• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Half Title
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Review of the literature
 Method of investigation
 Presentation and analysis...
 Summary and conclusions
 Recommendations
 Bibliography
 Appendix






Title: Relationship of the land laboratory plots to the farming programs of the All-Day Students in Moore Academy High School, Pasco County, Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000042/00001
 Material Information
Title: Relationship of the land laboratory plots to the farming programs of the All-Day Students in Moore Academy High School, Pasco County, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Taylor, Nathaniel James
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1954
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000042
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA0924
notis - ABV5534

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title page
    Half Title
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
        Page iv
    List of Figures
        Page v
        Page vi
    Acknowledgement
        Page vii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Review of the literature
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Method of investigation
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Presentation and analysis of data
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Summary and conclusions
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Recommendations
        Page 56
    Bibliography
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Appendix
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
Full Text








T7l !1LfT--OQHCI O: TfE LAUD LArcOrTrEY PLOT 10 T


ACA Y !!G0 SCtOOL, P10C C'T1, FL ORIDA









A 5nesis

Presented to

the F'iaculty of the Division of Graduate Study

Florida Agricultural and t-iechanical University









in Partial ulfillmnent

of the Requirements for the Degree

ivaster of Science in Agrictlture





by

Jnmes Nathaniel Taylor

August, 1954














- -- i .. S.,- 4


'.


.: L .
-A: 2 .: ; f .. ,4-,"









iresenyte. tr t-e .RecUlty cf t"e ..ivisl.. n of Grea.ute
,t.ady, -'1crii A;rric-lt&aVl hfnl .svac"micta l UnivPrsity ln I artbli
S;ai'l. cint of the oe9lreAtnts for the agrees 5:aster of :. >cncne
i ..! ri.2l3tre












jbJates hKthcri&l sT yl ori


'. I i. ;,
I I .- .. -L. *


%LW.USt, 1Ifo'r4













TABLE 0 CONTENTS


CHAPTSK

I. INTRODUCTION .

Theproblem ..

Hypothesis .

Delimitations .

Definitions of Terms

II- RK Vl "' T"".. LI"ru "TUr,-

LII, M1THCi F C'.V ..tIG..TICN







IbLIQO%-'PhY a. a a 4 .

AF' i.'itDX A ues io .

AFfI'-NDIX A. Questionnaire


APPUDIX B" .

PP'L D .IU.X .;

AHf-'LDiX t.

;ctu::N 1N.''' *~.--* '


Daily Diary i.heet


PAGE

. + . 1




. . . T
* 4 4 4 a a



, a a .a . 10

S + 14

OF D . 20

. . a 53

. a a a 56

a+ a a 4 57

a a a a a a a a a a a C 60

S*a a a a t a a a a 61U
a a a a a 61

. . . 64


Occupational .Record of agriculture e Students

Swinc Farm brnterprise Suirvey. *

Firnel f'Sttemnent of S-upervised ~sraring 'ork











Li.:. OF T-AjLL

TABL. PAGE

I, The Annual vera# e Temperature arid iifinfall

1943-1952 Pasco County, Flori a 2

II, Thie Number of Frtrms O-wrned or Rente- and th Lur? '-

ber of' Acres in lach ?ari u 1. ..

iii. The H,"nber of C(>.tivwteed Acres an- the ;Number of

Students on Each Farm .* *

IV, Total N1-mber of Farms and Total acres Compiled

on the Final Reports of the All-Day Students

1946-1952, Dade City, Florida 24

V, Fcres and h;umber of Students Using the Warmring

Practices Taught in the Land Laboratory Plots 2

VI. Distances turdents Lived troa the :chcl Com-

pared with the Nunmb.r of Ftarming Practices

Used 2. e .* .

VI Occupations of the Out-of-;chool arid in-School

Students in the Dade City Area, Florida 3

VI1I. The Numbber of Students Errol2e S in Each Enter-
a-
prise before and After Reorganizing and Pe-

arranging the Land Laboratory Plots 37

.X. Per Cent of Increase in En rollment in Enterprises

gfter Reorganizing and Rearranging the Land

Laboratory Plots at the ".choo3 . *. 38










ivr



.'.A "' .. .1
*.. ..t Pr it %-.dt b' t .tui ,ints .cfore eduvE
Aftev r;'*;nr -.'o n LtanyS, Sr; .earrurgin' th&e >nd

rT..: IL -" r n 4- tl'p "'-'co 41
., .?. .' .iter. .ri s ...f c .d ".f't-Sr .e-

Ar arIdiI: 2fl I G YL .2 fCi n f2 S n tLoratory

2- I.0. i's: 2% k..i City Are3 wPJtL thZ 0' y-it

cr l r --LX L: A.c' ntr-ri.e . 44

X.2. .. R E-r 't:.t -e: ts .ta- ished .n "-r?.i 0LV"

G"rd:-..t Icr ief '.re -nd .--t r :.o- ;. a ri. i fln. t,.h,

d L...r...cr;., ,,c ts at th t.ch,. .J -. 48













&:


1. ;f.p of vsCccu.nty ,,,, ., 1

., 1..: .'".'ro rU nt. of I..': .1- -. ttudenti C nr -

ti1 .fic tuir. -t cc:.- 1 Ir. C;F i-

Cit,. T -. c' 7 : :.nty j :..i it-t L I:-I-', t"'s ; X 'r"- s'

1 .4 ,; i ou;.,r. 1 .,: ,. ;.. , .
S ;. r l ti .. h p, y ;, t U
-aI


I '" 4 44 *4,


Jcr. 1I f -ili ri r..c tio*- o pl t-'
Au'l-c7 I r q





t .'by 3..' 4 0 ,; h d .3 -. ,





': .. .. ..a'" "" "e 1f.. "_' ca J f -nw i .-\ -
c-.I- ra r ,a.n












i'1ots -4r.. .. .. .i4
.C-'it1 o r rviirti- t-:Ca l e- r. rcf. ?,1 ; f ;'it.
U *- r?



thC. LF-n' L oxr'.t(y rio.- by ..4 ", -
tr3 :%.A&; .. it L e. th% . 4 4 48
? r--f r -;3 rJi o f .* '. ^iCD '"0 0 -, u -





1~~ ~ ri*r. c; ij + v *? 'Ch l ,- ,: 46










vi



7. r'"! 's.tl2tos-Thip, 2hcw- by Grs ph, Betwecr the

1In uter n9 *:p h r CL Hct. loci sea rnr the Net



The r .'Ltin ~ i ltrr Nt r ft ::. o Farini


&r 'ctls:t .CI r' t se. C r ? .oe ..; -i .h .r 0
E1 ";-ir' e .'r-.c' ic"s ..re J ed . . DE














tcknowledga'et 1 gladly giv-n to th': threc Lcn.mbers

cf graduate comiAttee for the .iny constructive crlticis;-s,

counsel, nnd guidance giver to the writer in conducting the

investtigeaton reported herein.

It.is investigation has been conducted under the

general guitnince of a three member comai-ittee oC the faculty

of Florida agricultural l and i4echanical University. 'The co-

mittee consists of M I. Conoly, chairman; Mr. F. WJ.

Gordon, consultant; and Dr. 1. I. Cooper:, consultant..

The writer wishes to express his grateful thanks and

appreciation to Dr. W. S. Maize, Dean of the Graduate School

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, who so

willirnly cooperated in outlining the courses for graduate

study in agriculture.

Frinr;ly, I oar. grateful to ,y family, particularly my

wife, who expressed words cf ar!ccuuagemeint when the task at

hand seerme difficu..t.


i: 3!~h~ 3~ i '~~ IZ:~ If'U ~'












IHAPTER I


ITiTOi`UCT lON

Cecgraphically, iPasco County shown in Figure 1, is


PASCO COUNTY l4 occSE
U.S.U. 4








S,,P OA PA-- ST M POU --LT


FIGURE 1. MAP OF PASCO COUNTY

located about half way down the Florida peninsula on the

Gulf coast of the state. The 1950 census report listed the

population as 2L,412 persons.

The topography of Pasco County ranges from slightly

rolling in the western three-fourths with light sandy ridges

and flat prairie land to hilly in the eastern one-fourth with

light sandy, fairly fertile, pine and palmetto flatwood soil.

The climate of the area, shown in Table I, is sub-tropical.



S-Nsthan Mayo, 'Notes on Florida's Population Growth
1950O p. 4.









TABLE I

ANNUAL AVERAGE TEiPE~ATURE AND RAINFALL 1943-1952
PASCO COUNTY


Year Annual Average Annual Average
Temperature Rainfall


1943 71.5 63.30
1944 72.4 54.30
1945 78.5 81.93

1946 73.6 51.79

1947 72.3 68.46
1948 74.4 51.33

1949 73.8 50.77

1950 72.5 57.35

1951 72.4 50.12
1952 72.2 42.62.

Average Temperature Average Rainfall
1943-1952 72., 1943-1952 57.19


The average rainfall 1943-1952 was fifty-seven and

nineteen hundredths inches per year with the heaviest rain-

fall occurring in the months of June, July, August, and

September. The annual average temperature 1945-195, was
seventy-two and three tenth degrees per year with an average

low of sixty-three and two tenth degrees in January and an











aversXge hih.r of eighty-one and eiht tenth degrees in

August. The highest a.nvption in twhe c-.unty above sea level

is 170 feet at St. Leo,.

Pasco County i-' bcrdered by -er'. -if-c County cn the

north, P ol'k and -Juter Couritict.s on the east, Pinellas Pn..

H llsbcrc.. h Countles on th- sruth. and the GCil? o'f "eyico

Oe the west. D&da ty, trhe county seat, located in the.

northwest Ysctlon 0 thE: county, thirty--sir mil n rro' T T"ip-i,

has a population of 3,792 perC.2ns.
4
The total ar'ca of' ...jc. Lc-,ulty i 4r0,640 acres.

Of this tctac. acacr e 357,441 acres or -&wev y-w- ~a\: fl'ur

tenrths per cent are in farms. TIhc tctal nu.bcx c'. frarzs- ir

the county are 1,100 with an E.veaSe V iof e4 ras i; Cr:.ch


';he major farm enterprises of ?asco CCj.,ty ir tlhei,

approximate order of I :porlan e r'::e citrus, beef cat.te,

poultry (egf gs?, grass seeds, wate;.rrelron, dairy prcC!m.cts,



JClimuatolo.;'tic8l tiSummaIry, U. Ieathor Bureau. k:t.
Laeo ,tatin~LTY;T p. 1*


4Jrlilte' tr.ates Census of AgricUlta-'e, 0i. 2, ''-rt .*,
a19r::.., p. 63.
ibid., p. 63.
5bAd., p- r 3.










par hogs. Pasca county hIs thef largest .lun.quet producing

area in t.h ie .ted :.-*.-te en- i. tf- secoIk Ir.ces t l t

prcdu.-cin c~,unty in th' state Cof l.,rid8.

hf 9'8 J lk (. ci.i K l..iio' ? L.. L-:ctU y : 1.._t I ..-

niL~~Uber of schols in the county m s e seve-:tien. ,1. thi tcta

Vour wure. Naro achoGis and thi.Ptr5 ri. 'ee v..ltt.e G
in. tihe ~osr egr~ c schools, there werr twenty-twc teach.:..r

i.cjv diia, principal; in 1th ? thirtme.n white schools t-ere

wr-. 15C teach :rs in,..cluding principals,. iThere were ~4

!'rp'o stu.eits anR. 45f vite Ft t, st nt ai.-z r, tot.J or?

