Citation
Golden anniversary, 1906-1956

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Title:
Golden anniversary, 1906-1956
Creator:
United Hebrew Congregation Temple Beth Israel (Havana)
Place of Publication:
Havana, Cuba
Publisher:
The Congregation
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource (48 pages) : illustrations, portraits ; 31 cm

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Subjects / Keywords:
Jews -- Cuba -- Havana ( lcsh )
Synagogues -- Cuba -- Havana ( lcsh )
Jews ( fast )
Synagogues ( fast )
Judíos ( qlsp )
Sinagogas ( bidex )
Cuba -- Havana ( fast )
United Hebrew Congregation, Temple Beth Israel (Havana, Cuba) ( lcnaf )
Temple Beth Israel (Havana, Cuba) ( lcnaf )
United Hebrew Congregation Temple Beth Israel (Havana) ( lcnaf )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

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General Note:
Includes advertisements.
Statement of Responsibility:
United Hebrew Congregation Temple Beth Israel.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
Biblioteca del Patronato de la Casa de la Comunidad Hebrea de Cuba
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
1066697223 ( OCLC )
36545179 ( ALEPH )
Classification:
BM253.H3 U5 1956 ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Cuban Monographs
Cuban Judaica

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Full Text

PAGE 5

Unttr~ larbrrm Qlongrrgatton Wrmplr irtQ 1Jsrarl ~nlhrn \nnturrsaru 1906-1956 l_E]uhlisqeb b~ ,niteb ~ebrefu
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INDEX Foreword .... .. .. ........... .. ...... In Memoriam ....................... Introduction by our President ......... Greetings from our Rabbi ............. Erwin Gotthelf, Cantor ............... A SAGA IN PROFILE The United Hebrew Congregation ...... Social Service and Public Relations .. The Building Fund ................... Rabbi Meir Lasker ....... ..... .... Rabbi Dr. Srul Sapira ............. Henry I. Liebman .................. Morris and Jeanette Schechter ......... Harry E. Price .......... ...... ... ... Rabbi Benjamin B. Lowell ......... .. Albert Hartman ......... .... .... .. Liberal Reform J udaism and the Future of our Congregation ..... Rabbi Abram M. Granison .... ... ..... The Religious School . . . . Our Board of Directors .... .... .. .... The Congregation Looks to the Future ... A Valedictory by Jacob Brandon, Editor and Historian .. .... .. In Memory of our dear Departed ...... On Behalf of our Children and Grandchildren ............. The Spiritual Leaders of Temple Beth Israel .......... Presidents of our Congregation .. ..... .. Golden Anniversary Dinner ............ Presidents of our Sisterhood ........... The Menorah Sisterhood .... .......... Greetings from Subscribers and Publicity .. Page ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, 4 5 6 7 8 9 12 18 20 22 23 24 26 28 29 30 31 32 34 35 37 39 40 41 42 44 46 48 49

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FOREWORil The United Hebrew Congregation came into being just fifty years ago at a meeting of minds. Eleven American J ews out of a total estimated Jewish population of about one hundred in Cuba decided to establish a Congregation and purchase land for a cemetery. Minutes of their meetings which are still extant make no reference whatsoever to the type of worship they wished to inclulcate. Orthodoxy, Conservatism or Liberal Judaism were nowhere mentioned. They evidently foresaw that prevailing world conditions would soon cause many thousands to emigrate from their homelands, and that Cuba, fresh from her long, brave strugg l e for freedom would be asked for asylum for many of these. The prospect therefore was for a heterogeneous religious group, and these eleven men werP willing to l eave to the future the consolidation of majority opinion. Our Congregation has never attained numerical supeno nty a lth o ugh it was the first Jewish institution to be organized in Cuba. An outline of its history follows this Foreword and will throw sorne light upan its usefulness and influence as a stabilizing factor in J ewish lif e. We avail of this opportunity to express to the people of the Republic o f Cuba our appreciation of their kindliness and hospitality in granting all peoples an opportunity for rehabilitation in this fair land without distinction of race and creed. The longer one abides in Cuba the greater becomes hi s amazeme nt at the strides which have been made in so short a time by her people, particularly in the arts and sciences. Their intellectual con tributi o n s are proverbially far above those of any other nation of comparab le size, bidding fair for a prosperous future Their solidarity with the United States, demostrated at various critica! times, has strengthened the ties between the two nations; ties unforgettably rooted in the Cuban War of Independence. During that same stressful period severa l American Jews rendered signal services to the country, sorne becoming members of the United Hebrew Congregation shortly after hostilities were over. Since that time other members of the United Hebrew Congregation have likewise contributed their share to the furtherance of Cuba's cultural and intellectual activities as well as to her industrial progress. In these days of joyful retrospect, the United Hebrew Congregation prays with profound sincerity for the continued happiness an d prosperity of the Cuban people. 4

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IN MEMORIAM It may be a surprise to many of our readers to learn that the origin of the word JUBILEE is recorded in the T o rah (Leviticus XXV-8-17). In those distant days it was looked upon as an exalted Sabbatical Year to be celebrated every fiftieth year ; that is to sa y, in the year following the seventh sabbatical year. The root of the word is Y O B E L meaning a ram 's horn or trurnpet, syrnbolizing a call to the pe op le to join in celebrating the event. From the Jewish point of view, therefore, the call is not only for what the word "jubilation ,, signif ies in rnodern parlan ce, but also for I soiernn and grateiul rernembrance of those who rendered conspicuous service to the Cause motivating the celebration. With this is rnind, the Jubilee Committee requests each mernber of the Congregation when reading these words to pause and reflect for a few brief rnoments upon the debt of gratitude we owe to the founders of our Institution and its numerous outstanding workers of the Past, especially so in the case of those who still sojourn with us in rnemone s of affectionate relationship; narnely: Louis Jurick, Mr. and Mrs Charles Berkowitz, Mrs. Adolph Kates, Mr. and Mrs. Henry I. Liebman Mr. and Mrs Joseph Steinberg, Gustave Hammel, Harry E. Price, Mauricio Schechter, Adolph W,inetraub, Mrs. Gustave Kates and Albert Hartman. May they, with ot h ers of our beloved departed, forever be at peace. 5

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IJ E AR FRIENDS: It has been a great h onor for me as we ll as a deeply appreciated privilege to se rve as y o ur President during the past two y ea r s and now once again in this year of 1956 which marks th e 50th anniversary of th e founding of the U nited Hebr ew C o ngr ega ti o n. During my thirty years of assoc iation with this co n g regati o n I hav e joyfully wit n esse d its progr ess the growth in its member s hip a nd the ex pan s ion of it s activities Thi s deve l opment is a ll the more impressive when we s t o p t o consider that throughout th e h alf ce ntury of its hi s t or y o ur congregation h as had to adjust itself to h o ldin g services and carrying on it s activities eit her in members' homes or in hir ed h a ll s sad ly l ac king th e space a nd facilities necessary for a T emp l e Th e so luti on fina lly adopted by your B oa rd one which for so long has been dear t o the hearts of a ll of u s is, as y o u ali know, to build a permanent house of wors hip of our ow n especially adapted to our needs a temple which we will be able to enjoy in our lifetime and our c hildr en and grandc hildr en in theirs. By way of putting thi s plan into immediate effect, our congregation has purchased during this Jubil ee Y ear of 1956 a parcel o f l and upon which we hope soon to erect o u r ow n building where our families and friends may unite in prayer and where there will be amp l e room for study and for conducting the various even t s which form a vital part of the life of the Congregation What more propitious tim e cou ld th ere be for beginning thi s magnificent work than this very moment when we usher out the o ld half century and welcome in the new What more appropriate tribut e cou ld we pay to the memory of those far,s ight ed men and women wh o founded this congregation What more fitting g ift cou ld we pass on to our loved ones who sorne da y wi ll take ou r places! As we st~nd on the threshold of th e future of the Uni ted H ebrew Congregation, the building of our temple is one of th e major tasks that es before us. I know that with y o ur generous cooperation, God willing, we wi ll accomp li s h it. M ay God bless us in this as in a ll our undertakings. Pr e sid c 11t U nit e d H e br e z C onqregalion 6

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GREETING It is with a sense of profound thanks t o our God and Father that we celebrate the G o lden Anniver sa ry of the founding of th e United Hebrew Congregation. Without His help and sustenance during the many trials ancl tribulations of thi s congregation, we would have nothing to celebrate. This Jubilee Golden B oo k is a richly deserved tribute to the founders, leaders and members of this congregation whose contr~butions to its life and development have earned for them our mdying gratitude. They have bequeathed to us a noble heritage which iL is our duty and privilege to preserve and advance. This we are determined to do with all the power and means at our command. Fortunately for us we have a loyal Membership and a devoted Board of Directors who fully measure up to their responsibilities In Mr. Morris Mayorkas, we have a superb President whom we all love and admire. Our Sisterhood which has done wonders, a lw ays stands ready to give its all for the welfare of the Temple. Our Religious School has achieved a status of prime importance, and continues to grow in s ize and in strengh. The spirit of the congregation is one of con fidence, courage and optimism. That is why I rejoice to be your Rabbi at this historie mile-stone a nd that is why I thank you with all my heart for the support and encouragement that y~m have given me in our sacred enterprise. The Congregation will continue to go forward and upward I feel certain of that. And I venture to prophesy that befare our Jubilee Year is over we will be well on our way toward erecting a new Temple that will inspire us with increased devotion to our faith and people T owar d this holy task let us dedcate ourselves in God's Name! Rabbi 7

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ERWIN GOTTHELF, CANTOR Chance winds are often h arbingers of Good F o rtun e. So it happened with Erwin Gotthelf when he so licited the position as Cantor for. Temple Beth Israel of Havana, Cuba, in September 1941, fifteen years ago this month. He had left Europe in searc h of more co ngenia! employment, going f irst to Colombia and then to Venezuela. Whil e in Caracas he received an invitation to work in Havana for the CMQ Radio Station. He carne to Cuba with this in mind. But this was not for Erwin Gotthelf. In Europe he had frequently substituted as Cantor, and it was now revealed to him that this, and this alone, was the vocation he loved and which brought to him a need of comfort and happiness. Erwin's application was accep t ed by the United H ebre w Congregation inasmuch as he possessed a cu ltur ed an d s ympathetic voice and a sturdy and pleasing personality. From that time to this, no person and no thing h as taken precedence in the mind of Erwin Gotthelf over hi s mission at th e Temple. He voluntarily took over in addition to his work as Cantor and the training o f an amateur choir, the supervision of the Templ e premi ses, supervision of the Congregation's accounts, its co ll ec ti o n s and di s bursements, apart from rendering assistance to the Congregation a nd Sisterhood in prepar ing festivities, religious programmes, community gatherings, etc., etc. Erwin Gotthelf is an important fac tor in o ur Temple activities. His voice is replete with those proverbial nuan ces which express the eternal "heimweh" of the Jewish soul. W e take this opportunity of conveying t o him o ur h ea rtf elt aprecia, t1on, and to wis h him l ong life and good h ea lth with which to continue his devotion to the work he has c h osen for hi s own. To use the Cantor's own words, "The Temple is my wife and my life." 8

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THE UNITED HEBREW CONBREBATION ( A HISTORICAL OUTLINE ) On the fifth day of August in the year nineteen hundred six, an event occured in the City of Havana, which had m o mentous implications for a small group of Jewish settlers in Cuba. These implications apply equally to their successors, among whom, we today are numbered. On that day fifty years ago eleven English-speaking Jews out of an estimated total of about one hundred throughout the Island, met at the rnggestion and at the home of one, Manuel Hadida, with the a vowed purpose of establishing a Congregation, and with the immediate aim of purchasing ground to be used for a Cemetery af ter its solemn dedication according to Jewish rites. To use their own simple verbiage they also agreed to establish a "benevolent section and everything connected with the Jewish faith." As we see it in the light of our own complicated times, this was a very broad commitment, but these eleven stalwarts were dynamic enough to tackle any task they coulcl then foresee. The majority of these men were Americans, of whom severa! had come to Cuba in the wake of her struggle for indepenclence, and had decided to remain visualizing the advent of favorable opportunities to make a goocl living, quite apart from having clevelopecl a profound sentiment of comradeship towards this kindly people who had fought so long and bravely for their freedom. Indeecl, only four short years had elapsed since that racliant goal had been attained, ancl the Country was still s uffering from the aftermath of its costly struggle. Cuba was still func, tioning under the aegis of a Provisional Government, and the time had not yet come to release her comrade in ,a rms at the North from its obligation to superintend her pacif ication and assist her through this trying periocl of transition into absolute autonomy But our eleven Jewish "settlers", as they called themselves, were in no way discouraged by these seeming obstacles Whatever may have been their limitations, the events which followed iustif iecl their faith in themselves and demonstrated that they possessed the vision to realize that if they were ever to earn the respect and consideration of other social and religious groups already well established in the Country, they must first consolidate into a worthy social entity with official recognition as such. They were well aware that an influx of Sepharclic Jews had started two years before, and it was a foregone conclusion that refugees from other sections of Eastern Europe would soon be seeking escape from persecution in the free countries of the Western Hemisphere. 9

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Thus they were moved to consider the whole gamut of Jewish welfare jn Cuba as their immediate concern; namely, to succor the poor and afflicted, provide religious service and community service to those worthy to receive them, and la st but not least, to own a Cemetery where tradi, tional interment would be available for every co-religionist departing this life in Cuba. These eleven men were unquestionably the fathers of the United Hebrew Congregation, as the minutes of their meetings show. Man y o thers joined later, and of these a considerab le number would not aff iliate until a permit for the Cemetery was actually secured and an uff icial charter for the Institution actua lly obtained. But the original eleven were free of skepticism. They were f ired with a different sort of zeal. Possible failure did not enter into their calculations; their foresight was unequivocal. The names of these eleven men were: Manuel Hadida Martn Kohn Jacob H. Heller Isidore Lirriano Manuel K. Jessel Louis Jurick Mauricio Schechter J oseph Steinberg Emile Berkowitz Adoph Dynner Alexander Freedman. At the f ifth meeting of the members of the Congregation held on October 7 1906, Mr. Hadida reported that he had been in New York to confer with Rabbi Dr. Harry Pereira Mendes, Rabbi of the Spanish, Portuguese Synanogue (Shearith Israel). That Dr. Mendes had recom, mended him t o a Mr. Saloman who apparently had influence with the State Department in Washington and succeded in having an order sent to Mr. Margan, United States Minister in Cuba, instructing him to ass ist the C o ngregation in obtaining the necessary permit to acquire land for use as a Cemetery from the Provisional Goverment of Cuba. In this connection it is interesting to note that in 1919, thirteen years after, when learning of the death of Theodore Roosevelt, the Board of Directors of the United Hebrew Congregation instructed its Secretary to send a letter of condolence to Mrs. Roosevelt expressing gratitude for the intervention of Mr. Roosevelt, then President of the United States in connection with the acquisition of the Cemetery. From this it would appear that the State Department in Washington had taken its cue in 1906 from the President himself. At the eighth meeting of the Congregation, Mr. Hadida announced that the Permit for the Cemetery had been granted. He forthwith solicited subscriptions so that the land for which they had been in treaty might be immediately paid for. Hadida did not ask in vain. At this 10

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very meeting a Constitution was submitted for approval by Mr. Hadida and accepted. At the 10th meeting of the Congregation, which had hitherto func tioned with a temporary Board of Directors, the following officers were elected: Jacob Barker, President Louis Jurick, Treasurer Manuel Hadida, Vice, President Martin Kohn, Secretary Five trustees were also appointed, among them, Joseph Steinberg. By this time the membership had reached about 40 in number. Among them were Charles Berkowitz, John Zoller, Robert Diamond, H. H. Diamond, A. Saloman, S. Friedlein, Sidney Rothschild, Morris Heyman, J. Couriel, G. A. Flesh, A. Schwarz, M Soriano, etc. This we believe, completes the first stage in the history of the United Hebrew Congregation. Mr. Joseph Steinberg Chart e r M e 111b e r o f th e U nit e d H eb r ew Congr e ga/i o n and Ca:ptain in th e Cuban A nn:Y of L i b e ration. 11

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SOCIAL SERVICE ANO PUBLIC RELATIONS Specialization is the orcler of the New Day. Ever increasing demands upon human energy, ingenuity and "Know,how" call for simplification and specializecl organization for optimum results. Less than two decades ago, however, our Congregation had not yet learnecl the aclvantages of specialization. Our members labored indefa, tigably to carry the heavy load to which the original Founders committed themselves fifty years ago, namely "to establish a benevolent section and everything connectecl with the Jewish faith." What could be more natural under the circumstances than that a consolidation should have been effected with the Centro Macabeo dedicated to the care of one wave after another of immigrants? Needless to say, the consolidation was for a highly worthy purpose, but it was quite alen to the normal functions of a Congregation, absorbing practically ali its available time and income, so that ultimately it was forced to relinquish these excessive responsibilities. In the interim h owever, the work and sacrifice entailed were nobly ancl efficiently borne, as the records s how. Much of the success was due to the organization of the Ezra Society, by Mrs. Jeannette Schechter and whose first President was Mrs. Joseph Steinberg From 1923 to 19 31 the Ezra carried on in combination with a committee appointed by the Hias of New York, which provided sorne profe ssio nal workers and considerable monetary assistance. But during 1931 the entire work was turned over to the Frauen Verein, a group affiliated with the Centro Israelita, the most influential factor in the local Eastern European community. Later in 1927 Mrs. Schechter organize d the Menorah Sisterhood with Mrs. Adolph Winetraub as first President. The organization was wholly compatible with the needs and aspirations of the United Hebrew Congregation, and its prof iciency and influence has been so far-reaching and so telling all through the years that it would require an entire vo lum e to do it justice. It had been our intention to comment specifically upan the accomplishments of the Sisterhood and mentan sorne of the outstanding l eaders in its midst, but the debt we owe is to so many and is so wide,spread among devoted workers that it would be utterly unfair to mention one without mentioning all. Suffice it to say at this point that the Menorah Sisterhood is the "right arm" of the Congregation, immeasurably streng thening community spirit, and enhancing the Congregation's income as the vanguard of its social as well as cultural activities. We recall with justifiable pride that at the start of Hitler's oppression of the Jews in Germany, members of the United Hebrew Congregation were selected by the American Joint Di str ibution Committee and its 12

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associated organizations to farm a committee, later known as the Joint Relief Committee, which received the German Je\vs sent by the New York organizations to obtain Permanent Visas at the American Consulate in Havana. Befare long wide spread persecution of Jews multiplied the cluties of this local Committee. Ship-loads of refugees arrived in Havana hailing from every section of Central Europe. During the period of about two years, until the American Joint Distribution Com mittee sent clown professional workers to take charge in Cuba, the local committee processed about 5,000 refugees, not one being allowed to become a public charge, thereby making it possible to obtain an uninte rrupted series of new immigration permits from the Cuban Authorities. The Joint Relief Committee was managed by Albert Hartman, Gustave Kates and Jacob Brandon with the splendid assistance of Osear Gurfinkel. Se veral ladies of the English speaking community, most of them members of the Sisterhood, assisted Mr. Brandon in conducting the extensive off ice work involved, and the Committee rented quarters in the Manzana de Gomez Building where ladies of the Sisterhood provided aid and comfart far the women and children arriving from Europe. Their ministrations to the sick and needy were continuous and their attentions were extended under particularly diff icult circumstances to those who for one reason or another were detained in quarantine. The Com mittee's relations with the American Consulate with respect to the interchange of infarmation regarding the status of the refugees was of a highly gratif ying nature, making it possible at times to expedite the issuance of visas far the United States. The same may be said of the Committee's relations with the Cuban Immigration Authorities. The C o ngregation has been a generous host throughout its history. Of late years ts premises have been utilized by Bnai B'rith, the Hillel I-1oundation and the Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A f ew years ago the Congregation placed its premises at the disposal o f Holy Trinity Cathedral under the auspices of their esteemed friend, Bishop Blankingship, until the new church was completed in the Vedado. Our Rabbis exchange pulpits on many occasions with spiritual leaders of Protestant sects. From time to time the American Ambassador has also addressed our Congregation from its pulpit. Several of our members have received recognition from the Cuban Government far services rendered to the Republic. First and foremost among these was Joseph Steinberg who, with his brothers Max and Edward, were personal friends of Cuba's Apostol, Jos Mart. At the latter's suggestion, Joseph Steinberg organized a Patriots Club of Cuba far the purpose or raising funds to aid the Revolution. Toms Estrada Palma, then delegate plenipotentiary 13

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of the Cuban Revolution (later Cuba's first president) appointed Joseph Steinberg a Captain of the Army of Liberation, authorizing him to so licit and collect revenue in Cuba and abroad, an assignment which was faithfully performed Our departed brother, Joseph Steinberg, won the affec tion and respect of all those who were fortunate enough to know him and his beautiful wif e was one of the most active workers in th e Ezra Society and th e Menorah Sisterhood. Joseph Steinberg was buried with military honors, a platoon of soldiers accom panying his mortal remains, placed on a caisson, to the Jewish Cemetery, where taps were sounded and a volley fired as the coffin was lowered into the grave. May this beloved couple rest forever in peace. Mr Ad o lph H. Kates, a past president of the Congregation has received from th e Cuban G ove rnment the Cross of the Order of Carlos }vfanuel de Cspedes in recognition of services rendered to Cuban interests in the country and abroad. He has likewise been knighced Grand Officer of the Order of C o mmercial Merit. He is a member of the American Chamber of C ommerce of Cuba, and also a director of the Cuban Chamber of Commerce and a member of its Executive Council. He is a member of the B oard of Director s of the Cuban Good Neighbor Foundation. Mr. Kates recently celebrated his seventieth birthday anniversary, and on that occasion announced a great number uf generous donations t o charitable, cultural and educational institutions in Cuba as well as abroad. Hi s benefactions ha ve indeed been many and wisely distributed. J acob Brandon was knighted with the Order of Merit Carlos Manuel de Cspedes on Febru ary 24th 1940 by Pre s ident Federico Laredo Bru, the decoration taking place at th e Cuban Embassy in Washington, D. C. Mr. Brand on had been a member of a Cuban Committee which attended the Eighth Scientif ic C o ngress in Washington for the purpose of studying ways and means to in sta ll a more reliable system of control for Vital Statistics in Cub a. Mr. Brandon was secretary and interpreter ad interim for the group of University men who were appointed on this important mission. At the time it was decided to include Mr. Brand on among tho se receiving the decoration, Dr. Miguel Angel Campa, then Chancellor of the Order, informed Professor Jorge Roa, one of the recipients of che same award, that the President also had in mind Mr. Brandon' s serv ice s t o the Cuban community as executive director of the J oint Relief Committee, he having so conducted its operations that th e question of Cuba accepting so large a number of refugees of the Jewi s h faith within so short a time ( once a controversia! subiect with Lab or and State department s ) never became a serious problem. 14

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Had it been otherwise, said he, the noble aims of the Joint Relief Com mitte could never have been realized as they were to the honor of Cuba. On December 3rd of the following year ( 1941) Mr. Brandon received the award of the Order of Merit, Carlos J Finlay, from the hands of President Fulgencio Batista in the City of Havana The decoration was in recognition of his personal efforts to establish in the United States an understanding that Dr. Carlos J. Finlay was the sole discoverer of the fact that one particular species of mosquito is the host and only transmitter of yellow f ever. Several of our members are pioneers in Cuba with respect to their respective fields of endeavor. We mention a few as follows: Adolph Winetraub was sent clown to Cuba in 1907 by the General Electric Company. He graduated from Columbia University as Electrical Engineer in 1905 immediately securing a position with the G.E. in Schenectady. In Cuba he rebuilt the f irst electric light and power plant m Santa Clara and electrif ied the City itself. He then returned to the United States until 1912 when he carne back to Cuba to join Gustavo Lobo. He also worked with the Kelvin Engineering Company, electri fying several sugar mills. He became consulting engineer for the General Sugar Company and the Polar Brewery, and electrified the Prado and the Plaza de la Fraternidad. Mr. Winetraub was an active member of the United Hebrew Congregation until he left Cuba permanently t o establish a business in the United States. Mr. Winetraub passed away sorne years ago at his home in West Palm Beach, where Mrs. Winetraub still resides She was at one time a most active participant in the work of the Sisterhood which was inaugurated during her presidency. Gustave Kates was twice president of the Congregation during a difficult period in its history. \\ l ithal, his friendly optimism, his energetic approach to knotty problemns and his excellent generalship brought encouragement to those who worked with him, and to the membership as a whole. The outstanding accomplishment during his last term of office consisted of the emergence of the Cemetery from the category of an fconomic liability to that of a self-supporting unit This was accom, plished, as elsewhere touched upon in this Outline, through Mr. Kates' intensive collaboration with Mr. Liebman and J acob Brandon, who with Mr. Isidore Stettner, comprised the Cemetery Committee at that time. From then onwards it became possible for the United Hebrew Con gregation to utilize income from normal sources for other constructive plans, among them the amelioration of the Building Fund, which it had been compelled to postpone so often in the Past. 15

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Gustave Kates as ca-chairman of the Joint Relief Committee (affiliated with the J o int Distributi on Committee of New York) also performed a great service to the community at large by fostering goodwill among government a uth orities on behalf of the Jewish refugees who were at the time arriving at the port of H ava n a in eve r increasing numbers. After hi s term of office at Templ e Beth I s r ae l had expired, Gustave Kates accepte d th e presidency of the C e ntro I s raelita de Cuba with a fore, knowledge of the great responsibility t o be incurred by defending the large Eastern European Colony through th e most venamous period of anti-semitic activities Cuba h as ever kn own; a period when repeated attempts were made to sabotage J ew i s h int e r es ts by Nazi and Fascistic elemen t s which had established themselves in th e country, and when a limited section of the l oca l Press had succumbed to th e wiles of those who sought to defame the Jews within these borders. In this connection Adolph Kates was lik ewise highly influential in curbing the vicious practice of two or three of th e l oca l newspapers which had adopted the policy of publishing at freguent intervals scurrilous anti-semitic articles. Slowly but su rely the intelligent handling of the situation by Adolph on the one h and and Gustave o n the other hand caused the publishers to realize the unwisdom of their policy and brought about its discontinuance. Th e g r atitude of the entire com, munity went forth to the brothers Kate s for their co urageous and untiring efforts in this important direction. Charles Shapiro, a past president of the Congregation, a nd his good wife, Wilma, have always been earnest workers and generous contributors to the Congregation and the Menorah Sisterhood respectively, Mrs Shapiro having been twice president of the Sisterhood. H er a bilities as a hostess are noteworthy As a matter of fact, everyone knows that whatever Wilma puts her hand to, she does wel l. Expressions of gratitude are likewise due to Ro se ll a Shapiro wh o together with her husband, Barney, gives of h er best to the Temple and Sisterhood year after year. Barney is anot h er pa s t president of the Congregation, while Rosella has served two terms as president of the Sisterhood. The Shapiros are a united fami ly group who possess in Mother (Grandma) S l oane a treasure of inestimable value; a true matriach who in her ninety,fourth year preserves a zest for living and a benign nature which is an irresistible magnet, drawing t owa rd her the attentions and the admiration of our entire commun ity. David Henry Br andon, another past president of the Congregation, has also contributed substantially to the we ll ,being of th e Congregation He and his wife, Louise, displayed great kindliness and s ympathy when 16

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they insisted that Rabbi Lowell should move into their home at the most critical period of his hopeless illness so that he might have the full benefit of their care and ministrations as long as might he possible Another past President, Philip Rosenberg, is a man of unusual perspicacity and judgement, demonstrated repeatedly on behalf of the Congregation. Durin~ his term of office as President, he succeeded in salvaging the Congregation from its chaotic economic position and in moving the temple from its crowded quarters on D street to its present premises on G. street. As a result of his inspired leadership and foresight, which includes inaugurating and making the first contribution to the Temple Build;ng Fund in February 1944, the Congregation took its first steps towards the economic self sufficiency which it enjoys toda y Mrs. Rosenberg was most active in the Ezra Society during the hectic period in which it functioned, and is presently an active member of the Sisterhood The Rosenbergs have inleed been a pillar of strength for the Temple and to the Community at large ever since they settled in Cuba many years ago. There are at this time twenty seven members of the Menorah, Sisterhood who are members of the Woman's Club of Havana, and a still greater number are members of the Mother's Club, several of them having served on the Board of Directors of this Club. Mrs. Ethel Hammel is a Founder Member of the Anglo, American Community House Council, and served two years as Chairman. She is also a past president of the Menorah Sisterhood. Mrs. Robert Kaplan is now a member of the Board of the Anglo,American Hospital, and has also served as Chairman of the Community House Council. Three members of the United Hebrew Congregation are active workers in the Little Theatre of Havana; namely James Knopke, Arthur Hammel and Earl Brandon Mr. Knopke was Treasurer for six years and served as Chairman for two years. Mr. Hammel is Treasurer at this time. Mr. Brandon gives unsparmgly of his talents, as do the others, on behalf of this interesting organization which in the 12 years of tts existence has contributed sorne $30,000 to worthy causes. Our membership includes many others who actively participate in civic and communal affairs and are a continued source of pride to our Congregation. Many of the ladies of the Sisterhood are included in this group. 17

