Citation
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Home Builder papers and manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Development Company brochures
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Housing development -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Real property -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Housing development ( fast )
Real property ( fast )
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
History. ( fast )
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
History ( fast )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Miscellaneous text and documents from the Bunnell Development Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10469 ( NOTIS )
1046991505 ( OCLC )
on1046991505
Classification:
F319.B92 B86 ( lcc )

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Bunnell home builder

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Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text

PAGE 1

Young grape-fruit tree in grove near Dupont One of the many attractive homes to be found in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO 108 SO. LA SALLE. ST. CHICAGO ILLINOIS BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO. 108 SO. LA SALLE, ST. CHICAGO ILLINOIS

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Notice Especial attention is called to the photographs in this booklet and to the complete description accompanying each one. They are, EVERY ONE OF THEM, with the exception of one picture of St. Augustine and one of Jacksonville, pic tures of actual scenes in and around Bunnell and Dupont. We do not have to talk of Florida as a whole, nor do we have to go all over the State to secure attractive pictures. There are so many good things to be found right in our community that there isnÂ’t space in this booklet for anything else. When you go to the Bunnell-Dupont colony my repre sentative there can show you every spot we have photo graphed. I stand ready to make any one a present of forty acres of land if I cannot prove to him that the pictures in this book let, with the two exceptions mentioned above, were made from actual photographs taken in Bunnell, Dupont and vicinity.

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•‘A LIT T I. E F A K II CHICAGO A II I G GIVING” T II O S. A. V E i! II !•: N I I s My Experience Your Gain I was born in Holland, reared on my father’s farm, where we had to make every square foot of land yield something to eat — something to sell. In Holland only a few farmers own their land—most of them must al ways rent. There the average farm is about three and onehalf acres, and this land sup ports anywhere from eight to twelve people. I have known what it is to raise a family while working for wages, and I want to say here that I consider it the first duty of every man to see that his family is protected against the time when he is unable longer to provide for them. Not only must he protect them, but he should be able to give them, the necessities of life, if not the luxuries. Knowing, as / do, the needs and the wants of men of ordinary means, / have endeavored to set forth in this booklet what I believe to be a solution to these problems. I shall not attempt to paint pretty pic tures of impossible things, but I will tell you in the following pages in a simple and direct way, a few plain facts regarding a country that responds more readily, more abundantly and more continually to the intelligent, energetic man than any country I know of, and I shall tell you how you may secure a farm home in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, where you can, upon a few acres, if you will work, give yourself and family everything you need and at the same time save a goodly portion of your earnings every year. More than this, you can enjoy many luxuries in the nature of all manner of out-door sports, ocean bathing, fishing, boating, etc., and at the same time go through life under the most healthful conditions. This is all that I promise you in the following pages, but I want to say that I can positively prove to your satisfaction that this will be your reward if you will read carefully every page of this book. I ask no man to take my word, but I appeal only to his common sense, good judgment and his earnest desire. Very sincerely, My buyers are my partners. Their success is my success. Florida As It Was Ponce de Leon was governor of Porto Rico when there came to him a few Spaniards who told wonderful stories of a region of flowers where the Indians said there was a spring of eternal youth, and he, being an old man, sought to renew his years by bathing in the waters of this spring. Accordingly he set forth on an expedition to discover the marvelous fountain, and landed near St. Augustine, Fla., in 1513, on Easter Sun day, and as Easter is called in Spain Pascua Florida, or Flowery Easter, he named the new land Florida. The romance and the poetry of this foolish man’s dream have always clung to Florida. Blood has been shed for this land; nations have quarreled over it; rich men have made it their playground, but it has been left to the man of ordinary means to develop it. Florida is now a region of cities, railroads, Florida county highways, truck gardens, citrus As It Is groves, winter and summer resorts, and is indeed, a modern, pulsing community. Her growth has been slow but sure. It is only in recent years that people have begun to realize Florida’s great possibilities, but now the development of the state is going forward at a tremendous rate. Without fear of successful contradiction, we say that Florida produces more, in dollars and cents, per acre, than any other State in the Union. However, you must not expect Florida to throw her bounties in your lap without toil and without sacrifice, but if you will do those things which common sense teaches one should be done, you may become prosperous and independent in this great State. Florida is a peninsula about one hundred and forty miles wide at its widest point and Climate Q f a gigantic coast extent, being almost sur rounded by the sea. It is constantly being swept by the sea breezes, which make mild its winters and take the sting from the summer’s sun. In Florida, six months of the year are not devoted to the consumption of the products and the savings of Florida East Coast Railroad Company’s Depot at Bunnell Page One

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“A LITTLE FAR M CHICAGO A RIG GIVING” T H O S. A. VERDENILS the other six, as is the case in many states. There are no sudden changes in the weather. The nights are ever cool and restful. Although the summers are longer than in the northern states, there is never the intense heat which prevails in the north. The average temperature at St. Augustine, our county seat, given Every good has its bad; every hot its Soil cold; every sweet its bitter—and Florida is no exception. It has its good soil and its poor soil; it has its extremely rich soil and its very barren ground. The general character, however, of Florida soil is a dark or gray sandy loam, under which lies a clay subsoil that has the tendency to retain the moisture during the period when the crops are growing. The above character of soil is the kind which is today responsible for Florida’s fame, and this is the kind that the Bunnell-DuPont colony possesses. Y NO OTHER STATE EQUALS FLORAcre Yields IDA IN AVERAGE PRODUCTION. Per Acre Per Acre Missouri yields.$ 9.38 Iowa yields.$12.22 Illinois yields. 12.48 Ohio yields. 13.36 Bank and Office Building at Bunnell, Modern in Every Way FLORIDA YIELDS $109.76 PER ACRE. The above is the average value of farm production in five great States, as per governmental statistics. Flor ida exceeds them all combined. Land in Missouri, Iowa, Illinois and Ohio sells for from $100 to $250 an acre, with the earnings above mentioned. What can you not do on Bunnell land, worth 1,000 per cent in productive value over any State mentioned above? The real value of Bunnell soil is not to be compared with that of the four States enumerated. by the United States Weather Bureau, is 68 degrees. Heat prostrations or sunstrokes are unknown in Flor ida. As our colony almost adjoins the Atlantic coast we have the benefit of constant sea breezes. These breezes, mingled with the odors of the pine and mag nolia and laden with the salt of the ocean, make one feel that life is indeed worth living. Professor Knapp of the Department of Agriculture is said to have spoken at a gathering of business men in Florida, about in these words: “Florida’s value lies in her climate. Eighty per cent is its ratio, 10 per cent soil value and 10 per cent man.” If man value is increased you will likewise find that the climate will return bountifully for this increase. As you can see from the photograph below, our land is cut-over pine land, slightly rolling. It has an elevation of about thirty feet. All of the valuable tim ber has been removed, but there is enough timber, however, left on the land for general purposes, such as fence posts, outbuildings, etc. Some people leave the stumps, cultivate around them and destroy them later, as they have more time. The stumps, being full of grease, burn very easily. There is some palmetto on a part of the land, but) other underbrush is almost wholly lacking. The Land As It Is ToDay Florida lies directly across the path of Location the most important sea highway, which will lead, through the Panama Canal, to all ports of the world, either east or west. What she is today is nothing to what she will be during the next ten to twenty-five years. Within thirty-six hours by fast freight and passen ger train lies a market for more than fifty million peo ple to be supplied by Florida. Along both coasts and in the center of the State are mighty trunk line rail roads, reaching away to all markets, while at various points along her coast the products of the soil are sent by ocean vessels to the eager markets. Florida can supply New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, etc., from three to five weeks in advance of other sections of our so-called mid winter farming communities. Page Two The Land As It Is Today. An Inspection Trip Over the Colony Is an Easy Matter in the Company’s Automobile

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“A I, I T T L E FA H M CHICAGO A II 1 G LIVIX G” T H O S. A. VERDENIUS Q ur The Bunnell-DuPont colony is a comf Inn v munity built along co-operative lines. VyOiony The p CO p] e w ho make up this colony and own its small farms are earnest, honest men and women. They are working for a purpose— they are not dreamers. Already they have accom plished much. They have built the beautiful little city of Bunnell that is the pride, not only of these colonists, but of every citizen of St. Johns county, Florida. The Bunnell-DuPont colony is located eighty-seven miles south of Jacksonville on the main line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. It is less than three miles from the Atlantic Ocean and about twenty-five miles from St. Augustine, in a direct line. This is a region that has, for hundreds of years, been known to man, and yet it is a spot that had not been fully appre ciated in a large way until about three or four years ago. Early Settlers Early settlers came to St. Johns county and became prosperous. They built ex cellent homes, established very fine or ange groves and truck farms, and, upon the whole, have given the soil, the climate, and the county, every test necessary to prove their value. Q .. The Bunnell-DuPont colony first began DUnnell to attract attention some three and onehalf years ago, and since that time has been steadily growing. Bunnell, which is the principal town in this colony, is also the largest town in the southern portion of St. Johns county. It is incorpo rated and has about six hundred inhabitants. Already there is a nice church, an excellent school, and a State bank. The town has telegraph service, also local and long distance telephones. It has a drug store, a good hotel, several general stores, including a large hardware and building material supply house, city water works, cement sidewalks, meat market, barber shop, Masonic Lodge and Knights of Pythias Lodge, lumber mill, barrel factory, bakery, livery stable, good physician, and the city is lighted by electricity. There are a number of trains going north and south daily, with good mail and express service. First 31. E. Church ami Parsonage at Bunnell Elsewhere in this book you will find views of this little city and you will note that the town is not made up of numerous shacks, but all of the homes would be a credit to any community. An application has been made for a free rural delivery of mail. Tribune Building and Adjacent Stores in Bunnell When you come to Bunnell-DuPont, so Pioneering ^ ar as y ur particular tract of land is con* cerned, you will come as a pioneer; that is, you will have to do the work, or have it done for you, that is necessary to bring forth crops. You will have to erect your house, dig your well, build your fences, plant your crops and take care of them, but you will not have to suffer the inconveniences which others have had to undergo in many sections of Florida. You will have this beautiful town close by you, where every need of your farm and your home can be sup plied. You can get out of a Pullman car at Bunnell; you can have your freight sidetracked there; you can make all the arrangements you want for the improve ment of your farm. You can meet with, and talk to, those who are engaged in small farming and fruit raisnig, and can obtain the benefit of their experience. You will find them an excellent class of men and women, who will be only too glad to welcome you and to tell you the things that you should know. You will find the company officials ready, willing and anxious to extend to you every courtesy in their power. They will take you to your farm and assist you as far as possible in getting settled. "p. Every commission merchant who handles potatoes has heard of Hastings, Florida, r amous for it is one of the greatest potato raising Hastings sections in the United States. Hastings District lies but twelve miles from our colony. Here the many buyers for commission houses throughout the United States come each spring and purchase the entire early potato crop. Page Three

