• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Introduction
 Review of related literature
 Presentation and analysis...
 Summary
 Bibliography
 Appendix






Title: Growth and development of Griffin High School from 1908-1955
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AM00000004/00001
 Material Information
Title: Growth and development of Griffin High School from 1908-1955
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Perkins, William R.
Affiliation: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publisher: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Publication Date: 1955
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Bibliographic ID: AM00000004
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida A&M University (FAMU)
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA0800

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Acknowledgement
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
    List of Figures
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Review of related literature
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Presentation and analysis of data
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 31-a
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Summary
        Page 41
        Page 41-a
        Page 42
    Bibliography
        Page 43
    Appendix
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
Full Text







THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMRN OF GRIFFIN HIGH SCHOOL

FROM 1908-1955








A Thesis
Presented to
the Faculty and Graduate Committee of
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Uhiversity








In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Science in Education






by
William R. Perkins
August 1955












THE GROWTH AND
N t

G^p


DEVELOPMENT OF GRIFFIN HIGH SCHOOL

FROM 1908-1955
,1'f.f ;.' ;


A Soesis

SpePWsm ted to

te FacultypaA Graduate Committee of

Florida Agriiahiral and Mechanical University

-a partial Fulfillment

of tlW4a quirements for the Degree

S~ter of Slence in Education

-by

St Williama R. Perkins

August 1955


Approved c94-



S r 4 9

(7 "


-Fni~n*-- -- --










ACKNOWLEQEMERTS


The writer wishes to make grateful acknowledge-

ment to the Graduate Faculty of Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical Wniversity for guidance and constructive

criticisms during the preparation of this thesis, in partic-
ular to Dr. W. S. Maize, Dean of the Graduate School and
to members of the Graduate Committee, Mr. A. J. Polk,
Dr. L. J. Shaw and Dr. W. L. Johnson.
The kindly cooperation of Leon County Superinten-

dent, Mr. Amos P. Godby and his office staff for making
available all necessary records constituted a source of

real help and encouragement.
It is with deep appreciation that I also acknow-
ledge the helpful information furnished by Rev. C. P. Allen,
Pastor of St. Mary's Primitive Baptist Church, Rev. D. A.
Crawford, Historian for the Primitive Baptist State Con-
vention, and to Miss Willie Mae Pemberton, Mrs. Carrie
McGhee Daniels, Mrs. Eleanor J. Dupont, and Mr. E. F. Norwood
who gave timely assistance and corrective criticisms during
the preparation of the manuscript.
Finally, my heartfelt gratitude belongs to my wife

whose constant encouragement proved valuable to me in the
preparation and completion of this thesis.












TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I. INTRODUCTION . .. 1

Purpose of study ..... 1
The problem .......... 1

Statement of problem ... 1

Importance of study 2
II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE 3

III. PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA 12

IV. SUMMIARY ............. 41

BIBLIOGRAPH . ... 42
APPENDIX ............ 4















LIST OF TABLES


TABLE PAGE

I. Number of Students Enrolled at Griffin
High School and Teachers From 1914-

1955 .. . . . 23
II. Number of Boys and Girls Gradtated
From Griffin Normal and Industrial
Institute from 1914-19g 5 25
III. Financial Support Received From the
State Baptist Convention and the
Leon County School Board From 1914-
1955 . . . 31











LIST OF FIGURES


FIGURES PAGE

1. First School Building and 32 of the 57
Students Enrolled During the School
Year 1914-15 . .. .. 18
2. MUsL Savanah Lee Davis, First Student
to Graduate From Griffin High School 27
3. Graduating Class of 1936 :nd the
School Faculty ,. .. 28
4. Graduating Cassa 1949 3 . 30
5. Side View of t.e N) w Building Presently
Under Consaruction ..... 38
6b Trustees of Griffin High School May
1934 .* .* . 48
7. Side View of Gurley Hall .. 9










CHAPTER I


INTRODUCTION


Education means real knowledge like everything

else, the highest value, which cannot be obtained easily.
It must be worked for, studied for, thought for, and more
than all, it must be prayed for. The establishment of

Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute served as an
added means for the Negro youth of the State of Florida

and the United States to obtain an education.

At the time Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute

was established, Negro education in the State of Florida

was almost at a standstill, therefore, with the opening

of the doors of this institution to the public, another

source of education was obtained by the citizens of the

State of Florida and the United States.
Purpose of the study. The purpose of this study was

to record the accurate growth and development of Griffin
Normal and Industrial Institute from 1908 to 1955; and to

cite the roll it played in the education of the Negro youth

of the State of Florida and the United States.

THE PROBLEM

Statement of the problem. It was the purpose of

the study (1) to establish an authentic record of the

growth and development of the Griffin Normal and Industrial


48051










Institute, now Griffin High School; (2) to show the

growth that the school has made during the past forty-

seven years; (3) and to correlate administration and

supervision with the growth and development of Griffin

High School.

Importance of the study. Griffin Normal and

Industrial Institute was established and dedicated to

the purpose of educating the Negro youths of the State

of Florida and the United States. Due to the sacrifice

and the hardships which the early pioneers have undergone

in order to get the school advanced to its present status

as an educational institution, it was felt that some con-

crete record of its advancement and achievements should

be maintained.
It is believed that an authentic record of the

growth and development of this school would not only be

of value to the Leon County School Board, the Primitive

Baptist Convention of Florida but also to the citizens

of Leon County and the State of Florida.








CHAPTER II


REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

One cannot study the growth and development of

schools without due consideration to a specific institu-

tion which in modern times comes to refer to as the church.