, 097 stw;lents in P~sc County"

The De:parr-ent ef Vocatic-il .I'..9 ricul rurle ,,'

established in the ,oore Acade~omy ri.gh School at Lade ..-y,

t;Oc-' C-unty,, 522l ra tL- 195,

iguri'Ec P onr p'fe 5 shows the enrcll.r t c.' the All-

asy stu :ot.' in cc'ctitra.l ?vriciture .t iocr-:.e b' ccd..'a

134~-1951.



State 3epartueT nt. of V iiacati.cn, ti Flor.i*a dluciational
Lirscts..y, jctcear, 19-5, p. 60,.
Ibid,, p. 69.
Superintendent cf Public Instruction, Pasco C''.oty,
n:.'UAl ;".t tenance Report. of 15 .-195.















1 I I I I




















''. r *' T' < .' L .-._ ..] -. *.. :.). L .; :" 3, .- :4 -3 ,


ie- .ux'Bl.t of :.ll-;. ny ,tu.dnts ,...le. in V.'c. -

ticw2ii 'icr.lcr.ilture iurixigt the -ermiod ccv'r: in t i hI s stts y

is cU &cw.u cx-- 60 st-u'en-t in 134.2, 70 st'ment s iU 3 943,

if: ~tuet3t.S i' 1944, te 3 stents 394:, students li

1:i4, 64 student-s in 1- 7, 7 C stt:,'i~erts in 3%4, stfadernts

1a -4, t;;: students in 19.,0, ';nd 6t stu:Ets tn 3 .t:.

LEr. e-.d i the order '-" th; r.otl cn si ter ra~pt. rti-,

.iif?:rei. t ... f:' ,. jecc.., the: f'r..I repe:''. .? eu.. I,-c.d

oprR.teek -' '.rk. ..:t tr -- t.tr et".n.rt.'-r : c :f "'. cion

p;l:s 'tA out I.^ t tM' v.)j- t:r". rupir.v-t RT3!L. r-t.inm









6

pgrams e.r the .all-DFay stu.lent, fvo 194 2 through 1951 ho ve

b.ezn as follo.'-s poultry (o-t), ho. (st), gner" tr ac4;

cr-',ps.2 w'ter Il h c (l;cer ig), .s"e t. ..oLtato ; si. i.rn

br, "s, r9.. corn (gre "-'.

afterr studyinrv the in.l rrnirts 't.e ,3.1sz .y stu-

dEitS C; pocr e fcadaim coveriov h rr.> t' ive y:xa p:m 1 -

194C, it was 7elt th-h't the larn:I lobcrstory ploti ;,i.t

cor'1t t1. or f one-fourt.* tcte oCt l*' .'.r, ..r 2l pr-rl.r r*1ily/ tS

a sourc'e ot prod uIC'-.lUi itrn^,&. f c :i t.oir; rCfdlCy lunchrco' shrcul.

be rAt.c.rir-eI onr r:eatugE. At tch sonme ti-e, o &.rv tion

was ;de of the wsiall size fiar:msE from which the ,.11-Day stu-

dentz of .oore ..-cad;emy came anFdi the scopns c the.LfLr sp;cr-

vised .-famin& progr!_e ms and.' it ppe-iarci--, thtt 0ome;thinga needed

to "!.& "~.do for da v'.op lonr-t.ie lr L.np for i.~r.ovin.:, tbh

supi'~ ~-r. 'ie f*arint. prtpmams of the _..l.l-ay students o. rjc;e

IPcad;E:yQ

I. 94; the l nd l.abratory plots which tare located

at toore ;.cad Tay were reorg anizeJ, rearrenLCed, anri :enlarged

to ten acces orer 0 ... e m, k pI Co r ib o tIve hprOduCti of' th

rmajcr, tIe m.i a:i, and *the contributory enterprises that rere

ri-veale- in. the cX;l.roy of t; f.iurve ys .o twenty f't.irmers

whose rejectss wire surv-y-v be fore rcor;a a l tin or srerreaiua-

ient f l.. hbo.ra.tory plots was started .t M-oore .cadeary,











The reorganizing and the rearrangrqeent cf? the I and

inboratcory plots at oore Academy woulVD Dpresent to the All-

Day students an opportunity to observe farming methods that

could be applied not only to their t dl.;i aual supervised

farming programs at home, but which could enable them to

introc.,uce into the community new c6ash c nterrritss.


I. T2E PROELE

The problem of this study is to determine the

relationship that exists between t'h fYraning programs in

the land laboratory plots and the supervised farming pro-

gramis of the dill-Day students.


Hypothesis. Frromr observation there seem r tc be
some relationship between the fsar ing programs on the; land

laborato-ry plotse and the supervised ferink. procgraws o thi

ll -DLy students.

Delimitations. This study is limited to (1) The

students who made up the rAll-Day enrollment fc iloor. e cadesdy

during the years 194. through 1951. (2) The analysis of

data shall be exhibited throu.j. tfhe use of" figures rind talks.

(5) The- study will include st,'derts from the e-ighth through

twelfth grades only. (4) This study is designed to inter-

pret the relationship of the farmingg progrse in the land










laboratoty plots to the farming programs of the PAl-Day

students individual supervised farming progerms. (5) Moore

Acader,' is the only Negro hbgQ school in the county.


11. DEFIITZONK" OF TIR'S


,l-xlZ students are boy- f7:arteen yeamr Cf age or
ve who e prep for f or ware ppar for f or w re ernagecd in

faarmin anid meet daily in clalyes which are organized in a

secondary school tc secure '.yste-,atic instruction in agri-

cul. ture.

Supervised fgrarrI Irogramns, in thib study, are

interpreted to mean eny fa.r activity whicr has educational

v..alue and Is pe4rformel for at leHst six n;,nths under the in-

structicn az=-d supervision C,^ !, teDcher of agriculture and thl

school where rAcords are kent and! regular systematic reports

aere raee.

lctiong hip is employed in this study to mean the

goixn together or oconrection between the farmi.ng prcgrarms

in the land. laboratory plots anir theb supervised farminA

prograigis of the All-Day students.

improvement Pirojects are used to indicate ary- f.ari

activity increases the real estate value of the home or the

f a'Z' ,,










Approved practices arc employed to mean farming

fsethods that bhve be-n uset, by mcost of the farmers in a

coaiunLfity In t heo s uccssful gro'i o crops or prouction

of livestock.

Par"iin4 practices are thought of ls ls necessary

in carryin- out -n eotrptrise.

2terap2iste is u business venture for exp.rienc .-d

profit, anid which 'F a mdinitua; uSutilly cc72"r: a prjlod -of
time represented by the orcduction: cycle of' a f.rm cc. ;.:-.,lity

or product.

Daj-Z in this 3stu. refers to written pDerwfa.ent
records of jobr done, lessons thaht., r. c c.a:;:. 'eco: icti.vr'itv.es

carrie&l on daily by the teacher oF voc,:tionnl acricult-iAure.

Far r ind.icites all lian undrc- thE control o'" o0ne

persnor or psrt~Lnr ip An the sales of agric- .lturLl proIoucts

amounts tc- :--150.00 or more annually.

Final reports, in this investigation, mean n ac%.curete

written statements of the supervised. ftraine 'work. done by the

A31-Day students und.::r th. supervision of th:e teacher o

vocational agrlicul3ture.











LAAiPT ~IT


Literature .lin r~irectlv with the :iubj.ct nd~.er

st.cdiy Sa;o:Ls to to l1.irte*< in Co -ti:ty I ?. TSrrow ri. sc-c.
.o dletaile- studR yr, s hor i:. su r.7ai -. C. S ',a- .i s ln

ar i. cul tural. education, ft regard to. t'e rin tioshp o:" the

farn... progra'.s in the ln li.bortrry pJ.cts to the fa.r-ln.

pro;rfas of:? t.e All"-ay ,,,a"ent hav0e -eo M!d, E. t the th. -

thi3s c1psent inyvstI(atIon wtis b ;. .rt a? te orobIle0s4

cou.-it Li'e! ir i thi U.tudy, however, h5ve re-ceivG ; cur.r--ent;

disCe~usion ot tU' arn.u.l cov. ,ferenc:E foryr" tPeachere n9 ar'cul-4

ture.

One of the ..arliest re.-rences t t1 eu, outside

aboratoiry v;;as &' by .ra cis aacon isn -.is Qe3e;1atet wcrk

o:n irad.ctive phlillcsovphy pubiAshed in 1620 uhere; eILphasis wis

put o: .iv.; ve:.tiit.ion, uxp,~rimentation, and verificatiln, in
contrast to the barren specs.uatios o. nature n-d natur-al

pr.ce.,sses, ,deg'uce.eJ .fl'o, t4he in)er w.-orklrt:s -f te ind. Thi

urgng or G Carfl investitor of Yntur s a gsr-.47'ce o .ofr

truth v ws ar, cf .?ectiv: coont.-;. ut-ir tr -i'-. orr'et s ,..:f sciencee:

it. ..a the suggesrion c' or3 utsde lbor tory. -od.- rn e,.-

phasis upon conducting expert~.ent at te-ts on the farm and

in. the fiel:i s :& e .Ee' v l vIop..r3iolt Cf tis hiloCso thy--the

extenizion of thhis i..eJa the i;. problems of lie whi-ct,:










inhere evtn 1i pre-ctical pureath.- "

arlcer cEtlated In 191S that "tnh& InborarLory and ''i

exercises c:?' :;ectondA.ry *vrtculturwe a.hc2J-l -a nrc alr be c si in

the sme rild, bu oul bJ c: cSc:s23er". r if v.t't 'sct 12o t.he

eic;. In vitcw, h1-.;v ;e r. ar ^:,e ^2 ** to I'= atta4.ine :y

the la.-.r.Etor; ei- tla: w._rk o d scon 0-- ,.- n ....a..... the
d ,scov ry .. t "ut b the pp ; th~. ..-,.ia n, b.y

11 i'..r.uctc. of' ftcc .z ie: .I'.:,.. ,herL' .o :- c Qh rt-lU
to lUf 1-rn; th.c ver1i; ic-.t.lok c-'~ ct tc, .f.1 lre .dy

kl-nows, for ith pF.rpose c. C. rifyi3g a77 ci:Tnsiiyt: Uts

kiowl..i;e; and pEictic- in c precticl p;.o,3.ic.t.,?o cC is
.ulS~.e1 -
ko 'le:0ge,) by ieans of w-ich e s.Zll raceve racttor trilu.i:Et4

iJay in 1930 reported that "'ach d3a.e.rt;e~nt. in th,- st.te

of Fioriea is recul-'it-e to have a' least a on.c- acr- lani lab-

oratory plot c ordint to the tate pl.. Th ..t 2 .ie- ...:

prE-lirily as 0a 'esch'in& us- S and developed with tbA. view-

poin ..En ai-,, T'hc. purpose o'f lborator,. pFt3 is not to

s.how large ) roPfit fro the opeveato.i tilerecf; bit tc :'-

L-,ish n diei..orsrcation outdoor fabort'ctry for use of th sch

a. coniu,;ty i suc:h us.e is not condcive to, pri't. -icw-

ever, each teacher Jis e'rpected to practice M-A; ...:..;i.ag.l..it


1...3.a. j C..teart alrJ Arthur ;:. G.t'a n, Teach-i.
Agr,.c$ultu-aral Vocations, 1997, p. 270,