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THE BUILDING FUND lt is as unrealistic to expect any institution to develop full eff iciency in cramped, inadequate quarters as it would be to expect a tree to come to full fruitage when its roots are confined within an earthen pot. 1t has been said with much truth that things either grow or tend to wither away. ::iomething of th1s sort was very likely in the minds of sorne of the Directors ot the Un:.ted Hebrew Congregation about 3 3 years ago when they met at the home ot their then president Mr. Morris Schecnter, on beptember 23, 1923. Mr. Barker and the Secretary, Mr. Actolph w : inetraub, started a discussion as to what should be done with regard to pledges which had been offered by several members toward a building fond for the temple. The upshot of the discussion was that the pledges were not accepted No record appears of what the pledges amounted to or by whom they were tendered. The importance of this lies in the fact that although seventeen years had passed since the Congregation was established, services and meetings were still being held at the homes of various members or in rented halls. lt cannot be denied that the Cemetery was sti ll a heavy burden upon the Congregation, not yet producing enough to cover its carrying charges or permit much,needed improvements. This was due to the fact that interments were almost wholly from groups of recently arrived immigrants not yet well accomodated to altered living conditions, and jn most cases unable to pay for graves. The fact is that the Con, gregation wa s suffering from a state of apathy and inertia innocently fostered in great part by a group of ultra,conservative members whose influence weighed heavily with the majority. Confidence in the future of the Congregation seemed to have faded. A minority group which held fast to its opinion that land ownership bespeaking faith in the future, would serve to re awaken the dormant spirit of the original founders, were quite unable to overcome the odds against them. For nearly 20 years this minority, prodded each incoming Board of Directors to take action in the matter of a so,called Building Fund. On one occasion an authentic plan for a Temple was prepared by a note, worthy architect At the same time two proposals were submitted for e xcellent lots in the Vedado at prices which today seem illusory. Very little interest was shown in these proposals. How ever, pressure never ceased from the minority group. Finally a Building Fund was started in February 1944 by Mr. Philip Rosenberg to which contributions were added by sorne who had previously been cold to the idea. By 1950 the Fund had grown to a substantial sum, and when Mr. Harry Price became 18

PAGE 23

President he worked dilligently to bring to f ruition the hopes of many for a Temple of our own, but the time was not yet ripe for this consum mation. Majority opinion still prevailed that it would be better to make extensive alterations in the premises at Avenida de los Presidentes rather than pay the prices being asked for land and construction Finally, at a meeting held on May 27th 1952 during th e presidential term of Mr. David H. Brandon, this alternative was decided upon. The premises at Avenida de los Presidentes were renovated and air conditioning included, the total cost of which amounted to $27,500.00. In spite of of these improvements the situation remained more or less unchanged in so far that there was no space for a Community House through which growing generations could beco me identif ied and familiar with the activities of the Temple and Congregation, no place for an aclequate library; insuff icient space and facilities for classrooms and last, but not least, the House of Worship would still continue to be utilized for acti vities of a wordly character incompatible with a place consecrated to prayer and meditation. Briefly stated, the inadequacy of the present quarters carne home to each and every member with unprecedented clarity, quickening the latent desire for a Temple and Community House huilt to fulfill the needs of the present and forseeable future as well. On February 28th of the current year 1956, Mr. Morris Mayorkas, our esteemed and exemplary President, who is now brilliantly completing his third consecutive term in off ice, secured a unanimous vote from the Board of Directors to appoint Committee consisting of Mr. Philip Rosenberg, Mr. Charles Shapiro and himself to investigate certain opportunities to purchase land in the Reparto Miramar, with authority to effect a purchase for account of the Congreagtion. This Com mittee decided upon an ideal location at the south went comer Quinta Avenida, Miramar, with an area of 4,076 varas. The property cost $91,000.00 and the terms of sale were a clown payment of $50,000 with a satisfactory mortgage for the balance. The fact that this forward step in the history of the Congregation has taken place in its Jubilee Year is highly auspicious. It is gratifying to note that the enthusiasm which attends the current drive for funds with which to start construction surpasses in intensity any activity previously undertaken by the Congregation. W.e may add at this point that the activities of the Congregation from 1951 to the present time during the presidential incumbencies of our departed brother, Harry Price and his successors, David H. Brandon and Morris Mayorkas, have been unequalled in any period of its career. Improved economic condi, tions have undoubtedly contributed to the progressive spirit of three consecutive Boards of Directors whose sterling abilities added to the devotion and cooperation of the Menorah Sisterhood, have made possible the realization of a long cherished dream. 19

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RABBI MEIR LASKER The year 1933 was a crucial one in the history of Cuba. It was the year of the revolution which unseated President Gerardo Machado of evil fame, and destroyed his bloodthirsty contingents. Rabbi Meir Lasker took on his assignment in Cuba at this very time and we know of no better means to present his enviable record to our readers than to quote his own words in a letter recently written by him to one of the members of our Jubilee Comittee. He says: ...... Now, let us turn back the pages of time and recall the events that were outstanding. It was in the summer of 193 3 that I first arrived in Havana. It was when Dave Lewis (manager of Metro,Goldwyn,Mayer) was president of the Congregation, and the country was in a deep depression following Machado's overturn. Batista had taken command of the army, but outbreaks were still a common occurrence. One of the lasting memories which has not dimmed with time was that year's Kol Nidre Service. A curfew had been established so that no one was permitted to appear on the streets after dark without an off icial permit. Through the courtesy of the Police we secured permission to hold services. Just after Cantor Ehrlichmann had finished chanting the Kol Nidre, there was a shot fired just outside the Temple, and a cry of pain followed. I remem, ber how startled we all were. I recall stepping to the pulpit, requesting everyone to remain in his seat while two of the ushers went out to see what had happened. A Cuban who had gone out to visit his wife at the maternity hospital, had failed to stop at the command of a soldier and was killed. The tension and realization that life was insecure, and an awareness of the danger hovering about made that Service one of the most sorrow, ful and meaningful I had ever conducted. Shortly afterward carne the boycott against German goods because of the cruelty of the Nazis against our people. Perhaps you will reoll the visit of Samuel Untermeyer to Havana and the sentiment expressed by him and others, that sorne eff ort shou ld be made to unite Cuban Jewry. Mr. Jurick was president of the Centro I srae lita at the time, and I became vice,president of the Juridische Comite of which you or lvfr. Hartman was chairman. I recall the many meetings and the time, the energy and the hopes expended to build a unif ied voice for Cuban Jewry, and to no avail. I also remember the attacks in the Press against the Jew s, and our visit to Batista urging him to put an end to these vitriolic attacks. J believe Gustave Kates went with me, for I have a picture taken during 20

PAGE 25

our v1s1t. I also see in my files the many articles I published in the Cuban Press to offset the horrible allegations against our people. Then carne the part of the refugees. This, of course, you can recall better than I for no man gave so much of his time and service as you did in organizing the help we needed through the Joint Distribution Committee. Moreover, my own efforts were concentrated in arousing our Sister hood to the need of bringing food and drink to those who were being held in the camp, to establish the school for refugee children at our Temple, from Kindergarten to the first year high school, to "schnorr" for funds for the maintainance of that school and to create in variou s parts of the city schools for adults in which sorne 900 were in attendance. Through intensive correspondence I succeeded in bringing clown the Friends Society of Philadelphia of which I became vice president. We rented a house in the country and took the young men and women off the streets and taught them farming, carpentry and other occupations while they waited for their visas to come through. Even now I frequently receive cards from sorne of those who, through my assistance, received visas for this country. I recall the S ./ S. St. Louis wich remained in port for several days, and the agonizing moments when we strove to get sorne of those Jewish passengers off to safety, and failed. But I believe it was at your suggestion that I called Panama where members of your family resided, and through their influence sorne 40 were brought to saf ety while the others were shipped back. As for the work in the Congregation itself, I organized a Religious School for the children, introduced the study of Hebrew, Bar,mitzvahed a number of boys and added a ceremony for Shebouth which I believe the Congregation is still using." From the above it will be readily seen that Rabbi Lasker is a man of un usual patience and determination. W ere this not so, he would never have consented to carry on for more than seven years under such difficult and trying conditions. Fortunately for the Congregation both his wif e and himself endeared themselves to all con cerned be cause of their loyalty, hard work, and understanding of the serious problems that were being faced. We can t: ay with assurance that these tender &entiments remain mutually unchanged with the passing years, and that ali of us who know them rejoice in the knowledge of their well being and success in the City of Brotherly Lave. 21

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RABBI DR. SRUL SAPIRA A short time after Rabbi Meir Lasker had resigned, the Grand Rabbi of Belgium together with his gentle and charming wif e, Sabina, arrived in Ha vana. They had fled from: Antwerp during the Nazi terror, finding their way, often by foot with others on the same sad errand, into France, from which they were forced immediately t o esca pe the identical fate that had pursued them in Belgium. Finally they arrived in Cuba where they received a cordia l reception from the United Hebrew Congregation and where our pulpit was eventua lly offered to the Rabbi. The Rabbi is an eminent person m his own country, having been sclected by the Belgian Government as the off icial representative of the Jewish people there. He is a man of great learning and experience, and it was quite a privilege to ha ve him with us until peace was resto red in Europe. His English was never fluent, but he has an ample vocabulary and his ability to deliver a convincing and uplifting sermon made a deep impression upon his hearers. Apart from our regular Friday evening services in English he conducted a conservative service on Saturday mornings either in French or in German, and the numerous refugees from Europe who were in Havana at that particular time derived much comfort and knowledge from same. Sorne of our members correspond quite frequently with Rabbi Sapira until now, and he reports that his Congregation in Antwerp is growing steadi ly in numbers and well,being, and that he is happily esconced once more as Grand Rabbi, on appointment by the Government. 22

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HENRY l LIEBMAN ANO THE CONGREGATION People are admired and respected for the way in which they think and for what they accomplish, but they are loved only for what they are. Henry Liebman was loved for his unaff ected probity and retinement and for his mild and tolerant disposition. Withal, his sense of justice did not allow him to bow to majority pressure, as was demonstrated time and again when he defended those he believed to be right against invincible odds. It was because of these admirable qualities that his cooperation was sought for ali praiseworthy social activities. He made an excellent president for the Congregation even in the stressful time when he was called to serve. For a great many years he and his good wife gave of their best to the Temple, the t:zra ::ioc1ety and the ::i1sterhood. But Henry s most cherished work was for the Cemetery, which together with Isidore Stettner he managed extraordinarily well considering that the Congre gation was for a long time unable to budget anythmg like what he considered its mnimum requirements. Atter considerable negotiation with the Chevra Kadisha during the presidency of Gustave Kates, after Jacob Brandon had joined the Cemetery Committee, arrangements were concluded which soon made the Cemetery self supporting and brought permanent financia! relief to the Congregation This having been accomplished, Mr. Liebman's next aim was to provide water for the Cemetery. At various times this had been attempted without success, and the Cemetery was an arid place. At last he met a country "engineer" who lived in the neigborhood and claimed he knew a spot not far away that could supply the Cemetery with all the water it needed. He offered to point it out to Mr. Liebman if the Congregation would agree to supply the precious liquid gratis to the adjacent homes. This was agreed to, and the engineer not only located the water but assisted Mr. Liebman to acquire the small piece of land for the Congregation. Unfortunately Mr. Liebman became very ill at this time, and did not survive to see the water actually piped into the Cemetery, but the credit was all his own. Today the Cemetery is a different place from what it used to be, and the water has enabled us to provide flowering shade trees and green graves. Apart from this Mr. Stettner has made vast improvements in the Cemetery, and should share with Mr. Liebman the gratitude of the Congregation for his exemplary services throughout an untold number of years. The graves of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Liebman are a fitting expression of the dignity and simplicity of their lives, and periodically serve as a Mecca for family and friends who wish to revive tender memories of their lovingkindness and devotion. May they forever rest in peace. 23

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MORRIS ANO JEANNEITE SCHECHTER This high-minded and devoted couple m a rried in New York City m 1913, ten years after Morris Schechter had entered into business in Cuba. He was born in Rumania, but had become an American citizen. Jeannette was born in Palestine, but had been living in New York for about eight years befare their marriage. H e was o n e of the estimated one hundred American Jews residing in Cuba at the time of his arrival. He was also one of the original eleven founders of the United Hebrew Congregation, listed as such in the minutes of the f irst meeting held on August 5, 1906. Both M orris and Jeannette Schechter ever held th e mselves in readiness for plilanthropic work, no matter how onerous it might be, and their home was a favorite rendez-vous for persons of culture and talent, many of them being visitors from the United States and Europe. Their hospitality was of the warmest and it was a grea t privilege to be counted among the guests at their famous Seder dinners. In these matters their sister, T ema, deserves a goodly share of the cred it. Mr s. Schechter is a past president of the Men o rah Sisterhood. Morris Schechter took office as president of the United Hebrew Congregation on July 1, 1923, and th e minutes of that Meeting, recorded by his secretary, Adolph Winetraub, a r e quite amazing. On that occasion 52 new members were adm itt ed int o the Congregation, a 1ecord never equaled befare or since. Thi s was s h ortly after the merger with the Centro Macabe o, and pref e, rential attention was being given to work on behalf of immigrants even though the Cemetery was in desperate need of improv e ment s and en largement to meet an increasing number of demises. When chided on this account, Morri s Schechter exclaimed, "Let us work not only for the dead, but also for the living." It was at thi s time that, at Joe Steinberg's suggestion, funds were raised to provide night school for immigrants so that they might learn both Engli sh and Spanish. Morris Schechter and Adolph Kates made common cause in efforts to secure pecuniary assistance and loans without co ll atera l for refugees, enabling many t o become se lf supporting. Th ey soug ht help from Israel Unter berg, Cyru s Adler, Robert Samuel Cohen and Judge Otto Rosalsky, and were not disappointed. 24

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About this time Morris presented the Congregation with its first, small Safer Torah, on behalf of his uncle, Solomon Schechter. During his presidency the services of Rabbi B.L. Hurwitz were obtained for the High Holy Days at a cost of $1,100.00, most of which was collected by means of a series of banquets at $ 3. 50 per person, a high price in those days. During the Hitler reg1me when large numbers of talented rrms1cians and artists found refuge in Havana, the Schechters gave many of these notables the opportunity to meet with local music-lovers at their home. Refreshments were served, and these occasions became a real "treat" for all concerned. Among the guests were Fritz Stiedrich, Carl Bemberger, Berta Glatz, Artur Rubinstein, Jacob Gimpel, Ivo Neurnan ( artist), etc. On sorne of these occasions the Schechter s availed of the opportunity to ailow promising local talent to rneet these rnasters. Sorne of Cuba's young hopefuls have since become farnous in their professions, but seern to have quite forgetten that they received their start with the assistance of the Menorah Sisterhood in Havana, a nd professor Jascha Fischerrnann. Morris Schechter passed away in the year 1952, one of the "Unfor, gettables" in our cornrnunity history. May he ever rest in peace well earned during his earthly sojourn, and may Jeannette find solace in these cornrnentaries and be spared for rnany more years of happiness with rhose who abide with her. 25

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HARRY E. PRICE On th e occas i o n when Harry Price f irst agreed to run for President of the Congregation ther e were few candidates available for the post. Great as was the honor, everyo ne was aware that any president would be facing a two,horned dilemma which might prove to be a heart, b r eaker at the very least In the f irst place, for a great man y years the controlling influence had been a welhntentioned and highly conservative group. On the other hand, rabbinical l eaders hip h ad partially collapsed owing to th e fact chat for a lm ost three years two rabbis s ucce ss iv e ly had served both the Congregation and the Hill el F oundatio n, d emo nstrating once again that no one individual is likely to meet with success who serves two masters simultaneously. Harry Price was not disquieted by the se formidable handicaps, and his remarkable ability to surmount them was n o t long in making itself f e lt Hi s procedure was unostentatious. He carefully analyzed disparate points of view without taking sides in a ny irrevocable way, and by gentle persuasion sought the middle road He p ossess ed a charming welhrained speaking voice and a warmth of manner which never failed to predispose his audience in his favor. D isco rdant factions often found themselves agreeing with respect to matters which a short while before had been a bone of contention between th em. Indeed, Harry Price endeared himself more and more to the members of the Congregation by his mi l d approach to every prob l em and his persistence in finding t:olutions by compromise. Af ter Rabbi Weissberg had resigned H arr y focussed his attention upan corraling ali possible sources of revenue with a view to augment the Building Fund as rapid ly as possible, while at the same time rein, forcing the General Temple Fund. It was Harry Price who selected R abbi L owe ll to occupy our pulpit, He did so because he recognized in the Rabbi a flexible attitude of mind which would harmonize wi th hi s own aims to heal dissension by compromise. He envisioned that by re,estab lishing tolerance and good wi ll among the members he would ob t a in whole-hearted co,operation which was sure to produce in turn a period of sig nal progress. In this he was abso lut ely right. In the light ot his strenous efforts to amass fund s for the Building Fund, and the extraordinary success which attended those efforts we cannot but marvel at his apparent unresisting acceptance of the make, shift plan to rehabilitate our present premises. Wie cannot but believe that h e suff ered in so doing, but would not alow anything to mar the 26

PAGE 31

easy low of goodwill within the body of our lnstitution. Perhaps he saw the wisdom of once more going the way of least resistance, in the moral certitude that the Congregation would soon come to realize unanimousiy that any deviation irom the original building plan was futile there being literally no space in our present quarters to meet the ciemands of the Religious School or develop activities which would promote pride in ownership in the hearts of oncoming generations. At a General Meeting held in May of 1952, Harry Price was made our first lif e time Honorary President, an h o nor which no man could better deserve than he. It was during his term of off ice that the Congregation received it s charter as member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Sadly enough both Mr. Price and Rabbi Lowell were gone from our midst before building plans carne to f ruition, but neither of the two will be absent from our thoughts when we arrive at the culmination o f our hopes. Both these men captured our undying affection because they possessed that indefinable quality of character which "makes the whole world kin." May they rest forever in peace in the heavenly Haven of Peace. 27

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RABBI BENJAMIN B. LOWELL Rabbi Lowell's coming in September 1951 was timely. The Con, gregation seemed to be l aboring under a spell of disillusionment. Religious services had dwindled greatly, and there was an atmosphere of dissatisfaction without a specif ic explanation of what was wrong. The personality of the new Rabbi put a speedy end to this anomalous situation. His good-cheer and alertness, his sense of humor and cu;:n radeship, his unusual charm and erudition, all contributed to build up unanimity under his friendly tutelage. Benjamn Lowell gave much of himself and asked little in return. No one ever heard him ask for support in hi s plans for the simp le reason that there was never any cause for him to do so. His excellent rhetorical ability and his perf ectly co-ordinated technique rarely made it necessary for him to utilize notes when delivering sermons and addresses. As an educator we rnay say that he was "to the manner born." He rarely gave attention to individual preference with regard to ritual. Whatever the religious committee seemed to call for, be it Conservative or Reform, he was quite willing to concede. His main purpose was to re-establish goodwill and unity in the body of the Congregation, using a friendly and intellectual approach to most problems. He never allowed him self to remain mentally aloof from his people; he must hav e needed them as much as they needed him. Plans for the enhancement of his work f illed his thoughts even after he must have realized that he was not destined to carry them to fruition. It was a heavy burden for him to bear. He expressed his desire to end his days among his devoted friends in Cuba, but this was not to be. lt is gratifying to remember that he remained a beloved guest in the home of Mr. and Mrs. David H. Brandon until it was deemed 1mper ative that he be hospitalized near his family in California. Although it was understood that Rabbi Lowell was a man of sorrows he never displayed bitterness or resentmem at his tragic fate. Trying cxperience must have served as a crucible in which only the gold remained to attest the sweetness and dignity of his character. He also possessed the gift of reconciling conflicting opinions by an irresistibly jovial attitude of tolerance. May his memory long remain green in this fair land where he faithfully fulfilled his last assignment, and may his soul rest in eternal peace. 28

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ALBERT HARTMAN Albert Hartman, past president of the Congregation, stood : high among those who sought to uphold the dignity of the Congregation, without as well as within the immdiate zone of its influence. He could always be depended upon to foment cordial relationships a.mong divergent groups, non-Jewish as well as Jewish, and in so doing took an active part through the great number of years of his residence in Cuba in such enterprises as would reach beyond points of difference in human credos and make for greater understanding and mutual respect He was a prominent member of Island Lodge No. 56 F and A. M. and a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Foundation. He was ca-chairman with Gustave Kates of the Joint Relief Committee, of which Jacob Brandon was executive secretary and treasurer, during the most critica! period of the Nazi effort to domnate in every part of the world and pursue its policy of genocide with respect to individuals professing the Jewish faith. The passing of Albert Hartman was a genuine loss to the foreign community in Havana, and a heavy blow to the United Hebrew Con, gregation, of which he had been a respected member for over thirty years. 29

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LIBERAL REFORM JUDAISM ANO THE FUTURE OF OUR CONGREGATION On J anuary 1 5, 19 51, cluring the f irst term as president of Mr. Harry Price, ancl during the tenure of Rabb1 Milton Weissberg as spiritual leader, the Unitecl H ebrew Congregation receivecl its charter of mem, bership from the Union of American H ebrew Congregations of New York. Thi s forwarcl step markecl the encl of a lengthy periocl of transition from orthodoxy to Liberal Reform Juclaism. Ritual ancl Ceremonial are probably among the most ancient of mankind's heritages. Their importance from an evolutionary standpoint les in the fact that even in their early repugnant stages they marked humanity's gradual emergence from utter animalism into unmistakable trends of conventional thmking. Thi s assumption seems justifiable in that the passing centuries havt so moldecl the human mincl that for upwards of a thousand ycars the primitive significance of sacrifice has been sublimated into spiritual seif,denia l resulting in the abandonment of sadistic practices in most parts of the world. Religious ritual and ceremonial today are genuine ly centerecl upon rendering praise and gratitude to God without blatant show of material sacrifice, and upon preserving noble ideals which link the vivid Present with the fading Past to assure the perpetuation of a cherished fa ith. Liberal Reform Juclaism frankly recognizes that a plthora of ceremonial rnay become tedious, even an obstacle to the free movement of the sou l which must transcend whatever is routinary in order to respond to the &piritual impulses which flower into prayer. There is no doubt that a growing number of Jewish people prefer a liberal ritual provided it entails no loss of the beauty and sanctity of original scripture. Our spiritual leader at this time, Rabbi Abram Granison, is an ardent exponent of the values which inhere in Liberal Reform Judaism. By avoicling lapses into earlier ritualism he has helped the Congregation to attain a consistent and unifonn religious service and a more realistic approach to routine problems. English-speaking Jews in Cuba are still a minority, but it is evident that a considerab l e number of youthful co-re ligi onis ts, especially those who have had a bi-lingual eclucation, favor our services and are likely prospects for future membership. Moreover, the J ewis h population in Cuba is steadily increasing, and the constant influx of the new industries, many of which are operatecl by Jewish investors, betokens a bright iuture for the United Hebrew Congregation. We no l onger need "to wait and see what the Future is likely to have in store for us" as many of our mernbers usecl to say in days gone by, for our Future is at our very doorstep. Let us then lose no time in gathering what we may of ihe go ld en harvest in this our Golden J ubilee Year, and joyfully set up rhe first milestone on the road to the Future as a gift of today to the generation that will succeed us. 30

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RABBI ABRAM M GRANISON Rabbi Granison succeeded Rabbi Benjamn Lowell in March of 1954. He found the Congregation on a decidedly upward trend economically, functioning with an active and conscientious Board of Directors, animated to add continually to its purposeful accomplishments. However, he also found a lurking threat to stability in a lack of coherence with respect to ritual and protocol, a matter of moment inasmuch as the Congregation had quite recently become affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations and the Rabbi has also dedicated himself to the furtherance of Liberal Reform J udaism. So seriously did this responsibility weigh upon him that he deemed it unwise to allow himself or others sharing this responsibility more than .:~ mnimum of latitude lest the signif icance of the forward step suffer even temporary occlusion. Experience has shown the need of holding fast to whatever ground has been gained as a springboard to further progress, sealing off loopholes of possible future friction which could easily lead to retrogression. By painstaking ef forts Rabbi Granison has suceeded in installing new pillars of strength and consistency within our spiritual edif ice, promoting punctuality, and re-organizing religious service ancl the religious school m such a manner that both are now pursuing a normal course, true to protocol, and in conformity with enlightened practice. Esteem and affection are the just rewards of mutual confidence and understanding. Our Rabbi has devotedly sought to develop such mutuality by adherence to principles which preclude the doubtful t clvantages of "laissez-faire." His stature amongst us grows as we perceive the improvement which attencls his efforts and as we learn to s hare his aims. Rabbi Granison has served the Executive Board of the Central Confe, rence of American Rabbis, the Board of trustees of the Jewish Institute of Religion, and Committee on Army ancl Navy Religious Activities (now called the Chaplaincy Commission) of the Jewish Welfare Board, which gives ecclesiastical enclorsement and supervises the ministrations of Jewish chaplains in the armed services of the United States. He has been active in the work of many communal organizations such as the Jewish Community Council, Unitecl Jewish Appeal, Community Chest, Red Cross, Family Welfare Society, Ministerial Association and the Masonic Order. Rabbi Granison is marriecl to the former Rose Block of Pittsburgh who commands the affection ancl respect of the Jewish Community in Cuba. They have a daughter, Saranne, in whom one discovers the same virtues which characterize her distinguished parents. 31

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THE RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Records of the Congregation 's first twenty years show no trace of a Children's Religious School. It was not until 1927, shortly after the Sisterhood was established, that Milly Winetraub, its f irst president, and her husband Adolph, started a class in a room on the second floor of the modest building in Carlos Tercero Street where the Congregation was then holding its services and meetings. Milly and Adolph were the first teachers, and the number of pupils was under ten. It does seem almost inconceivable that the members of the Con, gregation could have allowed so many years to pass without bringing their children together for Religious instruction, but the immensity of the work they already had in hand and the responsibilities which those hectic days had heaped upon them left them no time or energy to take o n any new developments. They were deeply involved in the maintainance and upbuilding of the Cemetery ; the formation of the Ezra Society after the union with the Centro Macabeo was consummated; the care and supervision of wave after wave of early refugee immigration. In addition to all this, genuine religious sentiment had been gradually fading out during some thing more than o ne generation, there being more lip-service than moral conviction prevailing. Indeed, it took a second World War with its un s peakable horrors to bring home to all free peoples how futile is relianc e up an a materialistic interpretation of life, its complexities and inter-dependence. Innumerable families were disinterested in putting themselves to the trouble of obliging their children to attend Sunday School, looking upan religious preparation as a mere nominal and perfunctory responsibility. In 19 3 3, h oweve r, at the very height of poli ti cal and economic adversi ty, Rabbi Meir Lasker, who had just taken charge, succeeded in evo king greater interest in the children's inalienable right to l earn why they should be proud of their Jewish lineage, and the Rabbi did make a success of the School despite the lack of monetary support. Shortly af ter he left after se ven years of faithful service, both the Congregation and the School lap se d into a state of inertia which continued to a greater or lesser degree until the first term o f Mr. Harry Price as President of the Congregation. Rabbi Milton Weissberg was in charge at that time. He started quite auspiciously, but unfortunately for all concerned had made a dual agreement with respect to dividing his time between the United Hebrew Congregation and the Hillel Foundation The Hillel effort ended in failure solely because of the hopeless unreadiness of the Cuban Jewish Community as a whole to undertake so advanced an educational plan. The Rabbi's disillusionment and discouragement was so intense that his usefulness to the Congregation became impaired, and he resigned. 32

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However, be it said to his credit, that prior to his departure the Con, gregation cast its lot with the Union of American Congregations, as he had strenuously advocated. This proved to be one of the most important decisions the Congregation ever made; it was, in fact, the turning point of several propitious events which were reflected in an upsurge of activity in the Religious School, as will be seen as we proceed. After a lapse of several months, Rabbi Benjamn Lowell arrived to take charge. It was not long befare he had the general situation in the Temple well in hand, applying remedies which resto red conf idence and inspired ali hands to pull together. A group of Ladies o f the Sisterhoocl a~sisted him in reviving the shattered remnants of the Religious School, bringing the attendance up to about 45 pupils. He did not succeed, however, in securing the acceptance of a budget large enough to perm.1t of thoroughgoing success. The School, was kept alive mainly by his own dynamism. A small library was started and very special attention was given to Chanukah and Purim plays which he himself prepared, and for which he personally trained the children. He also trained a Bailet of tots from five to eight years. But there was not as yet any syste matized organization; no currculum worthy of the name. He in s truccccl the olcler classes while the ladies taught the younger groups. R.abbi Lowell did, however, reawaken the interest of the Sisterhood in th e Religious School and established a salary basis for the teachers. To this extent the path of his successor, Rabbi Granison, was made somewhat less diff icult, giving him an opportunity to press further and obtain from the Sisterhood a budget for the School consistent with the splendid organization he has since set up. As Rabbi Granison has said, his aim has been to organize in such a way that the school may function safely on its own power, and not find itself again in a forlorn condition because of changes in personnel. He has established a system such as that which prevails in lay as well as religious schools, the staff at the present time being as follows: Rabbi Granison, Director Nancy Knopka, Principal Rose Granison, Voluntary teacher Raquel Wax, Bert Price, Gloria Shapiro, Leila Hart and Arda Saloman T eachers. Under the Rabbi's directorship the School started inmediately to prosper. In 1954, 54 pupils were enrolled. In 1955 the number enrolled was 64. The enrollment for the current year is 8 5. Rabbi Granison conducts a short Service at each meeting so that the children may become familiar with sorne of the prayers. He teaches Hebrew, prepares Bar-mitzvahs and directs the Confirmation Clas s es. From what has been said it is apparent that the Religious School is participating fully in the animated spirit which prevails in every branch of the Congregation's activities at this time. This bespeaks Rabbi Granison's exceptional ability as an organizer, and the Congregation i s happy in extending to him its fullest appreciation. 33

