• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 The problems and definitions of...
 Review of the related literatu...
 Presentation and analysis...
 Summary, conclusions and recom...
 Bibliography
 Appendix














Title: Appraisal of the curricula of the Negro high schools of Alachua county, Florida.
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Title: Appraisal of the curricula of the Negro high schools of Alachua county, Florida.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Walton, Clarence Williams
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1954
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title
    Acknowledgement
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
    The problems and definitions of terms used
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Review of the related literature
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Presentation and analysis of data
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Summary, conclusions and recommendations
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Bibliography
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Appendix
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
Full Text






AN APPRAISAL OF THE CURRICULA OF THE NEGRO

HIGH SCHOOLS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA









A Thesis

Presented to

THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE

Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University








In Partial Fulfillment

of the Requirements for the Degree

Master of Science in Education





by

Clarence Williams Walton

August 1954










AN APPRAISAL OF THE CURRICULA OF THE NEGRO
HIGH SCHOOLS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA








APPROVED:


Chairman



I (T-c


Director, Division of Graduate
Studies
















ACKNOWLEDGEMENT


To Mr. H. S. Hill and Mr. A. J. Polk,

I wish to express my gratitude for their guidance

and assistance in the writing of this thesis.











TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE


THE PROBLEM AND DEFINITIONS OF TERMS
USED . . . .


The problem . . .

Statement of the problem .

Importance of the study .

Delimitation of the problem

Basic assumptions . .

Definition of terms used,. ..

II. REVIEW OF THE RELATED LITERATURE

Literature prior to 1920 .

Literature after 1920 .

III. PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

Presentation of data .

Analysis of data ..


* 9 9 99

* S 9 09

* 9 9 **

* 9 9 *0

* 9 9 90

* 9 0 9

* 0 0 09

* 9 0 9

* 9 0 90

* 0 9 00

* 9 99

* 9 0 9.


IV. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS..

Summary ... .. . . .

Conclusions .. . ..

Recommendations . ..

BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . ..

APPENDIX .. ............. ..


CHAPTER

I.









LIST OF TABLES


TABLE PAGE

I. Classification of Questions and Items

of Pupils' Questionnaire . 36

II. Classification of Questions of Parents'

Questionnaire . ... . 37

III. Classification of Questions of First

Teachers' Questionnaire . .. 41

IV. Classification of Questions of Second

Teachers' Questionnaire .. 42

V. Frequencies ......... ..... 3

VI. Frequencies . . . .

VII. Frequencies . ....... ... 45

VIII. Total Frequencies in all Areas . .. 46

IX. Table of Means .. ....... 47










CHAPTER I


THE PROBLEM AND DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED

From the very beginning of thehistory of formal

education there has existed differences of opinion as to

the nature of the information taught and the methods

employed in realizing the desired results. Continuous

curricula revision and adaptation of new methods of teaching

substantiate the fact that these differences exist.

A teacher should, by virtue of his professional

training be qualified in the recognition of persistent life

situations. If a teacher gains anything in his pursuit of

education, he must have something to contribute to the

immature child which will be of more worth than a program

completely chosen by himself.1

If educational institutions are to develop the

personality of an individual that is in agreement with his

innate tendencies rather than a prototype, a considerable

degree of freedom must be extended to him.2



G. T. Bushwell, "How Much Freedom Should be Granted
to Pupils to Choose their Experiences in Learning,"
Elementary School Journal, 50: 154, December, 1939.
2bid., p. 262.


I~1













Situations that are puzzling to an individual should

be solved in terms understood by him. In order to give to

an individual understandable solutions to perplexing

situations a knowledge of what is understood, what is not

understood, and how much of an understanding is desired are

imperative. Only the individual can supply these answers.

Therefore such opportunity for obtaining this knowledge

should be given him.

The child is in the care of the parent at least
two-thirds of the school day. By virtue of this fact, the

parent is in an important position to give invaluable

assistance to the program of guidance and should be given

the opportunity to share in the construction of the

curricula.


I. THE PROBLEM

Statement of the Problem. It is the purpose of

this study to determine the extent to which the curricula

of the public schools of Alachua County, Florida contribute












3
to the solution of its pupils' persistent life situations in

growth areas ofs (1) individual capacity; (2) social

participation; (3) dealing with environment and forces as

revealed through a questionnaire study.

IMportance of the study. Curricula construction

has been the subject of criticism by administrators,

teachers, and laymen for many years. The popularity of the

curricula is indicative of its approval by those who would
otherwise criticiseit. Without being guided by the

consensus of opinions of all concerned the construction of

curricula stands a meager chance of being improved.

In this study the opinions of the pupils, parents,
and instructional personnel have been compiled through the

use of four questionnaires and classified according to
Stratemeyer, Forkner, and McKim3 into areas of persistent

life situations.

Delimitation of the problem. This study is limited

to four hundred pupils and fourteen teachers of the Alachua


3Florence B. Stratemeyer, Hamden L. Forkner, and
Margaret G. McKim, Developing a Curriculum for Modern Living,
(New Yorkt Bureau of Publications, Columbia University,
1950), pp. 101-299.












County Training School, Alachua, Florida; two hundred sixty

pupils and eight teachers of Archer High School, Archer,

Florida; two hundred sixty pupils and nine teachers of

Douglass High School, High Springs, Florida; eight hundred

pupils and thirty-two teachers of Lincoln High School,

Gainesville, Florida- two hundred eighty pupils and

eight teachers of Shell High School, Hawthorne, Florida;

and one thousand parents randomly selected from all high

school areas of the county, for the school year 1953-1954,


Basic Assumptions. The following are the basic

assumptions of this study: (1) the questionnaires have

been answered in complete honesty; each teacher gave to

each pupil a clear explanation of each item of the questionnaire;

each responding parent had a clear understanding of each item

of the questionnaire.

II. DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED

Abstainer. Abstainer was interpreted as meaning

one who refrains from casting an opinion of an item in the

questionnaire s












Adequate. In this study, adequate shall mean that
which is equal to the requirements for growth.

Array. Array shall be interpreted as indicating
a sequential arrangement of numbers that is descending in
magnitude.

Central tendency. Central tendency shall be
interpreted in this study to mean a value which is particularly
representative of the data as a whole, such as the mean,

median, and the mode.


Frequency. Frequency shall mean the repeated
occurence of a percentage at short intervals.

Growth i~ environmental factors an_ forces. Growth in
environmental factors and forces shall mean the development

of skills relative to natural phenomena, technological resources,

and economic-social-political structure and forces.

Growth in individual capacity. Growth in individual
capacity shall mean gaining knowledge in that which has to
do with health, intellectual power, responsibility for moral
choices, and aesthetic expression and appreciation.











Growth in social participation. Throughout this

study, growth in social participation shall be interpreted

as meaning the acquiring skill in person-to-person relation-

ship, group membership, and intergroup relationship.

