• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Half Title
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Introduction
 A review of previous literatur...
 Presentation of data
 Assorted evaluative criteria
 Summary, conclusions and recom...
 Bibliography
 Appendix






Title: Evaluation of programs of work of six selected chapters of New Farmers of America in Central America.
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Title: Evaluation of programs of work of six selected chapters of New Farmers of America in Central America.
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Language: English
Creator: Moore, Joseph Procter
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1955
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title page
    Half Title
        Half title
    Acknowledgement
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    A review of previous literature
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Presentation of data
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Assorted evaluative criteria
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Summary, conclusions and recommendations
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Bibliography
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Appendix
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
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Full Text






AN EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS OF WORK OF SIX SELECTED

CHAPTERS OF NEV FARMERS OF AMERICA IN CENTRAL

FLORIDA











Presented to the Graduate Committee of the Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University In Partial

Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree

Master of Science in Education


Approved:
SChairman


Adviser/












Dean, Graduate So 1o


7.~a~7t












AN EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS OF WORK OF SIX SELECTED CHAPTERS

OF NEW FARMERS OF AMERICA IN CENTRAL FLORIDA










A Thesis

Presented to

the Faculty of the Graduate School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University




_____- e
(-- '- '



In Partial Fulfillment

of the Requirements for the Degree

Master of Science


by

Joseph Proctor Moore

August 1955













ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



The writer acknowledges with sincere appreciation

the splendid assistance which he has received from many

individuals in the preparation of this thesis. Special

acknowledgment is made to the thesis committee. Without

the sympathetic interest and the continuous guidance of

the committee, the study could not have been accomplished.

Acknowledgment is also made to the staff of the

School of Agriculture and Home Economics of the Florida

Agricultural and Mechanical University; to the teachers

of Agriculture in Hillsborough, Hernando, Highlands,

Pasco and Polk Counties for providing information needed;

to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Library

Staff; to Mrs. Vivian B. Young of the Graduate School and

Dr. W. S. Maize, Dean of the Graduate School, who inspired

me in my effort.

Special acknowledgment is made to my wife for her

help, patience, and encouragement, appreciation is deeply

expressed.









iii


TABLE OF CONTENTS


CHAPTER PAGE


I. INTRODUCTION . . . 1

History of New Farmers of America .* *

Aims and Purposes * 1

Program of work . . 2

The Problem .* *. 3

Statement of the problem . . 3

Basic Assumptions . . . 4

Sources and methods of collecting data .

Delimitations . . 6

Definitions of terms . . 6


II. A REVIEW OF PREVIOUS LITERATURE. . 8


III. PRESENTATION OF DATA .. .. *.. 18


IV. SUGGESTED EVALUATIVE CRITERIA . . 8


V. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS .5-

Summary .. . . .. 51

Conclusions . . . 54

Recommendations . . 56

BIBLIOGRAPHY

APPENDIX







iv

LIST OF TABLES



TABLE PAGE

I. Evaluation of Items Related to Extent

Chapters of N F A Make Possible

Effective Participation of Members

Under Proposition I by the

Committee . . . *

I. Evaluation of Proposition II and Related

Items and Extent to Which Activities

Provide Training in Cooperation and

Leadership . . . .


III. Influence of Program of Work in Helping

N F A Members Realize the Aims and

Purposes of the Organization .... .


IV. Evaluation by Seniors in the six Sbhools

of the Degree of Influence of Partici-

pation in N F A Program . .

V. Student Participation and Help from

Teacher of Agriculture in Planning the

Program of Work o. f o . 34








LIST OF TABLES


PAGE


VI. Time Assistance Was Given By the

Teacher of Agriculture in Planning

the Program of Work .* .


TABLE











CHAPTER I


INTRODUCTION

The New Farmers of America is a national organization

of Negro farm boys enrolled in, and studying Vocational Agri-

culture in the public schools in states where separate schools

are maintained.

This group was organized in May of 1927 in the state

of Virginia. Since that time, the organization has grown to

over one thousand chapters with a membership of over forty

thousand individuals.

The organization offers its many members excellent op-

portunities to become great leaders by studying and putting

into practice those activities that are taught to them. It is

non-profit organization which has for its aims and purposes

the following:

1. To develop competent, aggressive agricultural
leadership.

2. To encourage intelligent choice of farming
occupations.

3. To encourage members to improve the home, the farm,
and surroundings.

.. To encourage members in the development of indi-
vidual farming programs.

5. To practice and encourage thrift.
6. To participate in worthy undertakings for the im-
provement of agriculture
48041












7. To develop character, train for useful citizen-
ship, and foster patriotism.

8. To participate in cooperative effort.

9. To provide and encourage the development of
organized rural recreational activities.

10. To strengthen the confidence of farm boys and
young men in themselves and their work.

11. To encourage improvement in scholarship.
1
12. To create and nurture a love of country life.


In order to realize the objectives just listed, each

chapter is expected to carry out a program of work. It is

essential that a broad program of work be planned by each

chapter in order to interest all the members and to offer

an opportunity for each to participate in the activities of

the chapter. The program of work for the year should be

planned within six weeks after school opens. The program of

work of some chapters may vary from that of others, because

of local conditions. Each chapter, however, is expected to

carry out the activities of the New Farmers of America*

official program of work.

It is one of the duties of the adviser to see that

each chapter holds regular meetings and carries out a defi-

nite program of activities throughout the year.


1
National Conference of New Farmers of America, Official
Guide for New Farmers of America. (Baltimores French Bray
Printing Company, 1954)7 P. 14.
*Here in after N F A will refer to New Farmers of America.











The official outline of a program of work as set

up by the National Committee and described in the N F A

Guide may be found in Appendix A of this thesis.

Since the Program of Work is regarded as the basis

for achieving the purposes of New Farmers of America,

it is imperative that ways and means be developed to as-

certain the values of such an enterprise through the

development and application of sound evaluative instru-

ments. Hence, the problem of this study is as follows:

Statement of the problem. To develop and to

apply sound evaluative criteria to the Programs of Work

of Six Selected Chapters of New Farmers of America in

Central Florida.

Objectives

l1 To construct evaluative criteria appro-
priate for ascertaining strengths and
weaknesses of programs of work of New
Farmers of America in six selected chapters
of Central Florida.
2. To apply said criteria in order:

a. To determine:

(1) How well programs of work in local
chapters of N F A contribute to
realizing the purpose of the N F A
organization.

(2) What difficulties teachers of agri-
culture have developing effective
programs of work.

(3) To what extent N F A members parti-
cipate in planning the local program
of work.











(4) To suggest ways and means of
setting up local programs designed
to implement the objectives just
stated.2


Basic Assumptions

1. New teachers of agriculture have difficulty
in establishing effective N F A chapters.

2. Written plans of many departments are not
carried to completion and therefore the full
purposes of the N F A organization are not
realized by the students.

3. Students, advisers, and school officials in
Central Florida are in need of evaluative
criteria to determine the effectiveness of
the N F A programs.

4.. The execution of an effective organizational
program depends on sound techniques of as-
certaining strengths and weaknesses in current
program.

5. The advisers to New Farmers of America chapters
in Central Florida have not developed evalua-
tive criteria that may be used effectively in
their particular situation.

Sources and methods of collecting data. The de-

velopment of evaluative criteria used in this study was

facilitated by an extensive and intensive study of litera-

ture on evaluation and the New Farmers of America organi-

zation. Criteria developed by others investigators for

the evaluation of Future Farmers of America were used

extensively in the construction of the instrument which

became the basis for this study*


bd p.
Ibid, p. 34.









5

The sources of data were the Departments of

Vocational Agriculture in Hillsborough, Highlands,

Hernando, Pasco, and Polk Counties of Central Florida.

All of the departments are located in Vocational

Agricultural Districts and are fairly representative of

the entire farm situations in the state, insofar as the

following are concerned diversified farming, per-

centage of rural and urban students, industrialized

section, size of vocational departments and opportuni-

ties for placement in farming occupation.

The principal sources of data were the vocational

agricultural teachers and senior students. The data

were secured by means of questionnaires. These instru-

ments were taken to the teachers of Agriculture in each

school under study, with the directions that the teachers

permit each senior complete one of the forms.

The questionnaires were returned and studied by an

evaluative committee consisting of a former teacher of

agriculture, another teacher in the regular program, and

the writer. This same committee then made a visit to

each department which had returned the completed question-

naires. An evaluation of the program of work in each

school was made by means of the following: interviews

with the teachers, observations and checking of records.











The evaluative scale used was based on two propositions,

namely: (1) "To What Extent Does the Organization of the

Chapter Make Possible the Effective Participation of All

the Members'? and (2) "To What Extent Do the Activities

in Which the Members Engage Afford Such Experiences As

Will Train Young Men in Cooperation and Leadership?'

These propositions were developed by a National Committee
3
on Standards for Vocational Education in Agriculture.

Delimitations.

I. The data in programs collected by the
writer were limited to the six N F A
Chapters in Central Florida (Highlands,
Hillsborough, Hernando, Pasco, and
Polk Counties).

2. Only N F A Chapters that had been in
operation for several years under the
same adviser and senior students in
agriculture were selected for the study.

3. The evaluation herein made is valid only
insofar as the techniques used are valid.

Definitions of Terms

Evaluation. The term evaluation as used in this

study refers to the process by which the values of an

enterprise are ascertained.

Program of Work. "A program of work is an outline

of activities covering a definite period which includes


3
National Committee on Standards for Vocational
Education in Agriculture. Evaluation Criteria for Vo-
cational Education in Agriculture (Chicagos The Univer-
sity o-f Illnois Press, 1947), p. 243.











specific goals, ways and means of reaching them, and
adequate provisions for checking on the accomplish-

ments."

Six Selected Chapters. Six selected chapters

are the N F A organizations located in the previously

mentioned counties of Central Florida.

New Farmers of America. The national organi-

zation of Negro farm boys who are studying vocational

agriculture in stated where separate schools are

maintained. (N F A)

Central Florida. Central Florida as used in this

study refers to the following counties: Hillsborough,

Highlands, Hernando, Pasco, and Polk.
















4
G. N. Wakefield, "Training for Leadership Through
the Future Farmers of America." M. A. Thesis, 1932,
University of Florida.











CHAPTER II


A REVIEW OF PREVIOUS LITERATURE

1
In 1946, Arceneaux made a study to determine
to what extent the organization of the local chapters

provided for effective participation of all members,

to point out the strong and weak factors of the organi-

zation of local chapters, and to offer suggestions for

improvements. Two other aims of this study were as

follows (1) to determine to what extent local chapters,

through their activities, provided for experiences that

would train their members for cooperation and leadership

and, (2) to point out the weak and strong points in the

programs of work of local chapters and to offer sug-

gestions for improvements.

The data for this study were collected by means

of a questionnaire addressed to the 45 departments

studied, and from an analysis of the local programs of

work which were obtained from the office of the State

Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture.


1
J. J. Arceneaux, "An Evaluation of Programs of
Work of Local Chapters of the Louisiana Association of
Future Farmers of America" (Unpublished MastHs's Thesis,
Baton Rouge: The Louisiana State University, 1946), p. 71












In his study, an evaluation was made of the

forty-five chapters in the Louisiana Association of

Future Farmers of America based on the evaluative

criteria as set up by the National Committee on Stan-
2
dards of Vocational Education in Agriculture. This

Committee states, Proposition I of the evaluation bulle-

tin: "To What Extent Does the Organization of the

Chapter Make Possible the Effective Participation of the

Members?" Proposition II is worded as follows: "To

What Extent Do Activities in Which Members Participate

Afford Such Experiences As Will Train Young Men in Co-

operation and Leadership?"