The highest institutions of higher learning, namely,

Harvard University and William and Mary, to name a few,

were founded by the church. Earl Mannhem has clearly and

powerfully shown the need for a religious foundation in

society, in his Freedom, Power and Democratic Planning1

says that:

Certain unchanging aspects of the human
mind seem to indicate the need for a transcen-
dental religious foundation in society; and
several factors made this need even more urgent
in our present situation. There exists some
archaic patterns in the human mind and in the
nature of human action that lead to the quest
for certainty and deeper foundations. The very
fact that in our practical procedures we always
think in terms of means and ends and have a
purpose in mind when we perform something that
makes it difficult for us to conceive of a uni-
verse without such an end. Although this may
be a thought habit acquired through the process
of living and doing things, it is so deeply
rooted that a world without purpose would mean
a kind of a homelessness hardly tolerable to a
thoughtful being... Only through satisfaction
of these deep-rooted aspirations (that there is


1Karl Mannheim Freedom, Power and Democratic Planning.
(New York: Oxford, 1951), pp. 288-289.










a purpose in what we are doing, and that
there is a personal power to whom man can
appeal) can man develop the sense of
belonging in a world where he can find his
place and where there is an order that
supports him and dispels his anxieties.
The early schools were organized and administered

in a modest way, during the second century by the church.2

The educational program grew as the church grew. It was
believed that only through systematic education could those

professing christianity be properly prepared for the re-
sponsible memb ership in the church. The cathedral schools
provided for more systematic education under the direction

of the church.3 The administration of the church was under

the leadership of the bishop. The cathedrals were con-
sidered centers of the diocese. The official chair or

throne of a bishop was contained in a cathedral. Here were
the centers of education of priests who, in turn, served
as teachers. The educational program maintained by the
church during the Middle Ages, too truly the Dark Ages, left
much to be desired, but no other force in Europe did so much
for education during these long and depressive centuries

as did the church.


2Clyde B. Moore and William E. Cole Sociolgy in
Educational Practice (New York: Houghton mirr.in co. 52),
p. 104.
3Ibid., p. 105.










Freedom of religion, the right to worship as one

might choose preceded any significant rebellion against

the divine right of kings to rule. A permeating religious

interest prevailed in practically all of the colonies

clustering along the Atlantic seaboard. For the most part,

to continue with organization and administration of early

christian schools, the meeting-house or church was the

first public building to be erected in a colony, however,

provisions for schools quickly followed. The protestant

groups far outnumbered the catholics during the colonial

period and their policy was to establish institutions of

higher learning of colleges under the jurisdiction of the

church.

"Elementary and secondary schools", wrote Moore,

"though largely in the hands of the leaders of the church,

tended to become community enterprises."' Later, upon the

founding of the Republic, public education took on a new

meaning and the provisions of the constitution made it a

state function. However, the catholics built and are still

building elementary, secondary and schools of higher learn-

ing.





4Ibid., p. 108.










The practice of "released time"1 in public schools

created a problem. During released time pupils of the

fourth through the ninth grade received religious instruc-

tions once weekly for thirty minutes. Pupils at the high
grades received instruction for forty-five minutes. The
constitutionality of release time arrangements for religious

instruction came under attack on constitutional grounds in

Illinois and later in the United States Supreme Court.6

Finally, says the court, "we have staked the very existence

of our country on the faith that complete separation between
the state and religion is best for the state and best for
religion." If nowhere else in the relation between church

and state, "good fences make good neighbors."7 This was a
turning point in the growth and development of public schools.
The state played a role in the organization and administra-

tion of public schools. "Within each state", wrote Otto,
"there are subjects and activities which as a result of

legislative enactments must be accorded a place in the school

curriculum."8


5Ibid., pp. 118-120.
6People of the State of Illinois ex rel. Vashti McCollum,
Appellant v. Board of Education District No. 71, Chapaign
County, Illinois et.al., March 9, 1948, No. 90 (Washington,
D.C.: U. S. Supreme Court).
71bid., pp. 19-20.
8Henry J. Otto Elementary ool Organization nd
Administration (New York: Appleton-Century-Crorts, nc.,
1954), p. 118.









Otto wrote that prior to 1800 the public elementary

school's curriculum consisted of reading and writing, with

some schools also teaching arithmetic and language.
Between 1800 and 1900, thirteen subjects found their way

into the program: arithmetic, language, spelling, history,
civics, geography, nature study or science, art, music,
literature, cooking, sewing, and manual training. Since
1900 nine additional subjects have been added. A survey
made in 1944 revealed forty-two different activities which
were classified by one or more schools as co-curricular.9
Laws are sometimes difficult to revise or erase from the
statutes. Schools in some states find that legal prescriptions

are a hindrance to the development of modern curricula,
continued Otto.10
The state government plays an important role in the
supervision of public schools. During the early christian
schools, the church played the important function in the
supervision of the schools. Moore wrote that the Smith-
Hughes Act of 1917 provided federal funds for vocational ed-
ucation below the college level.11 Yet, the federal govern-
ment set up standards by which the states must cooperate.


9Report of the Survey of the Public Schools of Waco,
Texas (Austin, University of Texas Press, 1947).
10Ibid.
11bore, O2. cit., p. 316.










One of the six standards which grew out of the SBith-Hughes

Act is cooperating with the states in planning, organizing,

supervising and administering vocational education. The

Federal Land Grant Act, the first act signed by President

Lincoln on 2 July 1862, provided for each state: the endow-

ment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where

the leading object shall be, without excluding military

tactics, to teach such branches of learning as related to

agriculture and the mechanic arts in such manner as the

legislature of the states may respectively prescribe, in or-

der to promote the liberal and practical education of the

industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions

in life. Land Grant colleges are supported by the federal
government. These colleges are supervised by the federal

government. The federal government has no supervision over

private schools. It was decided that federal assistance was

needed to supplement feeding of children in the secondary

and elementary schools. Therefore, in June 1946 Congress

passed the National School Lunch Act or Public Law Number

393.12

It has been decided that guidance, a phase of super-

vision, requires great skill as well as knowledge and patience.


120tto, op. cit., p. 461.










Boardman, et al. wrote that counseling should be done any

time a pupil seeks help in his problems.13 Counseling
may be thought of as a process of imparting certain infor-

mation and interpreting it to students, and then helping

them to make adjustments or decisions in the light of the

information. Students should be encouraged to talk.

"Teachers should consider", wrote Boardman et al., "all

information as confidential".1+ Good guidance is essential

for proper growth and development of good schools. Church

schools play a major function in good guidance of students.

This is especially true of the catholic schools.

Salaries for teachers and administrators are im-

portant in a good school set-up. Initial annual salaries

for teachers are higher than those in many other lines of

work. Although salary increases in teaching have not kept

pace with those in other professions and vocations, the
tremendous existing teacher shortage and the inability to

meet this demand serve to bolster future financial prospects.

These conditions also assure prospective teachers of a choice

of position, unless they have a very poor record and per-

sonality. According to Grieder and Romine, in the future

there will be a growing demand for teachers on the college

level. All in all, the picture is bright for those who will


14Ibid., p. 463.