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“A I. I T T LB BA R M CHICAGO A BIG MV IN G” The soil of our colony is like that of Hastings. Has tings land, which a few years ago could have been bought for a less price even than we are now offering our land for sale, cannot be purchased today for ten times the price before asked, and much of the land cannot be purchased at any price, so independent are the growers. Two hundred and fifty dollars per acre is not a large price for good Hastings land. This year the potato crop sold largely Irish around $4.00 per barrel and some of the Potatoes commission men who purchased pota toes at Hastings and also from our colo nists said that the best potatoes they had seen were, grown in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, thus placing the stamp of approval of expert buyers upon BunnellDuPont potatoes. Four of Bunnell’s leading citizens are clearing and are going to plant to potatoes alone, six hundred and forty acres—one solid section. This immense body of potatoes, representing thousands upon thousands of dollars expended before these men can obtain a return on their money is of itself the highest compliment possible to be paid to this colony. Hastings has specialized wholly upon potatoes, and its colonists have grown independently wealthy and have made a name, not only for themselves, but for Florida as well. Bunnell-DuPont farmers are equally as successful in the raising of potatoes, for the short time their land has been under cultivation. One of our colonists was paid $1,500.00 for his ten acres of potatoes; another received $1,800.00 for twelve acres; and others have done equally as well. These potatoes were planted in the early part of February, and the owners had sold and received their checks for them in less than three months. This is indeed the “proof of the pudding.” There is not a more certain, or a better Sweet crop than sweet potatoes. They require Potatoes but very little work and a failure is un known. From two hundred to four hun dred bushels per acre is a normal yield, and they never Home of Mr. I. I. Moody, Pres, of the Bunnell Dev. Co. Page Four T H O S. A. VERDENIUS One of Bunnell's Pretty Residence Streets sell for less than fifty cents a bushel and often as high as $1.00 per bushel. Prof. Knapp of the Agricultural DepartCorn ment states that throughout the entire South corn can be raised to good advan tage with proper care. Bunnell-DuPont has demon strated this statement to be a fact, and she is rapidly achieving wonders along this line. Corn is a splendid second crop. After your potatoes are harvested you can plant corn in April. It will yield about 50 bushels per acre, at 70 cents a bushel, or $35.00 an acre. This crop will not cost more than $5.00 per acre for seed, cultivating and harvesting and is raised in the summer months, when the North furnishes her own truck; hence is a crop consumed at home. Can be planted as a third crop. They will yield from two to two and one-half tons of excellent hay to the acre, worth at least $20.00 per ton. Seed, cultivating and harvesting of this crop will not ex ceed $6.00 an acre. Both velvet beans and cow peas are great forage crops. They enrich the soil and at the same time are very profitable. Velvet beans are the greatest beef producers known. It takes less than sixty days to fatten cattle on this crop. There is always a ready market for the beans, which sell for $2.00 a bushel. Cattle, hogs and sheep thrive splendidly on these crops. Possibly the safest and surest crop for Sugar the least amount of labor is syrup cane. Cane It produces here from four hundred to six hundred gallons of cane syrup to the acre. The Florida cane syrup is famous. It is a staple product and finds a ready market. This syrup is selling Velvet Beans and Cowpeas

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“A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO A RIG LIVING” THOS. A. V 10 H l> I'. MIS One of the Many Attractive Bungalows in Bunnell at seventy-five cents a gallon, thus giving the owner a profit of $200.00 an acre. Total failure of cane crops here is unknown. The actual cultivation and labor is very light. It grows so rapidly that it can be plowed but two or three times before it becomes too tall. The cane needs to be replanted only every three or foun years, and is therefore often called a “lazy man’s crop.” Intensive Farming Florida is the region of three crops a year. While we advise all of our colo nists to plant potatoes for one crop, we also advise them to engage in intensive farming, to some extent at least. You will understand that by intensive farming is meant utilizing every day, taking advantage of every season and crowding the soil to its utmost. A great variety of vegetables may be grown and sold at a time when prices are positively the highest in the country. BUT YOU MUST REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN NOT OBTAIN THESE UNLESS YOU FERTILIZE YOUR LAND AND TAKE CARE OF IT AS YOU SHOULD. Successive planting will exhaust your soil unless you keep it built up properly. Modern science of agriculture has proven that fer tilization is not an expense, but it is an investment that pays handsomely year after year. On page 14 you will find a general table which will show what it is possible to accomplish. Citrus It is a well-known fact that St. Johns Fruits county was the first place in Florida where oranges were grown, the seeds being brought here it is supposed, by Ponce de Leon, and wild orange trees have been found growing throughout the State, the seeds being carried, unquestionably, by the Seminole Indians. It is also an established fact that oranges grown in this latitude of Florida have a flavor peculiar to them selves and not approached by other sections. The profit in grape fruit culture is a Grape measured certainty. The demand for this Fruit fruit is constantly increasing. Florida is the only State adapted to its culture. Grape fruit is.sold in .New York and Chicago at $5.00 to $6.00 a crate WHOLESALE. The general average received by the Florida Citrus Exchange is about $3.60 at the packing house, and it costs less than fifty cents a box to grow them. It is a common occurrence for owners of grape fruit groves to net on an average $500.00 an acre. While the returns from oranges are not quite so large, the orange tree is a sure income bringer. California and Texas grape fruit is so inferior to that raised in Florida that our State has a monopoly in its production. Ten thousand cars, worth ten million dol lars, are shipped out of the State annually. Florida oranges are admitted to be betOranges ter, more sweet and juicy, than those raised in any other State. Both Florida grape fruit and oranges lead in market prices. Florida fruit can be put on the market cheaper than California fruit. Immediately adjoining our colony is an orange grove comprising one hundred and five acres, which is a living demonstration of this region’s productivity. Over ten thousand boxes of oranges and grape fruit were shipped from this grove last year. Several small groves are found around and immediately adjoining our colony. An orange and grape fruit grove can be brought to a profitable state in five years, and when fully matured will produce an annual net income equal to, if not in excess of the entire cost. The life of a grove is practi cally unlimited. You can make it possible for an orange or grape fruit grove to provide for you and your family for the bal ance of your lives, after the grove is five to six years of age. Berries of all kinds do well at Bunnell. Small Strawberries are especially prolific. Four Fruits thousand quarts to the acre are not un common in Florida, and at the high price of twenty cents a quart, which the market brings dur ing Florida’s strawberry season, means an earning of $800.00 per acre. All manner of small fruits should be cultivated, for they pay well and are easy to raise. Picking’ Oranges in Grove Near Dupont Page Five