To evaluate these propositions in the chapter,

a rating scale was used by Aroeneaux as set up by the

National Committee. Terms in the explanation of scale

used are as follows:

1. Perfect or practically perfect, the pro-
visions or conditions are present and
functioning perfectly or almost perfectly.

2. Very good; distinctly above average; the
provisions of conditions are present and
functioning poorly.

3. Average; the provisions or conditions are
present and functioning fairly well.

4. Poor; distinctly below average, the provisions
or conditions are present in inadequate amount,
or, if present, are functioning poorly.


2
Ibid, p. 4.











5. Very Poor; the provisions or conditions,
although needed, are not present at all.


The mean of the forty-five chapters studied

under Proposition I, according to the evaluative cri-

teria, was 3.2. This indicated the provisions of the

proposition were present and functioning in chapters

studied, "slightly better than fairly well." The mean

of the forty-five chapters studied on the basis of

Proposition II was 3.0. This indicates that the provi-
sions or conditions on this proposition were present and

functioning "fairly well" in chapters studied.

Arceneaux drew the following conclusion from the
3
study.
1. It was determined that the activities in which
the members participated afforded experiences
in leadership to a degree considered to range
between "superior to excellent."

2. The chapters afforded experiences designed to
improve community services which ranged from
"superior to fair".

3. Chapters provided activities that were "fair"
in developing organized recreation.

h. The activities providing experiences in
selling, and conservation of soil were "below
inferior".

5. Thrift, scholarship, and cooperative activi-
ties were rated "fair to inferior".



3
Arceneaux, Op. Cit., p. 121.











In 1947, an evaluation of the Future Farmers of
America activities relating to planning more effective
4
chapter programs was made by Masters. The main purpose

of this study was to evaluate the activities of several

chapters in order that more effective programs might be

planned in the future. This evaluation was based entirely

upon values assigned to the various activities by the

chapter members who participated in the study.

Masters concluded that the F F A* members were

carrying on well-rounded programs. F F A members se-

lected ten of the most valuable activities according to

the activities in which they had participated. The
5
activities ranged in importance as follows:

1. Participation in chapter meetings.
2. Keeping of accurate and complete super-
vised farming programs.

3. Paying local, state, and national dues
on time.
4. Helping to conduct meetings in a business-
like manner.
5. Participating in scheduled initiation
meetings.

6. Purchasing of war savings bonds and stamps.


4
A. Me Masters, "An Evaluation of F F A Activities
As Related to Planning More Effective Chapter Programs"
(Masterts thesis, Cornell University).

Ibid, p. 56
*Here in after F F A will refer to Future Farmers of America.












7. Testing milk for farmers.
8. Increasing ownership of productive projects.

9. Participating in project tours.

10. Helping to provide recreation and refresh-
ment for meetings.
6
Geiger, in 1933, made a study of methods of eval-
uating local programs of work of Future Farmers of America

chapters in the state of Ohio. A score card was developed

in this study with the help of the Ohio state supervisory

staff for Vocational Education in Agriculture. The Eval-

uation Committee consisted of the Federal Board for

Vocational Agriculture and a committee of agriculture

teachers from Shelby County, Ohio. The score card

covered nine major criteria based on the objectives of

the Future Farmers of America organization. A value was

given each criterion ranging from 75 to 125 points, and

according to their importance. This score card was used

to evaluate the programs of work of twelve local chapters

of the Ohio Association.
7
From the evaluations conducted, Geiger concluded,

programs of work of local chapters of F F A, in Ohio are


6
L. N. Geiger, "An Evaluation of Programs of Work
of Local Chapters of F F A in Ohio" (Master's thesis, 1933
Ohio State University).
7
Ibid,, p. 66












strongest in providing for social and recreational,

activities. The other assets pointed out were as

follows and in the order listed: leadership activities,

publicity and promotional activities, scholarship acti-

vities, thrift activities and character building.
8
A study was made by Wakefield in 1932 to deter-

mine or evaluate leadership training that a boy would

receive through the Future Farmers of America.

Information concerning the chapter program of

work was secured from the national secretary, from state

advisers, and the teachers of vocational agriculture in

Florida. This next step was to identify and to list

the psychological principles of leadershi-p from a number

of outstanding books and bulletins written by workers

recognized in the field of leadership training. The

programs were evaluated in terms of these principles.

The following conclusion was drawn from this

study: The F F A program of work will train for leader-

ship if those responsible for directing the activities

will keep in mind those principles of leadership.




8
Ibid.











9
In 1941, Jenkins made a study of the programs

of work of the New Farmer of America of Oklahoma to

determine chapter achievements and accomplishments.

He obtained through a survey, statements of the N F A

chapter objectives and goals attained during the school

year, 1939-40. These were then compared with those of

other State Associations. The conclusions listed below

were reached.

1. Many chapters lacked standard meeting equip-
ment.

2. Few chapters met requirements for granting
N F A degrees.

3. Few chapters held meetings to discuss the
achievements in the annual programs of work.

4. Social activities were inadequate in most
cases.

In 1940 and 1941 a study on evaluation of local

programs of vocational education in agriculture was made

by the national committee on Standards for Vocational
10
Education in Agriculture and was compiled by F. W.

Lathrop, specialist in research, under the direction of

W. T. Spanton, Chief of the Agriculture Education Service.


91bid.
Federal Security Agency, An Evaluation of Local
Programs of Vocational Education in Agriculture. Voca-
tional DivTsions Bulletin No. 2O- Agricultural Series
No. 58. Office of Education, Washington, 1949.












The evaluation was based on the evaluative criteria

published by this same national committee.

The evaluation was made up of the program of

activities of over 400 Future Farmers of America

Chapters. The chapters were divided as follows

(1) the very superior program; (2) the superior programs

(3) the average program; (4) the inferior program; (5)
and the very inferior program.

The following conclusions were reached by this

committees

The oharaeteristics of an adequate program
of Future Farmers activities may be described
from a study of the "very superior" and "superior"
chapter programs. These characteristics are

1. More than well-developed activity in
community service and recreation.

2. One well-developed activity in co-
operative buying and selling. Other
types of cooperation.

Leadership -

3. Participation in joint activities with
other chapters.

4.Progress in systematic degree advancement.

5. Common weaknesses in the activities of
Future Farmers program were
(a) Conservat$on activities
(b) Thrift activities
(c) Scholarship activities
The foregoing activities were either not concluded

or they were not regarded as important.











N F A leadership activities of the Florida Asso-

eiation are evaluated on the basis of accomplishment

reports submitted annually to the State N F A Executive

Secretary's Office. These accomplishment reports are

kept in line with the activities and objectives of the

State and National programs of work. Each local chapter

keeps its program of work in line with the state and

national programs. A copy of the Florida Association of

N F A Accomplishment Report has been placed in Appendix T.

of this study.
12
A study was made by Carl V. Tart at the Univer-

sity of North Carolina in 1951. This investigator was

interested in developing and applying sound evaluative

criteria to the programs of work of five selected chap-

ters of F F A of North Carolina. The questionnaire de-

veloped by Tart was limited to two propositions, namely!

(1) "To what extent does the organization of the chapter

make possible effective participation of all members?",

(2) "To what extent do activities in which members engage

afford such experiences as will train young men in co-

operation and leadership?" Tart concluded that (1) the


12
Carl V. Tart, "An Evaluation of Programs of Future
Farmers of America Chapters in Granville, Person, Durham,
Orange and Chatham Counties in North Carolina" (Unpublished
Master's thesis, The University of North Carolina, Raleigh,
1951) p. 83.









17

activities provided were about average in stimulating

effective participation of all members for the schools

studied. He concluded also, that almost 100% of the

programs of work provided experiences that tend to train

for the cooperation and leadership.












CHAPTER III


PRESENTATION OF DATA


A chapter program of work is prepared annually

with two purposes in mind: (1) to give members leader-

ship training, and (2) to furnish worthy goals for

chapter activities.

The methods of preparing a program of work for

an N F A Chapter may vary from school to school. The

local program of work is geared to fit the local situ-

ations. The time for preparing the program as well as

the procedure for executing same may vary among the

schools. The planning usually takes place a month after

school has opened; however, not later than the first six

weeks.

Each department has methods for evaluating chap-

ter accomplishments. These methods are developed co-

operatively by State Department of Agriculture. The goal

is to provide each department criteria which will enable

it to improve its program for the next year.

The chapters under study were evaluated by a com-

mittee of three persons composed of a former teacher of

vocational agriculture, another teacher in the regular

program, and the writer. This evaluation was based on










the evaluative criteria worked out by the national com-
1
mittee on Vocational Education in Agriculture. This

committee devised means of evaluating local N F A programs

of work based on two propositions.

Proposition I. Proposition I is stated as follows:

"To what extent does the organization of the chapter make

possible the effective participation of all members?"

This proposition had fourteen "items or provisions" that

could be used to evaluate the program of work of the chap-

ter as to its effectiveness in providing participation of

all its members:

a. Frequent meetings (at least one per month) are
held, which can be conveniently attended by
all members.

b. Each member has an opportunity to participate
in the meetings at least once during the
regular year.

c. The chapter is provided -with the recommended
equipment to practice degree advancement.

d. The members of the chapter formulate annually
a written program of work.

e. The income of the chapter is sufficient to
finance the activities.

f. The chapter has in its active membership a sub-
stantial majority of all day students of voca-
tional agriculture.

g. A committee functions for each activity or
group of activities.

h. The members study carefully the qualifications
of candidates for office.

i. The officers meet frequently to plan the work
of the chapter.

1National Committee on Standards for Vocational Edueation
Evaluative Criteria for Vocational Education in Agriculture.
(Chicago: The University of Illinois Press, 1942) p.240.








S20


j. The members of the chapter know in ad-
vance what is to be taken up at the
meeting.

k. Records of the secretary, the treasury,
and the annual reports are complete and
and accurate.

1. The current program of work of the chapter
has been approved by the principal or
superintendent.
m. A substantial proportion of members are
given experiences in positions of leader-
ship during their attendance in high school.
n. Most of last year's activities have been
brought to a successful conclusion.

Proposition II. Proposition II dealt with the

training of members after they had participated and is
stated as follows| "To what extent do the activities
in which the chapter members engage afford such experiences
as will train young men in cooperation and leadership?"

Ten "items or provisions" were listed as a guide in eval-
uating each chapter on this proposition. These items
were listed as follows$

o. Cooperative buying and selling.
p. Other types of cooperation common in rural life.
9. Conservation of soil and other resources.
r. Community service (as trimming shrubbery
around school, church, put on garden shows,
etc.)
s. Leadership
t. Recreation
u. Thrift
v. Scholarship
w. The chapter engages in joint activities
with other chapters.
x. The chapter is practicing systematic degree
advancement.












An evaluation is of questionable value unless

there is a valid set of evaluative criteria, scaled

so as to reveal relative positions. The evaluating com-

mittee that visited each school under study used the

following scale on each of the items under both propo-

sitions. The purpose was to determine the degree to which

each school was providing the significant related acti-

vities.


A (4.5-5.0)


B (3.5-4.4)


C (2.5-3.4)



D (1.0-24)



E.- (0.0-0.9)


Perfect or practically perfect;
the provisions or conditions are
present and functioning perfectly.

