• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Introduction
 The problem an definitions of terms...
 Review of the related literatu...
 Procedure used in gathering...
 Analysis and presentation...
 Summary, recommendations,...
 Bibliography
 Appendix














Title: Appraisal of certain aspects of the reading program of the rural elementary schools of Madison county
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Title: Appraisal of certain aspects of the reading program of the rural elementary schools of Madison county
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Collins, Lennie LaVern
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1955
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    List of Tables
        Page v
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The problem an definitions of terms used
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Review of the related literature
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Procedure used in gathering data
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Analysis and presentation of data
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Summary, recommendations, and conclusions
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Bibliography
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Appendix
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
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Full Text








AN APPRAISAL OF CERTAIN ASL'FCTS OF
THE READING PLOGQR.: OF THE RURAL FLY MENTARY
SCHOOLS OF MADISuN C. .:TX







A THESIS
Presented to
the Factaty of the School of Education
Florida Agricultural and MeFha-nieal University


In Partial Fulfillant
Of the Requirements for the Dogrne
Iuater of Science in Education





ngr
Leani. LaVemr Collins
My 30, 1395








SIGRATURH OF APPROVAL COUIMTTFES

4^^^ (14


GRADUATE THESIS COMMITTEE


Ikh*.C C.. .teanle


Ol~?d~_*;-C~
1LV3

~p~r-a~Ln


- .. "


Ato I- I@ Qwmpu









ACK ID WDGEM ES8


ta witr Is eeply grateful to or. I* B Cooper
for the expert earistance given her as her majo advisor
and bm. L, W Sevell,
S~e also wishes to acknowledge the ai.t given her
by NIe Jweethel. S. Mrrettt Supervising Principal of
the rural seboole of Mdieona County and teachers of the
eleaatary schools.
AenoIdledgememnt is madO to the Chairan of the
Graduate Division.


LeamS L.r Collint








(r
<:* I ?'


TABtE OF CONTESTS

CHAPTER PAGE

INTRODUCE' ON

I. TI! PROBLJFM AND DFNIT:lNS T OF T ZS *E 3 6

The Problem, ,. .. *

Statement oC the orobleam, . 6

meed fo) the study. . 8

Definitions of term uased, 7

Appraisal .* .

Rural School . 8


entaryeer Shool . . 8
Reading Programi #* a 8

One-Teacher Sohool # # * I

Organisation of the study .* .* 9

Baste Assumptions . 9

II. REVIEW OF THE RELATED LITERATURE *, f

III. PROCFDUSE USED IN QG THRO DATA . ., i

SuWaRry * ** *# #*

IV. ANALYSIS AND PRESSrTATION OF DATA 9

Vs SUMMARY, REC' ,.TDATIOBNS A1D CCNCLUSI. S ... S

Conolualons * * 0* 6

BIBLICOGRAPHY . . . . 56

APPENDIX .* .* .* # . So






LIST OF TABLES


TABE PAGE
X, The Physical .lanta cf the hural EleImenta
Schools *. W* 31
II. Educational Training of Teaching .er-onnel 34

II. Instructional Materials Found in the Schools 3
IV. Kinds of Reading Text Books Used . 38
y. Nuablr of Home owners and Non .Home owners 39
VZ, Occupational Status of Families 41
VII. The Number of Familles that ?Wved aid the
time of year Moving was done a, a 4l
VIII. The Number of Over-age PuIl.s in the flemen-
tary Schools a * f ** a *, 48
IX, EnrolLment and Number of iAop-Outs 45
X. Status and Ut.lisation of Row Peterson Test. 47
XI. Number of Children Who had Vision Defeots 49
XII. Analyzation of Questionnaire Results 51









INTRODUCTION

The traditional basis for appraising educational
progress has been an analysis of data about the excellence
of the scho 1 plant, the amoaint of aonrey spent, thr trnin-
ing of the teachers, tht number o! bo6ki in the library,
the sine of classes and similar itear. The inadequacy of
such an ap ronch is quite obvious, particularly when ad-
vorced from an appraisal of the educational product,
It to now generally recognized that a more satis-
factory basis for appraising an *duarional program s to
study It in terms of its philosophy of education, its in-
dividually expressed ourposes and objectives; the nature
of the r 11ls with whox it has to deal, the needs of the
conmmity which it serves and the nature of the American
doEnlsey of which it is a part.
A study of recent efforts to improve reading pm.-
graams hows that at let st siz groups of responatbilities
am involved. Noaelyi (1) the responsibllitteLf setting
up agencies for the cooperative study of the adequacy of
the present or current program, (4) the responsibility of

S. arr, "1.1.il ia i. Burton, and Leo Je Brueckner#
-gan salon ( New Yorki Appletnn.-Cent.;ry-Crofts, Ine, 1947),
peR 200 -










making provisions fbr interpreting recent trends and
developments t tthe staff, (3) the responsibility of ask.
ing provisions for securing finds, trained personnel, i.
struetioal facilities, freedom of staff for essential
individual eoamittee work (4) the responsibility of pro-
aoting the wise selection of taproved eurriculta mterialsj
(5) the resaonsibility of providing syapathetie constrao-
tie help to teachers and (6) the respoanibllity of la-
tepreting recent trends to the public. In order to t*-
ooaplish the six steps above certain conditions are pre
requisites to moseas. Thee muit be a genuine eonoern
on the part of the staff about the total situation and
thee maet be dynamiu leadership Ja *ffMtingl these need
ed obagmes.
Every school has a reading progrea hich has develop.
ed as a result of any factors every school has customs
and traditions which the staff natural tends to foUlow.
tMay persons are involved.-principals, teachers, parents,
supervisors, superintendents, al of whom have ideas about
the reading program ihich they have derived from tahir
various exparie ces. Therefore, it is valuable to look
oceasionally at the reading program ea* whole sa coo.
side all the things, that affect t and that are affected

a ilai I8. l Gray, apoed Reading Programs,"
Joural tY Education. 71t (1951),pp. 8555580








8
1g it, 3 Msh has been done to im ve anprorv ovide adequate
reading programs for schools. The investigator is aware
of these ma investigations and recognition to thea is
given in this Study. However, since each soho )1 oraUnity
has its Individual probles and since these investigations
can be used only as suggestions, the investigator seeks to
design an appraisal that will throw light on probleaS or
inadequacies of the present reading program of the rural
elementary schools of Madison County.
Madison County is located in North Florida, on the
northern boundary, The incorporated cities of the county
ae Greenville, Lee, and otdison, adison located IS
about the center of the county, La the county seat The
population is 14,77T
T e school population for the 1941 and 1942 term
was 1,611 pupils ai the elementary school and M8 pupils
il the junior and senior high school or a total of 1,959
Negro pupils. To teaoh those pupils required the services
of 69 teachers. TheLe were 41 different school centers
for Negro puA ils Thee were 39 one or two*teacher schools

ib ry J LeS gR CLP a1d M| Carhrild= (Aew
lorks Appleton*Centtry Go,, 1940), p. 39,
4SMx slria (Florida Stat Department of Agrieulttre,
Tallhassee, FiorSai 1950), p. 83,










located in arwal areas and two high schools located In
Greenville and Madison proper,.
The school population for the 1951 anf 1958 term
was 1,846 for elementary and high sCnool showing a de-
crease of 114 pupils, the number of rural scho 1 centers
have been reduced to Z4. Twenty-one of the rural schools
are one-teacher acholla, housed in two-ro~ m tre build ins
and Churchesd
Subject fields in the elementary and secondary
schools ares Language Arts, Matheaties, Scienoe, Social
Studied s Health, Musia, Art, Home Economics, and Agricul-
tural Education. The Language Arts area occupies a large
portion of the elementary school day, within this area read-
ing usually receives the most attention*
The materials for reading included the state adopt-
ed textbooks, along with small sets of supplementary readers.
No library as such is provided for Negroes, however, a
number of bo.ks selected by a group of ele mentary teachers
are provided for the Negro schools to serve this purpose,
blh has b:en done In the last few years to improve
the scho.1 program of Madison.County. Madison County has

....... Et = IfQCig (FlBorida St-ite
Sp-rtent of Education, Talahmnsuee "'loria, 194;), p4.
Departfernt eo tooT

6 ib aPa t (Florida State Department of
Education, Tallahassee, Florida, 1952), p. 153.










to compete with other counties in the state and with the
c-nstant growth and development of science and industry,
hence steps are in the making fr the improvement of all
the programs of the schools.
In the Language arts area there is a great need
for the development of a well-balanced reading program.
The procedure recommended for such work is as
followat (1) survey to determine what the resent situation
is, (8) classify, study, and evaluate the preasnt situation,
(3) aske recommendations, (4) decide how the recommended
needs can be accomplished, and (5) organize for work. This
study is centeed around a the first procedure.

















Dpt 'Arg nhp Pro r an? Jil C ounty (Florida State
4partuoet of WdeatjntTallahassaee, arorida, 1942), p. &Sd










CHAPTER I

THE PROBLEr

An Appraisal of Certain Aspects of The Reading Pro,
rea of The Rutal Elementary BShools of ?adison County.
StateLntaf l r ohlan. The problem of this study
Is to appraise the reading 'rogrEa of the Elementary
Saho Is of Madison County, and was made on the basis of (1)
observation of the schools and (Z) the fact that 113 pupils
ware failed because of their inability to read. Interviews
with the teachers of the twenty elementary schools .1n
Madison County led the investigator to conclude that the
reading program needed appraising. The investigator was
led further to believe that the present reading program
did not include all plans and arrangements in the school
system which affects the development of ch dre in An ted*
ing. If this be true, it seems to varrent an appraisal to
determine the statue of the present reading program
igJtat iJ Lt~uda In Ltadison County, rural school
reading instruct on was intended to develop fl my in both
oral and silent reading. Considerable effort was nade to
group pupils within a class and provide instruction approve
private to the group's needs rather than to assume that all








T
pupils of a given grade were at the saw reading level and
would benefit froa identical instruction and materials. Bow-
ever, in spite of this effort many present factors such as
the operation of many oneeteacher schools which include
eight grades maks it impossible for effective grouping or
teaching.
Tools for measuring the effects of reading in the
rural elementary schools are few and inadequate. During
the school year 1953-54, 11S students failed because of
poor reading. As a result of constant failure, there were
310 over-age pupils in low grades.
The investigator feels that an appraisal of the
reading prograa amy point up the real weaknesses of the
total reading program. In this study an attempt was made
to employ those techniques which would find and point up
the weaknesses of the present reading program, and makl
recomendations which will lead to possible solutions of
the problems.

X1, MWFINITIQOS OF TEL4S USED

AaraisaaL Appraisal is a process of inquiry, con-
cerned with the analysis and interpretation of data about
the excellence of an educational program Appraisal as
used in this study, is an aspect of evaluation which is









attempting to measure the strengths and weaknesses of an
educational program in terms of its objectives and phlloso-
phy.1
laL ahool. Revlin defines the tern rural school
as meaning those schools located in areas populated by
28500 persons or less.
Elamstaru flehl., Good says that elementary school
refers to schools offering work in any soabinration of grades
from I to 68 Throughout the report of this investigation,
the term elementaryy saho "1 shall be interpreted as mean-
ing those schools offering work for grades 1 through 8.
Read~na ArMma Bond and Wagner interpreted readere
ing program" as meaning a series of reading experiences that
encourages the growth of reading proficiencies in an orderly
meaningful, and developmental manner4
3S-SmPiu school2J One-teaeher schools, usually
rural, in whblh the pupils la a number of grades or groups
are hound and taught br one teacher.*

I Hmrold Shane, E. bainsati ofm Mi A
lMny iQrriculuaM (New Yorks Renry Holt & o. 96)

Harry I$ Revlin, EyloZ diaS o r Aducation
(Ne2 Yorks F, hbner & Co., 9 p. 696
Carter V. Good, ictinary fEduation (New Yoric
MNorawvRill Book Co., In., 194), p. 49.
4OW L. Bond, Eva Bond Wagner, Xaching o ha1a U T
eaWd (New York: The MoMillan Co., 1951)#,p 8.


50ood, ap .Ji. p. 149L









III. ORGANIZATION OF THE STUDY

This study consist of five chapters, The current
view of the problem has been set forth in the introduction.
In Chapter I the problem has been stated, the purpose and
scope of the study set forth, the terms defined, the basic
assumptions, and the organisation of the study given. rI
chapter II a review of related literature is furnished, In
chapter IIIX the procedure used in gathering data and the
summary given*. Z chapter IV an analysis and presentation
of data is given. Chapter V contains the sumaary and rew
commendat ons.