-10-


be entering teaching in the next few years.15 However,

the major question is can private schools compete with
public schools in teacher's salaries? The answer lies in
the Luture.
Grieder and Romine also said that there is a pro-
nounced trend toward making the school free, to provide
through taxation educational advantages that in times past

were available only to a privileged few.16 It was found
that schools are not entirely free yet. In only two thirds
of the states are textbooks furnished to all pupils in the

public elementary schools, and only about half the states
are they furnished in secondary schools, wrote Calvin Grieder
and Stephen Romine.17 It was thought to be common knowledge

that it costs money for boys and girls to attend high school,
in some cases up to a hundred or two hundred dollars a year
for school activities. It is believed that as the ideal of
free public education is more nearly achieved, school bud-
gets will necessarily be increased. Some persons do not
believe in this ideal, but nevertheless there has been and

is a continuing development in this direction. The Tenth


15Calvin Grieder and Stephen Romine, American Public
Education (New York: The Ronald Press Co., 1955), pp. 13-14.
16Ibid., p. 270.
17Ibid.







-11-


Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1791, provided

that "the powers not delegated to the United States by the

Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states are re-

served to the states respectively, or to the people.'l8

The Constitution made no mention of education, this article

is interpreted as reserving to the states the control of

public education.

A democratic outlook and philosophy of school follows:

The roots of our schools lie in the demo-
cratic tradition. Cognizant of the currents
and problems apparent on our own and the world
fronts and drawing upon human experience and wis-
dom, our schools mEUst seek to prepare an en-
lightened citizenry capable of effective and
satisfying living....Education must not only serve
as a learning process, it must also be concerned
with the promotion of social action. Increasingly
the American school are called upon to assume
leadership in bettering the lot of mankind and
in making th ideals of democracy a reality for
all people.1
"Good fences make good neighbors", and as a result

the church and the state are separate. Yet, church schools

assumed and are still assuming leadership in bettering the

lot of mankind and in making the ideals of democracy a

reality for all people.




is.bid, p. 243.
19Calvin Grieder and Stephen Romine, oe. cit., p. 72.







CHAPTER III


PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

One of the most significant achievements of the

Primitive Baptist Church in the State of Florida is the

growth and development of the Griffin High School which

is located in Tallahassee. The Primitive Baptist State

Convention was organized in 1901 at bMunt Zion Primitive

Baptist Church, Tallahassee, Florida. It was decided at

this organizational meeting that one of their main ob-

jectives would be to provide adequate educational opportu-

nities in the State of Florida and the United States for

Negro youth. Acting on the rules and regulations which

were drawn up at its convention organizational meeting in

1901, the Reverend P. Sanders, then Pastor of Mt. Zion
Primitive Baptist Church, appointed a committee to select

a site and consider the price of land in the Leon County

area for the purpose of erecting a school.
In 1907, the committee which was appointed by the

Reverend P. Sanders, made its selection of the land on which

Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute was to be erected.

The committee agreed on twenty-one (21) acres of land which

was located on the Old Bainbridge Road, Leon County,

Florida. The original selection was for 23 acres, but the

owner has promised to sell two of the acres to someone else

so the committee had to settle for only 21 acres. This









-13-


land was purchased from Mr. P. T. Mickler for a small

fee of $350.00. Mr. Mickler stated that the reason he

sold the land for such a small sum was because he was
interested in the field of education. During the same

year, (1907) the first building was erected on this site

at a cost of approximately $200.00. In view of the fact

that the state convention was still a very young organi-

zation, it was not able financially to hire a contractor

to construct this building. Many of the board members

whose trades were carpentry joined in and completed the

construction of the building. This building contained four

rooms. Two rooms were located downstairs and two rooms

were located upstairs. Later when boarding students were

admitted to the campus these four rooms were divided into
eight rooms, with four rooms being located downstairs and

four rooms upstairs.

The first term of school began in 1908 with Profes-

sor M. R. Baker serving as the first principal. After

serving as principal for a period of one year, Mr. Baker

resigned this position, and from 1909 until 1913 the school
did not operate, due to the lack of funds. Mrs. Sara S.

Young operated the school for a period of two months in

1913 and charged a fee of two dollars per month for each
pupil enrolled. Part of this money was to be allocated for












her salary. After a short while, it was found that this
operation would not succeed and the school was closed again.

The doors of Griffin Normal and Industrial Insti-
tute reopened again in the fall of 1914 under new leader-

ship. The Board of Trustees searched far and wide to find
a man who would be willing to sacrifice his time, energy

and salary in order to get a new school started for Negroes
in Tallahassee. The board finally elected Mr. W. R. Perkins

as principal and Mrs. Perkins as assistant principal.

The first board student, a boy, Coral McCloud from

Tampa, Florida, enrolled during the fall of 1915. There

were approximately twenty-five boarding students. They
were received from seven states, Alabama; Florida; Georgia;

Illinois; Indiana; Mississippi and North Carolina. In view

of the fact that the number of boarding students began to

steadily decrease after 1939 and the space was badly needed

for added classroom space, all boarding operations were
permanently suspended in the spring of 1944.

In 1917 the National Convention of the Primitive
Baptist Church requested that Professor W. R. Perkins be
transferred to Huntsville, Alabama. Mr. Perkins' job there
was to help organize and operate a similar school and also

to operate the Primitive Baptist Publishing House. There
he remained for one year. During this time the operation











-15-


of Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute was suspended.

Professor Perkins returned to Griffin in time for the

opening of the fall term of 1918.

The names and addresses of students who were en-

rolled at Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute and the

classes in which they were enrolled during the fall of

1914 are listed below. During the school year 1914-15, all

of the students who were listed on the school roll were

from Tallahassee with the exception of one. This young man

was from Tampa, Florida. There were 28 boys and 29 girls

enrolled during this school term.


