• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Introduction
 Review of some related studies
 Duval County and the development...
 Historical findings of Stanton...
 Summary and conclusion
 Bibliography
 Appendix






Title: Growth and Development for Public High Schools for Negroes in Duvall County, Florida from1920 through 1952
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000029/00001
 Material Information
Title: Growth and Development for Public High Schools for Negroes in Duvall County, Florida from1920 through 1952
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wilson, Hary Fridie
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMU)
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College
Publication Date: 1953
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: AM00000029
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA0891
notis - ABV5644

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Dedication
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    List of Tables
        Page vii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Review of some related studies
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Duval County and the development of negro education
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Historical findings of Stanton High School
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Summary and conclusion
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Bibliography
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Appendix
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
Full Text







THOE GHDTl AMD D SEVEO NT lOF PUBLIC RIl 310SCHOOL FOR NFWDE S

IN DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIAFROMS3 1920 THIRUH 1952









A Thesis

Preented to

The Faculty of the Oraduate Divl iol

Florida a and M College









In Partial Fultaleont

of the Rquireants for the D ree

master of Scence in education








Vary rtdie Wflhoc
Jutb, 19%3












THE GIROWT AND DEVELOPM.ET OF PUBLIC TIMH SCHOOL EDUCATION

FOR NEGROES IN DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA FROM 1920 THROUGH 1952




















APPROVEt


--nSies--n





Director, i Division or Graduate
Studies


























To the Memory of ry Mother

Release Baxter Fridie











ACKNaiffT? 1axi S


The writer wishes to express her aineere appreciation to
Doctor WS. M *oej, Chairmn of her Advisory Ca mittee. Though

DirJLtor of the Graduate S-hool with a2Sy heavy responsibilities,
he gave xwtintingl of his assistance in the preparation of this

thesis. Appreciation is also expressed to the other members of
the Canittne nean Doan T *KiWM ey axnd Iles Edna Calhoun.

T writer grmatefull ack owlcodgc her indebtedness to a
Dell and Mr. Ogden and other personnel of the Board o;f lubic

Intructiaon, Dual Cornty, for making retain records available

for this study

Fin&v, sincere thanks to q husband ho offered many help-
ful ariticias and gave MI moral support


A4F.W,













PAGE

I


ORAPTTIO

I. INTROUfflCTION * w e 6 + *


Purpose of the Budy * .4


Prob a * *


Sources f itforma tion ,* *

Limitation ...* .

Previous work in the srae feldl

OrGanisation of the otudy .* *

E-4VIi OF SUE a AkTED STUDI'S

DTnuAL MUMMT4 AnP THS MV itLOPEWT OF

hb ft.eQdaen*. uroaa 1 s.*


a, a r j. u a
00* 0 0 *0 0


4 0s*0**


00 0 0*0*0blr


0
wlin n


SUC AT *
aDUCATIOH


* 9q# 0e* 0 *


The development of Uero public education in

Florida and DUwal Cotrty prior to 1920 .


IV, IasTORICAL FInDrnIS OF STANTOf mIW ?SCMH

Locationu *. *

The history of Matthew W. Gilbert tg

Location 0 * .*a

Imreawe in staff 0 *

Prowth in instructional personnel *

Development of the cu rula *

inrolluttt * *


OOL .



440044


.
#0*000

40 00* ~ir


The demelopmnt in pupil population at Stanton

and ktthewr K. Gilbear HiCh SchoolAs # ,


II.

111.


2

2

3

3

3

3




$

8


9


17

17

20

20

23

24



30


30










GmAPTE
Teambers salarie w o o # w o
V. SUina f AND COiCUISION .

History of Stan3on ,. , .
Matthew r l. t ,, ., 1
The relationship of th school t th e commvasit
Sorm of the problem n coiered in the develop.w
amwt of Stanton and Mathew W. Gilbert .. *


APPfRDIX A. Duvsl County Nfgo Schools Tax District o, 1I
APPI4IX 1B. Dval Counowty o sa Population So!ool Tax


KPPEKafIx C,


District o. .,* *
New Junior and senior fligh Schoola luiflt

19S2w3 *. . *# .*


PAGE

34

36
36

37
38


39
l4




43


Ui









LIST OF TABLES


TABLE PAGE

I, Percntage of Iantructional Per~lsoel inEach

Certificate Training Rank, inaral County,

ilorida 2 5 0 4 25
II. Basic Data Jegarding Pupils nr-ollmsen and Per*

centage of Attendance (Stanton High School) 31

III. Baice Data regarding Pupils EbroUmwet aid Pwer

centage af Attendance (attthew Gilbert

Ich School) 32
IV. Basic Data Regarding Pupils, E rolluntts, and
Graduate (Stanton Iigh School) ,9 .*. 33

V. Basic Datta tRe.arding Pupils, Enrollusnts, and

Graduates (Iatthew W. Gilbert tigh School) 33

VI. Analysis of Teacher S5alaries at Matthew W.

Oilbert 1ti&h Schoolp 19 1-j2 3 5* L L $










CHAPTER 1


INTRODUCTIn

The widespread interest of the American people in public education
mWes ay st~ a y of educational develop nt and institutions on of ispor*
tance fWhen the study is one treating the awrican Negro and public educa-
tion it is of en gre after iaport ..e, for there is then involved an added
footor of nation wide interest vt the tASgr
The present t traces the history of public high school education
for Negroeo in Dva Countye
This study has t m chief ains (1) to trace the delopei t of
public high oooXl education for Negroee in Dual County and (2)to point
outr som of the problem which have attended the development of this
public high school education
'The ultim te purpose of education at all timU and in all places
has been to perpetuate, maintain a prove the chosen wr of life of a

people." TIe AImrican public schools have an opportunity and an obli-
gation to peretuate, maintain and iaproe our deu o at w a of life.
oefn ad determination can be made as to whether public high school
education has fulfilled the hopes placed i ,n i ithe history of education


iliston n. Lofton Ple Develoat of Publi cducatic for
twin i ton= D$ A o eeraTT ftW E p

Tholas D. ailey, School to ho Us tieg^ State DeparteVnt of
rdr nation, Tallahassee, ?l a1 *a p. Va

3h1d,, p. 7.









2
for the .g~ro Wast be fully recorded. Since education for Negroes has
varied greatly from locality to locality it is necessary that many local

studies be =ade with the view of showing the conditions under which edu-

cation developed o n re intezsting and important an area for study

could be selected than Duvall County.

PUiR2lE (F THE STUDY

This study is proposed to preset szi ply a true chronology of

wmnts froa 1920 through $192 in the demlopmat of the Negro high schools

of Duval County, Florida.

It is only by tracing the developed of public education can we

udgt inteligety fin which direction and along whih paths we should go
in providing education for the colored minrity in the United State*. As
a result of such studies of the local soe an intelligent judgmel t of

the national scene can be made.

STATMINT C T? ?PROF( a

The problem of this stAy is to detrmine the facts that charac-
tcried the history, the general philoophy and policies which have
characterized the evolution of the Stanton anid atthe w.' Gilbert High

Schools,


knllnton R. Lofton, T. e ueval t of Public da tin









3


PROCEDURB

In this study the historical method described in Good, Barr and
fsatea is used.

