
The Curricula
The Teachers
The Students
Highlights...


EPILOGUE ....


BIBLIOGRAPHY


APPENDICES .

NOTES........


0-1978 ..........


.. ... .. .. 27

.... . . 27
...27
, ....... .. .. .. 29
S......, ,... ...... 30
................ ... 3 1


.. ..... .. .... .........- 37


.. ... ...... ... .... 4 0.


43


64


1960-1969


'


I. .. ,.. +









Preface


History is a record of the past and serves as a guide to the future. This study
is concerned primarily with the instructional program which led to a degree;
however references are made to athletics for clarification. The writer viewed
physical education and athletics as "Siamese twins "-can be separated only by
a delicate operation; hence the sports coached appear in parentheses following
the teachers' names.
Factual information is presented concerning the facilities, curricula,
teachers and students. Comments are made on other activities involving
personnel in the Division. This is done by decades with some overlapping. It is
hoped that this narrative will be of interest to the present and future generations,
especially students, teachers and administrators who are concerned with
progress.
The major sources of information were Official Bulletins ofthe University;
Official Class Schedules for Semesters, Tiimesters and Quarters; The History of
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University; Departmental Annual Re-
ports; Division's Self-Study Report for 1973-1978; programs of past activities;
interviews; The Famcean; The Famuan and The FAMU Alumni News.
Gratitude is expressed to all persons for any assistance given. Special
thanks are due to Mr. James N. Eaton and Mrs. Helen N.H. Perry of the Black
Archives Research Center and Museum; Mr. Hardy Paul and Miss Lizzie M.
Washington of the Registrar's Office and Mrs. Alverta N. Morris of the
Coleman Library for making materials available.
Appreciation is given to Mr. William H. Cotton of the Industrial Arts
Department for a replica of "The Wheel" and "The Tree To Abundant
Living-Our Service Program".
Without the cooperation and encouragement received from Dr. Oscar A.
Moore, former Departmental Head (1962-1973); Dr. Virden Evans, present
Chairman, and other members of the Division of Health, Physical Education
and Recreation, this history could not have been written.
To Dr. Walter L. Smith, President of the University; Dr. Gertrude L.
Simmons, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Dr. Paul B. Mohr, Sr., Dean of
the College of Education; Dr. Larey G. Rackley, Chairman, and other
members of The Selection Committee for Sabbatical Leaves, a "Thank You" is
in order.


vil





A number of interested persons have read parts of the manuscript and made
valuable suggestions. Among them were Dr. Marcus H. Boulware, Mrs.
Edwina B. Martin and Mrs. Marolyn W. Smith.
Special acknowledgments are made to Mr. Robert L. Allen, Director of
University Relations; Mr. James L. Bruton, Chairman of the Printing Depart-
ment; Dr. Larry E. Rivers, Assistant Professor of History and Chairman of The
University Research Committee; Lt. Col. Willie E. Jenkins, Director of
University Development, and Mr. Roosevelt Wilson, Director of University
Publications, for assistance given in the final preparation of this study.
The writer does not consider this narrative to be a scholarly document; yet
it is hoped that a revision and a continuation will be forthcoming by a more
experienced researcher.

L.SB.


viii











Prologue


Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University had its inception in 1887
as a State Normal and Industrial School for Colored Students. It was established
in accordance to constitution provision (Article XII Section 14) and by
legislative enactment (Laws of Florida 3692).1 Fifteen students were the first
enrollees. Each paid seven dollars per month for room and board, one dollar per
month for laundering and twenty-five cents per day for nursing.
In 1899, Ellen O. Paige, a graduate of Vienna Millinery and Tailoring
School of New York and further study at Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and
Columbia University, joined the staff as an instructor of sewing and cooking. In
1901, Miss Paige introduced tennis as the first game to be played at the now
Florida A&M University. She spread sand over an area and used old chicken
wire for a backstop. This area was used for intramural competition until 1933.
The year 1906 marked the beginning of baseball and football spearheaded
by George M. Sampson, Professor of Mathematics and Latin, and Jubie B.
Bragg, Director of Blacksmithing and Wheeling.2
Physical culture, physical training or physical education was not a part of
the curricula for elementary, high school and normal students until after World
War IL







Conception 1918-1919


THE FACILITIES
In addition to the sand tennis court erected in 1901, the only other facilities
were open spaces with the sky as the ceiling, trees as the walls and sand and
grass as the surface. It was really space unlimited.

THE CURRICULA
The Official Bulletin for 1918-1919 stated that all courses in physical
culture were separated according to sex.
Through the Holloway Athletic-Association, the young men participated
in the usual athletic activities. The young women, in addition to daily walking
exercises, engaged in basketball, croquet and lawn tennis.
Male students were organized into Cadet Companies, each with a captain.
This organizational arrangement was maintained to complement study and help
in a well-rounded physical, mental and moral development of the boys. In
addition to Company Battalion drills, a course in military calisthenics was
given in the open air.3
There was a total of four classes taught.4 Students in vocational agricul-
ture, home economics, commercial study and teacher education also pursued
courses in physiology and hygiene.

THE TEACHERS
A perusal of Official Bulletins for 1918-19 and 1919-20 revealed that Sadie
A. Jenkins,5 B.S. from Florida A and M College, was an instructor of English
and geography, She was assigned also as an instructor of physical culture for
girls. Miss Jenkins was a member of the staff until 1923.6

THE STUDENTS
The total enrollment7 was 312 students in 1918-19 and 339 in 1919-20.
During this period the girls outnumbered the boys.




3

MISCELLANY

All students were required to rise at a given hour in response to a bell
known as "'reveille ", go to meals and attend classes regularly and punctually in
designated uniforms. A supervised study period was held each night with
compulsory attendance. A bell known as "taps" was used to signal lights out
and time to retire.





Embryo 1920-1929


THE FACILITIES
A frame building at a cost of $10,000 was constructed in 1922 under the
administration of President Nathan B. Young.8 It was located on the west side of
Boulevard Street where the new addition to the dining hall (Commons) now
stands. For six years this structure was used for daily chapel, special programs,
social affairs and commencement exercises. During the latter years of this
decade, it was also used as an indoor facility for physical education classes.
With the construction of Lee Hall in 1928, under the administration of
President J.R.E. Lee, the old chapel was used also as a gymnasium.

THE CURRICULA
During this decade, the term physical education was used instead of
physical culture or physical training. All girls were required to take some phase
of physical education throughout their stay in school. Military training, major
sports and mass athletics constituted the types of activities for boys. These
courses were designed especially to meet the demands of Land Grant colleges.
Two hours per week in military training were considered as a part of the
requirement in physical education. Boys also took courses in physical educa-
tion.
Required courses had specific titles as baseball, basketball, field hockey,
football, and games, contests and relays. An increase was noted in the total
number of course offerings from four to 16.9
The aim of physical education was to present a well-rounded two-year
course so that graduates could enter the fields of coaching, playground directors
and teachers of physical education. Courses added to fulfill these needs were:
Educational Gymnastics
Folk and Aesthetic Dancing
History and Psychology of Physical Education
Survey of Materials in Physical Education
Theory, Methods and Practice
The Science of Coaching






No excuses were accepted for missing battalion formation and drill for
boys and physical education for girls. An absence without permission brought
action by the Demerit Committee. Students appearing without uniform were
considered absent.
Students matriculating at the institution had to maintain a minimum
average of "C" (70) or would be placed on probation. While on the first
probation, participation in extra-curricular activities was denied. A total of 124
semester hours, which included physical education for women and military
training for men, was required for graduation. Honors were bestowed at
graduation in accordance with the average. Grades in physical education and
industrial arts were not considered unless the student was a major in that area.

THE TEACHERS
In 1923, Anita Prater Stewart, a graduate of Cookman Institute, joined the
staff as the one physical education teacher for that year. For five years Mrs.
Stewart was the only teacher in this area.'0
Beginning in 1925, physical education was under the Division of Liberal
Arts and Sciences with R. O'Hara Lanier as dean. During the year of 1928,
Jubie B. Bragg, a graduate of Talladega College who had been a member of the
faculty since 1906, accepted duties in physical education. In 1929 Winifred
Bates, a graduate of this Institution, along with Caleb J.A. Paddyfote, accepted
employment, the latter in military training. The largest number of teachers
during this decade was three."

THE STUDENTS
The maximum total enrollment during this decade was 531 in the year
1925-26.2 The number of students certifying in physical education was not
available at the time of this investigation.

MISCELLANY

The wearing of a designated uniform and attending chapel exercises daily
were still requirements.






Burping 1930-1939


THE FACILITIES
Early in the 1930s, Gibbs Park, a small amphitheater, was designed at a
cost of $9,000. Among its uses were band concerts, picnics, demonstrations by
the Department of Physical Education, play day activities and, in some
instances, a teaching station for physical education classes.
In 1932, the first gymnasium (old chapel) was remodeled at a cost of $1,500
with a seating capacity of 700.P There were no facilities for heating. One
considered this structure as air conditioned by nature because at times more
window panes were out than in; in fact it was often called a "painless"
(paneless) building. No lockers, showers or restrooms were provided. During
class periods it was called "the cracker box," but during intercollegiate
basketball games it was referred to as "the sardine can" because 1000 spectators
occupied a space designed for 700. Two small vertical closets were for
equipment used in archery, basketball, ping pong, shuffleboard and volleyball.
Equipment for field hockey, soccer and speedball, softball, as well as
dumbbells, Indian clubs and wands were kept in a horizontal bin under a row of
benches. Tumbling mats, when not in use, were rolled up and stored in the
comers or under the stairways that led to the upstairs balcony. The piano, with
approximately 50 of the 88 keys, was still able to produce sounds. Record
players and records were seldom available for instructional purposes. The
former stage of the old chapel was enclosed as an office space for the women
teachers. Office space for the men teachers was located in one of the men's
dormitories. Later, an area in the basement of Melvin Lodge, a women's
dormitory, was provided for the women until a snake was found there. A room
then was provided on the first floor of Jackson Davis Hall opposite the Dean of
Women's Office.
During the year 1933, four clay tennis courts were constructed at a cost of







$1,556. They were located southwest of the now Foster-Tanner Fine Arts
Center. These courts were in use until 1967. The athletic field was improved at a
cost of $8,000.



THE CURRICULA
The Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences, under the guidance of R.
O'Hara Lanier and later Eugene P. Southall, served all 500 plus students during
1930-1939. This area of instruction became the Department of Physical
Education in 1937. The number of course offerings for major students increased
from 14 to 22. The required service courses remained on a segregated basis, but
increased from eight to 32;"4 these included the addition of softball, soccer,
speedball, tumbling, tennis and volleyball. A course in personal hygiene was
required of all students in the Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
An orientation course for all freshman women students was designed
which allowed them to become acquainted with physical education activities
that could be elected for a semester during the sophomore, junior and senior
years. These courses were taken in sequence as shown below:


First Semester Second Semester
fieldball volleyball
soccer dancing
speedball stunts and tumbling
field hockey softball
basketball tennis

Instruction in each activity lasted approximately three weeks.
Unless officially excused by the college physician, two class periods per
week were required for female students. Only in special situations were
exemptions made. Women students were classified in groups with limits of
participation as indicated:
Grup Limit of Participation
I Any activity and intercollegiate sports
II Regular class and intramural activities
III Regular class only
IV Restricted recreational activities
V Rest and/or specific prescribed exercises
Recreational activities included archery, croquet, darts, horseshoe pitch-
ing, ping pong and shuffleboard. Students with disorders peculiar to females
engaged in Mosher exercises and bicycle riding.
Two years of "applied physical education were the requirements for male






freshmen and sophomores. Military training still satisfied the requirements in
physical education. Junior and senior male students were allowed to select their
activities if all health and posture requirements were met. For students seeking
the two-year certificate and those qualifying for a baccalaureate degree, the
following courses were added:
Administration of Physical Education and Health
Advanced Recreation Activities
Community Play and Recreation
Corrective Physical Education
First Aid
History of Physical Education
Intramural Activities
Personal Hygiene
Principles of Health Education
Principles of Physical Education
Practice Teaching in Physical Education
All of these courses were coeducational.

THE TEACHERS
In 1930 Bragg Paddyfote and Stewart were still the three teachers. During
1931 Clementine Nelson Daniels (basketball and tennis), who had attended
Wilberforce University and Hampton Institute and was teaching domestic
science here, and Theodore Wright (basketball, football and tennis), a graduate
of Baker University with further study at the University of Illinois and the
University of Michigan were employed; thus Daniels, Stewart and Wright were
the three teachers in 1931-32 and 1932-33. It was noted that Theodore Briggs of
the Industrial Arts Department taught a course in tennis during the latter year.
It was in 1933 that Mrs. Daniels became the college dietitian and Mrs.
Stewart was appointed as a critic teacher at the Lucy Moten Demonstration
School, a pan of the college structure. E Irene Ford, a graduate of Sargent
School of Physical Education, was employed this year. Miss Ford and Mr.
Wright were the two teachers in 1933-34.
During the summer of 1934, Wright resigned and Lua S. Bartley (basket-
ball, tennis and track), a graduate of Howard University and later the University
of Michigan, joined Miss Ford and kept the total number of teachers at two for
1934-35. Bartley was granted a leave of absence for graduate study during the
second semester of 1935-36 and was replaced by Lucille D. Bennings, a
graduate of Drake University; thus the total number of teachers did not change.
In 1936-37 Bartley returned and was allied with William "Big Bill" Bell
(basketball, football and track), a graduate of the Ohio State University and
Cecile A. Harrison (track), a graduate of Michigan State Normal College and
later the Ohio State University, which made three teachers during 1936-37.






The year 1937-38 was really the beginning of an organized Department of
Physical Education with Bartley, W. Bell and Harrison, plus the employment of
Alonzo S. "Jake" Gaither (basketball and football), a graduate of Knoxville
College and the Ohio State University. Academic wings were spreading. For the
two years following, these four teachers worked zealously for a more produc-
tive department. William Bell served as departmental head until 1943.
In 1939 Horace D. Bell (football), a graduate of the University of
Minnesota and a younger brother of "Bill" Bell, was employed, thus increas-
ing the departmental faculty to five in 1939-40.t5

THE STUDENTS
The total number of students in each year of this decade showed an
increase. During the year 1930-31 the total enrollment was 280; whereas in
1939-40 it was 876.1* Among the students who received a bachelor's degree
with physical education as a major were James Anderson, Lydia Benton, Annie
Mae Clark, James A. Ellerbe, James Everett, Theodore Faircloth, Agnes C.
Henderson, Dorothy L. Maxwell, Emma Lee Turner, Alton Williams, and
Dorothy Wright.