Inadequate. In this study, inadequate shall mean

that which is not equal to the requirement for growth.


Mean. Mean, in this study, shall be interpreted
as meaning a point on a scale such that the sum of the

deviations above it is exactly equal to the sum of the

deviations below it.

Median. Median was interpreted as meaning the point

on the scale of score values above which and below which

50% of the scores fall.

Persistent life situation. In this investigation,

persistent life situation shall mean reoccuring situations

that necessitate reasoning to arrive at its solution.

Respondents. In this study respondents shall mean

those persons whose opinions were recorded on the questionnaires.










CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF THE RELATED LITERATURE

The history of education is as rich in appraisals

of curricula as it is in revisions. Appraisal, because

of its nature, supersedes revision.
Only a brief summary of appraisals closely related

to this study is cited in this study,

Literature on appraisal of curricula prior to 1920.

In tracing the evolution of the curricula of the schools of
the United States from the beginning of colonial education

to date, GwinnI inferred several cases of curricula
appraisals.
The guiding forces responsible for the construction

of curricula of the schools of the Religious Epoch, 1635-

1770, were religion and state. Inevitably, it followed
that any appraisal of curricula of this period was made

in the light of the extent to which they satisfied these
religious and state needs.



1J. Minor Gwinn, Curriculum Principles and Social
Trends (New Yorks The Macmillan Company, 1950), pp. 1-36.









8
The rapid growth of colonial trade and commerce and

the shifting of emphasis from a class society brought from

the old countries to that of pioneer life in the new world

are the highly discernible forces that made a tremendous

impact on the obsolete curricula of the Religious Epoch.

Equally as irresistable were the forces of war against the
French and Indians; the decline of religious control of
all colonial activities; of sectional economies; of labor
problems; poverty, and mass education; of the existing type

of education's inability to provide for the needs; and of
the lack of educational training for girls. The combined
impact of these forces on the structure of the curricula of
colonial schools ushered forth new aspects of appraisals

of school curricula. In addition to bringing to an end
the Religious Epoch and its antiquated curricula these

combined forces formulated the foundation stones of a
new opinion of evaluating and brought forth the Political

Epoch (1770-1860).
The conclusion of the war with England for indepen-

dence created a unique dichotomy. Irrespective of the
political success gained by the colonies at the cessation
of hostilities, disaster of an educational nature was

inherited in the form of the Crown's withdrawal of its
support of colonial colleges, the end of textbook












supplements from England, and a shattered economy. These
developments had a profound effect on the curricula of the

educational institutions.

The aims and objectives of colonial education shifted
from literacy of the common people, as a measure of perpetuating

the hard won religious freedoms, to that of the preservation

of liberty and the democratic way of life. A different
program of curricula appraisal followed. Changes in aims
and objectives followed. As a result of these changes,

appraisals were made in terms of a curricula's efficiency

to prepare individuals to serve the cause of liberty and the

democratic way of life.

The introduction of textbooks, made in the United

States, into the colonial schools aided the ever-increasing

pressure that eventually ended the political epoch. These

new trends combined with those that survived the Political

Epoch constituted the basis of appraisal of the Utilitarian

Epoch (1860-1920). Lending its support to the forces in

action were those of vocational concept of training,

foreign influences, and influences that had their origin in

the new nation.










10

The two Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890 brought agriculture

and mechanics into the fold of respected professions. Because

the colleges of that day refused b give the A. B. Degree for

those two new educational endeavors, the B.S. Degree was

introduced to take care of this situation. The dual situation
of the curricula of the colleges provided a type of educational

solution offered to meet this practical need. The influence

of Pestalozzi on the methods of teaching changed the concept

from reciting by memory from textbooks to that embracing
sense conception, reasoning, and individual judgment. The
addition of these methods, advances in curricula development,

and ideas escorted into the educational theater the Epoch
of Mass Education, 1920 to date.
All of these forces acted to effect a change during

any period were used in the succeeding period as guides to

the appraisal of curricula.

Literature prior to 1920. The revision of

curricula has for more than thirty years been an object of

intensive study. An interesting comparison of the curricula
of 1920 and those of today is made by Edmonson.2


2J. B. Edmonson, "Then and Now." NEA Journal, 390L9
March, 1950.












The following is an account of his comparisons:


Curricula of 1920

1. A limited number of
academic units was given.


2. The authorities
were reluctant to organize
large school administrations.

3. The 8-4 plan had
general acceptance, and there
were only a few junior high
schools and junior colleges.

4. School enrollment
of 1920 was approximately
2,500,000.

5. Only a few pupils
get above the ninth grade.

6. Pupils paid tuition
in some high schools.

7. Only a few high
schools prepared for handi-
capped children.

8. Guidance was me
concern of the high school.

9. No program of
health was part of the
curricula.


Curricula of today

1. A variety of
academic units vocational,
health, and avocational
units are being offered today.

2. There is a demand
for larger units.

3. Education today
is extending upward and
downward and some counties
operate junior colleges.

4. Today, there
are more than 7,000,000.

5. Nearly all pupils
profit from high school.

6. There is no
high school tuition.

7. Caring for handi-
capped pupils is a part of
most high school programs.

8. Guidance is of
the most importance.

9. Health is a
part of today's program.













Curricula of 1920

10. Occupational
training received little
attention.

11. Much stress was
placed on citizenship with
emphasis on moral and
spiritual values.


12. There existed a
substantial agreement re-
garding the aims, content and
values of school courses.

13. Teachers stressed
memorization and rigid adherence
to requirements of the text.

14. Stern discipline
and teacher domination were
much in existence.

15. Preparation for
liberal arts college was the
controlling objective of the
schools.

16. There existed a
demand for more and better
education for youth,

17. Teachers and laymen
criticised education for
departing from earlier aims
and objectives.

18. There existed
professional inefficiency.


Curricula of today

10. Occupational
training is taught in most
high schools,

11. More stress is
placed on education with
increasing attention to
spiritual values and human
relationship.

12. There is a
considerable variation on
the same in the schools
of today.

13. Emphasis is on
problem-solving and learning
by doing.

14. Teacher-pupil
cooperation is part of the
program.

15. Preparation for
all youth is the controlling
objective.

16. Today the demand
is stronger.

17. There has been
no appreciable change in
attitude.

18. Today professional
efficiency is stronger,












A study of the information reported by Edmonson3
indicates that curricula has made a great change in the last
thirty-four years* These changes are indicative of the manY
appraisals that have been made during the period from 1920
to date.
Euric and Pace applied various techniques in their
appraisal of objectives of experimental curricula at
college levels.
Bell's5 pioneer study of the problems of the depression
confronting youth was an attempt to determine and analyze
the status of a representative sample of Maryland youth,
ages 16 to 24. After interviewing more than 13,000 young
people Bell gave his appraisal of their educational status
Three-fourths of the total group had no vocational guidance;
one-fourth attributed little or no economic value to their
schooling, and one-eighth attributed little or no economic
value to it.