NAME AND HOME TOWN OF STUDENTS ENROLLED AT
GRIFFIN NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE
1914-15


Primary Grade

Allen Ruth ----------------------
Brown, Winnie ------------------
Collins, Sophia ----------------
Edwards, Charlotte --------------
Fraizer, Noot ------------------
Jenkins, Nellie M--------------
Jiles, Willis JT. -----------
Lewis, James -------------------
Levins, Annie Mae ---------------
Mbore, Eddie -------------------
Norwood, Edwin -----------------
Sheavis, Samuel ----------------
Taylor, Edna -------------------
Thomas, Bennie ------------------
Thomas, James -------------------
Thomas, L. B. ------------------


Tallahassee
it
tl

t!
It
I'
at


It
tl

11

I,
n









-16-


Thurman, Daniel ----------------
Wilson, Francis ----------------
Wilson, Theo ---------------------
Walton, Roberta -----------------
Washington, Ruby -----------------
Williams, Peter -----------------


Tallahassee
n
If(
n

n


First Grade

Hunter, James -------------------- Tallahassee
Moore, Rachael -------------------
More, Lucy ----------------------
Norwood, Ernest ------------------
Spencer, Louis ---------------
Thurman, Walter -----------------
Wilson, Mary Ann ----------------
Walton, Clarence James -----------
Walton, Richard -----------------
Washington, Bernard -------------
Williams, Samuel ----------------


Second Grade


Collins, Violet ------------------
Ford, Matthews -------------------
Jackson, George -----------------
Moore, rnie-------------------
McCloud, Coral ------------------
Thurman, Frances ----------------
Whittaker, Msttie ---------------


Third Grade

Ford, Geneva --------------------
Hill Carrio --------------------
Williams, Iyrtle -----------------
Williams, Leroy ------ ------
Wilson, Marie -------------------

Fourth Grade

Davis, Laurine ------------------
Edwards, Reginald C. -------------
Ford, Mary ----------------------
Johnson, Willie -----------------


Tallahassee
it
It

Tampa
Tallahassee
ti


Tallahassee
tl


it


Tallahassee
n
ft
it









-17-


Fifth Grade
Jackson, Reecy -------------------- Tallahassee
Long, Chauncey -------------------
Moore, Anna ---------------------
Wilson, Julia --------------------

GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT

Sixth Grade
Thomas, Emma --------------------- Tallahassee
Whittaker, Raleigh ---------------
Williams, Mary ------------------. I

TOTAL ENROLLMENT

Boys -------------------------------- 28
Girls ---------------------------- -----
Total Nutaer Enrolled

Information presented in Figure I shows a portion
of the first school building and 32 of the 57 students who

were enrolled along with Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Perkins. This

picture was taken during the school year 1914-15.

The second building was erected in 1920 at a cost

of $10,000.00. This building contained 14 rooms, part of
which was used for classrooms, boarding facilities and of-

fice space. In March of 1926 tradegy struck and this build-

ing was completely destroyed by fire, burning most of the

early records, furniture and most of the personal belongings

of the boarding students. However, with the aid of the
citizens of Tallahassee, all of the boarding students were










-18-


i>-t.


*r7pt


Figure I. Pt teaov~ing a portion of first

building and 32 of thas l W students enrolled during

year 1911 l5.





7


school

school


i! ~Ji









-19-


placed in private homes, thereby, enabling the operation

of the school to be continued without an interruption.

Dr. Bunynn Stephens, then Pastor of the First Baptist
Church, which is presently located at the Corner of Col-
lege and Adams in Tallahassee, learned of the fire and

gave $38.60. This was the total collection for one night
from a revival that he was conducting.

The construction of a new building was begun in
August of the same year. Within a short while its con-

struction was completed and was ready for occupancy. This

$45,000.00 mortgage was completely liquidated in June of
194+.

The name of Griffin High School has changed three
times since the school was founded in 1908. The first

name of the school was Qrlffin Normal and Industrial Insti-

tute. Later the idea was conceived that someday may be the

school would develop into a college. From this idea the
school's curriculum was divided into Iour distinct parts;
primary course, normal department, theological department

and the college department. However, no students were ever
enrolled in the college department. The last name of the

school was Griffin High School and one of the main stipu-
lations which the church requested when the Leon County School

Board took over the operation of the school was that it

was to retain the name of Griffin.








-20-


Information presented below show these curricula

for Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute--1914.


CURRICULUM FOR GRIFFIN NORMAL AND
INDUSTRIAL INSTItUTE--1914

PRIMARY COURSE


First Year
Reading
Blackboard
Language (Oral)
Numbers

Third Year
Reading Third Reader)


Language
Arithmetic
Spelling
Physiology


Second Yea
Reading (Second
Reader)
Language
Numbers
Spelling

Fourth Year
Reading (Fourth
Reader)
language
Spelling
Geography
Arithmetic
Physiology

Geography
Physiology
Writing Drawing and
vocal music through-
out the course


(Oral)


Arithmetic
Spelling
Reading (Fifth Reader)
Language


GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT


Sixth Grade
Reading (Sixth Reader)
Geography
Orthography
English Grammar
U. S. History
Arithmetic
Writing, Drawing & Vocal Music


Seventh Grade
American Literature
(Lives of authors)
Orthography
U. S. History
English Grammar
Arithmetic
Geography
Physiology








-21-


Arithnietic '"., 0
Grammar
Physiology
Botany (Second Sawttr)
Orthography
Composition
History of Florida (First Semester)
*Girls have sewlvin' be sixth and seventh grades,
and domestic science In the eight grade.

NORI DEPARTMENTT


First Year
Arithmetic
Bookkeeping
Rhetoric
General History
Algebra
Ethics (Second -Sawster)

Third Year
Algebra
Latin--Vivi Romae; Caesar
Civil Government (First
Semester)
Pedagogy
Agriculture (Second Sem.)
English Literature
Chemistry


American Literature
Rhetoric
Physical Geography
Latin
Agriculture (Second Semester)

Fourth Year
Geometry (Plane)
Psychology
Latin--Cicero's Orations
Greek--Elements (Ball)
English History
Church History
Rhetoric


Note: To obtain a certificate of graduation from
this department, students must teach satis-
factorily for eight months under the super-
vision of the critic teacher.

THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT

Course of Study
First Year
Old Testament--Introduction and Exercises
Church History
Supplementary Reading









-22-


Second Year
New Testament--Introduction and Exercises of
Gospels
Study of Four Gospels
History of Denominations

Third Year.
Pauline Epistles
History of Our Lord
Bible Handbook
Preparation and Delivery of Sermons

Note: Graduates from this department receive the
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity.

