• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 List of Tables
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Review of related literature
 Nature and amount of research produced...
 General summary and conclusion
 Bibliography
 Appendices






Title: Analysis of Theses Submitted and Accepted in the Graduate Program at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University August, 1947 Through August, 1953
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Title: Analysis of Theses Submitted and Accepted in the Graduate Program at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University August, 1947 Through August, 1953
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Edwards, Ernest W.
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1955
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Volume ID: VID00001
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
    List of Tables
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Acknowledgement
        Page ix
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Review of related literature
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Nature and amount of research produced at Florida A & M ...
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    General summary and conclusion
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Bibliography
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Appendices
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
Full Text








AN ANALYSIS OF THE THESES SUBMITTED AND ACCEPTED
IN THE GRADUATE PROGRAM AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
AND CAAL UNIVERSITY AUGUST, 1947 THROUGH AUGUST, 1953

/ y


A Thesis


Presented to

The Faculty of the Graduate School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University






In Partial Fulfillmeat

of the Requiremedts for the Degree

Master of Science








by

Ernest W. Edwards


August 1955











AN ANALYSIS OFT THE THESES SUBMITTED AND ACCEPTED
IN THE GRADUATE PROGRAM AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY AUGUST, 1947 THROUGH AUGUST, 1953








A Thesis

Presented to

The Faculty of the Graduate School

Florida Agricultural and Mechancal University

In Partial Fulfillment


of the Requirements for the Degree


Master of Science

by

Ernest W. Edwards


August 1955


Approve(


Chairman





D ir sector
of the Graduate Sc.












TABLE OF CONTENTS


CHAPTER

I.





































I1.


INTRODUCTION

Statement of the Problem

Importance of the Study

Sources and Nature of Data

Eighty-seven theses

Student registration card

Questionnaire

Related Literature

General reference

Basic Assumptions

Delimitations

Definition of Terms

Categories

Analysis

Other Terms

Method of Procedure

Organization of the Study

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

Review of Literature on Personal Traits
of Research Persons

Summary


PAGE



4

6

7

7

7

8

8

8

8

9

11

11

I1

11

11

12

14


20

29










CHAPTER

MIle


NATURE AND AMOUNT OF RESEARCH

PRODUCED AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL

AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY FROM

AUGUST, 1947 THROUGH AUGUST, 1953

Analysis of the Eighty-Seven Theese Surveyed

Specialized Terminology

General administration and supervision

Attendance

Community- school relations

Curriculum

Foundations

Guidance

School Plant

Normative survey method

The historical method

The experimental method

Other methods

Classification of Theses

Summary

Personnel Study of Candidates Receiving the

Master of Science degree in Education

Summary


PAGE


30

30

32

32

32

32

32

35

35

35

35

35

36

36

36

50



51

64











CHAP TER

IV.


GENERAL SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

General Summary

Conclusions


BIBLIOGRAPHY

APPENDICES


PAGE

66


66

70











LIST OF TABLES


TABLE PAGE

1. The Number of Masters' Degrees Awarded by

American Universities from 1890e1944

by Year 2

I. Distribution of the EightyeSeven Theses at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University by Year and Amount 37

II. Distribution of Eighty-Seven Theses at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University by Method, Subject Matter

Area and Amount 39

IV. Distribution of the Eighty-Seven Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University by Method, Sex, Year and

Amount 43

V. Distribution of the Eighty-Seven Theses at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University by Amount and Levels of

School on Which Produced 45

VL. Distribution and lerCeat of Judgement Making

Devices employed in the Major Methods

of Research Employed at the Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University,

1947.1953 46


* _____~I










TABLE PAGE

VII. Distribution of the Eighty-seven Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University According to Graduate,

Undergraduate and Theses Area 48

VIII. Distribution of the Authors of the Seventy

Theses at Florida Agricultural and

Mechanical University According to Par-

ticipation in Socio-Civic Organization, 1947-

1953 52

IX. Distribution of the Authors of the Seventy

Theses at Florida Agricultural and

Mechanical University August, 1947

through August, 1953, According to

Attitudes Toward Civil Responsibilities 53

X. Distribution According to Religious Beliefs of

Seventy Candidates Receiving Master of

Science degrees in Education from Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University

1947-1953 by the Year 55

XI. Distribution of the Authors of Seventy Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University According to Marital Status 57










TABLE PAGE

XII. Distribution of Authors of the Seventy Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University According to College At

Which Undergraduate Work Was Done 60

XIII. Distribution of the Authors of the Seventy

Theses According to Positions Held When

the Master of Science Degree in Education

Was Granted from Florida Agricultural

and Mechanical University, 1947-1953 61

XIV. Distribution of the Authors of Seventy Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University According to Sex and Age at

Time of Receiving the Master's Degree

S 1947-1953 62

XV. Distribution of the Authors of the Seventy Theses

at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University According to Sex and Teaching

Experience 63









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Sincere appreciation is extended to the many individuals

whose interest and assistance helped to make this study

possible. Because of the large number of persons who gave

such wonderful cooperation in assisting me to obtain the desired

information, it is not possible to mention each one individually,

but to each of them, I extend my sincere appreciation.

For invaluable assistance and many helpful suggestions

in the preparation of this investigation, I am deeply indebted

to my committee, to Mr. A. A. Abraham, Chairman, for his

scholarly criticisms and willingness to help for hours extending

into the evening, to Mr. Leonard Spearman (in absentia) who

helped in the early days of the investigation, and to Dr. W. S.

Maize for his thoughtful words of encouragement.

To my wife, Cassie Mae, I am grateful for her

encouragement and understanding during the pursuit of this

accomplishment.


E. W. E.










CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION



The first master's degree awarded in America was
I
conferred by Harvard University as early as 1642. Since

then the utility of the master's degree, of which the thesis

is usually a partial requirement, has grown nt recognition

at all levels of the educational system. The recognition of

the value of the degree is evident by the increasing number

of masters' degree awarded by American universities.
2 3
John and the United States Office of Education have pub-

lished results on the number of masters' degrees awarded by

educational institutions in America. Some of the results of

their studies are presented in Table 1.




Ernest V. HoUis, "Graduate School," cited in Monroe,
Walter S., editor, Encyclopedia of Educational Research, The
MacMillan Company, Revised Edition, p. 511.

2
W. C. John, Graduate Study in Universities an
Colleges in the United States, U. S. Office of Educatni Bul
lin 1934, No. 20 (Washington, Government Printing Office),
cited in Brumbaugh, A. J., editor, American Universities
and colleges, American Council on Education, Washington, D. C.,
Fifth Edition, 1948, p. 56.


"Statistics of Higher Education," Biennial Survey of
Education in the United States, U. S. Office of Education, 1930-
1944, cited in Brumbaugh, p. 56.









2


TABLE I

THE NUMBER OF MASTERS' DEGREES AWARDED BY
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES FROM 1890 TO 1944 BY YEAR

-:-_: .. i, : :- :-:- __'Y -- '-- -J ---- -- ; -. -:., -:_- --::. ; : _: ':- _. / : :-: -- -:-:- :: -: .:::--_- -


YEAR


1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

1936

1938

1940

1942

1944


NUMBER OF DEGREES


70

1,744

2,444

3,873

14,445

18,243

22,631

26, 731

24,648

13,414


TOTAL


128,2 43


As the number of candidates for the masters' degrees

increased, the conception of the master's the sis~ has undergone
4
modification. In some graduate schools the master's thesis

4
John Henry MacCraken, editor. American Universi-
ties and Colleges, The Williams and Wilkins Company, Balti-
more, 1932, Second Edition, revised and enlarged.


- -- ~ '--- ~-~~ `~ "-'


CT.~~I..I'.Yi.-**I...II_ *III.__L-l-- .111-----~4~.2 1- ^i-Y~ -. --.._-lii-l~jl I.~_ -I..~Yr)_~I_--L-IislillL.-.l..l-~)- ~L-_il -~- -.iY .P_--Tlil_C._-LLI .-1IY --l_-YI- -L-LI 1I11_----I.~-1









3


differ from the doctor's dissertation. When this is the case,

the candidate intending to qualify for the doctorate sometimes

takes the master's degree on the way, presenting for a thesis

a section of what ultimately becomes the doctoral dissertation.

Other institutions do not require a contribution to knowledge,

but expect a competent presentation of existing knowledge in

the form of a well written essay.

Most educational institutions require the writing of a

thesis. The claim for this requirement is that it provides

training in assembling and analyzing materials, and in pre-

senting the results in writing. A few institutions omit the thesis

requirement when training in assembling, analyzing, and

presenting results is attained through essays in individual courses.

Or, the thesis may be omitted when it seems desirable to sub-

stitute a different type of training, such as a problem, project

courses, or a written project.

The master's degree program had ts beginning at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University in 1945. The first degree

was awarded in 1947. From August. 1947, through August. 1953,


5
A. J. Brumbaugh, American Universities and Colleges
American Council on Education, Washington, D, C. Fifth edition,
1948, p. 47.











4


one hundred twenty-four candidates have received masters'

degrees. Of the one hundred twenty-four candidates, the

Master of Science degree in Education has been conferred on

eighty-seven. The Master of Science degree in Education

requires the writing of a thesis in partial fulfillment of require-

ments for graduation. This investigation is concerned with a

critical analysis of the eighty-seven theses submitted in partial

fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science degree

in Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

from August 1947, through August 1953.

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

The primary purpose of this study was to determine

the nature and amount of the research done in the eighty-seven

theses submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for

the Master of Science degree in Education at Florida Agricul-

tural and Mechanical University from August, 1947 through August,

1953. A secondary purpose of this investigation was to make a

personnel study of the authors of the theses submitted in partial

fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science degree

in Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical from August,

1947, through August, 1953.










5


The specific questions to be investigated were:

A. The theses:

1, What was the nature of the research pro-

duced in the eighty-seven theses submitted in

partial fulfillment of the requirements of the

Master of Science degree in Education at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Univer-

sity from August, 1947, through August,

19537

2. What was the amount of research produced

in the eighty-seven theses submitted in partial

fulfillment of the requirements of the Master

of Science degree at Florida Agricultural and

Mechanical University from August, 1947,

through August, 1953?

B. The authors:

I. What are some of the personal and social

characteristics of the authors of the eighty-

seven theses submitted in partial fulfillment

requirements of the Master of Science degree

in Education at Florida Agricultural and Me-

chanical University from August, 1947, through

August, 1953?










6

2. What are some of the professional characw

teristics of the authors of the these submitted

in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the

Master of Science degree in Education at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

from August, 1947, through August. 1953?

3. W hat are some of the civic and community

activities of the authors of the eighty-seven

these submitted in partial fulfillment of the

requirements of the Master of Science degree

in Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechani-

cal University from August, 1947, through August,

1953?

IMPOiTANCG OF THE STUDY

The findings of a study of this type should improve the guidance

function in a program for graduate students. Those who teach

research should know as much as possible about the character and

amount of research done in a local situation. They should also know

as much as possible about the research procedures and techniques

employed by students and in-service teachers in the solution of pro-

blems. With this knowledge, t astructors may take the immediate

needs of students into account in the construction of their courses.








7


This "aowledge is also needed for the guidance aof tudat in

selecttag and writing theses. Such information may poit out

areas in which additional studied might be mads with benefit.

It may also point out areas ai which Ulile r nothing caa be

added by further Investations. Fracks sad flDvis have recogL

alawd similar instructionl and guidance values of such a stdy.

This invetgation is designed to make a ceatrbto to the

guidanf fncttion for graduate st dnts at Florida Agricultural

sad Mechan.ical University.