XV, BASIC ASSUM~TIONS
The following asiuptions were base to carrying
out this study
1, It is assumed that the reading program of the
rural elementary schools of Mbdison County needs appraising.
8. That tests can not be used entirely as a means
of f zding the causes of failure in reading
3. That the books used by the school children should
be selected by the teachers.
4. That there is some question as to the adequaney
of the library facilities.
B, That there is some question as to the adequaney
of the physical plants.








10
6. That there seems to be a limited amount of in-
struotional materials in the ashools.
7T That the aohool environment is not as conducive
to learning as it should be.









CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATES LITERATtfR

In this bcapter attention is called to literature
which tends to establish the fact that aany reading pros
grpa do include all plans end arrangements for the Ma-
tire school system which a"feet the development of the
children in reading*
Doloh, In attempting to evaluate the reading pro-

gr of schools, approached the problem by developing self-
surve charts for the teaching personnel. Each teacher
read and asked himself the four quest ones. amelyt (1) is
the statement largely true of my sehoolroonm? (2) is it
only partly truew? (3) would I like the statement to be
true, but find it aroasible of fulfillant? (4) do I
believe the statement should not be true? He concluded that,
through thr use of this self-survey form, in seeral school
systems, some important facts have been rcought out. Doleh
states that
Good moral must exist in the school and in the
school system Thij a great amount of disagreement
anst be expected, Wht the enwring discussion must
not be in terms of who is right, but in terms of what
is actually helping the children with their reading,
and finally it is suggested that the self-survey will
lead to experimntation.


1. V. Dol-chn "zeILgryol ry A&s
The TSM"g -teadn.* ISlemont Jxy School Journal, (1952)0
g* 8naB










The results further indicated that teachers who have
always followed one met-od of teaching reading may try another
and that the whole school system may decide to work together
on a new procedure.
In connection with a program of scho .1 appraisal in
a typical aid-western community, tauc and Owenson, members
of the research staff, noted what they considered to be a
serious lack of recreactional and supplementary reading mate-
rials in elementary school cass-rooms During a discussion
of this situation a question was raised as to bow much use
would be made of additional reading material if they were
made available to the children of grades IV through VIII.
As an approach to this problem a set of 171 books were made
available to the children of grades I through VIII, The
books were chosen to give a wide range of subject mater,
?bre easy than difficult books were included, but a suf.
fioite* atber of books were included to appeal to the Ita
terest of superior readers, Nauh and wenson concluded
that
Among the findings from this Stay of children's
recreational reading was that, tie alemctary pupils
did take advanta e of additional reading materi of
as;tablg type and difficulty when these were mde aval.l
able* *hat, children in grades IVYV seem to choose
more difficult books that children ia grades YVII
fVII chose books approxiiately the sase grade placement.
That, reading Is a fora of recreation in spare times
ranked rather low amang other recreational activities









of te children, And that, a~neiderat-onb should be
given to the causes of the marked degree in the amount
of free reading d ine by pupils in the hitter gprad's.
Reading ability, relat.i n of parents hone and care
tain developmental charctteristicS to children any .'rove to
be valuable s4urces of he.p in the reading program. Sheldon
and Carrillo, in their research report used the following
fhcts in a study of 868 students and 641 parents the size
of the family, the position of the child srang his siblings9
the number of boo A in the b hBa, the pupils age when bohe sp
first 3ords, his age when he spoke in sentences, the number
or children n th neighborhood of the damN age, educate onal
level of parents, the oecupat;-lnal status of parents, number
of ties the family moved, the fears of chldpreun, the fre
queny of their day dreams and parents's opanin of whether
the ohild like: or dislike school, 3heldon and CarrUllo eon-
clusions were
That the following fnat.rs seetm to bt deflniteLy
related to reading ability of any child showing con-
saatent trends The asmaler the fami y, the greater
the percent of good readers, the earlier tbh ord'nal
position in the family tw higher the per cent for
good readers, as tbh nho library increases, the per
cent of good readers increases, Good readers h:ve
coa from homes where parents have reached a higher
level o0 eduaotiunal attallnnt. Good readers tend
to like school. Oood readers tend to ca. e iPe often
from es sup: orted by professional and anagerial
vwrlkrs and father than fror less skilled workers,
sad the moving of the feaily if It ooeured when the

l so Mauch Laster J* Swenson, a C ti
n2 *t i-0erelAnIt |a xf f Eleaentary Shoroi j 5 p









child was from six to eight yetrs of age.3
No relation was sfown between reading ability and number of
children in the neighborhood of the same age, and the general
frequency of day dreaming. Differences were noted in specific
types of fe,;rs felt by good or poor readers, but the research-
era felt that these are probably due to different environ *
ments.
The investigator in studying the reading program
pointed up the fact that the op reful selectIon of the text-
books in subject areas other than reading is necessary when
developing a balance reading progress. Mt linson, In his
report on the rending difficulty of textbooks in elementary
silence states that one of the more significant criteria fbr
selecting textbooks deals with the level of reading ability
needed to understand the printed material.4
Berry, thinks that to provide a well-rounded read
ing ;rograa fur every child ai a high goal for any teacher
or any school. The three R'a, Raprort, Readiness and Re*
assurance, determine the emotional climate in which learning
best takes place. If a reading program is to meet the needs
of all, it mist include a wide range of reading materials

Williaa D. Sheldon, Lawrence Carrillo, aelatoan t
nlbB. Gorge an0d lCertain evaloMar ntal Charter i AS tS
Yhldor~iaa OWJadntltf
George G. Mallinson Harole E. Sturnm, ;T& RBaSl
SDiffi~ltpa S oextbooks & Peatrx MgXagg U Ea mentary
School J urnal, 501 p. 460, September-2ay, 1949*50,









whclh should be available and will include advertisaents,
pamphlets, textbooks, dictionaries, reference books, aspe,
classroom charts, atlases, pictorial material, prose and
poetry, realistic and fanciful materials and content re.
lated to common and particular interests of children,
There is a-other important way of looking at the
range of your reading program. It should include provision
for, (1) baste developmental reading, (8) voluntary reading
for enjoyment, (3) what might be called functional reading,
the development of the reading power needed to use reading
effectively in coenent subjects.
The Profession as a whole and the public is cane
earned today in the improvement of reading programs and in
the development of more e fioient readers. The challeng-
ig problem faced by osat schools As to develop improved
reading programs and promote increased competence among
readers in harmony with the exacting demands of the times.
To achieve these purposes the following guidAag facts end
principles should be adhered to # (1) The dominant role
and relations hip of reading have undergone notable changes,
(2) A clearer understanding of its nature and complexity
have developed. (3) Eirdenoe that growth in reading is a
continuous process. (4) Reading varies with the

uiltliao Altne Brry, 7, g Prom 5t
Education 71 T p. 553.








16
kinds of materials read and the purposes for reading, (5)
Children pass through an cessive stages of development as
they advance toward maturity (6) All children nass through
similar stages of development, they do so at different
times and rates.
Some essential aspects of a sound read ing program
areas (1) Sound basic instruction in reading (a) Guidance
In reading in the various curriculum fields (3) Provision
for wholesome inspiring adventure in pars nal reading, and
(4) Special adjustment for the seriously retarded.
Important periods or Stages of children development
that must be provided for are: (1) The period in which train-
ing and experience that prepare for reading is provided.
(2) The period which provides the basic training needed to
able a child to read simple material independently* (3)
The period of ra Id progress *a those basic attitudes and
skills. (4) The period in which increased efficiency In
all aspects of reading are required. (5) A final period
nl which the attitudes, habits and skills involved in rea6-
nag are rapidly improved.
Shan and MeS3ain, state that good grouping policies
are devised with a view t the developmental needs of child-
weas boor ones are likely to have as the source of their In.

t illiam a. Qrayp, a ve adigag Jo ala Education
701 p. 535, September-June, 19506a1*








17
adequacy the administrators' desire to contrive a plan which
is either aichanically content or, one which reflects a con-
eept of lebnning that iL mechanical in nature. The real dif-
fiulty ia likely to arise when the administration and/or
staff is of the conviction that the machinery they pains.
takingly fashioned is desirable because it help children
acquire subject matter, A grouping plan used in a Lid-
western county school system illustrates this point.7
The superintendent became convinced of the merit of
a plan whereby all reading in the first six grades was sched.
uled at the same hour of the day,
When the bell suund, doeah cbild made his way to
the classroom which corresponded to his read ng level as
shown W sutardardised tTES'pS A teacher may have any number
of grades represented in her reading class. The results
were unsatisfactLry because grouping was done without are
guards for social and emotional values. Many ature children
were grouped with less mature children.
Russell, related in his observation of two one.
teacher rural schools the different procedure used in the
reading class .~e school used the sterile procedure of oral

7Harold Shanm and t, T. MteSain, Ualt MA Th
M aCrrioulut m ( New Yorks Henry rr and opany,










reading 1tfr materials not too related to the child's liJie
with little ep ortunity for disouusaon developing meaning
or using th ideas in the books. The other sQho 1 used a
wide variety of worthwhile activities with reading taking
its place as one of a group of lenrn:ng activities, iRead
ing was growing out of th- various ourrtculm activities
and adding richness and meaning to the.al Rssel eonaluded
thatS
A modern reading urogrem had four main fnctorsnmams
iXy, (1) the devel pawntal reading progriaa (.) the
functional reading rogra, (3) the ereatib-nal reva-
ing program and (4) the enrichment program for ner.anal
and sooiti growth.
The realisat;on that a ass approach to the teahers
of reading create anwy problems for cXildren, has caused
some experimentation with reading program that are adjusted
to individual differ oes. Stullkea, believes that growth
in reading by unusual learning types is dependent on the
nature of the child's handicaps which mkas him an muusual
learner* the a' ectil reading nrograa at Montefore School,
(Chicago) for socially saladjusted boys adjusts teaching
to meet the needs of the socially handicapped by offering a

David p. Russell u541ri.ulu at udi
71 s 541.










a broader basis than mere intellectual development.
Preston studied the histories of forty pupils who
were sent to the diagnostle School of San Francisco public
school system. He concluded that those pupils who were the
most retarded in reading were also the aost variant in attl.
tulsd, social adjustment, and conduct. In most cases eaeh
additional year of retardation semred to make the probls
worse. As a result of diagnostic study and remedial teaehw
ing, 76 per sent of these children learned to read satis.
factorilys 13 per cent acquired fair ability, and per cent
required foundations and were beginning to read before
ciroastanAes caused them to withdraw from the school. These
pupils were not always taught by arn one method. A flexi-
ble program which made allowances for individual differences
in learning was planned.
Adams, states that to be valid, a reading nrograa
must Drovide for evaluation of its outcomes in terms of its
objectives. This evaluation should be more or less eon-
tinuous processes, When appraisal has revealed the degree
of attainment or non-attainment of objectives, it provides
the data for diagnosis and for correcting individual reading
difficulties. Foelow-ng a period of instruction, provision

a1n1ie m. Lns. Relating .Te -eadingasr A f a
Individual Differenaeg Vale 49a Swl S49, p. aW.









ia ades for a retvaluation and further amAifiatioane)
Co-operative plmann g in An Experlimntal Appraisal
of a plan far inlividudiia.tng instruction ir renadng was
reported in 1936 by J, T. Worlton of ZSlt Lake City, Utah.
This report refleeta ericalt t thinking intelligent ianna
ing, an a reasonable evolution from various points of
view* This work lScm~d serve Ba an inspiration for those
In despair. All such unltt standings require intelligent
leadnral.p, courage, and u ceasing etffrt,
The esentir~ld or this rograr include an inventory
of the reader, a rich variety of sternlals organized around
content unites systeatio developnat c bMasi reading
ski118, ability, tUi spefite reaOdnc difficluties, the in-
te astl and te tastes of the individual members or the
Qlass.* In ddit on to t obe re 'drs a wide variety 0o select.
ed ateri rl is ando available. Individuh l instruction, a
well as less and amiD group Qactivitles, characteries the
procesure. btivatlon Li achieved, in part, by o~oper Ativel
planned stuy aotlv.ties and appraisal pxocedur# Iand tV
s eialised disc~sa ona.