11Ga-rland r.. Bricn.r, h 'eaci o ricitu'e L
-il2 gilb acLl 1915, p. 217,










for ths school laboratory plot so tbht it will riot shove a
debit at the- end of' thc yeas."l^
lro'Cn in 2949 ft'un-d ttwt Thvn( lRbor.t-ory plots .-ve

a great deal of value as a teaching aid an c. could be con-
sFiAere bw any .school which hs t': fin-ancx to set it up

as a goin.L concern and maintain it at a high level."l1
Deyo- in 1 l cn;cludea on tho basis of a study in
Illinois that "no teacher should feel that a land laboratory

plot is a must tc. the ,evelopmert of a successful program of
vocational agriculture, even though there is sc:e indication
that sucBi ventures have been helpful in certain situations.
Teachers of vocational agriculture should thin?, in terms of

a functional program of instruction focused on supervised
farmi.nfg avn other- worth while activities, with attention to

all methods of instruction which aid in the development of
suCe. a poraa4t.4
Spilsbury reported in 1952 that "the values of the

lalcpator plots as a supplement for classroom teaching of

a~,rTcultue can be summsarize, as follows: (1) Permits boys



W1 athan yo, Vc2tkoQl Africullture it ltrida,
Vol. 40, No. 2, A1pril, 1950, p. 38.

13Bert L. Brown, "School Farm Becomes Much Used Pe-
source, ,0 gricultwu-al uceatlon ;;aEazins, Vol. 22, S. 35
September', 1949, p. 65.
14
14.eorge P. Deyoe, The Use of School Land y Dpartments
c- Vocati<.nall Agriculture IT 951nTT ccoli TSl {7.iieographa
pn ph-et''' P. 122-
U~iiJcptkCtdg 9p











,u. 3'..^^ f.*:: thtrL" 1 :iw s,;"ai -;'c ," rc ps 9:*'. cr':;", p s' .tic.-3 Co



L L.J.1, 1 -+
S-, .,,. t a, a
,..: ,,-:, .. ... c i -. -,, rt c-&:r-t..tn t t e "ch

So a
,. 1a ,. .-O -
., .,:, -. *- ^ ,. ., *.. 1 ','f. t.h, t": _', .' ,, '. 1 r r't ,, .t^


c,,., ( t 4 h ..- ., 1 ^ A. t by.. i t- v c. 1 s'.1
la"s t 1 -ii-'. t : -.ulc,- love livestocc., V -= a si ,

SKiv ,, it. I r f e.:.j, ( ) Pr- -its ,. tc 1"-' to
r1 *

-'i .. I. r o .



a lrd J f. l..ni l&tor;t-ovy )lot ?re thi' best veans for

t.s.4;z


IC.P. *?, Lsh'.,ry, "" ^ oci ^v' (. o :' '!"3, .Ara ft ^rtoltuaJ.l Kducrt ion k2nzt3
c L-. r, '

n^ re .I *elch, : "^^>-l '. ?- -C
^enter,** i-.v21ural- ^j .ucr tic} againin, Vol., Ii, no. E,
Sbr.-??i l S .




















*.;. P.C ,r" .'. .; .. -'. 0 .. 1 o --,

i ..* .1 .. *."
r t,*. .;fl..


. "i.s v. m C ? -'... '' I '. ..: .- ', "-_ 'k *. '' .' -
f .0 ,J -p.. l ; 0 f; .. -41




,* .*" -. :if -. .- .... n.... C ......



. '" -i -. o -" -.* ft ). ^ ".t -. Vfl" t. .A ."? *'u -, .. ...
. .... ..t. : ... ,' I ,- tS .. '.. ... o ".',' 7 '.'," 4-. r -'r v st f "




t* ..... A 4 ... : :. l, "" f 0. .- ,' ,
. ,.. .' h ..... -- -

.. ... .. ..- : 1.. ... ..- !,















1;- co" "tl-. a> T..: cn.zcruc3y pict vtr'i t i ocr c:*
... It: C .." t r U.L S S., -tS C U r --' c












j.&aiw ht. wia' ta u:cK p:.Ln. :l: r-? 7t. scirco '^ rrod rTclz S>- A
fc, t-h. "i-. 'tocj. n." Jr'-- 'o .-- .... 2:: ,',-"-3r" '' ..1 r -'" '- ,-t-
....... c.. ...- ',; "-'e -' .....: -. ; ..





". ; -e .e n.y . .. r -. t- t .m .. ." ". te

c. .... -_" c~. e -" .,., ''1:_" .. '- .>. ..










1'
re: 1..cto- .. :" -.. F ) L:, ...i. tnt C.r...ut Qr .. r%.li.

r a v c.-roA.-
rvet L .. inA. thU r; _. t,. surveys c twa ;.; .
*. -. *er, rur :y.-..i : the fri 0er b.'- a-, .r:. c


.eaS'.. s ,1 -... t .




fl"', .L.-C.FA. .. ., .. cc -^ "2 .. w *^ :e ...; ;:.- 1- .' *- .;. -.-
The ; I .e.... e:.. ... .'- "1.. i. r. s





F- --,~ .. .. ".*". ..:-' ;' "" -.F. c"

; t -cs .*. + .....a & ...,- l"', ,'C. a-
.... A ,6' iC .^ C ;^ ...., .C ,--. -- k-' -.



bcfor" the stucr ns perforoe- d at hc.n- t; s ilh. .r jc .,

in tHt.Hirp t i.vtu l supcrvilc'f:1 :it.;.E ri' rt cLuai5. j:- y .jonc

.. provi"-.d c. '.a a .hi .an,....xlal ,..,1 .1<. ..,,: ..;t-la3





-. i.-i:. '-o... er. tic jin.".." ., ,tio o ^ ..,'1-- < .... to .e-'-.l .-
4 "i-p ,q AQuF L3 -' ,j -"1 '.-.i, -.t uI k 4-. O E
" .:.j ,i- ... jo;i .,: f3' ec. to r; '.. ;- ter








pri-m e p.".Qe t .t on ta.: .i al s o. s ,. ,:o* .:;: .- ,-

.eA-.inr th.: i;.:.:;- 1-94'' throu 1 151. a d -ac n *U.: us:-

*L..or .rl A. A-..c ups 's J..olloS Ws, irOV R..Dpli.













-roodtin." bl b/y i.zcks
'eedi~i baby chicks

;rowin fry VR

W rt ij t."C dryers

s:;wc ,ttYin u'l try

.ricli r ecrm

Cr'c li "mr epEs



: 3 inr-.; pu0 3.5 ts

.'i.7 !V la ir'1 lE hrs

aat rkpttnerR. tns




"el'ctinl tre-.c. o" lliv-,-cto"..

a ev'l!cpirtu a feedli. program

lie.?:,se control fc'r .livesoc!

i:,.-tect cent-ro3 itr: livestock

arfcn .r.t-ins for Jlivestc;A -iterJ. itst

& .Aiaini- 1Li.nertJ., to hoes

H.c u.'ir.-g er-lq"jl.pzment

Letting up a s'iOne breedi,-l programfi

Care of y-ourn~ livescoci,

.'een~. ss..,s to purefbred bouPrs

aBstra-'.tig. pigE at fouir- weeks of aWge










Crorv

Analyzing crop enterprises into jobs

Sstitett-n cost o' production for enterprises

Se2ectlng land ror crops

Taking so.l samples

Preparing land use mans

JDrwiZi : -..ip o the home frwm

Preparing 3eedbed for crops

Developing a crop ro cation system

Determ.nilng the ?imoulrt of fertllizr; to Ise -y sa~e

Growing cover crops

Dc-termirnir, the arnalysis of fir-tl.'.zer t- use .a.r .sre

Distance between rows

LDistrnce between plaits cn tV-h rowsJ

Disease control progr-am for crops

Tnsi.et control procrej- for crops

Making a hotbed

Growing plants

Transplanting pliita
'ultivatinL crops

Parventin' crops

Grading crops

iMarketiLrg crops











.-l, Jcbs or Sklls

IsentiLfyn. tcn.ls

zqusrirc sr 2uti--.I :. a s

-iakin a bill of am: 1rr: c-i

L ;^vlrs^ simple Clonry &irjs

.,Zt-t t .. tep ola
,. !tct i. .. StepL

.castructinj pou:ltr'/ sel .f ..- rs

Crnstruc.tinL poultry self :.;teiers
.Co4nstrcctin farroT.. .,; .,-

iixnr3 :i;or:t.ar

j.ixing concrete



.-arvicr.n.i a tractor

A.d..justiv.. tlracor a.i.. pmezqT:



tfyi co.on oiTa itl of th. area

"...":iJ:ll.. E a ;:....opa'r .at/io in "bench

V it ^etint t cfnon oiniiieZt:ls o' t^ r-u-a

S..... 4. ... l;: i 'scape pl'J n

Lscpin the L c e far,


oro 0' r

*-c;;;.rollir:T .ere t.L ."ire

T ^ I out Appr-,ed p.Iee i c ?- .p"c
s '.oc e.

:ejin.r I'am records or crops PmiCd/or liViatOck










Th sbcv 11'-t ilr A.bi th5 ,1o. J or c] jr, :-.

neon crrle c.ut -.u. I? ."-3 .1 t.r*r. j. -'- strati c

r ethod ,f techint; it:. th- 1 :n .Lorter 1 t 04

scoON c enas'ol t' s :tuden 0E' Oven !", (J r 2CeS"C: K.. s

to e npr3lied In jQ, i n i .,l s'u-. J"v.'" n ;' -rq.







rsit M.. hp ora.o w' wPh- .. no-'. I- n
.th e..: :- lonu ire v t" ;.CJ or r ': .r '



di.cussio, should be rectd. .ber th :;y. ,y-t-i.:

shchrcdn Mh writer Q' PLC M'. n" A!

-usd in he students itn ividuwl f :,"" rr.i "'' :' -:. '

of. being tauit :n t r..', 1. lxor8ator: nl: et t'he 0c- l.