SOURCES AND NATURE OF DATA

The sources and ature eof data for this study wre as

fellows:

Eg!hhty-! vn theos. .The ighty-sevn theses submitted

in the gradua t program from August. 1947, through August,

1953, provided the nams of the authors, ad n torrt regard-

ing types of research, amount of research, data gathering device

employed in the research, and staitistcal measures used in





provided the following Informationt sex, addresses of uthoers,
nayzn -data,



Franks, Paul r. aAd Davis. Robert A.,. "Changing
Teadeeies in Edu~Lcaoal &Aesearch," Journal of :assctional
R -rs-ch ~3: 145, January May, 93 ---









8


date of taittal reglstratln. for gradasf work. uadergraesite
major ad graduate major.

Quest.*i **aa Tah qutiettxakre provided Aafeormatte

*o tbh cbaracteriatice of tethers Jfh ty*eeve then.

eailysednl this stSy. bueh characteristics as these welr

nsrveyd: (4a) lmewr sad netas, (b) eccp fttemal states sad

aplngermet.
Sat a, (d) ccharh affillats, mad te) marital tat-s.*

Related Lierattrs. Jssualt of studies inl to this

anvetatea wre proa idp by review e reied litertares

GCo erl rferemcs. General roefresens prbavid ek-

gread iafe6sr ha for th stady.

BASIC ASSUMPTIfoS

The flloiag b epa ly t this avestigatie

Srre 0an A t, 1947, throtsgh Aust, 1953. *igty.

evn thes were bmtted Ia partSial fimnat 9~

the rflwtreaaett eore the Mdater of Seleane degros ia

darrttin at Ftlrida Agriculttu and M chaaicl

Usiveretty. No debt then theses have varted coasider

ably saneg themselves with respect to 2mo~nt of research,

-methoerlegy, tchaiqusr of Invtgattee, ads agaly7i of









9

results. It should prove of interest and of value to know

the nature and extent of this variation among the eighty-

seven theses.

2. When teacher of educational research have knowledge

of the frequency of the mmthodology and the techniques

used in investigation and analysis of the eightyoseven

theses submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements

for the Master of Stcince degree in Education at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University, they may take

these into account in the construction of courses for their

students.

3. If research is to be rewarding to the student and contribute

to education, those guiding students & in developing theses

must have knowledge of t areas f t e needed research and

the areas in which research is not likely to make a further

contribution.

DELIMITATIONS

The boundaries for this study hare been set by these

delimitations.

1. It has already been pointed out that the primary purpose

of this investigation was to determine the nature and

amount of research done in the eighty-seven theses sub-

mitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the








10


Master of Science degree in Education at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University from August,

1947, through August, 1953. Since there are few,

if any reliable or objective measures for determining

even the general quality of theses of the types analysed

this study omitted entirely the qualitative aspect of

output.

2. The author s of the eighty-seven theses mentioned above

have provided the data for analysis in the personnel

study of the investigators. They respond to a

questionnaire developed for that purpose. For unex-

plained reasons, all of the respondents failed to answer

one or more items in the questionnaire.

3. In this study normative survey is used to indicate

research which is concerned with ascertaining the

presence and prevalence of conditions prevailing in a

group of cases chosen for study. It is essentially a

method of quantitative description of the general charac-

teristics of the group.

The analysis of results was limited to percentages,

ranges, and averages.








11


4. Inasmuch as research categories are abstractions

designed to facilitate the classification of research,

the analysis of the eighty-ven theses in this study

is delimited by the subjectivity inherent in the wr iters

conception of Investigational methods. As a result

of this fact, it is likely that the resulting freq cies

would be somewhat different if the analysis were

repeated by anther worker.

DEFINITION O TEr~MS

C 5tegorie. In this study "categorise" mea essentially

a process of noting similarities and differeaces, delimiting concepts,

and fitting them into &at e lagrating scheme.

Aailyx i. In this study the word "a"alysi" is to be

interpreted &a an act of reducing or taking a part of a total perform.

ance in the process of identifying specific part or aspects.

Other terms. Because of the immediate importance of

certain concepts for understanding the analysis of fl adi a, their r

terms" will be defined in Chapter M.

METHOD OF PROCEDURE

The task of securing data and making the analysis involved

the following stepe:

Stp The eighty-seven theses analysed in this study were








12


procured from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School,

Stp. The data in these theses were analysed and

submitted to a master sheet.

Step 3. A questionnaire was developed to be submitted

to the authors of the eighty-seven these s analyzed in this study.

a. The addresses of the authors were taken from the

registration cards of the authors in the files of the

office of the Dean of the Graduate School.

b. Questionnaires (See Appendix A) were mailed to the

oighty-seven authors of the theses analysed. A letter

(See Appendix B) of transmittal and a self-addressed,

stamped envelope accompanied each quesp~ tiaaire.

c. Data from quettonnaires were submitted to a master

sheet to facilitate analysis.

Step 4 All data were categorized and presented: (a)

in tabular form, (b) statistically, and (c) descriptively.

More detailed and specific methods of procedure will be

presented at the appropriate places in this study.

ORGANIZATION OF THE STUDY

This study consists of four chapters. In Chapter I the

introduction to the thesis has been set forth. The problem has

been stated. The importance of the study has been discussed.

The sources and nature of data have been given. The basic assump-

tions have been presented. The delimitations have been set,









13

definitions of terms given, methodology employed outlined

and the plan of organisation set forth. In Chapter a review of

related literature is provided. In addition to definitions of special

terminology, Chapter II presents the results of the analysis

under two heading, (1) nature and amount of research and

(2) a personnel study of aut o thee ao f th eighty-seven these

under investigation. Chapter IV is a summary of significant

observation and conclusions.









CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE


Many studies have been made on the classification of

educational research. Only some of those that report results

similar to this investigation will be reviewed in this chapter.

Review of L;terature on Classification of Educational
1
Research. Theisen appears to be one f the first to study

the amount and character of research in education. He oated

in his study that the testing movement received the greatest

share of the research workers' attention and that the statitical

techanques used at that time held a promtent position.

In analysis tea well-known periodicals, several books,

bulletin, and monograph. Woody ted the nmber of

articles and pages devoted to the different types of research

for that year. These types included research in administration,

instruction, educational and mental tests, statistical methods,

and experimental studies.

The bibliography of research articles published by
3
Ashbaugh formed the basis for the presidential address at

1
W. W. Theisen, "Recent Progress in Educational Research,"
Journal of Educational Research, VIII (1923) pp. 301-14.

Clifford Woody, "Survey of EducataRal Research 1923,"
Journal of Educational Research, IX (1924) pp. 357-81.


3
3. J. Ahbaugh, "Bibligraphy of Research Articles,"
published 1924, Jurnal of Educatminal Research II (1928) pp. 368-79.








15


the Annual Meeting of the Educational Research Association in

1925. This bibliography was divided into the following categories.

asmel: (1) Administration, (2) Curriculum, (3) educational

Tests, (4) Intelligence Tests, (5) Other types of tests, (6) Statistics

and (7) Misellaneous. According to the listings there was mre

research i. the area of Administration than any of the other areas.

Research in the Curriculum area ranked second.
4
Good made a study of one thousand three hundred fifty-

nine doctoral theses completed in education from 1918 to 1929 and

of five hundred eightyunine theses underway in 193$ 31. The

titles of the doctorate theses auderway were collected from twenty-

six graduate schools. The study showed that many graduate students

had been and were school administrators and supervisors. There.

fore, a large number of the theses completed and those that were

still underway were nl the field of administration and supervision.

A comparison of the total number of theses completed in psychology

and measurement with these underway in pscyhology and measurement

indicated that the research in this field was on the decrease. A

large number of theses was listed under the heading "Special Subject"

as compared to a much smaller number of "General Method and

Theory. V The study further revealed a considerable amount of interest

4
Carter V. Good, "Doctor's Theses Underway in Education,
1930031," Journal of Educational Research XXIII (January 1931).









16

shown in problems of moral, religious and character education.

There was not a single thesis underway in art education and only

a relatively small number was listed in other subject areas as:

commercial education, foreign language, home economics,

industrial arts, and music. The major type of research carried

on in conducting these ta ae was the normative survey. Approxti

lately oneihinth of all doctoral theses completed or underway

involved either the historical or legal eth of investigation. He

concluded that the fields which seemed, on the basis of frequency,

most in need of historical studies were psychology and measurement,

and elementary education
5.
In 1930 Frank and Davis conducted a study to analyze

the character and amount of scientific research in education covering

the forty-year period 1890 to 1929. The study was concerned with

general tendencies in educational practice and methdogy and

involved two thousand three hundred eighty-seven articles or 32, 109

pages from thirteen periodicals. They presented their findings

according to the amount of scientific research produced with regard

to: (1) method and techniques employed, (2) the various levels of

education, and (3) the several fields of education. Their study


5
Paul R. Franks and Robert Davis, "Changing Tendencies
in Educational Research, Journal of Educational Research XXIII
(January May 1931).









17


revealed the following (1) comparatively small amounts of re-

search using the historical, legal, comparative survey, and

case study methods, (2) a large number of articles which used

the questionnaire-core espondence and interview methods, and

(3) marked increase of statistical method since 1910. According

to levels, the largest amount of research was done on the

elementary level and the least on the higher education level.

Franke concluded that with the increased emphasis upon pre-

school and early childhood training that investigations on the

elementary level would continue unabated, and research in the

field of guiance was becoming more attractive as a field of study.

It has been previously pointed out that classifying research
6
is no easy matter. Barr recognized this problem and arranged

a symposium on the classification of research. He had several

outstanding specialists to prepare independent preliminary

statements upon the classification of research. After these pre-

liminary statements were received by Barr, he had them

mimeographed and returned to the authors with the request that

they be re-read carefully and revised in the light of the statements



A. S r.Barr, John C. Almack, et aL, "A Symposium on
the Classification of Research," Journal of Educational Research,
23: 353-382 (May 1931).









18


from other participats in the symposium. The revised

statements were placed In the hands of three critics, who

prepared brief comments on the discussion as a whole One

critic suggested that: "classification be based on the fild in

which research is carried on (subject matter), the place where

it is carried on (field or laboratory), or character of the data

(quqasitative or qualitative).

Another sadt "the search for a logical clarificatteo

of methods e research seems fStile, and that educational

research is much more likely to be troubtod by tBe difficulty

of fulftiing the commandment a science 'divide et imper'

than by confusion as to methods of research."

In summarising his observations, another critic stated:

Research is primarily careful and extended
study with a fairly definite aim or problem implied.
There may b as many different kinds of research
as there are kinds of such studies, but for the pur-
pose of this symposium three kinds of research are
recognized: scientific, historical, and philosophic.

Woody studied two hundred seventeen investigations dealing

with educational research in 1923-24. Of the two hundred seventeen

investigations he examined he made six categories with the following



Clifford Woody, "A Survey of Educational Research in
1923," Journal of Educational Research, IX (1924) pp. 357-81.









19


distribution: twenty-eight articles dealt with administration;

thirty-two articles dealt with instructioa sity-nue articles

dealt with educational and mental tests; sixty-three dealt in

statistical toda; seven dealt with experimental studies; and

eleven dealt with miscellaneous research.

An analysis of four hundred twenty-six theses that had been

sumitoted in the College of Education at the University of Florida
8
was made by Hall in 1950 Ball said:

In view atof the fact that well over r hundred
theses have been written under the direction of the
College of education covering thirty-six years, it
now seems advisable to make an inventory of what
has been doae. The faculty of the College of Education
should know where the emphasis has been a subject
matter and research procedures in order that it may
provide adequate caUnseling in the future.