3dmonson, loc. it.
A. C. Euric and C, R. Pace As 1oIlWup gtudy 2
Minnesota Graduates from 1928 to 19 (Minneapolis:
University of Minnesota Press, j938 P. 41.
5H. M. Bell, Youth Tell i tor" (Washingtons
American Council on Education, 938), p. 2











14
The appraisal of the curricula of these youth of
Maryland indicates that the curricula of the schools that
they attended did little toward preparing youth for the

depression.
6
In the Eight Year Study a new type of technique

of appraisal was employed. This technique measured by

making an interest and inventory determining the text of

thinking involving interpretation of data, application of

principles, the nature of proof, and a social-attitude

scale,
Superintendent Marland of the schools at Darin,
Connecticut, gives an interesting account of the use of

diplomacy in his successful attempt to promote a three

million dollar building program. This report is indicative
of the advantages of giving the laymen an opportunity to
play a leading role in school affairs.
After several unsuccessful attempts to get the

public building-conscious, the school board started a chain
of lay reactions that led to a successful conclusion.


6E. R. Smith, et al., "Appraising and Recording
Student Progress," garers, 3:550, May, 1942.
7S. P. Marland, "Local Citizens Solve an Acute
School Shortage Problem," The Educational Digest,
10s22-24, November, 1951.










15
In spite of the attempts of the superintendent and school
board to speed up the action, the program bogged down.
When everything seemed lost, a ray of hope came in the disguise
of a poor shipping clerk. Grasping the idea that the
Superintendent had unsuccessfully tried to explain, he
convinced the gathering of the importance of the program

by using words and examples that the group understood,
The program got under way,8
In 1948, a million-dollar building program was
completed. In 1949, the Superintendent announced that
an additional two million dollars worth of building would
be needed in the next three years. In 1951, the town voted
unanimously to build two million dollars worth of buildings.
The success of the program is due to a lay-committee
appraisal of the existing status of education.
Hamlish and Gaier9 studied the extent to which
similarities of pupils to teachers are related to the assign-
ment of marks. The subjects of the study were two women
instructors in practice teaching and eight girls under the


8
Marland, l cit.
9Erna Hamlish and Eugene L. Gaier, "Teacher-Student
Personality Similarities and Marks," The School Review,
62s265-273, May, 1951+










16

supervision of the instructors. The instructors were asked

to appraise each pupil on the basis of her observation of

the pupil's teaching ability. Each teacher was asked to

appraise herself and the two pupils with the highest and

the lowest marks in the course. Each student was asked

to appraise herself as she thought she was and to appraise

herself as she thought the teacher perceived her. Data

were collected at the end of the semester to give time for

teacher-student relationship to develop. The pupils picked

by the teachers to be more like the teacher received higher

marks.
Conant10 gave directions as to how the lay public

can appraise the school. His suggestions areas (1) are

the pupils of high intellectual ability being identified,

stimulated, and guided into proper channels; girls and

boys with athletic gifts, musical or in the graphic arts,

being given an opportunity to develop these talents; are

pupils who do not fall into either preceding categories

being provided with a program which keeps interest high;

and does education seem to them and their parents relevant

to their ambitious needs.


1James B. Conant, "Lay Public-School Appraisal,"
aMa Journal, 39:175-176, March, 1950.










17
Stratemeyer and othersll gave several suggestions
for appraisal of the curricula. How much consideration
is being given a child as a unique being, the learner
reacts as the consideration given is good or bad.

In 1950, the Classroom Teachers Association of the
West Virginia Educational Association took what is thought

to be the best program ever launched in years. This
program was undertaken after an extensive appraisal of the
existing curricula. The purpose of the projects (1)
to make schools good guiding forces for children; (2) to
work for adequate support for public schools with more
state and federal aid; (3) urge the expansion of health
and recreation facilities; (4) recruit the best young
people to teaching; and (5) interpret school needs more
effectively to other groups.12
The question of what specific method should one use
in the appraisal of the curricula has been frequently
asked. One should remember that because of America's
diversified environment, no specific procedure of curricula

appraisal can be used effectively in all sections of the


11Florence B. Stratemeyer, Hamden L. Forkner, and
Margaret G. McKim, Developing a Curriculum for Mder Living,
(New York: Bureau of Publications, Columbia University,
1950), pp. 56-65.
12Ii., p. 176.










18
country. The program of appraisal should be conditioned by
the peculiarities of the section in which it is to be used.

Even for the same locals, the program should change with

the progressive change of the community. Because of our

country's commitment to science and technology, its
appraisal of the educational program should be, to some

extent, in the light of the present methods with an outlook

on tomorrow.

The Faculty of Harvard College in 1883, after an

appraisal of the curricula, initiated a program of revision.

One of the questions up for discussion was college-entrance

requirements, and much of their discussion revolved around

the position of Greek in the requirements. The majority

contended that "There can be a liberal education without Greek,"

but agreed that no language could replace it as a means of
developing the power of thought and expression and expanding

the mental faculties10. The replacing of Greek with

mathematics or science was recommended.13 This indicates
the extent of the traditional curricula influence upon the

educational institutions of that day.


13Ellsworth Tompkins "Interesting Footnotes in
Education," The School Review, 62260, May, 1954.











CHAPTER III


PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

Presentation of data. The information contained
in this study was collected by the use of four questionnaires:

one for the pupils, one for the parents, and two for the

teachers.

The items of the questionnaires can be classified
under one or more of the three areas in which persistent

life situations are grouped. These areas are, growth
in individual capacity, growth in social participation,

and growth in the area dealing with environmental factors

and forces.1

The pupils' questionnaire has twelve major questions
in it. Each question is divided into three subdivisions.

Ten of these twelve questions are concerned with the area

of individual capacity, seven with social participation,

and nine with environmental factors aRd forces.

The parents' questionnaire has nine major questions.
There are seventy-one subdivisions. Sixty-two of these

questions are concerned with the area of growth in


1
Florence B. Stratemeyer, Haaden L. Forkner, and
Margaret G. McKim, Developing a Curriculum for Modern
Living (New Yorks Bureau of Publications, Columbia
University, 1950), pp. 56-65.












individual capacity, fifty-one are concerned with social

participation, and thirty-nine are concerned with growth

in the area dealing with environmental factors and

forces,

The first teacher questionnaire has eight questions

with a total of twenty-seven subdivisions. All of the

questions are concerned with the areas of individual

capacity and social participation. Seven of the major

questions deals with growth in environmental factors and

forces.

The second teachers' questionnaire has thirteen

major questions with twenty-six subdivisions. Eleven
questions are concerned with growth in individual capacity,

all are concerned with growth in social participation,

and eight are concerned with the area of growth in

environmental factors and forces.