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OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS We have previously remarked that from the time of Harry Price's Eecond term as president to this day our Congregation has enjoyed an uninterrupted sequence of excellent directorates. We may add in all sincerity that our current Board presided by Mr. Morris Mayorkas probably surpasses all predecessors in congeniality, foresight and an ability to maintain a high average of activity within the working committees. The Board consists of twenty,six members fully representative of majority and minority opinions. It also possesses a goodly meed of youthful initiative which accounts in part for a revival of the construc, tive urge which at the present time animates the intelligencia of every land dedicated to the practice of human liberty with proper respect for Law and Divine Guidance. This constructive urge applies not only to material things but notably involves a growing trend to reassess genuine values which make for more harmonious relationships with those whose persuasions differ from our own, and with whom we are called upon to co-operate for the benefit of a1l mankind. The services of our 26 Directors are distribut(::d among nine com, mittees, three of which specially co-ordinate their efforts toward a common objective namely to erect our Temple and Community House as soon as possible on the beautiful parcel of land we recently purchased. The Chairmen of the Building Drive Committee are jointly Philip Rosenberg and Charles Shapiro, the Chairman of the Building Plans Committee is Maurice Adams, the Chairman of the Jubilee Committee, which sponsors this Historie Outline among a multiplicity of other activities, is Harold Tanenbaum. Mr. Tanenbaum 's wise and energetic leadership is an inspiration to other directors asrnciated with himself, and the many lay mernbers, as well, who are contributing their best efforts to secure additional surns to be invested in our building project. In this way the entire Congregation is asked to do its part in giving wings to our hope for an early start in building, and brings ever closer our Day of irnmeasurable gratitude and supreme rejoicing. 34

PAGE 39

TO MORROW... THE CONGREGATION LOOKS AT THE FUTURE The highlights of the f irst f ifty years smce the founding of the United Hebrew Congregation have now been set clown lt is possible that sorne day in the future a more detailed account of this period of the Congregation's history will be published. Until that time arrives, however, we trust that this record will help to inspire tho::;e who read it to carry on the work of the Congregation already begun and bring it to even fuller realization than our humble but earnest efforts have been able to achieve. lt is logical to assume that in the commg years the Congregation wili continue to grow, and it is therefore our wish in this Jubilee Year to leave to those who follow us a House of Worship of their own, adequate to their needs. The land has already been purchased and plans for building are going ahead. We trust that in the near future we shall be able to raise the remaining funds necessary to make our long indulged dream come true To-day after fifty years, our Congregation finds itself united not only in name, but in fact. W e hope that this new sense of cohesiveness within the Congregation will continue to make itself increasingly felt a s the years roll on. The Religious School is now established on a f irm foundation, and with adequate classrooms, such as we look forward to having in the new Temple, our children will receive their religious education m more pleasant and serviceab l e surroundings than we have been able to offer them up to the present. W e are conf ident that the Menorah Sisterhood will continue to grow in scope and numbers, and look forward to the organization at an early date of a parallel Brotherhood to match their enviable record. English-speaking Congregation as we are, we are drafting a new Constitution along more modem lines to be submitted to the General Meeting in the near future, and which we hope will bring our organic law up to date. 35

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As we bring our Jubilee Year to a clase we witness with a deep sense of comradeship the subsequent rise of various other Jewish Congregations in Cuba. These have cordially united with us in commemorating the founding fifty years ago of the United Hebrew Congregation, the first to be established in Cuba. W e again express our gratitude to this kindly and beautiful country of Cuba for its unforgettable hospitality to our people. The past fifty years have been in a sense an epic test of our ability to measure up to our responsibilities as a Congregation. We pray that the years to come will bring the fulf illment of all the hopes and dreams which the eleven original founders so earnestly cherished, and which we in turn cherish on behalf of those wno will follow us. May the Lord aid our successors in a ll their efforts on behalf of Temple Beth Israel even as He has supported and comforted us in hours of tribulation and hrought us forth safely to our Year of Jubilee. 36

PAGE 41

A VALEDICTORV by Jacob Brandon We now approach the conclusion of our task. We had hoped to present an uninterrupted narrative, but this proved to be impossible because records covering about twenty intermediate years of the Con gregation 's history have unaccountably disappeared. We therefore turned to biography to bridge the gap and punctuate the progress that has been achieved. This is quite in order inasmuch as History and Biography are inseparable partners in the annals of mankind. We have also sought to capture something of the nature of that unquenchable religious impulse which for so many centuries has found apt expression in congregational worship, and which throughout eras of Dispersion kept the Faith of Judah alive, for we must not lose sight of the fact that the hope of humanity is centered upon what is unknown, unseen and esoteric rather than upon what is known, seen and rnaterially experienced. This is because Man's role in Nature is not that of a creator, but essentially that of a Discoverer of what has been created; an organizer of his own talents for controlling and utilizing the same. By this token he is constantly reaching out towards Realities which he has reason to believe le beyond the power of his physical senses to palpate. This is the stimulating factor behind ethical research, and an acceptable explanation of human craving for spiritual fulfillment. All progress stems from the need of readjustment to meet changed conditions. It is easily recognizable by a sudden urge to find "new worlds to conquer." This has been so in the case of the United Hebrew Congregation, for no sooner was the long awaited decision taken to modify its form of worship and become a member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations than the Board of Directors unani, mously voted that steps be taken to purchase land and proceed to erect a Temple and Community House of our own. The die was cast, and it was not long befare even the most cautious among the active mem bership became reconciled to the formidable investment required. Those who really feel a sense of unity with the Congregation have simply arrived at an understanding that the time has come to march forward and meet the Future half way as our contribution to an ever-widening horizon, or spearhead another decline into futile procrastination and frustration Symbolism, Metaphor and Parable alike have always been helpful in bringing to mind a just appreciation of ethical and spiritual verities. We therefore take the liberty of concluding our presentation upon a theme which insistently lingers in our thoughts. 37

PAGE 42

Lite as a spiritual Idea may be associated with the concept of an Instrument of Ten Strings, divinely fashioned and attuned to the Celestial Symphony so that each String shall vibrate in perfect unison with one cf the ten Cardinal Virtues. Every human being is free to approach the Instrument and reverently touch the Strings whereby unselfish deeds are transformed into perennial joys, and Duty into a labor of Love. Sorne there are who display the will and the wisdom to exercise their prerogative, giving thanks to Deity for the gif ts of lif e, intelligence and receptivity to the imperishable values He has created and placed at Man's disposal. There are, on the ot her hand, sorne who feel that Life, with its fading pleasures, its infirmities and its uncertain victories and clefeats, has been arbitrarily thrust upon them. These elect to dwel] upon the surface of Personal Desire, indifferent to the Still, Small Voice wnich whispers again and again of spiritua l surviva l and individual responsibility. When such as these irreverently brush against the s trings of the heavenly instrument, dissonant vibrations go forth into the Void to challenge, hopelessly though it be, the mastery of the human soul. We voice the hope in this Year of Jubilee that it will be given to us to witness an ebbing away of guile, artificiality and pseudo,idolatry; chat men and women everywhere may be provided with the sort of education which disproves the theory that lu st for temporal power and material aggrandizement can for long compete successfu lly for the laurels of posterity against spiritual enrichment, or compensate for the ills resulting from iniquitous leadership. May we and all others who would help to es tablish the Brotherhood of Man attune the inner ear to the music which rises from the Instru ment of Ten Strings whose immaculate accents reveal the Substance from which eternal Life is molded. NOTE. We understand the Ten Cardinal Virtues to be: Love, Faith, Piety, Probity, Compassion, Fortitude, Forbearance, Purity of Motive, J udgment, and a noble Humility befare the grandeur of th e Universe These Virtites are in the main co-related to the M osaic Decalogue. 38

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IN MEMORV OF OUR DEAR DEPARTED JACOB BARKER JEANETTE BARKER BERNARD BARKER ALBERT HARTMAN HENRY I. LIEBMAN JENNY LIEBMAN FERDINAND SEELIG JENNY SEELIG HENRY KANE ROSA KANE JUDITH MADURA BRANDON ANNA MADURA BRANDON MAYR MAYRSOHN ANNA MAYRSOHN GUSTAVE HAMMEL DA VID SLOANE JEFFREY J. SLOANE ROY H. SLOANE MAURICIO SCHECHTER ANNA SCHECHTER RAUL SCHECHTER A. SYL VIO SCHECHTER PHILIP KLEIN GENA BLOOM HELENE KA TES SIMON KATES CECILIA KA TES ABRAHAM RESNYIKOVITZ ,ANNA HOROWITZ ANNA BERGER LUIS SELTZER MORDKA JOSIF SCHNEIDER EVA SCHNEIDER 39 ALEXANDER Z. GABRYLEWICZ HAYA GABRYLEWICZ ALEXANDER BAIKOWITZ DEVORA KATZ DAVID GABRIEL KATZ PHILIP BRIN FRANCES BRIN ROSE ZVICK MAX PRACHNIK CIVIA BARTH HIRSCH BAR TH REBECCA MA YORKAS NISSO MAYORKAS HEINRICH GOTTHELF FANNY GOTTHELF JOSEPH GORLINE ESTHER TRILNIK ELIAS TRILNIK ANA BERGER HIRSCH HERMAN ROSENBERG HEIDRICH ROSENBERG JOSE SEGAL BEIN TAUBA SHAPIRO ISRAEL SHAPIRO JOSEPH STEINBERG BLANCA STEINBERG FAMILIA ZABIELINSKY ELIEZER STETTNER ZLA TA STETTNER SAMUEL PINCUS MARY PINCUS ISSAC SLUTSKY ADELA SLUTSHYANA

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ON BEHALF OF OUR CHILDREN ANO GRANDCHILDREN HARRY FALKENBURG RALPH FALKENBURG ROBERT PAUL SCHECHTER MICHAEL HIRSH HERTZBERG RICHARD HERTZBERG FANNIE ADELA REYLER RUTH FISCH MELANIE ANN FISCH SUSAN BARBARA FISCH NORMAN SCHWARTZ DEAN PHILIP KANE ALEXANDER BENES DA VID BIGELMAN .ANIT .A EPSTEIN ROBERT AVRAM MARCUS CAROL L YNN MARCUS ISRAEL BIGELMAN RAYMOND STEVEN SHAPIRO IRA SLOANE SHAPIRO GEORGE BERENS MARA BERENS MICHAEL KNOPKE DOROTHY ANNE KNOPKE EVA KALUSIN LA WRENCE KALUSIN LOUIS SZUCHMAN MARIO SZUCHMAN ANITA SZUCHMAN MICKEY SPATZ RENEE SPATZ SANDRA ABRA V ANEL EUGENE ABRA V ANEL FLORENCE ABRA V ANEL HELEN RESNIK .ALAN RESNIK BARRY ALLAN SHAPIRO SHELLY MACY SHAPIRO TIMOTHEY LOUIS SHAPIRO 40 MARTIN S TONE CAESAR S TONE DIANNE STONE ALEC JOSEPH ROSS MARIANNA DA VIDOVICI HELEN SEGAL SIMON SEGAL ANITA SEGAL JILL EDELSTEIN LYNN EDELSTEIN ISRAEL BERENS FREDDY BERENS ABRAM BERENS V ALERIE PRE S LEY COPELAN ROBERT FRANKEL NAOMI ELSA MASLIAH MICHELE IRENE MA S LIAH ILONA MERPORT SARITA CHAJMOVIC H SAUL CHAJMOVIC H RAYSA CHAJMOVIC H MARIL YS REBECCA NEPOMECHIE MONICA BEATRICE DON HELEN W ASSERSTEIN SANDRA WINSTON JUDY OSTROVSKY ABRAHAM OSTROVS KY JEFFREY PRICE RICHARD PRICE SUSAN PRICE HARR Y PRICE II DEBORAH HELENE PALMER LESLIE BRANDON GRANT BRANDON JUDITH BRANDON TERESA TANENBAUM RICHARD ISRAEL TANENBAUM ISABEL TANENBAUM DAVID THOMAS TANENBAUM

PAGE 45

Spiritual Lea~ers of Temple Beth Israel Rabbi Meir Lasker Rabbi Dr. Srul Sapira Rabbi Abram M. Granison Rabbi Benjamin B. Lowell 41

PAGE 46

Mr. Jacob Barker Mr. Maurice Schechter Presi~ents o f Congregation Mr. Lou is Jurick Mr. Adolph H. Kates 42 Mr. Bernard Barker Mr. Isaac Brandon

PAGE 47

Mr. Philip Rosenberg Mr. Gustave Kates Mr. Henry l. Lieb.man Mr Charles Shapiro Mr. Albert Ha r tman Mr. Barney Shapiro Mr. Harry E. Price Mr. David H. Brandon Mr. Morris Mayorkas 4 3

PAGE 48

Jubile e Ilinner 15 1956

PAGE 49

Congregatio n Ilecernbe r

PAGE 50

Mrs. Richard Knopke PresiOents of our SisterhooO Mrs. Maurice Schechter 46 1 Mrs. Charles Shapiro Mrs. Barney Shapiro

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Mrs Gus tave Hammel Mrs. Leon Lemberg Mrs. Harold T anenbaum Mrs. James Knopke PHOTOGRAPHS OF P AST PRESIDENTS MISSING Mrs. Adolph W eintraub Mrs. Ira Brussels Mrs. Joseph Steinberg Mrs. Adolph Kates. Mrs Albert Hartman Mrs. Robert Kaplan Mrs. Isaac Brandon Mrs. David Scharf 47

PAGE 52

THE MENORAH SISTERHOOD ITS AIMS AND COMMITMENTS Continuous activity and achievment are obviously the yardstick of Progre~s. Thi s truism unquestionably applies to the Menorah Sisterhood now at the threshold of 1ts 30th year of exemp lary devotion to Temple Beth Israel. It is pleasant indeed to call to mind the Sisterhood's traditional objectives, its voluntary commitmen t s and sorne of its sa lient activities of the Past and Present. We marvel at their wide scope and eff ectivity aimed to keep pace with a broadened interpretation of biblical lore as an infallible guide in human relations in our own Day just as it was in the Day~ of Yo_re. Social activities as sponsored by the Sisterhood have not only accelerated commurnty mtegrat10n but have served to promote a high morale among our congregants. Th e Si s terhood nourishes religious l oya lty among our children in their tender years inasmuch as the Religious School functions under its aegis. It thus co,operates with parents to inculcate a just pride in noble Judaic traditions while developing an affectionate relationship between the children, the T emp l e and the teachers who awaken in the minds of children an awareness of the wonders of the universe in which they live and an appreciation of the Divine Wisdom which governs all Reality A Library is maintained for members' use and for the chilclren of the Religious School. A choir composed of Sisterhoocl voices assists the Cantor on High Holy Days and other special occasions. Moreover, the Sisterhood has taken over the onerous duty of canvassing funds for primary Congregational purpo ses, including the Temp~ e Building Fund, our main preoccupation and responsability at this juncture. It maintains a Happy Day Fund, which is supported by volun, tary contributions and dedicated to the educa ti on of needy Jewish children, with emphasis upon those who posse ss unusual ta l ent. Through the A. Silverio Schechter Welfare Fund the Sisterhoocl lencl s a helping hand to needy Jewi s h families, holding it se lf in readiness to assist emergency cases. Members of the Sisterhood active ly co,operate and affiliate with worthy non,sectarian orga nizations dedicated to public service. The Sisterhood is a member of the National F e deration of Temple Sisterhoods in the United States, thereby keeping abreast of Reform Judaism in other parts of the world and maintaining contacts with other Sisterhoods. Th e Sisterhood has recently started a Special Fund to augment the substancial sum that will be reguired for the furnishings of the New Temple The Sist e rhood's membership numbers 140 at this time, and it possesses a permanent seat m the Board of Directors of the Cngregation. I? 1927 whe_n the Sisterhood was founded, the Congregation had no permanent place of worsh1p. The Sisterhood, therefore, held its first meeting at the home of Mr Adolph Kates, then the Congregation 's presiden t. As indicated in another section of this Historical Outline Mrs. Adolph Winetra~b was e l ected first president of the Sisterhood. Of the original founder~ those who are st1 ll active are Mr s Jeanette Schechter, Mrs. Charles Shapiro and Mrs. Philip Rosenberg. Others among t?e founders were Mrs. Adolph Kate s, Mrs Gustave Kates, Mrs. Joseph Stemberg, M rs. Morn s Sheps, Mr s. Richard Kn o pke, Mr s. John Zoller, Mrs. Isaac Brandon, Mrs. Nath an ~eller, Mrs. He~ry Edelstein and Mrs Sam Essrig. A Community Seder was hdd ? the f 1rst Passover N1ght af ter the founding of the Sisterhood, about 60 of the C~ngregat1on s members attending. The Sisterhood has continuecl to sponsor these Seders ever smce. In ~losing i t rem ains but to say that the S1sterhood has pledged itself to continue its co,operat1on as mtens1vely as possible to bring to fruition our most cherished project; namely, the construction of a new T emp l e on the beautiful site recently purchased by the Con gre~ation in Miramar. 48

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COMPLIMENTS OF General Distributors lnc. Distribuidores de Productos de alta calidad

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7 POWER TOOLS IN ONE! 1. BENCH SAW Makes all precis i an cuis in 1" lumber. 2. DISC SANDER. Oaes fas! prafes sianal sanding. 3, LATHE, Makes table legs lamp bases, bawls, etc ~l:(~3 4, HORIZONTAL DRILL, Bores enas and edaes makes d ~ owel holes r 5, VERTICAL DRILL PRESS, Daes deep drilling, straight or anglo 6. SHAPER. Pvta decarative edge1 on table-topa, 1helvff 7, PORTABLE ILIC TRIC DRILL. Pawer fvl drill rvna lt fa,lly re move1 far odd jabs Cummin6 BUILD ANY KIND OF FINE HOME FURNISHINGS REMODEL-REPAIR-EASYI Thousands of do-lt Shop owners have im proved their homes inside .and out. So can you! Cummins do-lt Shop is simple to oper ate-yet does real professional work. 45 long 7 high, weighs but 20 pounds. do-lt Shop even works on a kitchen table hangs on a closet hook when not in use can be car ried in a car trunk! Changes tools in seconds. Get in on the fun of owning a real power workshop of your own do-it Shop comes com plete-with a series of precision-engineered accessories-and NO MOTOR TO BUY 95 Reody to operate. lncludea shop illu trated above, Cummina Ball Rite 4~ Drlll, ftpro" table wlth miter gauge and rip fence, tool reat, cup and apur centers for lathe, acrew center for diac aanding and face plate turning, 4 aaw blade, arbor qnd extenaion rHI for bench aaw, wrench and mounting bolla. NO MOTOR TO BUY Products of ~hi%Manufacturing Co. REPRESENTANTES EXCL US IVOS CALVO V F. VIERA COMPOSTELA 663 TELF. A-6747

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COMPLIMENTS OF Armando J. Valds y Ca. Ingenieros-Importadores, S. A.

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-JOYA EM~RUJO PROME~A MADERAS O E S T E

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COMPLIMENTS OF J. Pauly, Sus Hijos & Ca.

PAGE 85

Publicidad Patio Las gallecicas Salcines de "La Estrella", ms deliciosas, que nunca son ahora tambin las ms nutritivas, porque su ingrediente principal ~s la Harina Enriquecida conteniendo Vitaminas y mi nerales Ms que una golosina, las galleucas de 'La Estrella" son un gran alimento. No hay nin guno mejor nt que sea can econmico. Prefiranlas para los nios y para usted. Siem pre estn frescas y tostaditas LOS NIOS GOZAN AL COME R LAS! En bien de su salud, productos de

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COMPLIMENTS OF ESSO STANDARD OIL, S. A. Cuba Ilivision

PAGE 87

Donde VSTED siempre halla Lo Mejo1 lo que DESEA! a Poco Costo

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPAIA EDITORIAL EL MUNDO

PAGE 89

'1 xr,;:Ult9iijq1ef!!b!;! ~: ~ ; ii:~iLl!!:!5 ... el milagro del Sonido Vivo! PHILCO f?~ III 1 El Phonorama III de PHILCO le ofrece caractersticas que solamente usted poda obtener antes en equipos costossimos a la orden. ,i Bocin a C athedral 66 bocinas electrostticas en una montadas en un arco de 180 Reprod uce hasta 20 000 ciclos. J Nuevo y grandioso "woofe r de 15 pulgadas combinado de una exclusiva red con la bo cina Cathedral. Reproduce desde 40 ciclos. J Transform ador de fuerza extra para el a mplificador de Alta Fidelidad con push-pull de salida de 30 watts. J Pick-Up de cermica de verdadera Alta Fidelidad a prueba de humedad. ,i Aguja de precisin de Di amante ,i Nuevo M icro-Mezclador" PHILCO que permite mezclar todos los tipos de discos de micro -es tr as, no importa si son de 331 / 3 45 rpm. son de 7 10 12 pulgadas, cambindolos automticamente. Sienta el orgullo de poseer un Phonorama III de PHILCO! Ca. Cubana Radio Philco, S.A. San Rafael 111 1 O de Octubre 433 Tel. M 8348 1-8577

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COMPLIMENTS OF LES PARFUMS CHANEL Paris, France BENJUMEDA No. 252 HABANA

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COMPLIMENTS OF HERMAN'S STORE PRADO 256 TEL. A-8080

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AGRICULTURA INDUSTRIA TRANSPORTE 3 FACTORES DE NUESTRA ECONOMIA A LOS QUE INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER Ofrece la Ms Completa Organizacin en su Qiro! Equipos para los agricultores .. para los contratistas .. para el transporte No importa cual sea su necesidad en este sentido, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER le ofrece el equipo que usted necesite ... y et respaldo de piezas y servicio que requiere a travs de sus 17 Bases de Operaciones estratgicamente situadas con 458 empleados, cada una con su departamento de repuestos y existencia adecuada de piezas legtimas IH. Y adems, 13 talleres de servicio con 12 5 mecnicos y la supervisin de un Departamento Tcnico de Ingenieros y especialistas, para la atencin de todos los aspectos del servicio de nuestros equipos. Habano INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO. OF CUBA Ave. de Espaa (Vives) 251, lptdo. No. 2, Habana JOSE JUNCO Y CIA., S. en C. MAQUINARIAS CAMAGUEY, S. A. Artemisa Ciego de Avila Camagey ORESTES JUNCO Y CIA., S. en C. Pinar del Ro MAQUINARIAS Y EQUIPOS ORIENTE, S. A. Santiago de Cuba Holguin Guantnamo SANTA CLARA MOTORES, S. A. SARIOL IMPLEMENTOS AGRICOl.AS, S. A. Sancti Spritus Sta. Clara Cienfuegos Habana Matanzas Crdenas Coln GUines Excluslvo para la Lnea de Equipos de Construccin: FUERZA INDUSTRIAL, S. A., Zapata y Paseo, Vedado INTERNATIONAL HA RVE STE R

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COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

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SEGUROS KOHLY un nombre centenario en seguros G. F. KOHLY, S. A. OFICINA EN NEW YORK 100 WILLIAM ST. BOWLING GREEN 90695 MARITIMO CRISTALES ROBO FIANZAS SEGURO DE VIAJEROS CALDERAS ELEVADORES
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COMPLIMENTS OF MINIMAX

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USTED PUEDE VIAJAR CON MUY POCO DINERO... el NUEVO PLA!'~:C?~~~H~E VIAJES A PLAZ;;; de{;UBANA Unico vuelo directo, sin escala, en slo 3 horas y minutos, en nuevos y ultramodernos cuatrimotores SUPER G CONSTELLATIONS, por slo $15.47 de entrada y $13.30 mensual EL MEJOR HORARIO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A slo 4 horas y minutos de La Habana el viaje ms rpido, directo y sin escala, en NUEVOS Y ULTRAMODERNOS CA 335 De entrada Ud. $1 ft 67 slo tiene que ~ abonar $17.36 mensual SERVICIO CON PRIMERA CLASE Y CLASE TURISTA SALIDAS DIARIAS 8:00 A.M Salida: 9 : 00 A M Llegada : 12 : 45 P.M LUNES MIERCOLES VIERNES 1 desayuno y almueno, sin coslo ad i cional. 1 TODO EL PERSOtlAL ES Exquisitas comidas y be DE HABLA ESPANOLA bidas sin costo adicional. 1 ~ ,.. 1-\:::i._';\ Todo el personal hablo espaol. 1 --= -~ ""'-~ L----~i, __ ----IP -.. --1 1 --1 A slo 55 minutos de La Habana en los incomparables cuatrimoto res Rolls Royce, VISCOUNTS Pase unas agradables vacaciones en esta maravillosa ciudad ca por slo $5 00 de entrada y ... 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 En los potentes y majestuosos SUPER G CONSTELLATIONS de Cubana, usted podr viajar a Europa en Primera Clase o Cla se Turista, como lo prefiera, y en ambas disfrutar de un agradable ambiente que le re cordar la tertulia con sus ms ntimos amigos, durante todo el tiempo que dure el viaje. y fjese en que forma tan cmoda usted puede pagar el importe de su viaje. Entrada Mensualidades Madrid va Santiago de Cuba la insignificante cantidad de 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Pars Londres Roma $176.69 178.04 168.84 203.16 $39.88 40.19 38.07 45.55 LA RUTA MAS ECONOMICA Usted pasar unas deliciosas vaca ciones en esta extica y hospitalaria tierra que tiene fisonoma propia y costumbres muy distintas a las nues tras por slo $10 68 de entrada y .. $9.62 mensual 4 SALIDAS SEMANALES $3.67 mensual 5 SALIDAS DIARIAS Cubana le ofrece salidas dia rias a Europa, va New York o en vuelo directo (cada viernes) va Madrid; el regreso puede hacerlo por cualquiera de di chas rutas. 1 Pida informes a su Agente de Pasajes o al U-4911 de 1 1

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Cortesa de P. Fernndez y Ca.

PAGE 99

PRESENTA AHORA CON ORGULLO SUS MARAVILLOSOS ---,.,,, ... ,; {I .,..,,.,,,, ;i" .... ,~:is. (>'' ~N_,,,,,.....,.,... ~~ ~.,,_ / .._, ._ ....,_V;JU">vo/"<''' en frascos de cristal protegidos con material plstico. Contenido: 3 onzas $3.50 el frasco 6 fcagonc;o, mund;olmente :=:,:, eA 6 bell~: colo,es d; ferentes : TABU EMIR 20 QUILATES PLATINO RAMILLETE DE NOVIA CANOE iMs prcicticos, ms elegantes, ms ecanmicos 1 Una l i gera presin del dedo ser suf i cien te para que un velo sutl y refrescante deje sobre Ud el exquisito roco de su perfume preferido LA MARCA SUPREMA EN PERFUMERIA DE LUJO

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HER S HE Y'S

PAGE 101

A ESTE MONOGRAMA debe usted su comodidad Para que usted viva ms cmodamente y d is~rute de todas las invenciones y descubrimientos que depara el progreso 1 una legin de tcnicos especializados trabaja incesantemente en los Laboratorios de la General Electric. De esos conocimientos tcnicos y experiencia prctica de la General Electric son los equipos y utensilios para su hogar 1 que le proporcionan una vida ms simple 1 grata y mucho ms cmoda y alegre. NNsfros Produdos son Indica de Progreso GENERAL fJ ELECTRIC e u A. GENERAL ELECTRIC CUBANA; S. A. Edificio General Electric, Estrado Palmo 556, ~oseo de Mart {Prado) y Anfmas, Hoboho .' Santiago de Cuba.

PAGE 102

Tip on the M a r ketThat's one thing investors t:till ask fer clay after clay-despi t e the fact that time after time we 've warnecl prnple aga i nst suc h tips and never peddle them ourselves Still they keep asking for a "sure thing on t h e marke t an inside tip to a fortune. Mind you, we don 't blame anybody w h o wants to get rich. But that's a poor way to start Not that there aren't any number of stocks that offer attrac, ti v e possibilities for making money Of course there are And w e 'll even be gad to suggest sorne, if you ask. But before we make any rccommendations, we' ll c h eck the facts f irst. Facts on sales, earnings, management, ou tl ook Facts on the industry, company, and competition. F acts t h at should give you at least a reasonab l e exp~ctation of receiving the rewards you hope for. S o if you realize the risks in buying stocks for price appre, ciation, feel you can afford them, and want he l p instead of tip s -ju s t ask. Simply stcp in at our office or write. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, fenner & Beane AGUIAR & O'REILLY, HAVANA TEL: M-8394

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COMPLIMENTS OF CUBAN TRADING COMPANV IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS P O BOX 1166 C a bl e : NABUC Raw and Refined Sugar Consignment of Ships Warehouses Sugar Bags Twine For Sewing Bags Calcium Carbide Industrial Paints Alcohol Molasses HORTER B U ILDING Obi s p o a nd Ofi c io s St s Ph o n es: A 11 2 1 M 8 2 91 HAVANA CUBA

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COMPLIMENTS OF The Texas Co., ltd. (WEST INDIES)

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COMPLIMENTS OF

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Compliments of HAMMEL and Co. Compliments of Comercial Impulsora de Plsticos, S. A.