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT

Curriculum of Study Leading to the Degree of
Bachelor of Arts

Freshman Year
Mathematics--Solid Geometry; Trigonometry (Last
half of Second Semester)
Latin--Virgil
Greek--Story of Cyrus; selections from Arabasis
English--Rhetoric & Theme
Bible


Sophomore sYe
Greek--Odyssey (First Semester); Apology (Second
Semester)
Latin--Horace
English--Milton and Shakespeare
Argumentation (Second Semester)
Logic--(First Semester)
Zoology
Bible
Botany (Second Semester)








-23-


Junior Year
Chemistry
German
Physics
Astronomy (Young)
Psychology (First
Sociology (Second
Oration
Bible--Greek Test


Senior )
Moral Sieance
Semester)


Semester
Semester


ament


(First


Political Scince
(Second Seaftter)


)Philosophy
)Geology
Civics
Evidences
Oration


of Christianity


Data presented


in Table


I shows the number of


students
teachers


enrolled at Griffin High School and the number


on the payroll each year


from 1914 to


TABLE I


NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED AT


GRIFFIN HIGH SCHOOL AND


TEACHERS FROM 1914-1955


.-. Boys


28t
32
36
Operation
43
50
61
68
64
72
76
81
73
67
71
62
71
69
70
71


Girls
29
39


Suspended
60
71
104
116
121
126
130
143
138
130
135
128


1955.


Year
93W
1914
1916
1917
1918
1919
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933


Teachers
2
2
3
3
1
5

6
6
6
5
5
5
6
6
5


II











TABLE I CONTINUED


Boys
71
69
69
70
72
70
98
112
112
120
150
161
184
182
210
183
212
197
198
200
201


Girls
130
134
128
130
132
139
129
129
132
147
156
158
180
202
209
230
225
232
250
255
256


The enrollment at Griffin High School


steadily in-


creased each year from 1914 to 1955. The school operated
each year except the year 1917, when the operation was
suspended due to the absence of the principal. It must be
noted that each year the enrollment of girls outnumbered
the boys. In some years the ratio was almost two girls to
one boy. During the year 1914 the school operated only the
primary department with an enrollment of 28 boys and 29
girls. During this school year M. W. R. Perkins and his
wife were the only teachers. The enrollment remained almost


Year
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955


S--Teacheyp
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
9
9
9
10
10
15
13
16
19
20
21
22
21








-25-


the same from 1914 to 1919 with 50 boys and 71 girls.
However, the number of teachers had increased from 2 to

3.
In 1920 the enrollment increased to 61 boys and
104 girls. With this increase in enrollment came an in-
crease in the faculty from 3 to 4. From 1920 to 1942
the enrollment remained almost the same without any sig-
nificant increases. During the same period the total
enrollment for girls ranged from 104 to 132 per year.
There was no significant increase in the number of teachers
which ranged from 5 to 7 per year.
In the meantime, during the period from 1943 to

1955 there was a very significant increase in the enroll-
ment for both boys and girls and also for the number of
teachers. The enrollment for boys increased from 112 to
203 and from 147 to 256 for girls. During the same period
the number of teachers increased from 9 to 23.
Data presented in Table No. II shows the number
of boys and girls graduated from Griffin Normal and In-
dustrial Institute from 1914 to 1955.

TABLE II
NUMBER OF BOYS AND GIRLS GRADUATED FROM
GRIFFIN NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE
FROM 1914 TO 1955

Year Boys Girls
1914-15 0 0
1915-16 0 0
1916-17 0 o








-26-


TABLE II CONTINUED


Year Boys Girls
1917-18 0 0
1918-19 0 0
1919-20 0 0
1920-21 0 0
1921-22 0 0
1922-23 0 1
1923-24 0 0
1924-2 5 2 3
1925-26 0 2
1926-27 0 5
1927-28 0 3
1928-29 1
1929-30 2 3
1931-32 3 4
1932-33 2 4
1933-34 2 3
1934-35 0 2
1935-36 3 4
1936-37 1 3
1937-38 2 5
1938-39 0 3
1939- 1 6
1940-41 3 5
1941-42 1 8
1942-43 1
194.3-44 2 3
1944-46 35
1945-46 5
1946-47 0
1947-48 4 6
1948-49 2 3
1949-50 5 5
1950-51 2 3
1951-52 3 9
1952-53 1
1953-5446
195- .5 8
Griffin High School has never had a very large class
to graduate in a single year. Information presented in
Table II shows that there were no graduating classes between





I___











.' r







.I: ~4

MI. M -II,'

-. I



.i











;I''




i; I-



"'I





















a'
*j*~~~: G9** .

*~ ~ 3 4..,* *Iu








-28-


.~; ~


pow

1~ ^"^^


Figure III shows t~ graduating


class of 1936 and


the school faculty.


te gad ating


class consisted of 1 boy


and 4 girls. There vewe five


~q~ _
I*rlmp .


persons on the faculty.


^ A~i
is

u^- 1J^ic








-29-

the years 1914 and 1922. The first graduation exercise
took place in June 1923, and the first person to graduate
was Savanah Lee Davis of Tampa, Florida. From 1923 to
1955 each of the graduating classes have been very small.
Figure II shows the picture of the first student
to graduate from Griffin High School.
Figure III shows the graduating class of 1936
and the school faculty.

Figure IV shows the graduating class of 1949,
along with the Principal W. R. Perkins and Assistant Prin-
eipal 1. 2. Norwood.









-30-


Figure IV shM.* togradiuauting class of
class consisted of ;fv..##udents, two boys and
Principal W. R. Perkins. ~ at the extreme left
Principal E. F. Norwood a; the extreme right.


L94.9* The ,
three girls.
and Assistant








-31-


Information presented in Table III shows the

financial support received from the State Baptist Con-
vention and the Leon County School Board from 1914 to

1955.
Operation was suspended in 1917 for one year
because the principal moved to Huntsville, Alabama,
to work in the publishing house. Operation was resumed

the next year, 1918. The members of the convention
realized the need for more finance and, therefore,
$2,000.00 was received from the churches compared to

$1,700 the previous year to carry on the work and $1,240
for teachers salaries compared to $760.00 in 1916.
The amount received for maintenance in 1918 was $760.00
which was less than the amount received in 1916.
In 1934 Leon County's School Board realized the
contribution being made by the school to the community,

and appropriated $965.00 to help pay the teachers and
$800.00 for maintenance. This type of assistance was
continued until 1955
It was agreed that the Leon County School Board

would pay the salaries of teachers who were transferred
and furnish supplies for the school. The agreement
further stipulated that the principal was to turn in a
monthly attendance report. In 1934 the county began to

supplement the salary of the principal.