HIGHLIGHTS
The connection between military training and physical education re-
mained in evidence throughout this decade. All students were required to be in a
designated uniform for the "Line of March" which took place at noon on
Sunday and Wednesdays. The professor of military training marshalled the
male students and the women physical education teachers were in charge of the
female students. The duties of these three persons included checking attend-
ance, attire and the adherence to the rhythmical beats of the drum in the band.
Formations were on the lawn and students marched in and out of the auditorium.
Attendance at Vespers each Sunday at 6:15 p.m. was compulsory and the
students were in uniform. Two Negro Spirituals, "Swing Low Sweet Chariot"
and "Steal Away to Jesus", were sung by the choir at each of these services. In
1933, under the tutelage of Coach "Ted" Wright, several freshman physical
education major students played in the First Orange Blossom Classic in
Jacksonville, Florida. James Anderson scored a touchdown and Alton Williams
kicked a field goal which netted a 9-6 victory for FAMCEE over Howard
University. Playing on Howard's team were such stars as Booker Gaither,
younger brother of "Jake" Gaither, and Paul Palmer. Before the end of this
decade, Anderson was an assistant to the Dean of Men and to the Commandant
at FAMCEE and Williams had earned a master's degree in physical education at
the University of Michigan.
During this segregated period, Colin English was State Superintendent of
Public Instruction and D.E. Williams was Supervisor of Negro Education for






the State of Florida. Mr. Williams sought to improve the quality of health
education and reading in Negro elementary and high schools. During 1936-37,
under the auspices of the Florida State Tuberculosis and Health Association
with Mrs. May McCormick Pynchon as Executive Secretary, Lua Bartley and
Mrs. D.E. Williams attended 63 of the 67 County Teachers' Meetings, giving
suggestions for improving those programs.
Two features of a less formal nature were the Annual Physical Education
Demonstrations and the Play Day Activities. Demonstrations were staged in
Gibbs Park during commencement week as a culmination of that year's work.
Students exhibited their skills in various dances, drills, stunts, tumbling and
pyramid building. Some activities were performed in the regular physical
education uniforms while others involved the use of simple costumes. The folk
dancers depicting Ireland, Finland, Scotland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden
used costumes representing each country. Students in the high school depart-
ment also appeared on the program, since many of their classes had been taught
by physical education majors during their semester of practice teaching. Play
Day Activities were planned for the entire campus family. President Lee
required every student and asked every teacher to participate. In his words:
"This is not a day for you to go fishing; if you are too old to play, just stand in
one place and shake. Responses Were excellent. The teachers in the Depart-
ment planned and organized the activities; students majoring in physical
education and other teachers supervised them. Participants registered three
days in advance and joined in at least six activities during the day of fun. All
available facilities and equipment on campus were used. Among the other
teachers assisting were Sylvester Beasley (auto mechanics); Theodore Briggs
(industrial arts); B. Fleming Clarke (mathematics); Essie M. Curtright
(French); George W. Jackson (Spanish); Harold S. Jenkins (trade and industrial
education); Charity M. Mance (educational psychology); Albert S. Parks
(history); Helen M. Pryor (music) and E. Earl Ware (biology). Activities were
from archery to volleyball plus tug-of-war for those desiring such.
Among the contributing authors of articles in the Quarterly Journal
(FAMCEE) during this decade were Lua S. Bartley, William M. Bell, Alonzo S.
Gaither and Cecile A. Harrison.





Crawling 1940-1949


THE FACILITIES
The four clay tennis courts constructed and the athletic field improved
during the previous decade were still in use. During the last three years of this
decade, an off-campus facility for teaching swimming was available.
In 1948, on the west side of Railroad Avenue (now Wahnish Way), a
Community Gymnasium was erected from an aeroplane hangar. After being
remodeled in 1952, the total cost was $178,079. This structure comprised two
parts, one designated as a men's gymnasium, the other as a women's gym-
nasium. Just as physical education and athletics were inseparable, so were these
two gymnasia. Both sexes used the entire facility until 1963. This duplex could
be described as:


Men's Gymnasium
2 offices
I regular classroom
1 official basketball
court for varsity and
class instruction in
combination with
1 volleyball court


Women's Gymnasium
1 office
3 regular classrooms
1 basketball court for
instruction in
combination with
1 volleyball court
2 shuffleboard courts
A rolling partition
which made it
possible for two
activities as
fundamental
movements and
rhythms or
gymnastics


Total
3 offices
4 regular classrooms
2 basketball courts
2 volleyball courts
2 shuffleboard courts
A rolling partition
which made it
possible for two
activities as
fundamental
movements and
rhythms or
gymnastics


Heating facilities, a small storage space, a rest room and approximately 20
lockers were on each side, but no showers. On the west side of the building was
an outdoor basketball/volleyball court.






THE CURRICULA
This area of instruction was still known as the Department of Physical
Education under the Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences with Professor E.P.
Southall as dean until 1947; then Dr. C.L. Spellman became dean.
The total number of course offerings reached 47 in 1940-41, but declined
to 37 in 1945-46.1 This reduction might have been due to World War II.
During the first half of this decade, all students were required to pursue a
course in physical education each semester of matriculation; later the require-
ment was reduced to two years. Courses added were:
Bait and Fly Casting
Creative Dance
Golf
Modem Dance
Recreational Games and Sports
Track and Field
Basketball, softball, tennis and volleyball were the courses offered most
frequently. During the latter part of this decade, swimming was taught as an
elective at an off-campus facility. Intramural athletics, as an outgrowth of class
instruction, increased rapidly.

To the curriculum for major students the following courses were added:
Health Diagnosis and Individual Physical Education
Introduction to Physical Education
Intramurals and Officiating
Materials and Methods in Physical Education (secondary level)
Nutrition
Personal and Community Health
Physiology of Exercise
Skill Techniques in Individual Sports
Skill Techniques in Team Sports
Stunts, Tumbling and Gymnastics
These additions resulted in deleting some courses, combining others and
renaming a few.
It was during this decade that the area of instruction became a Department
of Health and Physical Education. A bachelor of science degree, with physical
education as a teaching major, was awarded and upon completion of certain
designated courses, the students were certified in health education.


THE TEACHERS
After two years of employment, Horace Bell resigned to accept a job in the
field of recreation and community service and later pursued professional study






in the field of medicine. During 1941-42 the institution was fortunate to have
the services of Herman N. Neilson (football, gymnastics and tennis), a graduate
of Springfield College of Physical Education and later New York University.
Cecile A. Harrison resigned at the end of the school year. Fate played a
favorable role in employing Bertha P. James Minor (basketball), a graduate of
Florida A and M College and later Indiana University, as well as Geraldine
Geiger Underwood (second semester), a graduate of Talladega College, which
made a total of six teachers in 1942-43. In the spring of 1943, William Bell, who
had been departmental head for six years, answered the call to the armed
services. During 1943-44 Bartley, Gaither, Minor and Neilson were joined by E
Yvonne Walker Hoard, a graduate of Howard University and the University of
Michigan, thereby making a total of five teachers. With the employment of
Robert P. Griffin in 1944 (baseball, football, swimming and track), a graduate
of Florida A and M College and later the Ohio State University, meant six
teachers in the department.
During 1945-46 Bartley resigned to accept a professorial rank and
coaching duties at another Land Grant college, thus reducing the number of
teachers to five. Fortunately in 1946-47, Marolyn Warner Smith, a graduate of
Talladega College and later New York University, with further study at
Columbia University and Southern Methodist University; Sophronia S. Steele,
a graduate of Southern University and later Colorado State University; and
Anita Prater Stewart, a graduate of Florida A and M College and later Columbia
University, answered the call.
With the resignation of Hoard, Minor and Neilson, the number of teachers
remained at five,
In 1947-48 one teacher was granted a leave of absence to pursue further
graduate study. Five teachers, namely Catherine E. Jones, a graduate of
Talladega College and New York University; Oscar A. Moore (baseball and
football), a graduate of West Virginia State College, Springfield College of
Physical Education and later Boston University; Edward E. Oglesby (basket-
ball and football), a graduate of Florida A and M College and later the Ohio
State University; Ulis Shelton, a graduate of Southern University, and Hansel
E. Tookes (basketball, football and golf), a graduate of Florida A and M College
and later New York University, decided that FAMCEE was fertile soil in which
to plant their academic roots. The total number of teachers reached nine.
All of these teachers were intact the following year. The hiring of Julia G.
Lewis (basketball), with two degrees from Boston University, and Macon L.
"Body Builder Williams (boxing and football), a graduate of Florida A and M
College and later New York University, brought the total teaching staff members
to 11.18
It was during this decade that Alonzo S. "Jake" Gaither became the Head
of the Department of Health and Physical Education and held that position until
1962.






THE STUDENTS
The total enrollment almost doubled during this decade. It was 927 in
1940-41 and increased to 1811 in 1949-50.9 The number of students majoring
in this area was not available at the time of this study, but there were reasons to
believe that it was in excess of 75.

HIGHLIGHTS
Annual Physical Education Demonstrations and Play Day Activities were
gaining in momentum. As a demonstration during the May, 1941, Commence-
ment Week, the Department chose to have a circus, THE TINGLING
BROTHERS. The grand parade was led by the Lucy Moten Elementary School
Harmonica Band, followed by the college band and performers in costumes.
Real barking dogs in the neighborhood volunteered their presence which caused
much laughter. The program included:
"Gertie" -an educated giraffe that did arithmetic prob-
lems
"Floreq" -the dancing horse that waltzed
"Cumbo" -the elephant who climbed the ladder
"The Dionne Quintuplets "-p6rtrayed by five of the largest coeds with
their sun dresses, bibs and nippled bottles;
all trying to ride one tricycle at the same
time or use one swing together
"Men of Bronze" -statuesques depicted correct stance in vari-
ous sports
"The Hill Billies" -a tap routine led by Howard C. "Tubby"
Gentry (football captain and All-American
player)
"The Strong Man" -was Macon L. "Body Builder" Williams in
his performance in weightlifting
The spectators left Gibbs Park and visited the side shows in the gymnasium
which were projects of various classes in physical education.
Another demonstration in May, 1944, featured "Old Glory Drill Teams"
captained by Victoria Efferson, a social science major (now Dr. Victoria E.
Warner, Professor of Sociology at FAMU) and Juanita Kitchen, a business
education major. Such precisions then could be matched only by "The Present
Marching 100."
One of the most significant exhibitions was the staging of THE CON-
FLICT, a Health Masque Pantomime in three acts presented during the August,
1944, Commencement. "Pandora" (Humanity) was portrayed by Carrie Bette
Davis (now Attorney C. Bette Wimbish, Chairperson of the Florida Crimes
Compensation Commission) who at that time was a major in chemistry with a
double minor in biology and physical education. Other leading roles as







"Ignorance" and "Enlightenment" were enacted by Laura Warren (now Mrs.
L.E. Tiplet, professor at Albany State College) and Claudette Jefferson,
respectively, both of whom at that time were majoring in physical education.
During the same year (1944) approximately 25 physical education major
and minor students gave a demonstration at the Florida State Teachers'
Association meeting in Daytona Beach. The presentation consisted of calis-
thenics, folk and square dancing, pyramid building and tumbling.
Appearing in the March, 1945, edition of The Famcean, an article stated:
Typical of the charm and sportsmanship found at Famcee is this group
of lassies, all Physical Education Majors, who are always ready to do their
share when it comes to participating in recreational sports:
Name Hometown
Margaret Cason Madison
Inez Haywood Saint Petersburg
Claudette Jefferson Lakeland
Lillian Jennings Lakeland
Ollisteen McQueen Tallahassee
Bobbie Mitchell Bartow
Inez Newton Lake City
Clara Nixon Orlando
Thelma Pinkney Jacksonville
Carrie Pittman Tallahassee
Frankie Shannon Jacksonville
Margaret Swift Lakeland
Daisy Wallace Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Laura Warren Tlilahassee
Ann Washington Orlando
Theda Williams Pensacola

These 16 young women were the first members of the "PEM Club" (Physical
Education Majors) organized under the leadership of Lua S. Bartley in 1944. In
later years, this club had more than 300 men and women as members.
Dean Eugene P. Southall of the Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences
highly commended the Departments of Chemistry, Physical Education and
Physics for their contributions to the program of Civil Defense during the
middle of this decade."2
In 1945, Dr. William H. Gray, Jr., President of the University, was
chairman of a committee to explore the matter of graduate work at this
institution. Among the committee members was Robert P. Griffin of the
Department of Health and Physical Education. The work in the proposed
graduate program necessitated the hiring of one person with a doctoral degree
in each of the following six areas: Biology and Science Education, Chemistry




16
and Health Education, Elementary Education, English, Physical Education and
Secondary Education. Herman N. Neilson was the one named for Physical
Education. This method of hiring the six persons for the summer of 1945 was
used to make certain that instructional standards were met.21
Among those who were contributing authors of articles in the Quarterly
Journal (FAMCEE) during this decade was Robert P Griffin.






Standing 1950-1959



THE FACILITIES
Continuous use was made of the aeroplane hangar as a gymnasium
throughout this decade. Some improvements were made to an outdoor area for
basketball, softball and volleyball. With the construction of a city-owned golf
course -in 1955 within a mile of the campus, an added interest in golf was
manifested. An area on campus was devoted to. teaching the skills in this
life-time sport. On many occasions students were transported to this city facility
to play the actual game.