10oFay Aams, leafig;hW GUI3&A 2 nd. (New Yorks
Thoe bonald press Company, 1949)g pi 493o
fustaett Albert BNttu, S9I 2ijAd." lo
SIUaerta (New Yorkt AArrioan Br Coap sny,2t ):p.6










Bond and Wagner, stated that it is only through a
knowledge of each pupil's development in the fundamental
areas of reading that a group program, designed to teach
the children to read, may be formulated. It is only through
a program adjusted to the reading capabilities and needs of
the children that reading growth may be optimal and reading
disability minimal. To the extent that the reading program
is adjusted to known strengths and limitations of children,
growth in reading will be ooapeatble with the potentialities
of the children, An important aspect of a reading program
is that which provides for physical examination and correct-
ion of physical defects*
7 One of the first in importance as pointed up ly
mbnroe, is effective vision. At an early age children re-
cognise that we use our eyes when we read. Actually we
read with anh more than our eyes* leading is ;rilarily a
thinking process involving language meanings. The absorb.
ing reader becomes so engrossed with the ideas aroused that
he is more or less oblivious to what his eyes are doang dure
ing the act of reading. Let something interfere with the
proper seeing of the text, however, and the entire reading
process steps Vision is the sensory channel through which
language meaniiis are aroused in response to printing, just
as hearing is the sensory channel through which the same










kInds of meanings are aroused in response to a speakerp3
In developing a better reading program, Lee and Lee,
suggest that:
The following recent trends are significant
*1 Reading has Go .e to be e a 1funtional skill rather
Mtan a formal school exercise.
8. Reading fs now integrated with the whole school ourrieum
ua. I
S, Reading and personality are interrelated fnators.
4 Reading readiness is developed before the actual teaching
of reading begins,
S. Reading has a more casual and informal beginning.
6. There have been great improvements in the methods of teach*
ing reading.
7. More varied and flexible techniques are used in the teach.
ing of reading.
8. Phonies now is assuing its legitimate place as one tech.
niqui. of word analysis.
9. There is great increases in nrber variety, and quality
of books and other reading material.
10*Readig is more flexibly adjusted to the whole daily
schedule.
11.eading is mire individualized.
i..obre sensible goals and standards are st up in teras of
individual capacities and aptitudese
13.Diagnosis is made more readily, surely, and frequently.

M3F rion Monroe, ljg fa(Chicagot
Scott-Foreman and Company, p 141










14* There Ai a greater stimulation of reading interests.
15. The need of better library facilities Is recognized14
Wide acceptance has been gainedby the objectives
for the reading program of grades 4, 5, and 6 as set forth
bt the National Committee on Reading in 1925. One of the
objectives for the middle grades ealla for rich and varied
experience in reading. This objective has been interpre-
ted generally to man that children should not be limited
to a single textbook in reading which they reread once or
oftener if they get through it the first time before the
end of the term but rather tlat children should have
available to their a great variety and quantity of books in
asch fields as biography, travel, history, geography, nature
study, science, citizenship, folklore and literature. Read.
ing is to permeate all the activities of the children. Read.
tng is a tool which children in these grades use to broaden
their educational horizons. Much reading is done in con-
nection with all of the content subjects. OrlP reading is
confined largely to the audience situation* type.5
Instruction n reading should equip the pupil with

Mjrr1 Lee, Lerrs y Lee nd
ziea Iworke D. Appleton-Centiy CoGpanay 9 ,


Iand &galn( NIm ew X York A ppeton-Crntezy-Crots. Inc.,
19")41, p, O57t









the reading power in and out pf school. This statement ins
dicates that the first step in determ lnng what to teach in
reading is the discovery of those purpose as they are ex-
hibited in the reading activities which the pupil does and
should carry on* The seond step is the discovery of the
arderstandings, skiLls and attitude which constitutes the
reading power that the pupil muast acquire in order to
ahlieve his purposes.
UsKee, I his anr.lysis of t suggested instructional
reading program cnsldered briefly the reading purposes
and activities of the child in aad out of school an the
understandings, skills, and attitudes which the child needs
in order to achieve his purposes through reading, Four po-
pgra were proposed as essential to adequate instruction ta
reading* Thuse programs ar (1) the program in the funds-
mentals of reading, (4) the program in the reading-study
jobs (3) the progrLa in obildrn'a literature and (4) the
program t l oral reading He further states tbtt it is the
purpose of the program in the fundamentals of reading to
teach the pupil to like to read and to equip his with the
understandings, skills and attitudes whiho he needs in order
to identify and recognize printed words and to understand
adequately what he attempted to reAd,16

;P16 w Pal M heTtthn Q TYork :)iumlg1
UrW OcSwl (Mew Yorkt 1oughtB K iU-l8W T1n xoiepWy, 104ow J p









CHAPTER IIS


PIIOCRIARES WSED IN GATHIERNG DATA

The writer felt that tW observing the reading classes
aay important facts could be gained that could not be ob-
tained otheaise. Since the writer was interested in getting
fats which conarrand certain aspects of the reading program
observations were limted to chee ing for s (1) reading read.
ness materials, (2) reference materials, (3) aup leentary
reading materials, (4) teaching aids, and (5) classrooms
and surrounding .
The teUhnique of observt on is one of the most satis-
factory aethods of gathering first hand informatIon, so the
investigator made of every opportunity to observe the
reading classes while in session
Observations woe made every morning from 900 A. M.
until 10845 A. M which was the Langu ge Arts period for
each of the rural elementary scho As.
The organllmatia n o t h reading program wa also
studied. Since most of thi planning is donr by the teachers,
intormat on cone- rning the organization of the reading epro
gram in each o-' thr schools was given by the teacher of that
school










The investigator used a questionnaire interview
sheet as shown In the appendix to gather information in
such areas as the testing program, the general welfare of
students, age-grade status, and pupil progress1
By mean of the interview it is possible to secure
many data that cannot be obtained through the less personal
procedures of distributing a reply a blank. The interview
permits the interviewer to gain an impression of the person
who is giving the fLots, to form some judgment of the truth
in the facts and to "read between the lines9* things that
are not said.
An interview with the supervising principal was
also made. It was necessary to interview the supervising
principal of the rural elementary seho Is to gather infor-
mation that case directly from the supervisor's report. l-a
formation concerning the training of the teaching personnel
of the rural elementary schools was gathered from the super.
visor's report.
It is impossible to study an educational program
without studying the nature of the pupils with whoa It has
to deal, ad the needs of the coamunmty which It serves


(1) See Appendix










Since many important facts concerning pupils and their
horss are recorded on cumulative records, which is a re-
oord of information about a student that is accumulated
from sources over a period of time, the investigator used
the records of the 512 children studied to glin facts as
were made by the teachers for each student. The records
are confidential therefore, they are t pt under look and
kef when they are not in use by the teacher.
The investigator was given permission by the super-
vising principal to use the records of the rural schools
to gather information concerning the 512 students include*
ed in this stutr,
The following information was studied and record-
ed on a data sheet; the students birth date and age, the
date of entrance to scho '1, his classification, his test
record, his parents occupation, his parents' economic
status, and his health ecorCd.(1
Textbook inventory report and requisition blanks
were checked to find the names, the series and the date of
adoption of the text books used by the rural elementary
seho 1 for the 1951-52 term as compared with the textbooks
used for the 1953.54 term*


(1) See Appendix.









BSmary of data gathering techniques

The techniques of observation and interviewing are
u~ed by may persons in the research field. In the inter-
view far investigational purposes the research wwnkZr gather
ad data directly from others in faceto-face contacts. Obser-
vation for investigational purposes enables the research
worer to come in direct contact with the person or situation
he is observing. There are times when the data gathered Sa
this anner is based. The investigator is aware of this
limitation and has tried to remain objective in this stuly.
The investigator concluded that for this study the
techniques of observation and interviewing seemed best to
obtain data which aides In casting light on this problem.









CHAPTER IV

PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

Teachers have been long since found out that one of
the best ways to sttmulate in all children a genuine in-
terest in reading is through an attractive seoalrool which
presents in every nook ar oornar some reason and opportunity
for reading, two things sanould deserve consideration aen
a teacher attempts to make her classroom attractinve (1)
Se an the sehoolrooa be made as attractive and healthy as
possible? (2) What can be put into the room to arouse the
children's eurosity and interest in reading from the want
of their arrivalT
Every room, even if it has nailed--dvn seats and
dull, krown wood-ork, can be made attractive, at least 1A
spots. New paint on old toys, on boe k shelves, on the read.
ing table and chairs that go with it can add a note of
color to many a drab sitiatlones Pictures taken from magas
aines can be attractively mounted and hung low enough for
children to enjoy looking at them. Flower and plants,
arranged with eare, can contribute atuht
So also is there a place for an orderliness and
cleanliness that goes beyond Janitorial service and sees to-
it that materials which the children wse are in good con-
dition, ell arranged, and easily accessible.








30

A reading table with chairs and books attractively
arranged, can do much to arouse children's curiosity
The investigator kept the above facts in mind when
making the survey of the rural schools of Madison County.
The results of the survey revealed the following deficiences
as shown in table I, page 3 There were fourteen schools
housed in churches. Student c lasaroo desks were provided
for children in eight of the churches, but limited apace
created by the position of the chuch pews nade it impossible
for the seats to be used effectively.
The w fiows in the buildings were painted or stain-
ed which made natural lighting inadequate Since it t8 not
permissible to attach boards to the walls of the churches,
improvised chalk boards had to be used. Th heat was pro-
vided by mall wood heaters Since the buildings were large
and 14 many instances dilapidated, it was lapossible to heat
the building sufficiently. On very cold day the pupils
were forced to hbudle around the heaters to keep warm.
Tables, bulletin otards, plants, pictures, toys and
et., wee provided by the teachers to improve the school
surrounding as well as the learning atmosphere of the class-
room. In several of the churches al pictures or any dis
plays could not be placed on the walls. The condition was
improved in ten schools through the work, of the parent-
teacher clubs.










TABE I

PHYSICAL PLANTS OF THE RURAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
OF MADISON COUNTY


SCHIOO=L SCHOOL BUILDIOQ CHURCH


ANTI OCK 1
BETHLEEEM

CLEVELAND I
CROSS ROAD X

HAYBURG


JESTLAPs I
LEE
LITTLE ROCK X
MOSLEY HALL I

MOUNT MARlAM I

NEW BETHEL
PINE ISLAND

PROGRESS
REDDING HAMOCK
ROCKEIX PR 'NGS

ST. J'HNS X
S?. LUKE 3
SIAMANS X
TOTAL 4 4I









Six of the rural schools studied were housed in
two-room framed buildings. These buildings hav ten windows
on one side, two cloak rooes on the other side, and two doors
leading front each room to the porch*
The teacher is the ultimate agent of education. No
matter what appears in the official course of studies* it
is he who sets the daily plan or task for the pupils, or who
helps them develop a plan of work* It is he who sanctions
or condemns their habits, their personality qualities, and
their attitudes. If education is ever to have anr genuine
influence in shaping character, or in giv-ng insight into
life, the teacher will be the agent who will carry this in-
fluence, It is the teacher's philosophy of education put
into practice vhich really matters.
The teacher's role in guiding learning activities of
the pupils is exceedingly important; and he has other equal-
ly significant functions and responsibilities the directing
of extra-curricular activities, acting as a friend and coun-
selor of pupils; paitliipating as member cf a community that
has many expectancies with references to him. How he mets
these demands will determine in no small measure his success.
The improvement needs of teachers and of staff asebers
generally, may be derived through objective analysis. One
of the r~et coamon form of objective analysis is the










school survey. Surveys any be made of the training, ex-
periences, personal qualities, the academia and profession-
al background of the staff. A stuiy of the educational train-
ing of the teachers employed in the twenty one-teacher rural
elementary schools revealed that nineteen of the teachers
have obtained Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts Degrees.
Sixteen of the twenty teachers have done work above the beahe-
lor's degree. Seventeen are teaching in their special fields
of training, three are teaching out of their fields, but are
asking preparation to become qualified to teach in their resa
pective fields. This information is shown in table II,
page 54.
any probe as are presented to teachers and super-
visors by the rapidly accelerating rate at which instruction.
l materials are developing and the growing belief in the
necessity of closely relating thewor of the school to life
outside of the school Choices of materials must be madein
teras of factors which condition effective and fruitful learn-
ing. The emphasis that is being placed by current education-
al thought on preparing children for lift in a democratic
society demands a different conception of the functions of
instructional materials from that held wnhe the primary ob-
Jective of the school was the transmission of the social
heritage and the development of basic intelleetual skills.