Very Good; distinctly above the
average; the provisions or conditions
are present and functioning very well.

Average; the provisions or conditions
are present and functioning fairly
well.

Very Poor; the provisions or conditions
although needed, are functioning poorly
or are not present at all.

Very Inferior; most unsatisfactory
condition or provision.


Presentation of Data Collected from Schools on Proposition I


As shown in Table I, Proposition I was given an

average mean evaluation of 4.0 by the evaluating com-

mittee. This indicates that the schools studied are "very

good" on this proposition as judged by the rating scale of
the Committee. The conditions are "present and functioning
almost perfectly."




TO WIAT ]KTIT DOBS THE ,,QGANIATION OF THE CHAPTER MAKE POSSIBLE THE EFFECTIVE PARTICIPATION OF ALL


Mean evaluation, Bvaluation if programs of work for the six
Item fite all schools N. F. A. Chipters studied br.eamitteek -
..3 4 5 6
a Meeting held so all member
can attend conveniently 4.7 5.0 5.0 5.0 3.9 5.0 5.0

b Opportunity for member par.
-icipatioe at least one*
during Iyr. 4t2 4.3 4.4 4.8 4,0 4.4 4.4
o Degree equipment for.advaneo-
oeat 4.2 4.5 4.4 5.0 3.4 8.9 4.5
Id TnMa program of work rproprd 4.4 4.6 4.5 4.9 4.0 4.1 4.8
Income et fisnat for chapter
activities 4.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 2.5 5.0 5.0
f aloerity of agriculture students
EVA mmbrs80 5.0 50 5.0 5.0 50 5.0 5.0
gg A om- tte for oah chapter
Lattrity 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.0 4.2 4.3 4.5
h CaId.ia a carefully studied "
if :fie 4.0 3.4 4.4 4.8 3.4 8.6 3.5
i Ottht oeet regularly to pla -
wr ,k f chapter 3.5 3.0 3.4 4.5 3.5 3.4 3.7
J- Advance knowledge of plans to
be disossed is chapter meeting 3,4 3.1 2.6 4.4 3.6 3.5 3.6
k All chapter records completed
and accurate 3.5 2.5 .8 4.5 3.4 3.4 3.6
1 Annual program of work approved
by principal 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
a Opportunity for all members to
show leadership ability during
hih sebhol 3.3 3.0 3.4 4 24 34 3.5 2.5
a Last years activities completed 4.45 4.3 4.4 3.5 5.0 5.0
i I .. i...












Schools 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 scored 5.0, which

is "practically perfect". These organizations made

it possible for over ninety-five per cent of all the

members to participate in all the activities of the

chapter.

One school scored 3.9, which was rated "very

good" or distinctly above the average. The conditions

or provisions were present and functioning "very well".

All the schools were rated above "very good" on

providing experiences designed for effective partici-

p'ation of all members. This indicated that the N F A

chapters in the selected counties "provide effective

participation of all members" to a degree that would be

classed as "very good".

Also found in Table I are the ratings of the

evaluating committee on the fourteen items under Propo-

sition I, for each six chapters.

Items"f" and "1" scored highest with a score of

5.0. This meant'that each chapter was "perfect" because in

its membership, all the members were all day students in

vocational agriculture. Iten "l" was so rated because

each chapter's program of work was approved by the principal.

The evidence obtained by the committee to make an evalu-

ation of this item was collected during personal inter-

views with the teachers of agriculture.









All schools studied submitted a written program

of work to be approved by the principal before adopting

it for use.

Item "e" was evaluated next highest by the commit-

tee. This item was rated 4,5, indicating that each

chapter was "practically perfect" in providing for income

sufficient to finance the chapter's activities. The ac-

hievement records were checked by the committee at the

schools visited. Five of the schools visited were rated

5.0 indicating that the chapters had sufficient income to
finance the chapter's activities.

One school scored 2.5 on this item, giving it an

"average" rating. This chapter did not have income suffi-

cient to finance the chapter's activities.

Items "d" and "n" based on written annual programs

of work and year's activities were rated third highest

with a score of 4.4 each, which indicated that the schools

studied were "very good", somewhat above average. Four

schools were "perfect" on item "d". Schools IV and V made

a score of 440 and 4.1 which rated them "very good" on

item "d". This indicated that all chapters rated "very good"

or better on formulating an annual written program of work

on item "n" only two schools rated 5.0 "perfect". The

other four schools rated "very good" on the completion of

the chapter's last year's activities.












Item "m" rated lowest on the evaluation scale.

This item received a score of 3.5 which indicated that

all of the chapters studied were "average". Conditions

or provisions were present and functioning "fairly well,"

showing that on a whole, substantial proportion of the

members of each chapter were given experience in positions

of leadership during their high school training.

On no item under Proposition I did any school get

a rating below 2.5, which indicated that all the schools

under study were "average" or "above average" in re-

lation to Proposition I.


Presentation of Data Collected from Schools on Proposition II


Table II contains the results of the evaluation of

Proposition II and the items that support it. This propo-

sition had a mean evaluation of 3.6. This indicated that

all schools were "very good" or the provisions of Propo-

sition II were present and functioning distinctly above

the average. In general, each school was rated lower on

Proposition II than on Proposition I; however, all still

rated above the "average".

Under Proposition II, more than ninety per cent

of the chapters scored between 3.* and 3.6 which indicated

that provisions of Proposition II were present and func-

tioning above the "average" or "very good". Each school

rated average or better.











From the evaluation of items under Proposition II,

it shows that Proposition I rated over Proposition II.

The activities which afford-experiences that will train

young men in cooperation and leadership seem to be the

main objective of the programs of work of the majority

of the N F A chapters. Activities that train N F A

members in "conservation of soil and other resources"

were at the bottom of the list in this proposition with

a score of 3.2.





EVALUATION OF PROPOSITION II AND RELATED ITEMS AND EXTENT TO WHICH ACTIVITIES PROVIDE
TRAINING IN COOPERATION AND LEADERSHIP



Mean evaluation Evaluation of program of Work of Local
Item for all schools N. F. A. Chapters by committee

1 2 3 4 5 6
o Cooperative UWying and
aJiLg 3.99 2.5 4.4 5.0 2.5 4.3 5.0
p Otbr types of cooperation 3.3 2.7 2 3.0 4.5 3.4 3.2 3.4'

q Conservation of resources 3.2 2.0 3.5 5.0 2.5 2.7 3.6

r 'Geausity Service 3.9 3.4 3,8 4.9 3.4 4.0 3.9

a Leadership 3.8 4.4 3.4 5.0 3.0 3.2 4.0

t Recreation 3.5 4.0 3.9 4.5 3.5 3.6 3.6

U Thrift 3.3 3.4 3.4 4.4 2.5 2.9. 3.2

v Scholarship 3.9 3.4 4.0 4.3 3.7 3.8 4.8

V Joint activities with other
chapters 3.8 3.4 3.5 3.9 4.0 3.7 4.4

z Practicing systematic degree
advancement 3.6 3.5 3.5 4.0 3.6 3.0 4.0
( II ; II i- -- 11 i- -J l J III










The primary aims of the New Farmers of America

are to develop agricultural leadership, cooperation,

and citizenship. The following list of 12 aims and

purposes have been set up by the national association
35
to be used as a basis for program planning:

1. To develop competent, aggressive, agricultural
and rural leadership.

2. To encourage intelligent choice of farming
occupations.

3. To encourage members in the development of
individual farming programs.

4. To encourage members to improve the home,
the farm and surroundings.

5. To participate in whrthy undertaking for
the improvement of agriculture.

6. To practice and encourage thrift.

7. To develop character, train for useful
citizenship, and foster patriotism.

8. To participate in cooperative effort.

9. To provide and encourage the development of
organized rural recreational activities.

10. To strengthen the confidence of farm boys
and young men in themselves and their work.
11. To'encourage improvement in scholarship.

12. To create and nurture a love of country life.



3
Op. Cit._..., p.











Results of data received from N F A members.

To be able to fully evaluate the program of work

of the local N F A chapter, it is necessary to get the

reactions of the individuals for which the program is

intended. VWith this in mind, a questionnaire was carried

to each senior student in the vocational agriculture

department with a request' that he evaluate each of the

aims and purposes of the F A organization. This

evaluation was made to determine how well the programs

of work of the chapter provided conditions on provisions

that would help them to realize the aims and purposes

of the N F A organization. The students were asked to

use the following scale in evaluating the aims and

purposes:

5 Ver. Great Influence

4 Above the Average Influence

3 Average Influence

2.- Very Little Influence

1 No Influence




INFLUENCE OF PROGRAM OF WORK IN HELPING N F A MEMBERS REALIZE

THE AIMS AND PURPOSES OF THE ORGANIZATION


Mean of all
Aim or Purpose Schools Influence of Partiptiiation by Chapters
1 2 3 4 5 6
1. To develop Competent Leadership 4,2 3.3 4.1 5.0 4.4 3.8 4,8

2. Encourage choice of farming
occupation 3.2 4.0 4,8 3.5 4,2 3.3 3.6
3. Encourage the development of
farming programs 4.0 4.0 4.3 4.8 4.4 3.3 4.1
4. To encourage home and farm
improvements 3.6 2.8 4.0 3.1 4.6 2.8 4.7
5. Participate in worthy under-
Stakings for improvement of
Agriculture 4.0 4.0 4.8 4,4 4.4 2.7 4.1
6. encourage and practice t'rift 4.6 4.1 42 4.7 4. 40 4.8
7. Develop shracter, train for
useful citizenship 3.8 3.2 3,7 4.6 4.2 3.2 4.3
8. Participate in cooperative effort 3.6 3.1 3.7 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.5
9. Provide and encourage recreational
activities 4.0 4.0 4.2 4,3 4.5 3.5 3.7
10o. strengthen the NFA member with
confidence 3.9 3,5 3.2 3.9 4,6 4.2 4.1
11. Encourage improvement in scholar-
ship 3.4 2.1 3.6 3.5 4.5 3.5 3.4
12. Create a love of country life 3,6 3.4 3.8 4.0 4.4 3.4 4.2

Table III shows the results to the evaluation by senior students in the six schools studied.











From Table III, it can be seen that the program

of work of the New Farmer of America chapters had a

"very great influence" on making a lasting impression

of the aims and purposes on N F A members. Partici-

pation in the activities of the chapter made an "above

average" influence on chapter members.

"To encourage memBers to improve the farm and

its surroundings" is the sixth aim of the New Farmers

and ranked first in the evaluation. Participation in

the program of activities of N F A had a "very great

influence" on making and impressing students as to the

need of improving the farm home and its surroundings.

The range among the schools on this aim was from 4.0

or "above the average influence" to 4.8 "very great

influence."

"To create more interest in the intelligent

choice of a farming occupation" rated an average rating

of 3.6. This indicated that participating in N F A
activities have only an "average influence" in helping

students develop an interest in an intelligent choice

of a farming occupation. The students in schools 1

and 5 gave this aim a rating of only 2.8 or "very little

influence".











Schools 2, 3, and 4., showed the highest average
rating on all twelve aims and purposes of the N F A
organization. All five schools revealed that the aims
and purposes of the N F A organization were doing a good

job of making a lasting impression on N F A members on
the aims and purposes of the organization. The other
three schools rated from 5.4 to 3.5 which was "average
influence".