SOURCES F INIOPJ(ATION

Data for this study 'e secured from the following sources: (1)
Principals Annual Report to the County Board of Public Instruction, (2)

county school board m (3) county and state school records, (4)

files of state news paper, (5) laws of Florida and interviews with former

faculty ab ser principals axd original trustees.

LIMTrATIONS

This problem is limited to a study of two public Negro high
schools, Stanton High School and MatthEw i. Gilbert High School. It is
also liu ted to a stumd of the history of the tio schools. The study is

limited by the inability to secure ade te data from insomplet school



PUWN GUS$)RK IN I'S SAME FIEID

Twero has been a wide variety of studies on the deelopwae t of
public school education; n hoe e P v oly one stady was found of a Negro public

school sr tesi at the county level


5Cartor V. Good, A.S3. Barr, )ouxas A. Seated, fr setboble So
Ddimatiorzal Re IUeA w York; DP Appleton Cenattury Cpanryri5 *5a pp.











I


4
OMANIZATION OF TME STUDY
Chapter II presents a brief review -of related Uteratnre on school
histor-ies ad the developmnt of public school education.
Chapter III ~i,,v the history of Duval County and the developmumt
of Ueoo asdcation prior to lfO20
CbaptAr gives the h itorical bqackgrwd of Stanton High School
mal the Matthewr Gilbert gh School.
ChUapter V ay mma d coclusionse










cHAPTsA n


There has been a wide variety olf studies made on the develop
of public education ar the problems which have wdsted during the develop-
mert. A cursory overin w of soe closely related studies is preentd

Frcnm wote "A History of twh New Jersey State T7eiBOe College
at aTmton.* He ws interested in the school relative to (a) reason for
its establir mnt aw conttmanco, (b) support ad control, (c) business
mama e~tr (d) plant and facilities, (e) fa tlity, and (f) enrollnt
and curriculum. These factors must be studied to detomine the facts
that charactrised the history, the general philosophy and policies tich
have character~is d the evolution of the New Jersey Teahers College. The
fators studied by "rom could be used to determine the develff opmt of
Stanton ant Matthew W Gilbert igh Schools, From pointed out in his
study that nothing of real aJwtrtance "just mhppened." Its antecedentsa
though they ma not be apparent, unat hav tened into the past. It is
equally difficult to imagine that n event or completed plan is without
2
some degree of inf~ui me on the future, the deelopnt of the public
schools prior to 1 played a part in fbrmating present day policies


'l wre Gletnn Ir ros isto His of the 3tw J Stt Tgeachrsj
COaOle ew Yorkts school of ciWIoni "_Toirnrs~,i0-
2 bids* p. 7.








6
Loftotn't purpose in hi study was to show withinn the f viameiork
of the separate schol scl yt s the board of education with itsr members
drawn from both races stand as a guardian of Justice for the races in
sharing the benefits of public education Conequeat1~ly the public schools
in a.irhington have developed father tIhan may schools in the deeper south.4
A tg w rvWegs i the Alachua County Negro 3chaol system to dete-
mine the extent the public schools are serTing the Negro youths. He found
ny school areas in the county wasr the educational provisions for col-
ored youth did not parallel in the letst educationalon provisions provided
for the thite youth, He found that the aomsadards of achieoemnts
ar re quir of the ~ ezo as of the white
The sa mm tamndard of acbievem nt of e gro youth in Dwal Coumty
are expected as of the whtte youth.
6
Jarboe was interested in determining the factors which had great
irJluenc upon the development of the public school system in I Miana,
Taxtim was a vital issue. It as n ecesary to ot ro public restamce
to being taxed for the support of schools of both raew* Tis difficulty
existed in Jacker oville during the period 1869-18707


e Williaton Lofton=, 'AThe tDt Public Dlucation for





University of florilda ofthe anouou Nag;- --o
nwrett A. Jaztoej D 4 at of the Pohe ubt Shoo ge
I On4ians .f Ahrtm act1 Iri'aa ,Tfi 7 ^ r
7nG.. cutler, hae of frid4, the flt and Pgpt, Th*
Lenia Pbtliahing GCo 0*7^ ^ 0- r-w-7 i n'










Dr. caliver, Speoialist for Higher ih nation of Negroes, US.
Office of Education, was interested in the first fifty years of progress
in Negro public education. is report revealed that the Negro tacher
has been the keystone of progrerw~ IO report also shows that the V'reed-
man a Buremau, established by oongrss n 1866~ considered education to
be one of its aaj funtions It was large responaible for establish-
in free public schools fbr Negroes throughout the south. That it did
served as foundation for th- public school systems es~tabl d by the
recone truetion govaeaBea later,

Chapter Three ives the development of Dural CCount and Ja~ckson
vills.




















Ambrose Caliver, Specialist for Higher Education of MNgrecc
United States Office of Dducation, Washington0 DG,C. 193


7











CfACPTER In


DUVAL COUTOX NW) TH UEWNOi.04 T tU? N7O4R sEDCA2TIO'N

Anu ew Jackasn ia the first l. Utary QGovrnor of Florida from
March U121 to April 17,. 1822A1 He divided east ~ waset, orida into tw
counties, St. John on the east and nambia on the west, The first Lisoa

lative Council of the territory divided St. Johns County by creatirag the

County of Duwal, Govenror iillTia P Durl the. first Civil Governor of
the territory, approved the Act, August 12p, 123. The county wa named

in his honor

By an Act of the Legislative Council, February 9, 1832, and sp-
proved by the gpvernrr, r Itary 11, 1832, the to n of Jacksonville ws
incorporated Jaaksonville is known as the atewy city to the State of

Florida. In 19*5 t e r orida State Cos reald that there were

%0,4Z2 Negroes in Jack0sonillea

VIPS FMiSZ3fISS UAUB

The F*eeeidaena ureau had an l3portant historical role during the
early days of the Reconstruticon Period.

This Bura wowas oated in the tar Depart 4t by an act of Con-

grefs Marc 3 1 to last for one year# but was exrd to 1872 l


pleasant aniel Gold 4, i.t of flual Cunty I.ludiM the a
oifltEsT, .f ata. l. MA
"" 1- -M #








9


later atts passed over the veto of rPresidt Johnaon, Te Bdre mwas
established for the purpose of caring for the colored people dependmat
upon the Govray mwt, Colonel Thoras "C;borae was appointed the head of

the organisation in Florida and lands abandoned by the o-wnra were assigned
to it. Colonel Osborne came to Durl County in 1.866 and arranged for ea*
tabli&hin bools,3
The early history of Stanton Sgh School is interwoven with the
activities of the reedmen s BureaT It was this orgQanisUtin that was
ultimately responsible for Stanton T gh Scho4ol

THD DlE mWrT ci WrOlC PUBLIC EDUCATION IN
?LOMIDA AID DUJAL COUNT PMtIOR TO 1920

Nero public education first came into odstene in Florida in
3L66. vhn the Fre.daen Act was passed rl the State Legislature to pro-
vide a stemm of public ecdcation for the ch ildren f the freodan. The
act nade provisi no for the joverer to appoint a state eiparinteet to
org anie Negro schools and to maploy content teachepra
th*se Negro achoola were to be sup orted by a tuition fee of fifty
cents per pupil aBd ly a tax o on dollar to be levied upon all No mal
persons betmaa n the aa of twenty-one and fortofive years