TABLE II
EDUCATIONAL TRAIMNG OF TEACHING PERSONNEL
PARTICIPATING IN TIE STUDIO

TEACHERS BACiELOH AVE DONE NASTEIR TEACHING
OF DEGREE WORK ASCVr DE&HEE IN OUT
SCHQOWS A. 8. DQ. .FIELD


ANTIOCH
BETHL EEIN

CLEVEfA ND

CROSS ROAD

BAMBURG

BANSON

JESTLAMB
LEE

LITTLE ROCK

MDSELY HALLI

MUNT MARIAH
NEW BETHEL

PnW ISLAND
PINELAND

PROGRESS
BEDDING HAM*CK

ROCKe SPRING

ST. JOHNS
ST, LUKE

i9 ---
TOTAL,


0

0
0

0
0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
0


O
0

0
0





^-


iii--~- a- -~


I -TL-


~rlrrs I-- ----


if---- i In










The selection of instructional materials should
take place as the result of cooperative action by all who
are affected by thea, in some eases including even the pu-
pils and members of the community who are competent to ex-
press judC1gnt.
A check of instructional materals being used rI
the rural schools showed that a limited amount of reading
readiness materials were available in the schools. The
following instructional materials were found Un twenty of
the schools studied. Namelyt reading readiness, oiture
books, dictionaries, manuals, yard stiPks and rulers, seisa
s rse paste, and abarts
the following instructional materials were not found
La any of the rural elementary schools studied. Namelys
audio-visual equipment, tape recorder, phonograph and phono-
graph records of nursery rhymes. the information found in
column C of table III, page 36, showed that there was a
scarcity of instructional materials in these schools.
Another educational tool which should be carefully
selected is t textbook. The textbool is probably the most
important educational tool in this country. It is used al-
most universally. In recent years however, many studies
have been made of the quality and efficiency of the text.
books which have somestiL revealed serious weaknesses in
the a.










TABLE III


INSTRUCTI -1., MAT_:RIALA F I.D IN Ti H -E OCHO'LS

KINDS OF MlTEITIALS F POUfI Fy -L)e4 FOU1 I1


TAPE RECORDER
hEADING READkNES' ?PICTUF. BU XS I
MPS
ERJCYC..cOPE&IA
SU!PLMENTAHRX R\mIiSa
DICT.!. :.ARY I
A!:DIO.-VISUAL EUJIP? N7
MJANUALS I
SITOR SODO
,ICVJTU DICTIONARJ ES I
T HES.'ETI
SCALES
XARD STICKS AL 1htiULhS 2
CJ4PANION ~0 KS 2
CLOCKS I
PHBaSE C0 4;
8FNTEUCE C ~3 X
FiAGH C JiDS I
CAnisD ULDErS
PiOgOGRA H'1
SCISSORS

P;-iT, CL.:Y, Bi.'SiLS IX
CRo 'Y ..11S 2
CHARTS iES 2
TFACH' NG M,. RILS I

m AL .. ... 7 ._. .
--1.1 ii~, iri.. i i.j._ mi i ^ L m_,irjl- _- ni. -- 71L M










Upon visiting the olassooas of the rural elemen-
tar schools it was revealed that there were three seies
of reading textbocks used. The Alice an Jerry series was
used In twenty seho-ls. The Mlon Gray series was used ai
eight schools Efay Growth was used in eignt schools, fo
schools had all three series for all th~ grades. Some of
the textboolksl ud in the schools were of all adoptions.
Twenty sclo.ls were using the .ii e and Jerry, Easy Orowth
and Elson zgrfy series. l ixed adoptiona were used as a
basio text in all of the schnals studied. Here uere eight
seho.s Whicah had the 1941 adoption of the Alice and Jerry
series for th third grade, the 195. adoption fo tb*- ilson
Gray for the fourth grade, ar' .he 1941 adoption of Easy
Growth for the fiftS grade. This information is shown in
table IV, p.e 538.
Data ftra cumulative records shown in tables V, pag*
39, VI, page 41, VI, page 4,# VIII, page 43, and IX. psge
45, pav information recorded from the cuaulative records of
the 512 children studied. able 1, page 39, shows that a1l
of the 561 children were from families thnt ovu their homes
and 894 children were fr,.m ftilics that did not omm theIr
homes. The non-home owners mved frequently bElx.use of er.,
tain ooupational co'nditCons. Ynving frot one sci'ho to
another created problems of adjust.mnt.









38
TABLE IV

THE KINDS OF READING TEXTBOOKS USED

bctos ALICE ... .t sot. EAs "
ADD
:j ,i .... .G CWfl ,.

ANITOCH I I
BETHLEHEM I I I
CLEVEL.JD I I
CROSS ROAD I

HA.BURRO -
HAiSON X I

JES2lSAf& I
LEE I
LITTLE ROCK X X
MOSELY HALL I
MD;:NT r.IAN I I I

MEW BThEL I
PINE ISLAND I X
PINELAND I I
PROORES X
REDDING HAMMOCK I I
ROCs Y SPHINGS I I

at. JOHNS I X
ST. LUKE I I

8i1I?-- ---I-- "-------------------^^.
TOTALJ8Q ,a go









TABLE V

NUMBER OF H-'EMOWHERS AND NON.HO-IOWNBRS

SCHOOLS NUMBER OF CHILDREN MNUIBER OF C&iILDHEN
WHOSE PARENTS WHOSE PARENTS
OW-PD mWSa DO NOT -O"WN
ANT OCHI 9 1
BETHKkHEM 9 $
CLEVELAND 4 4
CROSS ROAD 10 4
BAMBUOR8 1a
rANSoN 10
JESTLAMB o
LE" 9 16
LITTLE ROCK 1i 16
XDSELY HALL 2 9
EWUNT MARIAB 2
HE': BETiFL 14 19
PINF ISLAND 12
PIMELAND I4 4
PROGRESS f 16
REDDINGO AMOCK 5 3
HOCKE6 SRING 89 6
ST. JOHNS 5 8s
ST. LME 80 36

TOZAL .. .










Table VI, page 41, indicates that 370 of the 518
children are from families who engage in farming and that
14 children are from families who engage in common labor.
Only 218 of the 512 children were from families who owned
their homes and farms. Table VII, page 42, reveals that
msot families moved during the months of December, January,
and February* This was evidenced by the number of children
who transferred to or from the rural schools each year.
Table VIII, page 43, points up the fact that many children
are overage in grade, some have been late entering school
therefore, this fact was kept in mind when the ages of the
pupils were computed. The fact that the investigator wishes
to convey is that n tbV twenty rural elementary schools
there are 310 pupils who should be given special consider.n
tion when planning a reading program.
Table VIII, page 43, also revealed that the largest
number of over-age pupils are in grades one, two, three,
and five,
Table IX, page 45, shows that seventy-two of the
51U students dropped out of school and dtrty-aine of the
seventy-two pupils who dropped out of school were over-age
for their grade.









TABLE TI

OCCUPATIONAL 9CArUS OF FAMILIES

SCHOOLS ~NuBES OF CHILLDI NWm OF CHILIRI
FRnOM ARM FAMILIES FROM FAMILIES W)
ENGAGE IN OTHER


ANTIOCH 18 a
BETLELMM 9 8
CLEVELAND 19 1
CROSS ROAD 13 a
HAKBURG 14 1
RASOx 31 4
JESTLAMB 18 10
LEE 3 10
LITTLE hOCK 28 1
osSELY RALL 19 U
WoU ifRf A 186 a
NEW BEtHEL 1 U1
PINE ISLAND s a
PIMELA5D 14
PROGRESS 81 $
REDDING ha*V0C 8 1
ROCKY SPRINGS 85 1g
ST, JOHNS 51 0
aM. LmUE s 11










TABI-. VII

NUMBf J OF PAWiLIES THAT M:EVED AND th MVNTH IE~Y


SCHN LS FAILI S iUaSEPT _CT.iOY DEC J 7Y. .B Mkil.AR MAY


ARTnOCK

BETHLEHEM

CLEVL AND

CROSSROAD

HA'KBUPRG

HARSON
JESTLAMB

LEE

LITTLE ROCK

WMSELY HALL
IEUNT MARIAF

NEW BETHEL

PINE ISLAND
PINr LAND

PROGRESS

ADDING HfAYOCK

InJo SPRING 1
ST JOHJS


ST. LUKE


I 1


3

8


1
6

5

4
S


3


1
B

8

6


1

a
rr


1,~f

1


11

I,

11f


si I
I

1, 1

2k 1
1

1

1 1,

2ir
15 1
1

3.

1 1

1,


I

11


I




IrC

I

13,


liltr


T 4T 81 8I 17
..-- -i i s i '









TABLE VIII

NUlBER OF OVAE-AGE CHILDR E IN EACH GiORE OF THE
RURAL ELEMEOT.LRY SCHOOLS OF MADISON
COUNTY


SCHOOLS 1.a.. it .3rd_.4th.5b.6th. ?tbhat. TOTL


ANTIOCH


BETHIELHLM
CLEVELAND
CROSS ROAD
HAMBURG
HANSON
JESTLAYB
LaE
LITTLE ROCK
iSELY NALL
oDUNT MA4IAH
NEW BETHEL
PINE ISLAND
PI~LAD D
PROGRESS
REDDING "AI.ooCK
BOCK! SPRINGS
ST. JOHNS
ST.LUKE
3TRMANS


0 4 1 12
4 1 1 I2
4 10 4 1
0 $ i 4
0 a 4 1
8 S 5 1
a 6 4 4
5 a 0 0
0 0 0 1
1 8 8 4
2 4 1 0
0 1 1 0
4 2 a 4
S 1 0 0
4 X 8 a
3100






7 1 8 0
3 a I 1
1 6 5
113a


7150sa
3211zs
1616~


1 0 &
5 1 0
0 a 2
8 X


18
S0 1 0
80 4
0 a a
6 0
0 3 0
0 0 0
8 a 0
3 0 0
1 2 8
1 0 1
3 8 2
3 4 2
3 1 8
3 2. I


0 0
o 3A
1 25
0 14
8 17
0 s88
o 18
1 18
1 6


0 8
o 10

a l

9

1 16
0 9
1 82
1 41
4 81
34 S
_ Sx


-,,... 5 W . 5 -








44
It is recognied by teachers in the prisry grade
that pupils in saio 1 very grett1y in the degree of mastery
of reading skiLl, of basic vocabulary nPad of the various
factors that constitute rea~ng ability, ?. series of tests
as sntwn in the a pendix has been construetni for use with
the Alloe ad JeJty Booas.() These tests are designed
for the purpose of providing, "*rofession.l tocolA* for the
teacher. First, they should aid in determining the readiness
of pupils to proceed with the learning of reading skills.
Then, after reading instruction has begun, they are intended
to assist the teacher in eraluating pupils progress and at
diagnosing strengths an weakn esse in a number o4 the essen-
tial elements of reading coaprehbension. Their use should re-
sult in aiuc greater attention tV the needs of individual
puoils and a more intelligent direction of the learning pms-
eessa All the test are group$ tests and are intended to tU
given by the regular elassrooa teacher. The test materials
relate directly to tne situations and experiences dealt with
in the Alice and Jerry b'oks. They are, therefore, easily
interpreted and used by the teacher. Investigations hve
shown that about 80 to .0 per cent of ty'eo.l entering first
grade pupils do not have sufficient maturity to su eeed normaX-
ly in formal reading astiv.ties. Test results o.' the reading
(1) SeeAppen~ix