THE CURRICULA
The aims of the required service program: The basic program for men was
designed to provide orientation in physical education; to instruct in personal
hygiene, and to emphasize strenuous distance running, balance and agility
activities, calisthenics and gymnastics. The basic program for women was
designed to provide orientation in physical education; instruction in body
mechanics, rhythms, tumbling, calisthenics and gymnastics.
The advanced portion afforded the opportunity to select and participate in
two of the following sports or groups of sports: (for men) touch football and
speedball, basketball and volleyball, softball and horseshoe pitching, badmin-
ton and archery, shuffleboard and table tennis, track and field, swimming and
tennis; (for women) golf and swimming, folk, social and square dancing,
shuffleboard and darts, basketball and volleyball, softball and horseshoe
pitching and tennis and archery.
Four semester hours were required of all students, which included one in
health and physical education and three in physical education activities. Classes
were still separated according to sex.
The total number of course offerings ranged from 37 in 1950 to 54 in
1959. 2The major professional courses exceeded by far those scheduled to meet
the physical education activity requirement. This increase in professional
courses perhaps was due to the fact that graduate instruction in the college
began in the summer of 1945 and by 1950 most departmental offerings
augmented.







In 1952, eight courses for graduate credit were listed as:
Coaching Clinic
Philosophy of Physical Education
Problems in Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics
Problems in Physical Education
Problems in School Health Education
Public Recreation
The Teaching of Contemporary Dance
Tests and Measurements

THE TEACHERS
Dr. Melvin O. Alston became Dean of the School of Education in 1949 and
served in that capacity until 1969. In 1951 this Department was transferred to the
School of Education. The beginning of this decade had the same 11 teachers as
in the previous year. The 1951-52 school year witnessed the loss of one teacher,
but the gain of three namely, Robert S. Cobb, a graduate of Lincoln University
(Missouri) with the master's and the doctoral degree from the Ohio State
University; Evadne Priester Abrams Cobbs, a graduate of Tennessee State
College and the University of Michigan, and Robert Mike (football), a former
student here and a graduate of the University of California at Los Angeles;
hence the total number of teachers during this school year was 13. During the
1952-53 school year, two additions were made to the instructional faculty; they
were Costa Kittles (baseball and football), a graduate of Florida A&M College
and later the Ohio State University, and Henry W. Warner (basketball), a
graduate of Morehouse College and New York University, making 15 the total
number of teachers.
Four teachers changed their places of employment in 1953-54. Replace-
ments were Louise Tucker Bland, a graduate of Florida A and M College and the
University of Michigan; Toni C. Plummer with a bachelor's degree from
Virginia State College, a master's degree from the University of Illinois and a
doctoral degree from Iowa State University, and Wilhelmina Clark Roux
Weaver, a graduate of Howard University and later New York University; hence
the total number of teachers was 14 in 1953-54, 1954-55 and 1955-56."
In 1956-57, one professor was transferred to the graduate division of the
School of Education, but the return of Bertha Minor kept the number at 14.
During the 1957-58 school year, two teachers sought leaves of absence, but the
transfer of S. Tanner Stafford, a graduate of Knox College (Illinois) and the
University of Michigan, from Hospital Administrator to this Department and
the addition of Letitia Smith Williams, a graduate of Thskegee Institute and
Smith College, caused the total number of teachers to remain at 14. Another
leave of absence was given in 1958-59; however, the hiring of Carrie Pittman
Davis Meek, a graduate of Florida A and M College and the University of






Michigan, and Hugh L. McKinnis with two degrees from Indiana University,
increased the total number of teachers to 15. The resignation of one during
1959-60 and the return from study of another kept 15 the number of teachers.2

THE STUDENTS
The total enrollment of the university increased from 2,006 in 1950-51 to
2,824 in 1959-60.24 It was noted that over a seven-year period (1954-1960) a
total of 196 students graduated with a major in physical education, averaging 28
per year.
One of the most widely known graduates from the Department of Health
and Physical Education during this decade was Althea Gibson, the first Black
woman to win three major tennis tournaments in one year. Miss Gibson was the
champion in the Forest Hills, United States Women's Open and the Wimbledon
tournaments. Another nationally known graduate from this Department was
Willie Lee Galimore (football) who became a running back for the Chicago
Bears.

HIGHLIGHTS
At the beginning of this decade, there were five Blacks with Life
Membership in the American Association for Health, Physical Education and
Recreation. One of the five was Robert P Griffin of Florida A&M University;
the four others were Lua S. Bartley of Tennessee State University, Julian Bell of
Knoxville College, John H. Burr of Howard University and John H. Codwell of
Phyllis Wheatley High School in Houston, Texas.
An area of dance was beginning to blossom. The Modem Dance Group,
under the direction of Sophronia S. Steele, accompanied the College Choir and
the Playmaker 's Guild on a tour of the state. A performance at the University of
Florida was highly commended through the news media.
Play Day Activities were changed from using one college, with all
students as participants, to three schools, namely Albany State, Bethune-
Cookman and Florida A and M, with selected participants.
Elementary and secondary schools in Florida were continuously being
evaluated or re-evaluated for accreditation by the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. Among the teachers asked to serve on The Visiting
Committee were Carrie P. Meek, Oscar A. Moore, Marolyn W. Smith and
Henry W. Warner. Some of the schools visited were located in DeFuniak
Springs, Hastings, Jacksonville, Marianna, Pensacola, Tallahassee, Titusville
and West Palm Beach. As assistance to major students engaged in student
teaching, Meek and Warner played leading roles.






Toddling 1960-1969



THE FACILITIES
In the inaugural address by Dr. George W. Gore, Jr. (the fifth president of
the university), on November 4, 1950, a six-point program was outlined. One
point dealt with facilities such as dormitories, libraries, regular classrooms and
buildings for specific areas like agriculture, art, home economics, music,
pharmacy and physical education.
Doubtless the most welcomed facility by the Department of Health,
Physical Education and Recreation was the Gaither Athletic Center completed
in 1963 at a cost of $1,000,000.
The main gymnasium of this structure contained one regulation basketball
court on which two practice basketball courts, three volleyball courts and six
badminton courts were superimposed in different colors. On the periphery were
six shuffleboard courts. In this vicinity were balance beams, bucks, horses,
parallel bars, rings, two trampolines and tumbling mats. There was a storage
space for some of this equipment and for ping pong tables and standards used
for badminton and volleyball. The seating capacity for spectators at basketball
games was approximately 4,500; for convocation, concerts and commence-
ment exercises it was close to 6,000. The two corridors had built-in glass cases
for displaying trophies won in athletic contests. A concession stand, a double
ticket booth, drinking fountains and rest rooms were located in this area.
In the adjoining unit were three classrooms, a lounge, a conference room,
a reading room, three administrative office suites and nine individual offices.
Each office was furnished with a desk, chairs, filing cabinets, telephone,
typewriter and even calendar pads, scissors and stapler. Some equipment was
provided for audiovisual materials and duplicating services. A mirrored dance
studio with an exercise bar, piano, record player and storage space for records
was also included. Rest rooms, lockers and shower areas for men and for
women students, varsity athletes and teachers, were some of the provisions
made. A training room with storage space for small articles and janitorial
closets with necessary items for cleaning were parts of the conveniences.
Adjacent to the building was an outdoor swimming pool with a one-meter
and a three-meter diving board. Some items for instruction and safety in


20






aquatics were provided in this unit. The pool was lighted inside and overhead
for use at night.
In 1967, four lighted hard-surfaced tennis courts were constructed at a cost
of approximately $20,000. Other outdoor facilities included a space for
practicing skills in archery, golf, softball and the 11-man sports. These areas
were not marked off.

THE CURRICULA
During this decade, the area of instruction was known as the Department
of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Anticipating a new gymnasium
with modem equipment, it was necessary to review and restate the aims of the
required service program as well as the major professional program.
The Required Service Program: The Department provided a service
program for all students as well as an intramural program. It cooperated with the
Athletic Department in its plans and programs for varsity athletes.
Students with physical deviations from normal in a sufficient degree to
justify modification of physical education, and with the recommendation of the
Director of Student Health, were assigned to an individual program.
Six quarter hours were required, two in Health for Modem Living and four
in selected physical education activities?6
The Major Professional Program: These courses were intended for
students who were preparing to be teachers of health and physical education,
athletic coaches and leaders in recreation. The courses satisfied the require-
ments for graduate school.27
More courses on various skill levels were offered. Classes in judo, karate,
wrestling, as well as swimming (from beginning to water safety instructor)
were scheduled. Bowling, with as many as six sections some quarters, was
taught in another building on campus with a six-dollar fee; yet was always filled
to capacity. Folk and square dance, modem dance, social dance and games of
low organization had great appeal and large enrollments. Techniques in golf
were still taught on campus, but the actual game situation was conducted at the
city-owned park.
For students majoring in physical education on the undergraduate level,
the following courses were added:
Applied Anatomy
Recreation for the Mentally Retarded
Adapted Physical Education
As electives for undergraduate or graduate credit, the following courses
were offered:
Analysis of Human Movement
Corrective Therapy and/or Recreational Therapy (in cooperation with the
Veterans Administration Hospital, Tuskegee, Alabama)




22

Health Project in Teacher Education
Supervision in Physical Education
The Teaching of Aquatics
The Teaching of Contemporary Dance
The Teaching of Thmbling and Gymnastics

Other courses listed for graduate credit were:28
Philosophy of Physical Education
Problems in Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics
Problems in Physical Education for Girls and Women
Problems in School Health
Public Recreation: Its Organization and Administration
Research Methods in Physical Education
Seminar in Athletic Administration
The largest number of different required service courses offered during this
decade was 34, undergraduate professional courses was 30 and graduate
courses was 17; making a total of 81 different course offerings.9 Many revisions
were made. By wise selection of electives, a student could be certified in health
education and/or driver education.

THE TEACHERS
Dr. Paul B. Mohr, Sr., an alumnus of this Institution, was appointed Dean
of the School of Education in September of 1969 and served through July of
1978. The number of teachers during this decade fluctuated between 15 and 17.
In the first six years there were 16. During the year 1960-61, Beverly A.
Hillsman Barber, a graduate of Wayne State University and the University of
Michigan with special study at the Connecticut School of Dance, and Ernest D.
Fears, Jr., a graduate of Florida A and M College and the Ohio State University,
made the decision to render services in this Department. Two teachers resigned
in 1961-62 to accept work elsewhere. These vacancies were filled by Robert T.
Mungen (football and tennis), a graduate of Florida A and M College and
Indiana University, and Juanita White, a graduate of Morgan State College;
hence the total number of teachers was still 16. In 1962-63 Oscar A. Moore,
who had joined the faculty in 1947 and with a doctoral degree from Boston
University in 1957, was appointed Head of the Department of Health, Physical
Education and Recreation, thus replacing the illustrious Alonzo S. "Jake"
Gaither who had served admirably for more than 15 years. Another leave was
granted for a teacher to accompany her husband for work in Africa. This year
Lua S. Bartley, returning with a doctoral degree earned in 1952 at the University
of Michigan, and Richard A. Hill (gymnastics and track), a graduate of
Southern University and the University of Buffalo, were the additions to the
teaching faculty causing 16 as still the number of teachers.







The sudden passing of Henry W. Warer in the spring of 1963 was a great
loss to the department. Fortunately in 1963-64 the university was in a position
to employ Allison H. Figaro, a graduate of Tuskegee Institute and New York
University with further study at Southern Methodist University, and Arnette S.
Ward, a recent graduate of Florida A&M University. The number of teachers
remained at 16.
In 1964-65 the loss of one by resignation and another with the bac-
calaureate degree was compensated with the return of Bertha J. Minor from
Africa and the employment of Kenneth D. Gibson (gymnastics, track and
field), with two degrees from Indiana University.
During 1966-67, Gibson resigned to pursue further graduate study; this
reduced the number to 15 teachers. In 1967-68 Bobby E. Lang (football, track
and field), with two degrees from Florida A&M University, was added to the
instructional staff, thus making the number of teachers 16 again.
When the year 1968-69 evolved, the department was minus one teacher
due to a leave of absence, but the services of Edwina B. Martin, who had earned
two degrees at Florida A&M University, were available. The campus was
saddened again by the passing of S. Tanner Stafford. In 1969-70, Anita P
Stewart retired, but the return of the teacher on leave plus the addition of Gerald
Maurey (wrestling) with two degrees from Pennsylvania State University, and
Clarence A. Montgomery (football), with two degrees from Florida A&M
University, raised the total number of teachers to 17.30


THE STUDENTS
The total enrollment increased from 2,493 in 1960-61 to 4,248 in 1969-
70.3 Without an official record it is conservative to say that the number of major
students in each of these years was in excess of 175. The PEM (Physical
Education Majors) Club increased in numbers and participation.
In 1965 Region I of the FAHPER held a workshop at Florida State
University. The following students from Florida A&M University were in
attendance:
Eva Betterson Vera Foxworth Billie D. Robinson
Pamela Bowie Eugenia Hall Barbara Spears
Patricia Davis Nellie McCorvey Marva Spears
Margaret Dawson Doris McRae Ardella Taylor

One of our major students with an interesting career was Bernard S.
McLendon, a varsity baseball player, who received a bachelor's degree in
physical education from Florida A&M University in 1965, a master's degree in
social work from the University of Michigan in 1970, and a doctoral degree in
jurisprudence from Howard University in 1973. Later McLendon became an
Assistant Attorney General in Florida and Section Chief of Civil Litigation in





24

the Office of the Attorney General. He was recently (1978) appointed Special
Counsel on Human Rights for the State of Florida.