-,In ly, : comp.r- is"n wps aitde c:P 1t. re. t .r-1TLi

by the tudenr't nuld'.r W: u,.ents ::roi ..le.f it. 0.c .i e .'-

pr is, .h-'e scopes of t. erpri;,es:, Ut- t nr. t. ; un.it

". :.;<..h S W !.', .. t. s, ShoWn 1 o t. f t,.' L, S M

a. j.I,-;.' O '" l c A' r tAuint.s t'..t-b'l l k '.. lm M ii' -. .r t:-.

p-*mi 1.404-l-'204 Waefor- -W'r'^^rs;i. 1-rer r- i E,

JlI.'eitory 01C.T 5kt the cratl tcr dT t. t v:: t .:.t-

th t.ver i i lior IN e. Vv-rn .;4i 14aV. ..'.:0 Y

th :/ .r.' : 1 :7.-3 1 :.? r : r.r:,-o'r l.-- :: '

in -? 1- .. "Y .l .. .1 thb- h ol.










.-. r- .


fjL 4t* t -"Y'I1: .* flJ t.vX: CO .c:


T]t-. -',:.o,ls of, th"' d.-I-.:1 .ri ,.il" Al'u, dy r-v.-2s tha. i

-..i -- v n--f-sch rt r. th- c~rT.y in

:cit 1 stu-t.o? tt2 r- rn 3 rnd e-hu r0 cr?-e l'::,- r i r .t

l1'V j".i p'1' n' cnt' fjrr *54 lanf "aKini, 'a tot 8l of 4.>G acrN"s

cr U and 4'l *. fl"reflQ of ;5 i r-nd Uit.> t hu:.adrzdtth. c1' a



ou-o-iCo tts wn =< n n t th **;, ">'

-3 '.' f :n t. 4- .L-.iLy-sve n wn e-hi 1 :.s orWt '+il J hi .Lc

l :.-'n ty tE-?IcX:.*? 'jw.n ni'-r anA t'r 1-fo uc rt1S h ijt E z S.

Srent 1E2 an seve-eis'tb c('rs no" t. l..t.h. tb' .a-

school *irV thy cut-of-uchool groups h.ve 365 ?ni one half

ltn t.s' ?. tt cJf bA ,UGP orV cuJl t Lvttfe:2 c."jps

a. riT .h r',lating to th'1 nei..A er of ",es r 1-:;. t

. :.."-s <'wne ory ir.tvr..t' ttht> nuadl:er c' (-.cr e s .:f cul-tiv,.te land

in etch x rmia inc-ued i:J this. ^-'.udy, th.' ilFt'Lces SLtu-jO.?.ts

r.- .livir. .f rom- th" schoci. ei: 'the cccup tios ,.', tb1t. :itu--

dOints S at tbe ti.sa tri- s inflVe t.-i. .tit, l. n1o 'wa a.. p .r....e "te'

:in iabls I throu'4h t','V. Ih' ,.eta o.f the L'ur-r.s i: LtH Jt'ae

.:'.ity a..ea f..a whict the ;-,rro -ll1-lay st ,c; nts cr.e :,4.r

,*7sn Lc O t give .n cc.U-atte picture oc t' .e vr.e oilttt--

li0 n t 'n sicX .*... T: t1 i'I on r-e S- ._ t.a -.14 .. v re

c'.t-s' C 'r o .ne cr renne. rcC t c :- n ber o0 c'- in c -












1

S n p s of P. .ti-


p- .. *


I.. L : ~? .C


.4.
* r,
r'ri ~


1 /0
1./4






P1 I/?
A


3? 1 .t/

4 1/8






A.-
/










*"o
/.*^7


-01. 1/8


*1 -


'i o


- -: .:'Y -I' +;'.s **r~ Awry
L L-
A-'lS: V,tjn. *iueP;...
~ : LA%~e 3 rr~ ;-r-~ Cp l1P. t e.i..A.


r---
3. t

7! /%-


15.- ,1


~'~~r~Y-l-4*r-~" -.-*--~.r~iL-us~-a*l~*-;-- L--r~-r


~t~~ -


f~~.~F~~;~.~',7 ,~ ~;P:t'm9














TA -. I-l

-.'_- -. -. ..'. -. -. -. .^ ":,- .



ke i ':' tu'ts hti:e of C tttvBt;id

Waewr M^-.C"A~ -s : -?r.s- >-.--'? D--. r C-z^-,r AtF % L*: -c; -*r. -r-t r I-w -: : 1 ;-t i --'.: ? .- s *.a *t-sC

16 1/6


'1 1/

1 .
1 41


-; --


1 1C




S33
1 a
I i -














C,: ticv..4_- e-rp. b:,+ th-se stdentE, ca.rr.y o ?olt,..-y for -^:,2.:,t. ow
. .. is : t ive .torprise r
~r:'rY3 5 f.SnZrl-- $5
a'-~- ~ C p~'~~: ~i~~~~l~,- c.=,~~~~ I~L~Ulll-Z~e~









Ttblec r7, on page 24, reveals the' number of frs

arvd acrec i' t-wc}e fPr F S cCpile, on the .i.na rs~norts

194c-1952 after; the le.nd l!XrfA.ta:r..y pl~2t ,er,:.- recr~inized

.nm rc"Pr :nge-. <..t the school.

".'n:-.s opeFr.te by .t~ro ..-1-- ,7 s-tuer t-. i, the l.de

CiLtIy Kr.uQ3, .u-co County, 'J1oTriv'.C, i'.- rsrivey swa1l in
terms cf ver ..-o Cerr-s ptr ?arw. DLurinr the ,r-i.od covered

in thi: invcstigtlEon after the land tlboratocry plots were

reorar nize~ and r-earrenges at the school, the.-e bas been a

slight average increase in the total t cre: of land per fP.rs,
ITh lowest average pe.r frarm t 1 X.3S acrec: of land ocau'ring

in 1946A5 sr there highest avers :e per farom o 5.71 neres of

lan- appearing in 1948. ihe total avorRca s-re. of le.d

per fasr-. 946-195; vws 4.39 .acrYes cf lnd.


















TALJLS IV

NjT ..-.. 'o. F .' A~. 0 :L. o1 .; .L
R^iUTZ ;. Ti._ ALL-D.Y STTJD_.T:J 1946-195?,
DALE -fz &E, fLOCA:/


Total Nuimber
Farms


Total3. rAcres ~verasga AFcres


213 0

167

200

176

187

189

233


3,9.34

4.17,

5.714

4.400

4.155

4.021

5,06 5


4.397


Year


1948


1949

1950

1951

1952


I-ru ; --I----------__-__------lil-rr~ur~-- n*rr ---


-~I.~II-CII~UILrUI-~--CIII~ll-:_ -V-~U-I 1111111114-1111


^--*----- ._LI-~..-L~ -~_il..^--_lly~----III----IYIIWI-I 1.I1~---1^~1II~-~


LIII ---C--.-lllllll13---111- -LIIICII-~--~----
C-- 111I~- ~ ----111-- ~-1 __~~__l--CI IL--l-~LIU-CIIIWIII- Ll










;'a'bl V, on ptlie 26, s cr: the nir.bcr of rtudiEts

in eac" age proup sn'm the Tver.g'= number onf f.'rlrrinp pr,.c-

LIeC ued v -a:>c y;oup*

v ri. t..-. r'. f:i'.!.of a.t':" t"c I nrc 3 bo r:;.t. ory pilots

were r-.-':oi ..i- L .'.:. .":, r:-*.r-i'. n.: t the ,:.co., 4.. -- 1,

thie .... L: r r ,e stud -.ts x. .. ,.urbv:r t;.?'t. -nine

-Xith th: la .r.r.t nuz-,r bo-in; in the gr-o2 i ze.~ ten ... .. C

eighteen t":'.V'j" of a 't'o.

Vle J rsv^sl th.t th.. hia ..at i-ar.'-. :A^Aicies c.f

fas:..rtL, prt.ctices compl.'ted by t.a ;~3'.-Day A:it,'ent s io th ~"i

inrt:liv 'i-_ su. rcrviset:, r.trLr, Ir. p git.r'Gb -5 r.-Elt.8 on Leinr:

taug -ht i: the ian :".1 .it... + p3ot.c p:.-' "CI l1? t:e

L.tuaendt2 14-16 years Co sa.-,c ccupletoe eiL avFrz-e o' P .0.73

f.rin L.- p.ctiJces per ttucdnt; the st"R.ents 19-23 years of

age cot pl etd 2i 3;verago of 40,-:.. fsarm in practices per stu-

dent; a:6 th:; studr-nts 4-.29 years of nre'e completed aii average.

of' 25,0- .C.rmii- practices per student.

h:s aveae.,e number of faraying practices used by the

jl_ l-.Lr. studerit.t in the.r in.divjrbue supe r isevdi 'acrni .ng

prore.2A; incr-csd2 ir. tt-: group 3..A to and P 1> 1- 09 to 2n

yeirs of 6. On th.- other hand, +t!e nuaLbr r, ,,' r.'_ -; -

ticas sRed th. & [ 2-ay studer:t' in their l 'vidu.l sjpa?-t

vised ari.in: p'rogras dFecreased ir tte 2 to 213 ye-r c:?"

group. Thiesindicates th;t more ermphasis zi nro'-lcd on th

farinin prctices berlng use& 'Ly the grou.p ?- to ';O years of











age, t.: frce,, .nore time ch .J be Avo-l to Zettei

v.. ccin i pr ctira s; ic th y.' .... 'arn.-r' cla. '. -.ic'- *'A u :

.pOc ed of ... '- o th"' 3 .'i T.s in h t :oup ..- y,, ee'- of'

aEge.


T-L' V


TUGHT: i TY-U: LAND


. '" ",O ,'*'1! LO -T.E' I
L ICRATDfY PLOTC


Ages .-tude ts rm ing of Ferxi ng
.r'cti:.ws P .ct ic':. Urse
rsed


14 4 1b;L 38.25
5 i 151 30.20
16 6 250 41.66
37 11 360 32,72
18 12 8 4.16
19 5 3,6 65. O0
wis 65-20
"C 5 1b9 27,680
21 6 .C 533.66
23; 6 ;35 39.16
f 58 9.00:
24 3 10. 34
S3 6--. 31.0:.
26 3 87 27.
27 4 41 10.25
29 1 37 37.00


A) A


~ll"-"e 1-C1~3-~I~-_- U- Ill-l--C---l ~~-II1I C- ~ ~----- ~i~-Clr -~ 3--C~U 1C
1~-~~11- 111-^11--1 -1 - II- -I^-- ---~ --.----L-~L---~I-











Table VI, on page -2, 5 o: -r thr results of the

.Lnvestigation :n rene.r to t ancs he 1iancs th-e ?S'tu. ts liv.

Sfrom t h sch' eI CopL r '.:i.t' the .nu...r of n, .min pTRc-

tlces used which inflicted thi 3ri 3 pner cent of the seventy-

five :tds3nts included in ,thi; stuy .. Ived .-n 'vivelra-. o.f

sever elt;ths o.f v iLe frtot; the.: *cholc', r :?' t1. r-emt.1ini.

69 per cent lived. distance of from cne to twenty uiles

froL the school.

The stt.-ents who live,' fror two ard one-half n.iles3 to

eight snd one-half mile from the school completed the

greatest number of farming practices avereging d*4.E6 prae-

tices pe_' student; the students. whc live fIroma nine to

twenty miles completed the s~allestt number ci fr.-iringt pr3-

tices averaging, 53.41 practices per student while the stu-

dents who lived from one eighth to two Uiles from the school

completed an; average of 3,.60 fRurmjg practices cer st-ixent.