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A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO A ISIG LIVING” T H O S. A. VEKDENIHS General Store in Dupont Grapes Florida is the ideal home of the grape. Such species as the Royal Malaga, the Seedless Raisin, the Scuppernong, are the more familiar and common kinds. They do exception ally well all over the State and will cer tainly prove big money getters at Bunnell-Dupont. Peaches and Plums Glimpse of a Beautiful Colonial Home in Dupont Peaches and plums do well in this sec tion of Florida. The Florida peach is equal to any grown and bears before other peaches, thus taking advantage of the highest market prices. What is true of peaches is likewise true of plums. You should have an acre at least planted to peaches and plums. You. may cultivate the ground between the trees without injury to your orchard. A good idea is to use this orchard as a chicken yard. Japanese persimmons are also adapted to our soil and bring fancy prices. Make up your mind, when you come to Pecan our colony, that you will plant pecans. Growing A first-class pecan tree will bear in five years at the rate of about five pounds and in eight or ten years anywhere from thirty-five to fifty pounds of nuts, increasing the yield as the tree grows older. The average price of good pecans is about 50 cents per pound, so that fifty full-grown trees would bring an annual income of $25.00 per tree, or $1,250 per year. A pecan tree is hardy and its product non-perishable. A physician living in Bunnell has a fine pecan grove on his farm just outside of town. Pecan trees do not interfere with the cultivation of other crops between the rows of trees for the first five or six years. Some Florida companies make a spe cialty of selling only pecan groves, and ask for one acre more money than we charge for ten acres of our land. We believe it is more profitable for the man who wishes to have a pecan grove to buy land from us and set out his own trees. He will not only save a great deal of money on his investment, but while he is rais ing small fruit and vegetables between the rows of trees, he can not only make a good living for himself, but also pay for the pecan grove by the time it is a paying investment for him. By all means make up your mind to go Live in for stock raising when you come to Stock Bunnell. Cattle do well in the BunnellDuPont colony and the business is profit able. Feed is cheap and it is not necessary to feed for warmth. No expensive buildings are required for shel tering—no extra winter expense at all. Don’t forget the hogs, either, and add a few of these to your farm. They will bring you good revenue and demand but little attention on your part. Dairying pays well on account of the Dairying easily raised forage crops, and there is a great local demand for milk and butter. The many large hotels on the east coast and the good railroad transportation for shipping milk give the dairy man in Bunnell-DuPont unlimited opportunities. While in Florida recently I was told that a carload of dairy products, comprising milk, cream and butter, is shipped every day from Chicago during the tourists’ season, for the famous Florida East Coast hotels. When I lived in Jacksonville I paid from twelve to fourteen cents a quart for milk, so one can readily judge of the demand for dairy products. Poultry raising in the Bunnell colony as Poultry a business or a side line brings handsome profits. Florida has fewer diseases among poultry than practically any State in the Union. The market is always high and few are engaged in the business. Most of the poultry and eggs consumed in the State are shipped from Georgia and Tennessee. No expensive poultry houses are necessary, and the Florida hen lays the most of her eggs in the winter months, when the prices are highest. The great winter resorts of Florida, with their tourist hotels, which are mostly found along the east coast, furnish a steady demand for all the fresh eggs and fryers one has for sale. Eggs sell for from forty to fifty cents per dozen and poultry from eighty cents to one dollar each. Bunnell School Building Page Six

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“A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO A BIG LIVING” Poultry Yard Near Dupont One can obtain good drinking water at a Drinking depth of from twelve to eighteen feet. Water almost anywhere in our colony, in inex haustible quantities, by merely driving a pipe through the subsoil and attaching thereto an ordi nary sucker pump. The whole outlay will cost about $15.00. Artesian water can be obtained at from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet. The cost of these wells is about $1.00 per foot. Lumber is very cheap at Bunnell. You Building can build your house, barn, chicken Material house, etc., for about one-half of what they would cost in the North. This is due to two reasons: Lumber is plentiful in the State, hence cheap: and the mildness of the climate renders more expensive buildings unnecessary here. There are good contractors in Bunnell who will gladly furnish you plans and figures when you are ready to build your home. The Bunnell Development Company Roads originally laid out the Moody Road, which extends from Bunnell to Ocean City, a distance of about seven miles. The Company has turned the road over to St. Johns county, and the county is now completing the shelling of same. The road begins at Bunnell, runs northeast to King’s Road (which, by the way, is the oldest road in the United States, and is the direct old mail route from Key West to New York and intermediate points). From the King’s Road it extends east to Ocean City. The county has agreed to complete the shelling of this road this year. Mr. Moody, president of the Bunnell Development Company, is also president of the Board of Road Commissioners, and we can be certain that this road will be a credit to the county as well as our colony. The Moody Road also extends south of Bunnell for a distance of about four miles and will be continued farther, to the end of our colony. The Bunnell Development Company has spent a small fortune on road building throughout the colony and expects to build several more miles of roads. This fall St. Johns county bought $70,000 worth of shell and gravel and our part of the county has received its share of same. T H O S. A. VEIIDENIUS Close by the edge of the Bunnell-DuPont Ocean colony this Company has laid out a town. City The name of this town is OCEAN CITY. It is ideally located for all the pleasures of boating, bathing, etc. Many people from the North have spoken of the beauty of this spot. It is most desirable in every way and within a short time we be lieve it will be one of the resort spots of the famous East Coast. A railroad is soon to be built from Ormond to St. Augustine and we hope to have a railroad station at Ocean City before very long. Lots in Ocean City are now selling for $100.00 to $400.00 each, half cash, bal ance on time. DuPont is a small town about three and Dupont one-half miles south of Bunnell and is located in the heart of the BunnellDupont colony. We predict a great future for this place. It has, at the present time, a school, store, etc. The DuPont Land and Railway Company have their lands southwest of DuPont and have built a narrow gauge railroad from their land to DuPont. They have the same kind of soil as have we, and this company are selling their farms for $100.00 an acre cash, and higher. To the south of DuPont we have two more stations at which trains stop, and as soon as the country is more developed these will grow into towns. Florida has sufficient rainfall during the Irrigation growing seasons to give the crops all the moisture they need, but the most up-todate farmers in Florida install small irrigation plants on their farms, using artesian wells, so as to be able to produce larger results should a possible shortage of moisture occur, and the fact that anywhere in this col ony you can get artesian water is an asset in favor of Bunnell-Dupont colony that cannot be estimated too highly. Irrigation means more money for the same amount of work, and after the well is installed it will pay for itself very quickly in added profits, although you will understand that irrigation is not necessary and is not used except among those intensive farmers who go in for immense yields per acre. If one wishes to engage in intensive farming and installs his own small irrigation plant, his initial ex pense will be all that he will have—no heavy yearly maintenance fees, such as the owners of irrigated farms in the West have to contend with. Poultry Pays the Pin Money to the Florida Housewife. Flock of Poultry in Bunnell Page Seven

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“A LITTLE FAR M A BIG LIVING' THOS. A. VERDENIUS CHICAGO A Bird’s-Eye View from Tribune Building of Bunnell’s Residence Section Tliis page of beautiful illustrations gives one an idea of tbe v Johns County in particular. Tbe first shows a small portion of the youngest city in St. t in Florida. The opposite picture shows a portion of the olde! States— St. Augustine — the county seat of St. Johns County. Below one has a glimpse of a few of the sky-scrapers to be fi About twelve years ago Jacksonville was practically destroyed by fire. Previous to tliat time tke city bad a population of scarcely 10,000 peo ple, with buildings two and three stories high. Page Eight

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Water Front of St. Augustine, Florida, the County Seat of St. John’s County vonderful development that has taken place in F lorida, and in St. Johns County— B u n n e l l — k n o wn as “the biggest little town” is t city, not only in St. Johns County, but in the entire United ifound in the metropolis of the South, Jacksonville. ili LITTLE FARM — A niG LIVING” T H O S. A. VEIIDENIUS CHICAGO Today Jacksonville is a thriving, puls ing city of com merce, standing as a monument to the great prosperity that has come to the Southland, and to Florida in particular. Page Nine

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“A LITT1K FARM CHICAGO A BIG LIVING” T H O S. A. V E R l F. \ I 5 S Corn Field West ol Bunnell When you buy a farm in this colony, No Taxes, you pay no taxes whatever until after Fees Etc. y u have completed all the payments on ’ your land. Every expense of this nature is borne by the Company. We pay all recording fees, taxes, etc., and there are no charges other than your regular payments on the land. This is so, even if you take possession of your farm after making but a single payment. Society and Schools A man, before he makes up his mind to go into a new community, should know that he is going to have good neighbors and good schools. At Bunnell there are some of the finest people in the United States and they are all working with a single interest, just like one big family. The public school at Bunnell is ample for the needs of all the colonists’ children at the present time. They have a superintendent and an assistant. Another school is located at DuPont, and schools will be established in other parts of the colony as they are needed. Page Ten Thus you may be assured that you will not be going into a wilderness, or a place where your family will lose the finer influences of the home when you locate at Bunnell-DuPont. Jacksonville! Jacksonville lies eighty-seven miles north of Bunnell. It is one of the finest cities ; i n the South and is growing very rapidly. In Jacksonville there are excellent de partment stores, theatres, churches, secret societies, all manner of supply houses for your farm or your home,; and the distance is so short from Bunnell that you may order by mail or telegraph and have whatever you need delivered within a few hours, or you may run up to Jacksonville and attend to such matters in person. You may call upon the big commission houses and buyers at Jacksonville, as most of the principal mar kets of the country have representatives here. Jacksonville morning and evening papers are deliv ered at Bunnell, so that you may keep constantly in touch with all of the important daily events. Nearby towns are Palatka to the northwest, St. Au gustine to the north, and Daytona to the south. So great is the fame of Hastings and our Crop particular region of Florida for potatoes. Buying oranges, produce of various kinds, that during the producing season buyers come to this section of Florida and buy the crops from farmers directly on their ground. They do not come in pairs, but they come by the score. Thus you see that the matter of marketing your crop is not left to you to solve, but is taken care of by these buyers, who repre sent large commission and export houses all over the country. They pay cash for the produce, delivered f. o. b. depot, if one prefers it, instead of shipping on consignment. The average rainfall of Florida, as a whole, is around 53 inches, although por tions of the State exceed this amount. The lowest rainfall of the year generally occurs in December and the highest in August. At Bunnell we suffered less from excessive rainfall during the past year than did Hastings, for the Tempera ture and Rainfall Sample of Bunnell’s 1913 Corn Crop