HIGHLIGHTS
In 1963 Alonzo S. "Jake" Gaither was the recipient of an honorary LL.D.
degree from Knoxville College, his alma mater. At the National AAHPER
Convention held in Washington, D.C., in 1964, Robert P. Griffin presented a
paper.
During 1966 Dr. Gaither authored a book entitled The Split-T Offense
which was published by Prentice-Hall, Incorporated. Contributing to this book
were Coaches Robert P. Griffin, Costa Kittles, Edward E. Oglesby and Hansel
E. Tookes. In that same year, under the administration of Hoyd Christian as
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 11 persons were appointed to review
and revise Bulletin 21, Physical Education in the Elementary Schools. Those
assigned this responsibility were Mary Alexander and Grace Fox (FSU), Lua
Bartley (FAMU), Ted Bleier (Miami), Judd Gatlin (Pensacola), Marie Howard
(Tampa), Zollie Maynard (Assistant Director of Instructional Services), Lucille
Moore (Panama City), Phil Roundtree (Chipley) and Billie K. Stevens and
Pearline Yates (U of F).
The Modem Dance Group, under the direction of Beverly Barber, pre-
sented Christmas and spring concerts along with numerous performances on
other university-related programs. This group presented programs in dance at
the Florida Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation meet-
ings in Jacksonville and Clearwater. Mrs. Barber was also choreographer for
"The Marching 100."
A majority of the teachers attended professional meetings of the AAHPER
on the state, district or national level. Due to professional pride, some paid part
or all of their expenses in order to be present. Bartley served as Chairperson of
the Resolutions Committee on the state level. Moore and Smith rendered
services to the Ethnic Minority Group on the state, district and national levels.
Tookes was a member of the Nominating Committee and Chairman of the
Ethnic Minority Group on the state level, as well as a member of the
Scholarship and Awards Committee on the national level. He also presented a
paper, "Tests and Their Usages in Physical Education," at one of the state
meetings.
A two-day Workshop in Physical Education and Recreation for the
Mentally Retarded was sponsored by the Department in May of 1967. This
workshop was funded in part by The Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation
through the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recrea-
tion and the Office of Continuing Education at Florida A&M University.
Marolyn Smith was the Director and Allison Figaro served as Workshop
Coordinator Among other professors who rendered invaluable assistance were
Robert Griffin and Oscar Moore. The keynote address, "Physical Education







and Recreation for the Mentally Retarded: Why'? Where? and When?," was
given by Dr. Julian U. Stein, Director of AAHPER Project on Recreation and
Fitness for the Mentally Retarded, Washington, D.C. Notable among other
visiting consultants were Mr. Ernie Davis of Crowley Special School in Saint
Paul, Minnesota, and Mr. David Cantley of Royal Palm School in West Palm
Beach, Florida. These consultants had outstanding programs in their respective
schools which had won national recognition. Other resource persons included
Mr. L.H. Reagan, State Division for Mental Retardation; Mrs. Wendy Cullar,
Specialist in Education for Exceptional Children; Miss Betty Palmer, Depart-
ment of Physical Education and Recreation, Florida State University; Mrs.
Juanita Stokes, Director of Volunteer Services, Sunland Hospital; Mrs. Lave me
J. Moore, Special Education, Florida A&M University and Dr. Belle Mead
Holms, Chairperson of the Department of Physical Education for Women at
Lamar State College of Technology in Beaumont, Texas.
In the fall of 1967, by using a university-owned station wagon, seven
teachers, namely Bartley, Kittles, Lewis, Minor, Mungen, Smith and Tookes,
attended a Life-Time Sports Clinic/Workshop in Clearwater.
Among the teachers serving on The Visiting Committee for the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools in its evaluation or re-evaluation of
schools for accreditation were Moore, Warner, Smith and Bartley. Some school
locations were Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Tallahassee and
Titusville.
Student teachers were supervised by Warner, Bartley or Figaro. Some of
the counties in which these students were located included Alachua, Baker,
Columbia, Dade, Escambia, Gadsden, Jackson, Hillsboro, Leon, Orange,
Polk, Pinellas and Taylor.
When President Gore stepped down in 1968, Benjamin Luther Perry, Jr.,
became the first alumnus to be appointed as President of Florida A&M
University. As one of FAMU's own products, he graduated from the elemen-
tary, high school and college units of the university with high honors. Prior to
this appointment he received a master's degree from Iowa State University and
a doctoral degree from Cornell University. At FAMU Perry had served as
Professor of Economics and as Dean of Students. Later he was selected as Dean
of Student Affairs at the University of Nigeria in Nsukka. It is the belief of the
writer that Perry's work in Africa influenced many students from that country to
matriculate at Florida A&M University.* After returning to FAMU, Dr. Perry
resumed his duties as Professor of Economics, later Director of Research and
Grants, then Dean of Administration.
On becoming president, Perry considered his immediate task was to lead
his alma mater down a road to independence and autonomy. For nine years he
gave strong leadership to the growth of the university and sought diligently to
employ the best qualified teachers available.
The National Summer Youth Sports Program, which was federally funded,
*See reference made to The Students in 1970-1978.




26

began on this campus in 1969. Physical education teachers worked with more
than 300 youths between the ages of 10 and 18 participating in such activities as
basketball, bowling, dancing, softball, swimming, tennis, track and field,
tumbling and gymnastics and volleyball.






Walking 1970-1978



THE FACILITIES
The facilities during these eight years remained practically the same as in
the previous decade, with two exceptions. A classroom was declared undesira-
ble for instruction and was petitioned to make two individual offices. The
reading room was converted to an office space. The number of regular
classrooms was two and the number of individual offices was 12.

THE CURRICULA
This eight-year period witnessed another spread of academic wings to the
extent that the former department became the Division of Health, Physical
Education and Recreation.
In light of current educational trends and societal manpower demands, this
division visualized its aims and services as:32
1. the major provider of instructional programs in health for modem living
and life-time sports for all students in the university;
2. the preparation of major students as effective teachers of health
education, physical education, and coaches of individual, dual and
team sports;
3. the pre-professional preparation of students for selected allied services
such as corrective therapy and recreational therapy;
4. the pre-professional preparation of students in community and public
recreation;
5. the pre-professional preparation necessary for teaching the mentally
retarded, physically handicapped and senior citizens in pursuit of their
goals to abundant living; and
6. the provision of curricula to meet requirements of the State Department
of Education in several different areas such as physical education,
health education, driver education, industrial arts and exceptional child
education (motor disabilities).
This Division consisted of the area of health education, physical education
and recreation. Physical education was subdivided into the required service









The Tree to

abundant Living
(Our Service Program)


IAADW
TVO-LEBAL- 0 LOARD
ITA A't
TALCA RE SOC1
OCCE% S-u4 0
ol DA/C -F DA


PLA s


dlJPJG F y ;^


a S s
c^ fiS


_ _




29

program for all students and a professional preparation program for major
students.
The Required Service Program: All undergraduate students, except vet-
erans, had to complete five quarter hours of physical education, which included
one hour in Fundamental Movements, three in Health for Modem Living and
one additional hour in a selected physical education activity course.
Students participating in cheerleading, dance production, varsity baseball,
basketball, football, tennis, and track and field were allowed one hour of credit
toward electives only after the five-hour requirement had been completed.
Practice periods in these activities were scheduled under physical education
with courses numbered. All of these courses, except three, were coeducational.
The Professional Curriculum for Undergraduate Majors required a
minimum of 180 quarter hours which allowed for certification in other tracks.33
This arrangement was made to provide more opportunities for employment.
The Curriculum for Graduate Majors required a minimum of 57 quarter hours34
The largest number of required service courses was 69, undergraduate
major courses was 42 and graduate major courses was 22, making a total of 133
course offerings during this eight-year period.35


THE TEACHERS
The first year of this period, 1970-71, witnessed the loss of Gerald
Maurey; hence the teaching faculty was reduced to 16. In 1971-72, Robert
Griffin and Bertha Minor were granted short leaves of absence. These two
vacancies were filled by Dennis Jefferson (football), with two degrees from
Florida A&M University, and Jeanne D. Mannings (basketball), having re-
ceived a bachelor's degree from Florida A&M University and a master's degree
from Indiana University.
The untimely passing of Clarence Montgomery in January of 1972 reduced
the number to 15 temporarily. In 1972-73 Griffin and Minor returned and with
the employment of James "Big Jim" Williams (football), a graduate of Florida
A and M College with additional study at Pennsylvania State University and the
University of South Florida, the number of teachers reached an all-time high of
18. In December of 1972, Edward Oglesby's passing was another loss.
In 1973-74 Coach Gaither and Mrs. Minor retired. Miss Mannings
accepted work in an out-of-state high school. Dr. Moore, after serving effi-
ciently for more than 10 years as Departmental Head, stepped down, but agreed
to remain as an adjunct professor. Lua Bartley was appointed Chairperson of
The Search Committee for a Departmental Head. Virden Evans, with a
bachelor's degree from Thskegee Institute, a master's degree from Texas
Southern University, a director's degree from Indiana University and a doctoral
degree from Northwestern State University (Louisiana), was selected. It was
during this same year that Ajac Triplett (basketball), having received two







degrees from Western Michigan University, was employed, which made 16 the
number of teachers.
Dennis Jefferson changed his location of employment during 1974-75 and
Marolyn Smith requested a leave of absence. The latter vacancy was filled by
Susan Jenkins who had earned a bachelor's degree from the Ohio State
University and a master's degree from the University of Kentucky. Added to the
staff during this year were Samuel A. Bogan (football), with a bachelor's
degree from Ohio University and a master's degree from Youngstown Univer-
sity; Frederick H. Goldsmith (football), who received two degrees from the
University of Florida, and Rudy L. Hubbard (football), with a bachelor's
degree from the Ohio State University, totaled 17 teachers. During 1975-76
Virden Evans and Edwina Martin were granted leaves of absence. Mrs. Martin
pursued further graduate study at the University of Connecticut. The numberof
teachers was reduced to 15.
In 1976-77 Oscar Moore retired and Rudy Hubbard was assigned to a
special position, but the return of Evans and Martin resulted in the number of
teachers remaining at 15. The 1977-78 school year witnessed the addition of
Sarah E. Jenkins Hill (track), who had recently received two degrees from
Florida A&M University. This period ended with 16 teachers.36

THE STUDENTS
The total enrollment increased from 4,543 in 1970-71 to 6,009 in 1977-78.
The number of major students increased from 273 to 369 during this period of
time.37 Among these students were 12 Africans who evidently had been
attracted by.the caliber of programs being offered in this Division. These
students were:
Elizabeth Akin Johnson Odharo
Funsho Akin Ebenezer Tubonein Oriaku
Elias Usman Gora Godfrey Oyamielen
Sullaman A. Ibrahim Elizabeth Udofiah
Mshekia Bulaman Isaku Sunday Peter Udofiah
Habibu Obankaki Ahmad Atingo Panda Yahaya

Nine (or 75 percent) of these 12 students, after receiving the bachelor's
degree, remained to pursue graduate study and received a master's degree
before returning to their native country.
Students became more involved in professional affiliations of the Ameri-
can Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation on the state, district
and national levels. In 1970 Alice McCrary Majors was a delegate to the
national meeting held in Seattle, Washington. Joyce Brown Smith was a
delegate attending the national meeting in Detroit, Michigan, during 1971.
Present as student representatives at the district meeting in Norfolk, Virginia,
were Ann Fennell, Ann Kiner, Bonita McCray and Richard Ramsey in 1974. In


___







the same year, Sara E. Jenkins Hill and Lewis D. Williams were delegates to the
state meeting in Miami.
The number of major students attending professional meetings continued
to increase. During the spring of 1976, more than 25 of the PEM Club members
participated in the Florida Student Workshop Seminar which was co-hosted by
Florida A&M University and Florida State University Physical Education
major students.
In 1977 Edith M. Brown and Emma J. Johnson attended the Southern
District meeting of the AAHPER in Atlanta, Georgia. It was during this same
year that 10 students, namely:
Nathaniel Bowens Martin Rainey
Loris Boyd Daniel Starkes
Anthony Dorsett Darlene Stephens
Renee Johnson Annie Thomas
Cheryl Paige Alfred Williams
were delegates to the Florida Alliance for Health, Physical Education and
Recreation Working Conference held in Orlando. These students were inspired
to meet Dr. Leroy T. Walker, first Black President of the American Alliance for
Health, Physical Education and Recreation since its inception in 1885, and to
congratulate Dr. Oscar A. Moore, former Departmental Chairman, upon
receiving a FAHPER Honor Award. Elias Usman Gora was the student
representative to the AAHPER National Meeting held in Kansas City, Missouri,
during March of 1978.
During this eight-year period, two students distinguished themselves as
outstanding athletes. Reynaud Robinson, Jr., was a participant in the 1972
Olympics held in Munich, Germany, and Andre Dawson became a member of
the Montreal Expos baseball team.
A total of 464 majors received a bachelor's or a master's degree during this
eight-year period. More specifically, at the June, 1978, Commencement, 44
received a bachelor's d gree and 15 were granted a master's degree. The
Graduating Class of 1978 numbered more than 1,000. Carmena M. Fennell, an
honor student with a major in physical education, was the class president. She
captivated an audience of more than 6,000 by challenging the graduates with
their responsibilities. Miss Fennell further charged them to be productive,
creative and intellectually active in advancing human rights and economic
well-being.
HIGHLIGHTS
These eight years were busy and fruitful ones for those involved in
teaching, coaching, committee assignments, curricula revisions, professional
affiliations, programs and evaluations. It is with some of these items that this
section deals.
In 1972 Oscar Moore was Chairman of the College Men's Section of the