TABLE IV

EVALUATION BY SENIORS IN THE SIX SCHOOLS AVERAGE OF THE

DEGREE OF INFLUENCE OF PARTICIPATION IN N F A PROGRAM




School Degree of Influence


4 4.3
3 4.1
2 4.0

S3*.5

5 3.4
1 3.4












Table IV gives the average degree of influence

that participation in the programs of work had on N F A

students. Members of the chapter in school 4 disclosed

that participation in the program of work had a "very

great influence" on helping them realize all the aims

and purposes of the N F A. This would indicate that

each member did have a chance to participate in acti-

vities of the chapter and that by participating in

these activities, he was influenced to such a degree as

to want to carry the practices in later life. This

rating shows that the program of work of New Farmers

left a lasting impression on all the members of the

schools studied.












TABLE V

STUDENT PARTICIPATION AND HELP FROM TEACHER OF AGRICULTURE IN
PLANNING TIHE PROGRAM OF `j'ORK



No. of No. ser- No. ser- Avg. No. Help from Teacher
School N F A ving as ving on a times Very Some None
Students Chairman Committee Comm. met Much

l1 7 6 7 3 x
2 8 4 5 4 x

3 11 9 11 5 X

4 9 5 9 3 x

5 10 5 9 3 x
6 12 4 12 3 X



Table V reveals that of the eleven seniors, nine had
served as chairman of a committee one or more times, during

their four or five years in high school. All eleven members

had served as a member of a committee one or more times

during their four or five years in the N F A organization.

Each of these committees met at least five times during
the'year, to plan the programs of work for that particular

committee.

There is something to note about school number 3,

the teacher of agriculture gave "very much help" to the











members of the committee as they planned the work of

the committee and its part in the totalprogram for

the chapter.

As shown by Table IV, all schools were rated
"average influence" or just a little better than

average, which indicated that participation in N F A

activities had "average influence" on helping all

members of the chapters studied to realize the aims

and purposes of N F A organization. The committees

in all six chapters met on an average of *.5 times

during the year to plan that phase of the total program

of work with the teacher of agriculture giving "some

help"."' Ninety per cent of all members in chapters

studied served one time or more as a member of a

committee during the four or five years as a member of

the N F A organization.












TABLE VI


TIME ASSISTANCE WAS GIVEN BY THE TEACHER OF AGRICULTURE

IN PLANNING THE PROGRAM OF WORK


e A School and Assistance Given*
Time Assistance
1 2 3 5 5 6
Gvn V S V S N V S N- V S N VSN V S N
S M M M M M R M-

Before Committee
Met X X X X X X


At the Time Corn- X
mittee Met X X X x X X

After Committee
Met and Before
Presenting to
Chapter

At Time Program
Was Presented
to Chapter


*VM Very Much help given by the teacher of agriculture

S Some Help Given

N None No help to the students in planning the work


of the committees











Table VI shows that in school 3, the N F A

students indicated that the teacher of agriculture

gave much help before the committee met to plan its

program and at the time the committee met the teacher

of agriculture gave "very much help." After the com-

mittee met and before the program was presented to the

chapter, the teacher gave them "some help", in wording

the program before it was presented to the chapter.

And at the time the program was presented the -teacher

gave 'home help" in presenting the points in the program

to the N F A chapter for approval.

The study shows that the vocational agriculture

teachers in all six schools under study gave some type

of assistance to each of the chapters at some time

during the planning period.











CHAPTER IV


SUGGESTED EVALUATIVE CRITERIA


In evaluating a total program of vocational

agriculture, there are several phases that should be
1
studied.

1. The physical facilities in use

2. The course of study being followed

3. The quality of standards being followed by
each student in his own farming program

4.. The quality of the classroom, shop, and field
instruction being given by the teacher

5. The percentage of former students who are
satisfactorily established in farming

6. The percentage of farm boys and farmers being
reached by organized instruction

7. The quality of the promotional activities of
the teacher

8. The reports and activities of the advisory
council

On the basis of theexperiences of teachers of

vocational agriculture and members of the New Farmers of

America, the writer has developed an evaluative plan which

can be adapted for use by teachers of agriculture and

others.

1
E. W. Garris, Teaching Vocational Agriculture
(New York; McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1954) pp. 42-533











The purpose in evaluating a program of work is
to improve the learning situation for the students.

"All evaluation should be made with only one objective
in mind to constantly improve the instruction being
2
given to the farm boys and farmers of America." Evalu-

ation is the !-ay in determining the effectiveness of the

programs in the past and present; and should be used in

formulating future programs. Deyoe says, "Evaluation is

concerned with how well~we are accomplishing what we set
5
out to do."

Leaders and teachers in the field of vocational

agriculture feel the need for some systematic methods of

evaluating the N F A program of work in terms of the edu-

cational objectives of the organization.

Hamlin made the following statement regarding the
4
need for evaluation.

Evaluation as an integral part of learning
and teaching is needed in (1) determining need
and readiness; (2) cooperative student-teacher


2
Ibid., p. 65.
5
George P. Deyoe, Supervised Farming in Vocational
Agriculture (Danville: The Interstate Publish~ng Company,
1947), p. 90.
4
H. M. Hamlin, "What is of Value?", The Agricultural
Education Magazine (April, 1951), p. 229.









40
planning in which the evaluations to be applied
are spelled out; (3) judging progress toward
objectives; (4) judging accomplishments at the
end of an activity, a unit, a course, or a series
of courses; (5) replanning programs of study
after the accomplishments of previous programs are
known.

Evaluation of the N F A program of work is needed

in (1) determining the needs of its members; (2) deter-

mining the extent of theplanning by students and teachers;

(5) informing school officials of the progress of the N F A;

(4) determining progress made toward its objectives set
up; (5) determining the chapter's accomplishments at the
end of the year; and (6) as a basis for planning the pro-

gram for the coming year.

To develop skill in evaluating a program of work
of an organization is, in itself, a desirable objective.

"One criterion for the success of training programs in

agriculture could well be the extent to which the indi-

vidual utilized evaluation as a means of improving ef-
5
ficiency. The 'ability to evaluate the N F A program of

work is a skill that needs to be developed by teachers and

students in order to improve efficiency.



5
An Editorial. "Evaluation as a Foundation for
Method" The Agricultural Educa tion Magazine, (April, 1951)
p. 219.












Steps in Developing A Score Card for Evaluation


Doyoe lists the following steps that should be

followed in a thorough and comprehensive approach to
6
the evaluation of outcomes in supervised farming.

1. The purpose on objectives of supervised
farming should be formulated in terms of
outcomes.

2. These outcomes should be carefully analyzed
to determine the types of evidences which
indicate that the objectives are being realized.

3. Methods should be devised for securing evi-
dence which indicate the degree to which the
objectives are being realized.


This approach was used by the writer in developing

the score card for evaluating the program of work of an

N F A chapter. The objectives of the N F A organization

were examined as the first step in formulating the score

card presented later in this chapter. These were used

because they are stated in terms of changed behavior

desired in students. Heretofore, most evaluations of the

programs of work have been based upon the eight areas of

work which are as follows: (a) supervised farming, (b) co-

operative activities, (c) community service, (d) leadership

activities, (e) earnings and savings, (f) conduct of meetings,

(g) scholarship, and (h) recreation.

6
Doyoe, Op. Cit., p. 88.











Evaluations based on these areas of work tend

more to be an evaluation of achievement on the part of

the member such as having three or more productive

projects, attending all N F A meetings, turning in

projects record books complete at the close of the

school term, doing the much needed repairs at home and

around the farm. The twelve objectives of the N F A

organization are worded in such a way that the educa-

tional values or outcomes of the program of work can be

evaluated in terms of the changed behavior and growth in

participating members.
7
Kruti has the following to say about educational

objectives and wh- they should be used in evaluation-

Educational objectives v rs dls inguished
from other objectives, in that they indicate
the type of behavior or development which is
to tkke place in learning in a specific area
or activity. Psychologically, the main function
of teaching and learning is to bring about de-
velopment of the individual learner. This develop-
ment is broadly described in terms of behavior
changes. These behavior changes or developments
are defined in terms of educational objectives.
This would imply that educational objectives would
state, first, the kind of behavior sought and,
second, the area in which this behavior is to be
developed. Educational objectives are distinguished
from other objectives in that they indicate the kind
of behavior or development which is to take place
in the learner in a specific area of study or activity.


7
Leo L. Knute, "The Nature of Educational Objectives"
The Agricultural Education Magazine,.March, 1951, p. 203.

^ .










43

The second step in the procedure used in pre-

paring this study was to analyze the desired outcomes

as set up by the national N F A organization. After

this analysis, the evidence which would indicate that

these outcomes are being realized was compiled.
8
Deyoe says:

Plans for evaluating a supervised farming
program should be as broad as the outcomes,
and evidences that the outcomes are being
realized should be sought in all of these ac-
tivities for which the department of vocational
agriculture is responsible. Certainly, this is
true of plans for evaluating a program of work
for an N F A chapter. The educational outcomes
of each objective are many and plans should be
formulated to evaluate each.

The third step in preparing the evaluative score

card was to compile a list of methods and devices that

may be used for collecting evidence which will reveal

that the N F A objectives are being realized.

This is necessary in any score card since each

person doing the evaluating will know in what area he

should search for evidence that will prove to be authentic

and correct, and that will cover all of the outcomes listed

under the objective. A list of these methods and devices

that may be used by each person concerned with the::program

of work to secure evidence to prove that the objectives are

being realized are listed later in this chapter.


8
Deyoe, Op. Cit., p. 90.












The fourth step in developing the evaluative

score card was a method of scoring the evidence showing

that the objectives were being realized. This scoring

is based upon satisfactory evidence, questionable evidence

and unsatisfactory evidence. Satisfactory evidence would

prove that the educational outcomes of the objectives

are being carried out satisfactorily as far as the per-

son doing the evaluating is concerned. If the evidence

was not quite strong enough to prove that the outcomes

were being realized, this evidence might be classed as

questionable. Evidence that proved that the outcomes

of the objectives were not being attained would be

classified as unsatisfactory.
9
It has been said by Rhoad, that a good program

of evaluation of student work should do the following

things:

1. Measure student behavior in terms of progress
toward specific goals accepted by him and
considered by the teacher to be desirable.

2. Measure students' behavior in relation to
real life situations instead of artificial
ones.



9
C. E. Rhoad, "A Plan for Evaluating Student Effort
in Vocational Agriculture" The Agricultural Education
Magazine, November, 1944. -










3. Teach students to evaluate their own
efforts daily.

.* Develop in students favorable attitudes
toward honest evaluation of their efforts.

5. Provide for individual differences of oppor-
tunity and capacity, and measure.the student
against his goals rather than other students.

6. Measure attitudes as well as command infor-
mation. Determine what the students have
been taught to do.

7. Emphasize the various phases of student
behavior in direct proportion to their im-
portance in our objectives.
8. A program of evaluation must have definite
essentials that must be followed or the main
purpose of evaluation will be missed.

On the basis of the foregoing information a score

sheet was developed which was used in evaluating the

program of work of N p A chapters. This score sheet will

be found in Appendix &









46

Methods and Devices Used to Secure Information for

-Evaluation


To be able to evaluate any program, the teacher,

students, school officials, and parents need some

methods and devices that may be used to secure evidence

to prove to them that the objectives are be~ag"realized.