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‘A LIT T L E F A R M CHICAGO A RIG LIVING” Cutting Cow Peas Near Dupont reason that our land is higher than Hastings—and this is a great advantage to our colonists. The annual average temperature in Florida is 74 degrees. We will give you an idea of the average dur ing the summer months. August averages 83 degrees, and it is a well-known fact that Florida has fewer days in which the temperature stands at 90 degrees or over than any State in the Union, except, of course, those States where the thermometer may go to 95 and down to 45 within a few days thereafter, thereby breaking the average. Do not be afraid of Florida’s summers. They are ideal, and no one suffers so much from the heat in the North as a man who has lived for a number of years in Florida. Through the very heart of the BunnellMarkets DuPont colony runs the Florida East Coast Railroad. This syc em is thor oughly equipped with refrigerator car line service. It makes no difference what the condition of the weather may be, crops grown in Florida are placed in these cars and whisked away to the markets in the North. Another railroad is to be built from Ormond to St. Augustine, on the east side of our colony, and plans are now under consideration for the laying of double tracks from Key West to Jacksonville, on account of the heavy freight and passenger traffic. We consider T H O S. A. VERDENIUS the Florida East Coast Railroad one of the best rail roads of the South, well equipped and up-to-date in every respect. The railroad company recently pur chased twelve new one hundred and ten ton engines. The Florida East Coast Canal, which runs from Miami to Jacksonville, passes just to the east of our colony. There is a landing at Ocean City, so that we have the advantage of being able to ship our produce by water as well as by rail. Florida enjoys the distinction of being Distance to the earliest marketing section of AmerMarkets ica, an d she is many hundreds of miles nearer to the large Eastern markets than California and the Texas Gulf Coast country. Fifty million people can be served with Florida products within thirty-six hours after shipment has been placed upon cars in Florida. This is an advantage which you must consider of especial favor to you when you make up your mind to locate at Bunnell-DuPont. From Bunnell, Fla. To Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y. Washington, D. C Chicago, Ill. Kansas City, Mo. Miles .1,321 .1,091 863 .1,192 .1,181 From Los Angeles, Cal. To Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y .. Washington, D. C Chicago, Ill. Kansas City, Mo. Miles .3,235 .3,145 .2,974 .2,260 1,809 The average haul to markets from Florida is 1,000 miles, against the average haul of 3,000 miles from California. Haling; Cow-Pea Hay on Farm Between Bunnell anil Dupont Florida maintains a complete agricultural Experiment department and experiment stations. Station These publish results of investigations in their lines and you may have these re ports by simply writing to the proper authorities in Florida. The State Agricultural Department of Correspondt he University of Florida is giving a corenre Course respondence course in truck growing for all non-residents who expect to make Florida their future home. Page Eleven

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“A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO A BIG LIVING” There is, perhaps, no State in the Union Out-Door where one may enjoy so many lines of Sports out-door sports as in Florida. You may have the sweetest water to bathe in, or you may prefer salt water bathing. You may fish for fresh water or salt water fish. Within a few hours’ ride from Bunnell you may enjoy good deer hunting, while squirrel, rabbit, fox and other small animals abound in and around our colony. Ducks, geese, turkeys, quail and other wild fowls are also to be found in profusion. Close by our colony, to the east, lies the great Atlantic Ocean, and here you may have the finest kind of bathing, boating and fishing at the least possible expense. There is a complete chain of resort hotels along the East Coast, adjacent to our colony, and the beautiful and quaint city of St. Augustine lies but a short distance away. Your children may romp and play over your land to their heart’s content, and your wife can take them to the seashore or other resorts almost any day of the year. Mortgage Lifters at Bunnell. They Will Make All Your Land Payments for You Florida is one of the healthiest States in Health the Union, the death rate being slightly Conditions over six to each thousand population. When you take into consideration that the majority of Northern States have a death rate of from fifteen to twenty per thousand, you will have some idea of the supremacy of Florida as a health com munity. I have many times met people, now robust and vigorous, who some years ago had come to Florida to die. It is a wonderful State in which to renew one’s health and prolong life. Many of the diseases so prev alent in Northern States are unknown in Florida. Oc casionally there is a case of malaria, but it is not nearly so common as many are led to believe, and, indeed, Page Twelve A Busy Scene in Bunnell Potato Field there are few States, if any, which are entirely free from malaria. Sunstrokes are absolutely unknown here, and the very fact that Florida today has tall pine trees, reach ing one hundred feet into the air, and has them in large quantities, is best proof of the fact that high winds, tornadoes, electrical storms, etc., do not abound here to a distinctive degree. Down along the Keys of the coast winter storms sometimes assail, but the State, as a whole, is free from any such disturbances. A great many folks have an idea that Insects Florida abounds in insects and reptiles, and We want to say that Florida is no more Reptiles afflicted in this regard than many other v States in the Union. It is natural that in a region where the trees are thick and where there is more or less low ground, that mosquitoes will lay their eggs, together with other insects, and breed rapidly. However, the moment that the land is cleared and the country given over to improvement, these pests disappear just as they do in other States. Mosquitoes are not a serious annoyance in our section of Florida, by any means. Florida is a land of worth—not a region of pests, but you will find mosquitoes here and you will find snakes, just as you will find them in Ohio, Minnesota, Iowa or Illinois, the best farming sections of the United States. On the first and third Tuesday of each Homemonth you can obtain, from most points seekers’ in the Central and Eastern States, a Fvrnr
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It Is Not a Question Can 1 One o ]HE Bunnell Development Company originally offered for sale 35,000 acres of land, located in Township Twelve. Most of this land has been sold ; the terms of purchase being fifty cents an acre each month. We have recently placed on the market another large traet of and, adjoining the original colony on the South, and located in Township thirteen. The terms of purchase of these farms are One Dollar ($1.00) an acre each month. The new tract comprises 25,000 acres of the very best land in the State of Florida and we would advise you to buy in this addition, as here you can secure an exceptionally choice location. However, if it is not convenient for you to pay One Dollar ($1.00) an acre each month for your farm, you can still purchase good land in the original colony at the rate of fifty cents (50c) per acre a month. Every ten acres you purchase in the old tract will cost you Five Dollars ($5.00) each month; twenty acres Ten Dollars ($10.00), etc. All land sold in new tract costs One Dollarj($1.00) an acre per month, price Thirty-five Dollars ($35.00) an acre in both^tracts. You may tak,e possession of your farm any time after you have made first payment thereon. DonÂ’t Let Seventeen Cents a Day Stand Between You and Success. Fill out the order blank opposite and send to me at once, and secure for yourself a choice farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony.

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ou Afford to Buy f These Farms? The Fact Is You Cannot Afford NOT To Buy One. Order 61an|^or^a Bunnell-Dupont Farm 1)0 NOT WRITE IN THESE SPACES See Back of Order Blank for Tp. Rg, 61k. Tr. THOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Ill. Please enter my order for a farm of< o,. -19_ -Acres (Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchjfcaf’whethei^kj-jiO or 40 acres.) of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35J50^ber aendrt at the rate of ->&. (Write in here the amount to be paid each month) per month, until paid for, subject to the conditions on back hereof. *o •% Enclosed find $ as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of Dollars hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment antfgdvise me which tract has been allotted to me. Name. -StreetTown R. F. D. No.Age— -County. State. -Married or SingleOccupation THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 S. LA SALLE ST., CHICAGO, ILL

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Terms and Conditions Exempt From Taxation.—The Bunnell Development Company agrees to pay the taxes due on this tract, until such time as a Warranty Deed shall have been delivered to the purchaser. No Interest.—The Bunnell Development Company agrees that the purchaser shall NOT foe required to pay any interest whatsoever, either on the principal sum or on deferred payments. Thirteen Weeks’ Grace.—It is mutually agreed that when twenty per cent (20%) of said purchase price shall have been paid, The Bunnell Development Company will grant 15 days’ grace on each monthly payment; that when forty per cent (40%) of said purchase price shall have been paid. The Bunnbll Development Company will grant 45 days’ grace on each monthly payment; and when sixty per cent (60%) of said purchase price shall have been paid, the Bunnell Development Company will grant thirteen weeks’ grace on each monthly payment. And that no interest shall be charged on such deferred payments during such days of grace. In Event of Sickness.—After ten per cent (10%) of the payments have been made on this contract, if the purchaser should be unable at any time to make a payment by reason of sickness, notice in writing may be given to The Bunnell Development Company of such inability, and the reason therefor, together with a hote or letter from the physician attending the purchaser and upon receipt thereof. The Bunnell Development Company agrees that the purchaser shall thereafter have thirteen (13) weeks’ grace for the resumption of payments. Provided, however, that such extension of time by reason of sickness shall be limited to one such extension each year. In Event of Death.—In event of the death of the purchaser before completion of this contract, the Bunnell Development Company agrees that the heirs of the purchaser shall succeed to all his rights, title and interest in said contract, and that such heirs of the purchaser may continue performance of this contract as fully and com pletely as the purchaser could do in his life time, and the Bunnell Development Company further agrees to deliver a Warranty Deed to said property to such person as may be nominated by the said heirs upon the fulfillment of the conditions of this contract. Eight to Sell or Assign.—It is mutually agreed that the purchaser may, upon prior notice to The Bunnell Development Company, assign or sell this contract to any person, and that such assignee shall succeed to all the rights and privileges under this contract. It Is Mutually Agreed by and between the parties hereto, that after the first payment shall have been made, if the purchaser shall fail to make the payments as herein specified, time being the essence of this contract and all its provisions, then and in that event the contract shall, at the option of The Bunnell Development Company, and without further notice, be and become null and void, and all rights of the purchaser growing out of this contract be forfeited as fixed and liquidated damages, except the purchaser shall be entitled to all the rights and privileges growing out of the provisions in the next succeeding paragraph. Ninety Days to Inspect.—It is mutually agreed that the purchaser be allowed ninety (90) days from the date of this contract in which to make a personal inspection of the property, or to send a relative or friend, or to secure some friend in Florida to inspect the property; and if the purchaser, after such inspection, is not satisfied with his property, for any reason whatsoever, he or she may then give notice in writing, and The Bunnell De velopment Company shall then refund all payments made by the purchaser, together with interest at the rate of six per cent (6%) per annum for such time as The Bunnell Development Company shall have had the money in their possession; provided, however, that unless such written notice is received by The Bunnell Development Com pany within ninety days from the date of this contract, the contract shall be binding upon both the purchaser and The Bunnell Development Company. Public Roads.—A strip of ground fifteen feet wide is reserved on all section and half-section lines, to be used as one-half right of way for public roads. It Is Mutually Agreed that this contract is made in Bunnell, Florida, and that all payments on said contract are to be made to The Bunnell Development Company, at their offices at Bunnell, Fla., or to Thos. A. Verdenius, 108 S. L.a Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.