A total of one-hundred two major questions and sub-

divisions of the four questionnaires are concerned with

the area of growth in individual capacity.

The four questionnaires have a total of ninety-two

major questions and subdivisions that are concerned with

the area of growth in social participation.










21

Seventy-one major questions and subdivisions of the

four questionnaires are concerned with the area of growth

in environmental factors and forces.

The three areas in which persistent life situations

are grouped areas

I. Situations calling for growth in individual
capacity.

A. Health

1. Physiological needs

a. Food

b. Aaand light

e. Body temperature

d. Rest and activity

*. Sex

f. Eliminating body wastes

2. emotional and social needs

a, Achieving secure relations with others

b. Making constructing use of emotions

c. Achieving self-direction


Loc. cit.











22

3. Avoiding and caring for illness and injury

a. Avoiding illness

b. &voiding accidents

c. Caring for physical defects

d. Caring for illness or injury

B. Intellectual power

1. Making ideas clear
a, Communicating by using language

b. Media other than language

2. Understanding the ideas of others

a. Reading

b. Listening

c. Observing

3. Dealing with quantitative relationships

a. Interpreting number values and symbols

b. Computing

4. Using effective methods of work

a. Planning

b. Using appropriate resources

c. Using a scientific approach to the
study of situations.











C. Responsibility for moral choices

1. Determining the nature and extent of
individual freedom.

a. Responding to authority

b. Acting upon a personal set of values

2, Determining responsibility to self and others

a. Preserving integrity in human relationships

b. Meeting the needs of others

c. Developing and using the potential abilities
of self and others.

D. Aesthetic expression and appreciation
1. Finding sources of aesthetic satisfaction
in oneself

a. Expressing self through varied media

b. Gaining artistry in regular work

c. Achieving attractive personal appearance

2. Gaining aesthetic satisfactions through the
environment

a. Creating aesthetic living conditions

b. Obtaining beauty through community planning

e. Obtaining aesthetic satisfactions through
the natural environment.

II. Situations calling for growth in social participation
A. Person-to-person relationship

1. Cultivating effective relations with others









24
a. Cultivating friendships and affectionate
relationships

b. Responding to casual social contacts

c. Taking part in social activities
2. Creating effective working relations with
others

a. Working with others on a common enterprise

b, Laboring in service groups with others
c. Working in situations calling for guidance
relationships
B. Group membership

1. Making a decision when to join a group

a. Determining the desirability of group
activity

b. Deciding on the nature and extent of
group participating
2. Taking part as a member of a group

a. Aiding in formulating group policy

b. Selecting leaders

c. Aiding in carrying out policies of a
group

3. Accepting leadership responsibilities
a, Formulating preliminary plans needed
to carry out the responsibilities of
leadership
b. Obtaining cooperative participation of
group members












C, Intergroup relationships

1. Activities with racial and religious groups

a. Understanding the basic purposes and
characteristics of racial and religious
groups

b. Protecting the rights and responsibilities
of racial and religious groups

2. Working with socio-economic groups

a. Determining the validity of distinctions
between socio-economic groups

b. Protecting the rights of economic groups

3. Dealing with groups formulated for specific
action

a. Determining when action of group is
justified.

b. Securing cooperative interaction among
groups

III. Situations calling for growth in ability to deal
with environmental factors and forces

A. Natural phenomena

1. Dealing with physical phenomena

a. Adjusting to atmospheric conditions

b. Adjusting to or controlling factors
conditioned by earth's structure and
contents

c. Adjusting to factors conditioned by
the structure of the univer e- .....

2. Dealing with plant, animal, ant Insect life

a. Producing and using animal liie-

b. Producing and using plant life














c. Producing and using insect life

d. Controlling and using bacteria

3. Making use of physical and chemical forces

a. Creating new products through physical
and chemical change

b. Conserving material

c. Using physical forces

B, Technological resources

1. Making use of technological resources

a. Using tools, machines, and equipment

b. Making use of household and office
equipment and appliances

c. Using communication instruments

d. Making use of transportational means

2. Contributing to technological advances
a. Helping experimentation contributing to
the development of technological resources

b. Assuring the use of technological resources
for maximum social good

C. Economic-social-political structures and forces
1. Earning a living

a. Providing for the work needs of society

b. Assuming individual work responsibility

c. Achieving effective workmanship













d. Deciding the worth of work

e. Working in and through vocational
structures

2, Securing goods and services

a. Making world's goods and services
available

b. Buying and selling the world's goods
and services

c. Managing money

3. Providing for social welfare

a. Working in and through family groups

b. Making use of the government as a means
to guarantee welfare

4, Molding public opinion

a. Taking part in organized education

b. Participating wih educative agencies
other than schools

c. Making use of instruments for disseminating
information

5. Taking part in local and national government

a. Electing governmental representatives

b. Securing effective organization for
government

c. Making and enforcing laws

d. Providing adequate financial support for
government










28

The first four tables contain all items of the four

questionnaires and the per cent of pupils, parents, and
teachers who think that the curricula of the high schools of

Alachua County adequately or inadequately provide for

growth in the areas of persistent life situations. These
tables also contain percentages of those who abstained
from casting an opinion concerning the adequacy or inadequacy

of the curricula, and the number of people casting their

opinions in each of the above mentioned ways.
Table Five contains the following information of

the first ad second questionnaires: adequate frequencies of

the areas of individual capacity, social participation, and
environmental forces and factors; inadequate frequencies of

the areas of individual capacity, social participation and
environmental factors and forces; and the medians3 of the
areas of individual capacity, social participation, and en-

vironmental factors and forces of the first and second

questionnaires.


3Hurbert Sorenson, Statistics for Students of Po chology
ad Education, (New Yorks McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1936)
pp. 70-90.










29
Table Six has the frequencies of adequate and in-
adequate opinions wasted in the areas of individual
capacity, social participation, and environmental factors
and forces and the medians of the three areas of the third
and foieth questionnaires.

Table Seven contains the sums of adequate and in-
adequate frequencies of each of the three areas of the

four questionnaires and the medians of each.

Table Eight shows the total frequencies, adequate
and inadequate, of the combined areas and questionnaires

and the medians of each.

Table Nine shows the means of the sum of frequencies
of questionnaires I, II, III, and IV in individual capacity,

social participation, environmental factors and forces;

the sum of all areas of all questionnaires.

AnalMsis Ro data. The basis of appraisal in this
study and the percentages of the opinions of pupils, parents,

and teachers who think that the curricula of the high schools

of growth compared with those opinions that are contrary or
contradictycry


)Harry A. Green and John R. Crawford, Workbogo in
Educational Maeasurements and EvaluationlNew Yorks Longmans,
Green and Company, 1945), PP. 34.