32

Florida Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation. During the
school year 1973-74, Virden Evans, with excellent training and experience on
the elementary, high school and college levels, was selected as Chairman to
guide the destiny of the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
A Newsletter, primarily designed as information for major students, was
circulated during each quarter of 1973-74 and 1974-75. During these two years
Bartley and Evans were Representatives to the Delegate Assembly of the
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation on the
district and national levels. Martin served on the Membership and Nominating
Committee for Scholarships on the state level.
Evans, Martin and Smith were often in attendance at state, district or
national meetings dealing with adaptive physical education, corrective therapy,
drug abuse, mental health, movement education or therapeutic recreation. In
1974 the Bureau of Education for the Handicapped made a grant of $5,000 for
program planning at this Institution. It was also in this year that Oscar Moore
received an Honor Award from the Florida Association for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation. Lua Bartley was a consultant at a Summer Workshop
held at the University of Florida for teachers of physical education in central
Florida dealing with "Recreational Activites for Coeducational Classes."
Beverly Barber was still serving as choreographer for "The Marching
100," The Orchesis Club, under her direction, presented special programs for
all middle schools through the Tallahassee Art Council. In addition, the
Orchesis Contemporary Theatre Area Group had performances in schools
located in Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Panama City, Pensacola, Sopchoppy,
Stuart and Tampa, Florida. Out-of-state presentations were in Bainbridge and
Thomasville, Georgia, as well as in Beaufort, South Carolina. Some appear-
ances were on such television networks as WCTV, WECA and WFSU.
Later in this same period, Mrs. Barber choreographed for the Theatre Arts
performances of "Purlie, "The King and I," European shows and others. She
sponsored residency of the George Faison Universal Dance Experience Com-
pany and the Arthur Hall-Afro-American Dance Ensemble through funds
received for the Arts Visiting Scholars Program of Florida A&M University.
Barber was also co-producer of the film, "The Black Church: A Liberating
Dance, produced by FAMU Media Center and FSU. The film was aired over
WFSU and entered in film competition.
At the 1975 National Convention of the American Alliance for Health,
Physical Education and Recreation held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, five
persons were recipients of the Ethnic Minority Service Group Award. They
were Dr. Lua S. Bartley, Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recrea-
tion, Florida A&M University; Dr. Roscoe C. Brown, Jr., Director of Afro-
American Affairs, New York University; Dr. Edwin B. Henderson, first Black
Instructor of Physical Education, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Charles D. Henry,
assistant commissioner, Big Ten Conference, and Dr. Leroy T. Walker, a







member of the 1973 United States Olympic Committee and "Hall of Fame
Honoree. "3 As one may recall, Walker was Coach of the United States
Olympic Men's Track Team in 1976, and in 1977 became the first Black
President of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recrea-
tion, an organization with over 100,000 members.
During the summer of 1975, Dr. Evans, Divisional Chairman, along with
Dr. Moore, sought to find out the locations of our recent graduates. This inquiry
resulted in more than 50 respondents indicating that the majority of them were
employed in the public schools of Florida; however, some were in the District of
Columbia, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey and Texas. Other locations in-
cluded Africa, Europe and the Virgin Islands. In addition to teaching health
education, physical education and coaching, other descriptive jobs were bank
teller, corrective therapist, director of recreation, graduate assistant, teacher of
early childhood education and United States Army officer.
At the 1976 National Convention of the AAHPER meeting in Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, two of our professors were among five to receive an Ethnic Minority
Service Award; they were Dr. Alonzo S. Gaither and Dr. Oscar A. Moore.
Others were Mr. Frank P. Bolden, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Robert S. Cobb,
Mankato State College and Dr. Bettie M. Smith, Stillman College. During the
same convention, Dr. Lua S. Bartley was one among four recipients of the
AAHPER Presidential Citations. Others were Senator Birch Bayh, Jr., of
Indiana and an initiator of Title IX; Mr Al O. Duer, journalist, Executive Editor
of NAIA and Executive Secretary of NCAA, and Mr. George B. Leonard,
author of "The Ultimate Athlete."39
In the spring of 1976, as an evaluation of the program, this Division sought
information from students, regardless of their major fields of study, concerning
the required course offerings. A questionnaire was designed which included
personal data such as age, sex, classification and location of high school with no
name attached. Fifteen physical education activities frequently taught in high
schools and colleges were listed for them to check the best and the least liked. It
was revealed that tennis, bowling, swimming, softball and volleyball were their
preferences in the order mentioned. Among the major findings was that 87
percent indicated that they would elect physical education courses regardless of
requirements for graduation. They seemed to have had a high regard for the
present program, but wanted the offerings increased. More than 85 percent said
that they were satisfied with the caliber of instruction.40
The 1976 FAHPER Working Conference was held in Orlando. Marolyn
Smith appeared on the program as a pan:- list discussing "Physical Education for
Exceptional Children." Barbara Merrell, a graduate student, was a speaker
during the student section.
During the Winter Quarter of 1977, Martin and Bartley, in addition to
full-time teaching loads on campus, worked in the Teachers Corps Project at
John G. Riley Elementary School helping teachers with health education and






physical education programs. Martin also conducted a class in Movement
Exploration for kindergarten pupils at Lucy Moten Demonstration School, a
unit of FAMU.
On September 1, 1977, after a five-month search among 90 candidates,
Walter Lee Smith, the second alumnus, became the seventh President of the
University. As a true son of FAMU he spent much of his youth in Tallahassee.
He received a bachelor 's degree in biology and chemistry and a master's degree
in administration and supervision from Florida A&M University. His doctoral
degree was earned in higher education administration at Florida State Univer-
sity. Prior to acceptance Dr. Smith taught biology and chemistry in Tampa. He
was an executive with the Florida and National Education Associations and had
studied law at the Woodrow Wilson College of Law in Atlanta, Georgia. Later
he served as President of Roxbury Community College in Boston, Mas-
sachusetts.
Dr. Smith, as one of FAMU's illustrious graduates, headed a school which
was a full partner in the nine-university public school system of Florida. He saw
FAMU's image as the single most important thing that was marketable.
President Smith began to establish a reputation of accountability where funds
were involved and hoped to attract more good students to the university. He
expressed a desire for adding more facilities for physical education and
athletics.
Perhaps the most detailed and important document during this period was
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Self-Study Report prepared
by the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. This report
involved a five-year study from 1973 through 1978. Information dealt with
organization and administration; purpose and role; students; faculty (age,
degrees, qualifications, salaries, specialties, teaching experience and teaching
loads); physical facilities; recommendations and projections, as well as a clear
statement of priorities. Contributing to this study were 14 of the 17 teachers,
namely Barber, Bartley, Evans, Figaro, Goldsmith, Griffin, Kittles, Lang,
Lewis, Martin, Moore, Mungen, Smith and Triplett.
Virden Evans, Robert Griffin and Oscar Moore wrote articles which were
published in The Journal of Health, Physical Education and Recreation or in
The Physical Educator
Edwina Martin and Lua Bartley participated in a working conference of
the Florida Association of Physical Education for College Women (FAPECW)
and the Florida Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (FAIAW)
held in Homosassa during the spring of 1977. Bartley was also in attendance at a
seminar for Women Athletic Directors at the University of Michigan during the
summer of the same year.
In 1978 Lua Bartley, Virden Evans, Allison Figaro and Sara Hill were
among the delegates at the national convention of the AAHPER held in Kansas
City, Missouri. Hill was also in attendance at the Florida Association of







Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (FAIAW) meeting in Fort Lauderdale.
Accreditation of elementary and secondary schools in Florida and the
improvement of major students in their internship teaching experiences were
still of concern to this Division. During this period, Bartley, Figaro and Martin
in different years accepted the invitation to serve on The Visiting Committee of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in the evaluation or re-
evaluation of some schools located in Brevard, Duval, Hillsborough, and Leon
counties. Student teachers were directly supervised by Figaro, Griffin and
Martin. These students were located in such counties as Alachua, Dade, Duval,
Escambia, Gadsden, Hillsborough, Leon, Orange, Polk, and Pinellas in
Florida, and Fulton in Georgia.
The National Youth Fitness Program, still federally funded, has been on
this campus every summer since 1969. During the last two summers the
enrollment was between 500 and 600.
From 1970-71 through 1977-78 there was a total of 26 different teachers,
50 percent of whom managed to attend one or more AAHPER professional
meetings on the state, district or national level; the other 50 percent were busily
engaged in athletics and civic/social-welfare activities that presented a calendar
conflict. With the limited amount of money, teachers accepted the most
economical means for travel, meals and lodging. At one time it was felt that
there could be no convention without Bartley, Evans, Lewis, Martin, Moore
and Smith in attendance.
Some of the states where the national meetings convened were California,
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, Washington and Wisconsin; yet at
each of these the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation at
Florida A&M University had representatives who in most instances were
financed by the university, channeled through the departmental or divisional
budget.
At least 50 percent of the teachers during this period had coaching duties as
in all previous years. In 1977-78 eight (or 50 percent) namely Bogan,
Goldsmith, S. Hill, Kittles, Lang, Mungen, Tookes and Triplett had such
assignments. Kittles, Lang and Mungen each coached two sports. All teachers
performed duties in three or more activities or were committee members on the
division, college or'university level. Edwina Martin was proclaimed as a
"committee demon" because she served on as many as 12 committees during a
school year. Each teacher was an academic advisor to 20 or more major
students.
The number of teachers in the division during the past 10 years seemed not
to have kept pace with the total enrollment and number of major students. The
data below attested to this.








Year
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78


Total
Enrollment
3956
4842
4543
4490
4563
5194
4871
5463
5632
6009


Number of Number of
Major Students HPER Teachers
233 16
261 17
273 16
292 16
317 18
369 16
287 17
320 15
300 15
326 16


Oscar Moore was a recipient of a Life Membership Award from the
FAHPER. Beverly Barber was nominated as Chairperson-Elect of the Dance
Section for the FAHPER. Virden Evans was a member of the Professional
Preparation Committee of the FAHPER, Regional Director-Elect for the
FAHPER, a member of the Executive Council of the SDAHPER and Member-
ship Coordinator of the National College of Physical Education for Men of the
SDAHPER.
Edwina B. Martin and Robert T. Mungen, graduates of the Class of 1953,
were among the recipients of FAMU Alumni Awards at the 25th Class Reunion
in 1978. Virden Evans was a member of The Common Course Numbering
Committee for the State University System. He also served as Chairperson of
The Search Committee for a Dean of the College of Education at Florida A&M
University.


_________ __ __ __ ___ __ ___ _





Epilogue



Over this sixty-year period (1918-1978) the Division of Health, Physical
Education and Recreation at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
had six presidents, four vice presidents, seven deans, four heads of the
department or chairmen of the division, nine athletic directors,41 and sixty-five
teachers who were responsible for the organization, administration, supervision
and instruction.42
Facilities increased from the bare outdoor open spaces to a modem
gymnasium with facilities for badminton, basketball, gymnastics and tumbl-
ing, rhythms, karate, ping pong, shuffleboard, swimming, tennis, volleyball
and wrestling. There were two regular classrooms, a conference room, a dance
studio, a lounge and 12 individual offices for teachers plus three office suites.
Rest rooms, locker and shower areas were provided. In addition, there were
outdoor areas for practicing skills in archery, golf, softball and the 11-man
sports, though not properly marked off. An eight-lane bowling alley was
located in the Student Union Building and was used by this Division for
instruction in bowling.
The curriculum grew from four to 133 course offerings. The two-year
certification program was deleted and was replaced by one which led to a
bachelor's degree and another which led to a master's degree. The offerings
included courses leading to degrees with physical education as a teaching major
and a minor or certification in other allied fields.
The total enrollment increased from 312 to 6,009, whereas the number of
major students rose from 9 to 369. The number of teachers increased from one
to 18.
The 10 most frequently mentioned colleges and universities (listed in
alphabetical order) where the 65 different teachers received degrees were:
Florida A&M University Southern University
Howard University Springfield College of
Indiana University Physical Education
New York University Talladega College
Ohio State University Tbskegee Institute
University of Michigan






The other 20 colleges and universities not listed above where degrees had
been earned were located in the following states:


California
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Iowa
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts


Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia


Florida A&M University has demonstrated its ability to attract and retain
teachers in the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Of the 65
teachers during this 60-year period, 10 had worked at this University for more
than 25 years. These were:


Lua S. Bartley.
Alonzo S. Gaither
Robert P. Griffin
Costa Kittles
Julia G. Lewis


Oscar O. Moore
Edward E. Oglesby
Marolyn W. Smith
Anita P Stewart
Hansel E. Tookes


Working in the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation at
Florida A&M University was not confined to teaching and coaching. The
teachers served in numerous capacities as members of the:


Adjudication Committee
Athletic Committee
Career Work Programs
Cheerleaders' Advisor
Faculty Senate
Family Institute
Founders' Day Activities
Homecoming Activities


Lyceum Committee
Orchesis Contemporary
Theatre Director
PEM Club Advisor
Sex Equity Committee
State Drug Conference
Student Health
Student Orientation
Tenure and Promotion


Among the major students who earned the doctoral degree were:
Albert A. Alexander (Boston University)
Simon Johnson (University of Florida)
John Robert Edward Lee, III (Kansas University)
Joe Lee Smith (University of Florida)

















The Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation
at
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
went through seven stages:
CONCEPTION
EMBRYO
BURPING
CRAWLING
STANDING
TODDLING
WALKING


As the crest of
the mountain is
approached there
is a dream that
RUNNING
will be added.


___ __ _


L





Bibliography


This bibliography does not reflect all references used in writing A BRIEF
HISTORY OF THE DIVISION OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION
AND RECREATION AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANI-
CAL UNIVERSITY FROM 1918 THROUGH 1978 (60 Years). Other sources
of information were interviews with former faculty members, students and
personal data preserved by the writer over a 27-year period.
Many of the sources of information are in the Black Archives Research
Center and Museum, Coleman Library and the Registrar's Office on the campus
of Florida A&M University.
BOOKS
Klein, Arthur, Survey ofNegro Colleges and Universities, Bulletin No. 7, 1928.
pp. vi 964.
Neyland, Leedell W. and John W. Riley, The History of Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University, 1963. Gainesville: the University of Florida
Press. pp. v r 303.
BULLETINS
Official Catalogs
State Normal and Industrial School for Colored Students
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College.
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University.
(All volumes 1887-1912 through 1977-78)

NEWSPAPERS
The FAMCEAN, March 1945
The FAMUAN, April 2, 1967
The Saint Petersburg Times, 1967
The Tallahassee Democrat, 1976-1977


40







PERIODICALS
Florida A and M College, Quarterly Journal 1934-1946.
Tookes, Hansel E. (editor), Handbook of Intramural Activities for Men and
Women. 1960-1962.
FAMU, College of Education, Newsletter Vol. VI, No. 3 (March-April, 1975).
FAMU, College of Education-Newsletter Vol. VII (April, 1976).
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Update,
June, 1976.
FAMU, College of Education-Newsletter Vol. VIII, No. 5 (August, 1977).
FAMU, College of Education-Newsletter Vol. VIII, No. 6 (September, 1977).
Florida A&M University, The Fang, Student Handbook 1977-79.

PROGRAMS
FAMCEE, Department of Physical Education: Annual Demonstration,
TINGLING BROTHERS CIRCUS, May 23, 1941.
FAMCEE, Annual Physical Education Demonstration, May 28, 1943.
FAMCEE, THE CONFLICT-Health Masque in Three Acts, Annual Physical
Education Demonstration, August, 1944.
Department of Health and Physical Education, "Workshop in Physical Educa-
tion and Recreation for the Mentally Retarded," May 5-6, 1967.
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Ethnic
Minority Senrice Committee, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1975.
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Ethnic
Minority Service Committee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1976.
FAMU, "Legislative Family Night-An Evening of Fashion, Dance, Music
and Art," May 3, 1977.
FAMU, Commencement Program, June 4, 1978.

UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS
Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Florida A&M Univer-
sity, Institutional Self-Study, 1973-1978.
Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, "Students' Opinions
Regarding Required Physical Education at Florida A&M University,
1975-76."







43







Appendices





44

APPENDIX A

Total Number of Students, Number of HPER Major Students, Number
of Different Courses Taught, and Number of HPER Teachers


Total Number Number of Different Courses Taught
Number of HPER Under- Number
of Major Required graduate Graduate of HPER
Year Students Students Service Major Major Total Teachers

1918-19 312 4 4 1
1919-20 339 4 4 1

1920-21 316 4 4 1
1921-22 339 4 4 1
1922-23 319 4 4 1
1923-24 361 6 6 I
1924-25 420 8 8 1
1925-26 531 8 8 1
1926-27 510 8 8 1
1927-28 434 8 8 1
1928-29 138 8 6 14 2
1929-30 219 10 6 16 3

1930-31 280 8 6 14 3
1931-32 375 8 14 22 3
1932-33 422 8 13 21 3
1933-34 469 8 11 19 2
1934-35 671 12 22 34 2
1935-36 708 9 11 20 2
1936-37 819 18 15 33 3
1937-38 822 24 17 41 4
1938-39 822 32 16 48 4
1939-40 876 26 20 46 5

1940-41 927 26 21 47 5
1941-42 907 24 20 44 5
1942-43 875 28 19 47 6
1943-44 735 24 14 38 5
1944-45 835 26 20 46 6
1945-46 1248 18 19 37 5
1946-47 1391 18 20 38 5
1947-48 1632 22 20 42 9
1948-49 1619 20 24 44 9
1949-50 1811 20 22 42 11

1950-51 2006 15 22 37 11
1951-52 2073 15 22 37 13
1952-53 2093 12 25 8 45 15
1953-54 2120 18 24 6 48 14
1954-55 2414 16 25 8 49 14





45


Total Number Number of Different Courses Taught
Number of HPER Under- Number
of Major Required graduate Graduate of HPER
Year Students Students Service Major Major Total Teachers


1955-56
1956-57
1957-58
1958-59
1959-60

1960-61
1961-62
1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1065-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70

1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78


2649
2693
2736
2748
2824

2493
2780
2794
2884
3265
3588
3482
3783
3956
4248

4543
4490
4563
5194
4871
5463
5632
6009


49
49
51
54
54

52
54
53
54
54
59
67
71
81
75

80
84
83
89
90
94
124
133


205
233
261

273
292
317
369
287
320
300
326





46


APPENDIX B
Teachers1 by Years 1918 through 1978


1918-1919 1919-1920

Jenkins Jenkins
I I


1920-1921

Jenkins


1921-1922

Jenkins


1922-1923

Jenkins


1923-1924

Stewart


1924-1925

Stewart


1925-1926


Stewart


1930-1931

Bragg
Paddyfote
Stewart
3

1935-1936

Bartley
**Benning
Ford


1940-1941

Bartley
Bell,H.
Bell, W.
Gaither
Harrison


1926-1927


Stewart


1931-1932


Daniels
Stewart
Wright


1936-1937

Batley
Bell, W.
Harrison


1941-1942

Bartley
Bell,W.
Gaither
Harrison
Neilson


1927-1928


Stewart


1932-1933


Daniels
Stewart
Wright


1937-1938

Bartley
Bell, W.
Gaither
Harrison


1942-1943


Bartley
Bell,W.
Gaither
Minor
Neilson
* Underwood
6


1928-1929


Bragg
Stewart


1933-1934


Ford
Wright


1938-1939

Bartley
Bell. W.
Gaither
Harrison


1943-1944


Bartley
Gaither
Hoard
Minor
Neilson

5


1929-1930

Bate
Paddyfote
Stewart
3


1934-1935


Bartley
Ford


1939-1940

Bartley
Bell, H.
Bell, W.
Gaither
Harrison
5


1944-1945

Bartley
Gaither
Griffin
Hoard
Minor
Neilson
6


'First semester
* Second semester
See Appendix M for full names and years of service.









1945-1946

Gaither
Griffin
Hoard
Minor
Neilson







5

1950-1951

Gaither
Griffin
Jones U.
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Steele
Stewart
Tookes
Williams, M.





11

1955-1956


Bland
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Plummer
Smith
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Weaver
Williams,


1946-1947

Gaither
Griffin
Smith
Steele
Stewart


1951-1952

Cobb
Cobbs
Gaither
Griffin
Lewis
Mike
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Steele
Stewart
Tookes
Williams. I


13

1956-1957

Bland
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Weaver
Williams, M.


1947-1948

Gaither
Griffin
Jones, C.
Moore
Oglesby
Shelton
Smith
Stewart
Tookes


1952-1953

Cobb
Cobbs
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Mike
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Steele
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Williams, M.
15

1957-1958

Bland
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Williams, L.
Williams, M.

14


1948-1949

Gaither
Griffin
Jones, U,
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Steele
Stewart
Tookes


1953-1954

Bland
Gaither
Griffin
Kitties
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Plummer
Smith
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Weaver
Williams, M.

14

1958-1959

Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
McKinnis
Meek
Minor
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Williams, L.
Williams. M.
15


1949-1950

Gaither
Griffin
Jones, U.
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Steele
Stewart
Tookes
Williams, M.
11


1954-1955

Bland
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Moore
Oglesby
Plummer
Smith
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Weaver
Williams, M.

14

1959-1960

Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Meek
Minor
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Williams, L.
Williams, M.
15


See Appendix M for full names and years of service.


47





48


1960-1961


1961-t962


1962-1963


1963-1964


1964-1965


Barber
Fears
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Meek
Minor
Moore
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
Williams. M.

16


1965-1966


Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Gibson
Griffin
Kitties
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes


1966-1967


Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Kittes
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes


1967-1968


Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes


1968-1969


Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Kitties
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes


1969-1970

Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Maurey
Minor
Montgomery
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Tookes

17


See Appendix M for full names and years of service.


Barber
Fears
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
White


Barber
Bartley
Gaither
Griffin
Hill, R.
Kittles
Lewis
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Warner
White


Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Hill, R.
Kittles
Lewis
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes
Ward


Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Gibson
Griffin
Kitties
Lewis
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Stafford
Stewart
Tookes








1970-1971

Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Minor
Montgomery
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Tookes




16

1975-1976

Barber
Bartley
Bogan
Figaro
Goldsmith
Griffin
Hubbard
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Moore
Mungen
Smith
Tookes
Triplett


1971-1972

Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Jefferson
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Mannings
Martin
Montgomery
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Tookes




16


1976-/977

Barber
Bartley
Bogan
Evans
Figaro
Goldsmith
Griffin
Kittes
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Mungen
Smith
Tookes
Triplett


1972-1973

Barber
Bartley
Figaro
Gaither
Griffin
Jefferson
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Mannings
Martin
Minor
Moore
Mungen
Oglesby
Smith
Tookes
Williams, J.

18


1973-1974

Barber
Bartley
Evans
Figaro
Griffin
Jefferson
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Moore
Mungen
Smith
Tookes
Triplett
Williams. J




16


1974-1975

Barber
Bartley
Bogan
Evans
Figaro
Goldsmith
Griffin
Hubbard
Jenkins
Kittles
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Moore
Mungen
Tookes
Triplett


17


1977-1978

Barber
BartelyBartley
Bogan
Evans
Figaro
Goldsmith
Griffin
Hill, S.
Kittks
Lang
Lewis
Martin
Mungen
Smith
Tookes
Triplett

16


See Appendix M for full names and years of service.


49








APPENDIX C
Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1963


Eng 101 Composition ........
Mat 101 College Math ......
His 101 American History .. .
PE 100 Hlth, and PE .......
PE 103 Intro. to PE .........
PE 107 Skills for Soc. Rec....
PE 225 Games of Low Org. ,,
MS 101 Military Sci. (m) .. .




Eng 201 Tech. Read'g,-Writ'g.
Edu 201 Intro. to Educ .......
Pos 200 Amer. Gov't. .......
PE Required PE Activity .....
Psy 210 Gen'l. Psychology ,..
PE 305 Theo. & Pract. Dance .
MS 201 Military Sci. (m) ..


PE 209 Tests & Meas'mts .. .
Edu 306 Elem. Sch. Prog ....
PE 303 Sk, Tech, Team Sp. (w)
PE 309 PE Prog. Elem, Sch ...
PE 311 Coach'g. Ftbl. (m) ....
PE 312 Coach'g. Bsktl, (m) ,
PE 401 Hith. in High Sch .....

Art 408 (or substitute) .......


Freshman


......3
. ,. .3








16-17

Sophomore

.... 1 .,3
-,--',3


. ... .1




16-17


Junior
. .3
,.3
.3
. ,3
. .3
..2
. .2

. .3


Year
Eng 102 Composition .....
Mat 102 College Math ....
Bio 110 Prin. of Zoology...
PE Required Activity .....
PE 104 Pers & Comm Hlth.
PE 106 Tumblg. & Gymnas.
MS 102 Military Sci, (m) ...


14-15


Year
Soc 200 Intro, to Soc ....
Psy 220 Educ. Psych .... .
Bio 200 Anat. & Physiol .
PE 205 Tech. Tchg. Dance
PE 402 Intro, & Off'g. ...
PE Required Activity .....
PE 202 Military Sci. (m) .


. .3
. . .4



..14-1...
. ... .1
14-15


Year
Eng 204 World Lit ......
PE 206 Play & Comm. Rec.
PE 304 Sk. Tech.Ind.Sp.(w)
Edu 308 Sec. Sch. Prog ...
PE 313 Coach'g, Baseball .
PE 315 Coach'g. Tr. & Ten.
PE 406 First Aid.........


15-16


.....3
'd -3



S .1



15-16


Tchg. PE in HS ........
Prin. of PE ...........
Adapted PE
Org. & Adminis. of PE.,
Physiol. of Exer ......
Pro. Seminar ..........


Senior
......3



- ., ..,3

..... .1

16


Year
Edu 401 Internship Tchg .............9
Edu 492 Sec. Sch. Seminar ...........3
Edu 495 Dir. Obs. & Parti. ........... 3
15


Minimum hours for graduation 120
Total hours for women 124
Total hours for men 128


325
408
404
408
410
416








APPENDIX D
Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1965


Eng 101 Composition .........
Mat 101 College Math ........
His 100 American History .....
PE 100 Health and PE ........
Pc 103 Intro. to PE .........
PE 107 Skills for Soc. Rec,...
PE 225 Games of Low Org ..
MS 101 Military Sci. (m) .....





Eng 201 Tech. Read'g.-Writ'g-.
Edu 201 [ntro. to Education ....
Pos 201 Amer. Gov't. ........
PE Required Activity .........
Psy 210 Gen'1, Psychology ,...
PE 305 Theo, & Pract. Dance .
MS 201 Military Sci, (m) .....


PE 309 Tests & Meas'mt. .....
Edu 300 Elem. Sch. Prog ......
PE 303 Sk. Tech. Team Sp. (w)
PE 308 Hlth. Prog. in HS .....
PE 311 Coach'g. Ftbl. (m) ..,.
PE 312 Coach'g, Bsktl. (m) ,
PE 401 Hlth. in High School, .
Electives 3-4


Freshman Year
...... .3 Eng 102 Composition ......
,... .3 Mat 102 College Math .....
,.....3 Bio 110 Prin. of Zoology ....
, ... .. PE Required Activity .......
..... .3 PE 104 Pers. & Comm. Hlth.
..... .2 PE 106 Tumblg. & Gymnas. .
...... 1 MS 102 Military Sci. (m) ..,
..... 1

16-17

Sophomore Year
......3 Soc 200 Intro. to Soc. ......
..,.. .3 Psy 200 Educ. Psyc.........
S. .3 Bio 200 Anat. & Physiol. ...
, ... I PE 204 Tech. Tchg. Dance ..
..... 3 PE 402 Intra. & Off'g ......
..... 3 PE Required Activity ......
......I MS 202 Military Sci. (m) ...

16-17


Junior
,,3
.,3

,,3
..3
..3

S.2
. .2


Year
Eng 204 World Lit, ....... .
PE 206 Play & Comm, Rec. .. ,
PE 304 Sk, Tech, Ind. Sp. (w)
PE 309 PE Prof, Elem. Sch, ...
PE 313 Coach'g. Bsebl. (m) .
PE 315 Coach'g. Tr. & Tn. (m)
PE 406 First Aid ...... ....
Art 408 (or substitute) .......


Edu 308 Tchg. in Sec, Sch ., ..
PE 325 Tchg, PE in HS .......
PE 403 Prin. of PE ...........

PE 404 Adapted PE ..........
PE 408 Org. & Adminis, of PE
PE 410 Physiol. of Exer ......
PE 416 Seminar in PE .......


Minimum Trimester hours 123
Women 122
Men 128


Senior






.3
. . -3

....... 3

.-3

.. 19
19


Year
Edu 401 Internship Tchg ............... 9
Edu 492 Sec. Sch. Seminar .......... .3
Edu 495 Dir. Obs. & Partic ............ 3

15


... 3

, | A3
. . .2

S. .1

- I

14-15




, . ,3

.., .4



4,. 1

14-15


......3





, | 3
. . ,3




15-16








APPENDIX E
Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1967


Freshman kear


Eng 101-102-103 Composition ....... 9
Mat 101-102-103 Basic .............9
His 101 Amer. & Pos. 201 Gov't. .....6
Bio 110 Gen'1. Biology .............4
PE 101 Fund'L. Movements ,......... 1
PE 102 Hith, for Modem Living ......2
PE 117 Beginning Swimming ...; 1
PE 103 Intro. to PE ...............3
PE 104 Pers. & Comm. Hth. ....... .3
PE 106 Tumbl'g. & Gymnastics .. .2
PE 107 Skills for Soc. Rec .......... 3
PE 121 Games of Low Org, ..........1
MS 101-102-103 Mil. Sci. (m) ........3

44-47


Sophomore Year


Hum 201-202 Fine Arts .........
Psy. Gen'l.-Edu.-Hum. Gr. & Dev.
Soc 200 Intro. to Sociology .., .
PE Required PE Activity ........
Edu 310 Soc. Foundation ........
PE 202 Intra. & Off'g. ........
PE 204 Tech. Tchg. Dance ......
PE 206 Community Rec. .......
PE 209 Tests & Meast .........
PE 305 Theo. & Pract, Dance ...
Spc 103 Found, of Speech ......
Bio 200 Anat. & Physiol ......