These methods and devices are mentioned in the third

column of the evaluative score card. Some of these

devices may be used by all concerned while others may

be used by the teachers, students, school officials,

or the parents individually. The following compila-

tion includes a list of these methods and devices that

may be used by each individual evaluators

Methods and devices that may be used by the

teacher of agriculture to secure evidence to prove

that the objectives of the N F A organization are being

realized:

1. General observation in the classroom, shop,
and on the farm.

2. Observation of the students' behavior.

3. Accumulative lists of the accomplishments
of the members.

4. Tests -
a.Oral In the classroom, shop of field
b. Written In the classroom and shop
c. Performance In the classroom,
shop and in the field









5. Interview with N F A members

6. Records

a. Supervised practice records
b. Records of the secretary and treasurer

7. Check lists and rating scales

8. Project stories of members

9. Occupational interests and choices of members

10. Community survey

11. Records of attendance there is evidence of
interest when attendance is voluntary

12. Observation of free time activities of the
members while at school

13. Written work of students papers, note-
books, and project records

14. Photographs those used in the scrap book
and others

15* Develop a list of improvements completed by
each member

16. Testimbnial meetings members are encouraged
to report their achievements through the use
of approved practices

17. Deferred results results that can be seen
in later life

Methods and devices that may be used by the

student to secure evidence to prove that the objectives

of the N F A organization are being realized:

1. Accumulative lists of accomplishments of
members

2. Project record books

3. Check lists and rating scales

4* Community survey material taken by the department
!










5. Rating of students by each other

6. Interview with the teacher

7. Interview with the parents
8. Use of photographs taken by the teachers
or others

9. Anecdotal records of their accomplishments

10. Listening to the testimonials of others

11. Examination of their performances in the
field
Methods and devices that may be used by the

parents to secure evidence to prove that the objectives

of the N F A organization are being realized

o1 General observation of N F A members

2. Observation of students' behavior

35 Checking accumulative lists of accomplishments
.* Checking written and performance tests of the
teacher

S5 Checking the records in the department
6. Observing dererred results in later life

7. By using a check list and rating scales
8. Listening to project stories of members

9. Observing occupational interests and choices
of members

10. By checking the community survey made by
the teacher

11. By checking the record of attendance good
voluntary attendance indicates interest










12. Interview with the teacher of agriculture

13. Interview with the N:I A members
14. Observing the scrap book and other records
in the chapter that would indicate the
scope of the work

15* Individual farm visits to the homes of the
N F A members

Methods and devices that may be used by the

school officials to secure evidence to prove that the

objectives of the N F A organization are being realized

1. General observation of the students in other
school activities

2. Observing the changed behavior of the students

3* Checking the accumulative lists of accom-
plishments of members

4. Interview with the student

5. Interview with the teacher
6. Checking the written and performance tests
of the teacher of agriculture

7. Checking the records of the teacher of agri-
culture and the supervised project books of
the students

8. Observing the occupational choices of the
student

9. Checking deferred results in later life
10. Listening to project stories of students

11. Checking records of attendance

12. Observation of free time activities of the
students

13. Individual visits to the farm









These lists are not conclusive. Each teacher

of agriculture should compile a list of methods of

collecting evidence that will help him evaluate and

improve the program of the N F A, and that will fit

the needs of the vocational department and of the

community which he is serving.











CHAPTER V


SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


Summary

1. Data brought out in this study showed that

provisions providing for effective partici-

pation of all members were above average for

all schools studied.

2. The N F A program of work proved to be "per-

fect or practically perfect" in 100 per cent

of the chapters in providing for experi-

ences that will train young men in cooperation

and leadership.

3. All of the students enrolled in all-day classes
of vocational agriculture are members of the

N F A.

4. The chapters are "practically perfect" in

providing for paraphernalia and equipment neces-

sary for degree advancement and general N F A.

meetings.

5. One hundred (100) percent of the chapters pro-
vided for planned scheduled meetings that

would provide for effective participation ef

all members.











6. One hundred (100) percent of the chapters

prepared a program of work that was presented

to the principal or superintendent for approval.

7. Ten (10) percent of the chapters had records
that were considered "very poor". These

records were inadequate and incomplete. Sixty

percent presented records that would be con-

sidered "average", and thirty percent had

records considered "very good".

8. There is a deficiency in activities that tend

to develop a consciousness on the part of a

boy so that he would conserve his money and

properly invest it.

9. Eighty (80) percent of the chapters provided

for cooperative activities with other chapters

which was rated "very good". The remaining

twenty percent provided activities that would

be considered "average" in comparison with

other chapter.

10. The chapters provided activities that would

develop scholarship to a degree was considered

to he "very good*. This activity rated at the

top of the list of activities that would train

young men in cooperation and leadership.









11. For an evaluation of a program to be effective

or useful, all persons concerned with formu-

lating and presenting the program should be

called in on the evaluation.

12. Participating in N F A activities had great

influence in helping members realize the ob-

jective of creating and nurturing a love of

country life.

13. The amount of participation by the teacher in
helping the standing committees plan the program

of work has a very definite effect on the amount

of influence the N F A chapter will have on

student members.

S4i. Seventy (iQ) percent of the N F A members in

the chapters studied had a chance to serve

as a chairman of a committee one or more times

during the four years,of N F A participation.

Ninety-five (95) percent servedd as members of

a committee during that time. The committees

met on an average of 3.5.times during the

school year,

15. Teacher participation before the committees
met and at the time of meetings has more in-

fluence on effective program planning than help

at any other time.










16. The writer prepared a score card that may

be used by all concerned to evaluate the

twelve aims and purposes of the N F A organi-

zation. Evidence was presented that showed

to what extent the aims and purposes were

being realized by participation in the

program of work along with a list of methods

and devices that may be used In collecting

this evidence.

17. The writer presented a list of methods and

devices that may be used by teachers of

agriculture, N F A members,school administra-

tors, and parents to collect evidence to in-
I-
dicate the effectiveness of the N F A program

of work.


Conclusions

1. The data presented in this study brought out

very clea rly that the assumptions made in the

introduction are somewhat true.

2. The teacher or adviser of agriculture should

be the leader or guide in planning the work

of each committee so that each member will

know that the adviser 16 interested in this

phase of the program, and thereby, will inspire
the student to do his task better. This will







55

bring out some of the things that should be

foremost in the minds of each teacher of

agriculture, "Learning to do by Doing".

Doing a task well will have a much greater

influence on the life of a boy than for some-

one else to do that task for him.

3. The teacher of agriculture should be an in-

spiration to the members by showing interest

enthusiasm, and initiative in working with

each committee; aid from the teacher before

before committee meetings has an influence

on planning a challenging program of work

and in turn has an influence on the effective-

ness of the program by making lasting impres-

sions on N F A members.

*. An N F A chapter should not expect to succeed

without an effective program of evaluation.

Each succeeding yearly program should show a

marked improvement in quality because of the

"evaluation". Evaluative criteria should be

of such that each person concerned with the

activities of the N F A would be able to, eval-

uate the outcomes in terms of educational

objectives.











Recommendations

1. The writer recommends that a program of eval-

uation be built into the program of work of

each chapter. The program of work should

first be formulated to meet the needs of the

N F A students and the organization as a whole,

then eva luative criteria should be molded lo

fit each phase of the program. The evalu-

ative scale should be flexible so as to be

adapted for use by the N F A members, teachers

of agriculture, school officials, and parents.

2. The life of an organization depends upon their

effective participation of the members in

the activities of the organization, therefore,

the writer recommends that chapters that do

not have functional standing committees should

appoint such committees as soon as the chapter

is organized at the beginning of the school

year. These committees should plan the program

of activities of the chapter under the leader-

ship and guidance of the teacher of agriculture.

3. The list of methods and devices that may be

used in evaluation would not necessarily be the

same in each school. Each teacher of agricul-

ture should make a survey of local conditions








57
to determine what evidence in that community

will prove that the objectives of N F A

organization are being realized and then he

should formulate methods and devices that may

he used in collecting this evidence.

4. That a sore card be formulated to be used in

evaluating the progress of the program of

.werk of N F A chapters. For example, check

the score card in Chapter IV.

5. The chapter program of work should be formu-

lated in such a way to provide for effective

'participation of all of the N F A members.

Each member should serve on a standing com-

mittee and have some part oi the program one

.or more time during the school years,

6. The chapter program of work should include

activities so that through participation,

an. N F A member will develop those qualities

.nich will help in cooperation, leadership

'atd citizenship.











BIBLIOGRAPHY


Deyoe, George P., Farming Programs in Vocational Agriculture.
Danville: The Interstate, 1953. 604 pp.

Deyoe, George P., Supervised Farming in Vocational Agri-
culture. Danvilles The Interstate, 1949. 502 pp.
Garris, E. C., Teaching Vocational Agriculture. New
York; McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc4 1954. 593 PP.
Hamlin, Herbert M., Agridultural Education in Community
Schools. Danville: The Interstate, 194 ." 493 PP-

BULLETINS

Federal Security Agency, An Evaluation of Local Programs
Vocational Education in Agriculture. Vocational
Divisions Bulletin No. 240 Agricultural Series No. 58.
Office of Education, Washington, 1949.
National Committee on Standards for Vocational Education
in Agriculture. Evaluation. Criteria for Vocational
Education in Agriculture. Chicago; Te University
of Illinois Press, .1947.


MAGAZINES

Hamlin, Herbert M., "Planning and Evaluating", The Agricul-
tural Education Magazine. (April, 1951) p. 229

Hamlin, Herbert M., "What if Value?" The Agricultural
Education Magazine, (May, 1941) pp. 2 -207
Knuti, Leo L. "The Nature of Educational Objectives".
The Agricultural Education Magazine, (July, 1949) p. 203
Rhoad, C. E., "A Plan for Evaluation of Student Effort in
Vocational Agriculture", The Agricultural Education
Magazine, (June, 1944) pp."6-857











UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS


Areceneaux, Jasper J., -"An Evaluation of Programs of
Work of Local Chapters of the Louisiana Association
of Future Farmers of America". Unpublished Master's
Thesis, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,
1946.
Geiger, Lester L., "An Evaluation of Programs of Work of
Local Chapters of Future Farmers of America in Ohio"
Unpublished Master's thesis, Ohio State University,
Columbus, 1946.

Jenkins, James M. "Programs of Work of Oklahoma New
Farmers of America Chapters". Unpublished Master's
thesis, Colorado State College of Agriculture and
Mechanic Arts, Fort Collins, 1941.

Masters, Arthur E. "An Evaluation of Future Farmers of
America Activities As Related to Planning More Ef-
fective Chapter Programs". Unpublished Master's
thesis, Cornell University, Ithaca, 1947.

Tart, Carl V. "An Evaluation of Programs of Future
Farmers of America Chapters in Granville, Peron,
Durham, Orange, and Chatham Counties in North Caro-
lina". Unpublished Master's thesis, University of
North Carolina, Raleigh, 1951.

Wakefield, George N. "Training for Leadership Through
the Future Farmers of America." Unpublished Master's
thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville, 1952.


MISCELLANEOUS


Federal Security Agpncy,Division of Vocational Education,
Improving Instruction in Vocational Agriculture
Through Supervision AFricultural Educational Service.

National Association New Farmers of America, Official
Guide for New Farmers of America, Baltimores French-
Bray PrFnttng Company,-1954.




