_It____ Fo i da:^n 3 pf t&, 39
ich Ioola of jnrlda p866. ap. 37.39








10


fy the esd of the first year the segro schools had inc rased in
ranaer to sixty-five, the teachav to for-trfive, and the enrollment to

2,726/
The period from 1 68 to 187$ sw marm d progress in education
both colored and white, but aore probably in the first on account of the
northern infiluesW in aidirg thcan
By 1866 Jacksonv~lle had thrr ee ero ssaoos, four teachers and
over five hmIdred P pupils. The Stanton Irntitute stood on the corner of
as3hley anad Bridg Strbtas, on tAb site of a a uiding built by the Frted-
nem 'ankc in 1866, which was k.afterwar bur;F d7
During the d4cradne 1$ro 36 to 187$ there had been grater ad-
vasmcent in education on the part of the State than at any pr
Ut~oe* The Conrtitution of 166~ authorized the Leislature to organise
a chool aystai for both ncse, provided for a State Superintoend t of
Public Inatruction Ide eah county a mhool district ad stabished a
County Board of ?ublic Inrtrnrtion with a County Supritenent of schools.'
The County wardd had thrity to appoint local school trustees This was


Wav re.tt. Cochnran, -itsy of U. School uc o
j^ridjPenaniywvXaias The New Er fyara Woapayj 19L*
%loannt Daniel Gold, frl 9j al Coitx flilao Floridae
Q rocor C re19p 29# po 1*b5-I

E sate, gg Of J3&e&nar


^Ibidi,







11


the foundation of the present school steatew Dural as, one of the first
10
counties to or.anise its school board with a county superintendent.
The first ity directory for Jaconvilne was published in 1870.
The directory givvs eoe insight to the history of Stantonr "iTe 'free'
school was Stanton Normal Institute, of which there wer six departants,
inclalirt ona for whit children with iH AverJ as tWacher*.
iss Celia t.ll am served as the principal of Stanton at this
time. The teachers ad dspartamnts wre listed as-
Noraal epartaent, Miss P.A. Williamr First Inter'-
aeiate, wiss D. Richan sod intermediate, Miss Maria
Robinsona Third Inteandirates, tia Co.K sWilliaa) First
Priar a E.L. tlltAS Se nd Prinmry, iLss ary Still;
For w~iites H* Avery T~.hacher
'dlte northern tea o ers were w emKloyed by the ).roodmmns aIreau
until the County lea~ d the propty for the purpose of conducting "Pfee
school for colored children.
In 1082 Dr. J.C*. Watos a northem colored anM vas elected as the
first principal of Stanton, after it bece a public school. He served
until s1 8.
'm.ate described Stanton in 1881S
The Santon Institute located on ite corner of Ashle
aed Bridge Streets is lar1 brick building, ee~ td
the site of on*m built in 1666 by the Friedann, 1 Tureu, and


owa SEverewtte CoCsran St of & aLc whool Educatio
orda, Pennrylvuantas The Nw Era TheaNwp.Si's^ i^ ^r>-.


2jackaoavilla ot mrt Cig S cfttyt iO, p. 9*








12


afterwards burned. This building is occupied bty graded
school for ootrd children. Its principal, Rev. DT.4
Gulp, is an educated geien mn of pue African decent.
He has Isee assistants. The school in a prosperous
condition and has a large attendance.

Mr wI.Mo Ar!tell., srvd as the principal of Stanton frim the open

ing of the fall twm 1687 to the close of th school year 189,4 At that
time he retired. The next principal was Jmes Weldon Johnson. Jam'
7eldon Johson wa born in Jacksonvill, Florida June 17, 1871. ie at*
tended Staanton and Maduated from the eighth grade. "This was all the

training a youth could receive from the public eshool at tlis times .
Sr. Johnson graduated from Atlanta University in 1894o. He w aslad to

accept the principal ship a Stanto. before he graduated. He accepted
the position and served from 1894 to 1902. At the aCe of twentyithree
James eldon Johnson beoom the principal of Stanton. "He had in hia hands
the administration of a public school with a thousand pupils and twnt
five teacherss"
At the cl ofs f the first year of Mr. Johson's attnistration
twentW-six pupils iwee ready to be graduated fr the eighth grad. Mrs.
16
JohnSso began plans to aead the e ucation of youth beyond the eighth
grade, He aroused the interest of the class in the projectJ then he pers-
msuded their parent, to let the come back the follow ig year. Principal


-Jaccksonville's First aCi4 Dector 1.70, pe 9,
Jae4 s Wefldon Johnson, Autobig Ao Thia The viktng
Prsae, New lorks 196,s p 129.


^Ibg^ ,p129.









13


Johnson laid ot a course for the pupils that was practically the Jbnior
Preparatory course at Atlanta Univerityr. He taudtt the class, The next
year he followed the s procdurEg told the esagrintendiet what he had
done, and asked for assistant. The general assembly room waa converted
into extra clam During the third ywr the second high school assistant
was obtained. Jam eldon Johnson introduced 3panish as the modern lain
guage in the couwn which he teucWht h wel. "That in short is the plan
by which Stanton Graded School was developed into Stanton tsgh School.*7

tfr, Johnson studied law whilee 1arbig as principal of Stanton and
was admitted to the Florida Bar During the Stanton drs he wrote with
his brother Raymwnd Jothnon the marabls ft EUery Vbine and Sing.1
Mr. Johnson wa priwipal of Stanton when the school was destroyed in the
Jackronville City fire of 1901e After the firo Stanton was rebuilt.
The Dural Comnty School Board ap sved p96,3.o00 for the construction of
Stanton. The school was nthed and s ready for opening the firt week
in AtWruary 1902. The building wa described by Mr. Johnson as huge,
crude, threes tory fraer building, t, Johnson was informed that the
Board propod to do awy with Stanton as a central ahool, ad for that
reason they oaroted a tAmorary building* It was not long before the
rctr was cmde mned as unsafe*0 IPrroisions wre made to repair Stanton.


1a7 m lFfldon Johnson, AutobiogpI Nl, The hiking
Pren, New York; 1916s .-
a. P. 129.
$rl1easaut bDeiel Gold, Histfy o ^gw Co ly. Porida; ThS
cscord Co ipmy, W929i, p. 197,
20laalte of the shool Board









34


Mr. Johnson resigned prior to the fall term of 1903 IHe remained
in New York with his brother h" e was enN aged in writing Eoas C nd

msuical plays for the stage*

r. SP Robi~non, a o served as the assistant principal under
Mr. Johnsn, ~ ws appointed by the :Doard of P uli Instruction to m aoeed

Wr. Johnson.