Hall classified the research by methods into five categories,

namely: (1) survey. (Z) case study, (3) historical, (4) experi-

mental, and (S) qcommat He then categortied the for hundred

twenty-six studies by subject areas and fmnt that he had groped

them under fourteen different headings. The largest a t of

production dealt with some form of pupil guidance, especially

those written after World War U. Only a small number f studies


8
William R. Mail, "An Analysis of Masters' Theses,
University of Florida, College of Education," University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.










20


dealt wit supervision per so Eightyefive per cent of the studies

under investigation by Hall used the survey method. The histori-

cal method ranked second. On the basis of frequency, the

questionnaire was the most important data gathering device for

the studies analysed. School, county, and juvenile court records

ranked second as data gathering sources.

Review of Literature on Per onal Traits of Research Persons.

Several studies on personal traits of research persons have

been made. Coe9 said:

It is difficult and probably undesirable to prescribe
the kind of training for research. It is more feasible
to suggest the trai-nig results to look for. Some of
these are: ability to handle data quantitatively; a
broad basic nde*r standing in fields related to the field
of specialisation a fair mastery of some field such as
psychology; sociology, economic school administra-
tion, school finance, curriculum construction, or
statistics; and an intimate ldge of some more
limited area within the major field, As a maitmm
of experience, for the lower levels of research work,
some acqwuitance with pMblic schoosis i important.
It matters less what this position is than that the worker
profited by the experiences. Experience has shown that
it takes from one to two years for a person with adequate
training and with this minimum of experience to carry
on research work with some dependence
10
As a secondary purpose Hall presented an analysis of

personnel information on the candidates that received masters'

'Warren W. Cone, "Planuing and Administering Educational
Research, Journal of Educational Research, 3* 368e79



Hall, lo:. cit.. 53 pp.




21


degrees from the University of Florida in the College of Education.

His study showed:

1. That 41. 80 per cent of the candidate who received

their Master of Arts degree in Education from the

University of Florida were natives of Florida.

2. That the a t th g the time of receiving the degree ranged

from twenty-on to sextyafour years. The median age was

thirty-five.

3. That of the four hundred twentysix authors, 53. 72 per

cent of them received their adergraduate degree at

the University of Florida. The largest number of candid

dates to receive degrees were classroom teachers, with

principals next. The range in experiences as teachers

was from an year to thirty-ight. The median number

of years experience was seven.
11
BuEwell made a study of some of the characteristics of

two hundred forty-two persons who were granted the masters

degree by the University of Chicago during the three-year period

1924-27. He found:


---T --------
G. T. Buswell, "A Personal Study of Students who Have
"w ARenoived the Masters' Degree from the University of Chicago,
School and jSociety 25: 730-36 June 19, 1927.









U2


1. That th median ge of this group at the time of

receiving bachelors' degrees wa twenty-aix

years, ranging from nineteen to fifty-three years.

At the time of securing master' degrees, the

median age of the group was thIrty-three years,

racing from twenty-one to ffty*aine years.

2. That the median time between receiving the two

degrees vas six years, ranging from e to

thirtywone years. The median ranber df yearn

teaching experience was nine, raging from no

years to thirty*mrven years.

3. That the two hundred forty-two persona had received

their undergraduate degrees from one hundred fifteen

different iastitition seated in thirty-three different

state and two foreign countries.

4. That of the two hundred forty-two candidates, ee

hundred twety-two were married; on hundred four-

teen were not married, and no information was available

n the other six. At the time of complete their

graduate work, forty-three of the married students had

no children; thirty had one child; twenty-eight had two








23


children eight had three; one had five; mad one had

six. There was ao informati on seven candidate.

S. That of the oe hundred venaty-ftre men and ,t1ty.

seren wonmea included in the study, both groups

received the bachelors degree at the same median

ago. The smdian age for the masters' degrees was

thirtyafive year afor women as compared with thirty.

three years for men. The median Ccl exporiance

for women was ouar years greater than that for men.

Only six per ct of thet woen were marrid as com-

pared to seventy per cent of the men.
12
In 1929 Wilson made a study o two thousand fifty-five

persons upon whom the University of Chicago had conferred the

Doctor of Philosophy degree from June 1893 to June 1927. He

sought nanwerS to ht folUowing questions: What proportion

of the candidates would enter into rcademic work and carry oa

the sam type of service as the instructors who made possible

their training? To what extent would the graduates enter iato

anosacatdemic types of service, either private or plbdic, in which

they could do a line of work similar to that of their major depart.

mentsa Similarly, how many would enter ns-academic fields

O. Wtlg" sona "_What the Chicafgo Doctor of Philosophy
Are Doing." School and Seciety 29: 815-18, June 22, 1929.









24


which have little or nothing A common with their major training?

And, what proportion would pass from this ife before their span

of service should naturally come to a clo-se?

WVilso found that 69, 2 per cent of all the graduate wre

t eacha Of this number 20. 9 per cent were teacin th

aubects ef their major preparation and 7. 99 per cent we

teaching subjects different from their major ppara~. Of the

graduates who were e~eaged i n moacademtic activities, 13. 7

per cent were engaged in service similar ln caters to that of te

dlpartmont of major preparation. The per cent of students egaged

in soMaacademic work entirely different from that of their major de-

patment was 4. 52. Of the two the d fifty-five graduates

4. 86 per cent were narle&l, although age differences apparently

were ot;a actor.
13
urwell made another study of individuals receiving the

Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Chicago in

1927 and 1928 to ascertain answers to question about how much

time elapsed between the approval of the thesis subject and final

acceptance of the completed dissertatioL? What did your thesis

cost? And how did yeo select your problem? He fouadn

---_-- ..,-- ,, _-----,---------=
13
G. T. Buerell, "Research and the Degree of Doctor of
Philosophy." Journal of Educational Research Vol. .XXI.r
(January May 1931) T. 148.









25


1. That the time varied greatly. One person received

his doctor's degree in five months, while another

person required twenty years to complete his work.

2, That of the one hundred seventy-four replies

received, twenty-five per cent cost less than

one hundred twenty-ive dollars. The upper twenty-

five per cent cost five hundred forty-two dollar;

while eleven dissertations involved expenses over

one thousand six hundred dollars each.

3. That sixty-three per cent of the candidates selected

their own problem; twenty per cent of the problems

were proposed by faculty; fourteen per cent grew out

of joint conferences and three per cent had problems

suggested to them by someone other than a member of

the faculty.

He concluded that:

While the selection of a ppor problem may be
prevented by careful criticism of the proposed subject
by the faculty, the fact remains that the limited per*
spective of the student at the time he must begin his
research frequently results in the selection of a poor
problem which would have been avoided had the student
been more mature.









36


Greea conducted a study on the ife of Negro holders

of Doctor of Philoeophy degrees and aaociate degree from

1876 to 1943. His prpoee was to present as accurate and

cmpet a pictur e as psebl of the statu of dterte

azona Negro ina; the hoLPua thel.at .mesr plnwitaL sa this

reaof experience might reeure a more factual buat for

Iralisa~tis and a sueadbr suene of direct ia d ctio~

plart g. He centered his study aroad tsi qu to: (1)

How many Negroee in Amerrica hav Doctor of Philosophy degrees

or equivalent degrees? (3) What is the scarce and quality of

thee doctorates? (3) In what field or areas of concetration

was study for the doctoratee d'o1? (4) What is the extent of

the research and creative output? (5) What were the osccpatio

of the holders of the doctratek degrees? and () What were

aigafancat fcideants to the posseesion of the doctorate degrees?

He found"

1. That siace 1876 at least three h .adged Leghtyas e

persaoa fd Negro decent had been grated the


14
Harry W. Greasen Ioder af Doctorate Am

nT??Sr -aK--









27


Doctor of Philosophy degree or its academic

equivalent. From 1875 through 1929 only fifty-en

Doctor of Philosophy degrees had beoe conferred

upon American Negroes. But from the period

1930-43, a period of just fourteen years, three

hundred sixteen Negroes had the homor bestowed

upon them.

1. That the equivalent degrees held by the persons n

the study were Doctor of Education, Doctor of uarti

dical Scence, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science,

Doctor of Modorn Language, Doctor of Public

Health, and Doctor of Social Science.

3. That the three hundred sixty-eight doctorate degrees

held by the person in th pron is study came from fifty-

seven institutions; fourteen of which were foreign.

The University of t Chicago mainvatid ite twenty-year

lead over all institutions that had granted doctorate

degrees to Negro students. But this fact seems even

more noteworthy when it is known that all such degrees

awarded by the University of Chicago were Doctor of

Philosophy while in the case of Columbia, Pennsylvania.

and Harvard, other doctoral degrees were included.







28


4. That on the basis of the investigation, there seemed

to be no question as to standard or quality of the

doctorate degrees. The large majority of the insti-

tutias that granted them were ranked very highly within

the circle of American scholarship.

5. That fifty colleges and universities had conferred

.two hundred ntnety-six masters' degrees or equivalent

degrees on the candidates studied. Thirteen of these

persome received masters' degrees from Howward

University.









29


SUMMARY

This chpater has been devoted to the task of presenting

related literature on methodology and personal traits of

research persons. It has been divided into two parts; the first

sect*in presented the results of several studies on the classi-

fication of educational research according to method. One of the

first persons to study the amount and character of research in

education was Theisen. He noted in his study that the testing

movement was receiving the greatest share of the research

persons' attention The normative survey method as revealed

by Franke and Davis was the most widely used and the questiton-

naire the most popular data gathering device.

The second part of the chapter was devoted to reviewing

literature on personal traits of research persons. Such factors

as age, (at the time of receiving bachelors' and masters'

degrees). Various colleges from which degrees were granted

and positions held were reported. The University of Chicago

lead all institutions in conferring the Doctor of Philosophy degree

upon Negroes.









CHAPTER m

NATURE AND AMOUNT OF R SARCH P PRODUCED AT FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY FROM
AUGUST, 1947, THROUGH AUGUST, 1953


It has already been pointed out that this study deals with a

critical analysis of the eighty-seven theses submitted in partial

fulfillment of the r equirernets for the Master of Scienc degree

in Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

from August, 1947, through August, 1953. The results of the

analysis are presented in this chapter.

The study has been divided into two parts and presented

(1) in tabular form, (2) statitcally, and (3) descriptively. The

parts are as f allows: The first part presents the results of the

analysis of the eighty-seven theses surveyed in this study; the

second part presents the results of the analysis of the character-

istice of the author of the eighty-seven theses analysed in this

study.

ANALYSIS O THE EIGHTY-SEVEN THESES SURVEYED

Specific methods of procedure used in analysng the eighty-

seven theses entailed creating workable categories to facilitate

the handling of data. Generally, the abundance of research in

recent years has been so varied in character that considerable

confusion about meaning and classification has resulted. According










31


I
to Good, Barr, and Scates this contuion appear to develop

from three conditions: (1) there may be disagreement as to the

scope of such expresatons as research, scientific, experimental,

statistical, and so forth; (2) the use of the name of a phase or

part of the research process to describe the total activity,

questionnaire or descriptive, for example is misleading; and (3)

the material may fail to indicate clearly the point of view from which

classifications ar&e made.

Continuing their argument, Good, Barr, and Scates point

out that methods of research may be classified from many points

of view: (1) fields to which applied education, biology, history, and

other subjects (2) place where conducted e field or laboratory,

13) applicat ion -* pure or applied research, and many other such

classifications.

It is recognised, then, that the differentiation of research into

specific categories for this study is somewhat arbitrary. However,

the classification is based on understanding acquired from two

courses taken in research, a study of related literature, studying


1
Carter V. Good, A. S. Barr, Douglas Scates, The
Methodology of Ed.ucational Reearch (Appleton-CenturyeCrofts,
Inc., New York, 193 5), p. 2.

Ibid., p, 207.