RHOLLRJ T AND UI4BER OF DROP.-OUT IN GRADES 1-8

SCHOOLS 4?RlR CF CHILDRKu NbKS& OF lF GRniDE NUTO?-i
_I EACH SqOOL In EACli SCH.UL ROP:0Rm

ANTIOCH / 1 1-8 0
BETHLEHEM 16 1-8 0
CLEVELAND 82 1.8 9
CROSS ROAD 16 1-8 8

AMURG4 1-8 1
HAN$so 39 1-8 1
JESTLAMB ES 1-8
LEF 9 148 4
LITTLE ROCK 30 18 0
mDET l HALL, 1.6 5
MWUNT MARIAH 16 1- 5

MW BETHEL 33 1-8
PINE ISLAND 88 1-8
PIl~w~a 19 1-4 0
PROGRESS 68 1.6 8

A&DDSGO BAAMGCK 15 1*4 0
ROCxx SPRINGS 40 1-4

ST. JO NS 26 1-4 6

ST. LUKE 31 1.6 14

81


_II^ _I_ill__~__i ^I ___~ ___1_~14_ _1_


_ _~_ _









4C

readlnas: test aLy be used as an aid in determining whether
certain iaaturte !Uals B rstcild be in pre-reading or tran-.
sition groups or classes rather than exposed to regular
reading instruction.
The above facts show to slow extent the value or
place of tesa ta La reading program. The data with regard
to the testing of ouils in the twenty elementary schools
of Madison County is presented in table X, page 47, Read-
ing Readiness Tests were provided for the first second.
and third grade pupils enrolled in the twenty elementary
schools in the ca unty. Colan A of table X, page 41, shows
that eight of the rural scholIs administered the tests*
Column B, stows that twelve sehooils did not'administer the
test. The eight schools tht administered the tests did
not record the test scores and five of the eight schools
did not score the tests booklets as shown in column I and C
of table X, page 47, Twelve of" the sano Is did not ad..in-
slter the test at all.
Since reading is a 'rocesn of reacontructing the
facts behind visual* symbols, it follows that the child
mIst be able to see in order to rb:~cond to visual symbols.
Children with normal visual funZt. ons mae, not leu-rn to read.
but some individuals may be hbanAeapped in their rea. ng
activities inefficient vision, If visual effliciery ls












STATUS OF

M&DISON COUNTY


TABLE X

'UTILIZATION 3 ELE MENITAIM SCHiO. LS
01
OF THE HOW PIETFBSON REt.DIONG READ ESS
TEST


SCHOOL a.m Q1S NOT O 1VS NOT FILED NOT -SCOI
II ,Ak .B 1_s D .-


ANTIOCM

BETHLEHEM

CLEVELAND

CRO8SROAD

HAMBURG


I


I


HANSON

JESTLAMB

LEE

LITTLE ROCK

MOSELY HALL

M UT MRABI

MEW BETHEL

PINE ISLAND

PINEtLND

PROGRESS

REDDING HANMtCK

ROCKY SPRINGS

ST. JOHNS

ST. LUKE


TOTAL


'2

Ir

I

I:


5 13


--


-"U~ .~ ..
__ _~ _~_ __ ____ __ L-








4.
a factor in reediness for reading, then the teacher shoUld
be aware of its edmuatiooml imliations. Teachers strculd
ave a knowledge of how to detect algns of visual defeats*
They should also have at their disposal visual test that
my be use to screen the pupAl.
The Swellen Chart was used by the teachers of the
rural schools of Madison County and the results were record-
ed on the pupilu* health records and emulative records. The
results of the teats are shown in table XU, page 49. Of the
twenty schools that grve the test, 568 children were xaaminE
ed and it was f,,ad that 107 of the 363 children showed that
further xamtnat on should be given, but only twenty-aix of
the 107 oases were followed up.()
The responses from the quesatonnaire intervrlftwar
pointed up in table XII, page 51, In the area of planning,
90f of the teachers did not have t definite philosophy tsr
teaching reading, however 100: of the teachers had objectives
for teaching readln.n *
In the area of materials of I~ntruction as siown in
table XII, page 51, 100Q of the teachers were using materials
aWd reading textbooks wbich verf not selected on the basis of
pupils' needs, O6g stated that the readIng readiness material
provided were inadeqwute ad 95% of them stated that referenm
materi l were inadeqate.

(C) be App"utix









TA&E XI
WNJHl OZ GCi'iLRfW) I4{ K0 YTISD DF$.NCTi AC S'irS
BY THE SNELLEN TEST
,,.
SCs;1 NUMkMhI OF CnC 'O NUXLM A hi F bUr.l QF CASrs
TH)1-T O.VP TlSTS ThU LDRE 7hbfiTL FOLLOW!


*tIQCB
BFT IEHEN
4CLVE :JEI









PIAM uhL
PM)JI Ld


Lrn'D ftocx







BITTL flo




ROCKY SPRINGS
ST ,JJRNS
8?T JLUKr


TE-STiD


as
16





a
16
















al
6

10
80
19
14


IAI
15
go
89
Z4


UhTHl Pi


'7'r4 ~&


1
12
4
'1


26

0
6


8

1

a
a

4

13


a
T8 r


U2


0
0
0

1
1
1
1
0
4


0
0


1

a



0
0
t4


D


F9i7a-1-
*l461111r


111


--


-- --- --- -- --


II.YP~Y .~._.. ...~c .--~ --- -- -- --
__ .. I -------- --- ----- ---- --'-- -'-









50
In the area of student welfare 559 of the teachers
stated that the reading program was not planned and arranged
to meet the needs of the children.
In the area of testing it was revealed by 90g of the
teachers that they had problems which arose as a result of
inadequate measuring devices.
In the areas of age-grade status 65% of the teachers
stated that pupil progress is based on teacher '.tgsmat.
65 stated that a large umber of children made unsatis.
factory progress. Ninety- five per cent stated that aay
over-age children were enrolled and 90 felt that the large
nars r of over-age students enrolled had very poor attendance.










I'a .. .. hX I









3. 3 0 I .
6r 3 17 15



6, 1 J 0 100

70 40 1000

-. S 0 100 0
. 17 15 1


13. X 19 3S 95
00 100 0

19. 1 32 05 95

9, 9 1 43

2a. la Ic 90

13. 1i 4 903 10

14. 0 0 3 100
15. 9 11 45 S5

16. 9 11 4 5,5

17, 14 6 70 .0

Is. 0 100 0

19. 1 4 30 0

o&. I a 90 10

-1i. 17 15 W

1.3 7 1& d8

2. 1C. 10 50 50
r^T L ^ '*S^ ,^ si7g 1 _,^










FINDIRTS OF THE STUDY

The evidence revealed in this study on the basis of
observations made of the eaassao -a, interviews made of the
sa teachers of the rural elementary schools, and a thorough
study of emulative records, health records, principals me-
ports, and textbook requisitions blanks, show these find
ings:
1. That fourteen rural schools were housed in
church buildings.
That only 8 of the twenty rural schools had a
philosophy for the reading program
3. That all of the rural schools had objectives.
4. That none of the rural schools had audio-visual
equipment.
5. That all of the schools had some type of audio-
visual materials.
6, That the reading textbooks were mixed series.
T. That seho Is were using textbooks adopted In
1936.
4. Th.t 19 of the twenty teachers interviewed held
degrees based on four years of college work.
9. That only a of the twenty teachers were teacher
out of their fields.
10. That only one teacher did not hold a degree based
on four years of college training.
fl. That the coamnity is a typical farming area as
shown by the number of children whose parents
are engaged in farming.










12. That children from ftailies who engage In share*
ropping moved frequently.
13. Thet the moving or aigrating Is inter-c .unty wide.
14. That families ove moat dur 'n the months of
December, January and Februry.
15. That tth children fr:a these fa.i tes are absent
from scizol frequently,
16. That 310 of the 51i children were over-aged for
their grade.
17. That grades one, twoe three, and five had the
largest number of over-age pupils
18. That there were W8 drop-outs in the twenty rura
Sohoils and 89 of the dropouts were overZ-age
19. That standardized tests re not used in any of
the twenty schools,
80. That reading read ness tests for the three grades
were provided for nII of the rutrl elementary
seho,. m
Sl, That only 8 schools administered the teat.
28, That 4o schools scored awa filedttw results of
the test.
23. Thet all rurl elementary schools administered
fte Snellen Vlis.on test*
84. that 107 of 8S oehildren egmined showed a need
fbr further exaninations and treatment,
S,. That a very limited amount of reading readimal
materials were found n the a80 school.
86. That 86 of the 107 students had vialor defeets
as shown The Smnlea Vision Test*
*7, That a very limited amount of supalementary rad*-
ing material were found in the 20 schools*











*8. That none o0 the twenty schools had a library
with adequate facilities
9.* That tue fll number of library books provided
cnasisted of story books and no refers nee books.
30, That In of the 80 teachers used teacher mad
tests.
31. That no valid standards were set up to measure
student's progress.
M., That 19 of tr e 0 teachers have had one or more
problems to arise as a res lt of inadequate
measurements,
3, That no provlslons ar" ade for exceptional
children in auy of the icbouls.
S4. ThAt a large number of children work to help
sup ort the family and as a result ar absent
from classes,
55. That none of the twenty schools arranged reading
programs to aret the needs of children who are
out of sa1tool to work*
56. That students from those facilles who earned a
living by sharneropling o ll work, w naval stores,
and tobacco work moved frequently.
37. That 17 of the 20 teachers stated that the pre-
sent mstLod of measuring pupli progress was ipn
satisfactory.
388 That 19 of thr 80 teachers felt that poor
attendance uas a contributing cause for over-
ageness.










CHAPTER IV

SUN.AiY CZ.CLtG OKJN 4) iEU C .D'3 NLx.T OMS



Obnrvrattn of and experience with children of the
rural elementary schooIs indicated treat 113 f the students
tailed during the 195 53 tkra, because of their inbility
to read. AS a result of constant failure, mary students
beeas over-aged for thei grade This observation led to
further inquiries, the result Showed that the reading pn-
gram of the rural elementary schools of ,.adison County wRC
not organisd or planned to wme the needs of the children.
A survey of the literature revealed aany studies on
th development of reading prograst in elementary sohoolfe
and sheds more light on this problem. The thought evidezted
in the literature is that madern reading program have a
sound philosophy, well defined and clearly stated objectives
a knowledge of the nature of the children and their community
sad valid evaluation tlchniqtes.
he hypothesis ur&o which thiA study was established
was that the reading program of th rural elementary schools
of :adison County, n. ded appraising, and that read 4P pro-

pras ei be improved.










Since the past investigations did not give considera-
tion to the appraisal of the reading program of Madison
County, there appeared to be a need for such a study which
the writer sought to develop.
Observations and interviews along with the question-
naire interviews were the main data gathering procedures used.
The sources of data were emaulative records, and the
health records of 518 children of the rural elementary schools
of I dison Countyi, textbook requisition blanks, supervisors
reports, twenty rural elementary schools and questionnaire ina
terviews.
he following conclusions seem valid base on the
findings of this study

1. That the instructional materials used fbr teach.
ing reading are inadequate.
g. That the students are housed in buildings that
inadequate.
S. There is no organized testing program
4. That most of the students are over-age in grade.
8, That moat of the teachers in term of college
preparat on should be qualified to teach reading.
6. That the students coe from tyical farming areas
and thrt there is much migratg of these families
inter-county wide.
T7 That the reading program for Madison County's
elementary bohools are inadequate to meet the
basic needs of the students they serve.











REC ECNDAT IONS
That the reading program for Madison County's Elemen-
tary Schools be organized and administered on a basis
that la consistent with the best evidence prevalent
in the field of reading,
That the teachers be given an opportunity to par-
tiiepate in the planning of the reading program.
That adequate instructional materials be provided
to meet the needs of these students.
That adequate school buildings be provided.
That specialists in reading be hired to provide
expert guidanae for the reading program of the
Elementary Schools of ladilon County.

Siege the ability to nead effectively is important
in our modern world, surely one of the major emassis that
schools should be interested in Is the stru turtaf of a
reading program that meets the individual needs of young
people enrolled in orw schools. This is of paramount signi
finance If we expect our young people to develop into ef-
fetive citizens.