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COMPLIMENTS OF Compaa Textilera Ariguanabo S. A. Fabricantes de Tejidos e Hilazas de Algodn, de Rayn y otras fibras sintticas y sacos para envase. Cayo La Rosa Bauta Habana, Cuba

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPANIA AZUCARERA ATLANTICA DEL GOLFO

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COMPLIMENTS OF North American lnsurance J. J. ALVAREZ Gerente PRESIDENTE ZAYAS 152 HABANA, CUBA

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COMPLIMENTS OF J A e o u E s e o E & e o. New York

PAGE 111

Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Stanley Wax Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Philip Rosenberg Congratulates the United Hebrew Congregation on their Golden Anniversary

PAGE 112

Compljments of OSCAR PALMER Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Rafael Snchez Losa~a

PAGE 113

Compliments of ALBERTO BROSS Best Wishes and Congratulations to the members of THE UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION on the occasion of its Golden Jubilee from Mr. an~ Mrs. Morris Mayor kas

PAGE 114

Compliments of Ted, Bruce, Jon and Craig Schwabach Compliments of ALBERTO BEHAR

PAGE 115

Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Enrique Kalusin IN LOVING MEMORY OF Harry E. Price Jacob Bol~ FROM THEIR DEVOTED FAMILIES

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Cortesa de Morn, Valds Rodrguez y Forcade Comphments of LA FILOSOFIA NEPTUNO, SAN NICOLAS SAN MIGUEL

PAGE 117

Para obtener imgenes ms claras nada mejor que un cinescopio RCA SILVERAMA r-----------r ...... 1 l Para imgen~s perfectas ~ cinescoplos super81uminizados RCA ilverama ... -El MEJOR TUBO-PANTALLA PARA REEMPLAZAR LOS YA GASTADOS EN TELEVISORS DE CUALQUIER MARCA 1-: s u s t e d d e l os qu e admiran la p e rf ecc i n qu e ti e n e n la s irn gc n cs e n a lgunu" t e l e vi so r es'! l'u es lo ci e rt o es qu e s u r ece pt o r p u di e ra muy l,i e n d a rl e t o dava im :e n es d e so rpr e nd e nt e orill o y nitid ez s i se r ee mpla z a e l t u b op a nt a lla (qu e pr o babl e m e n te es t y a b as t a nt e ga s tad o ) co n un o d e l tip o SILVERAMA, de la R C A El c in esco pi o SILVERAMA, s uperaluminizado m e di a nt e una m o d e rn ima t ni c a exc lu s iva d e la R C A d e v o lv e r a s u tel e vi so r la c alidad d e r e produ cc i n de un ap a rato nu e vo S e trata de un tub o -pantalla minuci os am e nte c alculad <_> e l ec tr ni ca y pticamente pa ra que pr o p o r c ion e im gen es impecables durante largo tiempo. R e juvenezca s u t e levi so r! ln s tlel e un cine sco pi o R C A SILVERAMA! L os cincscoo i os y la-. V:il\'ulns l' l ectrti ni cns R C A pruporr1onan im:i~enes y sonido 1 1 < Optima c a lid a d e n c-unlquirr l t I ,, hur D i str i bu i dores hclus i vos poro Cubo : HUMARA y LASTRA, S. en C. M v ,0110 4 0 5 407 T "' Ml 164 0 Opio de Venlo1 W ,0 6 6 Serw ic1 0 de Rad i o y Telev i i 6n e a no, M 9 0 93 Of ,ci nol W 4742 Refr,gerac 10 n y Tallut!s (ZIM LINES) UNICO SER VICIO ISRAEL! DE TRASATLANTICOS DE LUJO EN RUTA DIRECTA DESDE NEW YORK A HAIFA ISRAEL Y OTROS PUERTOS EUROPEOS DEL MEDITERRANEO AGENTES GENERALES PARA CUBA: R. Daz & Co. EDIFICIO CORREDORES DE ADUANAS OFICIOS 15 4 TELEFONO W-5767 SALUDAN SINCERAMENTE A LA UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION EN EL CINCUENTENARIO DE SU FUNDACION, DESEANDOLE TODO GENERO DE VENTURAS

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Cortesa del Peridico AVANCE Cortesa de DE SOTO AU T OS Y C AMI O NE S TELF U 17 50

PAGE 119

Europa lo espera... viajando por AIR FRANCE Modernos y lujo sos Super "G" Constellations, lo transportarn con la mxima rapidez, en el ambiente de ms confort y buen gusto que pueda Ud desear. Disfrute ele los precios que le ofrece ahora AIR FRANCE en su nuevo plan fami li ar hasta Marzo 31 de 1957. Habana, Pars Clase Turi sta Ida y Vuelta Cabeza de fami li a $ 673.20 Esprn : a $ 473.20 Uno, dos o ms hijos de $ 473.20 12 a 2 5 aos de edad cada uno AIR FRANGE LA RED AEREA MAS EXTENSA DEL MUNDO Trocadero No. 59 Habana Telfono A-7094 for beauty, prec1s1on, durability SULLYWATCH ALL THAT YOU EXPECT FROM A Perfect Timepiece EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR: LUIS ROSENTHAL HABANA, CUBA

PAGE 120

Cortesa de J. Gallarreta y Ca., S. A. Cortesa de LA SUCURSAL

PAGE 121

SU ACTUAL TELEVISOR PUEDE SER 7 VECES MEJOR le da a Ud. imgenes ms claras y ms brillantes, mayor relieve, mxima dimensin y ms detalles. Ahoro Ud puede obtener "una recepci6n perfecta y moderna" en su apara to de televisi6n, muy simplemente; dicindole a su tcnico que le instale un Tubo Pantalla SYLVANIA "Silver Screen 85 ". En los Silver Screen 85 la brillantez de la imagen ha sido casi doblada. El contraste ha sido aumenta do 3 veces Con ese buen televisor que ya Ud tiene, este avanzado tubo pantalla le da a usted m6s brillantez, imagen m6s clara, mayor profundidad y dimensi6n y ms detalles Pdale a su tcnico en televisin un "Silver Screen 85" i Hay un tipo para cada modelo! 1 CAON DE ELECTRONES DE FOCO PRECISO Diseo mejorado que acti vo lo pantalla en uno for mo superior poro dar una imagen ms definido y ms claro 2PANTALLA ACTIVADA CON PLATA Millones de tomos de plato que es s up erior en poder reflectivo, son agre gados o los sustancias fluo rescentes del tubo pantalla en su parte interior. Do ma yor contraste a lo imagen 3PANTALLA SUPER ALUMINIIADA Gran cantidad de la luz que entes se perda dentro del tubo choro se refleja hacia el televidente dando una ima gen ms brillante. ... ,"i:L~!l!~v Oficios 204. Frente a Correos Centro Privado: W-5625 fS-9 56 RENT A NEW CAR FROM $ AND $ 5.00 DAILY 25.00 WEEKLY 24 HOUR SER VICE AVIS OF CUBA, S. A. RENT-A,CAR SYSTEM MORRO 60 PHONE: A 0220 M-8661 HA V ANA, CUBA Aprenda a Manejar de Verdad Y OBTENGA SU CARTERA DACTILAR LEGALMENTE EN LA ACADEMIA DE AUTOMOVILISMO MAS ACREDITADA Director: HARDY L. SP ATZ HAVANA AUTOMOBILE SCHOOL MORRO 60

PAGE 122

Cortesa de THE FAIR SAN RI\FAEL 203 Y 205 LA HABANA Compliments of Consolidated Cuban Petroleum Corp. HABANA No. 260

PAGE 123

FABRICADO POR INDUSTRIAS "NODAL" Fbrica No. 566 Luyan Habana Para los que Saben y Pueden CHRVSLER Miembro Vitalicio de la Alta Sociedad

PAGE 124

Compliments of La Compaa Cubana de Cemento Portland Compliments of Industrial Bank Plaza de la Catedral

PAGE 125

ATLANTIS (CUBA) L TO. APARTADO 3243 TELEFONO W-5491 Representantes Exclusivos en Cuba de: PRODUCTOS DE RECKITT & COLMAN LTD., INGLATERRA (Azul Mgico, Pulimentos Brasso y Silvo, Mostaza Inglesa Colman, etc.) PRODUCTOS DE R. T. FRENCH CO., ROCHESTER, U. S. A. (MoE:taza, Especias, Extractos, Alimentos para Aves y Peces, etc.) PRODUCTOS DE THE NUGGET POLISH CO. LTD., INGLATERRA ( Betn N ugget, Cera Cardinal, Limpiadores Duraglit, etc.) TINTORERIA Y LA V ANDERIA CALZADA DEL CERRO 1410 Tell A-7246

PAGE 126

Compliments of Crusellas y Ca., S. A. Comphments of A FRIEND

PAGE 127

PRfCIO.S DfSD.f ilSO A~ 400 Halague su cario con el meior regalo OBSOUIELE CON RcP~ITtR Sell o d e O r o LA CORBATA OUE LAS MUJERES ADM I RAN y LOS HOMBRES PREF I EREN 4 13LLAS LiNAS y ELEGANTE DISEO PARA LUCIR EN SU HOGAR MAS ESPLENDOR Y ATRACTIVO LO MAS MODERNO EN MOBILIARIO y DECORACION FABRICA : CEPER0 105 CERRO 1 5796 ML-1493

PAGE 128

Compliments o f NORWICH INSURANCE Co. Compliments of PEREZ HNOS. MADER A S LUYANO No. 802

PAGE 129

B. V. D. Extends to Temple Beth Israel Congratulation on this Golden Anniversary ________ Llame al A-1904 o o su Agente de Pasaje1 ...

PAGE 130

Cortesa de MIERES y Co. Sastres Camiseros San Rafael No. 54 Compliments of Emerson Radio

PAGE 131

Compliments of lnter-America Chemical Co. lnc. SAN LAZARO 799 HAVANA, CUBA U0336l1200 ULTRAMAR Calidad Supr e ma, Extra 19 rubes, enchapada en oro IMPERMEABLE con cierre hermtico tropico lizada, con C.P Cuerda Permanente ant i magntico contrachoque ultram6t i co

PAGE 132

Compliments of American lnternational lnsurance Co. Compliments of Ganada Dry

PAGE 133

Compliments of American lnternational lnsurance Co. Compliments of Ganada Dry

PAGE 134

Compliments of Banco Continental Cubano AMARGURA No. 53 lhe FIRST NATIONAL BAN K o/ BOSTON Fundado en 1784 Ofic ina de la Habana Aguiar esquina a Lamparilla Sucursales : Aven ida de Italia, 568 Mximo Gmez, 702 Santiago de Cubo Cien fuegos Sancti Spritus

PAGE 135

Para viajar ms rpido y mejor ... Vuele Va Venezolana! ~-mEA AEROPOSJAl ~HEZOlMIA Un Eslabn de Amistad y Servicio entre las Amricas EN SU NUEVO LOCAL DE PRADO 257 TELFS. A-1943 Y M 6986 CONSULTE A SU AGENTE DE PASAJES Deliciosa hace de cualquier pausa La Pausa que Refresca

PAGE 136

Compliments of Robert Textile Corporation MANUFACTURERS OF: "P ALM BEACH" "SUNFROST" "GOODALL" THE FINEST IN MEN'S SUITS! Compliments of EL HISPANO Nez y Ca. AYESTARAN 619 HABANA

PAGE 137

WE EXTEND MOST SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS TO UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION OF CUBA ON THEIR GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY BURLINGTON EKPORT Co. 14 0 7 BROADWAYN Y CITY

PAGE 138

B A N K Compliments of OF NOVA SCOTIA SER VICIOS BANCAR I OS DE TODAS CLASES 1h e FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK ef New York HABANA SANTIAGO MATANZAS CARDENA S CA/BAR/EN MANZANILLO

PAGE 139

Compliments of

PAGE 140

Cortesa de FERROMAR, S. A. PARA COMERCIO DE PRODUCTOS SIDERURGICOS MATERIALES DE CONSTRUCCION Y MAQUINARIA Cortesa de TINTORERIA PALACE

PAGE 141

Compliments of Compaa Cubana, s A F bri ca e n M a t a nz as Ofi ci n as G e n e ral es: O c 1 0s N o 452 L a H a b a n o

PAGE 142

Compliments of Continental Can Corporation ARROZ CALLES SUAREZ Y PERK IN S LUYANO PHONE : X-3301 C ompliments of FRIJOLES JO N: CH 1 :_' j BOLA ROJA RODRIGUEZ Y CIA, SANTA CLARA 64 HABANA

PAGE 143

Compliments of La Zaragozana Compliments of THE REFRESHMENT OF FRIENDSHIP

PAGE 144

Compliments of CAMAY-ROSAilO SABATES Y CIA. See your Travel Agent or KLM, TROCADERO 55, ESQ. A PRADO Phone W-5770

PAGE 145

SYLVANIA FRIGIDAIRE SU AMIGO, EL AGENTE SYL V ANIA FRIGIDAIRE FELICITA EN EL CINCUENTENARIO DE SU FUNDACION A LA UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION Di s tribuid o r es Exclu s ivos para Cuba : Ca. Cubana de Refrigeracin Elctrica, S. A. CENTRO COMERCIAL LA RAMPA 23 No 10 VEDADO ZIPPE RSILm.JJM fllR -.. CALIDAD INSUPERABLE,... FORRADOS SEPARADORES ESMALTADOS NIKEL SIL VER METAL na. 5 BRONCE para Pantalones Jacquets Vestidos Trusas Efectos de piel Carteras, etc. ALUMINIO Usos diversos INDUSTRIAS LVIWAR,S.A. 1 N q U IS ID O ~-No.516-HABANA

PAGE 146

Cortes a de LA GRAN CERVECERIA 'l A TROPICAL'' 1'1AS DE 50 O S EN CUBA 8 Sucursales en La Habana LA HABANA Sucursales e11 BAYAMO MORON tAMAGUH PINAR DEL RIO CIEGO DE AVILA SAGUA LA GRANO[ GUANTANAMO SANCTI SPIRITUS HOLGUIN SANTA CLARA SANTIAGO OE CUBA O fici na P rinci pal Mon tre a l [I B nc o m s G r ande d e l Ca n ad

PAGE 147

Compliments of The Chase Manhattan Bank New York PRINCIPAL OFFICE: AGUIAR 310 HABANA OTHER BRANCHES: 23 ESQ A J VEDADO AMISTAD 304 HABANA ,, l,:.J A VE 51 (REAL) N o. 12802 MARIANA O .. traiga hoy mismo a su familia al RESTAURANT y COCKTAIL LOUNGE NUEV~ (3JA 1J Q\.O CLUB EL MAS BELLO PARA/S CAMPESTRE DE CUBA KLM. 8 CARRETERA DE RANCHO BOYEROS Esplndidos manjares y ricos especialidades Ambiente refinado Grata atmsfera familiar B"\lABllS TODAS LAS NOCHES c.t"~s s~ NTI y su GRAN ORQUESTA e,ON lUb ~ '' Exquisita atencin y servicio RESERVACIONES: 1-5923 t ; .. "' : :. ~~ ~! -. S E R Y IC I O P A R A B A N Q U ET ES HASTA D E 2.000 C O M E N S Al ES .. .. -~ -~ -n :--. ~ V I E R NES SABADOS y D01\ II NGOS BINGO en "NUEVO RIO CRISTAL CLUB" ~ o n m s d e S-t ,000.00 ele p r e mi os e n efec ti vo Bi ll etes e nt eros ele l a Lo t e a Nac i o n a l y o tr as g r a nd es opo rt u uicl a cl es.

PAGE 148

COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. Irving Schwab M1. and Mrs. Osear Ferenczi COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF CHEVRA KADISHA Mr. and. Mrs. VE CHESED SHEL EMETH Hen1y B. Seelig SZAJA KANNER President

PAGE 149

COMPLIMENTS OF Mors Rosenfeld and Family COMPLIMENTS OF Rafael III Palacios y Capablanca COMPLIMENTS OF M S Schwartz and Family COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. Moises Egozi

PAGE 150

COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. David Abravanel COMPLIMENTS OF Isidoro Stettner May Your Congregation continue to Flouri sh Our Best Wishes. Mr. and M1s. Ola! Holm COMPLIMENTS OF M1. and Mrs. Abe Fisch

PAGE 151

COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Issak Vi ten son Phi] Mann COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Alfonso Marquet The Kanes

PAGE 152

COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF M1. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. David Utiansky Ernesto Falkenbu1g COMPLIMENTS OF CORTESIA DE Mr. and Mrs. Max Pncus Mallin and Lengyel

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CORTE S IA DE SIMMONS INTERNATI O NAL LIMITED M O NT O R O 1 1 4 En sa n c h e de l a H a b a n a Florence Modas ARTI CU L OS FEMENIN OS A GU ILA 457 HABANA R. C. Allen Business Machines ).I cuina s el e s um a r el e es cri b ir y r eg i s t ra d o r as UN I COS DI ST RI BU ID ORES EN CUBA Ca j as co nt a d o r as Na ti o n a l, h as t a co n 3 0 co nt a d o r es i nc\i v iclu a l es. Pa r a t o ci a cl ase el e n egocios. E qui pos pa r a Cafe t e a y Ca rni ce r as. ).T O I SES LEV I N Ca5a el e l os l\l o lin os Telf A-0 1 22 Pa dr e \T a r e l a (Be l ascoa n 902) HABANA ACEITE "OLIVEITE" es un deleite V I V ER ES, S A H A BA NA

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COMPLIMENT S OF Hugo May COMPLIMENT S OF Tomas B. Besosa HILOS LILY Y BRAZOS LOS MEJORES AG U IAR N o 560 ML 19 0 5 M 7985 COMPLIMENTS OF The May Trading Co .. S. A. COMPLIMENTS OF Eve Textile Mfg. Co., lnc. A VE. INDEPENDENCIA No. 302 OESTE TELF. X0-2031 GUANABACOA

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CORTESIA DE h/eliu1i eLa/1,k, Cw.i,rJ, !J nielWtawnaL HOTEL NACIONAL DE CUBA Cortesa de: Maderera Antonio Prez F b r e a 1 O H Q b a n a COMPLIMENTS OF A Friend COMPLIMENTS OF REFRIGERADORES LEONARD TELEVISORES, RADIOS Y EQUIPOS DE ALTA FIDELIDAD RCA VICTOR MIRA LOA, S. A. Galian a 213 T elf ML 108 7 Habana A 8 3 3 7

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CORTESIA DE COMP LIMENT S OF Laboratorios Gravi, S. A Tejidos y Confecciones Perro, S. A. A GU IAR 61 1 HABANA C O MPLIMENT S OF COMP LIMENT S O F Peluquera Armando

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CO M PLIMENTS OF World Wide Freight Forward lnc. Co. CUSTO:M BRCKERS & FORWARDERS 401 DROADWAY "A COMPLETE SHIPPING SER VICE" COMPLIMENTS OF VERMOUTH COMPLIMENTS OF CORTESIA DEL MARAVILLOSO ARROZ ELEFANTE Di st ribuid o r es: J. NOVAL Y CJi\

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COMPLIMENTS OF CO MPLIMENT S OF Cromex Transportation Co. Kunex Transportation INDUSTRIA 305 LAMPARILLA 65 COMPLIMENTS OF CO M P LIMENT S O F Record Air Express Co. Continental Express Co. AVENIDA DE BELGICA 487 A VE N I DA DE BEL G I G A 4 8 7

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COMPLIMENTS OF Mme. Rossell CALZADA 1010 VEDADO TELF. F 3992 COMPLIMENTS OF Naviera VACU BA, S. A. OPERADORES DE VAPORES CUBANOS COMPLIMENTS OF Repostera Mignon CALLE LINEA VEDADO COMPLIMENT S OF san rafael y guila, m-5991-98, m-7941 '-"

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CORTESIA DE COR T ES IA DE Bonito "Comodoro" Davila y Cia. CORTESIA DE COMPLIMEN T S OF Transportes Rody S. A. A Friend

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' COMPLIMENTS OF Z. SIMON MODAS CALLE 15 No. 272, APTO. 1, ENTRE I y J TELEFONO Fl-7222 9.,{.ltima 97,ooeclacl RELOJ ORO 18 KILATES CON ESMERALDAS FINAS O {sisa auin[ana LA CAIA Dt lOf RtCiALOI CORTESIA DE Conservas "CONCHITA" CALIDAD ... PRIMERO ... Dulces en Almbar, Pasta de Guayaba, Bonito, Habichuelas, Salsa de Tomate, Pur y Pimientos. Mesa, Mateo & Co. COMISIONISTAS S. IGNACIO 313, TELF. M-3774, HABANA Distribuidore s a Mayotistas del papel higinico "PILLOW" y aceite "OLIVEITE"

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CO M P LI ME NT S O F CO MPLIMENT S OF STUDEBAKER Ca. Mercantil Astra, S. A. COMPLIMENT S OF CO RTE S IA DE Gustavo Kates e Hijos LUCERNA

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COMPLIMENTS OF 1 AUTIACEu,Ao. CASA CENTRAL. REINA 109, frente o GALIANO SUCURSAL : NEPTUNO 406, casi esq o SAN NICOLAS miss ClRiROl TINTES MODERNOS .. COLORES NATURALES CUBREN TOTALMENTE LOS CABELLOS GRISES Dist. Bienvenido Fernndez, S. A. Bernaza No. 113, La Habana Telf. ML-1226 COMPLIMENTS OF Auto Cine Vento ClJBA'S ONLY PRIVE IN THEATER AND MIRAMAR THEATER COMPLIMENTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES coming soon SOLIO GOLD CADILLAC with JUDY HOLLIDAY PAUL DOUGLAS and YOU CAN'T RUN A W A Y FROM IT IN TECHNICOLOR CINEMASCOPE with JUNE ALLYSON JACK LEMMON

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COMPLIMENTS OF Pion e e r, S. A. COMPLIMENTS OF La Pasiega COMPLIMEN TS OF Helados Guarina COMPLIMEN T S OF La Casa del Brillante NEPTUNO 205 HABANA

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CREACIONES VESTIDOS TAM O Confecciones EDITH, S. A. CONSULADO N o 165 HABANA LECHE y HELADOS Inspira Confianza PEDIDOS B 7960 y B 4888 COMING SOON THE GREATEST OF ALL PICTURES "GIANT" ROCK HUDSON ELIZABETH TAYLOR JAMES DEAN DIRECTED BY GEOGRE STEVENS WARNERS BROS. PICTURES

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COMPLIMEN T S OF CO MPLIMENT S O F Joyera Francesa N E F F C ORTE S IA DE COMPLIMENTS OF La Villa Roberto La Florida (FLORI DITA )

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RESTAURA NT,BAR LA REGULADORA Established in 18 79 Familiar Surrounding s SELECTED FOOD I-Lgh Int :rna.:: ional Cuisine Competely A ;r Conditioned AMISTAD 412 HABANA CUBA TELEFONOS: ML-1440 ML-1940 M-4938 V. de Calleja y G. de Castro CUBA Nm. 225 DPTO. Nm. 302 TELEFONO A -24 30 HABANA S & W FINE FOODS, INC. "MONACO" INSTITUTO CIENTIFICO DE BELLEZA (Mezzanine de Flogar) Galiano y San Rafael Lneas Exclusivas: JEANNE GA TENEA U de Par s EVE d e Italia. GOUBAND Y ALEXANDRE DE MARKOFF de New York TELEFONOS: W 4935 ML 1626 COMPLIMENT S OF JOYERIA VERSALLES ARTICULOS PARA REGALOS NEPTUNO 16 4 HABANA

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CORTESIA DE Casa Potin COMPLIMENTS OF Frankel Modas CORTESIA DE La Dalia q(J/UU COMPLIMENTS OF Textilera Tricana

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Hechcelo ... con DESERT FLOWER "la /raganc;a que recuerda el romance del des;erto" Magntica ... misteriosa ... mgica Dcsert Flower es ms que una fragancia fina, es una sensacin hechicera, y es la ~mica fragancia para la mujer cosmopolita la mujer sofisticada. Locin (con o sin atomizador), colonia sblida, jaLn de tocador, polvo para despus del bao, talco, etc. J ~\ tl Loci~n DWJTIN. Colonia Slida $1.25 Polvo Para Despu Del Bao $2.00 $2.25 r l De venta en todas las tiendas y Tarmac,as prmc,pa es SHULTON Rockefeller Center New York COMPLIMENTS OF AUSTRO-CUBANA COMERCIAL, S. A. MANZANA DE GOMEZ 563 HAVANA CUBA 1ng. Josef Wechsler Pr es id e nt COMPLIMENTS OF PUNTA ALEGRE SUGAR ANO SALES Co. BARAGUA IND U STRIAL CORPORATION OF NEW YORK FLORIDA INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION OF NEW YORK MACAREO INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION OF NE\V YORK COMPLIMENTS OF UNIVERSAL TEXTILE CIA. DE TEJIDO S EL GLOBO ", S A Imp o rt a d o r es d e T e jid os y L astex MURALLA 166 TELEFONO A5 10 22

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Norgulf Lines R. Robaina e Hijos COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF National Biscuit Co. Havana Post

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COMPLIMENTS OF Reddy Kilowatt YOUR ELECTRICAL SERVANT CORTESIA DE EL PAIS Leslie Pantin & Sons Agen t es Generales y Apoderados de las Cas.: GUARDIAN ASSGRANCE CO~[PANY, LTD. NOR \\"I CH UNION F IR E INS. SCTP., LTD. LEGAL & GENERAL ASSGRANCE CO. LTD. THE NORTJ-JEK ASSURANCE CO., LTD. THE YOR I~ SH IR E JKSURANCE CO., LTD. THE EAGLE FIRE CO., OF NE\V YORK LA GARA;\TIA C0-:'1 1 P A~TA DE SEGC'ROS, S. J\. SECCROS DI ~ TOD. ~ 1S CL--1.SES E.V CUALQU I ER LUG.AR DEL MCNDO ESCOBAR 451 TELF. U-1047 HABANA CABLE: PANTIN COMPLIMENTS OF C, E. Zanetti YOUR INSURANCE COUNSELLOR

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Marsh and Me Lennon Textilera Versailles, S~ A. COMPLIMENTS OF Hnos. Rosemberg Diario Nacional

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Boris Cafetera Jos F. Gonzlez Represcntative of GOOD JEWISH AMERICAN FOOD AMERICAN VISCOSE CO. CHEMSTRAND CORP. COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEN O APARTADO 1642 T,<1::: H!L,A.F.;>lbus LOVv'-DOVVN ON H'lGH UFE; ,,, ... BING G RACE FRANK CROSBY KELLY SINATRA ~ At(1!3Gl!fljEl1 FOR THE F/RST TIME! ... 1~~ M, : E'I//'~ ..... :: : .. .... ,._ ... -: .. .. 1 __ ; eA l'fl/~~ t y :' .. / uu ; ~ : ~ ~.} .... -~,.. ,7 ,. : ___ ./' .._ __ .,. / .... /, ..... : ...... : ,,;) ........... .. '.<',.,:-:- CELESTE HOtM JOHN LUND LOU! S (AWERN S!DNEY BlACKMfR tOLHS ARMSTRONG A~~:; "'""" JOHN PATR!U: ;;< (OLE PORTER }l:);iit-i fii!ifN >\llC '.\>\lll (hAYlW TErnZ&.~ rnARs\Vitn:R:,

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CORTESIA DE El Carmelo CALZADA y D VEDADO COMPLIMENTS OF JOYERIA LE TRIANON S. A. FONDON Y CIA. LTD. GALIANO 405 HABANA COMPLIMENTS OF OGDEN & Co. MERCHANDISE BROKERS APARTADO 906 HA V ANA, CUBA COMPLIMENTS OF HOTEL COMODORO PRIVATE BEACH AT YOUR AIR CONDITIONED DOOR STEP

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Be Protected by lnsurance Buy lnsurance COMPLIMENTS OF Novia American Poultry Farm WE HA VE EVER YTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE THIS A HAPPY HOi.IDAY SEASON. ORDER YOUR POULTRY AND EGGS FROM E V SIMPSON PHONE B9 1016 CLEANLINESS AND COUR TESY COMPLIMENTS OF Ruz-Roca FINEST HAND KNITTED APPAREL COMPLIMENTS OF Cigarros EDEN

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CORTESIA DE ACEITE "ABACO" y ARROZ "GLORIA" COMPLIMENTS OF La Cubana TINTORERIA BELASCOAIN 5 5 8 U-5223 CORTESIA DE Jos Navarrete PRODUCTOS NACIONAL NA V ARRETE MERCED 313 31 5 CORTESIA DE Impresos Lermo, S. A. IMPRESOS Y ENVASES EN PAPEL CELLOPHANE Y POLYETHYLENE

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a K O PROXIMO ESTRENO r!~Dto Filmada en CINEMASCOPE TECHNICOLOR COMPLIMENTS OF A Good Friend COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Pardias y Dominguez

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CORTESIA DE Congregacin Religiosa Adath Israel CORTESIA DE Enicak and Ebel Watches CORTESIA DE Logia Bene Berith Maimonides CORTESIA DE Organizacin Wizo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF Comit de Damas Pro-Edificio del Centro Hebreo Safaradi de Cuba CORTESIA DE Asociacin de Anti-Tuberculosis de Cuba CORTESIA DE Crculo Universitario Hebreo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

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CORTESIA DE Congregacin Religiosa Adath Israel CORTESIA DE Enicak and Ebel Watches CORTESIA DE Logia Bene Berith Maimonides CORTESIA DE Organizacin Wizo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF Comit de Damas Pro-Edificio del Centro Hebreo Safaradi de Cuba CORTESIA DE Asociacin de Anti-Tuberculosis de Cuba CORTESIA DE Crculo Universitario Hebreo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

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CO M PLIMENTS OF Splendid Grocery IMPOR TER OF FRESH AMERICAN DELICA T ESSEN COMPLIMENT S OF Universal lnternational Ann o un c in g th e rel eas~ o f WRITTEN ON THE WIND COMPLIMENT S OF Volp Tours CORTESIA DE Cuervo y Sobrinos LO S JOYERO S DE CONFIANZA COM P LIMENT S OF PARAMOUNT WHO THI S Y EAR BRIN G YO U W AR AND PEACE CO RTE S IA DE Jardn Rodrguez CA LL E 10 y 27, VE DA DO TELF F -5 7 58 CO M P LIMENT S O F Palacio de Cristal CO RTE S IA DE ZAID'S MODAS S AN MI GU EL 2 61 HABANA

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Berens Modas Phila Bags COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENT S OF O R B E A FRIEND

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IMPRESO POR CUBA INTELECTUAL CUBA N o 111 HABANA