30
Below is a classified display of the median from
Tables V, VI, VII, and VIII.

I. Medians of pupils' opinions (Questionnaire 1)
A. Medians of adequacy of the curricula

1. Individual capacity 60.7
2. Social participation 65.5

3. Environmental factors and forces 60.5
B. Medians of inadequacy of the curricula
1. Individual capacity 12.5
2. Social participation 5o25
3. Environmental factors and forces 10.5
II. Medians of parents' opinions (Questionnaire 2)

A. Medians of adequacy of the curricula

1. Individual capacity 35.17
2. Social participation 20,62

3. Environmental factors and forces 20.6
B. Medians of inadequacy of the curricula
1. Individual capacity 67.5
2. Social participation 65.17

3. Environmental factors and forces 60.13
III. Medians of teachers' opinions in Questionnaire 3
A. Medians of adequacy of the curricula











1. Individual capacity 97.5
2. Social participation 97.5
3. Environmental factors and forces 95.13
B. Medians of inadequacy in curricula
1. Individual capacity 4.8
2. Social participation 4.8
3, Eavironaental factors and forces 3.5
IV. Medians of teachers' opinions in Questionnaire 4
A. Medians of adequacy of the curricula
1. Individual capacity 95,39
2. Social participation 95.33
3. Environmental factors and forces 95.21
B. Medians of inadequacy of the curricula
I. Individual capacity 4.61
2. Social participation 4.65
3. Environmental factors and forces 4.62
V. Medians of the combined teachers' opinions in Questionnaires
3 and 7
A. Medians of adequacy of the curricula
1. Individual capacity 96.4
2. Social participation 96.4
3. Environmental factors and forces 95.2
B. Medians of inadequacy of the curricula










32

1. Individual capacity 4.7
2. Social participation 4.7
3. Environmental factors and forces 4.1
VI. Medians of total opinions in each area
A. Median of adequacy of curricula
1. Individual capacity 95.5
2. Social participation 95.5
3. Environmental factt4s and forces 95.5
B. Median of inadequacy of curricula
1. Individual capacity 4.5
2. Social participation 4.5

3. Environmental factors and forces 4.5
VII. Median of total of opinions of all questionnaires in
all areas
A. Median of adequacy of curricula 95.0
B. Median of inadequacy of curricula 4.99

The foregoing is indicative of the status of the

curricula in the opinion of pupils, parents and teachers.
In the opinions of the majority of the pupils, the

area of growth in social participation is more adequately met.










33
More than two-thirds of the pupils think that this area's
needs are met. Individual capacity and environmental factors
and forces follow respectively. A small number of pupils
do not think that the curricula proviea9for adequate growth
in the three areas.
The medians of the percentages of parents who think
that the curricula satisfies the needs of the pupils areas
35.17 in individual capacity; 26.62 in social participation;
and 20.6 in environmental factors and forces. Individual
capacity is the least of the areas provided for. This,
according to bthopinions of the parents has a median of
67.5. Social participation has a median of 65.17 and
environmental factors and forces, 60.13. These figures show
dissatisfaction with the curricula.

The provisions for growth made by the curricula ranks
very high in the opinions of the teachers. In the first
questionnaire for teachers, the medians are 97.5 each for
individual capacity and social participation, and 95.13 for
environmental factors and forces. Only a small fraction
of the teachers are of the opinion that the curricula is
inadequate. The second teachers' questionnaire reveals
almost identical results as the first. Individual capacity












ranks first in being efficiently provided for with a median

of 95.39. Social participation has a median of 95.33 and
environmental factors and forces has 95.21. The medians
of those who do not think that the needs are being provided
for are small. The combined questionnaires' medians are
96.4 for individual capacity and sociall participation and
95.2 for environmental factors and forces. The median of
Inadequacy is 4,7 for all areas,. The median of the two
questionnaires combined is 95.5,
According to the opinions of 95.0, median of all
respondents in all areas, per rpntof the teachers, parents,
and pupils, the curricula adequately meets the needs of its
pupils.
The means of the percentages of the responding
persons are shown in Table IV. The means of the opinions of
persons who think that the curricula adequately provides
for the needs areas individual capacity-pupil 65.4, parents
41,6, and teachers 93.2; social participation pupils 67.2,
parents 43.3, and teachers 96.0, and environmental factors
and forces pupils 6.,3, parents +5,2, and teachers 92.6.
The mean of all responding persons in each area
combined is, 48.2 in individual capacity, 60,3 in social











35
participation, and 52.2 in environmental factors and forces.

The mean total of all of the opinions in all areas combined
is 49.8 as compared with the inadequate mean of 37,6.

The medians show a much higher relative value of
adequacy than the means. A difference in these two measures
of central tendencies can be expected because of the nature
of each. The median is the center of the array above and
below which half of the scores are found. The mean takes
into account the weight of each score. The total weight
of the scores and the distance it is away from the center

has much to do with the position the mean occupies among
the scores.

The sum of the adequate and inadequate medians or
means does not always give a percentage because of the

number of abstainers.




































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TABLE V
FREQUENCIES

EXPLANATION OF COLUMN HEADINGSt A Individual capacity
B Social Participation
C Enviroaaeatal Factors



Class NPpis' Questionnaire Parents' Questionnaire
Interval Admnt* lande.ate Adequate lIadeauate
A- a C A C A p C A B C


1 1
2 3 1
1 1 1
3 3 3
2 2
1 1


3 2 2 13 10
3 3 3 7 2
3 2 2 7 5
9 5 6 1 1
1 4 4 3 3
1
1 1
2 1 1
3 1 1
1
1 2


1
1 1
2 2
1 1
2 2 1
3 3 3


3 1 1
1


3 1
2
2 1
1


2 4 5 1 1
1 1 2 5
7 4 4
7 3 2 1 1
12 10 9 12 10


95-100
90 -95
85 -90
80 -85
75 -80
70-75
65 -70
60 -65
55 -60
50 -55
54 -50o
40 -15
35 -40
30 -35
25 -30
20 -25
15 -20
10 -15
5-10
0 -5











TABLE VI
FREQUENCIES


EXPLANATION OF COLUMN HEADINGS


Individual capacity
Social Participation
Environmental Factors


Class Pu pf e tionaire Parent s Questio naire
Interval Sdea .ad e t de uate

95-100 9 9 7 1 1 1
90- 95 2 2 1 2 2 2
85 90
80 -85
75 -80
70 -75
65 -70
60 -65
55 -60 1 1 1
S- 55 1 1 1 1
415 -0 1
35 .40
30 -35
25 -30
20 -25
15 -20 1 1 1
10 -15
i -10 2 1 1 1 1 1
0o -5 5 5 5 9 10 8