Mr. Robinson served from ?4SeptmBy 1903 through JSwe 1912. For
the school ternt 1912-13 he s as the principal of Oakland lemntary
School. Mr. I?. Johnson a erved as the principal of Stanton for one tera*
Mr Robinson waa transferred back to VS.tanton for the school year 1913J

1913.
During the adinistration of Mr. obtinson the first eBgal trustees
for Stanton were appointed. The trustees wae appointed May 23, 1911#

amelyr 5atmebsi Archibald, SH, Mart, A.L. L s, J.r. 91oyd#, OL.
Gra~ieaa, T.L, Purcell~ n.C. Vawnderthort J.t. pI~ng, and W.H. Style

Mr. Robinson rosianed at the end of the school year 191U Ht ao-
coutd a position as principal of the Jartow High School

SMr IA. Bl ooker the eighth principal of Stantn, served from

Septeabera 191 through hJune 1917*
In the first yesr u r r, U. looker'ss administration the question
21E
of better school house the leadirg issue. A Bond issue of own
million dollars ws voted for school district nu one. The 9Board of


a e eof th .tanton Sc 0l Tr.Stees 13t.








36


Trustees of Stanton vwro not satisfied with the proposal to build three
building instead of rebuilding ftanton. On March 15, 1915 the tainton

Trustees together with other citisens, began a suit against the ual

County Board of Public Instruction. The ease wa settled by the agreement

that

A...the school board would erect on the site of the
Stanton school grounds, one good fire proof school
building that would be equvrtlent of schools for *hitet
childrain in Jacksnville in all respects, Th bui* i
and mquipmn t should not cost less than $8~,,00,000y.

Mr A. .A Bloeoker reman- d as the principal of Stanton from Septem-
ber 191 Uthrough June 1917, Then he was transferred to the N1ew Davis

3trvet School as the first wincipal.

The be o the 0 ra tin la dedicated the 15$) g tiag class dedicated their yearbook
to 1r'. Bloeakr. The Davis 3taet School was named the Zasah Blockeri Junior
High School in 3192.

tr. George It Sampoon came to Stanton in September 1917 as the

principal. He served for three school Drr n 8in his a nistdaation
the present Stanton Shool building was comletd in i sfpttedr at a cost
-0)
of $212,68, Wacolu di equi mt. The mbulding ws deiated Noveer 23,

1/17A Ur. JMa6 S I N. lWon Iecrvd as assistant principal, with twenty-four
teachers#

The develoapet of eacro public education prior to 1920 ends under
p. arpon s adInistration. He retired as the principal of Stanton in

June 1920.



k utn ofSaX CtheDm Bpond of I_ truction. DcoEdabc ,





Mr. JN, Wil son, the formt r assistant principal as elected as
the principal of Stanton for the Sp tembwr teta 1920. 1o asrAed ftom

4eptersr 1920 to as 19371 he requested a transfer to the LongeBran h

lemminary School and served until his retlrsent in Juno 19Z5

frr FP.J. Anderson m elected as the succeeding principal to
r. 1, il1son. lie evd until his death the second saestr; 19i The

assistant principal, It, Charles D. Brooks completed the school tera.

For the fall term 198&469, the principal of Davis Street Schorols
I*r, J.L. Terry was transferred to Stanton*. jro. aione J. bitlers his

assistant principal was also transferred with hin. r Terry is the

present principal of Stanton 'iUgh School









CHAPTER W I


H"AISOROAL FINDINS OF STANTON I SOBL

LOCATION

the Stanton High School is located on west Ashley Stree on the
corner of lBrad Street (formrly tBridge 3tre't). The school in located
appxoximately four blocks fom the cater of the cito.
IIsmdiMatey after these mancipatio the N~ero Citiens of Jackson-
ville organized th~er elves into an rwucational Socaety and on February 8,
1868 pnrohaed from Osaian fB Hart and wife the property on which the
sChool now and
The proper was purchased for eight h red and fiMty dollars
($8$^o.o)
The itS~a proposed to e ot on this property a school building
to be known as the Florida Institute. Ho vf the Sducational Society
was not ftlnmcialy able to eret a building on this pprty Arrange.
Ments were perfected in Dcember, 1868 with the Fred si Burau to
aeret a building. The first building was ereted and named St~nton in
honor of Gearal Adin Ioastear Stnton, Scretry of war in Lincolns
Cabinet.,


Ilntaut of tW School Tr1stees, Stanton High School Jacksonville
Florida.


gRtqdbe o f ^ sta gj~ .ldjlla Jacaovile Florida- 1317,









18


School was conducted by the sreedaen Buresau for the first four-
ten yeM. Ithe Frwadamn apq4oyWd northeam white teachers, At the and of
this period the wal County School Boanfd lesed the property for colored


The school was destroyed by fire twics, once in 1882 and again in
the Jcks ille city ire in 1901. The fir in 1882 was of incendiary


by fire which included Stanton, The school was insured from the in
surance a es w building was Wrected on the former tite. The new Stanton
was a larso 0rae 0 S three staory asreotu r thou h inadequate in aonstenoion
the school was ue ud until the pre t Stanton Iigh Sacool was completed
Nowvbe 23# 1917.,

Evid esa of edwucatioal progress for the awesmon 1916-1917 iS Er.
fle~ted in t ineaserr in esnollm t, There were 9,12 white children in
the oountyv 4762 colored, a total of 14t174%, Thae nmb1 of children mn*
rollMd in Athe swion of 1926427 wr 21576 in the city and 2,08 i1n the
arual section. There wwr 9,821 colored ch en the city aid 959 in
the rural district, mk a grand total of 34,76 childra in tie county,
Thar ws an l ea within the cunty in ten yers of nearly two hundred
and fifty pisent4

The fbrvnor Govarnwr uller arren aside


Pleaa ,t eaniel Ood4, f.ist9iy f Dai gCuff, f lorida, The
ren cmt par, 1r, p|. 21 2 ..-"









19


It is a source of gnxat attsfaction to -9 to know
that Forida has a school plan authorisod by law Which
not only provide for increased anrollent but also for
Sing teacht8e as tiey apror4 the r training and for
thi epanion of those tpres of w W which tend to
pake a woplete program of educational.
The rost productive physical improzvemt period for both white
and Nfgro Schools came after 19tr4 6 Rjnorld, rmith and flls6 ad a sur
va of the ~pl ical properties and the school plant of the pfulic schlola
of Dural County, pE c r 31, 1965 The stu rt$, that Stanton High
School was the only senior hirh school fbr Negroes in Jacksonville ae
Dual Court, It was reco d that at least one nw senior high
school should be developed, A new location for the new hih school was


Lack of playg&mnd pqace and lose proxinil to u~elSirable 1in
fluece condoms it for the purpose irt started.