Such findings' indicate that group of' 3 ll-Dry studezjts

should be visited f-reuently aYd -.nco.uraeed to inc-easc the

number of Car' ixn prv'"ctices bein-. .,e in od-'r th .t the -

net proft. c.t the 'll-Lay studurLnts .individrlu-l supervised

f.,r.zztnp proEra ms may be incrxnsed.













TA,.LE VI


icbTANCz .STUDi TS LIVED Ur! I TH1il sC';OL
iit'D'u32P or',',,,. V,.-


. rcu D


Number of Aver~agt Number
Distances Number of Farming of F2rm-ing
miles ) Students P practice practices Used
Used


1/S 1 54 34.00
i/4 18 610 33.8.
1/2 11 418 38.00
1 C 317 39.62
1 1/2 86 28.66
2 5 172 34.60
2 1/2 1 37 37.00
4 2 97 48.50
5 6 41.50
7 1 57 ,7,0C
6 1 32 32.00
8 1/2 o 98 49.01
9 4 143 35.75
10 8 226 28.33
11 2 60 30.00
12 5 130 4Z.3_
18 2 88 44. O
20 1 21 21.00


75 Es.710 35.13










fA sijUir.y rf the educational becktroutds, shown in

Figure 3 o pe ge 31, of th.i s.tjents tinclud e-:' thlis tudy

reveals thF.t 17.5 per cent ccZ.pl.t& eighth cade, 18.7 per

cent completed ni-ith grade, 16.7 pe:: cent coruplet&e tenth

grade, 9.3 per cent completed. elever.th ga rde, a: 3: per

cent completed twelfth grade.

InF addition t"-.: thb- nui.ieir ?C< &tre&nts eompletiYjg TUch

grade a. surmi:Ery was ijAde to 4et.er 'S? 'i1- number c.?tr -rig
practices beirig used by the t.ude:1na. in fec .trc.e :' r su'-lts

o0 being ta'.F.ht in the Ihc -i abrFtretc'ry plots 9t the school.

Thiv u=r, ary indic-ted that the eighth grade utjud<.' s cci-

pleted an &verr-a,:e of 39,384 fcrninz *. -.ticct p2r stad ent,

the ninth grade completed an average -o 43.07 farming prec-

tices per student, thl-, tenth gred1 ccmplet&.d an aver'ae of

39.28 farming practices per student, the- eleventh p.rsal oeo-

pleted airp average: of 40.71 f['rming practices pe' s tud.nt, and

the twelfth grade completed ar Ivrcra,6 a of 52,03 farm nz prec-

tices per stud;:nt,

The irvesti.g tion a3 so poirited cut th.t the lr.-3csool

stu'ients used al evera.-.e o. 5r.45 farmirig practices Der -istu-

dent and. out-of-school students used an average of l5r.03

farminrg practices per student.

Because the average number of farming precttees being

used by the iln-school group is much gresatr than thei average

nuriber being used by the out-"cf-school grcup indicates that











more emphasis is needed in Lbs develop;ment Co better

fsrmlnc practices with the out-of-school group.










* 31
- i


-I


ZZIL--4-4-1 I II U_ II IIIlIIi! I


m-t
I :I: I I


-I ENMJ-f 4463 --0


'T T

19 TT _


18

1-7
-cIt 14
-T


16

it t

14


tt- tt t-: H-4- L-
T I 4 4

114
IFtt: -i



to 14 +1 1 1 l


I T-F

44 . T_ -- ---t-i ~~-



te--H 4





-4
-1 #l i VH


ft. I 1,

f 4
4-t
T'
r 1+4-~C~'$~$tft71:.
1 f4 Hi 9 lO Ali


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y\


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IIU U4










This Invesftitito, as t:ow-r, In & abr e VII paI j 3i,

discloses that th,-;, c-.cf-C.sELc:ool. students .::re -a eav-.ed in

,re. i(L.,.6. O occup-.tioCs .-i t.h 9.L pa cent esi:abi."sU. in -a-

it:. i, thib cotu-nity, 24 pcP cent ,teq-.ed in closely ."re-

1 L.1l c.-c t..tica-s 1 4.2 per cent Iny i : .-elted

f'e n:' J '-. occupC tiojs, l n.*.l *['+,5 J,'I- r.*' c ~.A.'. .c d s

Tth6 o-ceapatJ'nl distr" Ation c,C thi i tud--it

1Lifntiotioe above are oxubstaniziatcd in able VIii which shows

the occupations of the i.n-Schocj f.. th@... ot-of school

students. Therefore, in plarming .e course o instr- cicr.

the oc cupational. distribution y erve h. a dlde e; aiu

In carefdllJy sel..ctin.f course con..tent that w' .l' m:wt the

needs, interests, ad as llitie3 o0' the students,












.TA L ,.,V-I


". '"',' J !.i: A ,, L U ....
ll-s 7" i '; L''~~~ ;;. -. '. .,' ,; A ';L '..'.


Occun a tions


--~~~CII --I-------L--C-: &=zr* I--~- -E:~=--CFF-;~~;S~~_ -- ~~


I ~ ~


U.~1- C1omv2Jt.+T it~


'?r-ctor drivers
F'arE~ managers
; rwLutll workers
'_.g csrctdler
*..tt.in'' nul pwood

: t' ..'" 0",~-T' tWt r

Cooleve ,,rcAFlr icul t ural
;'" F'icuil tuaiej teacher


situdcn r s


Dub- total

il, Con-f-'elated r'rnrtiij-: o)ccupb:tions

T oiloring 2

(."'lbUJny, fiGorgia. 1
,' hysicpl ;.t uc t io~n studentt
(Trl. ?.r nsee ) 1
i*'iti'eaFt:ics stuidenlt i'iJtll..aeh ee) 3.
..?.Iore ( ".111 ) 2

inin;; 3shoos 3.
bi.schrrged from Army -

rub-total

V. ri--School students


Tote) s 100-


iailTer Per Cent


.2' .


ii



'.5
I1
I
ii1


Z4. C


13.&.~

r'i5.
S *4u.









As inlicr:ter t in tt'e introduction, thr mtrnority of the

,:.r.- c.peifte. .y e'gro ~! -' .y stunts In the w d~Li City

;n.e 're Srnl". P '.vcr2e fC ncr'.' per ftni- ro..r which t1hj .egro

.l-:y rt udi:rt. c '..- r. t i. in'-; r'.-Irstij.-tion areR show in


i or:"i'cr to revoorJ the rr'lat.Ocrvsn'iD e istil'., betw.,ecin

t f.'-mnL -. o.re:;' .: li en.-1 cr tc-ry plots at the

school rt.! tL'.11 d indlvIduaj. supervised farming programs of the

;-Jl-Lay :stud.ntS fivee yeri" coe. son was mw .'do the

.e...t- obt.jnfie.d il tle ILdividuXl supervise fi:.ulr i.. nDrogr mns

of tihe .'.1i-' :: stu.'ients berforle e-nd sft'er reoTrgrwizi' in: A re-

arra g 'ir,. thr t -:n. 'b orn'ltc-ry pot-: rt t 'e school. np. five

yea~r pwviod ..94:-l3 inricludes the year? before the- l.eaYi

laboratory plots were reorganized snR rearrange a1t the

school. 'The five. year period 1947-19!1 includes the years

ftt :e; t'- .nrd l .bor-Icatcry pli-ts ,.;ere reorganizyI anod 'aI-

rr&m~d 8t: t uhns school. All detar in regar' to productI.ve

p eojoets :'er-: S-ecurI-e.' from th,- Cfin:a r.enorts of suDrbvised

pr.rcticC v.'w'. oT .2 c.!.:.t- '] -l ..y students.
5' i-1' r rivOe leWadir l entr priaf'.sef compared lste n t-h

or-er c. iccp, :s hon on th fnl rpott rfo relurirs. th-

per0iod 1i42 through 1'.51 are as follows: polOtry for neat,

ho~ s foer ileat, general trnck crops ho': fcr breeding, and

w.at e.rl elons














12.
2T t items coupjitre? ,iu 'n .{ e fiv- y'v. pr:w:o'." c

*.i:: above !mentoneh& (ntmrprrisce .-er (1t teb- ? $U r 2V 0 .*-

L eflt cor6 ll' .u .r<'- pt.. .r 7,, (.:) n r4t DC 'it

".:rr.2 .' LI u2 : ;tu lb:nts, (U) t.h *cop e; o trrt-r"" : 3

co! uple" ii -rsYjcl: I (4) t- at p rofit p.r i'; coslpa.red

ftcr mcr. e. n.i"pIisa, o. (. ) the ,n .j:- 6. f'or>; i ---C :: -a

eC=. l. I- ..-. -' r h- .. r, 1- n... o f, .

.:bl Vi. l:, Ps.:-t I, or. p-~ r7, revc-'l:, thr-.. urt.:


If -- .- L-U. _'-c to.- y plots we .,, *W t. "1-..- -, c:_ AI .. F. .<~f-l

c. -ri- .t:~:-. '--:. 3-1. 'P w w'flet. ciro2.en in ti- entf errpri:e -b cf


'poultry r '.,L :. .a,, CAo -I .r...n ,., 'oe e
tr.. a ,.-op. ''l i P gl or^ .

V'bir- V'ITI, F.rt I, on 5 iSCl i 7 -.1Th,,

-i-..irig t Ye years 3T47 thro^g 11 efter th. 1"n I:Lcl .ry
-Slots we- r r-y nL' '-. 'C J .n-..':J C. t. t Ih chfo. ? An-


:;oll.-nt i .ncr.? .-a frn: r::."t:i>x" tc onc-hunir '' i ht"'
i; o- 5' p ; t lr t- ent:.rprses o' poul'try fr format,

no ; ior cn.it, .':..-? ~ rutc crop.t, hoP~r for bre3edin5, "n.

water:alcu:-..

.ab" r Pge 36, LidJ.cates tha.:t :..fftoe the 1- 7ln:

LoIra',tor.y poktu t':a 2 rcrnizei anI r-;arrang!.. at the

.Y~lscl h I .i-cre.se in per cen.. o, encol. ,ent in th- entc-.;1-

pr1* s were as .fo.10o'-:s poultry for meant 9?,.45 pe.@ cent,

lhns^ for i-ent 200 per cent, genernj. truck crops ''0,45 per









36

cent, hogs fo.c breeding 500 per cent, and water;nelons 500

per cent.