-31-a


TABLE III


FINANCIAL SUPPORT
CONVENTION AND


RECEIVED FROM THE STATE BAPTIST
THE LEON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
FROM 1914-1955


Total amt.
Total amt. of money
of money received Amount
received from Leon Total amt. received
School from Couny teachers from
year church School Bd. salaries maintenan0
11 10 I 0onn. .M n .. .00. .64000


Operation
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
965.00
1080.00
1400.00
1400.00
14+00.00
1800.00
2280.00
2280.00
18,000.00
18,000.00
21,000.00
21,000.00
21,000.00
23,000.00
o






96.0


560.00
760.00
Suspended
1240,00
1240.00
1860.00
1890.00
1890.00
1890.00
2200.00
2200.00
2200.00
1890,00
1890.00
1890.00
1890.00
1890.00
1890.00
1890.00
965.00
1080.00
1400.00
1400.00
1400.00
1800.00
2280.00
2280.00
18,000.00
18,000.00
21,000.00
21,000.00
21,000.00
23,000.00


960.00
940.00

760.00
1060.00
840.00
610.00
810.00
910.00
800.00
950.00
1100.00
2110.00
810.00
710.00
1310.00
1310.00
1410.00
1210.00
800.00
800.00
800.00
800.00
1000.00
1200.00
1200.00
1200.00
1200.00
1350.00
1350.00
1350.00
1350.00
1550.00


1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
19+1
1942
1932

1
1945
1946
1947


1500.00
1700.00
2000.00
2300.00
2400.00
2500.00
2700.00
2800,00
3000.00
3150.00
3300.00
3000.00
2700.00
2600.00
3200.00
3200.00
3300.00
3100.00
800.00
800.00
800.00
800.00
1000.00
1200.00
1200.00
1200.00
1200.00
1350.00
1350.00
1350.00
1350.00
1550.00








-32-


TABLE III CONTINUE D


STotal at.
Total amt. of naoey
of money received Amount
received froAm ton Total amt. received
School from County teachers from
you church Iha#1B. a slaries Mintenance
1 1550.00 24 ooooo 24,000.00 0.00
199 1550.00 271000.00 27,000.00 1550.00
1950 1750.00 33,000.00 33,000.00 1750.00
1951 1600.00 33,000.00 33,000.00 1600.00
1952 1850.00 11,250.00 41,250.00 1850.00
1953 1950.00 41,250.00 41,250.00 1950.00
195 1950.00 45000.00 45,000.00 1950.00
1955 1900 00 .. 0.000.00 190.00


The financial struggle


of Griffin High School


from 1914 to 1955 has been a long and hard one. From
1914 to 1933 the school was solely financed by the state
convention of the Primitive Baptist Church. Sources
of income from within the state convention included dis-
trict associations, district Sunday School conventions,
union meetings and the women's congress. The school also
operated on a tuition basis, which ranged from $2.00 to
$8.00 per term. This eas eliminated when the county began
to share the responsibility in 1934.
From 1914 to 1933 the total yearly income received
from the state convention ranged from $1200.00 to $3100.00,
and the amount of money per month for teachers salaries
ranged from $560.00 to $1890.00. This was not very much









-33-


money per month for teachers and often they had to go

from one to two or more months without being paid.

However, as soon as the church would get the money, they

would receive all of their back pay. During this same

period, the amount of money received for maintenance

ranged from $640.00 in 914 to $1210.00 in 1933. There

were times when some of the boarding students were not

able to pay their board and tuition in cash money. In

such cases, the administration would permit them to pay

their bills in produce. This would help to eliminate

the problem of securing food and other necessities which

go along with the operation of a boarding department.

In order to relieve some of the overcrowded con-
ditions in Lincoln High School, the Leon County Super-

intendent, Mr. F. S. Hartsfield in 1934 negotiated with

the principal and trustees of Griffin Normal and Industrial

Institute to transfer some of their students and teachers

to Griffin. In the agreement it was stipulated that
Griffin would drop the tuition fee which had been charged

previously. It was also agreed that the Leon County School

Board would pay the salaries of teachers who were trans-

ferred and furnish supplies for the school. The agree-

ment further stipulated that the principal was to turn in

a monthly attendance report. In 1934 the county began to

supplement the salary of the principal.











From 1934 to 1955 the amount of money received
from the Leon Coanty School Board for teachers and
principal salaries and supplied ranged from $965.00
per year to better than $50,000.00 per year. In the
meantime, the church did not discontinue its financial
aid to the school merely because it was receiving aid
from the Leon County School Board. From 1934 to 1955
financial contributions received from the church ranged

from $800.00 to $1950.00. However, it must be noted
that when the school began to receive financial support
from the county, the church reduced its financial support
the next year from $3100.00 to $800.00. The church began
to increase its contributions again in 1938. From 1934
to 1955 the financial contributions received from the
church ranged from $800.00 to $1950.00. The entire amount
of money received from the church during this period was
used for supplies and equipment.
Basketball and Band. During the past 47 years,
Griffin High School has grown to be one of the leading
schools of the city and county of Tallahassee. Immediately
after the county began to give financial aid to the school,
Wrs. Perkins organized in 1935 the first basketball team
in the city and county. This team received wide
recognition both in the county and the state for its
excellent performance and fair play on the basketball









-35-


court. Mr. H. G. Howard, a teacher at Griffin, also

started the first basketball tournament in this dis-

trict. This tournament has been continued to this date.

Griffin High School has been successful in

winning honors each year since 19+0. The school has

been district champions several times. Griffin has been

both State runner-ups and State "B" champions two times

each. At present Griffin High School holds the FIAA

(Florida Intercollegiate Athletic Association) Champion-

ship Class "B", and in 1954 placed second in the CFII

Tournament.

The Griffin High School Band was organized during

the summer of 1951; however, prior to this time, the

principal and faculty had worked very hard to secure

instruments and otherwise lay the ground work for the

band. After only two months of organization, the band

made its first public appearance in the North Florida Fair

Parade. The uniform for this parade was white shirts,

white trousers, white shoes and sun helmets painted blue

and gold.