The council of social Agenlies cono~wr with [ills survey in
reosanre ling the Coakman park location for one of the rew senior high
schools, A second senior high school was record d to be built in a
location to care for population trends,
Af a result of this srv*r general renovations on Stanton began
in 1947 and oontinmud through 190,


le Morris, The Florida handbook, 191919%0, TallahQassa, Floridas
The Peninmula CosparV p. 317.' .
___Ida, J.'aitb ad. Hilm, A Snry aixl Stu^pz of the Phyica
~ ;pygd,~ ~ Scxfzool 3Plant o thei 1o te d,*a B

TCouncil of Social Agencies, Jaconville Looks At Its Negro Corn.
mmity, Jacksonville, Florida, 19k6, p. %),








20


The school plant wut provide the pqiteal facilities
to conduct a program des ed to amt the educational noed
ofyof oth of soday school age, his ueessitatMe provi-
sions for a %P arety of classroom ~ctivites, xa tr crricu-
lar or class ativites, mtd reoational cd comm~Pti
Sovittesa, nwide hoawiing ad equLipn&t or these activity
ti the plant mat provide 1l nwtan ater, wheat ard
ventlation, Nan protection s rvisq which contribute to the
health and safety of its occupant0
The aitsion of the business district of Jacsonvillo has render-
ed the pre nt location of Stanton less desirable for high school purposes

TPE HISTORY OF %ATi 'A. OIL a0 HIGH SCIEXOL

te second high school deeloped for Negroes in Dutwa County was
the UIMOth W1 Qilbert School.

LOCATION
The Matthew W, Gilbert Shool ias locatd in a quiet ridatal
rea knomn as the. ataide orf JackMsonvilles he school is on Franklin
Street which gsav th school theO early n of the Franklin Stree School*

the preemt site was qpur D t the Dual County Board of Publi
InstrUoon tfroa uthe Bptist Acade~gr. ILtthw W. Gilbert was erected in
1926, the original cost wa $108,2261.9 his school m op d for the
first c?*nael february 7, 1927 as an Elemntary School SAtrfy r mado
this consMnt about o ilbrta


Coopratnve Stuy of Secondary School standards, k aluativ
Ctt. .19!0 Editi on, p. 2V37.
'9Duvl County or urd of Public Instrtt~ on, JacOonville, Florida,
The office Ot School Constaction

ehrge D, Straer, t of the Surve of the Schools of Dura9
County, Florida 4aw Zoarks Tachara College, Colmbia Ucniversity, 1927, p. 391.









21


A new mad aupior buildit has boon plned for
colored children Ihe building one of the best in
the city* The colored children asould be required to
maintain it at the high standard which has been set in
its planning ald equipment.
School ope Ed Sfor the popfls February 7, 1927 with an enrobllnt
of 83%1 pupils. MI. turas E. Pan was elected as the trast principal of
Tatthew W, Gnilbert. The faculty consulted of twelve teachres and the prin-
cipal. One of tat original ab is a praent aenar of the faculty, 1r,
Miabelle Oliphant

The late ?rk Payne served as the principal of Matthew* 4 Gilbert
for at ahrt period. ie served from rebruary 1927 though Jine 1927. The
Dutal County Board of Public IXntruction elAeted his as the tfirt Colored
aSpmrrior for elemrntary and secondary schools
Wr. Vinet SP~teward eaoceeded a Payne as the next principal,
likewise searbd ab shfd rt period, He retired at the end of the first
sama ter in Jauary 1929. v r* i4dneoy Tillinghmust was elected a the fourth

principal to ooletot the smondW aWxoter fof 1929*
R*e Willira orris wae elected as the nw Priaciial of Matthew W.
Gilbert. se organized the school to insure the best possible results in
educ action for the gilbert b Oys and girls. Testing in Gi2bwt bean during
a r, srrits adnimtration., r itioria retired fro. gilbert in June 19A3
Wr. Wifias MI, wRanas was elected to macened t, tMorris, n o served
an the principal of Gilbert ftoa ptesber 1934 until his death in Febrary




1the ~bard of Pblio Intreation, DAual County, Attendance DUpartaaot.









22
The adinitratLon oat the late W ssor WM*. ine outtand-
irv for the following chances and d8velopat oocurrdt
1 The first and only sixth rade graduaton ws held.
2. The status of the school wes changed froa Elem ntary to
22
Jimior Rih School In 193.

3, The rna3 of Fr'ankin Stfret School to Matthewv V Gilbert
Jvnior ITich School, the school was namd in honor of iatthew W G.* ilbert
founder of the florlda Normal mad Inl w trial Collaeg, St. Auguatiwne
7f1rida
h. Tten additional lsrsrooa wre adde Wd prMPai31y to meet the
growing d md need an additional publ ahool
%. An fntrCoMMani action te w so installed throughout the
enttir plant through the efforts of the rapils and teachars.
The distribution of israde Is braitZy discussed as bllowna
Kattheww iW Gilbert carried grades onem trugh eight from 1927
through 19).o
At' th beginning of the 19t6sUo school yoer all Wlemntary graides

4(WMres oe through aix) wre traBnstrred to o&1lnd Eiamentary school.
Vatthew 4W Gilbert aaintarind the junior high school grades (grades sevmn
through nine). Te aCdition of th senior high grads bagan in Jamar
19i an rd oenoludteid in rar 19~2


Tatwof the Dwral County 7eard of Public Instraction, l9!3.

j Upe.a 396,










23


Tmo yers befr e the Senior 5igh school was established at
iatthewr W. Gilbert, Pofessor Willia Rainee diId t M, Eu ane J. Butwe
the forer Assistant Principal at Stanton Hih School was elected to rse
place ?*~ Raines. ;He ervd as the Acting Principal for the second saea*

ter 190 and returned as the PrinCipal in Sqptebw 1950. MF. aflar is
the prewxnt Principal of fatthew W, Gilbert High 9dSo .

Uatthew 4. Gilbert has stemdily promreaSS under the present lead
ership of r*, Buter. The following changes and development occPred

tawier his iddaitration
1. 1he addition of Oavrn clOasoos, a First Aid Room, throe
Lounges, an Asistant Principalos Officel Cafeteri, and Library,
2. Thir~tythree pupils rarded diloma at the first high
school oomeBas at, January 22, 1952.

The Southern Association of Co ges and Sondary Schoola
warded full wcnrvditatiou to Matthew W e Gilbert, NovbrW 92.
The validity of the steady physical and educational gwt has
been reflsted to sote amtent, in the increase in pupil Bnwro lmnt, in"s
create in the staff and in the s Opanuion of the curriculum,

INRcaS1 IN STAFF

In the year 1927 the faculty comnsited of thirteen meers*
faculty rwtr for 19-3$1 2 contains the na r of fty-fwor persons, af
when fourteen hold the Mastrs Dgrees All international personnel are re

quired by tho state to hold a four year college degree to teach in the
Florida Schools.









24


GH0W R InNSTRUCTIONCL PERSONNEL

Tebahers in Dual county are classified according to their train

Zag into ranlw.,
Th t h pay is based uipon his rank and years of experiOnce.
R*ank indiocatea that an indiviual holds a aadva~ ed Post Graduate
CwtiKicate based on six yers of College Preparation.

Rank II indie atas that an individual holds a Post Oraduate Cert.
ficat. based on a flafter's Dogmee or its equivasat,

ank ITI iW1ictes that an iividual holds a certificate baod
on a four yar college degree.
rank IV irndiate that an individual possesses at least nrwt
smeneaw hors f00 college credit.
Rank V indicates that an inivdidua has rn led ss than ninety
sawester hours of colego crdi t.