Fig-ure -, on psge 39, illustrates by ,raph tI':

reltlonshib between the number of -students enrolleC in the

fiv: enterapr-~es before and aF-ter tht: lan-' l.bor:,tory plots

wee r\oi'a rrze@e rrrrad 'A tIe rcr.ool










TABLE VIII
(Part I)

THE NU1MtBEB OF STUDF?,TS .ThOLLED IN EACH E!TFRPRISE BEFORE
REORGANIZING AiND REARIANGING MTE LAND LABORATORY PLOTS

Number
Enterprises 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 of
Students

Poultry, meat 10 13 10 1. 9 53

Hogs, meat 1 2 1 3 0 7

General truck crops 6 18 7 6 44

Hogs, breeding 0 0 0 1 0 1

Watermelons 0 0 1 0 0 1




TABLE VIII
(Part II)

TriE iUMBLiE OF ST JDU.T "DhROLLi IN LMACh Kl'ThilS. AiFTUi
fiRLOiGAN l2ING AID ILREJ;AI.C;ING TE LI3D- LABORATORY PLOTS

Number
T.ntcrprises 1947 1948 1949 1950 1961 of
Students
% "_! -., '-- ..Y. .w '" : :J ---- ...-~ =--- ~ -- = '' -
Poultry, meat 13 29 7 20 1S 102

Hcgs, meat 2 1 2 10 6 81

General truck crops 3 15 11 9 15 53

Hogs, breeding 0 0 1 4 2 7

Water-melons 0 0 5 1 8















TABLE XX
PER CENT OF INCREASE IN ENROLLMENT IN ENTERPRISES AFTER
REORGANIZING AND REARRANGING THE LAND LABORATORY PLOTS
AT THE SCHOOL

Enrollment Enrollment Per Cent of
Enterprises Before After Increase


Poultry, meat 53 102 92.45
Hogs, meat T 81 200.00
General truck crops 44 53 20.45
Hogs, breeding 1 6 500.00
Watermelons 1 6 500.00














.JH++R+


744
T H~




41

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T 4-
44

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I -; III


47


J-4
14-4 --j






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t18


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13


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H^!'!;"J!::^


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--4 -- --4- -4- ---Jw 4 -l l -i-n


Z 3 4 S,. 6 1 0 uU; 12 13 14 15 1 17 18








40

Table X, on page 41, is divided into three parts with
Part I showing the net profit earned by the All-Day students
from their supervised farming programs before the land labora-
tory plots were reorganized and rearranged at the school
during the years 1942 through 1946. Part IX of Table X, an
page 41, indicates the net profits earned by the All-Day
students from their supervised farming programs after the
land laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged at the
school. Part III of Table X, on page 41, reveals the per
cent of increase in the net profit that has taken place with
each enterprise since reorganizing and rearranging the land
laboratory plots at the school.
The per cents of increase in net profit after
reorganizing and rearranging the land laboratory plots at
the school were as follows: poultry for meat 109.20 per cent,
hogs for meat 369.24, general truck crops 47.97 per Mcet, hogs
for breeding 1,803.46 per cent, and watermelons 3,025.82 per
cent. These figures indicate a definite increase in produc-
tion after the land laboratory plots were reorganized and re-
arranged at the school.
Figure 5, on page 42, shows a graphic picture of the
net profit received from the All-Day students* individual
supervised farming programs before and after the land labora-
tory plots were reorganized and rearranged at the school.










TASLS X
NET ?POST? ILRYl D EB THS WlDWS1m BSORS AMD APMrW REDRGANIiING AN)
RSARRAWOIG THM LAIMD LAWRAfTORY LOT1 AT T1 SCI0OL
(wart 1)


iSntrprisni 1942 1945 19a4 1943 1946 totals


Poultry,, meat 2.22 34.27 31740.45 #)49.a2 # 9r.0 Z1,16.P
Hogs, mat 3.10 65.50 22,50 150.78 0 272.68
General truAnk
Orope 178.62 167.57 2%4.17 115.6 1X52.65 8a6.44
Hogs, bree.ad4ig 0 0 0 4a.10 0 42.10
Waternalone 0 0 26.10 0 0 26.10



(Part XiI)

ot, xrofiLt AfL^te RaorgLanksirn learay Labor9y ea
Rnterprisse 197 1948 1949 1950 1991 Totalr

3oultrys meat 578.9:2 $56.a27 P514.77 S 14< 624.68 Ua,458.45
Hogs, meat 47.-15 111.65 128.15 1.eo 950e85 1,279.5
oZenral trLtok
crops 12a.45 425.2 217.54 111.15 P9.01 1,12291
Aiogs, breeding 0 0 60.74 66575 5.87 801,06
Wateraeleas 0 0 3N2.56 48M.48 815.84



(Part III)

Per Cent of Increase After Reorgntgintg Land LaEbonat.ry Plots
nterpries warning Before Earning After "Pr OMat of

Poultry, meat 1,16.6 02 458.4 109.20.a4
Hogs, maot 272.68 1,279.5 59.24
General track eope a6.44 1222.,1 47.97%
oges, breding 42.10 801a, 1,805.45%
4ateamlens 26.io 815,.84 !a case
ZI
















73


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2tr

21


20


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_Tt

18 f
# 4
-t
17



I0 I I












i' 'I



5 1
14
















S+
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 T it- t -- ; :
13J
II


10



t +4












II I 1 L
I a



1 9% 111111 T

_____ YJfl+

i 360
iff i

I t I I I i
1 4
Itt








1 f~


It



1,. 2 3, 4Q 5 6 7 8 9 10 1z1 13 14 M 116 17


4 1 1 1 1 1


rr i


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Aa|


f


-A Lfa


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t







43

Tahle XI, on page 44, is divided into three parts with

Part I showing the scopes of the enterprises of poultry for

meat, hogs for meat, genpr- truck crops, bogs for breeding,

and watermelons. The enterprises in the il1-Day students

individual supc'vised farming programs during the years 1942-

1946 before the ltnd laboratory plots were reorganized and

rearranged at the school are also shown in this table.

Pqrt II of Table XI, on page 44, reveals the scope of

the enterprises o:. poultry for meat, hogs for meet, general

truck crops, hogs for breeding, and watermelons after the

land laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged at the

school.
Pert III of Table XI. on page 44, discloses the scope

of the enterprises before arnd after the Ilnd laboratory. plots

were reorganized and rearranged at the school. The per cent

of increase in the scope of the enterprises after the land

latcratory plots were reorganized and rearranged at the school

were as follows: poultry for meat increased 67.52 per cent,

hogs for m-at increased 141.66 per cent, general truck crops

increased 41.66 per cent, hogs for breeding increased 1,800

per cent, and the production of tertermelons increased 320 per

cent. The above figures indicate that the reorganization and

rearranging of the land laboratory plots at the school have

aided in increasing the scopes of the individual farming pro-

grams of the All-Dey students.









VIT


SCOPE Of BHTERISUE RSMR5 A*K APTIR RiRGUaM2II An)
LAM) EaEaAw rY w3 ii tiE AS OsE oDTr AREA WIs THs
INmPSASE IN WAEH ENTEr RISS
(part )


IEARRAumIN THS
tER OSwT or


l)terprianu I2a 1"4 1 19 tm lot".;

Rege, t ib hIe ad 2 head et 5 bsad 0 Za heM

opgs, brc~tlng 0 0 0 head 9 h mad
watexamel 0 0 amrn 0 I sone

(tart II)

Saterprta 1947 m 1 19% 19V1 htal.

Poultry, aat 87 e elad .,s .* 96O h, T. i. 742, 4ad b d
Hgs, must 2 head hd. thd 14 8 head 29 head
Onerale truck
aps 1 t &ere 4j A. I aore 5 A- 4 A. 1 7 aemw
sega, breaUts 0 0 1 head 9 hmd a hedf head
twmelen 0 0 9 0 7* A. 9 &tore id asres

(Part III)

for I ent orf -mgtMs Ayr ArAatag .l a Po
atertlprs Seep Befbr Seepe After Per Oent of

t,.^ 3 In,,,
Be*, maft 12 head 9 hbed 141.66%
oweaal true arPS U ta wa 17 sena 41.d66
segf, breating a ba 8 head 1,800,00%
tetmnelenu j s d sore. 520.006
I I~--- -- -- I-n--.-I,- *~-- I--------. I---. ~ ~ ---~~-









In order to determine the net profit per unit of
production for the various enterprises included in this in-
Vestigation, a comparison was made of the cost of production
of the enterprises before and after the land laboratory plots
were re-organized and rearranged at the school.
In as much as opportunities for increasing the size of
the farms of the Negro All-auy students by adding additional
acres are limited because of the scarcity or high price of
such land, one of the best methods to increase farm income is
to increase the net profit per unit of production. The net

profit per unit of production can be improved by more effective
utilization of approved practices.
Figure 6, on page 46, reveals the following in regards
to the unit cost of production after the land laboratory plots
were reorganized and rearranged at the school; poultry for
meat increased 35 per cent; hogs for meat increased 108.58 per
cent; general truck crops decreased 4.86 per cent; hogs for
breeding increased 1.4 per cent; and watermelons increased
57,31 per cent.


















-4+4--


- I-


1 t 1t I 11


, 11I


-1-1-4--*U+-1


10


17


16
16 -
i1-

15:C


13 ---- ----- --d-
fH


12
j1iT --T







Lt
4- A-4 4 .- I t l
9LL IIi l

8o ++4- 1- -- ----


7#

6+


5+











Ii 4-ic 'I-t
2 1 4 {LT




. .... L I I
I 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 1 1~ 13 Ig 1~ 1~ 1740 5 &


MI .1


as s:rlI I 1 l I l


+ W


1H4-k-4T44-MTT 'T1= 1-in1 T r


ailinll


iwi>- .iiia


--|


Rt l


I ~ r. 1 H ~V IV









47
"The primary aim of vocational education in agricul-
ture is to train present and prospective farmers for pro-

ficieney in farming."17 This being true, it appears that the

agricultural teaching program and the agricultural educational
activities of a community should be designed to lead the stu-
dents of the community through systematic instructions to

establishment in farming.

A summary of the occupational records of vocational
agricultural students after leaving school, as shown in Table

XII, page 48, disclosed that during the years 1942-1946 be-
fore the land laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged

at the school twenty-four students graduated from the agri-

cultural department of Moore Academy at Dade City and two be-
came established in farming. During the years 1947-1951

after the land laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged
at the school, there were thirty-five students graduated from

the agricultural department of Hoore Academy at Dade City and
seven became established in farming.

The per cent of increase in the number of students

becoming established in farming after the land laboratory

plots were reorganized and rearranged, as shown in this study,
was 250 per cent increase in the number of former students
farming.

- ~---~~ZS---------~~'~-~
S Gln7 Charles Cook, A Hanuboox on Teaching Vocational
Agriculture, 1947, p. 6.











TABLE XII
FORMS STUDENTS ESTABLISHED IN FARMING SINCE GRADUATION BEFORE
AND AFTER REOORGAIZING THE-LAND LABORATORY PLOTS AT
THE SCOOL

Number Number
Year Graduated Farming Year Graduated Farming
Before After
Laboratory Laboratory
Plot Plot

1948 5 1 1947 7 2

1943 5 0 1948 6 1
1944 4 1 1949 6 2
1945 6 0 1950 5 1

1946 4 0 1951 6 1


Totals 24 8 35 7









49
During th fivi ya'R pe-riod 1947-1.51 the seventy-five
All-Day students were taught a total of 106 different farming
preatices in the lend lasb-c-at-ry plotet at the school. A sum-
wmary of t-rhe questionnaire rev aV.Ced .e t-atc t 10 tr- faiin prPc'-

tices taught in the land labor.etor-y plo&a at the school were

used 873 different times by the All-*.iay studr,*nts i.t thoir In-
dividual supervised farming programs. 'The niimber of farming

practices the All-Day students used in their individual super-
vised farming programs so results of beinzf taug ; in the land
laboratory plots at the schooI are as follows : 67 farming

practices were used in 1947; 263 farming praeticos were used
inr 1948; 153 farSmng practices wre %use-d i 1949; 117 farrinag

practices were used in 1950Q S27 farming practices we-e used
in 1951.