3Z


tables of content in technical books on research, and the aspects

of research indicated in Chart With little modification, the chart

was taken from Good, Barr and Scates.

When each ef the eightyt-seven theses was investigated, it was

evaluated in terms of the method indicated in the fitrt column and itf

distinguithing characteristics in the corresponding cells to the

right of the first column. If the thesis met the majority of these

characteristics, it was so classified.

SPLCIA1IZED TERMINOLOGY

General Administration and S rviion. Throughout this

tivestigatipn, "general admai tration ad su pervision" means any

studies which have for their purposes the improvement of instruc-

tion.

Attendance. For this purpose all studies dealing with

drop-outs, migratory students, or absenteeiasm t any form are

included in this category.

Communitychoo Relations. This clasatfication include

studies dealing with surveys of public opinion concerning the

school, public rilatonas programs, and local parent-teacher groups.

Curriculum Because of the may versions the cu rrieicurm,

some over-lapping may exist between this and other subjtcrts. but

for this study the curriculum is concerned with the directed

experiences for students uader the suprviston of the school.






CHART I


SOME DISTINISHING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MAJOR REACH METHODS


Method Source o Data Type of Contrel Typical Purposs ypi

I. Historical Direct obsrvatton taeontroUled ob- Accurate record of past Verbal expoi
as ea eyo witn aes servation events interpretai
indirect observa. Status of phenomena at
ties though given time
documents, remains, ZntOrpretation -ad evalua-
and eye witne sses tioa of presert-day pro-
blems ad procedures
Determination at causal

. flormsrle Direct observation, Chiely uncen Status sad coznpariona Measures o
Survey u as the interview troUled observatiod of objects and coSt- tendency as
and meaurem*nt; but controlled in tions at the present time
IndirO t obtsrva- the cae of testing. (In some caes Casual
tlon, thogh quws relatikonship may be
tionrrn check- involved.)
lists, ste.
3. Expenrlme.n Direct iobertio Controlled oiXf~bsr- Deermi of cPaal Asmounts an
tal and mearsumment ration relationships, evaluation of experimn
*ad comparison experi- duced chang
mentally of educational
procedures.
No- W M -b--- ON 0 --w_ .- ... ~1~1- ~ ~---- -I___. I -L_ ..- ~- ~-_ 11- ~


ms or
ults

sition and








f central
d variability






nally pr. i






Chart I (Continued)


Method Source of Data Type of Control Typical Purposs Stating R.
P-MMOM, MO-PM-0 A 4-Statingsm Zesi-


Alt.
-rMI"1-- -


4. Other methods
especially adapted
to studying com-
plen caual rela-
tionships
(a) Casual Corm-
parative

(b) Corelation




(c) Case St udy





(d) Gene0tic


Direct obtirvation
and measurement

Direct observation
and measurement



Direct and indirect


documentary evi-
deance

Direct observation
and measurOement


Uncontr oled ob-
servation

Chi4fly uncfn-
trolled observa-
tion


Chiefly ufea
tSElled observa-
tdon



Controlled and aun-
controlled observa-
tlon


Determination of
casual relationships

Determination of casal
relationships and pre-
dictions


Determination of
casual relationships




Determination of change
growth, aad develop.
merant
Discovery of charac-
teristic traits and
norms at different
age levels
Determination of csual
relationships


Group likeness and
differences

Coefficients of correla-
ties amplel, partial,
and multiple) and re-
gression equations


Individual case
histories



Growth norms







35


Foundations. For this investigation, "foundations" in-

iude all studies that refer to the various subject offerings of

a school.

Guidance. This classification includes all studies which

can be used as aids to pupils in more wisely purposing, planing,

executing, and evaluating their own activities.

School Plant. All studies concerning the physical

settings, needs, or present facilities of a school are included

in this category.

Normative Survey method. The "normative survey

method" is used to indicate research which is concerned with

ascertaining the presence and prevalence of conditions prevail.

ing in a group of cases chosen for study. It is essentially a

method of qenafl tti.ve description of the general characteristics

of the groups.

The Historical Method, The "historical methd" of

research constitutes a systematic record of mnique events. On

the basis of past events, the historical method attempts to

develop fruitful generalizations that may act as controls of

behavior in the present and future. Its procedure is the analysis

and interpretation of past experience.









36


The Experimetal Method. The experimentall methods"

of research attempts to control all essential factors nt a

problem situation except a single variable, in which cae the

variable is manipulated with view at determining and measuring

the effects of itt operation

Other Methods. The "other methods in this investiga-

tion are interpreted as being any study not employing either of

the three methods named previously. It includes: canal

comparative, correlation, and case study investigatie"s.


CLASSIFICATION OF THESES

In the attempt to classify the theses in this study, it seemed

logical t a the question, what was the anmunt of research

produced by the eighty-seven authors of theses written at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University from August, 1947, through

August, 1953? Table I throws some light on this question. An

examination of the table shows that the number of candidates

for the Master of Science degree in Educ n creased progressive.

ly from one mandate in 1947 to thirtyetwo candidates in 1953, except

in 1948 and 1?49 when there were no graduates. The classes of

1952 and 1953 accounted for 71. 26 per cent of the total number of

studies included in this investigation. The same two classes produced









37


TABLE II

DISTRIBUTION OF THE EIGHTY-SEVEN THESES AT FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY BY YEAR
AND AMOUNT (1947-1953)*


THESES PAGES
YEAK Number Percent Number Percent

1947 1 1.15 60 1.21

1950 10 11. 49 557 11. 26

1951 14 16.09 813 16.44

1952 30 34.48 1, 741 35.20

1953 32 36.78 1,775 35. 89

TOTAL 87 99.99 4,946 100.00

* No Graduates in 1948 and 1949.

three thousand five hundred sixteen pages of research, or 71. 09

per cent of the total number of pages produced at Florida Agricul-

tural and Mechanical University during the period covered in this

study. Other questions to be answered were: What was the distri-

bution of these eighty-seven theses by method? What was the

distribution of these eighty-seven theses by subject matter ? What

was the distribution of these eighty-seven theses by amount?

Table III provides answers to the above questions.

From the standpoint of frequency, the Normative Survey

Method is the most widely used of all methods; however, quite

often incidence with a low frequency, may be more important than








38


om with a high frOequncy. Of eghty-seven tudis caadcted

during the period exteding from August, 1947, through

Autgut, 1953, at Florida Agricttural and i chlan Universty,

sirxtyfive. or 74. 71 por cent used the Normative Sarvey Mathod.

Analysing the table further, out oaf total production of four

thousand foir hundred alnety-six pages af research for the

period under iavestigatio, hree the seven hundred forty-four

pages6 or 75, 70 per cent were dvotod to the Mrmative Survey
4
Method. Good's tuady in 1930 showed sevety per ceat 1 the

students conductiag research at twfaty si different tverarttles

ued the Normative Survey Method. HMalls sty ceactd at

the University of Florida in 1950 showed &. 60 per comt of the

studies were made by the Norma1tive Srvey Method.

Under the Historical Methd, it can be seen that nine

candidates for the Mastr of Sctece degree la Education during the

period ot this study employed this mothd.

The atne tudies ctitut 10. 34 per ceat a all the

investigations conducted at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University during ta period covered in ths study. In most

graduate schools, the Historical Method of reach is net
.......-__4-_----;- -------:_-_ _ltz 2 _1_2:
Cartr V. Good, MethodelJgy s~of Educata~kl R arch_
(Appleta CenturywCro ac.f ti ew TYrkf 1935).3

5William 1. Hall, "An Analysis of Masters' Theses in
Educati,. Uaivrerity ef Florida (191 ~1949)" Gaiaesville, Florida.







TABLE III

DISTRIBUTION OF EIGHTY-SEVEN THESES AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY BY
METHOD, SUBJECT-MATTER AREA, AND AMOUNT (1945-1953)


Forative Survey Historical Me a erM. etod xperm. o Other Methods Total
x- A- Ai Alll AU An Al --An A- Al--
Subject Area Thbess -', Pages Theses Pages Theese Pages Theses Pages Theses Pages
No. % No. No. 5 No. No. No. % No. % No. 5 No. No. %
Administration &
Supervision 13 14.94 646 13.06 1 1.15 50 1 01 1 1.15 42 0.85 15 17.23 738 14.92
Attendance 7 8.05 416 8.41 1 1.15 37 0.75 8 9.20 453 9.16

Community.
School Relations 6 6.90 339 6.85 6 6.90 339 6.85

Curriculum 5 5.75 336 6.79 1 1.15 59 1.19 6 6.90 395 7.98

Foundations 18 20.69 1128 22.80 7 8.05 399 8.07 4 4.6 267 5.4 4 4.60 164 3.32 33 37.93 1958 39.59

Guidance 13 14.94 715 14.46 1 1.15 41 0.83 2 2.30 143 2.89 16 18.39 899 18.18

School Plant 3 3.45 164 3. 32 3 3.45 164 3.32

TOTAL 65 74.71 3744 75.74 9 10.34 508 10.27 6 6.90 345 6.98 7 8.05 349 7.06 87 100.00 4946 100.00









40


encouraged in the solution of a thesis problem, since it is not

generally considered as adding new evidence to the accumulated
6
tore of knowledge. The Historcal Method ranked second to the

Nermative surrey in uIse The same trend was shown in Good's

study iLa929 and Ha' study in 1950.

The section under Experimental Method shows that there

was a total of six studies or 6.90 per cent of all research produced

employed the sperimental Method.

The section under "Other Methods" shows that the authors

of seven studies employed aome method other than Normative

Survey Method. Historical Method, or Experimental Method. The

distribution of the seven studies employing "Other Methods"

according to subject matter area are: one in Administration and

Supervision, two in Guidance andfour in the Foundations. The

absence of entries in many of the spaces in Table I is to be noted.
9
According to Brownell,

The blank spaces in tables are fully as significant


Good,. Ic. cit. p. 280.

tid.

William R. Hall. "An Analysis of Masters Theses fa n Educa-
tion," University of Florida (1912-1949) Gainesville.

WWilliam A. Brrownell cited by Good (p. 346) Methodology
of Educational RZeasrch, Appleton-Century-Crofts. Inc.. NewYork.








41


as are the spces in which amber htav been eatered.
They show that certain classes of problems have nat
ben attacked by certain tcha qus ad iula on
to cosider whether a contr ibutin could be made in
those areas.

The area of ceommun tyOschool relations hows that .X2 six

studies were doA by the Normativ Survey Method. These six

studies rereesnted three hundred thirty-te paes or 6. 85

per cean of aul research pres at Florida Agricultural and M*e

chanical University. it is o testing to eote that the dit~ributt

of these studies by sea is even. The three men ace d for

mam hundred eilbty of th three hundred thrty-ala pags of the

research produced in this area.

How much of the research produced at Florida Agricultural

and Mechanical University from AgPust. 1947. thrgh August,

1953, was daoe by mera A brTakdown of the these by mhthfd,

sex. year, ad iao 'nt i p "rovided in TablK IV. Table IV

revels that women tended to vary their research mthods' more than

men. They exceeded menn i the use of all mtd with the exception

of the Normative Srvey Method. Twentyeight women or &xty

five per cent of the women as caupared with thirty-even mena or

eightyfour per cent of the men *mploy]d that method Although

the women employed a greater variety of method In their research,

the men produced a greater amount of research in their studies.

Forty-foar mnn produced two thouanad five hundred sixtcy-seven







42


pages of research for an average of 58. 6 pages per thesis, while

fortyathree women produced two thousand three hundred seventy

nine pages of research, or an average of 55. 3 pages per thesis.