A(PPNDIX











APPENDIX


A. OFFICIAL PROGRAM OF WORK OF N F A C

B. COPY OF LETTER TO VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
TEACHERS.

C. QUESTIONNAIRE TO VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
TEACHERS.

D. QUESTIONNAIRE TO SENIORS STUDYING VOCATION-
AL AGRICULTURE.

E. SCORE CARD FOR EVALUAnIN PROGRAMS OF WORK.

F TABLE FOR EVALUATING PROGRAMS OF WORK OF
LOCAL N F & CHAPTERS.

G, FLORIDA ASSOCIATION NFA CHAPTER ACCOMPLISH-
MENT REPORT.

H. LOCATION OF SCHOOL USED IN THIS STUDY.











APPENDIX A


OFFICIAL PROGRAM OF WORK OF N F A


I. Supervised Farming

1. Conduct project tours

2. Hold livestock shows


II. Cooperation

1. Engage in cooperative buying and selling

2. Hold special group meetings with nearby
chapters for activities like tours, leadership
schools, pageants, debates, fairs, etc.

III. Community Improvement

1. Plan local.and stateoprogram for organized
conservation work

2. Make farm homes more modern and attractive

3. Improve the school campus


IV. Leadership

A. Public Relations

1. Publish a state N F A news sheet

2. Secure at least one local advertisement for state
publication

3. Exchange N F A publications with other organizations

4. Provide suitable roadside markets for N F A members
who carry out standards of supervised farming
programs

5. Have special bulletin boards which will show reports
of outstanding activities from time to time

6. Make plans to conduct a radio program








T. Conduct a public program, April 5, for
National N F A Day.

B. Leadership Training

1. Start a special N F A library and add a
few good books annually.

2. Conduct a local public speaking contest.

3. Keep former members active in work in the
chapter.

4. Encourage members to take part in local,
state, and national N F A contests.

5. Encourage more members to qualify for the
modern and superior farmer degrees.

6. Develop special musical organizations.

C. Expansion of Program of Department

1. .Beep former members active in work of the
chapter.

2. Aid teacher in enrolling students in.a young
farmer class.

3. Help adviser keep a permanent record of
former students.

D. General

1. Keep an accurate written record of aachieve-
on program of work for use in making up
annual report on accomplishments.

2. Purchase a radio for the chapter.

V. Earnings and Savings

'1. Strive to have 100 per cent members take part
in the thrift bank.

2. Make a financial budget which will enable the
chapter to put over activities in the program.

3. Collect dues at earliest convenient date.








4. Have all financial activities recorded
in minutes of the secretary's and
treasurer's books.

VI. Conduct of Meetings

1. Conduct meetings for the definite pur-
pose of providing training in parlia-
mentary procedure.

2. Secure chapter meeting equipment.


VII. Scholarship

1. Stimulate members to maintain high
scholastic attainment.


VIII. Recreation

1. Plan an annual N F A banquet to be given
at a strategic time and use it as a means
of accomplishing a specific objective.

2. Have State Association make arrangements
for summer camp and leadership schools.







APPENDIX B.


Post Office Box 122
Lake Wales, Florida

Mr, W. L. Sams
Agricultural Department
Union Academy
Bartow, Florida

Dear Mr. Sams:

I am making a study in the form of an evaluation of the
Programs Of Work N.F.A, Chapters in Polk, Pasco, Hernando,
and Highlands counties.
For this study I would like to get some information con-
corning your chapter's program of work, on the teacher's
questionnaire I have enclosed. I have also.enclosed a quest-
ionnaire to senior: students studying agriculture. This is
to determine to what extent senior students contributed to
planning the program of work of the local N IA chapter, This
questionnaire also determine Crom the student -s viewpoint, to
the extent planning of work participating in these programs
has helped him to realize the purpose of the N F A Organization.
These questionnaires will enable a committee composed of
a teacher of agriculture, a regular teacher, and myself to
evaluate your program according to the sample evaluative sheet
I have enclosed.
This committee will visit your school by appointment for
the final evaluation when these questionnaires have been re-
turned to me.
Your cooperation in making this study a success will be
greatly appreciated,


Very truly yours,


J* P. Moore





APPENDIX C.


THE "LORIDA AGIIICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY

Tallahassee, Florida



INSTRU1~NT 1

estionnaire To Vocational Agricultural Teachers Or Advisors On Effectiveness rf

Of Programs Of Work Of New Farmers Of America.*


Purposes, For a committee to evaluate the program of work of the local

NBFA, chapter. (This questionnaire is based on the question-

naire set up by the National Committee on Tocational Education

in Agriculture.)

A. Organisation

Proposition A local chapter should be organized no that all

members can and do participate effectively.

!. Meetings

a, How often are meetings held:

(1) During the school year

(2) During the summer months

b, Where are meetings held

c. At what time of day were meetings held:

(1) During the school year

(2) During the summer months

2o Please enclose a copy of the program of Work for 1953-54.

3. Income, (Money made for the chanter last year,)


based on Instruments used by Tart. Carl Victor in Master Thesis at northh
rlina State College, Releigh, North Carolinao


I





Amount


f. ______ _____

Memberehipo (Give membership as of the day of evaluation)

(a) Number of students enrolled in the all-day classesso

(b) Number of above who are lFL.Ao members,

(a) Number of other NoFoA. members

Names of committees Lidt the names of the ones that are

fuaotiontig at the resent time,

o *

b.

do





















LUst Last years activities that were brought to completion.

a,
1.



if *III II i I I I I[II I I I I II

II III__I__III__IIII___I i *IIIII__II III_
h. ___ii_ ii___ i ii__iii__il__iiiii__I__I I_-


__


Source











I





____ __ __ ___











_





__ ___











__ ___

















I





_C




APPENDIX D.


THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MFC.ANICAL UNIVERSITY

Tallahassee, Florida



INSThUMENT II


istionnaire To Seniors In Vocational Agriculture On Effectiveness Of Programs
Of Work Of New farmers Of America.*

Purpose: To determine to what extent N.FA. members participate in

planning the program of work of the committees of the local

chapter.


bool



1,


wittee:


member

Have you served as chairman of a committee or committees while

a member of the N.F.A. chapter? Yes o

if this question was checked yes, check the name of the

committee or committees below and give the years you were

chairman. (Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior year.)

Check Tear


L. Supervised Yarming

I Cooperative Activities

~ Community Service

L Leadership Activities

). Earnings and Savings

). Conduct of Meetings





,. Publicity


4


mm

mm


ped on Instruments used by Tart Carl Victor
) State Qollege, Raleigh, North Carolina,

I


in Master Theis at North Caro-










10J.. others


2, Have yu serve~t as a member of a committee or committee while


a member of the N.A,,. chanTter? Yes N_ o


If this Question was checkedd yes, check the nume of the com-

mittee or committees below and give the year you served as a


member. (Freshman, Sonhomore, Junior or Senior year.)


committee ,Jheck Year


1, Sunervised Parming


2, 3oorwrative Activities


3, Community servicee

l. LeadorTsip Activi ties


5. arlings ano Savi:gs


6,. Conduct of Meetings


7, Scholarship

B i, recreation


9, Puoi.city

10, Others


3. Number of times co3mlttee or


,--gram of wc-~-r

Zclrnfi tteep


~-u-:. tO


w"ii ,' !'i (I*t 'ing


. A thn;e gi:v?,n ry the Agri ntl'i t'B~t:ner. To iwhait .egree


lid the Agri Timlture teacher give assistance in planning, the


nrcvi,.e.am 'f uwofk t-1 t h_ c irmitteev.


C


U ~


LI- -L^I- -L*..-CUI~--n YYI-)

^U 11-111 UUYLI- ---~--


~11~*---Ll1lllll~---

~UII~IICI~II(-~-----


IL~-_rX- --- ~I---PII-UI~

_ _~-l--l---.~----UII1-.-~ C.------l














Committee Degree of assistance from Agricul-
ture teacher

Very much help Some helo No help



*. __ '.. .. ...









5 Time asistance ve given by the teacher of tariculture
6. -" __JI II I__________ -_I__-__ --

5 Tim* assistance wva given b3' the teacher of Agriculture.




Timn Assistance o givea U.egree of aesatnace frot the
by the teacher teacher

Very wach help 'ome help bO help

l~ Before the committee
me e t.e

2, At the time the committee


3. A:ter the committee
0sete and before the
Program is presented
to the chapter.

4, It the time the program
!s presented to the
hatertr for approval,

6, When do committees most often meet? "heck

1. During agriculture e elass period,

2 .Other e.:hool time,

3. After a.,ho.c







-4-

7o Are the goals that your committee planned recorded by a member

of the committee at the time they are acooeiolishedl

Tes No _

Evaluation scale for Senior Students participating in NIbA.

activitleso

Purpose: To determine to what extent perticiT ating in N.i A. activities

have helped you to realise the terposes of the N.F.A. organioa-

tion.

Ae Check the following questions A, B, C, D, or E to indicate to what

degree rerticitating in No.F.A activities have helped you. Tour rating

scale will be as follows:

A Very great influence.

B Above the average influence.

C Average influence

Very little influence

E No influence

1. To what extent has formulating written A B, Co D E,
programs of work and narticination in these
programs for the past years halved you to
develop rural and agricultural leadership.----------------------

2, To what extent has participation in N.FoA.
work helped you to create and nurture a
love of country life. -----------------------------------------

3. To what extent has narticioation in N.F.A.
-h 4 **"I3ngthen confidence in your-
self and your work ----------------------------------------

4. To what extent has Darticination in BUo.A,
activities and planning a -rogram of work
effected your choice in selecting a farm-
ing occupation ---------------------- -------------------------

5o To what extent has program planning and
particirttion in N.'.A, activities helped
you in developing an individual farming
program and to become better established
in farming ----------------------------------------






-5-


6o To what extent has the N.'.A. encouraged
you to improve the farm home and its
surroundings -------------------------------------------

7, To what extent has participation in N.',A.
activities encouraged you to narticinate
in worthy undertakings for the imWrovement
of agriculture, such as membership in
agriculture organizations, rmrcticing new
methods of =ron and livestock nrotuction,
et cetra -------------------------------------------- -

8. o what extent has norticipation in N.F.A.
activities and Klanning programs helped
to develop your character, to train you
for useful citizenship and to foster your
patriotism -------- ------------- ---------- ----

9. To what extent has the N.F.A. helped you
to beo0ne cooperatively minded -------------------------------

10. To what extent has narticipation in the N.F.A.
activities encouraged you to improve your
scholastic standings in your school ----------------- ---

11. To what extent has narticioation in the N.YA.
activities helped you to become thrifty, to
start a savings account, to buy savings bonds,
et cetra -------------- ---------- ---

12. To what extent ha your .?F.A. chapter helped you
to develo- organisE4 recreational activities -------------------






APPENDIX F.


Table for Evaluating the Programs of Work of Local N F A

Chapters as Set up by the Iational Committee on

Standards for Vocational Education in Agri-

culture, 1942



There are several items under two propositions
that will be evaluated by the symbols A, B, C, D, and E.
The basis for marking is to be found on the questionnaire
sent to teachers of agriculture or in the parenthesis
following the items. The word "evidence" in the paren-
thesis means that the evaluators would see these con-
ditions in the local chapter.

The meanings of the symbols are as follows:

A Excellent, condition or provision is present
or made to a very satisfactory degree.

B Superior, condition or provision is present
for the most part or made to a satisfactory degree.