B333.:QjA I



Adams, Pay. C in khgLdQ 4 New Yorks The Ronald
Pns Coasmuiy, 190 49 pp.
Sette, fthntt A. ifnif l ria.,, ilao. N w
York c tlan m Coapany, I, 401 p4

JorOttoBs, l v Lo
ame, h Le, tnr, Pva Bond* aAJs1 =a Citld A

L~ae, ury .n, Lee Dorri.. IA., a i & ilA irrf m
Noew Yorki Db. ApletiO.-Centu2f Coptny, 10940 0 pe








State, "i3Ulrent logaf I&i-oM[ Itre., g a. lahmwsee t
135-136 pp.
;nrcs 0Uit :ono kr inlx z Aj~p HanG Chicago I Soott
FLorida sQCof .-imy, 19031 14 pe
Otto' Hewy I lot"' Haghna 1Ijp CjWiiijrntf And



Ut8LuLBr as )" or r i C y Nor ariry.,
PP.
tl: saa Barton Barr. ", an tix n u. rlg
mw xYQAt ApA;lntrrjeDCent ,Xy-Csvrotu, .I I= 7O 200s PP

PUDLICArONW 0' t1-,': 0. .Wi?' NT
Stuto Ae4artzert of grS.oa ItUreo fgjrifl. ?nllmahmaepse
norldfis 1980,



Stat Department of MnationB Mr aL tallaha a
losrda i18. 9 sa3 p.












beery, Althest heading Program For *.11, t* EtaUion. 71t
DONlea t sfturaw y of a Snhool Program For The
Testh!r of Readt r, M* @4 Mar A
Vol r -0. W pter 95
Lyon, Nellie 2 "TRh RTaTu di nd grga to Individtal
Different w.- TAM E202aAa a IugL Vol.
49 (1946"9=, I09
tllison, Gieorge G., Stun* hlsarld E. ith heading
bfiriculty of Textloks in Elesnatary leience,*
UA1 J5eamafl .Afgg laurzhfL. sf a p. 460.
Maush, lan S. Swenaon, Easter J. *A Study of Childrena'
Reoreatmlnal hnad ing," Is i JlM iaanal
50, p. 144.
Rusaell, David B. *Curriculut The ausls :-f cuadnzw,"
^muanii f T71: p. 541.
Sheldon,V WMlia. D.j, Carillo, Lawrenoe "ellation of
Parents Hcr And Gcrtaln Divelo%7ntal Character.
ilt ls t' ChQlldreun*a leading bitbyo," Ag HnaDBAl
holQJ, .Laumral. 52t p, 460.

ENG::C.'..;PrD:A A.h?"CIL'Z

Good, G4artet V. 1 Fevat cUM & X ork

tMnroe, 8.s "Fnoyaclopedia of EducationaI Rkesnarah,"
403. NOW York: ita&c il an Coatrsw, 1941.
RedIn, iafrry mK "EroZ ndREcfy a: ar MSntada. New4M
York .it-ber Coaxrwny, T .S













APPENDIX












QUESTIONNAIREE IfTJVIr.EW
OF THE 20 TEACHERS OF THa ErLE EI AR
SCHOOLS OF MIDISIN OOUNTI
Planning objectives and philosophies Yi J
1. Do you have a philosophy for teaching reading? ._
8. Do you have objectives in teaching re- ding?
Naterials of Instructiont
S. Do you have a carefully selected series of
reading textbooks of recent addition or adopt.
ion?
4. Do you have a variety of supplementary read-
ing materials?
O Ds ou have adequate reading readiness aate
arllO ~ -
$. Do you have adequate audio-visual equipment? -_
7. Do you have a library? w o
8. Do you have adequate reVerence materials?
9. Do You hbae audio-visual materials
Testing
10. Do you have standardized testing? ow
l1. Do you have other valid standards of meaaur.
ing puIl progress? -t
h,. Do you have problems arising as a result of
inadequate aeasurea nts?










Papil Welfare


3. Do you have a large aamber of okildrea who work
to help support the family?
14. Do you m ke proviLions for exceptlonal hildreat?

1X. Do you haves reading program arranged to meet
the needs of thse. fkiltretf
6. Doe hrove stautea earolled to do seasonal

17* Do you hae inatereounty transfer stuatets?
18. Do you know the taie of year hen most transfers
ocear?
19. Do yoa hba many ekilrea'troa other schools ia
the onratyT .

Age.grade Stata aand Ppil Progreaes


80. IZ pgpil progress based on valid standeriTa
*l. Is pupil progress based on standardised teat
* results?

42 Is papil progress base on teeeherts jadgemeatt

23*. o your method of measuring pupil progress sat..

24, IZ thero a lare amber of ehldrea who made an-
satistfatory progress?
29 Is IShkr a large u aber of overage children i
your mehool?
r4 Is it a rmeult of poor attendamee?
*7I Is it a realt of uamtiataetory work?


Me -- -
a"WN a0 0




IMe
*a
ON"~*WOM




I IrATE iNDE'


Las*


r rs


meaase


COLOR- SEX -- SCHOOL

FATHER'S NAME
MOTHER'S NAME


SCHOOL
DATE OF BIRTH BIRTH REGISTERED: YES NO-. PLACE OF BIRTH
SIGNIFICANT HISTORY:



IMvMUN'ZATIONS CLINICAL & LAB TESTS DISEASE EXPER IENCE

DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE TYPE RESULT DISEASE YEAR
TYPHC ID
SMALLPOX
D IPHTHER I A-PERTUSS IS-TETANUS
DIPHTHERIA
PERTUSSIS

TETANUS

GRADE: SCHOOL
AGE: DATE
NUTRITION
ORTHOPEDIC .' .___
SKIN & SCALP ______ _
EARS
EYES -_

NOSET ________T ______
MOUTH & THROAT
TEETH
GLANDS
HEART
LUNGS
ABDOMEN





DATE SIGNIFICANT FACTS AND PHYSICIANS' NOTES (WORKER SHOULD INITIAL EACH ENTRY)






















CODE: 0 satisfactory; I, 2, 3 Slightly, Moderately, Markedly Unsatisfactory; X Seeds Attention;
No Inforzation; 00 correction
Record approved by State Department of Education and State Board of Health SCHOOL RECORD MCN 304


~vun~~J






SERVICES RENDERED, HOME VISITATION & PARENT CONFERENCES
INFORMATION SECURED, ADVICE GIVEN, PLAN FOR CORRECTION
(WORKER SHOULD INITIAL EACH ENTRY)


TESTS GIVEN BY TEACHER
DATE

HEIGHT
WEIGHT
VISION W/O GLASSES R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L
VIS!ONWITHGLASSES R L L R L R L RR L L R L R L R L R L
HEARING R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L R L
TEACHER'S OBSERVATION DURING SCHOOL YEAR
TEACHER S NAME OR INITIAL
GRADE WHEN OBSERVED
FREQUENT STYES,CRUSTED LIDS, INFL.

EYES FREQUENT HEADACHES
SQUINTS AT BLACKBOARD AND BOOK
EARACHES AND DISCHARGING EARS
EARS
FAILS TO HEAR QUESTIONS
NOSE & PERSISTENT MOUTH BREATHER
THROAT FREQUENT SORE THROAT OR COLDS
MOUTH OBVIOUS NEED FOR CARE
SKIN & SKIN ERUPTIONS
SCALP PEDICULOSIS

MENSTRUAL DISORDERS
TIRES EASILY
GENERAL
POOR MUSCULAR COORDINATION
CONDITION
BAD POSTURE
APPEARANCE
SPEECH DEFECT
NERVOUSNESS OR RESTLESSNESS

BEHAVIOR SHYNESS
NAIL BITING
TOO LITTLE GROUP PARTICIPATION
HEALTH LACK OF EMOTIONAL CONTROL
HABITS EXCESSIVE USE OF TOILET
POOR FOOD HABITS

DAYS
ABSENCE
FOR

CODE: 0 Satisfactory; 1, 2, 3 Slightly, Moderately, Markedly Unsatisfactory; X Needs Attention
No Information; 00 Correction.







DATE NOTES (WORKER SHOULD INITIAL EACH ENTRY)







































E ==2










DATE NOTES (WORKER SHOULD INITIAL EACH ENTRY)
































































_I









FIRST YEAR READINESS TEST-I


FOR USE WITH


THE ALICE AND JERRY BASIC READERS
Devised by Dr. Willis W. Clark
Research and Guidance Consultant. Los Angeles. California


Age: yrs. mos.


School


PART I
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5

PART II
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8

TOTAL SCORE


Possible
Score
35
10
10
8
7

35
10
12
13

70


Pupil's
Score Rating


VERY
LOW
5%


PROFILE (Norms for Entering First Grade Pupils)

I 2 5


35

VERY
HIGH
5%


S 7 '0 15 2t0 25 26 3'0 32 35


6 i1 30


s9 45 so


ss so 60o s


PRACTICE


0


Copyright. 1947, 1936. Not to be reproduced in any form without permission. Row, Peterson and Company, Evanston, III.


Name


Date


Teacher


25 26 27 28 29 30


AVERAGE
so%


15 20


LOW
20%


31 32 33


HIGH
20%
















2


SCORE (number right) --
POSSIBLE SCORE 10


111


d-"!p


R




















,1 '
-^ ft-J^ 0

C:U< ^'i


0*sd:*
A- ,


Aj~
II


~


15 16








17 18








19 20








SCORE (number right) -
3 POSSIBLE SCORE 10


x~ti-







21





22


SCORE (number right) -
POSSIBLE SCORE 8






29











31







32


I I I i K^ ^









00 Q o*4 ft II. II
33







34







S35/

I B^ I0^? I^5- I%? 'S-II




SCORE (number right) -
5 POSSIBLE SCORE 7






v I
X 0 X S C

I
L I O L R

2
B D B P E

3
E F P E H

4
R P E R B

,5
C G C 0 Q

6
W V M H W

7
V Y U A V

8
M N M W E

9
p b d p q

10
do go do to of

SCORE (number right) -
6 POSSIBLE SCORE 10






** I
S z C e s

12
h y h n t

13
is is the yes to

14
on or no on of

15
dog odg god gdo dog

16
and ban and dan dna

17
saw was asw saw wsa

18
coat cow coat toac ceat

19
ride ebir rde ride rid

20
want wand want went wont

21
sing send sing gins dins

22
pony pond bonh pomy pony


SCORE (number right) -
POSSIBLE SCORE 12









24
not ton not nod two
25
boat boot tub boat tab
26
little title little littel little
27
mother other matter moth mother
28 I
with which with width tiwh
29
father faher rather father fatter
30
happy Iyapph happy haddy lady
31
brown drown down brown brawn
32
airplane arpane plane air airplane
33
weather wither water weather wether

34
Alice Alcie Alice Alive Mice

35
Jerry IMerry Perry Jerry Jery

SCORE (number right) -
8 POSSIBLE SCORE 13


dig


big


bid


pig


pig






SECOND YEAR READING READINESS TEST

FOR USEWITH THE NEW ALICE AND JERRY .BOOKS


Name Grade

Date Age: yrs. mos.

Teacher_ School


Possible Pupil's
Score Score


Rating


PROFILE
(For Entering Second Grade Pupils)


Part I. Word Recognition
Test 1. Initial Consonants
Test 2. Final Sounds


Part II. Comprehension
Test 3. Vocabulary
Test 4. Paragraph Meaning



TOTAL SCORE


VERY
.LOW
. 5%


LOW
20%


AVERAGE
50%


S 18 2S 3 24 32 33 3


St 2 1'i 3 f29 30 41 4Z





..-. -q


VERY
HIGH
5%


62163 741 78


Copyright, 1952, 1949. Not to bd reproduced in any form without permission. Row; Peterson and Company, Evanston, Illinois
3277


HIGH
20%


6 S'3 3'5 3'6





Test 1. Initial Consonants


sun


mice


cork


pie


tie


heel


vest


wheel


west


hN a,-W


book


cook


watch


nimble


catch


thimble


monkey


fun


nice


fork


f4


donkey


mine


nine


table


label


9





Test 1. (Cont'd.)


rake


soap


run


bear


14


j^*^^^^^^^J


cheep


jacks


horn


sheep


packs


corn


KU


- 11 II


poor


door


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 23.


lake


rope


lock


chair


bite


rose


sock


fair


kite


hose


gun


pear


~t~






Test 2. Final Sounds


spool


track


cab


bush


drug


drum


watch


shed


lead


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 11


cut


cup


spoon


~~-7


cloud


clown


trap


wall


flag


flat


cat


shell


swim


swing


buck


leaf


~





Test 3. Vocabulary


The bird will fly

is your name?


I have something for .

See the leaves on the

is coming to see me?

How pennies have you?

are you going?

I a big apple.

You put in a car.

A can jump.

I have one wagon.

Play with my ball.

The birds will make a

are apples on the tree.

I wish I go.

I say when I go away.

My pony is in the

All at I fell down.

How did you walk?

Come to my birthday


again

What


his

trucks

Where

man

What

at

gay

frog

must

watch

next

This

could

good

bank

once

farm

party


alone

Why


him

trains

Who

many

Who

ate

get

from

jump

catch

new

That

come

good-by

barn

one

for

parade


away

When


hill

trees

What

may

Where

all

gas

for

just

carry

nest

There

coming

got

back

on

far

picnic






Test 3. (Cont'd.)