The two thusan d five hunde d sixtyeseven pages of research pro-

duced by men during the period represented 51. 9 per cent of the

total production and the two thousand three hundred seventy-nine

pages produced by women, te thother 48. 1 per cent.

Table V presents a distribution of the eightyoseven studies

nciuded in this investigation according t tthe levels of the school

on which the studies wore *ade. Upon exa-mning Table V, it

can be seen that elementary education leads all other levels in the

amount of research. Thsiss anot unusual. In 1930, Fransk and
10
Davia conducted a study covering forty yea r from 1890*1929

and they found that elementary ldMtaiWm bad held a ceaspleuwes

position in amat of research produced on that level from 1890

to 1930. Franke expressed the opil that with increased em

phases upon pre-school and early childhood training that

investigates on the elementary level wold continue unabated.
11
One marked difference was noted here from Franks's


Paul it. Franks and Robert Davis, *Changing Tendeaicies
in Educational Research' Jour'al .f s:d',atioaal Research X XI
(January May 1931).

SItbid.






TABLE IV


DISTRIBUTION OF THE EIGHTY-SEVEN THESES AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
UNIVERSITY BY METHOD, SEX, YEAR AND AMOUNT (1947-1953)



Thesis Thesis Thesis Thesis Thesis Thesis
Method a Sex5 No, Pages No Pge N. Pages No. Pages No. Pages No. Pages No. Pages

1i/ Sperimental
Male 1 37 1 1 41 2 ?78
Female 2 97 2 170 4 267

2. Historical
Male 2 88 1 99 3 187
Female 1 50 1 63 4 208 6 321

3. Normative Survey
Male 6 319 4 26 3 14 940 13 679 37 201 4
Female 1 60 3 201 6 377 9 463 9 442 28 1543

4. Other
Male 2 101 2 101
Female I A6 3 146 1 76 5 248


TOTAL 1 60 10 557 14 813 30 1741 32 1775 87 4946


46
w


Per
Cent


1.58
5. 40


3.78
6.49


14. 50
31. 19


2. 04
5.01


99.99








44


tnvetigatiaonthat was the ticroand number of studies dealing
12
with higher education. Hall' s study sh d tat the largest number

of theses in his investigation dealt with 180oa form at pupil g dance;

howevr, he did not cateori. s hibs study according to levels.


O~.5jct.









45


TABLE V

DISTRIBUTION OF THE EIGHTY-SEVEN THESES AT FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY BY AMOUNT
AND LEVELS OF SCHOOL ON WHICH PRODUCED (1947-1953)


LEVELS

Elementary

College

Combination School

Junior High School

Kinder gar ten

Nursery School

Senior High School

General Studie s*


THESES
Number Percent

25 28.74

13 14.94

4 4.60

11 12.64

1 1.15

1 1.15

19 21.84

13 14.94


PAGES
Number Percent

1429 28.29

828 16.74

213 4.31

599 12. 11

73 1. 48

61 1.23

1120 22.64

623 12.59


TOTAL 81 100.00 4946 100.00

* General Studies includes studies that were produced at no par-*
ticular level of the schooL

Table VI shows the distribution and per cent of devices

employed in major methods of research at Florida Agricultural

and Mechanical University 1947-1953. Of the eighty* seven studies

conducted during this period, sixty-six, or 75.86 per cent used

the questionnaire. Documentary evidence ranked second with

thirty-five, or 40. 23 per cent.


MOVARYMiM
WAMONOUNN






TABLE VI


DISTRIBUTION AND PER CENT OF JUDGEMENT MAKING DEVICES EMPLOYED IN THE MAJOR METHOD
OF RESEARCH AT FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL I ITY (1947-1953)


TYPES AND PER CENT OF DEVICE
DOCumeptary
METHOD OF RESEARCH Evidence Interview Observations Questionnaire Test
No. PercenNo.o. Percent No. Percent No. Percent No. Percent

ExperiEmental 2 2.30 6 6.90

Historical 9 10. 34 3 3.45

Normative Survey 20 22.99 5 5. 75 56 64.37 17 19.54

Other 6 6.90 3 3.45 7 8.05 2 2.30


TOTAL 35 40.23 8 9.2Z0 2 2.30 66 75.86 25 38.74


%S








47


What were th undergraduate majors of the athors of

the thesesesi t his study? What were their graduate majors?

In what areas did they do their research?

According to Table VII. Elementary Edcation provided

the largest field of concentratis for the uadrgraduate majors.

Administration and Supervision was the area of largest

cecentratlon for graduate majors. More research was done

in the area E lme*B ,ary a-Education than any other area.

Of the sx udergraduate majors i agriculture, who

catered the graduate program, four majored in AdministratOa

and Supervialeon me majored in industrial arts and ely one

remainmed In agriculture. Research was dens ia the same areas

as the gradurat majors.

Of the thirtywthree rdergraduate majors in eleentary

education, feurtoee, or 31. 8 per cent majored t Adnmtittration

and Supervisoae on the graduate level, fiften, or 45. 5 per cent

rma in the area of Elementary Education, while oae majored

in Englih. and three concentrated in the Social Sciences. The

thirtysthree undergraduate majors in Elamautary Edcaion did

research projects ua follows: seventeen in the area of Elementary

Education, ten in guidance, three Ia social studies, and three in

audio-viaual edaea~ta.




TABLE VII
DI.STPKUTIOI.T, C EIGHTYSEV$NEN TIES ITIJ7A D.G0"QPTTTURAL kVD P2TAiiPTOL WIIrITY I'ORIl T NDE0fi
94 (17-91953)
*J~~~~yry~~- "ly vf -1111111 v- *'*'. **- '~-- *-



K' ^.^SSS^SI ___ ys -ss '^


X'iDUATf., AREA





AWPM
.mrim
,


Agriculture

Audio Visual
SEducatiaon.

Biology

Business

i Chemistry

Elementary
Education

: English
SHome Economics
Industrial Arts
Mathematics
Music
SPhysical Ed.
Social Studies
TOTALS


6


5


2


13


A4


1


2


6


2


6 5 3 2 33 141 2 6 2


4 1




a 2

2

2









1
12 9
1 12 At i 2


I


I


15`
J10


1


X 1
I


a


21 0 1 2


~-~- ~1~ 1~---` c~-` --~~~ ---*-~~rr ~ ~ lFrrL~l,, ---- --~r-Y-UIJ ~L~ I IIIIpI


1

2


7 115


I


x


a


1


.1


,10


72


1
1.,.


1


'2
S3 ~4 22 7 16 4 __


AJIOR


Admini.s-


tratioa


.___ I I- --I~V~-L


- -,., ,,,,.... _... __


#;%OJ6 -6 4rCu










There were fourteen undergraduate majors in English. As

graduate students, five, or 35.7 per cent majored ia Administra-

tin and Supervision, eight. or 57. 1 pr cent re id in the area

of Eaglish and one majod in Elementary Education. The four

teo undergraduate majors in English did their research studies as

follow: five in the ,area of Administration and Supervision.

seven remand in the area of Englsh, and two in the area of

Guidance. The only subjectematter areas at the undergraduate

level that failed to produce a major n Administration and Supervi

*ion at the graduate level were HImo Economics, Music, and

Physical Education.

I-duetrial arts area produced only two undergraduate majors.

As grdwate students both majored in Administration and Super

vision and did their research in industrial arts.










50


SUMMARY


The first part of this study has been concerned with

the nature and amount of research produced at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University from August, 1947

through August, 1953. It has been noted that there were

four thousand four hundred ninety-six pages of research

produced and of this total, men accounted for two thousand

five hundred sixty seven pages, or 51. 9 per cent of the

production, while women accounted for two thousand three

hundred seventy-nine pages, or the other 48. 1 per cent of

the total production. Based on frequency, the Normative

Survey was the most frequently used method and the ques-

tionnaire was the most widely used of all data-gathering devices.








51


PART II

PERSONNEL STUDY OF THE CANDIDATES
RECEIVING THE MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN EDUCATION


The purpose of the second part of this study is to present the

results of the personnel study on the authors of eighty-seven

theses presented in partial fulfllment of requirements for the

Master of Science degree in Education at Florida Agricultural and

Mechanical University August, 1947, through August, 1953.

Only seventy athors responded t tthe questionnaire designed for

this purpose at least one other had deceased, and no information

was available on the other sixteen.

Intelligent and useful citizens belong to and participate in
13
organizations appropriate to their interest and competence.

Table VIII shows the extent to which seventy of these authors

participated in the socio-civic organizations in their areas. Many

of these belonged to as many as three organizations, while eleven

had no connection with any organisation. The NAACP claimed

the top spot. One male candidate was connected with the Boy

Scouts organization and one female candidate served as Committee

Woman for the Girl Scouts.



Harry W. Greene, Holders of Doctorates Among Negroes,
(Boston, Meadow Publishing Company, 1946), p. 224.









52


TABLE VIl
DISTRIBUTION OF THE AUTHORS OF THE SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
ACCORDING TO PARTICIPATION IN SOCI00CM ORGANIZATIONS
(1947-1953)

... .. Jr. ... ... --J~-.~ I-_ C-_.. _2 I2 .. . . ... ... ... .. .. _~~ ~ ---}C--L _. _-- ""III~ C .. ... ...... ... .. .... .


MEMBER


Business League

Chamber of Commerce

Federated Clubs

Frontiers of America

Girl Scouts (committee woman)

NAACP

Red Creaoss

Scout Master

Tuberculosis Association

No organization


NUMBER PER C 7


3

3

6

2
a


43

I

1I

1I

11


4.2

4. 2

8. 3

2.8

1.4

59.7

1.4

1.4

1. 4

15. 3


TOTAL% 72* 100.0


How did the eighty seven authors feel about political participa-

tion in their areas? Table IX throws some light on this question.

There were only seventy responses from the eighty-seven authors

in this study. Out of the seventy questionnaires returned by the

authors of the theses submitted in partial fulfillment of the a


.II -. ---- I -`II ~-~1 -+~I-- C -I ~ ---- .~I~ I--I ~~~. -I-- ---u-- --- I----- ----------' II-I'-'~ .--"--.--~'~~JL ~-----~- _.--I--~I








53


TABLE IX
DISTRIBUTION OF THE AUTHORS OF THE SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AN MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
AUGUST, 1947 THROUGH AUGUST, 1953
ACCORDING TO ATTITUDES TOWARD CIVIL RESPONSIBILITY



1. Do you feel that teachers are morally obligated to affiliate with
service and human welfare agencies?


Male

Female

Total


Yes

36

96

65


2. Are you a rogisterod voter?

Male

Female

Total


37

30

67


No





S
<-1


1
I

a


Total

38



70


38

32

70


3. Did yeo vote in the last Gabrnatorial Election?

Male 34 4 38

Femal 26 6 32

Total 60 10 70

- -. I . ... ... . .. .. . .. .. . .. ..... ...... .

requirmants for the Master of Science reg i e at~i a

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, sixty-five of them


- ------ ------ --I ----------I-I------- -------e ----- ._~~___ I ______ __~









54


believed that the teachers were morally obligated to affiliate

with service and human welfare agencies, sixty-seven were

registered voters, and sixty voted in the last gubernatorial elec-

tion, Although sixty-seven candidates were registered voters,

none claimed active membership in any local voters league.

Table X shows the religious affiliations of the seventy

authors of these submitted in partial fulfillment of the require-

ments for the Master of Science degree in education at Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University for the period August, 1947,

through August, 1953. There are seven denominations represented

with the Baptist leading, followed very closely by the African

Methodist Episcopal denomination. Two candidates were not
14
identified with any denomination. Greene found in his study

that Negro holders of the doctorate degree were predominantly

African Methodist, Episcopals and Baptists.