C Fair, condition or provision is present to some
extent or only fairly well made.

D Inferior, condition or provision is present to
a slight degree or poorly made.

E.- Very Inferior, condition or provision is not
present or is most unsatisfactory.

Proposition I. To what extent does the organization of
the chapter make possible the effective
participation of all the members?

ITEM SCORE ITEMS

ABCDE

- -a. Frequent meetings (at least one per month)
are held, which can be conveniently attended
by all members (Teacher's questionnaire No. 1)

-b. Each member has an opportunity to participate
in meetings at least once during the school
year. (Testimony of N F A Members)









- - c.



- - d.



- - e.



- - f.




- - g.



- - h.



- - 1.



- - j.



- - k.



- - 1.



- - m.


The chapter is provided with the recommended
equipment to practice degree advancement.
(Evidence).

The members of the chapter formulate annually
a written program of work. (Teacher's
questionnaire no. 2)

The income of the chapter is sufficient to
finance the activities (Teacher' question-
naire no. 5)

The chapter has in its active membership
a substantial majority of the all day
students of vocational agriculture. (Teacher's
questionnaire no. 4)

A committee functions for each activity or
group of activity. (Teacher's question-
maire no. 5)

The members study carefully the qualifi-
cations for candidates for office (Testi-
mony of N F A members)

The officers meet frequently to plan the
work of the chapter. (Student's question-
naire no. 5)

The members of the chapter know in advance
what is to be taken up at the meetings (
Testimony of N F A members)

Records of the secretary, the treasurer,
and the annual reports are complete and
accurate. (Evidence)

The current program of work of the chapter
has been approved by the principal or
superintendent. (Evidence)

A substa ntial proportion of the members
are given experience in positions of
leadership during their attendance in high
school. (Student's questionnaire no. 6)


- - n. Most of last year's activities have been
brought to a successful conclusion. (Tea-
chers questionnaire no. 6)











Proposition II. To what extent do the activities in which
the chapter members engage afford such
experiences as will train young men in
cooperation and leadership. One or more
of the activities in the annual program'
of work affords experience in:


- - r.
-I,,





---8-.s

- o

- Q.


Cooperative buying and selling (Copy of
program or work)

Other types of cooperation common in rural
life. (Copy of program of work)

Conservation of soil and other resources.
(Testimony of N F A members)

Community service. (Evidence and copy of
program of work)

Leadership (Copy of program of work)

Recreation (Evidence)

Thrift (Testimony of N F A members)


- - V. Scholarship (Evidence)


-Xe


The chapter engages in joint activities with
other chapters (Testimony of N F A members)

The Thapter is practicing systematic degree
advancement. (Teacher's questionnaire no. 2)






THE FLORIDA AGJ'~'U'i .n 1 AND MECi&NICAL UNIVERSITY


Tallahassee, Florida


INSTRUMENT III


Score Card For Evoluatine The Xffectiveness Of Programs Of Work Uf lev Farmers Of America*


Objectives of the Fvidence that the objective* Methods and devices for use in col- Evaluation*
N.LYA organizations ate being realized lecting evidence which will reveal
that the objectives are being
__ _...,.,_ ~ achieved S IC U

1. To develop compe- 1. Provided for leadership: 1. Records showing one or more
tant, aggressive, training. programs designated for
rural and agri- leadership training.
cultural leader- 2. Provided facilities for',
shin. training boys as chairman 2. iReview of list of standing
of committees. committees.

3. Provided training in mub- 3. (a) Inspection of the re-
lic speaking. cords of the teacher,

4. Provided training in con- (b) Observing members in
ducting a demonstration. other activities.

5. Provided committee mem- 4, Inspection of the records
ber training, of the teacher.

6. Published a chanter news- 5. Review of the list of standing
letter. committees,

6. Cory kept in the school
file.
*S--Satisfactory evidence indicates that the educational outcomes of the objectives are satisfactory.

*C--Ouestionable evidence indicates that the educational outcomes of the objectives are satisfactory.

*--Unsatisfactory evidence indicates that the educational outcomes of the objectives are unsatisfactory.
**Based on Instruments used by Tart. Carl Victor in Master Thesis at North Carolina State College, Raleigh,
Hnrf~h Cor-i-i n n


i


- ~ ~---


.


.. '> -. ,






-2-


-:videncee. methods, devices and evaluations for objective one (continued)
7.Priiatedino ao radeio eoe(ota


2. To create and
nurture a love of
country life.


7. Participated in a radio
program.

8. Provided a chapter library.

9. Provided training in lead-
ing ground discussions.

10. Provided training in rar-
liamentary procedure.

11 Acquired ability of self
expression, written and
oral.

12. Encourage advancement to
higher degrees.

13. Planned programs well
beforehand,

14. Required a carefully
built program of work.

15. Maintained good public'
relate ons.

16, Member particiDated as
officers in other or-
ganizations in the school.


7. Records of the teacher.

8, Observation in the classroom.

9. Observation and inspection of
teacher records.

10. (a) Written tests

(b) Observation

11. (a) Tests

(b) Personal interviews

(c) Written reports


12. Examination
vancements,

13. Examination
programs.


of records of ad-


of records of past


14. Examination of this program.

15. Signs, displays, newsnaner arti-
cles and other forms of adver-
tieing,

16. Observation of other organiza-
tions.


4 S -_ .


1. Acquired an arwreciation
of country life.


Io (a) Interview

(b) Observation of free time
activities,








.tui ~ ~ Crr ivja ~ nam iw n. ~.m ...,k4~44


V.Y.^. J6 ,.I._ DfqFo V&. I.I, IW.L L.L... H VVIC VII.Y t TIwVm&rII.m yIS__


3, To strengthen the
confidence of farm
boys in themselves
and their work,


I


2. Participated in roadside
beautification.

3. ParticiDated in beautify-
ing the school ground.

4. Provided for two outdoor
trips, one local, one out
of state.

5. Provided for a talk by a
successful farmer.

6. Provided talks by agricul-
tural leaders.

7. Provided literature in the
library on country life.

R, Provided pictures and movies
of country life.


a


1. Developed self confidence
on the Dart of the members.

2. hxrtanded the supervised
farming program,


1.




2.


(a) Personal interview

(b) Observation of the beha-
vior of the members

(a) Interview

(b) I~xamination of project
record books

(c) Visits to farms


I i i


2. (a) Interview

(b) Observation of beautifice-
tion projects.

3. Interview and observation.

4. (a) records of the teacher

(b) Observation

(c) Interview

5, Records of the teacher.

6. (a) Records of the teacher

(b) Interview

7o Examination of the books in
the N.F.A. library.

8. (a) Records of the teacher

(b) Interview


. a Ifil i


-a-






.Svidences. methods, devices


4. To create more' in-
terest in the intel-
ligent choice of a
farming occupation.


9


and evaluations fr objective tree-
and evaluations far objective three


$. Developed new skills from
supplementary projects.

4. Project income average
$150.00.

5. Advanced in farming.

6. Ninety per cent of the boys
carried continuation projects

7. Members used at least ninety
per cent approved practices.

8. encouragedd improvement pro-
jects.


I i-


1. Acquainted students with
the range of occupations
in agriculture.

2. Provided first-hand con-
tacts and occupational ex-
perience with occupations
in which students might be
interested.


1. (a)

(b)





(b)

(c)


Interview

Records of the teacher

Community survey

Interview

Records of the teacher

Review of the N.,.A. program
of work


(contitm ed) .. .., ,,


I


* r


3. (a) examination of project
record books

(b) Visit to farms

(c) Personal interview

4. (a) Interview with member

(b) Examination of project
records

5. Note rental or purchase of tank.

6. zxlmination of the arojeot books
of each number,

7. (a) Interview

(b) Visit to the fare

8. (a) Examination of Droject re-
cord books

(b) Interview

(c) Visit t tthe far


, II.


,, smmm.mm ,,,,, m=


1 1 I







Evidenema. asth___a d.1__.a and_ *wnliiatinn f'r_ nhi.YIw.-~IC~ fr--~-n-- tn_


5. To encourage mem-
bers in the develop-
ment of individual
farming orograas and
establishment in
farming.


. Develop a clear vision of the
possibilities of the agricul-
tural occupation in which the
students are engaged.

*. Provided knowledge of stabi-
lity, financial returns, edu-
cation required and working
conditions in which students
were interested.

5. Required a four year farm
plan by all members,

6, Conducted a project tour.

7. Planned and carried on im-
proved practices.

B. Supervised a farm survey of
all N.FA. members.


IT


1. Participated in community
organizations.

2. Planned farming operations.


3. (a) Interview with the J.P.A.
members

(b) Review of literature avail-
able

(c) Personal testimonials

4. (a) Interview with members


(b) Examination of
cords


teacher re-


5. (a) Interview


(b) Examination of
cord books


project re-


6. Records of the teacher

7. (a) Examination of project books

(b) Visits to the farm

8. (a) Interview

S (b) Records of the teacher


.-.-- -L .


1. (a) Interview

(b) Observation

(c) Deferred results

2. (a) Interview

(b) Examination of project re-
cord books


t .........


Evidenaes. method., dvries a


and am vainti.ni fnr nhant.iva frAi fanati mnal







Evidence.. methods. devices


-6-

and evaluations for objective five (continued)


I H 1 I I


a


Evidences methods devices -


3. Arranged satisfactory basis
of land use.

4. Selected a tye of farming.

5. Used farm budget record.

6. Assisted members in selecting
a farming program.

7. Encouraged nutting into ef-
fect improvement and supple-
mentary practices ,

R, Develoved better rarent-son
understanding.


3. (a) Interview

(b) Examination of written
lease or agreement

4. (a) Interview

(b) Visit to the farm

(c) Examination of farm
plans

5. (a) JExamination of project
book

(b) Interview

6. (a) Interview with the
student

(b) Occupational interests
and choices

7. (a) Interview with the tea-
cher and student

(b) Visit to the fahne

(c) Pictures before and
after

9. (a) Interview with the parent

(b) Deferred results in later
life


a a e





-7-

frw& 11% ti"12*A)


Evidence
eq$ho I


--


I


9. Developed s,5.cable awards
for outs+.Ading achieve-
ments,

10o couragee the development
of home libraries.

11. bocouraged better farm liv-
ing.

12. Conducted a farm tour.

13. Provided a loan fund for
members.

14, Assisted members in ac-
quiring good livestock.