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“A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO A BIG LIVING” THOS. A. VERDENIUS knd the development taking place there from month to month. This magazine is also sent to those who are interested in our colony and who are anxious to obtain more information regarding Bunnell-Dupont. If you wish to receive the Home Builder free of cost for six months, write us at once for same. Hauling Empty Potato Barrels from Bunnell Barrel Fac tory to a Colony Farm Terms of Sale and Titles We are offering for sale these splendid farms in the Bunnell-Dupont colony at a very reasonable price; on the easy monthly payment plan; free of taxes un til paid for, and without interest on de ferred payments, or one-third cash, balance one and two years. If you prefer to pay cash for your farm, we will allow you a discount of 10 per cent. Our terms of purchase are so easy that every wage earner and salaried man and woman has the opportunity of obtaining a home and independence in our colony. Our price and terms are subject to change at any time, but you will find attached hereto an order blank giving our latest terms. On the back of same you will find an exact copy of the contract which you will enter into if you purchase a farm of the Bunnell Development Company. Recapitu lation We have tried in this booklet to be concise, conservative, and convincing. We have avoided anything that would tend to mislead or misinform you; we have used no pretty language—Florida is beautiful enough, and no word of man’s pen can paint her picture. Into this State are pouring thousands of people from all over the world. They are coming here with all man ner of ideas. They are bringing with them an enthusiasm and a desire for work that will make Florida go for ward, in our opinion, faster than any of her sister States along agricultural lines. These men and women are of the superior kind, simply because they show by their very actions in coming to Florida that they are instilled with great ambition. What is true of Florida, as a whole, is particularly true of the Bunnell-DuPont colony. We want you to j make up your mind to own one of our colony farms, and we want you to buy it with the distinct under^ standing that you are making an investment here that is a worthy one, and one that will place you in a posi tion of independence, if you will only do one-half the actual labor that is needed to make a first-class daily wage in any of our Northern States. Every month of the year is a working month in Florida. While you work you may, at the same time, be enjoying her wonderful sunshine, her great gifts of natural pleasures, and the bounties of health from her incomparable climate. Do not buy one of our farms unless you make up your mind fully that it is the place where you wish to locate. WE DO NOT NEED, OR WANT, ANY BUT THE SERIOUS-MINDED. You will find this Com pany always willing and ready to do everything to help you, but you must decide that you want to be helped before we can be of any assistance to you. Remember that when you come to Florida you will find everything as we say you will find it, but we advise you to come prepared in a financial way to build your house, clear your land, buy the necessary tools with which to do your work, and, at the same time, have money enough left to take care of yourself and family until your farm begins to produce. We want you to thoroughly understand this ques tion, so that you may reach the point which our colo nists have arrived at today, and reach it in the shortest possible time. The fact that this colony is so far along now and has solved all of the questions you will be asked to solve is an asset which you should not over look. Field of Sugar Cane Between Oeean City and Bunnell, from Ten to Twelve Feet in Height Page Thirteen

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“A I. I T T L E FAR M A RIG LIVING” Beautiful Drive at Knox & Belle’s 105-Aere Orange Grove, Almost Adjoining the Ocean We are selling our Bunnell land very rapidly and if you want to own one of these farms you should, by all means, make up your mind that the only sure way is to send in your application and remittance at once. There can be no other certainty, as practically every one who comes to see our land is charmed with it, and does not leave without buying a farm for himself; often reserving tracts for his friends. If you will pay a visit you will be just like the rest. Our field manager at Bunnell will be glad to take you over the colony in the Company’s automobile at any time, and show you your allotment, or help you in the selection of your farm. A Final In a booklet of this kind we cannot tell Word you ever ything we wish you to know. Our only aim is to convince you that Bu.nnell-DuPont is the most desirable community in Florida. If you want any further infor mation regarding this colony, write us and we will take pleasure in sending you a personal letter. Do not hesi tate to ask us any questions. We will answer to the best of our ability, and we believe to your complete satisfaction. Address all correspondence to ThoSo A, Verdeniiis 108 So. La Salle St. Chicago, Ill. All orders for land should be sent to the above address, but we wish to emphasize the fact that no allotments are made from this office. We are conscientious in the matter of allotting our farms, hence our Engineer and Field Man ager in charge at Bunnell, who are familiar with every foot of land in the colony, make each indi vidual selection for our customers. T H O S. A. VERDE NILS CHICAGO CROPS GROWN, WHEN PLANTED AND AVER AG YIELD m IRISH POTATOES, planted in January, harvested in April and May. Yield from fifty to sixty barrels per acre at S3.50 to $5.00 a barrel. SWEET POTATOES, planted in June, July and August, harvested from October to January. Yield from 200 to 400 bushels per acre, bringing from 50c to $1.00 a bushel, CABBAGE, sown in September and October, trans planted in October and November, harvested in Jan uary, February and March. Yields 175 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. CELERY, planted in field in January, harvested in March. Yields 750 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. LETTUCE, sown in the fall and harvested about eight or ten weeks later. Yields 600 hampers per acre at $1.00 a hamper. EGG PLANT, planted in December and January, harvested from April to June. Yields 600 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. BEANS, planted in the fall. Yields from 100 to 200 hampers per acre. Fair average $1.50 a hamper. TOMATOES, sown in December, January and February, harvested around April and May. Yield 150 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. CUCUMBERS, planted in January, harvested in April. Yield 300 crates per acre at 50c a crate. PEPPERS, planted in October and November, har vested in January, February and March. Yield 600 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. OKRA, planted the whole year around. Yields 400 crates per acre at $1.00 a crate. ONIONS, planted about October and November, harvested about April. Yields 500 bushels per acre at $1.25 a bushel. The above table is merely an estimate. In many cases the yield has been much larger than quoted. Every reader will understand the prices vary, according to the demand and supply, but we consider these figures fair average prices. The highest prices have NOT been quoted in the above table. Bunnell’s Hotel, Where You Will Be When You Arrive Made Comfortable Page Fourteen

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“A LITTLE FARM CHICAGO Good Advice The Bunnell Development Company endorses the following from the Florida Times-Union: “There is not a shadow of doubt that many of the advertisements that have appeared concerning Florida land have been gross misrepresentations of the lands advertised and the conditions that exist where the lands are located. In almost every instance such advertise ments have been inserted by land companies or indi viduals who have their headquarters outside of Florida, and whose only interest in Florida is to dispose of as many acres of land as possible in as short a time as possible. They have secured some semblance of a title to a large tract of Florida land and through their mis leading advertisements and illustrated literature, as well as bogus testimonials, have unloaded thousands of acres of perfectly worthless land—or worse still—swamps that it will cost thousands of dollars to drain, upon peo ple who have bought in good faith. “There is not a particle of necessity of misrepresent ing anything in connection with Florida. The land company telling the truth about the lands it owns will make more in the end than the swindler, for the honest company will gain the confidence of its patrons and the public generally and its reputation for honesty and fair dealings will become widespread and secure for it a business that the dishonest company can never hope to attain. “Every person buying land in Florida should know with whom he is dealing. He should ascertain from banks, boards of trade, public officials and newspapers the character and reputation of the persons composing such companies and also the general nature of the lands advertised. It is much safer to deal with a company organized and chartered in Florida, by citizens of Flor ida, who have the interests of Florida at heart, than it is to deal with a foreign corporation, having absolutely no interest in Florida except to sell Florida lands.” One of the Many Farm Homes Sow Being Erected Throughout the Colony T H O S. A. VERDESIHS A Pew Hours’ Catch Near Ocean City The Bunnell Development Company is a Florida corporation. Mr. I. I. Moody is president and Mr. J. F. Lambert is secretary. Its officials have their homes in Bunnell. The Chicago office is merely the General Sales Office. The Bunnell Development Company is composed of men of high standing in Florida, and has the endorse ment of prominent people and banks throughout the State, among whom are the following: J. E. INGRAHAM, Vice-President of the Florida East Coast Railroad, St. Augustine, Fla. WM. A. MacWILLIAMS, Member of the House of Representatives from St. Johns County, St. Augustine, Fla. HON. WM. S. JORDAN, Ex-Mayor, Jacksonville, Fla. BUNNELL STATE BANK, Bunnell, Fla. COMMERCIAL BANK, St. Augustine, Fla. ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, Jacksonville, Fla. Ocean Beach at Ocean City Page Fifteen