PAGE 5

Unttr~ larbrrm Qlongrrgatton Wrmplr irtQ 1Jsrarl ~nlhrn i\nnturrsaru 1906-1956 l_E]uhlisqeb b~ ,niteb ~ebrefu
PAGE 6

.. .. .. 1f1 .,.._: I 1111 11 I -...:.a. ..... r

PAGE 7

INDEX Foreword .... .. .. ........... .. ...... In Memoriam ....................... Introduction by our President ......... Greetings from our Rabbi ............. Erwin Gotthelf, Cantor ............... A SAGA IN PROFILE The United Hebrew Congregation ...... Social Service and Public Relations .. The Building Fund ................... Rabbi Meir Lasker ....... ..... .... Rabbi Dr. Srul Sapira ............. Henry I. Liebman .................. Morris and Jeanette Schechter ......... Harry E. Price .......... ...... ... ... Rabbi Benjamin B. Lowell ......... .. Albert Hartman ......... .... .... .. Liberal Reform Judaism and the Future of our Congregation ..... Rabbi Abram M. Granison .... ... ..... The Religious School . . . . Our Board of Directors .... .... .. .... The Congregation Looks to the Future ... A Valedictory by Jacob Brandon, Editor and Historian .. .... .. In Memory of our dear Departed ...... On Behalf of our Children and Grandchildren ............. The Spiritual Leaders of Temple Beth Israel .......... Presidents of our Congregation .. ..... .. Golden Anniversary Dinner ............ Presidents of our Sisterhood ........... The Menorah Sisterhood .... .......... Greetings from Subscribers and Publicity .. Page ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, 4 5 6 7 8 9 12 18 20 22 23 24 26 28 29 30 31 32 34 35 37 39 40 41 42 44 46 48 49

PAGE 8

FOREWORD The United Hebrew Congregation came into being just fifty years ago at a meeting of minds. Eleven American Jews out of a total estimated Jewish population of about one hundred in Cuba decided to establish a Congregation and purchase land for a cemetery. Minutes of their meetings which are still extant make no reference whatsoever to the type of worship they wished to inclulcate. Orthodoxy, Conservatism or Liberal Judaism were nowhere mentioned. They evidently foresaw that prevailing world conditions would soon cause many thousands to emigrate from their homelands, and that Cuba, fresh from her long, brave strugg l e for freedom would be asked for asylum for many of these. The prospect therefore was for a heterogeneous religious group, and these eleven men weff' wi llin g to l eave to the future the consolidation of majority opinion. Our Congregation has never attained numerical supeno nty a lth o ugh it was the first Jewish institution to be organized in Cuba. An outline of its history follows this Foreword and will throw some light upon its usefulness and influence as a stabilizing factor in Jewish life. We avail of this opportunity to express to the people of the Republic o f Cuba our appreciation of their kindliness and hospitality in granting all peoples an opportunity for rehabilitation in this fair land without distinction of race and creed. The longer one abides in Cuba the greater becomes hi s amazeme nt at the strides which have been made in so short a time by her people, particularly in the arts and sciences. Their intellectual con tributi o n s are proverbially far above those of any other nation of comparab le size, bidding fair for a prosperous future Their solidarity with the United States, demostrated at various critical times, has strengthened the ties between the two nations; ties unforgettably rooted in the Cuban War of Independence. During that same stressful period severa l American Jews rendered signal services to the country, some becoming members of the United Hebrew Congregation shortly after hostilities were over. Since that time other members of the United Hebrew Congregation have likewise contributed their share to the furtherance of Cuba's cultural and intellectual activities as well as to her industrial progress. In these days of joyful retrospect, the United Hebrew Congregation prays with profound sincerity for the continued happiness an d prosperity of the Cuban people. 4

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IN MEMORIAM It may be a surprise to many of our readers to learn that the origin of the word JUBILEE is recorded in the T o rah (Leviticus XXV-8-17). In those distant days it was looked upon as an exalted Sabbatical Year to be celebrated every fiftieth year ; that is to sa y, in the year following the seventh sabbatical year. The root of the word is Y O B E L meaning a ram's horn or trumpet, symbolizing a call to the pe op le to join in celebrating the event. From the Jewish point of view, therefore, the call is not only for what the word "jubilation,, signifies in modern parlance, but also for I soiemn and grateful remembrance of those who rendered conspicuous service to the Cause motivating the celebration. With this is mind, the Jubilee Committee requests each member of the Congregation when reading these words to pause and reflect for a few brief moments upon the debt of gratitude we owe to the founders of our Institution and its numerous outstanding workers of the Past, especially so in the case of those who still sojourn with us in memorie s of affectionate relationship; namely: Louis Jurick, Mr. and Mrs Charles Berkowitz, Mrs. Adolph Kates, Mr. and Mrs. Henry I. Liebman Mr. and Mrs Joseph Steinberg, Gustave Hammel, Harry E. Price, Mauricio Schechter, Adolph W,inetraub, Mrs. Gustave Kates and Albert Hartman. May they, with ot h ers of our beloved departed, forever be at peace. 5

PAGE 10

I] EAR FRIENDS: It has been a great h onor for me as we ll as a deeply appreciated privilege to se rve as y o ur President during the past two y ea r s and now once again in this year of 1956 which marks th e 50th anniversary of th e founding of the United Hebr ew C o ngr ega ti o n. During my thirty years of assoc iation with this co n g regati o n I hav e joyfully wit n esse d its progr ess the growth in its member s hip a nd the ex pan s ion of it s activities Thi s deve l opment is a ll the more impressive when we s t o p t o consider that throughout th e h alf ce ntury of its hi s t or y o ur congregation h as had to adjust itself to h o ldin g services and carrying on it s activities eit her in members' homes or in hir ed h a ll s sad ly l ac king th e space a nd facilities necessary for a T emp l e Th e so luti on fina lly adopted by your B oa rd one which for so long has been dear t o the hearts of a ll of u s is, as y o u all know, to build a permanent house of wors hip of our ow n especially adapted to our needs a temple which we will be able to enjoy in our lifetime and our c hildr en and grandc hildr en in theirs. By way of putting thi s plan into immediate effect, our congregation has purchased during this Jubil ee Y ear of 1956 a parcel o f l and upon which we hope soon to erect o u r ow n building where our families and friends may unite in prayer and where there will be amp l e room for study and for conducting the various even t s which form a vital part of the life of the Congregation What more propitious tim e cou ld th ere be for beginning thi s magnificent work than this very moment when we usher out the o ld half century and welcome in the new! What more appropriate tribut e cou ld we pay to the memory of those far-s ight ed men and women wh o founded this congregation! What more fitting g ift cou ld we pass on to our loved ones who some day wi ll take ou r places! As we st~nd on the threshold of th e future of the Uni ted H ebrew Congregation, the building of our temple is one of th e major tasks that li es before us. I know that with y o ur generous cooperation, God willing, we wi ll accomp li s h it. M ay God bless us in this as in a ll our undertakings. Pr e sid e nt U nit e d H e br e z C onqregalion 6

PAGE 11

GREETING It is with a sense of profound thanks t o our God and Father that we celebrate the G o lden Anniver sa ry of the founding of th e United Hebrew Congregation. Without His help and sustenance during the many trials and tribulations of thi s congregation, we would have nothing to celebrate. This Jubilee Golden B oo k is a richly deserved tribute to the founders, leaders and members of this congregation whose contr~butions to its life and development have earned for them our mdying gratitude. They have bequeathed to us a noble heritage which iL is our duty and privilege to preserve and advance. This we are determined to do with all the power and means at our command. Fortunately for us we have a loyal Membership and a devoted Board of Directors who fully measure up to their responsibilities In Mr. Morris Mayorkas, we have a superb President whom we all love and admire. Our Sisterhood which has done wonders, a lw ays stands ready to give its all for the welfare of the Temple. Our Religious School has achieved a status of prime importance, and continues to grow in s ize and in strengh. The spirit of the congregation is one of con fidence, courage and optimism. That is why I rejoice to be your Rabbi at this historic mile-stone a nd that is why I thank you with all my heart for the support and encouragement that y~m have given me in our sacred enterprise. The Congregation will continue to go forward and upward I feel certain of that. And I venture to prophesy that before our Jubilee Year is over we will be well on our way toward erecting a new Temple that will inspire us with increased devotion to our faith and people T owar d this holy task let us dedicate ourselves in God's Name! Rabbi 7

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ERWIN GOTTHELF, CANTOR Chance winds are often h arbingers of Good F o rtun e. So it happened with Erwin Gotthelf when he so licited the position as Cantor for. Temple Beth Israel of Havana, Cuba, in September 1941, fifteen years ago this month. He had left Europe in searc h of more co ngenial employment, going first to Colombia and then to Venezuela. Whil e in Caracas he received an invitation to work in Havana for the CMQ Radio Station. He came to Cuba with this in mind. But this was not for Erwin Gotthelf. In Europe he had frequently substituted as Cantor, and it was now revealed to him that this, and this alone, was the vocation he loved and which brought to him a need of comfort and happiness. Erwin's application was accep t ed by the United H ebre w Congregation inasmuch as he possessed a cu ltur ed an d s ympathetic voice and a sturdy and pleasing personality. From that time to this, no person and no thing h as taken precedence in the mind of Erwin Gotthelf over hi s mission at th e Temple. He voluntarily took over in addition to his work as Cantor and the training o f an amateur choir, the supervision of the Templ e premi ses, supervision of the Congregation's accounts, its co ll ec ti o n s and di s bursements, apart from rendering assistance to the Congregation a nd Sisterhood in prepar ing festivities, religious programmes, community gatherings, etc., etc. Erwin Gotthelf is an important fac tor in o ur Temple activities. His voice is replete with those proverbial nuan ces which express the eternal "heimweh" of the Jewish soul. We take this opportunity of conveying t o him o ur h ea rtfelt aprecia, t1on, and to wis h him l ong life and good h ea lth with which to continue his devotion to the work he has c h osen for hi s own. To use the Cantor's own words, "The Temple is my wife and my life." 8

PAGE 13

THE UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION ( A HISTORICAL OUTLINE ) On the fifth day of August in the year nineteen hundred six, an event occured in the City of Havana, which had m o mentous implications for a small group of Jewish settlers in Cuba. These implications apply equally to their successors, among whom, we today are numbered. On that day fifty years ago eleven English-speaking Jews out of an estimated total of about one hundred throughout the Island, met at the suggestion and at the home of one, Manuel Hadida, with the a vowed purpose of establishing a Congregation, and with the immediate aim of purchasing ground to be used for a Cemetery after its solemn dedication according to Jewish rites. To use their own simple verbiage they also agreed to establish a "benevolent section and everything connected with the Jewish faith." As we see it in the light of our own complicated times, this was a very broad commitment, but these eleven stalwarts were dynamic enough to tackle any task they could then foresee. The majority of these men were Americans, of whom several had come to Cuba in the wake of her struggle for independence, and had decided to remain visualizing the advent of favorable opportunities to make a good living, quite apart from having developed a profound sentiment of comradeship towards this kindly people who had fought so long and bravely for their freedom. Indeed, only four short years had elapsed since that radiant goal had been attained, and the Country was still s uffering from the aftermath of its costly struggle. Cuba was still func, tioning under the aegis of a Provisional Government, and the time had not yet come to release her comrade in -a rms at the North from its obligation to superintend her pacification and assist her through this trying period of transition into absolute autonomy But our eleven Jewish "settlers", as they called themselves, were in no way discouraged by these seeming obstacles Whatever may have been their limitations, the events which followed iustif ied their faith in themselves and demonstrated that they possessed the vision to realize that if they were ever to earn the respect and consideration of other social and religious groups already well established in the Country, they must first consolidate into a worthy social entity with official recognition as such. They were well aware that an influx of Sephardic Jews had started two years before, and it was a foregone conclusion that refugees from other sections of Eastern Europe would soon be seeking escape from persecution in the free countries of the Western Hemisphere. 9

PAGE 14

Thus they were moved to consider the whole gamut of Jewish welfare jn Cuba as their immediate concern; namely, to succor the poor and afflicted, provide religious service and community service to those worthy to receive them, and la st but not least, to own a Cemetery where tradi, tional interment would be available for every co-religionist departing this life in Cuba. These eleven men were unquestionably the fathers of the United Hebrew Congregation, as the minutes of their meetings show. Many o thers joined later, and of these a considerab le number would not aff iliate until a permit for the Cemetery was actually secured and an uff icial charter for the Institution actua lly obtained. But the original eleven were free of skepticism. They were fired with a different sort of zeal. Possible failure did not enter into their calculations; their foresight was unequivocal. The names of these eleven men were: Manuel Hadida Martin Kohn Jacob H. Heller Isidore Lirriano Manuel K. Jessel Louis Jurick Mauricio Schechter Joseph Steinberg Emile Berkowitz Adoph Dynner Alexander Freedman. At the fifth meeting of the members of the Congregation held on October 7 1906, Mr. Hadida reported that he had been in New York to confer with Rabbi Dr. Harry Pereira Mendes, Rabbi of the Spanish, Portuguese Synanogue (Shearith Israel). That Dr. Mendes had recom, mended him t o a Mr. Salomon who apparently had influence with the State Department in Washington and succeded in having an order sent to Mr. Morgan, United States Minister in Cuba, instructing him to ass ist the C o ngregation in obtaining the necessary permit to acquire land for use as a Cemetery from the Provisional Goverment of Cuba. In this connection it is interesting to note that in 1919, thirteen years after, when learning of the death of Theodore Roosevelt, the Board of Directors of the United Hebrew Congregation instructed its Secretary to send a letter of condolence to Mrs. Roosevelt expressing gratitude for the intervention of Mr. Roosevelt, then President of the United States in connection with the acquisition of the Cemetery. From this it would appear that the State Department in Washington had taken its cue in 1906 from the President himself. At the eighth meeting of the Congregation, Mr. Hadida announced that the Permit for the Cemetery had been granted. He forthwith solicited subscriptions so that the land for which they had been in treaty might be immediately paid for. Hadida did not ask in vain. At this 10

PAGE 15

very meeting a Constitution was submitted for approval by Mr. Hadida and accepted. At the 10th meeting of the Congregation, which had hitherto func tioned with a temporary Board of Directors, the following officers were elected: Jacob Barker, President Louis Jurick, Treasurer Manuel Hadida, Vice, President Martin Kohn, Secretary Five trustees were also appointed, among them, Joseph Steinberg. By this time the membership had reached about 40 in number. Among them were Charles Berkowitz, John Zoller, Robert Diamond, H. H. Diamond, A. Salomon, S. Friedlein, Sidney Rothschild, Morris Heyman, J. Couriel, G. A. Flesh, A. Schwarz, M Soriano, etc. This we believe, completes the first stage in the history of the United Hebrew Congregation. Mr. Joseph Steinberg Chart e r M e mb e r o f th e U nit e d H eb r ew Congr e gati o n and Captain in th e Cuban A nn:Y of L i b e ration. 11

PAGE 16

SOCIAL SERVICE AND PUBLIC RELATIONS Specialization is the order of the New Day. Ever increasing demands upon human energy, ingenuity and "Know,how" call for simplification and specialized organization for optimum results. Less than two decades ago, however, our Congregation had not yet learned the advantages of specialization. Our members labored indefa, tigably to carry the heavy load to which the original Founders committed themselves fifty years ago, namely "to establish a benevolent section and everything connected with the Jewish faith." What could be more natural under the circumstances than that a consolidation should have been effected with the Centro Macabeo dedicated to the care of one wave after another of immigrants? Needless to say, the consolidation was for a highly worthy purpose, but it was quite alien to the normal functions of a Congregation, absorbing practically all its available time and income, so that ultimately it was forced to relinquish these excessive responsibilities. In the interim h owever, the work and sacrifice entailed were nobly and efficiently borne, as the records s how. Much of the success was due to the organization of the Ezra Society, by Mrs. Jeannette Schechter and whose first President was Mrs. Joseph Steinberg From 1923 to 19 31 the Ezra carried on in combination with a committee appointed by the Hias of New York, which provided some profe ssio nal workers and considerable monetary assistance. But during 1931 the entire work was turned over to the Frauen Verein, a group affiliated with the Centro Israelita, the most influential factor in the local Eastern European community. Later in 1927 Mrs. Schechter organize d the Menorah Sisterhood with Mrs. Adolph Winetraub as first President. The organization was wholly compatible with the needs and aspirations of the United Hebrew Congregation, and its proficiency and influence has been so far-reaching and so telling all through the years that it would require an entire vo lum e to do it justice. It had been our intention to comment specifically upon the accomplishments of the Sisterhood and mention some of the outstanding l eaders in its midst, but the debt we owe is to so many and is so wide,spread among devoted workers that it would be utterly unfair to mention one without mentioning all. Suffice it to say at this point that the Menorah Sisterhood is the "right arm" of the Congregation, immeasurably streng thening community spirit, and enhancing the Congregation's income as the vanguard of its social as well as cultural activities. We recall with justifiable pride that at the start of Hitler's oppression of the Jews in Germany, members of the United Hebrew Congregation were selected by the American Joint Di str ibution Committee and its 12

PAGE 17

associated organizations to form a committee, later known as the Joint Relief Committee, which received the German Je\vs sent by the New York organizations to obtain Permanent Visas at the American Consulate in Havana. Before long wide spread persecution of Jews multiplied the duties of this local Committee. Ship-loads of refugees arrived in Havana hailing from every section of Central Europe. During the period of about two years, until the American Joint Distribution Com mittee sent down professional workers to take charge in Cuba, the local committee processed about 5,000 refugees, not one being allowed to become a public charge, thereby making it possible to obtain an uninte rrupted series of new immigration permits from the Cuban Authorities. The Joint Relief Committee was managed by Albert Hartman, Gustave Kates and Jacob Brandon with the splendid assistance of Oscar Gurfinkel. Se veral ladies of the English speaking community, most of them members of the Sisterhood, assisted Mr. Brandon in conducting the extensive off ice work involved, and the Committee rented quarters in the Manzana de Gomez Building where ladies of the Sisterhood provided aid and comfort for the women and children arriving from Europe. Their ministrations to the sick and needy were continuous and their attentions were extended under particularly difficult circumstances to those who for one reason or another were detained in quarantine. The Com mittee's relations with the American Consulate with respect to the interchange of information regarding the status of the refugees was of a highly gratifying nature, making it possible at times to expedite the issuance of visas for the United States. The same may be said of the Committee's relations with the Cuban Immigration Authorities. The C o ngregation has been a generous host throughout its history. Of late years its premises have been utilized by Bnai B'rith, the Hillel I-1oundation and the Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A few years ago the Congregation placed its premises at the disposal o f Holy Trinity Cathedral under the auspices of their esteemed friend, Bishop Blankingship, until the new church was completed in the Vedado. Our Rabbis exchange pulpits on many occasions with spiritual leaders of Protestant sects. From time to time the American Ambassador has also addressed our Congregation from its pulpit. Several of our members have received recognition from the Cuban Government for services rendered to the Republic. First and foremost among these was Joseph Steinberg who, with his brothers Max and Edward, were personal friends of Cuba's Apostol, Jose Marti. At the latter's suggestion, Joseph Steinberg organized a Patriots Club of Cuba for the purpose or raising funds to aid the Revolution. Tomas Estrada Palma, then delegate plenipotentiary 13

PAGE 18

of the Cuban Revolution (later Cuba's first president) appointed Joseph Steinberg a Captain of the Army of Liberation, authorizing him to so licit and collect revenue in Cuba and abroad, an assignment which was faithfully performed Our departed brother, Joseph Steinberg, won the affec tion and respect of all those who were fortunate enough to know him and his beautiful wife was one of the most active workers in th e Ezra Society and th e Menorah Sisterhood. Joseph Steinberg was buried with military honors, a platoon of soldiers accom panying his mortal remains, placed on a caisson, to the Jewish Cemetery, where taps were sounded and a volley fired as the coffin was lowered into the grave. May this beloved couple rest forever in peace. Mr Ad o lph H. Kates, a past president of the Congregation has received from th e Cuban G ove rnment the Cross of the Order of Carlos }vfanuel de Cespedes in recognition of services rendered to Cuban interests in the country and abroad. He has likewise been knighted Grand Officer of the Order of C o mmercial Merit. He is a member of the American Chamber of C ommerce of Cuba, and also a director of the Cuban Chamber of Commerce and a member of its Executive Council. He is a member of the B oard of Director s of the Cuban Good Neighbor Foundation. Mr. Kates recently celebrated his seventieth birthday anniversary, and on that occasion announced a great number of generous donations t o charitable, cultural and educational institutions in Cuba as well as abroad. Hi s benefactions ha ve indeed been many and wisely distributed. Jacob Brandon was knighted with the Order of Merit Carlos Manuel de Cespedes on Febru ary 24th 1940 by Pre s ident Federico Laredo Bru, the decoration taking place at th e Cuban Embassy in Washington, D. C. Mr. Brand on had been a member of a Cuban Committee which attended the Eighth Scientific C o ngress in Washington for the purpose of studying ways and means to in sta ll a more reliable system of control for Vital Statistics in Cub a. Mr. Brandon was secretary and interpreter ad interim for the group of University men who were appointed on this important mission. At the time it was decided to include Mr. Brand on among tho se receiving the decoration, Dr. Miguel Angel Campa, then Chancellor of the Order, informed Professor Jorge Roa, one of the recipients of the same award, that the President also had in mind Mr. Brandon' s serv ice s t o the Cuban community as executive director of the J oint Relief Committee, he having so conducted its operations that th e question of Cuba accepting so large a number of refugees of the Jewi s h faith within so short a time ( once a controversial subject with Lab or and State departments) never became a serious problem. 14

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Had it been otherwise, said he, the noble aims of the Joint Relief Com mitte could never have been realized as they were to the honor of Cuba. On December 3rd of the following year ( 1941) Mr. Brandon received the award of the Order of Merit, Carlos J Finlay, from the hands of President Fulgencio Batista in the City of Havana The decoration was in recognition of his personal efforts to establish in the United States an understanding that Dr. Carlos J. Finlay was the sole discoverer of the fact that one particular species of mosquito is the host and only transmitter of yellow fever. Several of our members are pioneers in Cuba with respect to their respective fields of endeavor. We mention a few as follows: Adolph Winetraub was sent down to Cuba in 1907 by the General Electric Company. He graduated from Columbia University as Electrical Engineer in 1905 immediately securing a position with the G.E. in Schenectady. In Cuba he rebuilt the first electric light and power plant m Santa Clara and electrified the City itself. He then returned to the United States until 1912 when he came back to Cuba to join Gustavo Lobo. He also worked with the Kelvin Engineering Company, electri fying several sugar mills. He became consulting engineer for the General Sugar Company and the Polar Brewery, and electrified the Prado and the Plaza de la Fraternidad. Mr. Winetraub was an active member of the United Hebrew Congregation until he left Cuba permanently t o establish a business in the United States. Mr. Winetraub passed away some years ago at his home in West Palm Beach, where Mrs. Winetraub still resides She was at one time a most active participant in the work of the Sisterhood which was inaugurated during her presidency. Gustave Kates was twice president of the Congregation during a difficult period in its history. \\ l ithal, his friendly optimism, his energetic approach to knotty problemns and his excellent generalship brought encouragement to those who worked with him, and to the membership as a whole. The outstanding accomplishment during his last term of office consisted of the emergence of the Cemetery from the category of an fconomic liability to that of a self-supporting unit This was accom, plished, as elsewhere touched upon in this Outline, through Mr. Kates' intensive collaboration with Mr. Liebman and Jacob Brandon, who with Mr. Isidore Stettner, comprised the Cemetery Committee at that time. From then onwards it became possible for the United Hebrew Con gregation to utilize income from normal sources for other constructive plans, among them the amelioration of the Building Fund, which it had been compelled to postpone so often in the Past. 15

PAGE 20

Gustave Kates as co-chairman of the Joint Relief Committee (affiliated with the J o int Distributi on Committee of New York) also performed a great service to the community at large by fostering goodwill among government a uth orities on behalf of the Jewish refugees who were at the time arriving at the port of H ava n a in eve r increasing numbers. After hi s term of office at Templ e Beth I s r ae l had expired, Gustave Kates accepte d th e presidency of the C e ntro I s raelita de Cuba with a fore, knowledge of the great responsibility t o be incurred by defending the large Eastern European Colony through th e most venamous period of anti-semitic activities Cuba h as ever kn own; a period when repeated attempts were made to sabotage J ew i s h int e r es ts by Nazi and Fascistic elemen t s which had established themselves in th e country, and when a limited section of the l oca l Press had succumbed to th e wiles of those who sought to defame the Jews within these borders. In this connection Adolph Kates was lik ewise highly influential in curbing the vicious practice of two or three of th e l oca l newspapers which had adopted the policy of publishing at frequent intervals scurrilous anti-semitic articles. Slowly but su rely the intelligent handling of the situation by Adolph on the one h and and Gustave o n the other hand caused the publishers to realize the unwisdom of their policy and brought about its discontinuance. Th e g r atitude of the entire com, munity went forth to the brothers Kate s for their co urageous and untiring efforts in this important direction. Charles Shapiro, a past president of the Congregation, a nd his good wife, Wilma, have always been earnest workers and generous contributors to the Congregation and the Menorah Sisterhood respectively, Mrs Shapiro having been twice president of the Sisterhood. H er a bilities as a hostess are noteworthy As a matter of fact, everyone knows that whatever Wilma puts her hand to, she does wel l. Expressions of gratitude are likewise due to Ro se ll a Shapiro wh o together with her husband, Barney, gives of h er best to the Temple and Sisterhood year after year. Barney is anot h er pa s t president of the Congregation, while Rosella has served two terms as president of the Sisterhood. The Shapiros are a united fami ly group who possess in Mother (Grandma) S l oane a treasure of inestimable value; a true matriach who in her ninety-fourth year preserves a zest for living and a benign nature which is an irresistible magnet, drawing t owa rd her the attentions and the admiration of our entire commun ity. David Henry Br andon, another past president of the Congregation, has also contributed substantially to the we ll -being of th e Congregation He and his wife, Louise, displayed great kindliness and s ympathy when 16

PAGE 21

they insisted that Rabbi Lowell should move into their home at the most critical period of his hopeless illness so that he might have the full benefit of their care and ministrations as long as might he possible Another past President, Philip Rosenberg, is a man of unusual perspicacity and judgement, demonstrated repeatedly on behalf of the Congregation. Durin~ his term of office as President, he succeeded in salvaging the Congregation from its chaotic economic position and in moving the temple from its crowded quarters on D street to its present premises on G. street. As a result of his inspired leadership and foresight, which includes inaugurating and making the first contribution to the Temple Build;ng Fund in February 1944, the Congregation took its first steps towards the economic self sufficiency which it enjoys today Mrs. Rosenberg was most active in the Ezra Society during the hectic period in which it functioned, and is presently an active member of the Sisterhood The Rosenbergs have incleed been a pillar of strength for the Temple and to the Community at large ever since they settled in Cuba many years ago. There are at this time twenty seven members of the Menorah, Sisterhood who are members of the Woman's Club of Havana, and a still greater number are members of the Mother's Club, several of them having served on the Board of Directors of this Club. Mrs. Ethel Hammel is a Founder Member of the Anglo, American Community House Council, and served two years as Chairman. She is also a past president of the Menorah Sisterhood. Mrs. Robert Kaplan is now a member of the Board of the Anglo,American Hospital, and has also served as Chairman of the Community House Council. Three members of the United Hebrew Congregation are active workers in the Little Theatre of Havana; namely James Knapke, Arthur Hammel and Earl Brandon Mr. Knapke was Treasurer for six years and served as Chairman for two years. Mr. Hammel is Treasurer at this time. Mr. Brandon gives unsparmgly of his talents, as do the others, on behalf of this interesting organization which in the 12 years of tts existence has contributed some $30,000 to worthy causes. Our membership includes many others who actively participate in civic and communal affairs and are a continued source of pride to our Congregation. Many of the ladies of the Sisterhood are included in this group. 17

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THE BUILDING FUND It is as unrealistic to expect any institution to develop full efficiency in cramped, inadequate quarters as it would be to expect a tree to come to full fruitage when its roots are confined within an earthen pot. It has been said with much truth that things either grow or tend to wither away. ::iomething of this sort was very likely in the minds of some of the Directors ot the Un:.ted Hebrew Congregation about 3 3 years ago when they met at the home ot their then president Mr. Morris Schecnter, on beptember 23, 1923. Mr. Barker and the Secretary, Mr. Adolph w : inetraub, started a discussion as to what should be done with regard to pledges which had been offered by several members toward a building fond for the temple. The upshot of the discussion was that the pledges were not accepted No record appears of what the pledges amounted to or by whom they were tendered. The importance of this lies in the fact that although seventeen years had passed since the Congregation was established, services and meetings were still being held at the homes of various members or in rented halls. It cannot be denied that the Cemetery was sti ll a heavy burden upon the Congregation, not yet producing enough to cover its carrying charges or permit much,needed improvements. This was due to the fact that interments were almost wholly from groups of recently arrived immigrants not yet well accomodated to altered living conditions, and jn most cases unable to pay for graves. The fact is that the Con, gregation wa s suffering from a state of apathy and inertia innocently fostered in great part by a group of ultra,conservative members whose influence weighed heavily with the majority. Confidence in the future of the Congregation seemed to have faded. A minority group which held fast to its opinion that land ownership bespeaking faith in the future, would serve to re awaken the dormant spirit of the original founders, were quite unable to overcome the odds against them. For nearly 20 years this minority, prodded each incoming Board of Directors to take action in the matter of a so,called Building Fund. On one occasion an authentic plan for a Temple was prepared by a note, worthy architect At the same time two proposals were submitted for e xcellent lots in the Vedado at prices which today seem illusory. Very little interest was shown in these proposals. How ever, pressure never ceased from the minority group. Finally a Building Fund was started in February 1944 by Mr. Philip Rosenberg to which contributions were added by some who had previously been cold to the idea. By 1950 the Fund had grown to a substantial sum, and when Mr. Harry Price became 18