MS 201-202-203 Mil. Sci. (m)


Junior Year


Edu 301-302 Elem. Sch. Prog, .3 3
Edu 307 Elem. Sch. Prog ....... 3
Edu 308 Tchg. in Sec. Sch. ..... 3
PE 325 Tchg. PE in HS ....... 3
*PE 311 Coaching Football ...2
*PE 312 Coaching Basketball .... 2
*PE 313 Coaching Baseball ...... 2
*PE 315 Coaching Ten. & T, .... 2
**PE 303 Sk. Tech. Team Sports .3
**PE 304 Sk. Tech. Ind. Sports 3
PE 308 Hlt. Ed. in Elem. Sch. .3
PE 309 PE Prog. in Elem. Sch. 3
PE 401 HIth. Ed. in High Sch. ..3
Edu 200 Reading ............ 3
Edu 313 Hist. & Phil. of Ed, .... 3
PE 406 First Aid .............. 3
Edu 414 Audiovisual Aids ... ..3
1A 408 Arts & Crafts .........3
17 17 19


Senior Year


PE 403 Prin. of PE ........
PE 404 Adapted PE .....


PE 408 Org. & Adm. of PE .... 3
PE 410 Physiol. of Exer. ....... .3
Ed 415 A-V Aids .. ........,.. 3
Electives ... .. ....... ..... ... 12
Edu 401 Intern. Tchg ........... 9
Edu 492 Sec. Sch. Seminar...... 3
Edu 495 Dir. Obv. & Pr. Tchg ... 3
15 12 15


Total Quarter Hours:


Men 189
Women 181


*Men
"Women


.,,. ,6
. .9
. ,, .3


. .. .1 3
.3



. ..3
. . .3
. ,3


43-46


_____ ____


. I I.


. .3








APPENDIX F
Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1969


Freshman Yar

Eng 101-102-103 Composition 3 3 3
Mat 101-102-103 Basic .......3 3 3
His 100 American History ..... 3
Pos 201 American Government ,. 3
Bio 100 Biological Science .. .. 4
PE 101 Fund'l. Movements .. l
PE 102 Hth. for Modem Liv. ... 3
PE 117 Beginning Swimming ....
PE 103 Intro, to PE ......... ,3
PE 104 Personal & Comm, Hth. 3
PE 106 Thmbig. & Gymnastics .3
PE 107 Leadership in Soc. Rec. 3
PE 121 Games of Low Org ...1
17 15 14



Junior Year

Edu 301 Elem. Sch. Program ...3
Edu 307 Sec. Sch. Program .. .. 3
Edu 308 Tchg. in Sec. Sch. ..... 3
Edu 310 Soc. Found. of Ed. .. .3
PE 325 Tchg, PE in HS ........ 3
*PE 311 Coaching Football .....2
*PE 312 Coaching Basketbal .... 2
*PE 313 Coaching Baseball ..... 2
*PE 315 Coaching Ten. & 't .... 2
**PE 303 Sk. Tech. in RTam Spts. 3
**PE 304 Sk. Tech. in Ind. Spts. .. 3
PE 308 Hlth. Ed. in Elem. Sch. .. 3
PE 309 PE Prog. in Elem. Sch. 3
PE 310 Hlth. Prog. in High Sch,, 3
PE 322 Rec. for Mentally Ret. ,, 3
PE 305 First Aid ............... 3
PE 306 Tests & Measurements 3
Electives ....................... 6

17 17 19


*Men
*Women


Sophomore Year

Hum 201-202 Fine Arts ........ 3 3
Psy 210 Gen'l. Psych. ..........3
Psy 302 Human Gr. & Dev. ....... 3
Psy 320 Educ. Psych ............ 3
Bio 200 Anat. & Physio ........ 5
Soc 200 Intro. to Soc. ..........3
PE Required Activity ........ .. 1
PE 202 Intramurals .............. 3
PE 204 Tech, Tchg. Dance .......3
PE 206 Community Rec ......... 3
PE 205 Theo. & Pract. Dn....... 3
Spc 103 Found. of Speech ....... 3
PE 203 Officiating .............. 3
Ed 414 A-V Aids ............... 3
15 15 15


Senior Year

PE 401 Camp/Outdoor Ed. ...... .3
PE 403 Prin, of PE ............ 3
PE 404 Adapted PE ............ 3
PE 408 Org, & Admin. .........3
Electives ..................... 3
PE 410 Physio. of Exer. .......... 3
PE 416 Prof, Seminar............ 1
1A 408 Arts & Crafts ............ 3
Electives ...................... 9
Edu 401 Student Teaching ........ 9
Edu 492 Inst. Seminar ........... 3
Edu 495 Dir. Obv. & Pract ....... 3
15 16 15

Suggested electives:
Abnormal Psychology
Bacteriology
Children's Literature
Driver Education
Exceptional Child Education
Marriage & Family Relationships


__ __





54


APPENDIX G
Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1971


Freshman Year


Eng 101-102-103 Composition .,. 3 3 3
Mat 101-102-103 Basic .... .. 3 3 3
His 100 U.S. History ... ..... 3
Pos 201 American Nat'l. Gov't. ... 3
PE 101 Fund'l. Movements .... .
PE 102 HIth. for Modem Liv. 3
PE 117 Beginning Swimming ...... 1
Bio 100 Biological Science ,..4... 4
PE 103 Intro. to PE ............3
PE 104 Pers. & Comm. Hlth. ..... 3
PE 106 Tumblg. & Gymnas ...... 3
PE 107 Leadership in Soc. Rec ... 3
PE 121 Games of Low Org. ......1
17 15 14


Junior Year


Edu 301 Elem. Sch. Program ..... 3
Edu 307 Secondary Sch. Prog. ... 3
Edu 308 Tchg. in Sec. Sch. ....... 3
Edu 310 Soc. Found. of Educ, .. 3
PE 303 (w) Sk, Tech. Team Spt. ..3
PE 304 (w) Sk. Tech. Ind. Spt ... 3
PE 305 First Aid..... .......... 3
PE 306 Tests & Measurements .... 3
PE 308 H1th. in Elem. Sch ....... 3
PE 309 PE in Elem, Sch ....... 3
PE 310 HIth. in High Sch ......... 3
PE 311(m) Coachg. Football .... 2
PE 312(m) Coachg. Basketball .... 2
PE 313(m) Coachg. Baseball ...... 2
PE 315 (m) Coachg, Track & Ten. 2
PE 322 Rec. for Ment'ly. Ret.... .3
PE 325 Tchg. PE in HS .......... 3
Electives ................... 3 4 2
20 20 18


Sophomore Year


Hum 201-202 Fine Arts ......... 3
Psy 210 Gen'l. Psych, .,.... ... 3
Psy Human Gr. & Dev... .......
Psy 320 Educ. Psych ...........
Bio 200 Anat. & Physiol. ........
PE 148 (m) Wrestling ., .......
Soc 200 Intro, to Soc ..........3
PE 202 Intramurals ... ........
PE 204 Tech. Tchg, Dance .......3
PE 206 Community Rec. ........
Edu 414 A-V Aids ....... .....
PE 205 Theory & Pr. Dn. ...... .3
Spc Found, Speech ..............
PE 203 Offi'g. Tech. ...........
15


3

3


3
3
15 15


Senior Year


PE 401 Camp/Outdoor Ed ....... .3
PE 403 Prin. of PE ............3
PE 404 Adapted PE ............3
PE 408 Org. & Adm, PE ......... 3
PE 410 Physiol. of Ex........... .3
PE 416 Prof. Seminar ............ 1
IA 408 Arts & Crafts ............ 3
Electives ................... 3 8
Edu 401 Student Tchg ............ 9
Edu 492 Inst. Seminar ......... 3
Edu 495 Dir. Obv. Sec. Sch .... .. 3
15 15 15

Suggested electives:
Bacteriology
Corrective/Recreational Therapy
Driver Education
Problems of Marriage
Exceptional Child Education


Men
Women





55


APPENDIX H

Curriculum for Majors in Health and Physical Education
1974


Freshman Year


Sophomore Year


Eng 101-102-103 Composition ........ 9
Mat 101-102-103 Basic ............ .9
His 100 U.S. History ........... ..3
Pos 201 Amer. Nat'l Gov't. .........3
PE 101 Fund'1. Movements ........ 1
PE 102 Hlth. for Modern Liv. ........3
PE 103 Intro. to PE ............... ,3
PE 104 Pers. & Comm. Hith. ....... 3


PE 106 Thmblg, & Gymnas..
PE 117 Beginning Swimming.
PE 121 Games of Low Org. ,,
Bio 100 General Biology .. .
Spc 103 Found. of Speech ...


- 1
. . 1
. . .4


46


Hum 201-202 Fine Arts .. .
Soc 200 Intro. Soc. ........
Bio 200 Anatomy & Physiol.
PE 147 (m) ...... ..........
PE 202 Intramurals .........
PE 203 Officiating .........
PE 204 Tech. Tchg. Dance...
PE 205 Theory & Pract. Dn..


PE
PE
PE
Psy
Psy
Psy


206
207
208
210
301
320


Community Recreation
Leadership in Soc. Rec.
First Aid .. .......
Gen'l. Psychology ...
Human Growth & Dev.
I Educational Psychol..


. .. .6
.......... 6




......... .3
.3 .


.........3
. .. .3
. . .3

. .. .. 3




. . .3

45


Junior Year


Edu 301 Elem. School Prog. .........3
Edu 307 Sec. Sch. Program .. ....... 3
Edu 308 Thhg. in Sec. Sch ......... .3
Edu 310 Found. of Educ. .. ..........
**PHE 303 Sk. Tech. Team Sports ,.....3
**PHE 304 Sk. Tech. Ind. Sports .......
PHE 308 Health in Elem. Sch. ........3
PHE 309 PE in Elem. Sch. ..........3
PHE 310 Hith. Edu. in HS ,.........3
*PHE 311 Coaching Football ......... 2
*PHE 312 Coaching Basketball ........ 2
**PHE 313 Coaching Baseball......... 2
*PHE 315 Coachg, Tr. & Tennis ....... 2
PHE 322 Rec. for Ment'ly. Ret. ...... 3
PHE 325 Tchg. PE in HS .............3
Electives .......................4


Senior &Yar


PHE 401 Camp'g & Outdoor Ed.
PHE 403 Prin. of PE ..........
PHE 404 Adapted PE ...........
PHE 408 Org. & Adm. of PE ,..
PHE 410 Physiol. of Exer. .......
Ecu 401 Student Teaching .......
Edu 492 Professional Sem. ......
Edu 495 Dir. Obv, & Practice ..,.
Electives ... ....... .... .......


Tracks of Interests were:
Athletic Coaching
Corrective Therapist
Dance Specialist
Driver Education
Exceptional Child Education
Health Education


A minimum of 180 quarter hours for graduation including Tracks of Interests

*men
** Women


. . .3
. .3

S. ., .3

S. -., .3
. .. 3.

..... 15

45


J





56

APPENDIX I
Curriculum for Majors in Health, Physical Education and Recreation
1975


Freshman *ar

Eng 101-102-103 Composition .........
Mat 101-102-103 Basic Math .........
His 100 U.S. History .... .........
POS 201 Amer. Nat'l. Gov't. ........
Bio 100 General Biology .............
PHE 101 Fundamental Movements......
PHE 102 Health for Modern Living. ..
PHE 103 Foundations of Phys. Educ. ..
PHE 104 Personal & Comm. Health ....
PHE 106 Iumbling & Gymnastics ......
PHE 117 Beginning Swimming .......
PHE 121 Games of Low Organization ...
PHE 131 Recreational Dance ..........
Elective ........................


Sophomore far


.9
,9
.3
.3
.4
.1
.3
.3
.3
.3
.1
.1
.1
l.1


45


Junior lKar


Hum 201-202 Intro. to Fine Arts ......
Psy 200 General Psychology .......
Psy 301 Human Growth & Dev. ......
Psy 320 Educational Psychology ......
Soc 200 Introduction to Sociology ....
Edu 310 Social Foundations .........
PHE 200 Early Involvement .........
PHE 203 Officiating ..............
PHE 205 Theory & Practice Dance ....
PHE 206 Community Recreation ...
PHE 207 Leadership in Soc. Rec. ....,
PHE 208 First Aid ................
PHE 148 Wrestling (m)..............
Electives .....................


45


Senior ear


300
307
308
301
303
304
305


Elem. Sch. Program.......
Sec. Sch. Program ......
Teaching in the Sec. Sch. ...
Foundations of Phys. Educ. .
Skill Tcch. Team Sports (w).
Skill Tcch. Ind. Sports (w)
Recreational Dance Forms ..


306 Tests and Measurements ..,
308 Health in the Etem. Sc h...
309 Phys. Educ. in Elem. Sch .
310 Health in the High School ..
311 Coaching Football (m). ...
312 Coaching Basketball (m) ...
313 Coaching Baseball (m) .....
315 Coaching Tennis and flack..
322 Rec. for Mentally Retarded .


ives


EDI 305 Arts and Crafts (or sub) ...... .3
PHE 401 Camping & Outdoor Educ ... 3
PHE 402 Intramurals ...............3
PHE 403 Principles of Phys. Educ.......3
PHE 404 Adapted Physical Educ. ... .. .3
PHE 408 Org. and Adminis. of PE ......3
PHE 410 Physiology of Exercise ,..... ,3
Edu 401 Student Teaching .............9
Edu 492 Professional Seminar .........3
Edu 495 Dir. Obv. and Practice ..........3
Electives .................... ....9
45


...3
...3
...3

, ,,3
. .3

.. .3
. .3
. .3

F .2
. .2
..,2
. .2
. ,3


. . . . . . .
40-47


Suggested Tacks of Special Interest or Emphasis:

Athletic Coaching and Practicum .... ... .. ..... .. ... ........ ...
Adapted Physical Education; Dance Specialist (recommendation of advisor) *
Driver Education ........................... ......... .... ......
Exceptional Child Education .. ...................................
Health Education (bacteriology, nutrition, related health) ....,........
Corrective Therapy (abnormal psychology, corrective therapy) ............