Table I slow e the prcenataeo of instructional per l in ah
certtiicate training rank from 19h731$254









2%


TABLE I
PESCEITAGE OF INSThOCTINAL P mrM9NEL IN MACH CERTIFICATE TRAINING RANK
DtWAL COM$T, FLORIDAA


ankt 19S74-1w8 19h8-1 9 X1949 49% 19 0o-1 i1 19%1-19S52

1 0 0 502 % ,$o
U 4.03 4.974 14$ 1.37 7.ai
III 61.o7 67.70 80.31 8%.79 85.93
Vt 27.2 19.88 12.43 8,7 0 643
V 6.& 4S59 2.9 55 o

Notes igr refer to t he a grS o teachers of u a alnd the figure~ s
itre compiled from the State Deparbnt of Public Instrwtion Tallalassee
Florida 1952*

DEV7EOPMWR O THE CMRICUWM

No phase of ecoondary edcattion is more significant and far-reaching
than the administration of the curriculum.
The eb s of the taval County Board of Public Instruction emloyed
the services of several curriculum ap cialists in 1948*199 to study the
crricul.um of the Duval County Schools, The teachers in each school in
Durwal County worked with the specialists,
The present course may, on paper r, eble considerably the tradi
tional one, however there is a chane in ephasis. A yet we have been


_James B, EdaonsU Joseph 8. RoeMr ad Fraia Daoon, Te A4d
sanistration of the Ibdeia Sr' O School, Nerw osr The Vaaci33E nSupfl any,
r9 a










26
=nable to find a plan of education that seems more widely usaBle and satis-

factory than ooim form of the traditional subject matter courses. But in

the Du~al County Schools it is recognized that the subjects ar not to be

taught because of any worthines of their own but siqpdy as avenues along

which the individual mind and character W be best directed toward whole*

soae maturit. The early school frequently gave the impression that the

pupil was regarded Werely as tUa medi for the perprtuation of the glory
of the subject. In the two High Schools, Stanton ad Matthew GiOlbert

primary consideration is given to the pupil and teaching the subject only
as i iis of benefit to himt This is t t rue difference between the old

and new view points in education. The subjects are much the same, their

purpose and traatmnt, the reasons advanced for their exitenos are com-

pletely different,

The present rcomewaed curriculum of the DXral County
School Systen contains tay traditional subjects as w ll as
some new ones. The difference in the former and nw cnrri-
cula lies not in the namee of the courses in each but in
their Sartng points s aiM. The recoh~ded curriculum
started with an analysis of the needs of boys m~a girls in
our area today called the Iperatve needs of Youth. old
co-ures were selected or new ones igned to met these
needs in the best mannr possible,

The courses themselves in the reoomided curriculum for the Dural
County School system are designed to et the needs of Ineral County boys

and girls,16 but eqal care has been taken to insure that the teacher who


The Curriculum Revision Coa ittee Report, Dural County, Florida,
19(49, P. 93.


I '' I










27


mist implemnt the pro;ran are .a d with the concept of the wholesome
dmvlopmnt of the individual a the goal of education ad with the recog-
nition of the fact that subjects are merely convenient avenues leading to-
ward this goal to be followed insofar as they continue to lead td rd the
desired end. Subjects are to be tauM ht ot for their own akej but as
developers of attitudes and behaviors ich will determine the child s
adjustment and social competence.

The Curriculum Stucdy ld to the developmet of the present recoin
Meande curriculum which is given

There ar four tapo of curricula offered in Matthew w* Gilberta
College Preparatory, Ccarcialsj Oeeral and Vocationsal The College
Preparatory curriculu gives a foundation for further study in collage t
technical schools. Tha Compareial c curriculum mwy be terminal or give a
bass for further tdy in college. The Vocational Curriculum is both

terminal md College Preparatory, Stent who omaqplete tUs plan are

qualIied for entrance into college or eaploymt in trdade

The subjects offered for each curricula are given,

Orade 10
General Cout*e Businms Course Col Course
Required aequireds Required
vysicl al Edution PhysicalBd Eucation Physical Education
English 3, 4 &Eglish 3, o English 3, Is
mathfemticAa business Mathematics Algebra 1 2
1, 2 language 1, 2 or 3

^H[lts~ ak for T^ ltattheow W, Gilbert ttgh School9 Jackson.










28


Grade D
(Cont*d.)


Tlectives 2-
PASebra 1, 2, 3 or 4
Art
asiec athnatics
Bible 1, 2 (i credit)
Business arithmetic 1, 2
economi e Oeoraphy 1, 2


3usijassa Core

Elstives 2
History 3o
Inmhiuatal Arts
as~-gue 1, 2 or 3
Music
(Band or Chorus)


Co. 34 s Courng

The Electives are
the same n given
for the Business
Course


Grade 11


Onmeral Course
C~~-a2 qawlmna


fquired


Physic al education
English !, 6
History

Electives 2
Algebra 3, 4
Art
Basic Mathematicas
nible 1, 2 (j credit)
Business Arithtatic 1, 2
Economic Gography 1, 2


Business Co


Required


Pbhyic al Bduatlon
English 5,v 6
History 5, 6
ypAwriting 1 2
Shorthand 14 or
toodceeping 1s 2

aectiveesr nane


P Co urGo

Required

Physical E-ducation
English 6
History 5, 6
i)mtheatics 5, 6

Electives 1

Industrial Arts
language 1, 2, or 4
IUathatics 5 6

Shorthand 1, 2
SpTic 1, 2
Typewriting 1, 2


Grade 12


uirnesw s Co
Rapiredt


Reqireds


ColWe e curse

Required,


Physical ?Pdx ation
English
Electivs 3
Alcebra 3, 4
Basic Hathematica
usio~bsep 1,2, or 3,r
uTsiness Econosics 1


Physic al sEuc action
TEglish
Toypwritin 3, # or
BookkeWpin& 3, 4

Electives 2
Art.
Bible


Pbysic al education
English

Electives 3
The Electives are
the esme as offered
for the Business
Course


F__










29


Grade 12
(Conktd.)


a Issaas9





7Problewm of Awican
Demaorsacy
Shorthand 2 3 or 4


Grade 10

r4tIeish III & IV
SasiC MatheMtiCe
or Algebra
P yicaal Aucation
ITndustrial Artu


flanla Sfolys


usimness Arithmetic
IMsines LawI
Clerical Practice
Divrsified coopere-
tive Training
History !, 6
Induitrial Arts
Latin American fiew
story 1, 2
tana t
Salesmanship
Solid -e0itrxy

VOC rTTOhAL CfUR tICuLqa

Basic Off riAI

Auto Mecharni


English IV & t
Amrican History a V VI
Related mathematics or
Che&dstry
Auto Mechani c


Coie Coase*


-lish Vla II & VIII
Related Science or
Pysrics I & II
Vocational tonotc a
or Civics
Auto Mechanics IIT & IV


AUTO BODY AEID ?WEFTPR RRAI'R CUALJCUILUM


Graswe


english I TI & IV
,asic Uathomtia eor
Algebra
Plysical sAucation
Industrial Arts Dnrwf.
ing and Shop


imnglii 7 VI &v
Amrican History V & VI
Related Mathe atis or

Auto fIdy and FMnder


aEglish VII & VIII
Related science or
Chatistiry
Vocational 1~caooics
or Civicv
Auto Body & Pedr