PAGE 23

President he worked dilligently to bring to fruition the hopes of many for a Temple of our own, but the time was not yet ripe for this consum mation. Majority opinion still prevailed that it would be better to make extensive alterations in the premises at Avenida de los Presidentes rather than pay the prices being asked for land and construction Finally, at a meeting held on May 27th 1952 during th e presidential term of Mr. David H. Brandon, this alternative was decided upon. The premises at Avenida de los Presidentes were renovated and air conditioning included, the total cost of which amounted to $27,500.00. In spite of of these improvements the situation remained more or less unchanged in so far that there was no space for a Community House through which growing generations could become identified and familiar with the activities of the Temple and Congregation, no place for an adequate library; insufficient space and facilities for classrooms and last, but not least, the House of Worship would still continue to be utilized for acti vities of a wordly character incompatible with a place consecrated to prayer and meditation. Briefly stated, the inadequacy of the present quarters came home to each and every member with unprecedented clarity, quickening the latent desire for a Temple and Community House huilt to fulfill the needs of the present and forseeable future as well. On February 28th of the current year 1956, Mr. Morris Mayorkas, our esteemed and exemplary President, who is now brilliantly completing his third consecutive term in off ice, secured a unanimous vote from the Board of Directors to appoint Committee consisting of Mr. Philip Rosenberg, Mr. Charles Shapiro and himself to investigate certain opportunities to purchase land in the Reparto Miramar, with authority to effect a purchase for account of the Congreagtion. This Com mittee decided upon an ideal location at the south went corner Quinta Avenida, Miramar, with an area of 4,076 varas. The property cost $91,000.00 and the terms of sale were a down payment of $50,000 with a satisfactory mortgage for the balance. The fact that this forward step in the history of the Congregation has taken place in its Jubilee Year is highly auspicious. It is gratifying to note that the enthusiasm which attends the current drive for funds with which to start construction surpasses in intensity any activity previously undertaken by the Congregation. W.e may add at this point that the activities of the Congregation from 1951 to the present time during the presidential incumbencies of our departed brother, Harry Price and his successors, David H. Brandon and Morris Mayorkas, have been unequalled in any period of its career. Improved economic condi, tions have undoubtedly contributed to the progressive spirit of three consecutive Boards of Directors whose sterling abilities added to the devotion and cooperation of the Menorah Sisterhood, have made possible the realization of a long cherished dream. 19

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RABBI MEIR LASKER The year 1933 was a crucial one in the history of Cuba. It was the year of the revolution which unseated President Gerardo Machado of evil fame, and destroyed his bloodthirsty contingents. Rabbi Meir Lasker took on his assignment in Cuba at this very time and we know of no better means to present his enviable record to our readers than to quote his own words in a letter recently written by him to one of the members of our Jubilee Comittee. He says: ...... Now, let us turn back the pages of time and recall the events that were outstanding. It was in the summer of 193 3 that I first arrived in Havana. It was when Dave Lewis (manager of Metro,Goldwyn,Mayer) was president of the Congregation, and the country was in a deep depression following Machado's overturn. Batista had taken command of the army, but outbreaks were still a common occurrence. One of the lasting memories which has not dimmed with time was that year's Kol Nidre Service. A curfew had been established so that no one was permitted to appear on the streets after dark without an official permit. Through the courtesy of the Police we secured permission to hold services. Just after Cantor Ehrlichmann had finished chanting the Kol Nidre, there was a shot fired just outside the Temple, and a cry of pain followed. I remem, ber how startled we all were. I recall stepping to the pulpit, requesting everyone to remain in his seat while two of the ushers went out to see what had happened. A Cuban who had gone out to visit his wife at the maternity hospital, had failed to stop at the command of a soldier and was killed. The tension and realization that life was insecure, and an awareness of the danger hovering about made that Service one of the most sorrow, ful and meaningful I had ever conducted. Shortly afterward came the boycott against German goods because of the cruelty of the Nazis against our people. Perhaps you will reoll the visit of Samuel Untermeyer to Havana and the sentiment expressed by him and others, that some effort shou ld be made to unite Cuban Jewry. Mr. Jurick was president of the Centro I srae lita at the time, and I became vice,president of the Juridische Comite of which you or lvfr. Hartman was chairman. I recall the many meetings and the time, the energy and the hopes expended to build a unified voice for Cuban Jewry, and to no avail. I also remember the attacks in the Press against the Jew s, and our visit to Batista urging him to put an end to these vitriolic attacks. J believe Gustave Kates went with me, for I have a picture taken during 20

PAGE 25

our v1s1t. I also see in my files the many articles I published in the Cuban Press to offset the horrible allegations against our people. Then came the part of the refugees. This, of course, you can recall better than I for no man gave so much of his time and service as you did in organizing the help we needed through the Joint Distribution Committee. Moreover, my own efforts were concentrated in arousing our Sister hood to the need of bringing food and drink to those who were being held in the camp, to establish the school for refugee children at our Temple, from Kindergarten to the first year high school, to "schnorr" for funds for the maintainance of that school and to create in variou s parts of the city schools for adults in which some 900 were in attendance. Through intensive correspondence I succeeded in bringing down the Friends Society of Philadelphia of which I became vice president. We rented a house in the country and took the young men and women off the streets and taught them farming, carpentry and other occupations while they waited for their visas to come through. Even now I frequently receive cards from some of those who, through my assistance, received visas for this country. I recall the S ./ S. St. Louis wich remained in port for several days, and the agonizing moments when we strove to get some of those Jewish passengers off to safety, and failed. But I believe it was at your suggestion that I called Panama where members of your family resided, and through their influence some 40 were brought to safety while the others were shipped back. As for the work in the Congregation itself, I organized a Religious School for the children, introduced the study of Hebrew, Bar,mitzvahed a number of boys and added a ceremony for Shebouth which I believe the Congregation is still using." From the above it will be readily seen that Rabbi Lasker is a man of unusual patience and determination. Were this not so, he would never have consented to carry on for more than seven years under such difficult and trying conditions. Fortunately for the Congregation both his wife and himself endeared themselves to all concerned because of their loyalty, hard work, and understanding of the serious problems that were being faced. We can t: ay with assurance that these tender &entiments remain mutually unchanged with the passing years, and that all of us who know them rejoice in the knowledge of their well being and success in the City of Brotherly Love. 21

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RABBI DR. SRUL SAPIRA A short time after Rabbi Meir Lasker had resigned, the Grand Rabbi of Belgium together with his gentle and charming wife, Sabina, arrived in Ha vana. They had fled from: Antwerp during the Nazi terror, finding their way, often by foot with others on the same sad errand, into France, from which they were forced immediately t o esca pe the identical fate that had pursued them in Belgium. Finally they arrived in Cuba where they received a cordia l reception from the United Hebrew Congregation and where our pulpit was eventua lly offered to the Rabbi. The Rabbi is an eminent person m his own country, having been selected by the Belgian Government as the official representative of the Jewish people there. He is a man of great learning and experience, and it was quite a privilege to have him with us until peace was restored in Europe. His English was never fluent, but he has an ample vocabulary and his ability to deliver a convincing and uplifting sermon made a deep impression upon his hearers. Apart from our regular Friday evening services in English he conducted a conservative service on Saturday mornings either in French or in German, and the numerous refugees from Europe who were in Havana at that particular time derived much comfort and knowledge from same. Some of our members correspond quite frequently with Rabbi Sapira until now, and he reports that his Congregation in Antwerp is growing steadi ly in numbers and well,being, and that he is happily esconced once more as Grand Rabbi, on appointment by the Government. 22

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HENRY I LIEBMAN AND THE CONGREGATION People are admired and respected for the way in which they think and for what they accomplish, but they are loved only for what they are. Henry Liebman was loved for his unaffected probity and retinement and for his mild and tolerant disposition. Withal, his sense of justice did not allow him to bow to majority pressure, as was demonstrated time and again when he def ended those he believed to be right against invincible odds. It was because of these admirable qualities that his co-operation was sought for all praiseworthy social activities. He made an excellent president for the Congregation even in the stressful time when he was called to serve. For a great many years he and his good wife gave of their best to the Temple, the t:zra ::ioc1ety and the ::i1sterhood. But Henry s most cherished work was for the Cemetery, which together with Isidore Stettner he managed extraordinarily well considering that the Congre gation was for a long time unable to budget anythmg like what he considered its minimum requirements. Atter considerable negotiation with the Chevra Kadisha during the presidency of Gustave Kates, after Jacob Brandon had joined the Cemetery Committee, arrangements were concluded which soon made the Cemetery self supporting and brought permanent financial relief to the Congregation This having been accomplished, Mr. Liebman's next aim was to provide water for the Cemetery. At various times this had been attempted without success, and the Cemetery was an arid place. At last he met a country "engineer" who lived in the neigborhood and claimed he knew a spot not far away that could supply the Cemetery with all the water it needed. He offered to point it out to Mr. Liebman if the Congregation would agree to supply the precious liquid gratis to the adjacent homes. This was agreed to, and the engineer not only located the water but assisted Mr. Liebman to acquire the small piece of land for the Congregation. Unfortunately Mr. Liebman became very ill at this time, and did not survive to see the water actually piped into the Cemetery, but the credit was all his own. Today the Cemetery is a different place from what it used to be, and the water has enabled us to provide flowering shade trees and green graves. Apart from this Mr. Stettner has made vast improvements in the Cemetery, and should share with Mr. Liebman the gratitude of the Congregation for his exemplary services throughout an untold number of years. The graves of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Liebman are a fitting expression of the dignity and simplicity of their lives, and periodically serve as a Mecca for family and friends who wish to revive tender memories of their lovingkindness and devotion. May they forever rest in peace. 23

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MORRIS AND JEANNETTE SCHECHTER This high-minded and devoted couple m a rried in New York City m 1913, ten years after Morris Schechter had entered into business in Cuba. He was born in Rumania, but had become an American citizen. Jeannette was born in Palestine, but had been living in New York for about eight years before their marriage. H e was o n e of the estimated one hundred American Jews residing in Cuba at the time of his arrival. He was also one of the original eleven founders of the United Hebrew Congregation, listed as such in the minutes of the first meeting held on August 5, 1906. Both M orris and Jeannette Schechter ever held th e mselves in readiness for philanthropic work, no matter how onerous it might be, and their home was a favorite rendez-vous for persons of culture and talent, many of them being visitors from the United States and Europe. Their hospitality was of the warmest and it was a grea t privilege to be counted among the guests at their famous Seder dinners. In these matters their sister, T erna, deserves a goodly share of the cred it. Mr s. Schechter is a past president of the Men o rah Sisterhood. Morris Schechter took office as president of the United Hebrew Congregation on July 1, 1923, and th e minutes of that Meeting, recorded by his secretary, Adolph Winetraub, a r e quite amazing. On that occasion 52 new members were adm itt ed int o the Congregation, a 1ecord never equaled before or since. Thi s was s h ortly after the merger with the Centro Macabe o, and pref e, rential attention was being given to work on behalf of immigrants even though the Cemetery was in desperate need of improv e ment s and en largement to meet an increasing number of demises. When chided on this account, Morri s Schechter exclaimed, "Let us work not only for the dead, but also for the living." It was at thi s time that, at Joe Steinberg's suggestion, funds were raised to provide night school for immigrants so that they might learn both Engli sh and Spanish. Morris Schechter and Adolph Kates made common cause in efforts to secure pecuniary assistance and loans without co ll atera l for refugees, enabling many t o become se lf supporting. Th ey soug ht help from Israel Unter berg, Cyru s Adler, Robert Samuel Cohen and Judge Otto Rosalsky, and were not disappointed. 24

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About this time Morris presented the Congregation with its first, small Safer Torah, on behalf of his uncle, Solomon Schechter. During his presidency the services of Rabbi B.L. Hurwitz were obtained for the High Holy Days at a cost of $1,100.00, most of which was collected by means of a series of banquets at $ 3. 50 per person, a high price in those days. During the Hitler regime when large numbers of talented rrms1cians and artists found refuge in Havana, the Schechters gave many of these notables the opportunity to meet with local music-lovers at their home. Refreshments were served, and these occasions became a real "treat" for all concerned. Among the guests were Fritz Stiedrich, Carl Bemberger, Herta Glatz, Artur Rubinstein, Jacob Gimpel, Ivo Neuman (artist), etc. On some of these occasions the Schechter s availed of the opportunity to ailow promising local talent to meet these masters. Some of Cuba's young hopefuls have since become famous in their professions, but seem to have quite forgetten that they received their start with the assistance of the Menorah Sisterhood in Havana, a nd professor Jascha Fischermann. Morris Schechter passed away in the year 1952, one of the "Unfor, gettables" in our community history. May he ever rest in peace well earned during his earthly sojourn, and may Jeannette find solace in these commentaries and be spared for many more years of happiness with those who abide with her. 25

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HARRY E. PRICE On th e occas i o n when Harry Price first agreed to run for President of the Congregation ther e were few candidates available for the post. Great as was the honor, everyo ne was aware that any president would be facing a two,horned dilemma which might prove to be a heart, b r eaker at the very least In the first place, for a great many years the controlling influence had been a well,intentioned and highly conservative group. On the other hand, rabbinical l eaders hip h ad partially collapsed owing to th e fact chat for a lm ost three years two rabbis s ucce ss iv e ly had served both the Congregation and the Hill el F oundatio n, d emo nstrating once again that no one individual is likely to meet with success who serves two masters simultaneously. Harry Price was not disquieted by the se formidable handicaps, and his remarkable ability to surmount them was n o t long in making itself fe lt Hi s procedure was unostentatious. He carefully analyzed disparate points of view without taking sides in a ny irrevocable way, and by gentle persuasion sought the middle road He p ossess ed a charming well,trained speaking voice and a warmth of manner which never failed to predispose his audience in his favor. D isco rdant factions often found themselves agreeing with respect to matters which a short while before had been a bone of contention between th em. Indeed, Harry Price endeared himself more and more to the members of the Congregation by his mi l d approach to every prob l em and his persistence in finding t:olutions by compromise. After Rabbi Weissberg had resigned H arr y focussed his attention upon corraling all possible sources of revenue with a view to augment the Building Fund as rapid ly as possible, while at the same time rein, forcing the General Temple Fund. It was Harry Price who selected R abbi L owe ll to occupy our pulpit, He did so because he recognized in the Rabbi a flexible attitude of mind which would harmonize wi th hi s own aims to heal dissension by compromise. He envisioned that by re,estab lishing tolerance and good wi ll among the members he would ob t a in whole-hearted co-operation which was sure to produce in turn a period of sig nal progress. In this he was abso lut ely right. In the light ot his strenous efforts to amass fund s for the Building Fund, and the extraordinary success which attended those efforts we cannot but marvel at his apparent unresisting acceptance of the make, shift plan to rehabilitate our present premises. Wie cannot but believe that h e suffered in so doing, but would not allow anything to mar the 26

PAGE 31

easy low of goodwill within the body of our Institution. Perhaps he saw the wisdom of once more going the way of least resistance, in the moral certitude that the Congregation would soon come to realize unanimousiy that any deviation irom the original building plan was futile there being literally no space in our present quarters to meet the demands of the Religious School or develop activities which would promote pride in ownership in the hearts of oncoming generations. At a General Meeting held in May of 1952, Harry Price was made our first lifetime Honorary President, an h o nor which no man could better deserve than he. It was during his term of off ice that the Congregation received it s charter as member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Sadly enough both Mr. Price and Rabbi Lowell were gone from our midst before building plans came to fruition, but neither of the two will be absent from our thoughts when we arrive at the culmination o f our hopes. Both these men captured our undying affection because they possessed that indefinable quality of character which "makes the whole world kin." May they rest forever in peace in the heavenly Haven of Peace. 27

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RABBI BENJAMIN B. LOWELL Rabbi Lowell's coming in September 1951 was timely. The Con, gregation seemed to be l aboring under a spell of disillusionment. Religious services had dwindled greatly, and there was an atmosphere of dissatisfaction without a specific explanation of what was wrong. The personality of the new Rabbi put a speedy end to this anomalous situation. His good-cheer and alertness, his sense of humor and cur11radeship, his unusual charm and erudition, all contributed to build up unanimity under his friendly tutelage. Benjamin Lowell gave much of himself and asked little in return. No one ever heard him ask for support in hi s plans for the simp le reason that there was never any cause for him to do so. His excellent rhetorical ability and his perfectly co-ordinated technique rarely made it necessary for him to utilize notes when delivering sermons and addresses. As an educator we may say that he was "to the manner born." He rarely gave attention to individual preference with regard to ritual. Whatever the religious committee seemed to call for, be it Conservative or Reform, he was quite willing to concede. His main purpose was to re-establish goodwill and unity in the body of the Congregation, using a friendly and intellectual approach to most problems. He never a ll owed himself to remain mentally aloof from his people; he must have needed them as much as they needed him. Plans for the enhancement of his work filled his thoughts even after he must have realized that he was not destined to carry them to fruition. It was a heavy burden for him to bear. He expressed his desire to end his days among his devoted friends in Cuba, but this was not to be. lt is gratifying to remember that he remained a beloved guest in the home of Mr. and Mrs. David H. Brandon until it was deemed imper ative that he be hospitalized near his family in California. Although it was understood that Rabbi Lowell was a man of sorrows he never displayed bitterness or resentment at his tragic fate. Trying experience must have served as a crucible in which only the gold remained to attest the sweetness and dignity of his character. He also possessed the gift of reconciling conflicting opinions by an irresistibly jovial attitude of tolerance. May his memory long remain green in this fair land where he faithfully fulfilled his last assignment, and may his soul rest in eternal peace. 28

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ALBERT HARTMAN Albert Hartman, past president of the Congregation, stood : high among those who sought to uphold the dignity of the Congregation, without as well as within the immediate zone of its influence. He could always be depended upon to foment cordial relationships among divergent groups, non-Jewish as well as Jewish, and in so doing took an active part through the great number of years of his residence in Cuba in such enterprises as would reach beyond points of difference in human credos and make for greater understanding and mutual respect He was a prominent member of Island Lodge No. 56 F and A. M. and a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Foundation. He was co-chairman with Gustave Kates of the Joint Relief Committee, of which Jacob Brandon was executive secretary and treasurer, during the most critical period of the Nazi effort to dominate in every part of the world and pursue its policy of genocide with respect to individuals professing the Jewish faith. The passing of Albert Hartman was a genuine loss to the foreign community in Havana, and a heavy blow to the United Hebrew Con, gregation, of which he had been a respected member for over thirty years. 29

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LIBERAL REFORM JUDAISM AND THE FUTURE OF OUR CONGREGATION On January 1 5, 19 51, during the first term as president of Mr. Harry Price, and during the tenure of Rabbi Milton Weissberg as spiritual leader, the United H ebrew Congregation received its charter of mem, bership from the Union of American H ebrew Congregations of New York. Thi s forward step marked the encl of a lengthy period of transition from orthodoxy to Liberal Reform Judaism. Ritual and Ceremonial are probably among the most ancient of mankind's heritages. Their importance from an evolutionary standpoint lies in the fact that even in their early repugnant stages they marked humanity's gradual emergence from utter animalism into unmistakable trends of conventional thmking. Thi s assumption seems justifiable in that the passing centuries haVE: : so molded the human mind that for upwards of a thousand years the primitive significance of sacrifice has been sublimated into spiritual seif,denia l resulting in the abandonment of sadistic practices in most parts of the world. Religious ritual and ceremonial today are genuine ly centered upon rendering praise and gratitude to God without blatant show of material sacrifice, and upon preserving noble ideals which link the vivid Present with the fading Past to assure the perpetuation of a cherished fa ith. Liberal Reform Judaism frankly recognizes that a plethora of ceremonial may become tedious, even an obstacle to the free movement of the sou l which must transcend whatever is routinary in order to respond to the &piritual impulses which flower into prayer. There is no doubt that a growing number of Jewish people prefer a liberal ritual provided it entails no loss of the beauty and sanctity of original scripture. Our spiritual leader at this time, Rabbi Abram Granison, is an ardent exponent of the values which inhere in Liberal Reform Judaism. By avoiding lapses into earlier ritualism he has helped the Congregation to attain a consistent and uniform religious service and a more realistic approach to routine problems. English-speaking Jews in Cuba are still a minority, but it is evident that a considerab l e number of youthful co-re ligi onis ts, especially those who have had a bi-lingual education, favor our services and are likely prospects for future membership. Moreover, the J ewis h population in Cuba is steadily increasing, and the constant influx of the new industries, many of which are operated by Jewish investors, betokens a bright iuture for the United Hebrew Congregation. We no l onger need "to wait and see what the Future is likely to have in store for us" as many of our members used to say in days gone by, for our Future is at our very doorstep. Let us then lose no time in gathering what we may of the go ld en harvest in this our Golden Jubilee Year, and joyfully set up rhe first milestone on the road to the Future as a gift of today to the generation that will succeed us. 30

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RABBI ABRAM M GRANISON Rabbi Granison succeeded Rabbi Benjamin Lowell in March of 1954. He found the Congregation on a decidedly upward trend economically, functioning with an active and conscientious Board of Directors, animated to add continually to its purposeful accomplishments. However, he also found a lurking threat to stability in a lack of coherence with respect to ritual and protocol, a matter of moment inasmuch as the Congregation had quite recently become affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations and the Rabbi has also dedicated himself to the furtherance of Liberal Reform Judaism. So seriously did this responsibility weigh upon him that he deemed it unwise to allow himself or others sharing this responsibility more than .:~ minimum of latitude lest the significance of the forward step suffer even temporary occlusion. Experience has shown the need of holding fast to whatever ground has been gained as a springboard to further progress, sealing off loopholes of possible future friction which could easily lead to retrogression. By painstaking efforts Rabbi Granison has suceeded in installing new pillars of strength and consistency within our spiritual edifice, promoting punctuality, and re-organizing religious service and the religious school m such a manner that both are now pursuing a normal course, true to protocol, and in conformity with enlightened practice. Esteem and affection are the just rewards of mutual confidence and understanding. Our Rabbi has devotedly sought to develop such mutuality by adherence to principles which preclude the doubtful t dvantages of "laissez-faire." His stature amongst us grows as we perceive the improvement which attends his efforts and as we learn to s hare his aims. Rabbi Granison has served the Executive Board of the Central Confe, rence of American Rabbis, the Board of trustees of the Jewish Institute of Religion, and Committee on Army and Navy Religious Activities (now called the Chaplaincy Commission) of the Jewish Welfare Board, which gives ecclesiastical endorsement and supervises the ministrations of Jewish chaplains in the armed services of the United States. He has been active in the work of many communal organizations such as the Jewish Community Council, United Jewish Appeal, Community Chest, Reel Cross, Family Welfare Society, Ministerial Association and the Masonic Order. Rabbi Granison is married to the former Rose Block of Pittsburgh who commands the affection and respect of the Jewish Community in Cuba. They have a daughter, Saranne, in whom one discovers the same virtues which characterize her distinguished parents. 31

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THE RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Records of the Congregation's first twenty years show no trace of a Children's Religious School. It was not until 1927, shortly after the Sisterhood was established, that Milly Winetraub, its first president, and her husband Adolph, started a class in a room on the second floor of the modest building in Carlos Tercero Street where the Congregation was then holding its services and meetings. Milly and Adolph were the first teachers, and the number of pupils was under ten. It does seem almost inconceivable that the members of the Con, gregation could have allowed so many years to pass without bringing their children together for Religious instruction, but the immensity of the work they already had in hand and the responsibilities which those hectic days had heaped upon them left them no time or energy to take o n any new developments. They were deeply involved in the maintainance and upbuilding of the Cemetery ; the formation of the Ezra Society after the union with the Centro Macabeo was consummated; the care and supervision of wave after wave of early refugee immigration. In addition to all this, genuine religious sentiment had been gradually fading out during some thing more than o ne generation, there being more lip-service than moral conviction prevailing. Indeed, it took a second World War with its un s peakable horrors to bring home to all free peoples how futile is relianc e up on a materialistic interpretation of life, its complexities and inter-dependence. Innumerable families were disinterested in putting themselves to the trouble of obliging their children to attend Sunday School, looking upon religious preparation as a mere nominal and perfunctory responsibility. In 19 3 3, h oweve r, at the very height of political and economic adversi ty, Rabbi Meir Lasker, who had just taken charge, succeeded in evo king greater interest in the children's inalienable right to l earn why they should be proud of their Jewish lineage, and the Rabbi did make a success of the School despite the lack of monetary support. Shortly after he left after seven years of faithful service, both the Congregation and the School lap se d into a state of inertia which continued to a greater or lesser degree until the first term o f Mr. Harry Price as President of the Congregation. Rabbi Milton Weissberg was in charge at that time. He started quite auspiciously, but unfortunately for all concerned had made a dual agreement with respect to dividing his time between the United Hebrew Congregation and the Hillel Foundation The Hillel effort ended in failure solely because of the hopeless unreadiness of the Cuban Jewish Community as a whole to undertake so advanced an educational plan. The Rabbi's disillusionment and discouragement was so intense that his usefulness to the Congregation became impaired, and he resigned. 32

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However, be it said to his credit, that prior to his departure the Con, gregation cast its lot with the Union of American Congregations, as he had strenuously advocated. This proved to be one of the most important decisions the Congregation ever made; it was, in fact, the turning point of several propitious events which were reflected in an upsurge of activity in the Religious School, as will be seen as we proceed. After a lapse of several months, Rabbi Benjamin Lowell arrived to take charge. It was not long before he had the general situation in the Temple well in hand, applying remedies which restored confidence and inspired all hands to pull together. A group of Ladies o f the Sisterhood a~sisted him in reviving the shattered remnants of the Religious School, bringing the attendance up to about 45 pupils. He did not succeed, however, in securing the acceptance of a budget large enough to perm.1t of thoroughgoing success. The School, was kept alive mainly by his own dynamism. A small library was started and very special attention was given to Chanukah and Purim plays which he himself prepared, and for which he personally trained the children. He also trained a Ballet of tots from five to eight years. But there was not as yet any syste matized organization; no curriculum worthy of the name. He in s truccccl the older classes while the ladies taught the younger groups. Rabbi Lowell did, however, reawaken the interest of the Sisterhood in th e Religious School and established a salary basis for the teachers. To this extent the path of his successor, Rabbi Granison, was made somewhat less difficult, giving him an opportunity to press further and obtain from the Sisterhood a budget for the School consistent with the splendid organization he has since set up. As Rabbi Granison has said, his aim has been to organize in such a way that the school may function safely on its own power, and not find itself again in a forlorn condition because of changes in personnel. He has established a system such as that which prevails in lay as well as religious schools, the staff at the present time being as follows: Rabbi Granison, Director Nancy Knopka, Principal Rose Granison, Voluntary teacher Raquel Wax, Bert Price, Gloria Shapiro, Leila Hart and Arda Salomon Teachers. Under the Rabbi's directorship the School started inmediately to prosper. In 1954, 54 pupils were enrolled. In 1955 the number enrolled was 64. The enrollment for the current year is 8 5. Rabbi Granison conducts a short Service at each meeting so that the children may become familiar with some of the prayers. He teaches Hebrew, prepares Bar-mitzvahs and directs the Confirmation Clas s es. From what has been said it is apparent that the Religious School is participating fully in the animated spirit which prevails in every branch of the Congregation's activities at this time. This bespeaks Rabbi Granison's exceptional ability as an organizer, and the Congregation i s happy in extending to him its fullest appreciation. 33

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OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS We have previously remarked that from the time of Harry Price's Eecond term as president to this day our Congregation has enjoyed an uninterrupted sequence of excellent directorates. We may add in all sincerity that our current Board presided by Mr. Morris Mayorkas probably surpasses all predecessors in congeniality, foresight and an ability to maintain a high average of activity within the working committees. The Board consists of twenty-six members fully representative of majority and minority opinions. It also possesses a goodly meed of youthful initiative which accounts in part for a revival of the construe, tive urge which at the present time animates the intelligencia of every land dedicated to the practice of human liberty with proper respect for Law and Divine Guidance. This constructive urge applies not only to material things but notably involves a growing trend to reassess genuine values which make for more harmonious relationships with those whose persuasions differ from our own, and with whom we are called upon to co-operate for the benefit of all mankind. The services of our 26 Directors are distribut(::d among nine corn, rnittees, three of which specially co-ordinate their efforts toward a common objective namely to erect our Temple and Community House as soon as possible on the beautiful parcel of land we recently purchased. The Chairmen of the Building Drive Committee are jointly Philip Rosenberg and Charles Shapiro, the Chairman of the Building Plans Committee is Maurice Adams, the Chairman of the Jubilee Committee, which sponsors this Historic Outline among a multiplicity of other activities, is Harold Tanenbaum. Mr. Tanenbaum 's wise and energetic leadership is an inspiration to other directors asrnciated with himself, and the many lay members, as well, who are contributing their best efforts to secure additional sums to be invested in our building project. In this way the entire Congregation is asked to do its part in giving wings to our hope for an early start in building, and brings ever closer our Day of immeasurable gratitude and supreme rejoicing. 34