14
Ibid.










DISTRIBUTION ACCORDING TO RELIGIOUS BELIEFS OF SEVENTY CANDIDATES RECEIVING MASTER
OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN EDUCATION FROM FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVER-
SITY 1947-1953 BY THE YEAR


PRESBY- EPIS
Year AME BAPTIST CME ME C.JRCH OF GOD TERUAN COPAL NONE TOTAL

1953 12 14 2 i 2 1 32

1952 8 10 1 19

1951 6 4 1 1 2

1950 3 $ 6

1947 1 1


TOTAL 29 32 2 1 1 1 2 2 70
0.001-01-4 ___ _--oft M-P ON-
too~ --- .-~ .- -- -- --- --~ -.._.- ~-- .1~-~..-..I. .~1,. _. ..~1,..~..,~_.~..... ...... ... .. .~-:-- ~~


ta







56

What was the marital status of the eightywseven candidates

for the Master of Science Degree in Education from Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University during the period from

August, 1947, through August, 1953? Table XI will throw some light on

this question. Out of the seventy questionnaires returned, thirty

eight men an d thirtytwo womn, it is observed that thirtyf4ive

men were married; two were single, and one was a widower. The

thirty-two women were distributed as follows: twenty-three were

married; three were single; four were divorced ad two were widows.

Fifty of the seventy authors had children. One author had ten

children, thirty-nine authors had one child each, five authors had

two children each, three authors had three children each, and

two authors had five children each.

Further Graduate Work. Fifteen authors had done further

graduate s work since receiving the Master ao Science degree in

Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Two

authors had gone to Columbia University; one to Harvard University;

one to New York University; one to the University of Kansas; two to

North Carolina College; one to the Universlty of Pennsylvania; and

seven had returned to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University to study in another field of concentration.









57


TABLE XI

DISTRIBUTION OF THE AUTHORS OF SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
ACCORDING TO MARITAL STATUS (1947- 1953)


Widow or
Are you Married Married Single Divorced Widower Total

Male' 35 2 1 38

Female 23 3 4 2 32


TOTAL 58 5 4 3 70





How Many Children Number of Children
do you have ?0 1 2 3 5 10 Total

Male 7 23 3 2 2 1 38

Female 13 16 2 1 0 0 32


TOTAL 20 39 5 3 2 1 70


Honors and Awards. Four authors have established them-

selves in their vocations with distinction. Besides being an eminent

minister, one serves as Assistant Administrator of Extension

Services at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and is a

major in the United Stats Army. Another one in the medical school

of the University of Kansas is unsurpassed in academic achievements;









58


one serves with the United States Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq;

and another is at Harvard University, where he has competed

all residential hours for the doctorate degree and has been

awarded a scholarship to the University of Heildeburg, Germany,

to do his dissertation.

Table XII shows a distribution of schools where the under.

graduate degrees were conferred on the seventy candidates

responding to the questionnaire. It will be noted that thirteen

schools werererepesented, with Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University claiming 73. 1 per cent of the total. Bethune Cookman

College, another Florida institution, ranked second in number of

candidates.

Table XIm shows the distribution of positions held by seventy

candidates for the Master ao Science degree in Education when they

received the degree during the period extending from August, 1947

through August, 1953. A glance at the table will show that the

largest number of degrees granted went to principals and elementary

teachers ranked second. There were seven candidates not* working

at the time the degree was granted. Table XIV will show the dis-

tribution of the seventy authors responding to the questionnaire

with regard to age group at the time of receiving the Master of

Science degree in Education from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University. Nine women or 28. I per cent received their Master's









59

degree between the ages of 31-35 while eight or twenty-five

per cent received their master's degree between the ages of

thirty-six to forty. The largest number of men, thirteen or 34. Z

per cent, who received the master's degree were between the

ages of thirty-six to forty. The range was from twenty years

to sixty-five years.





60


TABLE XII


DXSTRIBUTION OF AUTHORS OF THE SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
ACCORDING TO COLLEGE AT WHICH UNDERGRADUATE
WORK WAS DONE



College Number Per Cent


Albany State College 1 1.4

Bethune Cooknan College 6 8. 6

Clark College 1 1.4

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University 51 73.1

Florida Normal Industrita College 3 4. 3

Howard University I 1.4

Morehoe College 1 1. 4

Morris Brown College 1 1.4

Prairie View Collge 1 1. 4

Taursgee Institute 1 1.4

Virginia Union University 1 1.4

West Virginia State College 1 1.4

Wilberforce University 1 1.4


TOTALS 70 100.0
+- ... --- i- -i:--- ,,- -" ":v.:,,,.. / :i :: -: .. ..... ..ra le :_ __ _: = .. .. .








61


TABLE XI

DISTRIBUTION OF THE AUTHORS OF THE SEVENTY THESES AC.
CORDING TO POSITIONS HELD WHEN THE MASTER OF SCIENCE
DEGREE IN EDUCATION WAS GRANTED FROM FLORIDA AGRICUL.
TURAI X AND MECHAII"CAL UNIVERSITY
1947-1953

4~el1 i P "mI~II(*ILI*ILL


Number


Position


Assistant Principal

Elementary Teacher

High School Teacher

Principal

Secretary

Supervisor


20



26


Percent


4 4


28.6

171

37. I


1. 4

1.4


(No wokig 7. 10.0- --~-~Y -l~IMILbllLIIIII


_ -- -r -1 ---- _-- C -- IC C---C-- r -----~ ~----- L-


- -------mom


10 O


(Nmot; working)


7








62


TABLE XIV

DISTRBUTiON OF THE AUTHORS OF SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
ACCORDING TO SEX AND AGE AT TIME OF RECEIVING THE
MASTERS DEGREE
1947'-1953



Women Men
Age Group Number Percent Num-ber Percent

61-65 1 3.1 0

50-60 0 0

51-55 1 3.1 3 7.9

46-50 0 3 7. 9

41-45 4 12.5 7 18.4

36-40 8 25.0 13 34.2

31-35 9 28. 1 7 18.4

26-30 7 21,9 2 5.3

21-25 2 6.3 2 5.3

16.20 0 1 2.6


TOTAL 32 100.0 38 100.0
.. .-o ....- MV .- WW *W W-.-_








63


Table XV shows the distribution of the seventy authors

according to teaching experience. The largest number of men

and women was in the ten to fourteen year bracket. Fourteen

women or 43. 8 per cent and fourteen men or 36. 8 per cent had

between ten and fourteen years of teaching experience. The

range in teaching experience was from no years to thirty years.


TABLE XV

DISTRIBUTION OF THE AUTHORS OF THE SEVENTY THESES AT
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY AC-
CORDING TO SEX AND TEACHING EXPERIENCE


Women
Years experience Number Percent


30-34

25-29

20-24

15-19

10-14

5- 9

0- 4


1

2

3

14

8

3


3. 1

3. 1

6.2

9.4

43.8

25.0

9.4


Men
Number Percent


0

I

3

6

14

6

8


2.6

7. 9

15.8

36.8

15. 8

21.1


TOTALS 32 100.0 38 100.0


-- .--__-~~ --II.~. -- ----ri- ----- ---- ---- -rl----L-- -- -1 L --^---P----liLLIIIYIII~~










64


SUMMARY


This section of the study was designed to ascertain

information on personal traits of the authors of the theses

in this study.

On the basis of questionnaire returns, thirty-eight men

and thirty-two women; ninetyOtwo per cent of the men were

married as compared with seventy-two per cent of the women.

Candidates for the Master of Science degree in Education at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University were pre-

dominantly Baptist and African Methodists; two were not

identified with any religious sect. All candidates were employed.

Four authors were eminent in their chosen professions.









CHAPTER IV

GENERAL SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

General Summary


The primary purpose of this study was to determine

the nature and amount of research done in the Cighty"seven

theses submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for

the Master of Science degree in Education at Florida Agricul-

tural and Mechanical University from August, 1947, through

August, 1953.

The method employed in this study was limited to that

of the Normative Survey. The Normative Survey is used to

indicate research which is concerned with ascertanaing the

presence and prevalence of conditions prevailing in a group of

cases chosen for study. It is essentially a method of quanti-

tative description of the genera characteristics of the group.

There sources of dato for this study were: (1) eighty-seven

these submitted ad accepted n the Graduate Program at

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University from August,

1947. through August, 1953, (2) student registration cards

of the authors of the eighty-seven theses, (3) responses to ques-

tionnaires malted to the authors of the eighty-seven theses, (4)

a study of related literature, and (5) a perusal of general

reference books.







67


A. Nature and amount of research

The analization of the eighty-seven theses revealed the

following facts:.

1. That there was a marked increase in the numbat of these

and amount of research produced at Florida Agricultural and

Mechanical University from August, 1947 through August, 1953.

The number of theses in 1953 and 1952 more than doubled the

number of theses and the amount of research produced in 1951,

1950, and 1947.

S2. That there was a total of four thousand four huidred

ninety-six pages of research produced with all methods. The

Normative Survey accounted for three thousand seven hundred

forty-four pages, or 75.74 per cent of the total; the Historical

Method accounted for five hundred eight pages, or 10. 27

per cent of the total; the Experimental Method accounted for

three hundred forty-five pages or 6. 98 per cent of the total and

the "Other Methods" accounted for three hundred forty-nine

pages, or 7.06 per cent of the total. It can be observed that the

Experimental Method accounted for the smallest amount of research

produced.

3. That all the research produced in the eighty-seven

theses had been classified under seven different subject matter

areas. Of the subject matter area, more of the research, one

thousand nine hundred fifty-eight pages or 39. 59 per cent of the








68


was produced in the Foundations Area. The next largest amount of re-

search, eight hundred ninety-nine pages, or 18. 18 per cent of the

total was produced in the area of Guidance. The smallest amount of

research, one hundred sixty-four pages or 3. 32 per cent of the

total was produced in the School Plant area.

4. That the male authors of the eighty-seven thess produced

two thousand five hundred sixty-seven pages or 51. 9 per cent of all

re search, while the female authors accounted for two thousand

three hundred seventy-nine pages, or 48. 1 per cent of the total

amount of research, Male authors exceeded :the female authors

in the amount of research produced under the Normative Survey

Method by only 13, 31 per cent. As for the distribution of sexes

in this study, there were forty-four male and forty-three female

authors.

5. That the largest number of theses and amount of pages

produced was on the Elementary level. The research on this level

accounted for one thousand four hundred twenty-nine pages or

28. 89 per cent of all research produced. The next largest amount

of research, one thousand one hundred twenty pages or 22.64 per

cent of all research produced, was on the Senior High School level.

The smallest amount of research, sixty one pages or 1. 23 per cent

of all research produced was on the Nursery School level.








69


6. The questionnaire was the most widely used data

gathering device employed by the authors of the eighty-seven

theses in this study. It was employed by sixty-six, or 75. 86

per cent of the eighty-seven authors. Documentary evidence

was the next most widely used source of evidence. Observation

was the least used source of evidence. It was employed by two,

or 2. 30 per cent of the eighty-seven authors. Other data

gathering devices used in the eighty-seven theses were tests of

various types, and the interview.

7. That of the eighty-seven authors, the largest number,

thtrty-three, had an undergraduate major in Elementary

Education. The next largest number of undergraduate majors,

fourteen, was in the area of English. There was only one author

with an undergraduate major in Home Economics, and one had a

major 6i Physical Education at the undergraduate level.

8. That at the graduate level, the largest number,

- forty-four, of the eighty-seven authors chose a major in Super-

vision and Administration. The next largest number, twenty-*one,

chose a major in Elementary Education. Agriculture had one

major at the graduate level. There were six authors with an

undergraduate major in Agriculture.