The net profit during the same period was a sc sum-
marized and the summare revealed that when the nuambar of farm-

ing practices that were taught in the land laboratory plots

.inireafsed the net profit of the AlT-Day students indivIdual

supervise rr farmIing program also increased. The summary als3

in~d:.-:ted that when the number of farmin, practices ta-.ght in

the land laboratory plota decreased the net. profit of the All-

Day students individual supervised farming programs decreased,
la Fieure 6, page 50, is sbown by grAfph the relationship

between the number of farminxy practices taught in the land

laboratory plots st the school and net profit earned by the All

Day students in their individual supervised farming programs.











`'( *-.






51

In order to show the effects of the number of farming
practices used on net profit of the All-Day students pro-
ductive projects, two groups with ten students in each, were
selected for study. These students were considered to be
representative of the students carrying poultry for meat as
a productive project in the Dade City area, with distances
from the school, grade levels, ages, number of years in voca-
tional agriculture, and the scopes of the students individually
supervised farming programs being the same for each student
in each group.
Data were obtained on the students individually super-
vised farming programs of each group for a period of five
years. This data included the net profit the students re-
ceived from their individually supervised farming programs
before and after the land laboratory plots were reorganized
and rearranged at the school.
Figure 8, on page 52, shows the net profit of the
two groups of All-Day students for a five year period before
and after the land laboratory plots were reorganized end re-
arranged at the school. This was accomplished by using the
latest information available for working out approved prac-
tices for poultry production for seat.




-. r . v,



52



23


22


21


zo




Is
19




16


13


14




12 1' y :


10











I r












I





1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ,9 10 11 I 13 14 15 16 171











CiIAPTWR V


SUMMARY ANt CNOCLUSIONS

Pasc ;r:onty consists of 492,161 acres of land located
i1r the cen1rrnt part if the state on the west coast of Florida.

The topography ranges from slightly rolling ir the
wester- throe-fourJt with lig:t sandy ritige: and prairie land
to hilly in the astern one-fourth with light sandy, fairly

fertiles pijni tn palmetto flatwood land,
Thc -.i.:ate cf the r.es is sub-tropical. The annual

qvra-ge tep)e9tura is :72.2 degrees Fahreinhhit. The amulli
,fdntel1 ij ?'t^19 5ishes,

VThe egs4'c All-Day students of M.ooe AcadeSy represent
sma.l farm3 with the .leading productive enterprises being

( roi.ltry ro- !e t, (2) hogs for meat, (3) general truck

crops, 4 ho e2 fr breeding, arid (5) wateruelons.
Th- p.ii-ul.tilo of the Dade City area has shown rapid

incr-es ,s d-c.i 1945,

iThki Lxs'tigation wyas conducted to determine the
raelatio.ns-hp I*f the lan labo.ratory plots to the farming pro-
grrtrs cf thi All-Dp. stW-aentr.s Msoroe Academy High School,

Pa sac County FR1~rida,
The diata for this stvudy were obtaineA_ by resorting to

th: emuestlonna!re teThnDque o? the ncrmative survey method of

research and an on the farm personal interview with each All-Day


_ _~_~








54
student concornint his individual supervised farming programs.

The conclusions confirmed as results of this study
indicate as following:

1. In the individual supervised farming programs more
farming practices were employed by the groups of students 14

to 18 years of age and the 19 to 23 years of age than by the

groups 24 to 89 years of age.

2. Tho students who lived a distance o" from two and
one-hnrlf miles from the school to eight and one-half miles

from the school completed the greatest number of farming prac-

tices in their individual supervised farming programs. The

students who lived a distance of from nine to twenty miles

from the school completed the smallest number of farming

practices in their individual supervised farming programs.

6. In their individual supervised farming programs
the in-school students employed almost twice as many farming

practices as the out-of-school students.

4. The out-of-school students who are graduates of the

agricultural department of Moore Academy are engaged in various

farming and non-farming occupations.

5. After the land laboratory plots were reorganized
and rearranged at the school, enrollment increased rapidly in

the five leading enterprises.

6. The net profit of each enterprise increased after
the land laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged at









the school.
8. Net profit per unit cost of production increased

with each a productive enterprise, except general truck crops,

after the lend laboratory plots were reorganized and rearranged

at the school.

9. The number of students becoming establi hed in

farming increased 250 per cent after the land laboratoryy plots

were reorganized Cid rearranged at the school.

10. Net profit from the students* productive projects
increased in relationship to the number of farming practices

used in the students' individual supervised farming programs.

XI. When farming practices taught in the land labora-
tory plots were used in the students' individual supervised

farming programs, the net income was double that obtained

by students who used but few farming practices,









CHAPTER VI,


RECOMMENDATIONS

As a result of the investigation and the relationship
indicated between the farming practices taught ia the land
laboratory plots at the school and the farming practices
used by the All-Day students of Moore Academy in their in-
dividually supervised farming programs, the writer proposes
the following recommendations:
1. More emphasis be placed on the use of better
farming practices in the *young farmer class" at Moore Academy
which includes many of the students in the group 24 to 9
years of age.

So Students who live a distance of from nine to
twenty miles from the school need more project supervision and
on the farm instructional visits by the vocational agricul-
tural teacher to aid in increasing the number of farmiLn
practices being used.
3. More time and planing be devoted to young farmer
instructions on and off the farm.
4. Continue the development of the land laboratory
plots at the school to improve the efficiency of farming of
the All-Day students of Moore Academy in the Dade City area.






























UflJtOOflU









BIBLIOGRAPHY

A. BOOKS

Bricker, Garland A., The Teaching of Agriculture in Hih
i New Yorkic The 0 ailn Company, 19B. 802 pp.
Cook, Glen Charles, A Handbook on Teachin Vocationa i
culture. Danville, Illinois [intersiatae Puflihing
Dompafn, 198. 671 pp.
Stewart, Rolland M. and Arthur K. Getman, Teachim Agricul-
tural Vocations. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.,


B. PERIODICAL LITERATURE

Brown, Bert L. "School Farm Become Mach Used Resource *
The Agricultural education M)az 2255, September,
194, .
Mayo, Nathan, "Vocational Agriculture in Florida," quarter
Bulletin of Florida tate Department of Educa.tin, 40;38,
April, 19C0.
Spilsbury, P. D., "A School Farm Laboratory Supplements
Class Room Teaching," Me Agricultural Education Magazine,
25466, September, 1958.
Welch, Andrew B., "The School Farm As A Training Center,"
The AricultuTal Education Magazine, 851l9i, February, 1953.

C. PUBLIC DOCUMENTS

Mayo ath e n, 1j- d u "
Tallahassee: 5ate of Iori ait*15. PEkp.
United States Bureau of Census. Agriculture C nsus of Florida,
1950, Volume 1, Part 18. Washington, D. C., Uitaed
States Government Printing Office. 285 pp.
United States Weather Bureau Cooperative Observers. _jMA-
tological Suimarl St. Lee, Florida, 1952. 8 pp.










D. REPORTS

Anual AtteLdance Report of 1952-1953,8 Superintendent of,
Public Instruction ofFTaiee Conty, Florida. 4 pp.
Florida State Department of Education, Flori Educational
Director. Tallahassee, Florida, Z1-1 79 pp.

R 1- MAYTNSCRIPT ENTRIES

Deyoe, George P, :"The Use of School Land by Departments of
Vocational Agriculture in Illinoli." Mimeographed
pamphlet, University of Illinois, Urbana, 191. 12 pp.































1~911~









APPF.DIX A


2liaun3&aB


1. What i ur y Ae nearest bi rt ay ?
2.%ht4 is yo.r- prese:it occupston?_______________
3. '8hat -,V-- tu.e 1Ist frs.de completed int school?
4. ha&t i v th,; type of farm o: which you live? Distance from
school

(a) Gaanral f.arm (d) Citrus farm
a') 'fTrack f&ar_ (e) Combin&.tion farm
(c) Pou~ltry farm (f) Otrere
5. Number of s ,ro;, of land awned_
6. suaiwber of Laeres of lca rested
.a Total. fara ecrts (acres owned plus scres related)
64. Tottal acre used .for cultivated crora____
'. Statu of former: (Chcek one.) Owner nter_____
shosecropoparer labarert _, Others____

SFaming Practices
10. Farming Praetlcef Taug4at in used in Suparvisaed
Ladboratoer Plots___. Faring Procraa


Brooding by.y- chiaCok
Peediap bab-r *a.ials
GrowiugS fryrs
Killiug fryer.e
Vbcolnatia .poultr-y
Oandling eggs
Ooolinrg eggs
Gradinr nggs
calling pullets
Cu1llint laying, henc
Market imng fryerf
Markatig *gr e
Selection breeds of 1Ivestock
iDe9vl.pintg, t' feediin; program
Diaeaaijs control fao livrastoc'r
Intect control for lirestock
BalaaoCin rtioa ion for livistock'
ntet erpriesaa

Feedi;g mineral to ho ;
Ho*Usii3n equiaieat
Settitag up sawinia brseding program
Breeadisn sove to p;rabredl boars%
Ca ore .oryounn liirestocc
Castratitag pigs at four week of age
Analyzinn ; crop entenriaes into jobs
ati'niati. co.s.t of prod.nctio;- for
ent .rxori ess


3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

I..
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.


A. Poultry "meat)
R. Hog (meat)_
L. log breedingq)


18.

0.
21.
22.
23.
24.

25.


1.

3.
4.
5.
6.


9.
7.


10.
11.
12.
13.

15.

1?.
17.



18.
19.
20.
231.
22.

25.
2,.