We must get up

I want some your cake.

Summer days are .

I took a walk.

Is your house?

Please come .

I will help you I can.

Jack "This is my cap."

I will you some cake.

I to the store in the car.

I laughed at the funny

We had a in the woods.

Do you a ball?

The play will be over.

Is your garden?

When I hurt my leg, I

I how to play ball.

The car went down the


eat

off

warm

look

then

her

it

said

gave

walked

money

picnic

had

some

the

cross

no

rolled


every

of

want

looked

there

head

if

see

give

want

monkey

party

have

soon

that

carry

know

road


early

oh

was

long

this

here

of

saw

gate

went

many

parade

hop

so

then

cried

not

rooster


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 36





Test 4. Paragraph Meaning


o May had a new pet. It did not say "Bow-wow." It said "Mew-mew."


The pet was a:


dog


kitten


bird


1 One morning Billy walked down the road. He saw a man he liked very
much.


Billy said:


"Good night."


"Hello."


2 "I am five years old," said Jack. "But tomorrow I will have a birthday."


Tomorrow Jack will be:


twenty


five six


3 Carl liked to help with the cows. He gave the hens and ducks something
to eat.


Carl lived:


in a city


in a town


on a farm


4 "I wish the rain were over," said Bobby.
house. I want to go out to play right away."


"I do not like to stay in the


cross sleepy


"Help!"


Bobby was:


happy





Test 4. (Cont'd.)

5 Andrew and Father went down to the river. Then they got into Father's
boat.


Andrew was going to catch: fish


deer.


geese


6 "Look at my surprise," said Jack. "Father had it in his big coat pocket.
I can put all my pennies in it."


The surprise was a: barn


ball bank


7 "Here is some money, Jack," said Mother. "Go down to Mr. Green's and
get me some apples. I saw some good apples in his window. You may get
some ice-cream, too."


Mr. Green had a: garden


store farm


8 The leaves in the woods were red and brown. The birds had started to fly
south. The days were not so warm.


The time of year was: winter


spring


summer


autumn


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 8'






THIRD YEAR READING READINESS TEST

FORUSEWITH THE NEW ALICE AND JERRY BOOKS


Name Grade

Date Age: yrs. mos

Teacher_ School


Possible Pupil's
Score Score


Part I. Word Recognition
Test 1. Initial Blends
Test 2. Vowel Sounds
Test 3. Phonetic Parts


Part II. Comprehension
Test 4. Vocabulary
Test 5. Paragraph Meaning



TOTAL SCORE


Rating


VE
LC
5


PROFILE
(For Entering Third Grade Pupils)


0 28 36 37 45 46 4

RY VI
)W LOW AVERAGE HIGH HI
% 20% so% 20% 5



0 10 1'8 19 44 45 48 5(


0


38 54 1 55


90 91 94


Copyright, 1952, 1949., Not to be reproduced in any form without permission. Row, Peterson and Company, Evanston, Illinois


ERY
GH
*%




Test 1. Initial Blends


frog I smoke


spoke I broom


drum Iscooter shooter fag


crown I sake


glove pants


snake I tap


plants


screen


bloom


flag


trap I spring


string


seen peasant present

SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 15


fog


dump


clown


grove


- - -


r L
=ot

F~i~i~i




Test 2. Vowel Sounds


rose Ipan


fly


big


check


lane


meat


pen Istump


stamp I sock


gad


chick I cheese


line I fox


mail


chase


cane


sick


cone


Ai&


fix Icandy candle


15


oars


ears I loaf


leaf


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 16


rise


flee


bug





Test 3 Phonetic Parts


2 3 4



iit~jr~~


tray


hook


hawk


boil


bowl


4 I t


shirt


curl


4 t


14

C)

p ~ cre--


cloud


toy


clerk


15








awl


tar


clew


oil


pay


pew


spurn


warm


spoon


worm


SCORE (Number right) _
POSSIBLE SCORE. 16
1


star


stay


trout


clay


claw


shout


L 4


owl


cool


ought


eight


clown




Test 4. Vocabulary
I


o My work is all .


gone


i


down


Did you live on a farm?

May I a ride in your car?

Please me that red apple.

I wish I ride a horse.

Jack the ball to me.

Have you the good news?

I have waiting a long time.

The boys had baseball suits.

I your name.

I my cap is very pretty.

I am with my work.

What did you at the store?

Father me home in the car.

Be when the baby is asleep.

I will stay for a little .

I must to play a fiddle.

I have no bananas.

We will come if it rains.

I will give you one of flowers.


done


every

have

gone

could

through

here

being

their

no

thing

threw

buy

bought

quite

when

lean

most

ever

this


ever

has

give

would

knew

hear

been

there

know

think

through

by

bring

quiet

white

learn

move

even

then


even

had

gave

wood

threw

heard

be

these

now

thinking

thought

be

brought

queer

while

learned

more

every

these





Test 4. (Cont'd.)

The boy cried he hurt his knee.

How bags did you bring?

It is to ride a pony.

Dog is easy word.

Are you to go?

I have a big dog.

I walked around the flowers.

Please my question.

No one is coming.

The sun was the clouds.

There is left in my basket.

I will do that again.

I will remember your name.

You are as old as I am.

I will my dog with me.

This is my bracelet.

You must that you are right.

Can you this riddle?

Do these flowers in the garden?


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE


because

many

each

an

really

grew

among

another

early

before

nothing

ever

always

always

ring

on

proud

guess

grow


believe

man

easy

and

real

green

alone

around

else

behind

no

never

alone

almost

bring

once

prove

yes

grew


being

any

ear

am

ready

great

alike

answer

edge

began

thing

nearer

along

alike

sing

only

prize

queer

gray





Test 5. Paragraph Meaning


Sandy Gray was eight years old. His eyes were blue, and his hair was the
colorr of the sand.

Sandy's hair was:


brown


gray


yellow


On his next birthday he would be:


ten


eight


nine


Jack wanted to make a birdhouse. He got some wood, a saw, and some nails.
3ut the thing he needed most he could not find.

The thing Jack wanted most was a:


hammer


shovel


rake


Carl lived next door to Bobby. Every morning Carl called for Bobby. Then
:he two boys went out to play or walked to school together.

! Bobby and Carl were good:


ball players


friends


singers


One morning Carl did not call for Bobby. Before long Bobby saw a car stop
it Carl's house. A man with a black bag got out and went into the house.

I Carl did not call for Bobby because he was:


asleep


away


sick


I The man with the bag was a:


milkman


farmer


doctor





Test 5. (Cont'd.)

Andy, Joe, and Jim each had a garden. In his garden Andy had corn and
beets. Jim had beets and peas, and Joe had just corn. Joe took good care of his
garden, but Andy and Jim forgot about the weeds.


5 The one who had the best garden was:


Andy


Joe


Jim


6 The only one who had peas was: Joe


Jim Andy


Down in a nest in the grass were five baby rabbits. They could not opei
their eyes. They did not even have any fur. Mother Rabbit had pulled out soml
of her own fur to make the nest soft and warm.


7 At first a baby rabbit's eyes are: black


shut


open


8 At first a baby rabbit has:


some fur


brown fur


9 The fur in.the nest comes from:


a father rabbit


a baby rabbit


a mother rabbit


A
place.
three,


mother turtle crawled up on the riverbank. She found a warm, sand
Then she made a hole with her back legs. Soon there were two, there
then four eggs in the hole. By and by there were ten.


Turtle eggs are white and feel as if they were made of thin rubber.


10 Turtles lay eggs in: water


sand


grass


11 The number of eggs in the nest was: ten


four two


12 Turtle eggs are:
soft and brown


hard and white


soft and white


SCORE (Number right)
POSSIBLE SCORE 11
A


no fur





Form Tx 12



Name of


PEI--4-1-53 STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL ELEMENTARY TEXTBOOK INVENTORY REPORT AND REQUISITION SCHOOL YEAR 1953-54

School fWhite ( ) District No County
(Negro ( )


INSTRUCTIONS: In preparation of this report, record indicated information for each title under the appropriate column heads:
Column 1. Transcribe figures from Column 12 of the previous year's Inventory Report.
Column 2. Record books which were reported as lost on previous inventory reports, but which were found and returned to use.
Column 3. Record the number of books issued by the County Superintendent to your school during the year.
Column 4. Add previous columns and record (Equals column 13).
Column 5. Record all new, unused books returned to the superintendent for redistribution.
Column 6. Record all used books returned to the superintendent for redistribution, renovation or discard.
Column 7. Record the number of books which have been lost or damaged and paid for.
Column 8. Record the number of lost or damaged books for which charges have been assessed against pupils but for which collections have not been made.
Column 9. Record books which nave been lost and for which there has been a failure to account.
Column 10. Record all usable books on hand.
Column 11. Record all unusable books on hand.
Column 12. Total columns 10 and 11.

Column 13. Grand Total columns 5 through 11. (Balance: same as column 4.)
Columns 14, 15, 16. The initial requisition should be based upon assured use requirements and should reflect only those known minimum needs which cannot be supplied
from the. store of usable books on hand (column 10).
Reference Mark: The asterisk (*) indicates titles which no longer may be purchased from the publishers, but if requisitioned, an effort will be made to secure used copies
without cost to the county allocation.
Since the requisition must be based upon accurate inventory accounting, no initial requisition for books will be honored unless the inventory report first has been completed.
This report is to be prepared in duplicate: the original is to be filed in the County Superintendent's office at the close of schooL

INVENTORY REQUISITION
SCHEDULE 1 RECEIPTS DISTRIBUTION DURING SCHOOL YEAR 1953-54
Lost or Damaged On Hand 6/30/'54 a


LIST OF TITLES 0






Little Lost Dog, pre-primer 58 58 .2
A Home 0or Sandy, primer 60 .75
Rain and Shin E primer 61 61 75

FIRST GRADE _____


Reading for Inerent rSerieader :
See and Do, readiness book 55 55 .36
Ned and Nanc, pre-primer56 _______ 56 7_____
Bigger and Bigger, pre-primer, 5l l 1 72 57 .27
Little Lost Dog pre-pre-imprer 58 58lv .273
Molly, Pete and Ginger, pre-primer e59l 3 7 594 .30
A Home for Sandy, prmer 60 60 .75
Rain and Shine, primer 61evl 2 76 61 .75
Something Different, first reader e62vl 1 7 627 .90 _
Easy Growth in Reading (Star Edition):
Mac and MufS pre-primer, level 1 72 72 .36
Twins, Tom and Don, pre-primer, level 2 73 73 .33
Going toSchool, pre-primer level 3 74 74 .33
At Play, primer, level 1e We 75Read 8a 8a75 .96
Fun in Story, primer, level 2 76 ______ ______ 76 .96
I Know a Secret, first reader, level 1 77 _______ 77 1.05____
Good Stories, first reader, level 2 78 _______ 78 .99
Curriculum Foundation Series: ______
New Before We Read, readiness book 82 82 .42
Teacher's ed.. New Before We Read 82a 82a .42
We Read Pictures, readiness book 83 83 .36
Teacher's ed.. We Read Pictures 83a 83a .36
We Read More Pictures, readiness book 84 84 .36
Teacher's ed., We Read More Pictures 84a 84a .36
New We Look and See, pre-primer 85 85 .33
New We Work and Play, pre-primer 86 86 .33
New We Come and Go, pre-primer 87 87 .36
Teacher's ed., New Pre-primer Program 85-87a 5-87a 1.02
Guess Who, junior primer 88 88 .90
Teacher's ed., Guess Who 88a 88a .)0
New Fun with Dick and Jane, level 1 89 89 .99
Teacher's ed., New Fun with Dick and Jane 89a 89a .99
New Our New Friends, level 2 90 90 1.11
Teacher's ed., New Our New Friends 90a 90a 1.11
New Alice and Jerry Series:
Reading Readiness Test No. 1, g. 1 1 1
Reading Readiness Test No. 2, g. 1 la la
Here We Go, reading readiness 63 63 .36
Over the Wall, reading readiness 64 64 .30
Skip Along, pre-primer 65 65 .30
Under the Sky, pre-primer 66 66 .36
Open the Door, pre-primer 67 67 .36
High on a Hill, pre-primer 68 68 .30
New Day In and Day Out, primer 69 69 .93
New Wishing Well, parallel primer 91 91 .93
New Round About, basic reader 70 70 1.02
New Anything Can Happen, parallel reader 92 92 1.02