Seven months after organization, this band competed

in new blue and gold uniforms; took part in its first

State Band Festival at Miami, Florida. They were rated

first division in marching and second division in concert

competitions.









-36-


In addition to participating in these Band
Festivals and two District Band Festivals, receiving
a total of seven superior ratings, four excellent
ratings, and one good rating.

In addition to participating in these Band
Festivals, the Griffin High School band has also parti-

cipated in many civic parades and other community
activities, both in Tllahassee and other neighboring
communities. The band also holds the distinction of
being the only band that could assemble within a few
hours to welcome the late Governor Dan McCarty upon his
arrival in Tallahassee to assume his duties as Governor.
Two graduates of Griffin High School, who were band
members, are now members of Florida A and M University's
great Marching and Concert Band.

The Leon County School Board discussed on June 15,
1951, the possibility of acquiring a site from Griffin
High School for the purpose of erecting an additional
school in Leon County for Negroes. As a result of this
meeting, the President of the Leon County School Board
instructed the secretary to arrange for a meeting between
the Board of Trustees of the Primitive Baptist Church of
Florida and the Leon County School Board. This meeting
was held and on March 22, 1952 the Trustees of the








-37-


Primitive Baptist Church of Florida authorized a com-
mittee (see Appendix) to enter negotiations with the
Leon County School Board for the sale or transfer of
10 acres of land located on the east side of the build-
ing which is presently located on the grounds.

As a result of these meetings the Leon County
School Board in 1952 agreed to purchase these 10 acres

and paid the State Convention of the Primitive Baptist
Church ($5,000). O half of this amount was payable
when the warrantry deed was executed and placed in escrow
with one of the Tallahassee Banks (see Appendix). The
other half was payable within twelve (12) months from
the first date. Such deferred payments were to bear
interest at the rate of 5 per cent until date paid.
Plans for the erection of a $533,360 building
were drawn and presented to the Negro Building Committee
in January 1953. These plans were approved and accepted
by the committee. This building will contain 18 class-
rooms; 3 science rooms; lavatories; boiler room; home
economics room; music room. It will also provide space
and facilities for the library, teachers lounges, locker
rooms, offices, art and industrial arts and an ultra-
modern cafetorium.

A side view of the new building which is presently
under construction is shown in Figure V.










-38-


ls 4 *4th'4. -t.Alt


:Aak 54.- ^^ A**


*TParIcw A ,ide view of

is pr dik l41l truction.
P L ,r- ^ :. .


the new building which


*c*^.' '*^A.u


-.~~ ~ ~ I-~ lrV A
th '&t


"^w; .'l








-39-


During the early days of Griffin Normal and
Industrial Institute,tie duties of the principal were
varied and numerous. He was business manager, teacher
and principal all combimd.
Due to the l3ck of funds, and the small number
of boarding students Wiing the first years, the hiring
of a cook was impoasittb' frs. Perkins, with the aid
of students who had ts'Gmrn all or a part of their ex-
penses, supervised ~~Aba^1 ding department. Boys and
girls were given vork ~a the school farm and as Janitors
in order to earn a part-sf their expenses. By this
means, practically 'aI of the work in the kitchen, dor-
mitories, and farm aW~Jpleted. Students who could
not pay in cash were alUtoed to pay in labor or produce.

The principal ve responsible for the selection
of teachers, purchasing of furniture for the dormitories,
food and all supplies otherwise not provided; and most
important of all, the raising of finance which went to
help support the school*
The recruiting of students was also a part of
the responsibility of the principal. Tlo carry out this
responsibility, the principal on week-ends visited
churches in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden and Taylor counties
addressing church groups, for the purpose of soliciting
funds and students. He also attended all district and











state meetings of the Primitive Baptist Church in be-

half of the school. As a result of these contacts,

many students enrolled in the institution and the

amount of finance for the support of the school in-

creased considerably.

With the growth of the student body and the re-
sultant increase in the number of teachers, the County

School Board assumed more or practically all of the

financial responsibility of operating the school.

This increase in the number of teachers made not
only possible, but highly necessary a more efficient

method of operating the school. Accordingly various

committees were organized and given the responsibility of

administering certain activities of the school.

One of the greatest reasons why Griffin was able

to weather the storm during the dark days of its opera-

tion and come up with a highly successful plant and

faculty, was due to the willingness of the principal and

teachers to sacrifice and envision the new era.









SUMMARY


The idea of Griffin High School originated at
the State Convention of the Primitive Baptist Church
which convened in 1901 at Tallahassee, Florida. The

committee which was appointed by Reverend P. Sanders
made its selection of 21 acres of land in 1907. This

land was located in the Northwest section of Tallahassee,

Florida.
The doors of Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute
opened for the first time in September 1907, and operated

for a period of 1 academic year. From 1907 to 1913 the
school was closed due to the lack of finance. The school

reopened for a short time in 1913. Since 1914, the school

has been in continuous operation.

The first building was erected on the grounds at a
cost of $1200.00 by members of the Board of Trustees, and
the second building was erected at a total cost of

$10,000.00 in 1920. The first building was destroyed by

fire in March of 1926. A new building was erected in its
place during the same year at a cost of $45,000.00.

The name of Griffin Normal and Industrial Institute
was changed three times. The names were: Griffin Normal

and Industrial Institute, Griffin Normal and Industrial
College and later to Griffin High School.











The enrollment of Griffin High School increased
from 57 students in 1914 to 459 in 1955. The number of
teachers increased from 2 in 1914 to 23 in 1955. The
first student was graduated from Griffin High School in
1923.
The Leon County School Board began to give Griffin
High School financial support in 1934. The financial
support for the first year was $965.00, and by 1955 it had
increased to $50,000.00. The Leon County School Board
also appropriated $53,360.00 in 1953 for a new physical
plant. This building should be ready for use by September


1955.


































BIBLIOGRAPHY










BIBLIOGRAPHY


Butts, R. Freeman, A Cultural History of Education.
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1947.
A study designed primarily for use in courses
in the history of education; it is also designed
to provide a background for other types of work
as courses in elementary, secondary or higher
education.
Eby, Frederick and Charles Flinn Arrowood. The History
and Philosophy of Education Ancient and Medieval.
New York: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1940.
A study of the history of education which em-
braces the study of the rise and progress of human
culture as a whole and its transmission from the
older to the younger generation.