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Take Care of a Little Farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony And the Little Farm Will Take Care of You In the preceding pages of this booklet I have tried to be brief, and yet cover every point regarding our colony. I have endeavored to set forth plain, unvarnished facts and now I want to have a final word with you, men and women, who know the value of a dollar, and who sincerely desire to own a home of your own, and to invest your dollars where they will bring the largest returns to you. I believe I have proven to your satisfaction that you can make a better living on a small farm in the Bunnell-Dupont colony, and at the same time get more real pleasure out of life than you can work ing for wages elsewhere, but better still, you may have the assurance that your work will bring you permanent benefits, and that you will not be thrust out when your days of usefulness are over, and you will have no worries regarding strikes, panics or the loss of your job. You who read this—what have YOU really accomplished during the time you have worked for wages, or paid high rents to someone else? HOW LARGE IS YOUR BANK ACCOUNT? HOW MUCH ARE YOU WORTH TODAY? These are not questions to be answered to me, but to your self. THEY ARE ASKED TO SET YOU THINKING. If you are satisfied with your present condition, you need not pay any attention to my appeal, but if you are not, I have shown you how you may better yourself. Again I say, do not take my word for this, but prove my assertions for yourself. I only appeal to your common sense and good judg ment. I am not a philanthropist—I am in business, like yourself, to make money, but there is a real satisfaction in selling Bunnell land, for I thoroughly believe that any one who buys a farm in our col ony, at the price we ask for our land, gets one hundred cents for every dollar invested. I furthermore believe that this land will be worth $100.00 an acre by the time you have made your last payment on same. Our colony originally comprised 35,000 acres of land, but the demand for our farms became so great that we have added about 25,000 acres to our holdings, giving us a body of land 60,000 acres in extent. We have issued more than seventeen h ndred contracts to buyers all over the United States, Canada, Hawaiian Islands, and in some parts of Europe. I made Florida my home for two years. I made money in Florida and I have seen others make fortunes there. I have been in almost every State in the Union, but I consider Florida, today, above all other localities, THE OPEN DOOR TO OPPORTUNITY, and the man who realizes this now is the man who will make money. My faith in the State is based on careful study and observation. A man with energy and intelligence can bring one acre of our Bunnell land under such a state of cultivation that it will feed the largest family in the United States. A few hens will supply your home with an abundance of fresh eggs. You may enjoy delicious milk and butter from your own cow, and can raise three crops every year on your land. WHAT OTHERS ARE DOING YOU CAN DO. THE MAN WHO THINKS AND ACTS AND WHO SEES THE OPPORTUNITIES BEFORE HIM IS THE MAN WHO MAKES A SUCCESS IN LIFE. To substantiate all I have told you in this booklet, to verify each statement I have made, all you need do is—COME TO BUNNELL-DUPONT AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. Our terms of sale, as you have noted previously in this booklet, are within the reach of every person who is really sincere in his desire to own a home of his own. Bear in mind we charge no interest on deferred payments, no taxes or fees of any nature. Our titles are absolutely perfect. You are dealing with honorable people—you cannot possibly lose by buying land at BunnellDupont. I have told you the plain facts regarding our colony. It is now up to you. An order blank has been placed in this booklet for your convenience. Fill it out, attach remittance and mail to me AT ONCE. You have been thinking long enough about securing a Florida farm—NOW IS THE TIME FOR YOU TO ACT. TAKE CARE OF A LITTLE FARM IN THE BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY—AND THE LITTLE FARM WILL TAKE CARE OF YOU. Thos. A. VerdenillS, Bunnell Development Company, 108 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. Page Sixteen

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Ob' 06 / D/ 7 &r?c/ How We Allot Our Land The plat below represents one section—640 acres—of land divided into four quarter sections or blocks, each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each, and 4 tracts of 20 acres each. PO//L7 This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permitting every owner to enter and leave his land in the easiest possible manner. On this page you will also find a map of Florida, indi cating the exact position of the Bunnell-Dupont colony. On the back cover of this booklet you will find a large map o f our colony lands. This map will give you a better idea of how our farms are laid out; it will show you the location of the railroad, canal, ocean, country roads and towns. If you wish a large map of the colony, write us for same. 1 Loke ’.
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Map of the Bunnell Development CompanyÂ’s Land, at Bunnell, Florida

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*

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He who owns a home of his own, If only a cottage with vines overgrown, Of the pleasures of life gets a larger per cent. Than his haughtier neighbor who has to pay rent. Copyright, 1912, Thomas A. Verdenius

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MY EXPERIENCE YOUR GAIN I was born in Holland, reared on my father's farm, where we had to make every square foot of land yield something to eat—something to sell. In Holland only a few farm ers own their land—most of them must always rent. There the average farm is about three and one-half acres, and this land sup ports anywhere from eight to twelve people. I have known what it is to raise a family while working for wages, and I want to say here that I consider it the first duty of every man to see that his family is protected against the time when he is unable longer to provide for them. Not only must he protect them, but he should be able to give them, at least independence, if not luxuries. Knowing, as I do, the needs and the wants of men of ordinary means, I have endeavored to set forth in this booklet what I believe to be a solution to these problems. I shall not attempt to paint pretty pic tures of impossible things, but I will tell you in the following pages how you may secure a farm home in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, where you can, upon a few acres, if you will work, give yourself and fam ily everything you need and at the same time save a goodly portion of your earnings every year. More than this, you can enjoy many luxuries in the nature of all manner of out-door sports, ocean bathing, fishing, boating, etc., and at the same time go through life under the most healthful condi tion;. This is all that I promise you in the following pages, but I want to say that I can positively prove to your satisfaction that this will be your reward if you will read carefully every page of this book. I ask no man to take my word, but I appeal only to his common sense, good judgment and his earnest desire. Very sincerely, My buyers are my partners. Your success is my success.

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONjj Florida Ponce de Leon was governor of Porto A T+ W Rico when there came to him a few AS it was Spaniards who told wonderful stories of a region of flowers where the In dian said there was a spring of eternal youth, and he, being an old man, sought to renew his years by bathing in the waters of this spring. He landed near St. Augustine, Fla., in 1513, on Easter Sunday, and as Easter was called in Spain Pascua Florida, or Flowery Easter, he named the new land Florida. The romance and the poetry of this foolish man’s dream have always clung to Florida. Blood has been shed for this land; nations have quarreled over it; rich men have made it their playground, but it has been left to the man of ordinary means to de velop it. Florida Flordia is now a region of cities, rail -r -r roads, county highways, truck gardens, AS it IS citrus groves, winter and summer re sorts, and, indeed, a modern, pulsing community. Florida has learned her lessons, has passed through her periods of travail and of a con sequence is now going forward at a tremendous rate. Without fear of successful contradiction, we say that Florida produces more, in dollars and cents, per acre, than any other State in the Union. You cannot expect Florida to throw her bounties in your lap without toil and without sacrifice, but if you will do those things which any man of common sense knows must be done, you may become a Floridian of the new order—of modern type. A Bird’s Eye View rom Bank Bldg. Roof of a part of Bunnell’s Residence Section. Florida is a peninsula about one hunClirnate fired and forty miles wide at its widest point and of a gigantic coast extent, being almost surrounded by the sea. Florida has all the sea breezes, which make mild its winters and take the sting out of the summer sun. Professor Knapp of the Department of Agricul ture is said to have spoken at a gathering of busi ness men in Florida, about in these words: “FlorRich men spend thousands for Florida climate. ’Tis yours for laughter, love and life. 2

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V THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO ida’s value lies in her climate. Eighty per cent is its ratio, 10 per cent soil value and 10 per cent man.” If man value is increased you will likewise find that the climate will return bountifully for this increase. Florida lies directly across the path of Location ^ le most important sea highway, which will lead through the Panama Canal to all ports of the world, either east or west. What she is today is nothing to what she will be during the next ten to twenty-five years. Within thirty-six hours by fast freight and passen ger train, lies a market of more than fifty million people to be served by Florida. Around both coasts and in the center of the State are mighty trunk line railroads, reaching away to all markets, while at various points along her coast the products of her soil is sent by ocean vessels to the eager markets. Florida can reach New York, Philadelphia, Bos ton, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, etc., from three to five weeks in advance of other sections of our so-called mid-winter farming communities. Bank and Office Bldg, at Bunnell, Modern in every way. Every good has its bad; every hot its g Q jj cold; every sweet its bitter—and Florida is no exception. It has its good soil and its bad soil; it has its extremely rich soil and its very barren ground. The general character, however, of Florida soil is a dark or gray sandy loam under which lies a clay subsoil that has the tendency to hold better the moisture during the period when the crops are growing. The above character of soil is the kind which is today responsible for Florida's fame, and this is the character of soil that the Bunnell-DuPont colony contains. Remember there is but one crop of soil, also that all New York sold once for $24.00.