70


9. That the largest number of theses, twenty-two, was

done in the subject matter area of Elementary Education. There

were. no majors at the graduate level in Guidance, but the next

largest number of theses, sixteen, was done in the area of Guidance.

Although there were forty-four majors in Administration and

Supervision at the graduate level, only fifteen theses were produced

in the area of Administration and Supervision.

CONCLUSIONS

1. The recognition of the utility of the master's degree is

reflected in the increasing number of theses being written in

partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science

degree in Education at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical

University.

2. That most of the research done by the authors of the

theses analyzed in this study was confined to the Normative

Survey Method.

3. That most of the theses and amount of research produced

by the eighty-seven authors was in the area of Foundations.

4. That most of the theses and amount of research produced

by the eighty-seven authors was on the Elementary level.

5. That the questionnaire was the most widely used data

gathering device employed by the authors of the eighty-seven theses.









71

6. Upon registration, there was a tendency for the authors

of the eightyaseven theses to shift from the area of the under-

graduate major to a different area for a major at the graduate

level. There was a further tendency for the authors to write

their theses in an area fairly unrelated to their major it either

the undergraduate or graduate level.
































BIBLIOGRAPHY







72


BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Alexader, Carter, How to Locate Educational Ifrm~atio
and Data New Yerk: Bureau of Publicat Teacher
College, Columbia Univereity, 1950,

2. AlIen, Edward M., The Author Handbeok, International
Text k Company, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 1938.

3. Almack, John C., Rsuearch and Thesis Writing, HOughton
MUfflin Company, New York, 1930.

4. Ashbaugh, E. J,, "Bibliography of Research Articles published
1924", JoPurnl of Eda~i ttasal R earkch, Vel. U,1 1928.

5. Barr, A. S., John C. Almac et atl "A Symposium oa the
Clasification of Educational Research," JoLmsal of
E Educatkn Rjeearch an: May, 1941.

6. Buswell, G. T., "Research and the Degree of Doctor of
Philosophy," Journal ofi SEdcatr# al a rch., Yel.
XXXIIn (January May) 1931.

7. ,_ "A Perrsenal Study of Students Who Have Received
the Master of Science degree from the University of
Chicag. School atdoaety 25: (June 19, 19).

a. Campbell, Go. G. Ti a Writing. Hhton MiMin Company.
New York, 1954.

9. Come, Warren W., "Pl~anng and Administering skatriaa
Research," Journal of dtatial Research, Vol. XXXIX
(September ay) 1i-46-. .

10. Carmichael. C. "Neglected Areas in Educatio. ,
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I 1. Daughterty, Donald H. Blanch, Loyd E. Amefrica nierty
sad Celeges, Sixth EdidLea, 1952.

12. "Problems of the Masters' Degree" A report
presented to the Association of American Universities
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of Miami Press.
13. Franke, Paul ft. and Davis, Robert, "Changing Tendcieas
ia Ednatn Researrh., Journal of Educational
Reearch, XXII (January May ), 1931.








73


14. Freeman. Frank 4M. "A Symposium" Journal of Educational
Research, Volume XXIV (June 1931),l

15. Greene, Harry W., "Holders of the Doctorates Among
American Negroes" (Meadow Publishing Company. Boston
1946).

16. Good, Carter V., "Fields and Types of RUearch in Education,
1918f1931 Journal of Educational Research, Vol. XXIV,
pp, 33-43, J rune 1931,9.

17. Carter V.. "Doctors Theses Underway in
Education. 1930-1931," Journal of Educational Research
XXII (January 1931).

18. Tho Methodology oft Educational Research,
Appleton-CfxaturyCroits, Inc. 1941.

19. Hall, William R.. and Eggert, C. L., "An Analysis f Master's
Theses in Education at the University of Florida (1912-
1949) with Respect to Methods of Research and Techniques
of Research" Master's Thesis, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida, 1950.

20. Harmon, D. B.B. "Needed Reearch", Indiana University.
School Educational Bulletin 29: 5261, No. 53.

21. Perrian, Porter G.. Index to E~glish, Scott, Foresman and
Company, New York

22. Ryan, W. C. Early St aies in Graduate Educat~, Bulletin
30 (New York, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement
of Teaching 1939).

23. Theisen, "Recent Progress in Educational Research," Journal
of Educational Research. Vol. 23j May, 1931.

24. TrabuM, M. L., "Educational Research in 1925. Journal of
Educational Research, 1926.

25. Troxler, A. E. "Some Comments on Educational Research
at Mid-centary," Journal of Educational Research 47:
359.66, January 1954.

26. Whitney, F L. "Elements of Research," Prentice Hall, Inc.
New York, 1950.







74



27. Wilson, M. O., "What the Chicago Doctora of Philosophy
Are Doing," School and Society (29: 815-18 June 22)
1929.

































APPENDICES





















APPENDICES



THESES CLASSIFICATION WITH

RESPECT TO SUBJECT AREA, METHOD

AND

YEAR WRITTEN

COPIES OF: QUESTIONNAIRE, LETTERS

SENT TO: AUTHORS OF THESES









75


Administration sad Supervision


1. Bailey, Juanita G., "A Survey of Teacher Estimates of High
Intelligence in Grades 4, 5, and 6 of Bond, Griffin,
Lincoln. sad Lucy Moten Schools" (Survey 1953)

2. Bryant, JamesB ,. "An Investigation of the Nature of Improve-
ments in the Negro Schools of Nassau County from
1946-1950 and Factors Which Contributed Toward These
Improvements"- (Survey, 1952)

3. Hicks, Willis D., "Bases for Improvements in Lunchroom
Programs for Schools of Nassau County, Florida"
(Survey, 1953)

4. Jackson, William H. "Evaluation of the Supervisory Program
in a Selected Group of Negro Secondary Schools in
Florida" (Survey, 1953)

5. Kinsey, U. S. "A Survey of the Attitudes of Negro Teacher ita
Florida Concerning the Use of the Tenth Month of School"
(Survey, 1953)

6. Lawson, Wilber B., "A Comparative Study of Retardation
in the Negro and White Elementary Schools of Ce bia
County, Florida (1947-1948 and 1951 and 1952)"
(Survey, 1953)

7. Lee, Winnie B., ."Survey of Methods and Materials Used in
Science for Third and Fourth Grades in the Public
Schools of Pinellas County, Florida" (Survey, 1953)

8. Norwood, Edwin F. "An Exmination of the jEtension Program
at Florida A and M College (Survey, 1951)

9. Ricks, Lillie Mae, "A Proposed Pbgram of Instruction for the
Visually Handicapped Pupils of Leon County with Special
Reference to the Negro"


~l~s_ I~








76
Elementary Grades (Other 1952)

10. Seabrooks, alter S. "An Inventory Study of the Problems
of Five Hundred Negro Pupils in Grades Seven and Nine
of Leon County Florida" (Survey 1953)

11. Tucker, Morris A., "A Study of Retardation in the Negro
Elementary Schools, Jefferson County, Florida,
(September 9, 1945 to June 1, 1950Q (Survey, 1952)

12. Wesson, Adreanna, "An Analysis of Florida Principal's
Reports on Exceptional Children Earolled in Public
Schools for Negroes 1947-1950" (Survey 1951)

13. Whitehurtt, Harold B., '"The History and Analysis of the
Supervisory Program of Lake Conaty. Florida Negre
Schools from 1940-1950" (Historical, 1952)

14. Williams, Ernest, "A Comparative Study of Arithmetic
Competencies of Prospective Elementary School
Teachers and Potential Elementary Education Major*
Now Enrolled ia Secondary Schools" (Survey, 1952)

15. Williams, Olivia, "An Evaluation of the Health Program in
the Rural Negro Schools in Leon County. Florida"
(Survey, 1953)








77


ATTENDANCE

1. Cook, Richard H., "A Follow-up Study of 184 Pupils Who
Dropped Out of the A. L. Lewis Junior High School and
the Davis Street Junior High School, Jacksonville,
Florida, during the School Te rms of 1945-1950 Inclu-
sie to Determine Certain Factors Which May Have
Contributed to the Te Term i of Their School Education"
(Survey, 1952)

2. Dudley, Edward, "An Invatigation of Reasons for Student
Drop-outs in the Negro Junior High Schools of Orange
County, 1947-1949" (Survey, 1952)

3. Jasmin, Elisabeth I., "An Identification of Some of the
Coaditiona Which are Associated with Absenteetim in
the Ninth Grades of Junior High Schols for Negrees of
Jacksonville, Florida, with Proposals for Improvement"
(Survey. 1950)

4. Maey, William S., "An Analysis of Seasonal Migration in
Winter Garden, Florida As It Affects Community Life,
School and St dent Life" (Survey, 1952)

5. McCurdy. Charles, "A St udy of the Magnitude and Character
of Seasonal Migration at Belle Glade a Eementary
School" (1944-1949)" (Survey, 1950)

6. Tillman, Jaues, "A Comparative Study of the Mental and
Scholastic Achievement of Seasonal Migratory and
Nonr-migrastry Pupils Enroled at the Lincoln High
School during the 1948-49 Term" (Experimental 1950)

7. Williams, Emory D., "A Survey of Factory Association with
Drop-outs in the Negro Secondary Schools of Escambia
County, Florida" (Survey, 1951)

8. Williams, Homer T., "A Comparison of Certain Characteristice
of High School Stayer and Leavers in Highlands County,
Florida (1945-1949)" (Survey, 1952)






78


CURRICULUM

1. Brown, Rosa B., "A Proposed Program for Organising
and Developing a Kindergarten in Relation to the
Elementary Department of the Dunbar High School" (Sur-
vey, 1951)

2. Gavin, Willie B., "N. B. Young Nursery School in Comparison
with Negro Nursery Schools of Florida" (Survey, 1952)

3. Howard, Amanda W., "The Status of Library Service in
Selected Group of Grade Schools in the State of Florida"
(Survey, 1953)

4. Polk, Marion T., "Au Analysis of the Literature on the Educa-
tion of Negro Gifted Children from (1940-1950)"
(Historical, 1953)

5. Stafford, Douglas K. "An Analysis of Time Magazine0'
Comments Concerning the Negro (1937-1941)" (Survey
1953)

6. Stitt, Odel F., "A Study to Determine the Utilieation of News-
papers and Periodicals in the Periodical Room (Florida
A and M College by Graduate Students at Florida A and
M. College by Graduate Students at Florida A and M
College" (Survey, 1952)








79


FOUNDATION


1. Bennett, Evelyn A. "Development of Reading-Readiness
Program in the First Grade of DarnellUCookman
School" (Survey 1950)

2. Bethe&, Doris, "An Investigation of the English Department
of the Negro High Schools of Northwest Florida" (His-
torical 195 1)

3. Bolden, John H., "An Investigation of the Music Program
of the Public Elementary School of Putnam County"
(Survey, 1952)

4. Brown, pt ,ll, "A Followr Up St udy of the Science Programs
in Eleven Selected Florida High Schools for Negroes"
(Survey, 1953)

5. Bryant, Lillian F., "The Implication of SociowMetric Data
in Relation to the Specific Needs of the Fifth Grade
at Madison Street School, Ocala, Florida" (Survey, 1952)

S 6. Calloway, Grace, "Zora Neal Huston, Author and Folklorist"
(Historical, 1952)

7. Carter, Cornelia, "The Relationship between Achievement
in Freshman and Sophomore Required English Courses
and That of Other Academic Courses at Florida A and M
College" (Others, 1952)

8. Carter, Josephine, "An Analysis of Some Factors Related
to Interest in Literature Ameng Negro High School
Students of Jackson County" (Survey, 1953)

9. Crutchfield, Mispoh S., "An Analysis of the Relationships
between Reading Skills and Ability to Solve Verbal Pro*
blems in Mathematics on the Juaior High School Level in
Douglas High School, Key West, Florida" (Other,. 1952)

10. Dorsey, Phillip P., "A Suggested Program to Improve
Utilisation of Audio-Visual Equipment" (Survey, 1951)

11. Evans, Lillia J., "A Comparative St ady of the Vocational
Interest of Seniors of Lincoln High School" (Other,
1951)

12. Fielder Anni Annie "An Investigatiocn of the Competencies


in Arithmetic Reasonings (Experimental. 1951).