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TO MORROW... THE CONGREGATION LOOKS AT THE FUTURE The highlights of the first fifty years smce the founding of the United Hebrew Congregation have now been set down It is possible that some day in the future a more detailed account of this period of the Congregation's history will be published. Until that time arrives, however, we trust that this record will help to inspire tho::;e who read it to carry on the work of the Congregation already begun and bring it to even fuller realization than our humble but earnest efforts have been able to achieve. It is logical to assume that in the commg years the Congregation will continue to grow, and it is therefore our wish in this Jubilee Year to leave to those who follow us a House of Worship of their own, adequate to their needs. The land has already been purchased and plans for building are going ahead. We trust that in the near future we shall be able to raise the remaining funds necessary to make our long indulged dream come true To-day after fifty years, our Congregation finds itself united not only in name, but in fact. We hope that this new sense of cohesiveness within the Congregation will continue to make itself increasingly felt a s the years roll on. The Religious School is now established on a firm foundation, and with adequate classrooms, such as we look forward to having in the new Temple, our children will receive their religious education m more pleasant and serviceab l e surroundings than we have been able to offer them up to the present. We are confident that the Menorah Sisterhood will continue to grow in scope and numbers, and look forward to the organization at an early date of a parallel Brotherhood to match their enviable record. English-speaking Congregation as we are, we are drafting a new Constitution along more modem lines to be submitted to the General Meeting in the near future, and which we hope will bring our organic law up to date. 35

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As we bring our Jubilee Year to a close we witness with a deep sense of comradeship the subsequent rise of various other Jewish Congregations in Cuba. These have cordially united with us in commemorating the founding fifty years ago of the United Hebrew Congregation, the first to be established in Cuba. We again express our gratitude to this kindly and beautiful country of Cuba for its unforgettable hospitality to our people. The past fifty years have been in a sense an epic test of our ability to measure up to our responsibilities as a Congregation. We pray that the years to come will bring the fulfillment of all the hopes and dreams which the eleven original founders so earnestly cherished, and which we in turn cherish on behalf of those wno will follow us. May the Lord aid our successors in a ll their efforts on behalf of Temple Beth Israel even as He has supported and comforted us in hours of tribulation and brought us forth safely to our Year of Jubilee. 36

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A VALEDICTORY by Jacob Brandon We now approach the conclusion of our task. We had hoped to present an uninterrupted narrative, but this proved to be impossible because records covering about twenty intermediate years of the Con gregation's history have unaccountably disappeared. We therefore turned to biography to bridge the gap and punctuate the progress that has been achieved. This is quite in order inasmuch as History and Biography are inseparable partners in the annals of mankind. We have also sought to capture something of the nature of that unquenchable religious impulse which for so many centuries has found apt expression in congregational worship, and which throughout eras of Dispersion kept the Faith of Judah alive, for we must not lose sight of the fact that the hope of humanity is centered upon what is unknown, unseen and esoteric rather than upon what is known, seen and materially experienced. This is because Man's role in Nature is not that of a creator, but essentially that of a Discoverer of what has been created; an organizer of his own talents for controlling and utilizing the same. By this token he is constantly reaching out towards Realities which he has reason to believe lie beyond the power of his physical senses to palpate. This is the stimulating factor behind ethical research, and an acceptable explanation of human craving for spiritual fulfillment. All progress stems from the need of readjustment to meet changed conditions. It is easily recognizable by a sudden urge to find "new worlds to conquer." This has been so in the case of the United Hebrew Congregation, for no sooner was the long awaited decision taken to modify its form of worship and become a member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations than the Board of Directors unani, mously voted that steps be taken to purchase land and proceed to erect a Temple and Community House of our own. The die was cast, and it was not long before even the most cautious among the active mem bership became reconciled to the formidable investment required. Those who really feel a sense of unity with the Congregation have simply arrived at an understanding that the time has come to march forward and meet the Future half way as our contribution to an ever-widening horizon, or spearhead another decline into futile procrastination and frustration Symbolism, Metaphor and Parable alike have always been helpful in bringing to mind a just appreciation of ethical and spiritual verities. We therefore take the liberty of concluding our presentation upon a theme which insistently lingers in our thoughts. 37

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Life as a spiritual Idea may be associated with the concept of an Instrument of Ten Strings, divinely fashioned and attuned to the Celestial Symphony so that each String shall vibrate in perfect unison with one cf the ten Cardinal Virtues. Every human being is free to approach the Instrument and reverently touch the Strings whereby unselfish deeds are transformed into perennial joys, and Duty into a labor of Love. Some there are who display the will and the wisdom to exercise their prerogative, giving thanks to Deity for the gifts of life, intelligence and receptivity to the imperishable values He has created and placed at Man's disposal. There are, on the ot her hand, some who feel that Life, with its fading pleasures, its infirmities and its uncertain victories and defeats, has been arbitrarily thrust upon them. These elect to dwell upon the surface of Personal Desire, indifferent to the Still, Small Voice wnich whispers again and again of spiritua l surviva l and individual responsibility. When such as these irreverently brush against the s trings of the heavenly instrument, dissonant vibrations go forth into the Void to challenge, hopelessly though it be, the mastery of the human soul. We voice the hope in this Year of Jubilee that it will be given to us to witness an ebbing away of guile, artificiality and pseudo-idolatry; chat men and women everywhere may be provided with the sort of education which disproves the theory that lu st for temporal power and material aggrandizement can for long compete successfu lly for the laurels of posterity against spiritual enrichment, or compensate for the ills resulting from iniquitous leadership. May we and all others who would help to es tablish the Brotherhood of Man attune the inner ear to the music which rises from the Instru ment of Ten Strings whose immaculate accents reveal the Substance from which eternal Life is molded. NOTE. We understand the Ten Cardinal Virtues to be: Love, Faith, Piety, Probity, Compassion, Fortitude, Forbearance, Purity of Motive, Judgment, and a noble Humility before the grandeur of th e Universe These Virtites are in the main co-related to the Mosaic Decalogue. 38

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IN MEMORY OF OUR DEAR DEPARTED JACOB BARKER JEANETTE BARKER BERNARD BARKER ALBERT HARTMAN HENRY I. LIEBMAN JENNY LIEBMAN FERDINAND SEELIG JENNY SEELIG HENRY KANE ROSA KANE JUDITH MADURA BRANDON ANNA MADURA BRANDON MAYR MAYRSOHN ANNA MAYRSOHN GUSTAVE HAMMEL DAVID SLOANE JEFFREY J. SLOANE ROY H. SLOANE MAURICIO SCHECHTER ANNA SCHECHTER RAUL SCHECHTER A. SYL VIO SCHECHTER PHILIP KLEIN GENA BLOOM HELENE KA TES SIMON KATES CECILIA KA TES ABRAHAM RESNYIKOVITZ ,ANNA HOROWITZ ANNA BERGER LUIS SELTZER MORDKA JOSIF SCHNEIDER EV A SCHNEIDER 39 ALEXANDER Z. GABRYLEWICZ HAYA GABRYLEWICZ ALEXANDER BAIKOWITZ DEVORA KATZ DAVID GABRIEL KATZ PHILIP BRIN FRANCES BRIN ROSE ZVICK MAX PRACHNIK CIVIA BARTH HIRSCH BAR TH REBECCA MA YORKAS NISSO MAYORKAS HEINRICH GOTTHELF FANNY GOTTHELF JOSEPH GORLINE ESTHER TRILNIK ELIAS TRILNIK ANA BERGER HIRSCH HERMAN ROSENBERG HEIDRICH ROSENBERG JOSE SEGAL BEIN TAUBA SHAPIRO ISRAEL SHAPIRO JOSEPH STEINBERG BLANCA STEINBERG FAMILIA ZABIELINSKY ELIEZER STETTNER ZLA TA STETTNER SAMUEL PINCUS MARY PINCUS ISSAC SLUTSKY ADELA SLUTSHYANA

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ON BEHALF OF OUR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN HARRY FALKENBURG RALPH FALKENBURG ROBERT PAUL SCHECHTER MICHAEL HIRSH HERTZBERG RICHARD HERTZBERG FANNIE ADELA REYLER RUTH FISCH MELANIE ANN FISCH SUSAN BARBARA FISCH NORMAN SCHWARTZ DEAN PHILIP KANE ALEXANDER BENES DAVID BI GELMAN .ANIT .A EPSTEIN ROBERT AVRAM MARCUS CAROL LYNN MARCUS ISRAEL BIGELMAN RAYMOND STEVEN SHAPIRO IRA SLOANE SHAPIRO GEORGE BERENS MARA BERENS MICHAEL KNOPKE DOROTHY ANNE KNOPKE EVA KALUSIN LAWRENCE KALUSIN LOUIS SZUCHMAN MARIO SZUCHMAN ANITA SZUCHMAN MICKEY SPATZ RENEE SPATZ SANDRA ABRA V ANEL EUGENE ABRA V ANEL FLORENCE ABRA V ANEL HELEN RESNIK .ALAN RESNIK BARRY ALLAN SHAPIRO SHELLY MACY SHAPIRO TIMOTHEY LOUIS SHAPIRO 40 MARTIN S TONE CAESAR S TONE DIANNE STONE ALEC JOSEPH ROSS MARIANNA DA VIDOVICI HELEN SEGAL SIMON SEGAL ANITA SEGAL JILL EDELSTEIN LYNN EDELSTEIN ISRAEL BERENS FREDDY BERENS ABRAM BERENS VALERIE PRE S LEY COPELAN ROBERT FRANKEL NAOMI ELSA MASLIAH MICHELE IRENE MA S LIAH ILONA MERPORT SARITA CHAJMOVIC H SAUL CHAJMOVIC H RAYSA CHAJMOVIC H MARIL YS REBECCA NEPOMECHIE MONICA BEATRICE DON HELEN W ASSERSTEIN SANDRA WINSTON JUDY OSTROVSKY ABRAHAM OSTROVS KY JEFFREY PRICE RICHARD PRICE SUSAN PRICE HARRY PRICE II DEBORAH HELENE PALMER LESLIE BRANDON GRANT BRANDON JUDITH BRANDON TERESA TANENBAUM RICHARD ISRAEL TANENBAUM ISABEL TANENBAUM DAVID THOMAS TANENBAUM

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Spiritual Lea~ers of Temple Beth Israel Rabbi Meir Lasker Rabbi Dr. Srul Sapira Rabbi Abram M. Granison Rabbi Benjamin B. Lowell 41

PAGE 46

Mr. Jacob Barker Mr. Maurice Schechter Presi~ents 0 f Congregation Mr. Lou is Jurick Mr. Adolph H. Kates 42 Mr. Bernard Barker Mr. Isaac Brandon

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Mr. Philip Rosenberg Mr. Gustave Kates Mr. Henry I. Lieb.man Mr Charles Shapiro Mr. Albert Ha r tman Mr. Barney Shapiro Mr. Harry E. Price Mr. David H. Brandon Mr. Morris Mayorkas 4 3

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Jubilee Dinner 15 1956

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Congregatio n Decembe r

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Mrs. Richard Knopke PresiOents of our SisterhooO Mrs. Maurice Schechter 46 1 Mrs. Charles Shapiro Mrs. Barney Shapiro

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Mrs Gus tave Hammel Mrs. Leon Lemberg Mrs. Harold Tanenbaum Mrs. James Knopke PHOTOGRAPHS OF PAST PRESIDENTS MISSING Mrs. Adolph Weintraub Mrs. Ira Brussels Mrs. Joseph Steinberg Mrs. Adolph Kates. Mrs Albert Hartman Mrs. Robert Kaplan Mrs. Isaac Brandon Mrs. David Scharf 47

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THE MENORAH SISTERHOOD ITS AIMS AND COMMITMENTS Continuous activity and achievment are obviously the yardstick of Progre~s. Thi s truism unquestionably applies to the Menorah Sisterhood now at the threshold of 1ts 30th year of exemp lary devotion to Temple Beth Israel. It is pleasant indeed to call to mind the Sisterhood's traditional objectives, its voluntary commitmen t s and some of its sa lient activities of the Past and Present. We marvel at their wide scope and eff ectivity aimed to keep pace with a broadened interpretation of biblical lore as an infallible guide in human relations in our own Day just as it was in the Day~ of Yo_re. Social activities as sponsored by the Sisterhood have not only accelerated commurnty mtegrat10n but have served to promote a high morale among our congregants. Th e Si s terhood nourishes religious l oya lty among our children in their tender years inasmuch as the Religious School functions under its aegis. It thus co,operates with parents to inculcate a just pride in noble Judaic traditions while developing an affectionate relationship between the children, the T emp l e and the teachers who awaken in the minds of children an awareness of the wonders of the universe in which they live and an appreciation of the Divine Wisdom which governs all Reality A Library is maintained for members' use and for the children of the Religious School. A choir composed of Sisterhood voices assists the Cantor on High Holy Days and other special occasions. Moreover, the Sisterhood has taken over the onerous duty of canvassing funds for primary Congregational purpo ses, including the Temp~ e Building Fund, our main preoccupation and responsability at this juncture. It maintains a Happy Day Fund, which is supported by volun, tary contributions and dedicated to the educa ti on of needy Jewish children, with emphasis upon those who posse ss unusual ta l ent. Through the A. Silverio Schechter Welfare Fund the Sisterhood lend s a helping hand to needy Jewi s h families, holding it se lf in readiness to assist emergency cases. Members of the Sisterhood active ly co,operate and affiliate with worthy non,sectarian orga nizations dedicated to public service. The Sisterhood is a member of the National F e deration of Temple Sisterhoods in the United States, thereby keeping abreast of Reform Judaism in other parts of the world and maintaining contacts with other Sisterhoods. Th e Sisterhood has recently started a Special Fund to augment the substancial sum that will be required for the furnishings of the New Temple The Sist e rhood's membership numbers 140 at this time, and it possesses a permanent seat m the Board of Directors of the Cngregation. I? 1927 whe_n the Sisterhood was founded, the Congregation had no permanent place of worship. The Sisterhood, therefore, held its first meeting at the home of Mr Adolph Kates, then the Congregation's president. As indicated in another section of this Historical Outline Mrs. Adolph Winetra~b was e l ected first president of the Sisterhood. Of the original founder~ those who are sti ll active are Mr s Jeanette Schechter, Mrs. Charles Shapiro and Mrs. Philip Rosenberg. Others among t?e founders were Mrs. Adolph Kate s, Mrs Gustave Kates, Mrs. Joseph Stemberg, M rs. Morn s Sheps, Mr s. Richard Kn a pke, Mr s. John Zoller, Mrs. Isaac Brandon, Mrs. Nath an ~eller, Mrs. He~ry Edelstein and Mrs Sam Essrig. A Community Seder was hdd ?n the f 1rst Passover Night after the founding of the Sisterhood, about 60 of the C~ngregat1on s members attending. The Sisterhood has continued to sponsor these Seders ever smce. In ~losing i t rem ains but to say that the Sisterhood has pledged itself to continue its co,operat1on as mtens1vely as possible to bring to fruition our most cherished project; namely, the construction of a new T emp l e on the beautiful site recently purchased by the Con gre~ation in Miramar. 48

PAGE 53

GREETINGS FROM SUBSCRIBERS ANO PUBLICITY

PAGE 65

COMPLIMENTS OF M1. and Mrs. lsido1 Abravanel and Family

PAGE 66

OUR BEST WISHES Brandon and Company Proveedo1a Indust1ial 1 S. A.

PAGE 67

LE PARFUM ROI JEAN PATOU

PAGE 68

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

PAGE 69

PONTIAC 57 VILLOLDO MOTOR COMPANY CALZADA y 12, VEDADO TELEFONO p 9977

PAGE 70

COMPLIMENTS OF KLA WANS & DIEZ RIVAS ABOGADOS ATTORNEYS AT LAW EDIFIC I O AMBAR MOTORS 907 908 2 3 N o. 55, VEDADO, HABANA, CUBA CABLE : "CUBALA W"

PAGE 72

COMPLIMENTS OF Gorrin, Mafias, Macia y Alamilla Abogados

PAGE 73

IIIISl!IJliiiil!iiliiiiiii!IJi : h ;: ,; .. ..... : .. iil!S!J!tf~l. 0 ,, ~t ~ os 7-f~!ISiE EJJ!!!Jj liSIII! P e rfum es, cl es cl e I 3.00 &111111111 -: _.* -&' .. ma1111 : .' '. ,. : .. : Chr~ ; ;~an -, .. : Agua d e T ocaclor, d es cle 5.00 ~!!iii!!! f : ~~: ) ," 1!1111~ Co l onias, 2.75 y 5.00 Eilililt.,, .... .1.. il!!illlll IJii&IJIJiii!ii!ii!l!iiiiiiiSI COLONIAS LOCIONES Y PERFUMES E xclusivos de Ch n {t'-rls tlan lor A l a ventae n nuest r as Sucursales y Agen cias. Prestigie sus regalos co,, la etiqueta disti11g11ida tie EL ENCANTO

PAGE 74

COMPLIMENTS OF HARRY WINSTON, INC.

PAGE 75

SUCURSALES EN TODA LA ISLA Agular y Obrapla Galiano y San Jose Ave. de Italia 308 Oficlos 112 Ly 23, Vedado 23 y P, Vedado Linea 705, Vedado Concha y Fabrica, Luyano Ayestaran y 20 de Mayo Zanla y Belascoain Almendares (Calle 12 y 7a.) Miramar (Sta. Ave. y Calle 92) Pinar del Rio Matanxas Varadero Cienfuegos Ranchuelo Santa Clara Moron----___ Sanctl Spirltus 7 Camagi.iey Holguin-Santlago de Cuba The Trust Company of Cuba UNA MODERNA INSTITUCION BANCARIA AL SERVICIO DE UO Oficina Principal: Obispo 257, La Habana

PAGE 76

Cortesia de Galban Lobo Tra~ing Company, S. A. Cortesia de La Agrupacifin ~e lngenios Julio Lobo

PAGE 77

Com pan la "Ron Bacardi", S. A. SE ADHIERE AL CINCUENTA ANIVERSARIO DE LA UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION Y APROVECHA ESTA OPORTUNIDAD PARA SALUDAR A LA MUY PRESTIGIOSA COLONIA HEBREA DE CUBA

PAGE 78

COMPLIMENTS OF LAINZ y Co. APARTADO 802 HABANA SOLE AGENTS OF BOGER & CRAWFORD PHILADELPHIA PA. COMBED and MERCERIZED YARNS

PAGE 79

Rega I e estos Discos Long Playing

PAGE 80

COMPLIMENTS OF General Distributors Inc. Distribuidores de Productos de alta calidad

PAGE 81

7 POWER TOOLS IN ONE! 1. BENCH SAW Makes all precis i on cuts in 1" lumber. 2. DISC SANDER. Does fast profes sional sanding. 3, LATHE, Makes table legs lamp bases, bowls, etc ~l:(~3 4, HORIZONTAL DRILL, Bores enos and edaes makes d ~ owel holes r; 5, VERTICAL DRILL PRESS, Does deep drilling, straight or angle 6. SHAPER. Pvta decorative edge, on table-top,, 1helvff 7, PORTABLE ILIC TRIC DRILL. Power ful drill rvna It Ille,. fa,lly re move, for odd jobs Cummin6 BUILD ANY KIND OF FINE HOME FURNISHINGS REMODEL-REPAIR-EASY I Thousands of do-It Shop owners have im proved their homes inside .and out. So can you! Cummins do-It Shop is simple to oper ate-yet does real professional work. 45 long 7 high, weighs but 20 pounds. do-It Shop even works on a kitchen table hangs on a closet hook when not in use can be car ried in a car trunk! Changes tools in seconds. Get in on the fun of owning a real power workshop of your own do-it Shop comes com plete-with a series of precision-engineered accessories-and NO MOTOR TO BUY! 95 Ready to operate. lncludea shop illus !rated above, Cummins Ball Rite 4~ Drill, ftpro" table with miter gauge and rip fence, tool rest, cup and spur centers for lathe, screw center for disc sanding and face plate turning, 4 saw blade, arbor qnd extension rHt for bench saw, wrench and mounting bolts. NO MOTOR TO BUY Products of ~hi!b%Manufacturing Co. REPRESENT ANTES EXCL US IVOS CALVO V F. VIER A COMPOSTELA 663 TELF. A-6747

PAGE 82

COMPLIMENTS OF Armando J. Valdes y Cia. lngenieros-lmportadores, S. A.

PAGE 83

-JOYA EM~RUJO PROME~A MADERAS O E S T E

PAGE 84

COMPLIMENTS OF J. Pauly, Sus Hijos & Gia.

PAGE 85

Publicidad Patino Las gallecicas Saltines de "La Estrella", mas deliciosas, que nunca son ahora cambien las mas nucririvas, porque su ingrediente principal ~s la Harina Enriquecida conteniendo Vitaminas y mi nerales Mas que una golosrna, las galleucas de 'La Estrella" son un gran alimenco. No hay nin guno mejor nt que sea can econ6mico. Prefieranlas para los niiios y para usced. Siem pre esran frescas y tostadicas iLOS NINOS GOZAN AL COME R LAS! En bien de su salud, produclos de

PAGE 86

COMPLIMENTS OF ESSO STANDARD OIL, S. A. Cuba Division

PAGE 87

Bonde VSTED siempre halla Lo Mejo1 lo que DESEA! a Poco Costo

PAGE 88

COMPLIMENTS OF COMPANIA EDITORIAL EL MUNDO

PAGE 89

'1 xr,;:Ult9iijq1ef!!b!;! ~: ~ ; ii:~iLl!!:!5 ... el milagro del Sonido Vivo! PHILCO fr~ III I El Phonorama III de PHILCO le ofrece caracteristicas que solamente usted podia obtener antes en equipos costosisimos a la orden. ,i Bocin a C athedral 66 bocinas electrostaticas en una montadas en un area de 180 Reprod uce hasta 20 000 ciclos. J Nuevo y grandiose "woofe r de 15 pulgadas combinado de una exclusiva red con la bo cina Cathedral. Reproduce desde 40 ciclos. J Transform ador de fuerza extra para el a mplificador de Alta Fidelidad con push-pull de salida de 30 watts. J Pick-Up de ceramica de verdadera Alta Fidelidad a prueba de humedad. ,i Aguja de precision de Di amante ,i Nuevo M icro-Mezclador" PHILCO que permite mezclar todos los tipos de discos de micro -es tri as, no importa si son de 331 / 3 6 45 rpm. 6 son de 7 10 6 12 pulgadas, cambiandolos automaticamente. Sienta el orgullo de poseer un Phonorama Ill de PHILCO! Cia. Cubana Radio Philco, S.A. San Rafael 111 10 de Octubre 433 Tel. M 8348 1-8577

PAGE 90

COMPLIMENTS OF LES PARFUMS CHANEL Paris, France BENJUMEDA No. 252 HABANA

PAGE 92

COMPLIMENTS OF HERMAN'S STORE PRADO 256 TEL. A-8080

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AGRICULTURA INDUSTRIA TRANSPORTE 3 FACTORES DE NUESTRA ECONOMIA A LOS QUE INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER Ofrece la Mas Completa Organizaci6n en su Qiro! Equipos para los agricultores .. para los contratistas .. para el transporte No importa cual sea su necesidad en este sentido, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER le ofrece el equipo que usted necesite ... y et respaldo de piezas y servicio que requiere a traves de sus 17 Bases de Operaciones estrategicamente situadas con 458 empleados, cada una con su departamento de repuestos y existencia adecuada de piezas legitimas IH. Y ademas, 13 talleres de servicio con 12 5 mecanicos y la supervision de un Departamento Tecnico de Ingenieros y especialistas, para la atenci6n de todos los aspectos del servicio de nuestros equipos. Hobo no INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO. OF CUBA Ave. de Espana (Vives) 251, lptdo. No. 2, Habana JOSE JUNCO Y CIA., S. en C. MAQUINARIAS CAMAGUEY, S. A. Artemisa Ciego de Avila CamagUey ORESTES JUNCO Y CIA., S. en C. Pinar del Rio MAQUINARIAS Y EQUIPOS ORIENTE, S. A. Santiago de Cuba Holguin Guantanamo SANTA CLARA MOTORES, S. A. SARIOL IMPLEMENTOS AGRICOl.AS, S. A. Sandi Spiritus Sta. Clara Cienfuegos Habana Matanzas Cardenas Colon GUines Excluslvo para la Linea de Equlpos de Construcci6n: FUERZA INDUSTRIAL, S. A., Zapata y Paseo, Vedado INTERNATIONAL HA RVE STER

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COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

PAGE 95

SEGUROS KOHLY un nombre cenlenario en seguros G. F. KOHLY, S. A. OFICINA EN NEW YORK 100 WILLIAM ST. BOWLING GREEN 90695 MARITIMO CRISTALES ROBO FIANZAS SEGURO DE VIAJEROS CALDERAS ELEVADORES
PAGE 96

COMPLIMENTS OF MINIMAX

PAGE 97

USTED PUEDE VIAJAR CON MUY POCO DINERO... el NUEVO PLA!'~:C?~~~H~E VIAJES A PLAZ;;; de{;UBANA Unico vuelo directo, sin escala, en solo 3 horas y minutos, en nuevos y ultramodernos cuatrimotores SUPER G CONSTELLATIONS, por solo $15.47 de entrada y $13.30 mensual EL MEJOR HORARIO I I I I I I I I I I A solo 4 horas y minutos de La Habana el viaje mas rapido, directo y sin escala, en NUEVOS Y ULTRAMODERNOS CA 335 De entrada Ud. $1 ft 67 solo tiene que ~ abonar $17.36 mensual SERVICIO CON PRIMERA CLASE Y CLASE TURISTA SALIDAS DIARIAS 8:00 A.M Salida: 9 : 00 A M Llegada : 12 : 45 P.M LUNES MIERCOLES VIERNES I desayuno y almueno, sin coslo ad i cional. I TODO EL PERSOtlAL ES Exquisites comidas y be DE HABLA ESPANOLA bides sin costo odicionol. I ~ ,.. 1-\:::i._';\ Todo el personal hoblo espoiiol. I --= -~ ""'-~ L----~i, __ ----IP -.. --I I --I A solo 55 minutos de La Habana en los incomparables cuatrimoto res Rolls Royce, VISCOUNTS Pase unas agradables vacaciones en esta maravillosa ciudad magi ca por solo $5 00 de entrada y ... I I I I I I I En los potentes y majestuosos SUPER G CONSTELLATIONS de Cubana, usted podra viajar a Europa en Primera Clase o Cla se Turista, como lo prefiera, y en ambas disfrutara de un agradable ambiente que le re cordara la tertulia con sus mas intimos amigos, durante todo el tiempo que dure el viaje. y fijese en que forma tan comoda usted puede pagar el importe de su viaje. Entrada Mensualidades Madrid via Santiago de Cuba la insignificante cantidad de I I I I I I I I I I I I Paris Londres Roma $176.69 178.04 168.84 203.16 $39.88 40.19 38.07 45.55 LA RUTA MAS ECONOMICA Usted pasara unas deliciosas vaca ciones en esta exotica y hospitalaria tierra que tiene fisonomia propia y costumbres muy distintas a las nues tras por solo $10 68 de entrada y .. $9.62 mensual 4 SALIDAS SEMANALES $3.67 mensual 5 SALIDAS DIARIAS Cubana le ofrece salidas dia rias a Europa, via New York o en vuelo directo (cada viernes) via Madrid; el regreso puede hacerlo por cualquiera de di chas rutas. I Pida informes a su Agente de Pasajes o al U-4911 de I I

PAGE 98

Cortesio de P. Fernandez y Gia.

PAGE 99

PRESENTA AHORA CON ORGULLO SUS MARAVILLOSOS ---,.,,, ... ,; {I .,..,,.,,,, ;i" .... ,~:is. (>'' ~N_,,,,,.....,.,... ~~ ~.,,_ / ..... .... ....,...-.,uu.<>vor"'' en frascos de cristal protegidos con material plcistico. Contenido: 3 onzas $3.50 el fresco 6 fcagonc;o, mund;olmente :=:,:, eA 6 bell~: colo,es d; ferentes : TABU EMIR 20 QUILATES PLATINO RAMILLETE DE NOVIA CANOE iMas prcicticos, mas elegantes, mos ecanomicosl Una l i gera presion del dedo sere suf i cien te para que un vela sut1I y refrescante deje sabre Ud el exquisita roc,a de su perfume preferida LA MARCA SUPREMA EN PERFUMERIA DE LUJO

PAGE 100

HERSHEY'S

PAGE 101

A ESTE MONOGRAMA debe usted su comodidad Para que usted viva mas c6modamente y d is~rute de todas las invenciones y descubrimientos que depara el progreso 1 una legion de tecnicos especializados trabaia incesantemente en los Laboratorios de la General Electric. De esos conocimientos tecnicos y experiencia practica de la General Electric son las equipos y utensi lios para su hogar 1 que le proporcionan una vida mas simple 1 grata y mucho mas c6moda y alegre. N11esfros Produdos son Indies de Progreso GENERAL fl ELECTRIC I U A. GENERAL ELECTRIC CUBANA; S. A. EdHiclo General Electric, Estrado Palmo 556, ~oseo de Marti {Prado) y Anfmas, Hoboho .' Santiago de Cuba.

PAGE 102

Tip on the Ma r ketThat's one thing investors t:till ask for clay after day-despi t e the fact that time after time we've warned people aga i nst suc h tips and never peddle them ourselves Still they keep asking for a "sure thing on t h e marke t an inside tip to a fortune. Mind you, we don't blame anybody w h o wants to get rich. But that's a poor way to start! Not that there aren't any number of stocks that offer attrac, ti v e possibilities for making money Of course there are And w e 'll even be glad to suggest some, if you ask. But before we make any recommendations, we' ll c h eck the facts first. Facts on sales, earnings, management, ou tl ook Facts on the industry, company, and competition. F acts t h at should give you at least a reasonab l e exp~ctation of receiving the rewards you hope for. S o if you realize the risks in buying stocks for price appre, ciation, feel you can afford them, and want he l p instead of tip s -ju s t ask. Simply step in at our office or write. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane AGUIAR & O'REILLY, HAVANA TEL: M-8394

PAGE 103

COMPLIMENTS OF CUBAN TRADING COMPANY IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS P 0 BOX 1166 C a bl e : NABUC Raw and Refined Sugar Consignment of Ships Warehouses Sugar Bags Twine For Sewing Bags Calcium Carbide Industrial Paints Alcohol Molasses HORTER B U ILDING Obi s p o a nd Ofi c io s St s Ph o n es: A 11 2 1 M 8 2 91 HAVANA CUBA

PAGE 104

COMPLIMENTS OF The Texas Co., ltd. (WEST INDIES)

PAGE 105

COMPLIMENTS OF

PAGE 106

Compliments of HAMMEL and Co. Compliments of Cornercial lrnpulsora de Plasticos, S. A.