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY \ Acre No other State equals Florida in averYields age P roduction Per Acre Per Acre Missouri yields... .$ 9.38 Iowa yields.$12.22 Illinois yields. 12.48 Ohio yields. 13.36 FLORIDA YIELDS $109.76 PER ACRE. This is the average value of farm production in five great States, as per governmental statistics. Florida exceeds them all combined. Land in Mis souri, Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, sells for from $100.00 to $250.00 an acre, with the earning above mentioned. What can you do on Bunnell land, worth 1,000% in production value over any State mentioned above? The real value of Bunnell land is not to be compared with that of the four States mentioned. Our Bunnell-DuPont colony is a commun„ ity built upon co-operative lines. The Colony people who make up this colony and own its small farms are earnest, honest men and women. They are working for a purpose— they are not dreamers. Already they have accom plished much. They have built the beautiful little city of Bunnell that is the pride, not only of these colonists, but of every citizen of St. Johns county, Florida. Bunnell-DuPont colony is located eighty-seven miles south of Jacksonville on the main line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. It is less than three miles from the Atlantic Ocean and about twenty-five miles from St. Augustine, in a straight line. This is a region that has, for hundreds of years, been known to man, and yet it is a spot that had not been fully appreciated in a large way until about three or four years ago. 4

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Early Early settlers came to St. Johns county and have thrived and done well. They bettlers have built excellent homes, established very fine orange groves and truck farms, and, upon the whole, have given the soil, the climate, and the county, every test necessary to prove its value. Bunnell-DuPont colony first began to Bunnell attract attention about two and onehalf years ago, and it has steadily grown ever since. The little city of Bun nell, which is the principal town of this colony, has about six hundred inhabitants. Already they have a fine church, a most excellent school, a first-class A home of one of our colonisfs, just outside of Bunnell. bank; the town has telephone connections with all the important points of this country; they have a drug store, blacksmith shop, a good hotel, three gen eral stores, city water works, meat market, barber shop, Masonic lodge, cement sidewalks, lumber mill, shingle mill, and the city is electrically lighted. Ten acres have been reserved for a park to be laid out in the northwest portion of the town. Elsewhere in this book you will find views of this town. A later application will be made for free rural de livery of mail. When you come to Bunnell-DuPont, so far as your particular tract of land is concerned, you will come as a pioneer; that is, you will have to do the work, done for you, that is necessary to bring forth the crops. You will have to build your home, dig your well, erect your fences, plant your crops and take care of them, but you will not have to suffer those inconveniences which others have to undergo in many sections of Florida. You have this beautiful town close by you, where every need of your farm and your home can be sup plied. You can get out of a Pullman car at Bunnell; you can have your freight sidetracked here; you can make all the arrangements you want for the im provement of your home. You can meet with, and talk to, those who are engaged in small farming and fruit raising. Pioneer ing or have it A few years of earnest labor will bring a real age of ease. 5

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY You will find them an excellent class of men and women who will be only too glad to welcome you and to tell you the things that you should know. You will find the company officials ready, willing and anxious to extend you every courtesy in their power. They will take you out to your home and assist you as far as possible, so that real pioneering will not be necessary for you to pass through. The Famous Hastings District Every commission merchant who han dles potatoes has heard of Hastings, Florida, for it is one of the greatest potato raising sections in the United States. Hastings lies but twelve miles from our colony. Here the many buy ers for commission houses throughout the United States come each spring and purchase the entire early potato crop. The soil of our colony is like that of Hastings. Hastings land, which a few years ago could be bought for a less price even than we are now offer ing our land for sale, cannot be purchased today for ten times the price before asked, and much of the land cannot be purchased at any price, so indepen dent are the growers. Two hundred and fifty dol lars per acre is not a large price for good Hastings land. A busy scene in a Bunnell potato field. This year the potato crop sold largely around $6.00 per barrel and some of the buyers who bought crops at Hastings and also from our colonists, said that the best potatoes they had seen were grown in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, thus placing the stamp of expert buyers upon Bunnell-DuPont soil. Four of BunnellÂ’s leading citizens will clear and plant to potatoes alone, six hundred and forty acres for the next spring market. This immense body of potatoes, representing thousands upon thousands of dollars expended before these men can obtain a re turn on their money, is of itself the highest compli ment possible to be paid to this colony. Potatoes produce profits, not payment for plumb ersÂ’ bills. No frozen water pipes here. 6

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Hastings has specialized wholly upon potatoes, and its colonists have grown independently wealthy and have made a name, not only for themselves, but for Florida as well. Bunnell-DuPont colonists are equally as success ful in the raising of potatoes, for the short time their land has been under cultivation. Mortgage lifters at Bunnell. They will make all your land payments for you. One of our colonists was paid $1,500.00 for his ten acres of potatoes; another received $1,800.00 for twelve acres; and others have done equally as well. These potatoes were planted in the early part of February, 1912, and the owners had sold and re ceived their checks for them in less than three months. This is indeed the “proof of the pudding.” Taking knocked down barrels from Bunnell depot to potato field. Prof. Knapp of the Agricultural DeCorn partment states that throughout the en tire South corn can be raised to good advantage with proper care. Florida has demonstrated this statement to be a fact, and she is rapidly achieving wonders in this line. “Ancient poetry and mythology suggest, at least, that husbandry was once a sacred art.”—Thoreau. 7

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY Corn is a splendid second crop. After your pota toes are harvested you can plant corn in April. It will yield about 50 bushels per acre, at 70 cents a bushel, or $35.00 an acre. This crop will not cost more than $5.00 per acre for seed, cultivating and harvesting and is raised in the summer months when the north furnishes her own truck; hence is a crop consumed at home. Velvet Can be planted when your corn is cultip. vated the last time. This crop will yield rieans and f rom one anc i one-half to two tons of Cow Peas excellent hay to the acre, worth at the least $20.00 per ton. Seed, cultivating and harvesting of this crop will not exceed $6.00 an acre. Both velvet beans and cow peas are great forage crops. They enrich the soil and at the same time are very profitable. Cattle, hogs and sheep thrive splendidly on these crops. Intensive Florida is the region of three crops a p. • year. While we advise all of our colorarming n i s ts to plant potatoes for one crop, we certainly likewise advise all manner of intensive farming. You will understand that by intensive farming is meant utilizing every day and taking advantage of every season and crowding the soil to its utmost. A great variety of vegetables may be grown and sold at a time when prices are positively the highest in the country. BUT YOU MUST REMEMBER THAT YOU CANNOT OBTAIN THESE UN LESS YOU FERTILIZE YOUR LAND AND TAKE CARE OF IT AS YOU SHOULD. You cannot rob the soil by successive planting without exhausting it. Under intensive farming, the following general table will show you what may be accomplished. Some Cabbages—Weight 14 lbs. each. Raised by a Bunnell farmer, originally from Oklahoma. Work in Florida in your shirt sleeves, not in shackles. But remember, Florida only wants WORKMEN. 8

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Vegetable Date of Planting Date of Harvesting Sweet Potatoes.May 15 to July 15 Oct. 1 to Jan. 1 Irish Potatoes.Dec. 1 to Feb. 1 Feb. 20 to Apr. 20 Cabbage.Aug. 1 to Dec. 1 Oct. 15 to May 1 Squash.Jan. 1 to Feb. 1 March 15 to May 1 Celery.Jan. 1 to Feb. 1 March 1 to Apr. 1 Lettuce.Dec. 1 to Jan. 1 Apr. 15 to June 15 Egg Plant.Dec. 1 to Jan. 1 Apr. 15 to June 15 Cauliflower.Sept. 1 to Oct. 1 Jan. 1 to Mch. 1 Tomatoes.Dec. 15 l") Jan. 15 Apr. 15 to June 1 Beans.Jan. 15 to Feb. 1 March 15 to May 1 Bermuda Onions.Oct. 1 to Dec. 1 Apr. 1 to May 1 Cucumbers.Jan. 15 to Feb. 1 Apr. 1 to May 1 Okra.Aug. 1 to Aug. 1 Nov. 1 to Nov. 1 Peppers.Oct. 1 to Jan. 1 Jan. 1 to May l Vegetable Amount Realized Per Acre Sweet Potatoes. 50 Barrels at $3.00 $150.00 Irish Potatoes. 50 “ “ 3.50 175.00 Cabbage.175 Crates “ 1.00 175.00 Squash.600 “ “ .60 360.00 Celery.800 “ “ 1.00 800.00 Lettuce.600 Baskets “ 1.00 600.00 EggPlant.800 Crates “ 1.00 800.00 Cauliflower.150 “ “ 1.50 225.00 Tomatoes.200 “ “ 1.75 350.00 Beans.175 “ “ 1.50 262.50 Bermuda Onions.400 Bushels “ 1.25 500.00 Cucumbers.300 Crates “ .50 150.00 Okra.400 “ “ 1.25 500.00 Peppers.600 “ “ 1.00 600.00 Tomatoes have yielded as much as $1,000.00 an acre, but the average runs from $300.00 to $500.00, and celery as much as $1,500.00 per acre. A happy party of St. Louis buyers in an orange grove 35 miles north of Bunnell. Before many years they hope to own such a grove themselves in our colony. Citrus It is a well-known fact that St. Johns Fruit* county is the first place in Florida rruits where oranges were grown, the seeds being brought here, it is supposed, by Ponce de Leon, and wild orange trees grew through out the state, seeds being carried, unquestionably, by the Seminole Indians. Oranges grow, they don’t drop in your lap. So come serious, not visionary. 9