TABLE VII
FREQUENCIES

EXPLANATION OF COLUMN KEADINGSs A Adequate
B Inadequate


Class TOTAL OF L AREAS IN EACH QUESTIONNAIRE
Intervals Pupils Parents lit 2n
Teachers Teachers
A A A S A D
95-100 7 30 12 25 3
90 -95 9 11 5 6
85 -90 7 17
80 -85 20 4
75 -80 2 9 10
70 -75 6 1
65 -70 3 2
60-65 9 2 2 3
55-60 4 4 3 3
50o -55 2 1 1
5 -50 1 3 1
40 45
35 -40 3 2
30 -35 1 3
25 -30 1 1
20 -25 2 11 3
15 -20 4 4 14 3
10 -15 2 15
5 -l 5 12 3 4 3
0 5 9 26 32 15 27










TABLE VIII


TOTAL FREQUENCIES IN ALL AREAS


Class
Intervals Adequate Inadequate

95-100 44 33
90 -95 20 13
85 -90 7 17
80 -85 20
75 -80 11 10
70 -75 7 o
65 -70 5
60 -65 14 2
55 -60 11 3
50 -55 3 1
45 -50 2 3
o -0 0
35 -40 5 5
30 -35 1 3
25 -30 1 1
20 -25 11 5
15 o20 4 21
10 -15 15 2
5 -10 12 12
o 5 26 56










TABLE IX
TABLE OF MEANS


Number of Questionnaire and area Adequate Inadequate
Frequencies Freauencies
1 Individual capacity 65.4 22.1
2 Social participation 67.2 42.5
1 Environmental factors and
forces 64.3 13.6
2 Individual capacity 41.6 45.2
2 Social participation +43.3 53.8
2 Environmental factors and
forces 45.2 51.5
3 Individual capacity 88.7 4.8
3 Social participation 88.7 4.8
4 Individual capacity 96.5 3.2
4 Social participation 92.9 7.2
4 Environmental factors and
forces 96.2 3.3
3, 4 Individual capacity 93.2 4
3, 4 Social participation 96.0 6.3
3, 4 Environmental factors and
forces 92.6 4.4
All Individual Capacity 48.2 50.0
Total Social Participation 60.3 36.6
Total Environmental factors and
forces 52.2 38.2


TOTAL OF ALL AREAS


37.6


49.8









CHAPTER IV


SUMMARY, CONCLUSION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Summary. The information contained in the
foregone chapter is indicative of the status of the
curricula in the opinions of the pupils, parents, and
teachers.
In the area of growth in individual capacity,
there is not much uniformity in the magnitude of opinions,
of pupils, parents, and teachers. The wide difference in
the medians of the opinions of pupils, parents, and
teachers indicates a difference in the values of the elements

of the curricula. In the opinion of the parents (35.17),
the curricula is far below the level of adequacy. The

greater number of parents think that the curricula is
not making provisions for adequate growth in the areas of
individual capacity. The majority of the pupils think

that the curricula are making adequate provisions for
growth in individual capacity. The median of the teachers

who are of the opinions that the needs in the development
of individual capacity is less than four per cent under

one hundred. The median, 95.5, and the means, 18.2,
presents a different picture of the opinions of adequacy.












According to Sorenson when a distribution of
scores has a greater concentration of extreme number, the

validity of the means for summarizing the data is lessened.
Because of this inherent characteristic of the mean, the
median is the most valid measure of central tendency. The

fact that the curricula is effective; in the opinions of

pupils, parents, and teachers as a whole; is indicative of
the magnitude of the mean.
In the area of growth in social participation the
median is much higher than the mean. Because of the median
being a more representative score,4its reliability should

be more influential in the appraisal of this area of growth.
The-values of the median and means of this area are 94.5 and
52.2 respectively. 20.62 for parents, 65.5 for pupils, and

97.5 for teachers is an ascending sequential arrangement of
the medians. In the opinions of the majority of the parents,
this area is not being adequately cared for. A little more

than half of the pupils think that the curricula are making
adequate provision for growth in the area of social partici-
pation. Almost all of the teachers are of the opinion that


Hurbert Sorenson, Statistics for Students ef Psychology
and Education, (New Yorks McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1936), p. 54.









50

the area of social participation is adequately being provided
for.
Environmental factors and forces, with medians of

60.5, 20.6, and 95.2 for pupils, parents, and teachers
respectively, are being adequately provided for.
In the interpretation of the medians, the parents do

not think that the curricula are making adequate provisions
for growth in either area. The expressed opinions are that
the area of environmental factors and forces, 20.6, is the
most neglected with social participation, 120.62, following
closely. Individual capacity ranks highest with a median of

35.17. According to the means, the sequential order is
reversed.
The teachers highly appraise the curricula as making

adequate provision for growth in all areas. Individual capacity
and social participation are ranked highest with medians of

97.5 each. Environmental, with a median of 95.13, ranks
lowest.
The medians for the combined opinions rank all areas

even with 95.5 for all. The mean makes some discrimination
in ranking the areas. An arrangement, descending in magni-
tude of the means areas social participation 60.3;











environmental factors and forces 52.2; and individual capacity -
48,2. The median and mean of the combined opinions of all the
areas are 95.0 and 49.8 respectively.


Conclusion. The data indicated several facts, some
of which are included in this conclusion.

Because of the median being the most representative

score of the two measures of central tendency used in this
study, the conclusions are made in the light of its reliability.2

The curricula is inadequate in the opinions of the
parents. According to these expressed opinions, the area
is a fraction higher than one-fifth adequate in provisions that
make for growth in individual capacity. Provisions for

growth in social participation is only .02% higher than those
made for social capacity. The area of growth in individual

capacity is slightly more than one per cent greater than
one-third provided for.
The pupils are of the opinion that the curricula
provides for growth, in all areas combined, adequately.

Social participation is provided, with provisions for
growth, for which more than two-thirds efficiency is indi-
cated.


2Ibid., p. 55.












Individual capacity and environmental factors and

forces follows respectively with provisions being approxi-

mately three-fifths sufficient.

The teachers' appraised the curricula as being
approximately five per cent less than being perfectly

efficient in providing for growth in all areas.

The conclusion is made in the light of the median of

the opinions of all on the adequacy of provisions for

growth in all areas.

The curricula of the high schools of Alachua County,

Florida make adequate provisions for growth in the areas of:

individual capacity; social participation; and environmental

factors and forces.

Recommendations. Because of the wide differences of

opinions as to the effectiveness of the curricula in providing

for growth in each and all areas, it is recommended that a
study be conducted to determine the cause.

A careful check of all responses of each questionnaire

should be made. Responses of inadequacies in provisions for

growth in each area should be carefully examined. These













responses should be classified as to the educational
activity that is designed to provide greater growth in
the item responded to. This educational activity should
be reconditioned to provide for greater adequate growth

in the area in question.
The responses made by the pupils and teachers indicate

that there is need for expansion in the sub-areas of most
major divisions of growth. There is also an indication

that the sub-areas that are now in existence in the high
schools should be developed to a higher degree of efficiency.

If the recommendations that these two deficiencies in the
curricula be corrected the opinions of adequacy would
increase considerably.