ENROLLMENT '53-'54 Gr. 1 Gr. Gr 2 G Gr. Gr. 4 Gr. 5 Gr. 6
REQUISITION
ESTIMATED ENROLLMENT: '54-'55 REQUISITION

SCHEDULE 2 RECEIPTS DISTRIBUTION DURING SCHOOL YEAR 1953-54

Lost or Damaged On Hand 6/30/'54
o 5
LIST OF TITLES *w 8- Va V c




FIRST GRADE (coat.)
Social Studioe: Stories About Linda & Lee 79 79 1.26
Nancy's World 80 80 .93
Science: I Wonder Why 93 93 1.08
Health Education: Our Good Health 52 52 .51
Handwriting: Here We Start (manuscript) 81 81 .18
Arithmetic: Row-Peterson Arith. Primer 94 94 .45
Row-Peterson Arithmetic Book One 95 95 .54
Music: New Music Horizons, 1st book 54 54 .57
I Know a Story (literary reading) 71 71 .87
'Wonderworld of Science, Book 1 51 51 .63
SECOND GRADE
Basic Reading
Reading for Interest: Lost and Fond Fond 31 31 1.02
Easy Growth in Reading (Star Edition):
Along the Way, level 1 35 35 1.17
The Story Road, level 2 36 ___ 36 1.05
Curriculum Foundation Series:
New Friends and Neighbors, level 1 40 40 1.23
Teacher's ed., New Friends & N. 40a 40a 1.23
New More Friends & Neighbors, level 2 41 41 1.23
Teacher's Ed., New More Friends & N. 41a 41a 1.23
New Alice and Jerry Series:
Reading Readiness Test for grade 2 1 1__
New Down the River Road, readiness reader 32 32 .96
New Friendly Village, basic reader 33 33 1.17
New Neighbors on the Hill, parallel reader 42 42 1.02
Social Studies: Stories About Sally 37 37 1.44
Someday Soon 38 38 .99
Science: Seeing Why 43 43 __1.20
Health Education: Healthy and Happy 28 28 __.54
Handwriting: On We Move (manuscript) 39 39 .18
Spelling: Spelling Goals, g. 2 44 44 .78
Arithmetic: Row-Peterson Arith. Book Two 45 45 1.29
Music: New Music Horizons, 2nd book 30 30 .69
*It Happened One Day (literary reading) 34 34 .96
Wonderworld of Science, Book 2 27 27 _.69
*Using Words, second year 14 ____ 14 .33
THIRD GRADE
Baic Reading
Reading for Interest: Fun and Frolic 36 36 1.08
Easy Growth in Reading (Star Edition):
Faraway Ports, level 1 41 41 1.20
Enchanting Stories, level 2 42 42 __1.17
Curriculum Foundation Series:
New Streets and Roads, level 1 46 46 _1.35
Teacher's ed., New Streets & Roads 46a 46a 1.35
New More Streets and Roads, level 2 47 47 1.35
Teacher's ed., New More Streets & R. 47a 47a 1.35
New Alice and Jerry Series: __
Reading Readiness Test for grade 3 1 1
New Through the Green Gate 37 37 1.02
New If I Were Going 38 38 1.29 __
New Five-and-a-Half Club 48 48 1.20
Social Studies: Your Town and Mine 43 43 1.92
New Centerville 44 44 1.05

Science: Learning Why 49 49 1.32
Health Education: Everyday Health 33 33 .57
Handwriting: We Write Now 45 45 .18
Spelling: Spelling Goals, g. 3 50 50 .78
Language: Language for Daily Use, g. 3 40 40 1.05
Arithmetic: Growth in Arithmetic, g. 3 51 51 1.59
Music: New Music Horizons. 3rd book 35 35 .75
*After the Sun Sets (literary reading) 39 39 1.05
*Wonderworld of Science, Book 3 32 32 .75
Using Words, third year 14 _14 .33
*rowth in A We Use, g. 3 16 16 .52


Basic Reading:
Reading for Interest: Luck and Pluck 39 39 1.17
Alice & Jerry: Singing Wheels ('47 ed.) 42 42 1.29
Easy Growth: Today & Tomorrow ('48 ed.) 43 43 1.29
Ginn Basic Reader: Roads to Everywhere 45 45 1.47
Literary Reading: Sunshine Book 40 40 1.20
Social Studies: Florida Through the Years 32 32 1.11
Science: Explaining Why 46 46 1.62
Health Education: Health at Home & School 35 35 .63
Handwriting: We Grow Up 44 44 .18
Spelling: Spelling Goals, g. 4 47 47 .78
Language: Language for Daily Use, g. 4 41 41 1.11
*Out of adoption, but continued in use and accounted for on state inventory record forms.







ENROLLMENT '53-'54 Gr. 1 Gr. 2 Gr. 3- Gr. 4.W-. G6. 5.5-R Gr. 6__ .
ESTIMATED ENROLLMENT: '54-'55_ ACQUISITION

SCHEDULE 3 RECEIPTS DISTRIBUTION DURING SCHOOL YEAR 1953-54

S ? S Lost or Damaged On Hand 6/30/'54


LIST OF TITLES V* *0' 0 a ^ r

@0 wo M .0
so c o Sj So 3 0 'S o' g c e 2
W o E 4 z a Z Na

FOURTH GRADE (cont.)
Arithmetic: Growth in Arithmetic, g. 4 48 48 1.59
Music: New Music Horizons, 4th book 38 ___38 .78
*Geography Around the World 33 33 .99
*Wonderworld of Science, Book 4 4 34 .84
*Using Words, 4th year 12 12 .36
*Thorndike Century Beginning Dictionary 37 __37 1.20
*Arithmetic We Use, g. 4 14 ____14 _.52
FIFTH GRADE
Basic Reading:
Reading for Interest: Merry Hearts & Bold 36 ____ ____ 36 -.98
Alice & Jerry: Engine Whistles ('47 ed.) 43 _42 1.29
Easy Growth: Looking Forward ('49 ed.) 43 43 __1.44
Ginn Basic Reader: Trails to Treasure 46 __ 46 _1.65
Literary Reading: Blue Sky Book 37 37 1.26
Social Studies:
Makers of the Americas (history) 38 ___ 38 1.80
American Continents (geography) 39 39 2.04
Science: Discovering Why 47 __47 1.65
Health Education: Health at Work & Play 34 34 .66
Handwriting: Working Together 44 _44 .18
Spelling: Spelling Goals, g. 5 48 ___48 __.78
Dictionary: Winston Diet. for Schools, g. 5-6 45 __45 1.80
Language: Language for Daily Use, g. 5 40 40 1.14
Arithmetic: Growth in Arithmetic, g. 5 49 49 1.59
Music: New Music Horizons, 5th book 41 ___41 1.08
*Frontiers Old and New 4 ____4 .84
*Wonderworld of Science, Book 5 33 ___33 .90
*Using Words, fifth year 11 11 ..36
*Arithmetic We Use, g. 5 13 13 .54
SIXTH GRADE
Basic Reading:
Reading for Interest: Brave & Free 36 ______ __ 36 .98
Alice & Jerry: Runaway Home ('49 ed.) 41 __ 41 1.29
Easy Growth: Moving Ahead ('49 ed.) 42 42 1.50
Ginn Basic Reader: Wings to Adventure 45 ____ __45 1.65
Literary Reading: Firelight Book 37 _____ __ ______ 37 1.26
Social Studies:
Builders of the Old World (history) 32 I ____ __ ____32 _1.35
Old World Lands (geography) 88 I 3 2.16
Science: Understanding Why, g. 6 46 _____ 46 1.71
Health Education: Growing Healthfully 34 34 .69
Handwriting: We Make Plans 43 43 .18
Spelling: Spelling Goals, g. 6 474 47 .78
Dictionary: Winston Diet. for Schools, g. 5-6 44__ 44 1.80
Language: Language for Daily Use, g. 6 39 _____ __39 1.17
Arithmetic: Growth in Arithmetic, g. 6 48 ____ _48 1.59
Music: New Music Horizons, 6th book 40 __ 40 1.26
*On the Long Road 4 4 .84
*Wonderworld of Science, Book 6 33 _______ 33 .96
*Using Words, 6th year 11 __ 11 .36
*Arithmetic We Use, g. 6 13 _____ _____13 .54
UNITEXTS
Basic Science Education Series:
Fall is Here (1) 1 1 .36
Winter is Here (1) 2 2 _.36
Spring is Here (1) 3 ( 3 .36
Summer is Here (1) 4 4 36
Birds in Your Back Yard (2) 5 ___ 5 _.36
Leaves (2) 6 -6 .36
Six-Legged Neighbors (2) 7 7 .36
Toys (2) 8 8 .36
Animals and Their Young (2)' 9 9 .27
Animals That Live Together (2) 10 ___ 10 .27
The Pet Show (2) 11 11 .27
Water Appears and Disappears (2) 12 ____ 12 .27
An Aquarium (3) 13 13 .27
Animals Round the Year (3) 14 14 .27
Birds in the Big Woods (3) 15. 15 .27
Doing Work (3) 16 ____ __ 16 .27
How the Sun Helps Us (3) 17 __ 17 .27
The Insect Parade (3) 18 18 .27
Plants Round the Year (3) 19 19 .27
Useful Plants and Animals (3) 20 20 .27
The Air About Us (4) 21 ________21 .27
Animals of the Seashore (4) 22 22 .27
Animals We Know (4) 23 23 .27
Birds (4) 24 _____ 24 .27
Clouds, Rain and Snow (4) 25 25 .27
Fire (4) 26 ___ ____________26 .27
*Out of adoption, but continued in use and accounted for on state inventory record forms.







ENROLLMENT '53-'54 Gr. 1 Gr. 2 Gr. 3- Gr. 4 Gr. 5_ Gr. 6
REQUISITION
ESTIMATED ENROLLMENT: '54-'55
SCHEDULE 4 RECEIPTS DISTRIBUTION DURING SCHOOL YEAR 1953-54
Lost or Damaged On Hand 6/30/'54 4







Basic Science Education Series (cont.)

The Garden and Its Friends (4) 27 27 .27
Gravity (4) 28 28 .27
Living Things (4) 29 29 .27
Magnets (4) 30 30 .27






Seeds and Seed Travels (4) 31 31 .27
Toads and Frogds(4) 32 32 .27
Animals of Yesterday (5)33 .27



Fishes (5) 34 34 .7
00 04 )0 o 0 C 0 -0 -

Heaic Science Education Series (cont.)












Garden Indoors (5) Fr35 35(4) .27
Plant Factories (5) 236 36.27
Reptiles (5) 37 37 .27
The Sky Above Us (5 4 38 38 .27
Sound (5)F 39 39 .27
Spiders (5) t40e 40 .27
Stories Read from the Rocks (5) 41 41 .27
Thermometers, Heat and Cold (5) 42 42 .27
Water (5) Fac43 43 .27
You as a Machine (5) 44 44 .27
Animal Travels (6) 45 45 .27
Dependent Plants (6) 46 46 .27
The Earth a Great Storehouse (6) 47 47 .27
Electricity (6)d f t R 48 48 .27
Flowers, Fruits, and Seeds (6) 49 49 .27
Insects and Their Ways (6) 50 50 .27
Machines (6) 51 51 .27
Plant and Animal Partnerships (6) 52 52 .27
Saving Our Wild Life (6)53 53 .27

Scientist and His Tools (6) 54 54 .27
Trees (6) 55_ 55 .27
What Things are Made Of (6) 56 56 .27
Manuals for Unitexts:
Primary Manual I (key 1-8, one to 30 texts) 19a 19a
Primary Manual II (key 8-20, one to 30 texts) 20a 20a
Intermediate Manual (key 21-56, one to 30 texts) 21a 21a

Total Amount Collected for Lost or Damaged Books 1953-54 $ Elementary School. TOTAT.

Note: The requisition form does not carry a listing of manuals, but if manuals are available under contract the Department of Education will order them for you (customarily in ratio of 1 manual for
each 25 texts). In the event that additional manuals are needed, it is possible that teachers may secure them by writing directly to the publishers.
Figures in parentheses indicate level of difficulty and interest, and suitable grade placement.

This will certify that by actual book count, the information contained herein is a true record.




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