26. Selaetint: las for crops
27. 'Ts1ina soil samplas
28. Prepaj rng land usie map
22. DraD&-j ;a cwap nTf th. home fpr9
30. "reparint: Bee-bed for cropsi
31. Developin R, a-rop Zotation. systeOei
32. Deterl.ai. i: mfflJ of fertilizer to
use p-ei acre
33. Oron': coveb crop
A. &wis.e .. rWinter
31:. $etNcarmiIsw .ian'lysie of fernilizer

3,. Methr' of tvrlyt^ rertilter
A. S3t.e crts '. Drill
C. r.ow.')natio D. OQthere
3.. ast alcsc between rows
3?. i stan. bsetsPen plants o rowv
3. Tisea% *',tjrol program for crpis
39. Iasect csatrol program for crops
40. making a hocbed.
41. qraowar nle.iats
41. Tr 1nplantia,-t; plante
)9. Cultivativn croors
1'. Rarvesting crops
45. tratiim; cerona
V4. MarAetin-9g crops
47. i)oerati~ a& tractor
48. 3Jervio iQ e trfeittor
49. Adjusttir tractor eqdpAipant
50, Ile-itifying Toaols
51. Squfisig &ani c',iring lumber
52. Mwaing a 'ill SI:' rstria].
53. Drawing sample flor i l ans
5I. Outtirn ste ar
$5. doaan;ructiA; ocaltrr ealf feederar
55. conasruatia." Poultry self waterers
P?. Gonstruotia. ftsr.rowin pene
5S. PN1xiin; sortar
35. Milxtai concrete
60. ldentifyin,- corm.von ornamentals of area
1. .biildir a &roipao gatizng benaoh
62. Propa tin; co~amo ornaamrntal of area
63, Trsvwinc a lbaascqae pflLn
64. tLaniscsia thA oni 7 -r
6.5. ontrollia, forest f :'es
66,. or--in o-:t 6e-.roved pr,-ctices
eropa or/OaaC' ilvestock
(a) Poult.7ry (peat) (e) Uo.? (Cbreedi
(b) Hoj sieit) (fI) Strio: j.an
a() Gaenrsl :r.ck; o rcp (g) 'atirmelons
(d: ;'eet potatoes lI) Corn, .raee


2V..
27.
2 .
2S.
30.
31.

32.
33.


34.
3$.


36.
37,
3'.


41.
42.
43.
44,
45.



5 .
46.
47.
14.
19.
50.
51.
52.
53.
51.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59-
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
";5.
,5.


is


A,
i.

A. ______


ib._____).
U.


































(b) (f)
(c)__(g)__
(d)_ _(a)___








67. Keeping farm records of crops or/and
livestock


67. A.
Q;


What diseases ani/or parasites of livestock did you control in your
farming program as results of being taught in the land laboratory
plots?
A. Poultry dAlsea e 3. Poultry external larasites
1. pullorum 1 .. i. lice ____
2. coccidiosis ........._ 2. mites ,... ....
3. fowl pox 3. fleas __
4. peroWs i_____. .... 4. files __....._____ .
5. blue ooab
6. diarrhea .._. Q. Poutry internal sites
7. colds ___. Large roundworms .....
8. canaibalism 2. Tapeworms _
9. newcastle ,


D. Swine diseases
1. Hog cholera __
2. Swine Lrysipelas
3. Baby pit; scours ___
4. Vesicular ixantbea _


I. rasn Uxternal P2araiteq
1. Hog lice ____
2. Mange_. ..
3. .SorewormsB.


F. ., Int'na9 l parasites
1. Kidney worms __.i,___
2. Iang worms ., ._.,
3. Large roundworms

What diseases and/or insects of crops did you control in your
farming program as results of being taught in the land laboratory


plots?
A. Waterioihn ailsena
1. Anthraonose _____.
2. fsariura wilt _. .
3. Stem-end rot .. ......
4. Downy aildew

0. Sweet cor2 d1ia@ei
1. Corn leaf blight _-




3. heeut ot~ao diseases
1. Black rot ..
2. Stem rot .
3. Soft rot ______

G. wSa19 aiseasems
1. Rust
2. Powdery mildew


3. Watermelon insects
1. Squash bug .-. ......
2. Green pumpkin bug _
3. Aphids _____..
4. Leaf miner _...

D. swt sr insects
1. Oorn ear worm .... ,
2. Corn bud worm
3. Out worms
4. Corn silk fly


1. Sweet potato weevil -
2. Sweet potato white
fly 0 'I

H. Sl ibas f I Ieat F
1. 3ean leaf hopper .,
2. Bean leaf roller _
3. Mexican bean beetle
4. Serentine leaf
miner
\








APPENDIX 3


PALT DIRy SHEs T FOR RmCORDIw JOBS OR 1OB 1SSSO TAUGHT. OR GLASS


Month ClasS in Agrioulture

Classifi- Job, Lesson, Field Trip, or Other
Date Acat ittoi*LO






























~-----I- --


*1. Supervised Faraing
2. Farm Shop
3. FYa Enterprise Jobs


4. Forestry
5. F.rA..
6. Oonservation


7. Misellaneouu
7&. Laboratory Plot


(This heet should, be filed with the teaching program Ot wa& of
month.)







OCCUPATIONAL BRCCGD OI3 VOCATIOIAL STUITEN'
Wom 8.-74 A~T ar LAM SCHOOL
Nam _.__


Changes o address ad "at


iI m I I a m mM I[ mli mll I .. I


'fam laborer
vith specif ic

At Avag
home from
home


At
home
with
in-

on or
more
enter-
prises


Partner in
a frame

At AvWe
hoee from
hamu.


Renter
or an
opera-
tor of
far


Owaer
and
opera-
tor of
fare


Man-
aer WI

aaeothea
partr


in


Other
status


of
farn


Sire
aerm


Other
occa-


fty






iii
Oe~lei
zr~ o


0oatiauatioia
J education










14 s 1 l4 T I


List
effi-

held

bar-
ship

in

tioa


12I


Year


At
home

vith

or
indef-
inite
al00w-
eao
9dOe


WOV. A


- --- --- Y L-L-


I










AP~ XI.~ D


SWISL J 45FARM zTjPR1S) SURVEY

1. Name of operator D. .. ..ate ...... ..,,_
P. 0. Address _,, __ ; T y ,01,, Canty
Total acres in farm ,,4 Oaceres cullivated
Acres in feed crops _., ,.__ acres is. posture -
Feed crops grown _,,._. ____ __ _
ihmber year experience __ _,

2. Breed usae Total 3uaber hogs raised last year_

Number sows on farm last year ____ tfis year
Number litters last year __..., _... __,
Number pigs per litter
Pigs raised lest year____ Pigs died last yer -._
Ceaae of deaths
Breed of boar used Owned

3. &Cre of sow:
hge of sow when bred Farrowing .te
SCondition of sow at farrowina: time
Care during pregnancy: peAturL____ ineralls.
Concentrate
Care t8t. frrowing; Removed from other ho:;s ,_
On clefta pasture ________;____ clean wtesr
'House used ________ __

4, Perrowias. pigs:
Fsed before wearsiig: pasture mineral____
Concent r&tas
Age of -weanin..g Ake of castration
Source of' water____ vaccinated ..._
hegistared wormed.

5. Care of boar:
Age win&.f firat use3 __coldi.ion_
Dumber of sowa per boar
Does bor ru.n with sows? .-
Kindl of feed 'usedl
Number of yearE kept Do you inbreedt

6. Finishiv for market:
Were hog fei in dP lot?
eesd used in dry lot
Green grazing crops. ___ __ ___
Supolemente: minerals
protein
Average eight when put on feed










Average weight whan sold ___- ._ ------__ _-_ --
Timse ept on teed ...___... _, ..... .... _-,- ---_

7. Merketingi
,ge when marketed _________
Price receaved- per pound -
HOV market ed
When m&rist ted __
Weight when marketed ... .....
NToter used at home .......
Total weight used at home





APPENDIX E


AG Form 4
2%M-21877-7-53



Type of Class


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE


Date Received


FINAL STATEMENT OF SUPERVISED FARMING WORK

ALL-DAY, DAY-UNIT, YOUNG FARMER

VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


The following is an accurate statement of the supervised farming work done under the supervision of

-.------.. .------..- -. ...--,------- ------------ -------- ----------- ----.- -.., teacher of Agriculture in

---_-. .---- -.------ _------......- ------------------------.-- School during the year 19 _---- __19-..-


County Superintendent or Principal


Teacher of Agriculture


DEFINITION OF TERMS
Productive Enterprise Project: A business venture for profit, usually limited to a production cycle in a farm enterprise.
Improvement Project: A project intended to increase appreciably the real estate value of the farm, or improve the efficiency
of the farm business.
Supplementary Farm Jobs: Jobs selected for the purpose of improving farm family living conditions; conveniences, etc., se-
lected by the teacher in conference with the student. These jobs or practices are more restricted in scope than improve-
ment projects. EXAMPLE: Constructing general equipment and home conveniences.
Placement for Farm Experience: Placement on a farm of a student-usually a town boy-who is lacking in farm experience,
or transfer to a suitable farm of a student who has too limited facilities on his home farm. The placement of such
students on farms, and the follow-up of their program on these farms is one responsibility of the teacher of agriculture.

INDIVIDUALS
Summarize the individuals carrying projects and "other supervised farming" begun in the year covered by this report.
No duplicates are to be in the reports under a, b, c, d.

TYPE OF FARMING Number Beginning Number Completing
(Based on PreL Report)

a. Productive enterprise projects; different individuals enrolled in such projects only
b. Other supervised farming; different individuals enrolled for-
(1) Improvement projects Only

(2) Supplementary farm jobs Only

(3) Placement for farm experience Only
c. Productive enterprise project and other supervised farming; different individuals
enrolled in projects plus one or more forms of "other supervised farming"

d. Two or more forms of "other supervised farming" different individuals enrolled
e. Of the total number completing, how many are:
(1) Farm boys

(2) Part-time or subsistence farm boys

(3) Non-farm boys

TOTAL

This report is to be made out in triplicate. One is to be sent to the District Supervisor of Agriculture, one to your
County Superintendent of Public Instruction, and one placed in your files.


___________________I___1_11_





Group the productive enterprise projects by enterprises and make a sub-total for each enterprise with a grand total for all e
prises. Skip a line after each sub-total before entering next enterprise.


FARM WHERE LIVING PRODUCTIVE ENTERPRISE PROJECTS

No. NAME OF STUDENT Size in Busels,
Acres Type of Farming Kind of Enterprise Scope Lbs., e






































































Grand Total xx xxxx xxxx xxxx xx








Credited ~Ee Student Total Labor Student' tSupplemntary
Total Labor Hours All Income Income *Im ent Pa
Amount Amount Income Man Labor Per Hour (Share) Praetices
*I ------------------ ------__ _------- --- a- .__________


xx xx


*On the back of this report is a summary of the improvement projects. Indicate in this column by corresponding numbers, those
Tied out by the different individuals. (Reference-Mimeo. Bul No. 4.)
tIndicate in this column, by corresponding numbers from the back of this report, supplementary farm practices carried out by
Ferent individuals, not including the practices carried out by the student in connection with productive enterprises and improvement
)jects. (Reference-Mimeo. BuL No. 4.)






SUMMARY REPORT OF IMP'ROl EMENT PROJECTS

*Number Number of Scope Units Number of Scope Units
Projects (Total No. Units) (Acres, Head, etc.) *Number Projects (Total No. Units) (Acres, Head, etc.)




























SUMMARY REPORT OF SUPPLEMENTARY FARM JOBS
SUPPLEMENTARY FARM JOBS

*Number Number of Individuals *Number Number of Individuals





























**SUMMARY REPORT OF PLACEMENT FOR FARM EXPERIENCE

TYPE OF FARM EXPERIENCE Number of Individuals

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.
*Refer to list of improvement projects and supplementary farm jobs shown in Mimeo. Bul. No. 4.
**Report on inside of this form each student placed for farm experience, showing type of work, period over which work
extended, total hours worked and pay received.




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