It is recommended that the parents, pupils, and
teachers should, as a group, discuss the inadequacies and

collectively make suggestions for improvement.
A follow-up study should be made after recommendations
have been acted upon. Enough time should expire after

corrections and improvements have been made to allow for
the pupils, parents, and teachers to examine these changes.









BIBLIOGRAPHY


Baker, Clara Bell, et al., The Curriculum Reader,
Indianapoliss The Bobbs-Merrill Conpany, 1934.
Bobbitt, John Franklin, The Curriculuma Bostoni Houghton
Mifflin Company, 1918.
Caswell, Hollis Leland, Curriculue Developaent, New York:
American Book Company, 1935.
Caswell, Hollis Lellad, Curriculu Development i Public
School Sjtesq New Yorks Bureau of Publications,
Columbia University, 1950.
Clement, John Addisoa, rriculi asking q Secondary Schools.
New Yorks .. eH and Ceopany, 1923.
Conant, James B. "Lay Public School Appraisal," )l Journal,
39t175-179, March, 1950.
Edmondson, J. B., "Then and low," IK Journal, 39t60, March, 1950.
Green, Harry A., et al., Worbook in Educational Measurements
and ~5valuatio. New Yorks Longmans, Green and Company,

Gwinn, J. Minor, urriculu Princiles and Social Trends.
New Yorks The Macmillan Company, 1950,
Hamlish, Erma, et al., "eacher-Student Personality Siilarities
and Marks," The School Review, 62:175-176, May, 1954.
Hopkins, Levi Thomas, CurrIculua Principles and Practices.
Chicago: B. H. Sanborn and Company, 1929.
Krug, Edward August, Curriculum Planning. New Yorks
Harpers, 1950.
Marland, S. P., "Local Citizens Solve an Acute School Shortage
Problem," The Educational Digest, November, 1951.
Monroe, Walter S., Editor, Encyclopedia of Educational Research.
New York:









55
Peters, Chester Clinton, T~ C.rriculum of Democratic
Education, New Yorks McGraw-Hill Company, 1942.
Smith, E, et al., "Appraising and Recording Student
Progress," Harpers, 3s May, 1942.
Stratermeyer, Florence B., et al., DeveloDing a ~urriculum
for Modern Living, New Yorks Columbia University,

Sorenson, Hurbert SZatistice for Students of Psychology
and Education. New Yorks McGraw-Hill Book Company,
M5.
Thompkins, Ellsworth, "Interesting Footnotes in Education,"
School Review, 62s260, May, 1954.































APP1MDIX










PUPILS' QUESTIONNAIRE


Question
Number


All questions checked are classified as -
Adequate Inadequate
A B C A B C


x
x
x
x
x x


x x
X x
x x
X X
x
x x
X x
x x
x x
x x
x x


x x


__ ___ __ _


- ---









THE STUDENTS' QUESTIONNAIRE


1. Regardless to the marks you get, in how many of your
subjects would you say that you are "learning a lot
this year?"
a. Most or all
b. About half
a. Less than half .

2. All things considered, how much do you think you are
getting out of your school work?
a. About all I could get __
b. Somewhat less than I
could get _____
e. Considerably less than
I could get ______

3. How much of what you are studying do you think will
be useful to you in everyday living?
a. Most or everything

b. About half _
e. Much less than half

4. How well satisfied are you with the variety of subjects
that your school offers?
a, Satisfied
b. Half satisfied
c. Dissatisfied

5. How well do you think you "get along" with your teachers?
a. Get along well
b. Trouble sometimes
e. Trouble frequently

6. In general how often does the teacher treat you fairly?
a. Always or usually
b. About half the time..
.e Seldom

7. How many of your teachers know your abilities, interests,
and-special needs as well as they should?
a. Most of them
b. About half
c. Less than half









THE STUDENTS'QUESTIONNAIRE

8. In general, do you have to do too much or too little work
to keep up in your studies?

a. About right _
b. Too much
e. Too little
9. Does the school give you enough help in choosing
subjects?

a. Yes
b. Sometimes
0, No _____
10. Does your school give you enough help in choosing a
vocation?

a. Yes _
b. Sometimes
e. No
11. Does the school give you enough help in getting informa-
tion about college and choosing a college?

a. Yes
b, Sometimes
C. No _

12. How much help does the school give you in solving your
social problems?

a. All or almost all the
help I need
b. Little of the help
I need
e. Considerable of the
help I need _















PARENTS' QUESTIONNAIRE


Question All questions checked are classified as -
Number uate adequate
*a b e 4 o Yes X None M La b c d N


o Yes X None


X X X


xx


xx X


Not classified
Not classified


_ __ ___


- ---


---~ --- --









THE PARENTS' QUESTIONNAIRE


1. What kind of a job do you think that the Alachua County
Schools are doing in educating the children? (Check X)
a. Excellent job _
b. Good Job
c. Fair job ..._
d, roor job
*0 No opinion
2. What things are inadequately provided for? (Check X)


School Plant
Summer Camp
SAttention given each
child
Subjects in grades 1-6
Subjects in grades 7-12
SThe kindergarten program
Job training program
The lunch program
Teaching materials
The physical education
program
SMovies used in teaching.
Methods of teaching
Arts and Crafts
School assembly programs
-Summer school
Reading, writing,
arithmetic
Provide job placement


SAthletic teams
Citizenship
The health program

Children quitting
school
Evening adult classes
Patriotism
Provide school nurses
Quality of education
Club activities

Morals
School safety program
SOrchestra
Band
- Chorus
Report Cards

Guidance program


3. In the following teaching areas please marks
(m) to indicate that you think more attention is needed in
this area
(L) to indicate that you think less attention should be
given to this area
(X) to indicate your satisfaction with things as they are
Languages (Latin, French, Spanish)
__Sciences (Chemistry, Biology, etc.)
.____Counselling (Guide children properly)
A___ Advanced English Skills (Speech)
____Homework







THE PARENTS' QUESTIONNAIRE

__Wise use of leisure time
Mental Skills (How to study, to think)
__Health (Health, care, sex education)
_omemaking (Child care, cooking sewing)
Reading
Handwriting
vocational Skills (Typing, getting a job, business)
____Social Studies (History, Geography, Civics)
p8. social Psychology (Getting along with people)
_.__ Character traits and values (Self-reliance honesty)
M__athemetics (Algebra, Geometry, Arithmetic)
____ .Fundamental English (Spelling, Grammar)
______.o opinion
4. In regard to discipline, do you think that Alachua County
Schools areas


a. much too easy?
b. A little too easy?
e. _about right?


d, too strict?
e. no opinion


5. Are you in favor of the teacher grading the quality of
your child's work on the basis ofs

a. a comparison of your child's work tith the average
work of the class?
b. a comparison of your child's work in comparison
with his own ability to do the work?
c. test averages developed by experts in testing?
6. Do you feel that educators in the Alachua County Schools
give enough, personal thoughtfulness and individual
attention to each child?