I I I


.f__VID. II~~~~~~eS.e t h*- -- *4 Al e x .- .,,. .,


9. (a) Check lists and rating
scales

(b) Project stories

(c) Rating of students by each
other

(d) Pictures before and after

10. (a) Individual visit to the home

(b) Deferred results in later life

11. (a) Observation of members

(b) Community survey

(c) Visit to the home

(d) Testimonials of the individ-
uals

12. Bezords of the teacher.

13. Records of the chapter
treasurer.

14. (a) Interview with students

(b) Visit to the farm










6. To encourage mem-
bers to improve th<
farm home and its
surroundings.


1. Encouraged members to dis-
cover needed repairs and
undertake same.

2. Conducted a community ia-
orovement canmaign.

3. Arranged for cooperative
buying of materiel needed
ftr hose iamrovement.

4. Emphasized the value of
beautification.

5. Developed an interest in
improving the farm home
and its surroundings.

6. Promoted an achievement
day.


* I T


1, (a) Pictures before and after

(b) Community survey

(c) Anecdotal records of mem-
bers

2o (a) Gommunity survey

(b) Record of the teacher

(c) Visits to the farm

3. (a) Records of the teacher

(b) Interview with the teacher

4. (a) Personal interview

(b) Deferred results in later life

(c) Observation

5. (a) Interview with the member

(b) Observation of the farm
homes by personall visits

(c) Personal experiences

6. (a) Results seen by a project
tour

kb) Itecords of the teacher

(c) Kxamination of achievement
records





-9-

*<0 4AU<'<-A)


2w4 Aerm m 4.kiAe rw Aummr naA1 ewer~~ 1,ieb ree ew a 4enA


7. Promoted a safety wagrM 7. (a) records of the teacher
for the home.
Sb) Visit to the fare home

-c) Observation


7. To participate in
worthy undertakings
for the improvement
of agriculture.


1. Obtained mrmered liwstocM
for members.

2. Formed a 100 bushel cora


3. Purchased certified seed
for all supervised msaas
twice projects.

4. Formed a cooperative buy-
ing and selling organisa-
tion.

5. Stressed conservation -rac-
tices on all farm land.


1. (a) Interview with student

(b) Coaduct a project tour
to farms of members

2. (a) Ixamination of the records
of the school

(b) Interview with the teacher
or students

3. (a) Interview

(b) Insnection of need tags as
presented by members

(c) Visit to the farm

(d) Observation of crop yields

4. (a) Insaection of the records of
the teacher

(b) InsDection of the organisation

5. (a) Insnection


(b)


Observing land use in the com-
munity by a fare visit






S.vidences.. methods. devices


N ro

and evacuations for objective seven


x -- --A--- a-- -v


'I


R. To develop charac-
S ter train for use-
ful attiz anhrois.and
foster patriotism,


6. Stressed cron rotation system.

7. Conducted a livestock sanita-
tion nrograa.

, Developed use for maintain-
ing and improving the wro-
Auctvity of our soils and
other natural resources.


1. Developed qualities of
good citizenship.

2. Conducted meetings in
a businesslike manner.

3. Developed a civic con-
sciousness and interest
in community service
activities,


Ic~nt4niw41~~~ ____


(c)

(d)


7. (a)

(b)


8. (a)

(b)


lnswection of fare plans

Observing cropping system
from year to year

Interview

Examination of student
records

Personal testimonials

Observing results in the
community

Personal testamonials

Deferred results as seen
in later life


1. (a) By observing student during
free time activities

(b) Deferred results in later
life

2. (a) Records of the secretary

(b) Observing students in other
activities

3. (a) Personal testimonials

(b) Deferred results as observed
in later life


I I i




-11-


,videnges.meethoss, devices end evaluations for ob 4stive eight (ooantinuel) _


4. ieveloved ability to con-
duct organisation eeat-
ings and to be an intelli-
gent rarticitator in or-
ganization in activities.

5. Developed interest in as-
suming position of leader-
ship in school and commu-
nity activities,

6. Acouired an appreciation
and understanding of the
American system of democra-
tic values.

?. Develo-ed a wholesome re-
lationship between the
home, school and other cos-
munity institutions.

8. Developed qualities of
leadership.

9. Developed habits of
courtesy, re jpnsibility
honesty and respect for
others,

10. Acouired socisl and eco-
nomic statue.


4. Observing students as they
organize other groups that
function in the total school
Program.

5. ~a) Personal testimonials

(b) Deferred results as seen
in later life

(o) Observing free time activities
of students

(d) Observing students in other
organizations

6, Personal interview with the stu-
dent.

7. (a) Personal interview

(b) Observing behavior of students
in school and out of school

8. Observing students in N.FPA. and
other activities.

9. (a) Observing behavior in all ac-
tivities

(b) Deferred results as seen in
later life


(a) Personal testimonials

(b) Observing results in later
life




-12-


svidences, methods, device and evaluations for objective eight ( uruanned)

11. Provided one program on 11. Examination of program of work.
citisenshio.
12. Examination of N.F.A. library.
___________ 12. Provided on cistenship. I


9. To participate in
cooperative effort.


1. Develor'd ability to co-
ope-ate with others in
nome, school, and commu-
nity activities,

2. Stressed abilities in de-
mocratic procedures and
practices.

3. ,Developed an appreciation
of the place of agricul-
ture in industry.

4. Participated in programs
of cooperative buying
and selling.

5. Developed the ability to
understand the problems
of our fellow men.

6. Developed ability to carr
out parent and son agree-
ments.

7. Developed ability to get
along with other NHF.A.
members and classmates.


1. (a) Observing free time activi-
ties

(b) Deferred results as seen
in later life

2, (a) Personal interview

(b) Examination of the program
of work

(c) Observing deferred results

3. Personal testimonials.

4. Examination of the records of
the cooperative organization.

5. (a) Testimomlals of members

(b) Observing the behavior of
members when working with
others

6, (a) Examination of this agree-
ment before and after com-
pletion of project

(b) Visit to the farm

7. Observing the behavior and atti-
tudes of the members as they work
together.




-13-


EJAI & A- tm


Aaw4~r a. .A a hrratI-rwr f'n. nhilgdtiym nine Icontinned)


ong gr -
V6. & A~v..v. 0% is A a 'Ilia-t -,,- ob--ci nine d -


10. To encourage and'
practice thrift.,


Q. Developed ideals and values
essential to community bet-
terment.

9. Partisioeted in keening
cha-ter scranbook.

10. Urged 100 Der cent at-
tendance to all members.


1. Prepared a chapter budget.

2. Keep accurate and com-
olete financial records.

3. Stimulated interest in
systematic savings.

4. Lead members in earning
money cooperatively.

J. ?.rticipetP4 in finan-
cing ahanter activities.

6. Encouraged members to
invest in productive
enterprises and saving
bonds,

7. Operated a thrift bank
for systemAtic savings.

8. Encouraged loaning of
money to members to in-
vest in productive
enterprises,


9. (a) Individual testimony

(b) Deferred results as
seen in later life

(c) By observing student
behavior

9. Examination of pictures of
participatory members.

10. Examination of the records of
the secretary.


1. records of the treasurer.

2, (a) Kxamination of the records
of the treasurer

(b) Examination of the woject books

3. (a) Personal interview

(b) Examination of savings and
food purchased

4. (a) Examination of the program
of work of the chapter

(b) Observing other school acti-
vities involving raising
funds

5. Examination of the records of the
teacher.


------ r -- -I r






b'vidences. methods. devices and evaluations for objective ten (continued)


11. To encourage
improvement in
school rshiD


9. Encouraged borrowing money
to invest in productive
enterprises.

10. Encouraged members to set
financial goals to be at-
tained.


6. (a) Personal interview

(b) Visit to fares

(a) Deferred results as
seen in later life

7. Examination of the bank as set
up by the chapter.

8. (a) Personal interview

(b) Examination of loan
system as built in
the program of work

9. (a) Personal interview

(0) Visit to farm to see
how money is invested

10. (a) Examination of the program
of work

(b) Examination of student wro-
ject plans

(c) Personal interview


I- I U. -9- -


1. Formulated and maintained
an honor roll system,

2. Developed a point system
of which scholarship is
a part.

3. Awarded prices for attain-
ment in scholarship.


1. Examination of this honor
roll and the records of
the teacher.

2. Examination of records of the
teacher.

3. (a) Records of the teacher
(b) Interview with students





-15-


Evidence methods d s


nnA *wanlCintle~s fnr~ rnhI~int~w alawan tiinnt~nnrA)


,,, -. I, Y. Ua ---- I -pa- .n ..n ....,. .


12. To provide and
encourage the
development of
organized rural
recreational
activities.


4. Developed a guidance pro-
gram,

5, Devoted one chanter meet-
ing to scholarship,

6. Encouraged students to
strive for scholastic
honors,

7, New members are assisted
by advanced students.


4. Examination of the records of
the teacher and files on
ti'dance.

5. Examination of the program
of work.

6. (a) Personal interview

(b) Observing students in agri-
culture and other classes

7. Interview with new members and
the teacher.


9 9_ --4 -* I.


1, Developed anpreciation
of wholesome leisure
time activities.

2. Organized athletic
teams.

3. Encouraged federation
and district coroetition.

4. S-onsored a parent and
son banquet.

5o Sponsored a stunt night.

6. Attended the state N.F.A.
camp.

7, Sponsored recreational
Program in the local
community.


1. (a) Personal testimonials

(b) Observing free time
activities

(c) List of leisure time
activities

2, Observation of teams in ac-
tion and results.

3. (a) Examination of the program
of work

(b) Observing spirit of soorts-
manship

4, Examination of the records of the
teacher.

5, Examination of the records of the
teacher.
6, Exr mnation.ef-tha list of members
Wxat artenaed camp,





-16-

and evaluations for objective twelve


- ------ ---- ---


(continued) --


S8. Developed interest in
good literature.

9. Bevelo-ed an aarreciation
of clean mind and a sound
body.

10. Encouraged suTervised re-
creation.


.radmran mathadn- devices


-r-~rurr-~ ar-~--ro --r-----.~~- ----1-~------ ---- ---IZ-;-


7. Observation of the activities in
the community.

8. (a) Personal interview

(b) Check list of books read
by members

(c) Observation of changed be-
havior due to good litera-
ture

(d) Observing home libraries

9. (a) Personal testimonials

(b) Interview with students

(c) Deferred results as seen
in later life

(d) Observation of literature
read

(e) General observation

10. (a) Record of parties, out-
ings, and banquets

(b) Personal interview

(c) Observing the type of re-
creation members participate
in




APPENDIX G.

NFA CHAPTER ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT


19i 19,i




This report is due on or before May J, 19.a
and should be mailed to C. C. Cunningham, Executive Secretary, NFA
Florida A and M University, Tallahassee, Florida. Any report received after
this date will not enter the contest.


port of the


Chapter


School


0, Address


unty

te Chapter was Chartered _Present Active Membership

'FICERS:


President

Vice-President

Secretary

Treasurer

Reporter


Adviser


Members of


Executive Committee


Approved by


President


Date


Local Adviser


Date


I


--- I

II-- -- I--


-


-I -- -- ----

-- ----- ----- --

------- --- II


- --


- I I '--- I ----- --




-- -- --- --- I --


-~I- --


I --I---






I SUPERVISED FARMING PROGRAMS ACCOMPLISHIiENTS
(As recorded in Project Record Books;

1. Actual number productive enterprises completed
by chapter members ........................

2, Actual number of improvement projects completed
by chapter members .......... ,........ ...

3. Actual number of supplementary farm practices
or jobs completed by chapter members ........o

4. Number of members having a balanced long-time
supervised farming program in operation o...oo

5. Number of members vrith full ownership of
productive projects .... ................. ...

6. Actual number of new farm skills learned by
chapter members .............................

7. Actual number of project tours made by
chapter members during year ..................

8. Number boys receiving FFAF Awards .....oo.
a, Local Medals ............ ..........
bo State ...................................
o. National ..... ..... o.......... .........

II. COOPERATIVE ACTIVITIES ENGAGED IN BY CHAPTER
AN: MEMBERS
(Items graded on comparative basis as to number of activities, value
and per cent of participation)

1. Buying Activities

a. Total cooperative purchases by NFA members for their own productive
enterprises

Kind Amount Value No, of % chapter
Members members
participating
after each act

(1)

(2)

(3)



(5)

(6) _
Total xxx




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