80


13. Guyton, Eva L., "Improvement of Poor Reading Coadl sa
in the Pickett ELementary School, Duval Cunty"
(Survey 1952)

14. Hartsfield, Elizabeth A., "A Proposal for Developing A
Functional Audio-Visual Program" (Survey 1951)

15. Haywood, Margaret. "Aspects of the Elisabethan Legendary
Chronicle Play" (Historical. 1953)

16. Holiday, Amy W., "An Analysis of Reading Difficulties
and the Provision of an Effective Reading Program to
Meet the Needs of Children in the Primary Grades
of Carver High School" (Experimental, 1953)

17. Jackson, Haywood, "An Analysis of the Content of Selected
Biology Textbooks in Terms of Objectives of
General Education and of Instruction in the Bialogical
Science" (Survey, 1951)

18. Lawson, Joseph L. "A Historical Study of the Development
of Albany State College" (Historical. 1952)

19. McKinnon, Helen, "Dramatic Techniques Used in the Elisa
bethan Revenge Tragedies" (Historical, 1953)

20. Miller, Lessie P., "A Study of Reading Proalems and
Suggested Techniques to Control Them in the Negro
Elementary Schools of Dogherty CGomty, Georgia"
(Survey. 1953)

21. Otey, Frank M., "An Evaluation of the Health Program of the
Negro Junior-Senior High Schools of Orage County.
Florida" (Survey, 1953)

22. Payne, Patsye 1* "The Statse of Audio-Visual Education in
the Negro Elementary Schools in Leon County, Florida"
(Survey, 1951)

23. Reed, Lillie S. "An Evaluative Study of the Private Beauty
Culture Schools for Negroes of Mississippi in 1951"
(Survey, 1953)

24. Russell, Samuel, "Trade and Industrial Education in Negro
High Schools of Florida" (1950-51) (Survey. 1952)

25. Stevens, Curtis L, "The Rise and Development of Universal


Education in Florida during Reconstruction" (Historical.
1953)







81


26. Stoudamire, Catherine, "A Study of Spelling Errors Found
Among One Hundred Sicth Grade Students of Putnam
County, Florida" (Survey, 1953)

27. Thumbtzen, O'Cain J., "Some Problems and Factors That
Influence the Growth and Marketing of Flue-Cured
Tobacco in Hamilton County, Florida" (Other, 1953)

28. Triplett, Mary D. "An Investigation of Causes Underlying
Rteacind Difficulties" (Survey, 1951)

29. Weather spoon, Suse J. "A Proposed Remetdia Reading
Program for the Negro Schools of Alachua County"
(Survey. 1952)

30. Williams, Minnie L., "A Study of the Relationship between
General Academic Success and Achievement in the
Work Study Skills of Pupils in Grades 7- 9 at the Bond
Junior High School of Leon County" (Experimental, 1953)

31. WilliWams, Rachel, "An Analysis of Prevalent Speech Problem"
(Experimental, 1951)

32. Williams, Thelma B., "A St udy of Fifth Grade Pupils to
Determine the Relatioship between Reading Ability and
Achievement in Other Subject." (Survey, 1953)

33. Wilson, Mary, "The Growth and Development of Public
High Schools for Negroes in Duval County, Florida
from 1920 through 1952 (Historical, 1953)







82


GUIDANCE

1. Allen, Robert E. "A Survey of the Standardized Testing
Programs in Negro Schools of Florida and Their
Implications for Guidance (Survey, 1953)

2. Bright, Sylvester R.. "A Study of the Attitudes of One
Hundred Florida A and M College Students toward
the Church" (Survey, 1950)

3. CaldweUl, Roy L. "A Mental Health Analysis Study of
Two Hundred Senior High Schoo.l Students of Polk
County" (Other, 1953)

4. Campbell, Witt A. "An Experimental St udy of Two
Methodologies in the Teaching of Reading to First
Grade Pupils of the Midway Elementary School,
Gadsden County, Florida" (Experimental, 1952)

5. Clark, LEla L., "A Comparison and An Analysis of Weak-
nesses in English Fundamentals of Freshman Students
Entering Florida A and M College in September 1952"
(Other, 1953)

6. Deldagal, Daniel W., "The Status of Sex Education in Negro
High Schools of Florida" (Survey, 1950)

7. Graham, Elliot W., "To Devise A Functional Guidance
Program for the Carver High School, White 'Springs,
Florida" (Survey, 1952)

8. Graham, Naomi, "A STudy of the Available Recreation
Programs for Negress in Tallahassee, Florida with
Proposals to Meet Existing Limitations" (Survey, 1952)

9. Hortsfield, Walter L., "A Proposal for Developing a Guidance
Program at Central Academy Senior High School, Palatka,
Florida, (Survey, 1950)









83


10. Henry, dward M., "An Investigation of the Educational
Mortality of the High School Students of Harry County,
South Carolina with Suggestions for the Organixation
and Improvement of the Guidance Program" (Survey
1952)

11. Russain, Gustarva, "A Suggested Program of Guidance
for the Elementary Grades of Lincoln Park Academy"
(Survey. 1952)

12. Jiles, Zola M., A Program to Meet the Educational Needs
of the Migratory Children at the Pahokee Elementary
School" (Survey, 1950)

13. Mills, Vera F., An Analysis of the Incidence of Selected
Super titions in Relatioa to Mental Health Amoat the
Senior High School Stdents of Lincoln High School,
Tallahssee. Florida" (Survey, 1953)

14. Morse, Benjamin A., A Proposed Program of Health
Education for Monroe High School at Cocoa, Florida"
(Survey, 1950)

15. Strachan. Robert N. A Study of the Problems Affecting Pupils
in the Transition from the Elementary School into the
High School ;arapbll Street High School, Daytona Beach,
Florida" (Survey, 1953)

16. Williams, Eula D., A Study of the Effects of Certain Factors
upon Achievement in Elementary Science, by Fifth
Grade Pupils in Thomasvill and Thomas County, Georgia,"
(Survey, 1952)






84


SCHOOL-COMMUMNITY RATIOS


2. fDlubrI, lsles L, "Thoe etal of the Washingtv o Park School"
Survey. ~W)

2. Doanete, E2eaor ., ", mat.ety PFt ata one H ndred
and Thirty -Rgh Ngro Publ; Schaool Techers t he
Scio*'e Actvivtesj af LAeo Comaty" (Survey,
195,)

3. Gardner, Jans 3., A Proqvnal of Skhease pal ma
Coeedi*tieae to Centrol SEleoD- Aspets of Deinaquet
aBh*lrtr Amoas a Nero ToanSu at WsaUstax, Fleridar*




(SArvey.. 1951)

5. gr, Rlad, A Pr 4 Sch *Commait
SCeord r_-...-o* Baot ts noeokerhr H sIhee r S o ..ie
Floitda, Deaignad to Cambat Da iYtag CLy Amag Negro
Yestle" (Settry, 1952)




(Survey. 195))
twprftslaTb -7ty" JOMS49







85


SCHOOL PLANT

1. Lawrence, Freeman, An Evaluation of the Physical Plant
for Firv Consolidated ural Schools for Negroes in
Leon CouWnty, with Aceannumedations for Improving
Existing Conditions" (Survey. 1953)

2. Tillman, Herbert T. An Evaluatio of the Physical
Facilities of Three High School. for Negroes in Brooks
County, Georgia in Terms of Selected Criteria" (Survey,
1952)

3. Wilson,, icha, "The Status of the Physical Plant of th
Lincoln High School. TaUlbla se, Florida for the Second
Year (1949-1950)" (Survey. 1952)








86


426 W. Carolina Street
Tallahassee, Florida
July 20, 1954



Dear Friend:

I am in the process of developing my thesis for the Master's
Degree in Education at Forida Agricultural and Mechanical
University. My project Lo "An Analysis of the Thesee Sabmitted
and Accepted in the Graduate Program at Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University since 1947."

Inasmuch as you are the author of one of these theses, your
help is needed in providing additional information ahout yourself
as as author by responding to the enclosed questionnaire.

Please react to every item on the questioaire, and be assured
that all information will be considered strictly cotfidential. No
names will be used with any date since the data will receive
mass treatment.

I shall appreciate your cooperation by refpo g to the ques-
tionnaire and returning it to me immediately in the tamped,
self-addreseed envelope.

Respectfully yours,


E~rest W. Edwards








87


319 Van Buren
Tallahassee, Florida
June 28, 1955





Dear Friend:

I am writing my thesis as partial fulfillment of the master's
degree at Florida A and M University and have chosen as my
problem "An Analysis of the Theses Submitted and Accepted
in the Graduate Program at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University for the period 1947-1953. "

Since I have not received a reply from you, I am enclosing
another questionnaire in a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
Will you tMdly fill it out and return to me immediately.

In order to do what I am proposing, it is absolutely necessary
for me to have certain information about you as one of the authors.

Thank you.

Gratefully yours,


Ernest W. Edwards







88
THE PFLORIDA AGRICULTURAL ATD MECHA 1AL UNIVERSITY
Talilaa ee, Florida

QUS TI 0NNAIRE

Name Male Female Date
1TastE first middle

I. Do you believe that teachers are morally obligated to affiliate

with service and human welfare agencies? Yes No

2. Are you n registered voter? Yes No If Yes, d.$ you vote

in the last gubernatorial election in Florida? Yes

3. Are you a church member? Yes No_ If you are a church

member, what is your church affiliation? AME ME ,

Baptist Catholic__ Presbyterian

4. Are you married? Yes No Divorced Widow Widower

Remarried

5. If you are married, how many children do you have?

6. Are you a member of an honor society such as Alpha Kappa Mu

atlozaal Honor Society, Beta Kappa Chi Honorary Scientlfic Society.

etc.? Which ones?

7. Are you a member of a Greek Lotter organization" Yes No

Which one?

8. Are you a member of a national, state, or local service or

human welfare organization Such as the NAAZP, the --Business League,

neighborhood councils, etc.? Which ones?

9. In which year did you receive your undergraduate degre .

Graduate degree Major? In what

subject-matter area are you certified?

10. If you are an elementary teacher, what grades do you teach?


If you are a high school teacher, what is your subject-matter

area?


___ ____ ___ __


_ __ _r __ _I _~_ ~ _






89
1'l If you have duties other thUan classroom teaching at present,

what are they?________________



12. From which institution did you receive your undergraduate

degree? .. .

13. Have you done further graduate work since receiving your Master's
Degree at FAMU? Yes No How many semester hours

Quarter hours Where did you take them?



14. Indicate your age at the time you received your Bachelor's Degree.

18-20 21-23 24-26 Other (name it)

15. Did you complete your work for the Master's Degree before you

had any teaching experience? Yes No

16. If you taught before receiving your degree, have you changed

jobs since receiving the degree? Yes No If you have

changed jobs since receiving your degree, how many times have

you changed?

17. If you had teaching experee before be receiving your Master's

Degree, how many years hrd you taught prior to receiving the

degree?

18. Date of birth_

19. From the time your subject was chosen, indicate how long it

took you to complete your thesis,

20. Indicate how long it tool: you to get a thesis committee.


21.. As you know the Master of Science program requires the writing


of a thesis. What factors influenced you to enter this program?




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