Grade 10
s-a- ~--~t-.-~


-2e










30


CAJIPENTR 6tAND *A A i~WMKIG CURRICTUM


Grade 10
aFl ~Ro


english III & IV
Basic Iathw tics or
A gC ebra
Phsaical FAdation
Industrial Artra rwm
Imng at Shop


Grade 10
sinw ------ -,


english III & TIV
Basic l- atheatice or

Pifreal education
Industrial Arts Meoidhanl
cal Drawing Shop


0Engliah V & VI
American History V VIX
Woodmoridng Drawing
4XWV


cA1rrE CtTtICtMJW
Grade ,

1glish V & VI
Ar~itcan History V & VI
chiantcal Drawopls
Sheet MEtal Shop


Aga~ish VI & VIII
Related la-t~atios
Vocational onomiteos
or Civics
Cabi$ taskg hop


Grade 12


English VII & TVI
Relied Mtlhematicn
or Gwomt3ry
Vocational Scnomies
or Civics
Sheet Metal & 3hop III
& IV


The four types of curricula offered in Matthew ', Gilbert High
school are offered in Stanton ILtth School likewise .




Two tables are presented t show the increase in pupil emnrolant

for the two High Schools uader stu~y, Stanton and Gilbert*


THEi DVWrlOPMENT IN PUPIL PO3JP1ATIO AT SVTAN=T AND %ATTHE: NI. GILEMT



There has been a radtal increase in ppil enrollmnt, average daily

attetanre and peroentae of att~endme at both Stanton and Matthew Gilbert*



S f t AWtendanc Deaortaent a Brd of Public Instruction,








31

Between 19i7 and 1952 the schools' population increased at Stanton
from 1,319 to 1,342 and at Matthew Gilbewt frm $15 to 1,072.
To show the gradual increase in pupil eanro=llma avage daily
attendance and percentage of attendane two tables are presented.

TABLE II

BASIC DATA RMARDIM? PUI EN OLM TS AND PERC TAQE OF ATT12DACEE
... .. ,- .. .. m m-m ml-- . .. . ... . .. .- .. ... -- .- I L] -- I_ L :I T_ ;

Year Stanton iJgh 3choo_, ThgUTwelfh Qrade





ote: F o wore coiled fArage Dafly Aterd eaPte g
1ErotllJnith aend!tar of A ttlda n

19,47.448 1319 1129 92
1946o49 1316 131 93
191940 13$u 1206 93
1950m1 2382 3U51 90.79
1951"52 32 1230 91*16

Notes Fige a were conpilad frrei reporUs froa Attemnace Depart-mnt,
EBoard of Public Instruction, Jacksonville, Florid."









eaeeords front the Alttendare Deartment, Board of Public Instruc-
ti on, J a kMSH; nie, Floria,









32


TABLE 31
BA3IC DATA RIBARWI? PUPIL SSI AMD PiCErkTAQS OF ATTE4DAIEC


Year Cb chovth lfth Gae
Etnrtolaent Attendance o ef AtnxairAi
197-485 $16 6 92
19849 $99 26 91
1969 725 66991


19%$192 1072 922 91.96

Notes Figuyr "mre compiled from reports from the atteidasce darts
Ment, noard of Public Thitrnwtion, JackrnZville, Florida.










TABLES IV
BASIC DATA RARAltDIC PUPILS, WElMIDWTS
STANTOMN 3H SCHOOL


AND GRADUATES


Yeaar ErTll nt atsea -Total graduates iwho rnterew

1914.1tA7 161 00oo 3IA 2ls 1339
197lt-1948 1277 133 168 301 128
2198-1949 3316 135 r170o 305 1q
194619 50 1313 102 191 293 42
19%0-1591 3382 120 181 301 353
W191-19%2 31s2 132 200 3315 io

Note s Figurs were compiled from the principal' filst, Stanton
High School, Jacksonville, rForida June 1 32.



A31SC DATA RIAfRDDI PUPILS, ENiTOLUE TS AND GRADUATES
OLTTHEA t* GILURT WItH SCHOOL

year MEllaOAt GOradustnt Total Graduate tWo 1rteom*

l9o0-451r 9% 0 0 0
1951-1492 17 39 39 78 36
192193 1100 13 %0 93

Notas tMatthew 10 Gilbert Senior High School began in JaSmary 1952.
Figures were compiled from the office of the principal, Matthew ,. Gilbert
High School, Jstncosvll, Florida, June 19%3.


33












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CHTPTER V


S'uim ANDi C4otCLUSION


The dvelop&jnt of public school education in Dural County dates

from the Civil Yar,

Before 1860 public school education was considered to be the duty

of the individual rather than the nmmicipalivty
Public school education for degrees and for white children began

ats almost the same time

The pr.ent educational ytem of Florida was inaugurated under

the constitution of 1868 and the school law of 1869. One provision of the

la was8 the requiremnt that egro children should be gven educational

advantages equal to those of the white.

Tw periods in the history of Stanton igh School stand out, The

first, 18661900 was the period of organization. The second, 1902-1952,
was a period of expansion. Additional courses of study were added, in-

creased egnwlsaent contirmed throc~hout this period

1iISTORY Of 5TANTON

The Negro citisans of Jacksonville purchased frm Mr* and rss

0.o Hart the property on which Stanton nw stmads. The pur e was made
February 8, 31868.

The first school buldi was erected by the reedt reau In

186 and a Stanton in honor of general dwin &rcMasters Stanton, Secrs.

tay ofr r in Lincoln's CabLinet.










37
The sadool was destroyed by fire twice, once in 1882 and again in
the Jacksonville City fire, M~a 3, 1901.

The school was rebuilt after each fire from the insurance received.

The Stanton school has remained on the original site on the corner

of Broad and Ash1w~ Streets from 1868i1952.

The status of the school was changed under the administration of
Jams aJdon Johnson. Re mLdo the school a high school in 1896.

The present school building was dedicated flovaeber 23, 1917, r.

George Sampson ws the principal*

RLT2Dn; QILBEYTZ

The Gilbert site wa purchased by the school board of Duval CounM

from the FlTrida Bptist .cadsr in 1926.

The present school was constructed in 1926. The school was com-

pleted in 1927 The first classes began o7,bruary ? 1927, Rufus .

Pmqne was electr as the first principal. The first faculty consisted of

thirteen mm s including the principal. One of that original muber is

now teaching at Matthew 4* Gilbert.
MatThew Gilbert was referred to as the Franklin Street School

from 19274192, In the fall of 194243 the school rwas Mr ed Matthew W,

Gilbert Junior High School, in hoor of Mr, Matthew Gilbert, a founder

of Florida Normal Industrial MeFarial Colleog of St. Augustine, Ylorida.

The status of the shBool changed in 19!2. Matthew i. Gilbert be-,

esen acn credited high school, Noveber, 192,









38


THi RIZATItrSHIP OFS T SCHOV OL TO rTIr COwUuNITY

tanton nd Matthew GilSbert High schools exist primarily for the benefit

of the boys and girls of the community which it serves. The schools should

know the distinctive characteristics and needs of the people and groups of

people of the school comannity, particularly those of the children.