a. Yes
b. No


c. Uncertain
d. No opinion


7. Are you satisfied with the services of the Superintendent?


a. __Yes


b. _No


8, Are you generally satisfied with the services of the
following personnel? (Check X)


The Director of Instruction
The General Supervisor
Building Principals
Classroom Teachers
Special Teachers
Custodians
Bus Drivers
Lunchroom Personnel


_Uncertain Yes __No
__Uncertain Yes__No
Uncertain Yes No
Uncertain Yes __No
Uncertain Yes __No
Uncertain Yes __No
Uncertain Yes No
_Uncertain __Yes __No








THE PARENTS' QUESTIONNAIRE

9. Are you satisfied with special instruction for:


. Yes
Yes
SYes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

Yes
=Yes


_No
No
.No
No

"No
he
=No
1..0


Children with poor eyesight?
Crippled children?
Children who are hard of hearing?
Children who are brilliant?
Children who learn slowly?
art education?
children who have speech difficulty?
music education?
Children who are ill and unable to
attend school?
recreational activities?
auto driving?


bn you fr your hel. Please ask your child to return your
completed questionnaire to school and drop it in the large box
placed Just inside the front entrance.











FIRST TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE


Question All questions are classified as -
Nu#ber Adoepate mInamguate
S e ab cd
1 x x
2 x x
3 x x x x
4 X X x
5 xx xx
6 x xx
7 x x x
8 x x,








TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE


1. Do you consider that your present teaching assignment in
your school is as important as any other assignment you
might have been given?

a. As important as any other assignment I might have
b. I could be doing much more important work in
a different assignment.
2. Do you think that your present teaching position
is as important as any other type of work outside
the Alachua Schools?

a. It is as important as any other type of work
I might engage in
b. I could be doing much more important work
elsewhere
3. How do you rate teaching in Alachua County with
reference to freedom of expression?
a, I feel that teachers are unfairlyzestricted in
expressing themselves.
b. Teachers are restricted on some matters, but
by and large, freedom of expression is not
restricted.
c, I doubt that teachers are more restricted
than anyone else.
d. In my opinion, opportunities for self-expression
are greater in teaching than in many other types
of professions.
4. If you have the opportunity, do you think you will stay
in Alachua County School System?
a. Yes, I am almost certain I will.
b. Yes, I probably will, but I am not sure.
c. I may, but I probably won't.
d, I am almost sure I will not, No.

5. Do you think you will stay in teaching?
a. Yes, I am almost sure I will.
b. Yes, I probably will, but I am not sure.
c. I may, but I probably won't.
d. No, I am almost sure I will not.
6, What is your attitude toward promotion policies
on the elementary school levels?

a, Child should be promoted more or less automatically
on the basis of chronological age and social develop-
ment, and instruction should be adopted to the
needs of each individual pupil. .








TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE

b. Children should attain certain minimum
subject matter requirements before being
promoted to the next grade.
e. Undecided.

7. What policy should a high school adopt regarding
standards of attainment in traditional subjects?

a, A high school student should be failed and
possibly forced to drop out of school.
b. The school should offer courses in which
such failure students can do acceptable work.
c. Undecided.

8. How do you view discipline in the school?

a. Discipline is obedience to authority,
b, Discipline is a learning situation in which
boys and girls need a chance to learn to
develop self-discipline and the right habits
of behavior.
c. Undecided.














SCOnD TrACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE


Question All questions checked are classified as -
Number dat ______. __. Inadeua4te _
_____' | l








TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE


Directions Cheek only one.
1. What do you think should be the teacher's place in
the classroom group?
a. The teacher should be in a position of
authority, demanding the respect of pupils
and keeping them in line,
b. The teacher should be one of the group and
work along with the boys and girls as a
kind of leader.

2. What method of classroom control and regulation should
the teacher employ?
a. The teacher should make the rules and
enforce them.
b. The teacher should aid the pupils in setting
up their own standards and rules as well as
permitting them to take a large portion of
the responsibility to get group compliance.

3. Should teachers decide what subject matter students
are to learn, or should the teacher and pupils
together decide goals and topics for study?
a. The teacher should follow the school's
course of study and decide what subject
matter students are to learn.
b. The teacher and pupil should decide goals,
choose topics for study, and plan learning
activities in terms of pupils' needs and
interests.
4. Should the teacher encourage each student to think
and act for himself, or should the teacher tell
him what to do and how to do it?

a. The teacher should encourage each student to
think and act br himself, have ideas, and
carry them out (so long as these are in
harmony with group welfare).
b. The teacher should tell him what to do and
explain exactly how he should do it.

5. Hew much group activity do you think the teacher
should encourage during school hours?
a. The teacher should encourage the children
to work in groups and talk things over
during class periods.
b. The teacher should seethat each child attends
to his own work without talking and whispering.








TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE
6. How do you feel about how much each student should be
allowed to participate in class discussion?
a, Every student should contribute something
worthwhile to the group.
b. The teacher will get better results if she and a
few of the best students do most of the explain-
ing and talking in class.

7. What should be the teacher's attitude regarding uniformity
of specific class assignments?

a. The teacher should expect all members of the
grade or class to cover the same assignment.
b. The teacher should provide for a wide range
of difficulty of work so that each child may
have an opportunity to work at goals most suited
to him.

8. Should pupils' work deal only with classroom activities?
a. Pupils' work should be restricted to things
they do in the classroom.
b. The teacher should encourage pupils to help with
projects for community betterment and should
direct such work.

9. What is the teacher's responsibility regarding
instructional materials?
a. The teacher should surround pupils with a wide
variety of books, pictures, study topics,
recordings, movies, and other materials.
b. The teacher should choose a good textbook and
give definite assignments.

10. How should the teacher handle racial, religious, and
class differences?
a. Teacher should make a definite effort to try
to do away with race,religion, and class lines.
b. The teacher should carefully avoid any reference
to such matters.

11, Should the school program be arranged around life problems
or subject matter fields?
a. The school program should be arranged around
life problems, such as making a home rearing
children, running a business, participating in
government and using leisure time.
b. Students would learn more if the curriculum was
organized by subject matter fields, such as
history, civics, literature, grammar, art, and
music.










TEACHERS' QUESTIONNAIRE

12. How should the school handle marking and the measure-
ment of pupil progress?

a. The boys and girls should have a share in
deciding how well they have done their work,
whether they have been successful or un-
successful, and where they have made their
mistakes,
b. It is the responsibility of the teacher alons
to judge their progress and give them their
marks.

13. To what extent is the teacher responsible for the
pupil's all around development?

a, It is most important that each student get
his lesson and pass.
b. The teacher should be responsible for pupil
guidance of interests, abilities, health
conditions, and attitudes along all lines,
and help him learn to meet life problems
successfully.




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