..6
..3
..3
..3
..3
.3
. .3

..3
. .3
..3
. .3
.1.
..5


Edu
Edu
Edu
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE
PHE


PHE
Elect





57

APPENDIX J
Curriculum for Majors in Health, Physical Education and Recreation
1977


Freshman Year

Eng 101-102-103 Composition .......9
Mat 101-102-103 Basic Math .......... .9
His 100 United States History .......... 3
Pos 201 Amer. Nat'l. Government ...... 3
PHE 101 Fundamental Movements.......1
PHE 104 Personal & Comm. Health .....3
PHE 106 Tumbling & Gymnastics .. .. 3
Soc 200 Intro. to Sociology .......... 3
Spc Foundations of Speech ........... .3
PHE 200 Early Involvement ........ .3
Bio 100 Biological Science ........... 5
45


Junior kYar


Edu 300 Elem. School Program ....... 3
PHE 303 Sk. Tech. Team Sports (w) ... 3
PHE 304 Sk. Tech. Ind. Sports (w) .... 3
Edu 307 Secondary School Program ... .3
Edu 308 Teaching in Sec. School ......3
PHE 306 Tests and Measurements ......3
PHE 308 Health in Elem. School .......3
PHE 309 Phys. Educ. in Elem. Sch. .. ..3
PHE 310 Health in High School ........3
PHE 322 Phys. Educ. for Ment. Ret..... 3
PHE 324 Theory of Coaching .........3


Sophomore Yar

Hum 201-202 Intro. Fine Arts .... .. 6
Psy 200 General Psychology 3... .3
Psy 320 Educational Psychology ........3
Psy 350 Human Growth & Development .3
PHE 208 First Aid ................. .3
PHE 217 Swimming ........... ......2
PHE 301 Foundations of Phys. Educ. .. ...3
PHE 302 Officiating ........ ........3
PHE 305 Theory of Dance .............3
PHE 321 Creative Rhythms .......... .2
Bio 200 Anatomy and Physiology .......5
Edu 310 Social Foundations ..........3
Electives ............ ....... .. 6
45

Senior Year

PHE 401 Camping & Outdoor Educ. ... 3
PHE 402 Intramurals ................3
PHE 403 Principles of Phys. Educ....... 3
PHE 404 Adapted Physical Education... .3
PHE 406 Community Recreation ....... 3
PHE 408 Org. & Adminis. ofPhys. Educ.. .3
PHE 409 Kinesiology ..................3
PHE 410 Physiology of Exercise .. ... 3
Edu 401 Student Teaching .............9
Edu 492 Professional Seminar ..... ...3
Edu 495 Dir. Obv. & Practice ...... ... 3


PHE 325
PHE 330
EDR 363
Electives


TIhg. Phys. Educ. in Hi. Sch. .3
Motor Learning ......... 3
Reading ....................3
.... ............ ....... 6 to 3


Electives ............ ....


4 P 4 4 06
45


Suggested Tracks of Special Interest or Emphasis:


Athletic Coaching and Practicum ...... .............. ...... .....
Adapted Physical Education; Dance Specialist (recommendation of advisor)
Driver Education ................................... ..........
Exceptional Child Education ...................................
Health Education (bacteriology, nutrition, related health) ...............
Conective Therapy (abnormal psychology, corrective therapy) ..........
Recreational Therapy (abnormal psychology, recreational therapy) .......
This curriculum allowed a minimum of 180 quarter hours for graduation.


.14
.20
.17
.9
.9


.............
............






58


APPENDIX K

Curriculum for Graduate Students in Physical Education
1977


I. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION ...,.......... .......................... ,9
Advanced Educational Psychology ...............,.......... ........ 3
'Sociological Foundations of Education ................. ............. 3
History of Education ................... .. ................... ..,,..,3
Philosophy of Education ............... .......................3


II, CURRICULUM AND METHODS ..........................
Methods and Teaching in Intermediate School .......,.
Methods and Techniques of Teaching in Secondary School
Secondary School Curriculum -........................
Audiovisual Production ...............................
Audiovisual Utilization ................ ............


III. PSYCHOLOGY ... .....................................
*Adolescent Psychology .............................


IV. GENERAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION .............
Principles and Techniques of Research ............
Seminar in Secondary Education .................
Testing and Evaluating .........................


V. HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
*Philosophy of Physical Education ................
Problems in School Health ......................
*Public Recreation .............................
Analysis of Human Motion ....................
Biological Aspects of Physical Disability ..........
Contemporary Dance............. ..............
Current Problems in HPER .....................
Directed individuall Study ....................
Issues in Health Education .. ..................
Organization and Administration of HPER ,.......
Problems in Inierschool Athletics ..,,...,,.... ,...
Problems in School Health Administration ,........
Research Methods in Health, Physical Education
and Recreation .............................
Seminar in Athletic Administration ...............
Supervision in Physical Education ................
Tests and Measurements in Physical Education .....
Theory and Practice of Teaching Swimming ........
Theory and Practice of Teaching Tumbling
and Gym nastics ............... .. .........


SRequired


.... .... -3


........ . .3
... ... ...3



.............3
.3.. . .
... . 3


..3


..24


. . . . . .
. ..... ... ., ,.,.


. r.. ..... ...... .3
......... ......, 3
..,.... ....,,...., 3


.......... .. ... .. 3




.. ,... .......... .3



... ..... ..... ..3
.. .. ........... 3

. . . . .. 3
.. .... ..... ...... ..3




. . . .3


Total





APPENDIX L
Administration


N. B. Young


1920-19.N N. B. Young
W. H. A. Hawanl

J. R. E. Lcr


].1- 19. J. R. E. Lee




1940.1949 J. R. E Let


J B Blra
I Acligi
i. B. Bng


J B. Rr g


J B. Brfa,
(ActingJ
W. H Gray. If.
H. M Efe'rsnn
l Acanpl :
louwrmrng HallhI, Phbslcal PjrdiBman and Rectation


h P INR idtir
IIern of Adminiisiursim

Dean of UFaiwluy
DIan o tIrtivrcriy
Dean of ALhminiisrair
Affain
Dean DF Acadrmic AfaITal
v'tt PitsdIeal for
Acmiermc Affain


RI, L. Uer
E. P. authidl

W. M. ill
E. P. Suthall W. M. Brll


C. I.. Spellnui


A. .S Guither


Perld


Presidefnd


"'e-n or
Divis inu
C~cll l


Heod
Thaimun
D parlimmn
Diviiaon


Atlicix
DAtcluK
Din-clur


J. B Bragg
L. Blacks
1-Tanz Byrd


W. M. King
T Wrigh
J. B. Bragg
W. M. Beli
W. M. Bell


A. S. Gather


I C. WrujilI
Humr Thurmm
Homer Thomam
H. P Calerman
(Aclinpg
R. O. LBni r


__


I.1M--119l





APPENDIX L-Continued

Peiod PRlid m v* LPrcslm "De' of HeIad AISrhi
DEan of Alkniidrllio DivisioD Chaumm Dirzcor
Dean of PFrlry ColIse Depa mrn
Dein of tUni'criny Divisiam
Dean of AdmlmiNduive
Affmin
Den of Ac dres AffOll
mce Prtaidle far
AcaSkmib- AEfai

195-19Q G. W. Gor. Jr. ]. R. E. Lee, Jr. M. Ahit A.U. S. Gaither A. CSait r
W196-196 G. W. Gare, Jr. R. E. Lee, Jr. MJ. Alhton A. S. Gaithd A. S. Gaiher
i., M. Easot F. B. Mor dSrt. A. MooN
H. L. Pery. J.
L. L. Baykin
M. C. RhMey
B. L.. Py, Jr._
IW l 1973 B. L. Pny, Jr. M. C. RbIa y B. Mo) St. 0. A. AMcst A. S. Gahulr

G. L. Simmnns Vinn Eva
O. A. Moor H. E, TNoke

VWda BLt S
W. L. Smith


*Oaaing akh, Physical Educatin and R~et ea" i







APPENDIX M
Names of Teachers and Their Years of Service in the Division
of Health, Physical Education and Recreation
at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
1918-1978


Decade
1918 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970
Name 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1978 Total

Barber, Beverly A. Hillsman 9 8 17
Bartley, Lua S. 6 5 8 8 27
Bates, Winifred L. 1 I
Bell, Horace D. 1 1 2
Bel William M 4 3 7
% Bennings, Lucille D.
Bland, Louise Tucker 5 5
Bogan, Samuel A. 4 4
Bragg, Jubie B. 1 1 2
x BriKgs, Theodore A. 1 I
Cobb, Robert S. 2 2
Cobbs, Evadne Priester Abrams 2 2
Daniels, Clementine Nelson 2 2
Evans, Virden 4 4
Fears, Jr., Ernest D. 2 2
Figaro, Allison H. 7 8 15
Ford, F. Irene 3 3
Gaither, Alonzo S. 3 10 10 10 4 37
Gibson, Kenneth D. 2 2
Goldsmith, Frederick H. 4 4
Griffin, Robert P. 5 10 10 7 32
Harrison, Cecile A. 4 2 6
Hill, Richard A. 2 2
Hill, Sarah E. Jenkins 1 ]
Hoard, Yvonne Walker 3 3
Hubbard, Rudy L. 3 3
Jefferson, Dennis 3 3
Jenkins, Susan 1 1
Jones, Catherine E. 1 1
Jones, Ulysses 2 1 3
Kittles, Costa 7 10 8 25
Lang, Bobby E. 3 8 11
Lewis, Julia G. 1 10 10 8 29
Mannings, Jeanne D. 2 2
Martin, Edwina B. 2 7 9
Maurey, Gerald 1 1
McKinnis, Hugh L. 1 1
Meek, Carrie Pittman Davis 1 2 3
Mike, Robert 1 1
Minor, Bertha P. James 4 1 4 3 12


x part-time
one semester





62


Decade
1918 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970
Name 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1978 Total

Montgomery, Clarence A. I 2 3
Moore, Oscar A. 3 10 10 5 28
Mungen, Robert T. 9 8 17
Neilson, Herman N. 5 5
Oglesby, Edward E. 3 10 10 3 26
Paddyfote, Caleb J.A. I
Plummet, Toni C, 3 3
Sanders, Sarah A. Jenkins 1 4 5
Shelton, Ulis 1 1
Smith, Marolyn Warner 4 10 10 7 31
Stafford, S, Tanner 2 10 1 13
Steele, Sophronia S, 3 4 7
Stewart, Anita Prater 6 3 4 10 10 33
Tookes, Hansel E. 3 10 10 8 31
Torrence, Herman
Triplett, Ajac 5 5
Underwood, Geraldine Geiger
Ward, Arnette A. 1 1
Warner, Henry W. 7 4 11
Weaver, Wilhelmina Clark Roux 4 4
White, Juanita 2 2
Williams, Letitia J. Smith 2 1 3
Williams, James 2 2
Williams, Macon L. 1 10 1 12
Wright, Theodore 3 3


one semester
' one quarter





63


Notes

SLeedell W. Neyland and John W. Riley, The History of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University, pp. 9-11. Gainesville: The University of Florida Press, 1963,
zlbid,, pp. 124 -129.
3Bulletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes (31st annual Catalog)
pp. 26-27.
4See Appenidx A (information from Registrar's office).
5Bfletin of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes (33rd annual Catalog)
p. 7,
6See Appendix B.
'See Appendix A (information from Registrar's office).
sArthur Klein, Survey of Negro Colleges and Universities, Bulletin No. 7, p. 214.
9See Appendix A.
'See Appendix B.
"See Appendices A and B.
'See Appendix A.
'3Leedell W. Neyland and John W, Riley, op. cir., p. 129.
'4See Appendix A.
"See Appendix B.
'1See Appendix A.
'7See Appendix A.
'See Appendix B.
"See Appendix A.
I'Leedell W. Neyland and John W. Riley, op. cit., p, 163,
2lIbid., p. 185.
2See Appendix A.
23Se Appendix B.
2See Appendix A.
5Leedell W. Neyland and John W. Riley, op. cit., p. 241.
-Florida A&M University Bulletin, 1968-1969, p. 201.
"See Appendices C, D, E and F,
21See Appendix K.
9See Appendix A.
3See Appendix B.
"See Appendix A.
2Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Institutional Self-Study, 1973-1978, p.
6.
"See Appendices G, H, 1 and J.
"See Appendix K.
3:See Appendix A.
'See Appendix B.
3"See Appendix A.
'"American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, "Ethnic Minority Service
Committee Honorees," Atlantic City, March, 1975.
"American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, "Awards and Presidential
Citations," Update, June, 1976.
"Di vision of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, "Student Opinions Regarding Required
Physical Education," 1975 -76.
'4See Appendix L.
42See Appendix M.












The Author






Lua S. Bartley, Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation,
was born in Jacksonville, Florida and educated in several public elementary
and junior high schools in the state, as well as the senior high school department
at Bethune-Cookman College. She received the A.B. degree cum laude from
Howard University and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees were earned at the
University of Michigan while studying as a General Education Board Fellow.
She served as an instructor and coach at Bethune-Cookman College, Jones
High School and Florida A&M College. Later she became a Professor and Head
of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation at Tennessee
State University before returning to Florida A&M University in 1962.
In the athletic circle, she has been affiliated with basketball, swimming,
tennis, and track as contestant, coach; and official.
She has contributed articles to the FAMCEE Quarterly Journal, Michigan
Studies in Higher Education and The Official Tennis-Badminton Guide. The
author served on numerous committees of The American Alliance for Health,
Physical Education and Recreation on the state, district and national levels and
received awards and citations for her services.
Her travel includes nine countries in Europe and five in Africa, as well as
extended tours of the Hawaiian and Caribbean Islands.
Honor societies in which she has membership are Alpha Pi Phi, Sigma
Delta Lambda and Pi Lambda Theta. In addition she holds life membership in
The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated and The National Council of Negro
Women.

The author is listed in :
Who's Who in Colored America, 1950
Who's Who of American Women, First Edition, 1958-59
Personalities of the South, 1970
Who's Who of American Women, Sixth Edition, 1970-71
The World Who's Who of Women, Second Edition, 1974-75
The World Who's Who of Women, Third Edition, 1976


64










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