Towothirds of the Gilbert Commamty is composed of tegroes, the

other third it composed of ttite residents.

t'rio is other secondary school, 3oylanH8aven HiTh bSchool, a

private hich school supported by the Methodist Church for Colored. Girls.

Both schools, Matthew T Gilbert and 3Boylanw-aven, present musical

prsams, concerts and Vepe r Services to help improve the cultural and

educational standards of the cooanity. One program for the ocmaity is

presented each mnanth

The two schools work harmoniously with the twenty4five Colored

churches in the cowmtmity The schools do not schedule a Sunday program
during the regular dcurch hours,

The general health of the onommnity is good. The community health

age-raes area (1) the 'ltlnor Street rawsery and Baby Clinic, and (2) ay

iHopital. Gilbert is prompt in carrying out all health directives inoued

from atWr one of the health a-ancies.

The recreational agencies of the comamity are very limited*
There are two play grmundse one at tOhe Boys' Parental Horm ani the other at

Oakland Park, ?Matthew N. Gilbert has found it naeoasary to help rPiw.de

wholesome recreation for the children of the com nity. The ,lator Bowl










39


Stadium and the tuwal CountEy narary, both located in the coiramtitr are
used frequently.
Thae is one theatre in the com ity, the Fix' theatre, R h
wanaeir, 1.r* Fothchild, has shown interest in Gilbert throu his frequent
visits to the school and with financial help to school driven,
The civic organisatione of the commit are (1) the Parent
Teachers Association, (2) the ~st Side Civic Club, (3) Dadsla Club, a# d

(4) bthoer-s Club. The ciAvi organisationa have beo e helpful in helping
to brig about a better undmrstnditng betM a the school and the comannity
Each orgawisation has given financial assistance to the school.
The citisten of the Gilbert coamit have exa lifted interest in
the school, its prpoe and program ba school is proud of its ocmi
fld plans to continue working tnoart a bigger ad bettor Matthew W.
Gilbert High School.
In the 192 nvaiwation Report the coa t.e said
Study t of the findii of th acultV committee
regarding the pupil population and community of
Matthew S. Gilbert nigh School reveals that the school
knows its co~prn and is sorg it wfll

SOME OF STE PtOBI&AE iCOUSTE ZD IN Tm DNVEOPMWP T
OF STANTON AND MLTTHE1 W. OILSERT

Fiancing earl education was a probln The public was bitterly op-
posed to s*oeol tax in 1366, f 1886 public sentiment in Jacksonville toward


kC aittee on valxation Representing the Southern Association af Col0
leOe a d seoar~~l y schools, Jaconville, Florida, Noveor 1952.









BIDLIOGRAPt


A, B1ooS

Beat*, Rutard K : and Mronanberg Henry H, Pri of Seconday Educ.
can, Nsw Yorks Vnar -iH Bhook CRompmy, iW94
Boamngt n P o SecoHr dOat r t Ne w Yorks Prentice.

eustt efll t L., thae c and o r c ihoolist ea it Im R032

c l-ala, aaado77r WTaf has

ve Of S School rt, Evaluative Criteria,

Coch~ran, D Ia n tt, Hisrtlo of NbTj Shohe ljfufebl Fal
Owvis$yred"ick t ? k jr .4nii1i g j


Dltst* Jakfatmv1t8a Fixrirt Cit Directory, Jackonfvlle, Florida,

Ewgate, J1mes, Jckonvifle f f t oarnachutett
rinia P~np him Pirinting d;aoyir B, p
Florida State Dep0art nt of Education, Florida Soh Stwi ards, 19158,
Ttllanhau"e, Florida SItate Dpoartmn a iion*

Good, Carter V, aro AS.3, aM S3cates, Douglas E, r4 Mthobo of
mxEationa2 -He h, ?New 'fYork ) D r Appleton Century Y

Gold, Pl ant Daniel, iOa f T hral Coor including Tar g
rAt y USnt Ilas Re aFCBpay, 1929, a34p*
Johnsaon, JameB ?IEd3one 4%tAlgagr Aloft New Yorks Thae Viking

oinroe, Wi'alter S S of dcational a Now York The


torris, Allen, ^h nlrida Handbook 1?94$10, Tllahatsee, florida; The
Pelntlutr"rIl r -fpisry, s.t9










42


Strye, Oeaarge D,, Sry of the ~cholosa of Puv'l Oon Flr
'c^ U versityz, 1927,i 103 pp.

B. PUBLICATrCNt OF LE-ARED OfSAfIZATIONS

Bail~ Thomas a D, Bienwial R ort SperZintendent oar Public Instruction,
Tallahassec, el ri-da, ~~54 0
lorida Schools Look Ahead State Department of BEducation, Tallahaaseeo


1 Cw trouZ FxCton6 6a4seae, Florida,1 19*3.
Ja rkanvile Looks at itae Nsn C The Coucil of Social AXgenci.e
ackson^ Hora, li6.-

lroynolds,, S dth wd IHlls, Smia and StUaI of the c stcal Proaol m


Calirer, .Arone, ears of Pwre n iPblic ShooX Uducattcn1
0ashinte -OtC1 0s111h~ .*t=k a.,
1952.

C, UNPUTLISWiD M1AThIALS

Ashmaor ePI ron L,. "A Srvey of the Alachua County NBgro School Sys ta
Unpublished Vaster a Thesis, Tinivwrity of Florida, 19U46
~Pro Glets n Frwrtt "A History of the Nw Jersey State Teachers College
at Trenton from 185 through 1950," U published Doctor s Dissertation,
School of rEdwatton, New York tUnivrsity, 1950.
Jarboe, ;verette ~* "e Developmsnt of the Public School Systea in
Indiana from I0 through 1870,' Unpu~bised Doctor'sa Dissertation,
Univesrity of Indiana, 1949.
Jasmin, fiTabeh H., "W~n Identification of Some of the Conditions which are
Associated with Absenteeism in the Ninth Grade of the Junior Iigh Schools
for ~nogroes of Jackeonville, Florida with Proposals for Iuprovement,'
Unpublished Master' s TIesis, Florida A. end M. College, Tallahassee,
Floridas, 19O.










43
Iofton, Willston H*, "The DevelopUent of Public ,etucation for Neroeg
in Washington, .C.,t A Study of Separate but Equal Accomodationsa
Unpublished Doctcr's Dissertation, American Uhiversity, 'WVashington,
D.C., 19W4.
'laon, Richard, "A Study of the Physical Plant of incoln High School8
Tollhasem lo ritda," Unpublished Mastert s ihes, i Forida A, and M.
College, Tajla a $o- F1lorida, O190


































APPlfDIXES




























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S. CHO OL TAX DSTRI1C NO. I
:.' '> .' ,
StlA K L If L L N S.

HIM PLATE N0.1-4


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LEGEND

- 86 %

-68 %

- 49 %

- 30 X


--A t-.--^VCi^ r
SCALE OF M* MIMES
OUVAL COUNTY NEGRO POPULATION
SCHOOL TAX DISTRICT NO. 1-1945 CENSUS
PERCENT OF TOTAL POPULATION
A.\ AS OF LESS THAN 0% NIKROs .
" NOT SHOWN PLATE NO. 10


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