PAGE 107

COMPLIMENTS OF Compania Textilera Ariguanabo S. A. Fabricantes de Tejidos e Hilazas de Algod6n, de Rayon y otras fibras sinteticas y sacos para envase. Cayo La Rosa Bauta Habana, Cuba

PAGE 108

COMPLIMENTS OF COMPANIA AZUCARERA ATLANTICA DEL GOLFO

PAGE 109

COMPLIMENTS OF North American Insurance J. J. ALVAREZ Gerente PRESIDENTE ZAYAS 152 HABANA, CUBA

PAGE 110

COMPLIMENTS OF J A C Q U E S C O E & C o. New York

PAGE 111

Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Stanley Wax Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Philip Rosenberg Congratulates the United Hebrew Congregation on their Golden Anniversary

PAGE 112

Compljments of OSCAR PALMER Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Rafael Sanchez Losa~a

PAGE 113

Compliments of ALBERTO BROSS Best Wishes and Congratulations to the members of THE UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION on the occasion of its Golden Jubilee from Mr. an~ Mrs. Morris Mayorkas

PAGE 114

Compliments of Ted, Bruce, Jon and Craig Schwabach Compliments of ALBERTO BEHAR

PAGE 115

Compliments of Mr. an~ Mrs. Enrique Kalusin IN LOVING MEMORY OF Harry E. Price Jacob Bol~ FROM THEIR DEVOTED FAMILIES

PAGE 116

Cortesia de Moran, Valdes Rodriguez y Forcade Comphments of LA FILOSOFIA NEPTUNO, SAN NICOLAS SAN MIGUEL

PAGE 117

Para obtener imagenes mas claras nada mejor que un cinescopio RCA SILVERAMA Para imagen~s perfectas ~ cinescoplos super81uminizados RCA ilverama ... -El MEJOR TUBO PANTALLA PARA REEMPLAZAR LOS YA GASTADOS EN TELEVISORS DE CUALOUIER MARCA ;, E s usted d e lo s qu c adm iran la pcr(c cc ion quc ticnen la s ir11cig-cnc s en alg-unu" tcl c vi su r cs '! l' ucs l o cicrlo cs quc s u r ecep t or pudiera muy l,icn darl c todavia im ,i ~cnc s de so rprendente l,rillo y nitidcz s i sc rccmplaza c l Lubo-pantalla (que probablemente est:i ya ba s tante ga s tado) co n uno d e tip o S ILVERAMA d e la R CA. El cinescopio S ILVERAMA, s up era lumini zado mediante una moderni s ima tecnica exc lu s iva d e la RCA, devolvera a s u televisor la ca lid a d d e r e producci
PAGE 118

Cortesio del Periodico AVANCE Cortesio de OE SOTO AU T OS Y C AMI O NE S TELF U 17 50

PAGE 119

Europa lo espera... viajando por AIR FRANCE Modernos y lujo sos Super "G" Constellations, lo transportaran con la maxima rapidez, en el ambiente de mas confort y buen gusto que pueda Ud desear. Disfrute de los precios que le ofrece ahora AIR FRANCE en su nuevo plan fami li ar hasta Marzo 31 de 1957. Habana, Paris Clase Turi sta Ida y Vuelta Cabeza de fami li a $ 673.20 Esprn : a $ 473.20 Uno, dos o mas hijos de $ 473.20 12 a 2 5 anos de edad cada uno AIR FRANCE LA RED AEREA MAS EXTENSA DEL MUNDO Trocadero No. 59 Habana Telefono A-7094 for beauty, prec1s1on, durability SULLY WATCH ALL THAT YOU EXPECT FROM A Perfect Timepiece EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR: LUIS ROSENTHAL HABANA, CUBA

PAGE 120

Cortesia de J. Gallarreta y Gia., S. A. Cortesia de LA SUCURSAL

PAGE 121

SU ACTUAL TELEVISOR PUEDE SER 7 VECES MEJOR le da a Ud. imagenes mas claras y mas brillantes, mayor relieve, maxima dimension y mas detalles. Ahoro Ud puede obtener "una recepci6n perfecta y moderna" en su apara to de televisi6n muy simplemenle; diciendole a su tecnico que le instale un Tubo Pantalla SYLVANIA "Silver Screen 85 ". En las Silver Screen 85 la brillantez de la imagen ha sido casi doblada. El contraste ha sido aumenta do 3 veces Con ese buen televisor que ya Ud tiene, este avanzado tubo pant al la le do a usted m6s brillantez, imagen m6s clara, mayor profundidad y dimensi6n y m6s detalles Pidale a su tecnico en televisi6n un "Silver Screen 85" i Hay un tipo para coda modelo 1 CANON DE ELECTRONES DE FOCO PRECISO Diseno mejorodo que octi vo lo pantollo en uno for mo superior pore dor una imogen mos definido y mos claro 2PANTALLA ACTIVADA CON PLATA Millones de otomos de plate que es s up erior en poder reflective, son ogre godos a las sustoncios fluo rescentes del tubo pontallo en su parte interior. Do ma yor controste a lo imogen 3PANTALLA SUPER ALUMINIIADA Gron contidod de la luz que ontes se perdio dentro del tubo chore se refleja hacia el televidente dando una ima gen mos brillante. ... ,"i:L~!l!~v Oficios 204. Frente a Correos Centro Privado: W-5625 fS-9 56 RENT A NEW CAR FROM $ AND$ 5.00 DAILY 25.00 WEEKLY 24 HOUR SER VICE AVIS OF CUBA, S. A. RENT-A-CAR SYSTEM MORRO 60 PHONE: A 0220 M-8661 HAVANA, CUBA Aprenda a Manejar de Verdad Y OBTENGA SU CARTERA DACTILAR LEGALMENTE EN LA ACADEMIA DE AUTOMOVILISMO MAS ACREDITADA Director: HARDY L. SPATZ HAVANA AUTOMOBILE SCHOOL MORRO 60

PAGE 122

Cortesia de THE FAIR SAN RI\FAEL 203 Y 205 LA HABANA Compliments of Consolidated Cuban Petroleum Corp. HABANA No. 260

PAGE 123

FABRICADO POR INDUSTRIAS "NODAL" F6brica No. 566 Luyan6 Habana Para los que Saben y Pueden CHRYSLER Miembro Vitalicio de la Alta Sociedad

PAGE 124

Compliments of La Compafiia Cubana de Cementa Portland Compliments of Industrial Bank Plaza de la Catedral

PAGE 125

ATLANTIS (CUBA) LTD I APARTADO 3243 TELEFONO W-5491 Representantes Exclusivos en Cuba de: PRODUCTOS DE RECKITT & COLMAN LTD., INGLATERRA (Azul Magico, Pulimentos Brasso y Silvo, Mostaza lnglesa Colman, etc.) PRODUCTOS DE R. T. FRENCH CO., ROCHESTER, U. S. A. (MoE:taza, Especias, Extractos, Alimentos para Aves y Peces, etc.) PRODUCTOS DE THE NUGGET POLISH CO. LTD., INGLATERRA ( Betun Nugget, Cera Cardinal, Lim piadores Duraglit, etc.) TINTORERIA Y LAV ANDERIA CALZADA DEL CERRO 1410 Tell A-7246

PAGE 126

Compliments of Crusellas y Gia., S. A. Comphments of A FRIEND

PAGE 127

PRfCIO.S DfSD.f ii SO A~ 400 Halague su cariiio con el meior regalo OBSEOUIELE CON RcP~ITtR Sell o d e O r o LA CORBATA OUE LAS MUJERES ADM I RAN y LOS HOMBRES PREF I EREN 4 13LLAS LiNAS y ELEGANTE DISENO PARA LUCIR EN SU HOGAR MAS ESPLENDOR Y ATRACTIYO LO MAS MODERNO EN MOBILIARIO y DECORACION FABRICA : CEPERO 105 CERRO 1 5796 ML-1493

PAGE 128

Compliments o f NORWICH INSURANCE Co. Compliments of PEREZ HNOS. MADER A S LUYANO No. 802

PAGE 129

B. V. D. Extends to Temple Beth Israel Congratulation on this Golden Anniversary --------~ Llome al A-1904 o o su Agente de Posoje1 ...

PAGE 130

Cortesia de MIERES y Co. Sastres Camiseros San Rafael No. 54 Compliments of Emerson Radio

PAGE 131

Compliments of Inter-America Chemical Co. Inc. SAN LAZARO 799 HAVANA, CUBA U0336l1200 ULTRAMAR Calidad Supr e mo, Extra 19 rubies, enchapada en oro IMPERMEABLE con cierre hermetico tropico lizada, con C.P Cuerda Permanente ant i magnetico contrachoque ultram6t i co

PAGE 132

Compliments of American International Insurance Co. Compliments of Canada Dry

PAGE 133

Compliments of American International Insurance Co. Compliments of Canada Dry

PAGE 134

Compliments of Banco Continental Cubano AMARGURA No. 53 The FIRST NATIONAL BANK o/ BOSTON Fundado en 1784 Ofic ina de la Habana Aguiar esquina a Lamparilla Sucursales : Aven ida de Italia, 568 Maximo Gomez, 702 Santiago de Cuba Cienfuegos Sancti Spfritus

PAGE 135

Para viajar mas rapido y mejor ... ,Vuele Via V enezolana! ~-mEA AEROPOSJAl ~HEZOlMIA Un Eslab611 de Amistad y Servicio entre las Americas EN SU NUEVO LOCAL DE PRADO 257 TELFS. A-1943 Y M 6986 CONSULTE A SU AGENTE DE PASAJES Deliciosa hace de cualquier pausa La Pausa que Refresca

PAGE 136

Compliments of Robert Textile Corporation MANUFACTURERS OF: "PALM BEACH" "SUNFROST" "GOODALL" THE FINEST IN MEN'S SUITS! Compliments of EL HISPANO Nunez y Cia. AYESTARAN 619 HABANA

PAGE 137

WE EXTEND MOST SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS TO UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION OF CUBA ON THEIR GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY BURLINGTON EXPORT Co. 14 0 7 BROADWAYN Y CITY

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BANK Compliments of OF NOVA SCOTIA SER VICI OS BAN CAR I OS DE TODAS CLASES 1h e FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK ef New York HABANA SANTIAGO MAT ANZAS CARDENA S CA/BAR/EN MANZAN/LLO

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Compliments of

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Cortesia de FERROMAR, S. A. PARA COMERCIO DE PRODUCTOS SIDERURGICOS MATERIALES DE CONSTRUCCION Y MAQUINARIA Cortesia de TINTORERIA PALACE

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Compliments of Compaiiia ~oneri:::v Cubano, s A F O bn ca e n M a t a nz as Ofi ci n as G c n e ral es: Of1 c 1 0s N o 452 L a H a b a n o

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Compliments of Continental Can Corporation ARROZ CALLES SUAREZ Y PERK IN S LUYANO PHONE : X-3301 C ompliments of FRIJOLES JON: CH I :_' j BOLA ROJA RODRIGUEZ Y CIA, SANT A CLARA 64 HABANA

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Compliments of La Zaragozana Compliments of THE REFRESHMENT OF FRIENDSHIP

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Compliments of CAMAY-ROSAilO SABATES V CIA. See your Travel Agent or KLM, TROCADERO 55, ESQ. A PRADO Phone W-5770

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SYLVANIA FRIGIDAIRE SU AMIGO, EL AGENTE SYLVANIA FRIGIDAIRE FELICITA EN EL CINCUENTENARIO DE SU FUNDACION A LA UNITED HEBREW CONGREGATION Di s tribuid o r es Exclu s ivos para Cuba : Cia. Cubana de Refrigeracion Electrica, S. A. CENTRO COMERCIAL LA RAMPA 23 No 10 VEDADO ZIPPE RSILm.JJM fllR -.. CALIDAD INSUPERABLE,... FORRADOS SEPARADORES ESMAL TAD OS NIKEL SIL VER METAL no. 5 BRONCE para Pantalones Jacquets Vestidos Trusas Efectos de piel Carteras, etc. ALUMINIO Usos diversos INDUS TRIAS LVIWAR,S.A. IN q UIS ID O ~-No.516-HABANA

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Cortes i a de LA GRAN CERVECERIA 'l A TROPICAL'' 1'1AS DE 50 AN O S EN CUBA 8 Sucursales en La Habana LA HABANA Sucursnles e11 BAY AMO MORON tAMAGUH PINAR DEL RIO tlEGO DE AVILA SAGUA LA GRANO[ GUANTANAMO SANCTI SPIRITUS HOLGUIN SANTA CLARA SANTIAGO OE CUBA O fici na P rinci pal Mon tre a l [I B nc o m o s G r ande d e l Ca n ada

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Compliments of The Chase Manhattan Bank New York PRINCIPAL OFFICE: AGUIAR 310 HABANA OTHER BRANCHES: 23 ESQ A J VEDADO AMISTAD 304 HABANA ,, l,:.J A VE 51 (REAL) N o. 12802 MARIAN AO .. traiga hoy mismo a su familia al RESTAURANT y COCKTAIL LOUNGE NUEV~ (3JA 1iJ QlO CLUB EL MAS BELLO PARA/5(] CAMPESTRE DE CUBA KLM. 8 CARRETERA DE RANCHO BOYEROS Esplendldos manjares y ricos especialldades Ambiente refinado Grata atmosfera familiar B"\lABllS TODAS LAS NOCHES c.t"~s s~ NTI y SU GRAN ORQUESTA c.oN lUh ~ Exquisita atencion y servicio RESERVACIONES: 1-5923 t ; .. "' : :. ~~ ~! -. S E RY IC I O PA RA BAN Q U ET ES HAST A D E 2.000 COM E N SA l ES .. .. -~ -~ -n :--. ~ V I E R NES SABADOS y D01\ II NGOS BINGO en "NUEVO RIO CRISTAL CLUB" ~ o n rn ;'.1s d e S-t ,000.00 de p r e mi os e n efec ti vo Bi ll etes e nt eros de l a Lo t e ri a Nac i o n a l y o tr as g r a nd es opo rt u uicl a cl es.

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. Irving Schwab M1. and Mrs. Oscar Ferenczi COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF CHEVRA KADISHA Mr. and. Mrs. VE CHESED SHEL EMETH Hen1y B. Seelig SZAJA KANNER President

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COMPLIMENTS OF Moris Rosenfeld and Family COMPLIMENTS OF Rafael III Palacios y Capablanca COMPLIMENTS OF MS Schwartz and Family COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. Moises Egozi

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COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and M1s. David Abravanel COMPLIMENTS OF Isidoro Stettner May Your Congregation continue to Flouri sh Our Best Wishes. Mr. and M1s. Olaf Holm COMPLIMENTS OF M1. and Mrs. Abe Fisch

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Issak Vi ten son Phil Mann COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Alfonso Marquet The Kanes

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF M1. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. David Utiansky Ernesto Falkenbu1g COMPLIMENTS OF CORTESIA DE Mr. and Mrs. Max Pincus Mallin and Lengyel

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CORTE S IA DE SIMMONS INTERNATI O NAL LIMITED M O NT O R O 1 1 4 En sa n c h e de l a H a b a n a Florence Modas ARTI CU L OS FEMENIN OS A GU ILA 457 HABANA R. C. Allen Business Machines ). Ia quina s cl e s um a r cl e es cri b ir y r eg i s t ra cl o r as UN I COS DI ST RI BU ID ORES EN CUBA Ca j as co nt a cl o r as Na ti o n a l, h as t a co n 30 co nt a cl o r es i nc\i v iclu a l es. Pa r a t o cl a cl ase cl e n egocios. E qui pos pa r a Cafe t e ri a y Ca rni ce r ias. ).T O I SES LEV I N Ca5a d e l os l\l o lin os Telf A-0 1 22 Pa dr e V a r e l a (Be l ascoa in 902) HABANA ACEITE "OLIVEITE" es un deleite V I V ER ES, S A H A BA NA

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COMPLIMENT S OF Hugo May COMPLIMENT S OF Tomas B. Besosa HILOS LILY Y BRAZOS LOS MEJORES AG U IAR N o 560 ML 19 0 5 M 7985 COMPLIMENTS OF The May Trading Co .. S. A. COMPLIMENTS OF Eve Textile Mfg. Co., Inc. A VE. INDEPENDENCIA No. 302 OESTE TELF. X0-2031 GUANABACOA

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CORTESIA DE h/eliza eLa/1,k, Cadin(J, !J nielWtawnaL HOTEL NACIONAL DE CUBA Cortesia de: Maderera Antonio Perez F 6 b r i c a 1 0 H Q b a n a COMPLIMENTS OF A Friend COMPLIMENTS OF REFRIGERADORES LEONARD TELEVISORES, RADIOS Y EQUIPOS DE ALT A FIDELIDAD RCA VICTOR MIRA LOA, S. A. Galian o 213 T elf ML 108 7 Habana A 8 3 3 7

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CORTESIA DE COMP LIMENT S OF Laboratorios Gravi, S. A Tejidos y Confecciones Perro, S. A. A GU IAR 61 1 HABANA C O MPLIMENT S OF COMP LIMENT S O F Peluquerfa Armando

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CO M PLIMENTS OF World Wide Freight Forward Inc. Co. CUSTOM BROKERS & FORWARDERS 401 BROADWAY "A COMPLETE SHIPPING SER VICE" COMPLIMENTS OF VERMOUTH COMPLIMENTS OF CORTESIA DEL MARA VILLOSO ARROZ ELEFANTE Di st ribuid o r es: J. NOVAL Y CJi\

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COMPLIMENTS OF CO MPLIMENT S OF Cromex Transportation Co. Kunex Transportation INDUSTRIA 305 LAMPARILLA 65 COMPLIMENTS OF CO M P LIMENT S O F Record Air Express Co. Continental Express Co. AVENIDA DE BELGICA 487 A VE N I DA DE BEL G I G A 4 8 7

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COMPLIMENTS OF Mme. Rossell CALZADA 1010 VEDADO TELF. F 3992 COMPLIMENTS OF Naviera VACU BA, S. A. OPERADORES DE V APORES CUBANOS COMPLIMENTS OF Reposteria Mignon CALLE LINEA VEDADO COMPLIMENT S OF san rafael y aguila, m-5991-98, m-7941 '-"

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CORTESIA DE COR T ES IA DE Bonito "Comodoro" Davila y Cia. CORTESIA DE COMPLIMEN T S OF Transportes Rody S. A. A Friend

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' COMPLIMENTS OF Z. SIMON MODAS CALLE 15 No. 272, APTO. 1, ENTRE I y J TELEFONO Fl-7222 9.,{.ltima 97,ooeclacl RELOJ ORO 18 KILATES CON ESMERALDAS FINAS 0 {s!sa auin[ana LA CAIA Dt lOf RtCiALOI CORTESIA DE Conservas "CONCHITA" CALIDAD ... PRIMERO ... Dulces en Almibar, Pasta de Guayaba, Bonito, Habichuelas, Salsa de Tomate, Pure y Pimientos. Mesa, Mateo & Co. COMISIONIST AS S. IGNACIO 313, TELF. M-3774, HABANA Distribuidore s a Mayoi-istas del papel higienico "PILLOW" y aceite "OLIVEITE"

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CO M P LI ME NT S O F CO MPLIMENT S OF STUDEBAKER Cia. Mercantil Astra, S. A. COMPLIMENT S OF CO RTE S IA DE Gustavo Kates e Hijos LUCERNA

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COMPLIMENTS OF I AUTIACEu,Ao. CASA CENTRAL. REINA 109, lrente a GALIANO SUCURSAL : NEPTUNO 406, cosi esq o SAN NICOLAS miss ClRiROl TINTES MODERNOS .. COLORES NATURALES CUBREN TOTALMENTE LOS CABELLOS GRISES Dist. Bienvenido Fernandez, S. A. Bernaza No. 113, La Habana Telf. ML-1226 COMPLIMENTS OF Auto Cine Vento CUBA'S ONLY PRIVE IN THEATER AND MIRAMAR THEATER COMPLIMENTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES coming soon SOLID GOLD CADILLAC with JUDY HOLLIDAY PAUL DOUGLAS and YOU CAN'T RUN AW A Y FROM IT IN TECHNICOLOR CINEMASCOPE with JUNE ALLYSON JACK LEMMON

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COMPLIMENTS OF Pioneer, S. A. COMPLIMENTS OF La Pasiega COMPLIMEN TS OF Helados Guarina COMPLIMEN T S OF La Casa del Brillante NEPTUNO 205 HABANA

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CREA CI ONES VESTIDOS TAM 0 Confecciones EDITH, S. A. CONSULADO N o 165 HABANA LECHE y HELADOS Inspira Conf ianza PEDIDOS B 7960 y B 4888 COMING SOON THE GREATEST OF ALL PICTURES "GIANT" ROCK HUDSON ELIZABETH TAYLOR JAMES DEAN DIRECTED BY GEOGRE STEVENS WARNERS BROS. PICTURES

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COMPLIMEN T S OF CO MPLIMENT S O F Joyeria Francesa N E F F C ORTE S IA DE COMPLIMENTS OF La Villa Roberto La Florida (FLORI DITA )

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RE ST A URA NT-BAR LA REGULADORA Established in 18 79 Familiar Surrounding s SELECTED FOOD I-Lgh Int :rna.:: ional Cuisine Competely A ;r Conditioned AMISTAD 412 HABANA CUBA TELEFONOS: ML-1440 ML-1940 M-4938 V. de Callejo y G. de Castro CUBA Num. 225 DPTO. Num. 302 TELEFONO A -24 30 HABANA S & W FINE FOODS, INC. "MONACO" INSTITUTO CIENTIFICO DE BELLEZA (Mezzanine de Flogar) Galiano y San Rafael Lineas Exclusivas: JEANNE GA TENEA U de Pari s EVE d e Italia. GOUBAND Y ALEXANDRE DE MARKOFF de New York TELEFONOS: W 4935 ML 1626 COMPLIMENT S OF JOYERIA VERSALLES ARTICULOS PARA REGALOS NEPTUNO 16 4 HABANA

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CORTESIA DE Casa Patin COMPLIMENTS OF Frankel Modas CORTESIA DE La Dalia vJl(J/UU COMPLIMENTS OF Textilera Tricana

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Hechicelo ... con DESERT FLOWER "la /raganc;a que recuerda el romance de! des;erto" Maguctica ... misteriosa ... magica Desert Flower es mas que una fragancia fina, es una sensacion hechicera, y es la ~mica fragancia para la mujer cosmopolita la mujer sofisticada. Locion (con o sin atomizador), colonia sblida, jaLon de tocador, polvo para despues del bano, talco, etc. J ~l\ l Loci~n DWJTIN. Colonia Salida $1.25 Polvo Para Despuel Del Baiio $2.00 $2.25 r l De venta en todas las tiendas y Tarmac,as prmc,pa es SHULTON Rockefeller Center New York COMPLIMENTS OF AUSTRO-CUBANA COMERCIAL, S. A. MANZANA DE GOMEZ 563 HAVANA CUBA 1ng. Josef Wechsler Pr es id e nt COMPLIMENTS OF PUNTA ALEGRE SUGAR ANO SALES Co. BARAGUA IND U STRIAL CORPORATION OF NEW YORK FLORIDA INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION OF NEW YORK MACARENO INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION OF NE\V YORK COMPLIMENTS OF UNIVERSAL TEXTILE CIA. DE TEJIDO S EL GLOBO ", S A Imp o rt a d o r es d e T e jid os y L astex MURALLA 166 TELEFONO A5 10 22

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Norgulf Lines R. Robaina e Hijos COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF National Biscuit Co. Havana Post

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COMPLIMENTS OF Reddy Kilowatt YOUR ELECTRICAL SERVANT CORTESIA DE EL PAIS Leslie Pantin & Sons Agen t es Generales y Apoclerac\os de las Cias. : GUARDIAN ASSGRANCE CO~[PANY, LTD. NOR WI CH UNION F IR E INS. SCTP., LTD. LEGAL & GENERAL ASSGRANCE CO. LTD. THE NORTJ-JEK ASSURANCE CO., LTD. THE YOR I~ SH IR E INSURANCE CO., LTD. THE EAGLE FIRE CO., OF NEW YORK LA GARA;\TIA C0-:'1 1 P A~TA DE SEGC'ROS, S. J\. SECCROS DJ ~ TOD. ~ 1S CL--1.SES E.\T CUA.LQU I ER LUG.AR DEL MCNDO ESCOBAR 451 TELF. U-1047 HABANA CABLE: PANTIN COMPLIMENTS OF C, E. Zanetti YOUR INSURANCE COUNSELLOR

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Marsh and Mc Lennon Textilera Versailles, S~ A. COMPLIMENTS OF Hnos. Rosemberg Diario Nacional

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Boris Cafeteria Jose F. Gonzalez Repr ese nt a ti ve of GOOD JEWISH AMERICAN FOOD AMERICAN VISCOSE CO CHEMSTRAND CORP COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND APARTADO 164 2 -r,<1::: H!Lo...r:,;,iibus LOVv'-DovvN ON HIGH UFE; ,,, ... BING G RACE FRANK CROSBY KELLY SINATRA ~ At ( 1!3Gl!fljEl1 FOR THE FIRST TIME ... 1~~ M, : ,Tl/'~ ,.. ..:: : .. .... ,._ ... -: .. .. 1 __ ; eA 1/~~ t y :' .. / uu ; ~ : ~ ~.} .... -~,.. ,7 ,. : ___ ./' .._ __ .,. / .... /, ..... : ...... : ,,;) ........... .. '.<',.,:-:- CELESTE HOLM JOHN LUND LOUI S (Al.HERN SIDNEY BlACKMfR LOUIS ARMSTRONG A~~:; "'""" JOHN PATR!U: ;;< (OLE PORTER K):i~M fii!iW >\llC '.\>\lll (hAYlW TrnN1Z&.~

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CORTESIA DE El Carmelo CALZADA y D VEDADO COMPLIMENTS OF JOYERIA LE TRIANON S. A. FONDON Y CIA. LTD. GALIANO 405 HABANA COMPLIMENTS OF OGDEN & Co. MERCHANDISE BROKERS APARTADO 906 HAVANA, CUBA COMPLIMENTS OF HOTEL COMODORO PRIVATE BEACH AT YOUR AIR CONDITIONED DOOR STEP

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Be Protected by Insurance Buy Insurance COMPLIMENTS OF Navia American Poultry Farm WE HA VE EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE THIS A HAPPY HOi.IDAY SEASON. ORDER YOUR POULTRY AND EGGS FROM E V SIMPSON PHONE B9 1016 CLEANLINESS AND COURTESY COMPLIMENTS OF Ruz-Roca FINEST HAND KNITTED APPAREL COMPLIMENTS OF Cigarros EDEN

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CORTESIA DE ACEITE "ABACO" y ARROZ "GLORIA" COMPLIMENTS OF La Cubana TINTORERIA BELASCOAIN 5 5 8 U-5223 CORTESIA DE Jose Navarrete PRODUCTOS NACIONAL NAVARRETE MERCED 313 31 5 CORTESIA DE lmpresos Lermo, S. A. IMPRESOS Y ENV ASES EN P APEL CELLOPHANE Y POLYETHYLENE

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It K 0 PROXIMO ESTRENO r!~Dto Filmada en CINEMASCOPE TECHNICOLOR COMPLIMENTS OF A Good Friend COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Pardias y Dominguez

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CORTESIA DE Congregacion Religiosa Adath Israel CORTESIA DE Enicak and Ebel Watches CORTESIA DE Logia Bene Berith Maimonides CORTESIA DE Organizacion Wizo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF Comito de Damas Pro-Edificio del Centro Hebreo Safaradi de Cuba CORTESIA DE Asociacion de Anti-Tuberculosis de Cuba CORTESIA DE Circulo Universitario Hebreo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

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CORTESIA DE Congregacion Religiosa Adath Israel CORTESIA DE Enicak and Ebel Watches CORTESIA DE Logia Bene Berith Maimonides CORTESIA DE Organizacion Wizo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF Comito de Damas Pro-Edificio del Centro Hebreo Safaradi de Cuba CORTESIA DE Asociacion de Anti-Tuberculosis de Cuba CORTESIA DE Circulo Universitario Hebreo de Cuba COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND

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CO M PLIMENTS OF Splendid Grocery IMPORTER OF FRESH AMERICAN DELICA T ESSEN COMPLIMENT S OF Universal International Ann o un c in g th e rel eas~ o f WRITTEN ON THE WIND COMPLIMENT S OF Volpe Tours CORTESIA DE Cuervo y Sobrinos LO S JOYERO S DE CONFIANZA COM P LIMENT S OF PARAMOUNT WHO THI S Y EAR BRIN G YO U W AR AND PEACE CO RTE S IA DE Jardin Rodriguez CA LL E 10 y 27, VE DA DO TELF F -5 7 58 CO M P LIMENT S O F Palacio de Cristal CO RTE S IA DE ZAID'S MODAS S AN MI GU EL 2 61 HABANA

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COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF Berens Modas Phila Bags COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENT S OF 0 R B E A FRIEND

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IMPRESO POR CUBA INTELECTUAL CUBA N o 111 HABANA