Grieder, Calvin and Stephen Romine. American Public
Education. New York: The Ronald Press Company, 1955.
A study designed primarily to meet the needs
and interests of two groups, namely, students in
colleges and universities who are beginning their
preparation to teach, and teachers in service who
have never systematically prepared themselves in
this field, or who did so many years ago.

Moore, Clyde B. and William E. Cole. Sociology in Edg-
cational Practice. New York: Houghton Mifflin
Company, 1952.
This study is designed to describe and analyze
educational policies and procedures and to improve
educational practice by bringing together for the
teacher (in preparation or in practice), the super-
visor, the administrator and the lay reader, signifi-
cant sociological data and principles which are
applicable to educational practice and which are in-
dicative of what educational policies and practices
might be.

Perkins, W. R. Catalogue, Griffin Normal and Industrial
Institute, 1914.
































APPENDIX









Tallahassee, Florida
June 21, 1952






TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

This is to certify that the Primitive Baptist
State Convention of Florida while assembled in regular

annual session in St. Mary's Primitive Baptist Church

#2 in Tallahassee, Florida, duly authorized on March 22,

1952, the trustees whose names are undersigned, to enter
into negotiation with the Leon County School Board for

the sale or transfer of ten acres of land on the east

side of the building located on said grounds.

The site, if acquired, is to be used for the erection

of a junior high school building for Negroes.

Rev. C. P. Allen
President of Convention

Rev. T. R. Griffin
Secretary of Convention

W. R. Perkins

L. R. Vaughn

C. Rice

P. E. Hinson

J. H. Hobbs or P. B. Brantley

L. Daymon

C. W. Herndon or D. A. Belford








Tallahassee, Florida
April 10, 1952




We, the Committee representing the Griffin Normal and
Industrial Institute, owner of certain property briefly

described as being bounded on the east by the Old Bain-

bridge Road and on the south by Wilson Street and on the

north by Lincoln Heights Subdivision and on which land

is now located the Griffin Normal School, we do hereby

propose to sell to the Leon County Board of Public In-
struction 10 acres of said land for use as a public school

building site. The said 10 acre tract to comprise that

part of said property which is bound on the east by the
Old Bainbridge Road on the south by Wilson Street and ex-
tending west from the Old Bainbridge Road to a point on

the north boundary of Wilson Street, which point is approxi-
mately 30 feet east of the present school building located
on said property; thence extending in a northwesterly

direction on a line approximately parallel with the west

boundary of the Old Bainbridge Road to a point on the

north boundary of a tract of land owned by the Griffin Nor-
mal and Industrial Institute thence easterly along the

northern boundary of said property to a point on the west
boundary of said Old Bainbridge Road; containing 10 acres
or less.











The terms of this sale are as follows:
1. Price five thousand dollars ($5,000.00), payable
one-half (J) when warrantry deed conveying said
property is executed and placed in escrow with one
of the banks of Tallahassee, conveying said property
to said School Board and the other one-half (i)
payable within twelve (12) months from said date.
Such deferred payment to bear interest at five per
cent (5% until date paid.
2. When school is constructed on said property the name
Griffin shall be a part of such name.

3. Seller will furnish an abstract of title to said pro-
perty showing a valid fee simple title within thirty

(30) days after the proposal is approved by the Leon
County School Board and said Board shall have fifteen
(15) days thereafter to have such title examined by
its attorney.
4. Such proposal to be either rejected or accepted by the
Leon County School Board within thirty (30) days from
this date and this committee notified in writing thereof.
/s/ Rev. C. P. Allen /s/ Rev. L, Dawson
Is/ W. R. Perkins
/s/ L. R. Vaughn
/s/ J. H. Hobbs









04&


rr~


iw"vu tl, Piltw


hwur gmrop at tmuste ot


oriftta M wmam W AO As* *
''^i:.: *.'iW~ tes.3 ncv^'~. l-;, "-,h:


.At=


















































Figure VII. A side view of


Gurley Hall.


building has housed both the elementary and

sections of Griffin High School for many ye


high school


ars.


7"s~
-J


This


~!M NOM











ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM

Griffin School 1955


I1t Grade
Citizenship
Language Arts
Reading
Spelling
Writing
Social Studies



2nd Grade
Citizenship
Reading
Spelling
language Arts
Writing
Social Studies
Arithmetic
music
Art

3rd Grade
Citizenship
Language Arts
Reading
Spelling
Social Studies
Writing
Health
Science
Arithmetic


4th Grade
Citizenship
Reading
English
Spelling
Writing
Social Studies
Mhsic
Science
Arithmetic

5th Grade
Citizenship
Language Arts
Reading
Spelling
Writing
Social Studies
Arithmetic
Health
Science

6th Grade
Citizenship
Reading
Spelling
English
Social Studies
Science
Arithmetic
Music
Art











SECONDARY CURRICULUM


Griffin High School


TIglish Language Arts
Social Studies
Mathematics
Art
Masic
Physical Education
Homemaking
Science
Typing
Crafts
Industrial Arts
Others
Activities:
Clubs
Student Council
Assembly of Homeroom
Intramural
Bible Reading


Grade 8
English-Language A3
Social Studies
Mathematics
Science
Health or Everyday
Physical Education
Homemaking
Crafts
Industrial Arts
Art
Masic
Typing
Languages
Others
Activities
See Grade 7


1955


Eglsh-Language Arts
Social Studies
Mathematics
1. Algebra
2. Functional Mathematics
3. Fundamentals or Busi-
ness (Boys)
Science or Agriculture
(Girls)
Homemaking
Physical Education
Electives:
Art
Music
Languages
Business Training
Typing
Others
Activities
See Grade 7


Grade IQ
ts English-Language Arts
Social Studies
Biology
Physical Education
Living Electives
Electives or Study Hall
Library Activities


rf









-52-


Grade 11
English-Language Arts
Social Studies
Physical Education
Electives
Electives or Study Hall or Library
Activities
See Grade 7

Grade 12
Enish
Journalism
Speech
Drama
Creative Writing
Business English
Others
Social Studies or Electives
Physical Education or Health or Effective Living
Others
Mathematics or Bookkeeping
Consumer Mathematics
Higher Arithmetic
Functional Mathematics
Modern Family Living
Electives
Electives or Study Hall or Library
Activities
See Grade 7




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