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY In the early days citrus fruit culture had not ad vanced to the point it has reached today, but it is a well-known fact that oranges grown in this lati tude of Florida have a flavor peculiar to themselves and not approached by other sections. Immediately adjoining our colony is an old orange grove consisting of one hundred and five acres which is a living demonstration of this region’s productivity. Orange groves abound all over the county, and grapefruit trees as well. The man who goes in for this manner of fruit cul ture should thoroughly understand it before he risks his capital, and the best way to do this is to spend at least a year in Florida, so that you may know just what to do and when to do it. Small Fruits Berries of all kinds do well in Bunnell. Strawberries are especially prolific. Four thousand quarts to the acre are not uncommon in Florida, and at the high price of twenty cents a quart, which the mar ket brings during Florida’s strawberry season, means an earning of $800.00 per acre. All manner of small fruits should be cultivated, for they pay well and are easy to raise. Peaches Peaches and plums do well in this sec, p, tion of Florida. The peach orchard ana Blums about one and one-half miles east of Bunnell is a complete demonstration of this fact. The Florida peach is equal to any grown and bears before other peaches, thus taking advantage of the highest markets. What is true of peaches is more so true of plums. You should have an acre at least planted to peaches and plums. You may use the ground between the trees without injury to your grove. A good idea is to use your orchard as a chicken yard. Japanese persimmons are also adapted to our soil and bring fancy prices. Grapes Florida is the ideal home of the grape. Such species as the Royal Malaga, the Seedless Raisin, the Scuppernong, are the more familiar and common kinds. They do exceptionally well all over the State and will certainly prove big money getters at BunnellDuPont. Pecan Make up your mind, when you come to „ our colony, that you will plant pecans, urowing One pecan company was recently or ganized in Florida with $500,000 capital, to engage in this business. A first-class pecan tree will bear in five years at the rate of about five pounds and at eight or ten years anywhere from thirty-five to fifty pounds of nuts, increasing the yield as the tree grows older. Your hands, money and desire with Florida’s cli mate and soil can make all worry weary. 10

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO The average price of good pecans is abouft 50 cents per pound, so that fifty full-grown trees would bring an annual income of $30.00 per tree, or $1,500 per year. A pecan tree is hardy and^ its .product nonperishable. A physician living in Bunnell has a fine pecan grove on his farm outside of town. Live By all means make up your mind to go in for stock raising when you come to otOCk Bunnell. This section of Florida will raise most excellent stock, and there is always a heavy demand for dairy products. Don’t forget the hogs either, and add a few of these to your farm. They will bring you good revenue and demand but little attention on your part. Poultry raising in the Bunnell colony will bring handsome profits. Florida has fewer diseases among poultry than almost any State in the Union. The market is always high and few are engaged in the business. Most of the poultry and eggs used in the State come from Georgia and Tennessee. Poultry Poultry pays the pin money to the Florida housewife. Above photo shows Mrs. Verdenius in her poultry-yard in Florida. Drinking You can get good drinking water at an ... easy depth, either for man or beast, water almost anywhere in our colony, and artesian water at from one hundred to three hundred feet. Cost of these wells is about $1.00 per foot. Building Lumber is exceedingly cheap at BunMat • 1 nell. You can build your house, barn, Viateriai chicken house, etc., for about one-half of what they will cost in the North. This is due to two reasons: Lumber is plentiful in the State, hence cheap; and the mildness of the climate renders more expensive buildings unneces sary here. “The child is father of the man.”—Wordsworth. Help your child build a pure body and brain and leave it more than a memory of you. it

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY Moody The Bunnell Development Company •p originally laid out the Moody Road. •Koad This, when completed, will extend from Bunnell to Ocean City, a distance of about seven miles. The Company then turned the road over to St. Johns county, and the county is now shelling same. The road begins at Bunnell, runs northeast to King’s Road (which, by the way, is the oldest road in the United States, and is the direct old mail route from Key West to New York and intermediate points). From the King’s Road it will run east to Ocean City. The county has agreed to complete the shell ing of this road at as early a date as possible. Mr. Moody, president of the Bunnell Development Co., is also road commissioner, and we can be certain that this road will be a credit to the county as well as our colony. The Moody Road extends south of Bunnell for a distance of about four miles. As soon as the work of shelling the road east of town is completed, this road south of town will be shelled. Several new roads will be opened up throughout the colony dur ing the coming autumn and winter. Ocean Close by the edge of Bunnell-DuPont colony this Company has laid out a '-' lt y town. The name of this town is OCEAN CITY. It is ideally located for all the pleasures of boating, bathing, etc. Many people from the North have spoken of the beauty of this spot. It is most desirable in every way and within a very short time we believe it will be one of the resort spots on the famous East Coast. Lots in Ocean City are selling for $250.00 to $300.00 each, half cash, balance on time. General store in Dupont. To every purchaser of a ten-acre farm in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, this Company will give a lot absolutely free in the townsite of DuPont, the sis ter city of Bunnell, located in the southern part of the colony, about three and one-half miles from Bunnell. Free Lots in Dupont “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose,” but he can’t make another acre of land. 12

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO No Taxes, When you buy a farm in this colony, Fees Etc you P ay no taxes whatever until after you have completed all the payments on your land. Every expense of this nature is borne by the Company. We pay all re cording fees, taxes, etc., and there are no other charges than your regular payments on the land. This is so, even if you take possession of your land after making but a single payment. Glimpse of a beautiful Colonial home in Dupont. Irrigation Florida has sufficient rainfall during the growing seasons to give the crops all the moisture they need, but the best farmers in Florida irrigate their land with artesian well water so as to produce larger re sults should a possible shortage of moisture occur, and the fact that anywhere in this colony you can get artesian water, is an asset in favor of BunnellDuPont colony that cannot be estimated too highly. Irrigation means more money for the same amount of work, and after the well is installed it would pay for itself very quickly in added profits, although you will understand that irrigation is not necessary and is not used except among those inten sive farmers who go in for immense yields per acre. Florida is a real land for real men. DonÂ’t tell your grandchildren your failures. is

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLONY Society A man, before he makes up his mind to an( j go into a new community, should know o 1 that he is going to have good neighocnoois bors and good schools. At Bunnell there are some of the finest people in the United States and they are all working with a single inter est, just like one big family. The public school at Bunnell is ample for the needs of all the colonistsÂ’ children at the present time. Other rooms will be added to meet the grow ing demands, and schools will be established in other parts of the colony as they are needed. Thus you may be assured that you will not be going into a wilderness, or a place where your fam ily will lose the finer influences of the home. Bunnell's Public School Building. JacksonJacksonville lies eighty-seven miles ... north of Bunnell. It is one of the finest vliie cities in the South and is growing ex ceedingly rapid. They have most ex cellent department stores, theatres, churches, se cret societies, all manner of supply houses for your farm or your home, and the distance is so short from Bunnell that you may order by mail or tele graph and have whatever you need delivered within a few hours, or you may run up to Jacksonville and attend to such matters in person. Jacksonville morning and evening papers are de livered at Bunnell, so that you may keep constantly, in touch with all of the important daily events. You may call upon the big commission houses and buyers at Jacksonville, as most of the principal mar kets of the country have representatives here. Florida is a workshop where your children may romp at your feet.

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HOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO So great is the fame of Hastings and our particular region of Florida for potatoes, oranges, produce of various kinds, that during the producing season buyers come to this section of Florida and buy the crop from farmers directly on their ground. They do not come in pairs, but they come here by the score, so thus we see that the matter of marketing your crop is not left to you to solve, but is taken care of by these buyers, who represent large com mission and export houses all over the land. Crop Buying TemperaThe total rainfall of Florida, as a whole, tnr*> on a s around S3 inches, although portions P of the State exceed this amount. The Kainiall lowest rainfall of the year generally occurs in December and the highest in August. At Bunnell we suffered less from excess rainfall during the past year than Hastings did, for the rea son that our land is higher than Hastings—-and this is a great advantage, especially to the new colonists. The annual average temperature in Florida is 7 4 degrees. I will give you some idea of the average during the hot months. August averages 83 degrees, and it is a well-known fact that Florida has fewer days in which the temperature stands at 90 degrees or over, than any State in the Union, except, of course, those cold States where the thermometer may go to 95 and down to 45 within a few days thereafter, thereby breaking the average. Do not be afraid of Florida’s summer's. They are ideal, and no one suffers so much from the heat in the north as a man who has lived for a number of years in Florida. The "proof of the 1912 pudding." First train-load of Bunnell potatoes leaving railroad yard. Through the very heart of the BunnellMarkot DuPont colony runs the Florida East Coast Railroad. This system is thor oughly equipped with refrigerator car line service. It makes no difference what the condi tion of the weather may be, crops grown in Florida are placed in these cars and whisked away to the markets of the North. k Florida is a summer as well as a winter resort. r Each night you sleep, each day you smile. 15

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BUNNELL. DUPONT COLON Distance Florida enjoys the distinction of being 1UT the ear Fest marketing section of AmertO Markets ; ca> an( j S J 1C j s man y hundreds of miles nearer to market than California and the Texas Gulf Coast country. Fifty million people can be served with Florida products within thirtysix hours after shipment has been placed upon cars in Florida. This is an advantage which you must consider of especial favor to you when you make up your mind to locate at Bunnell-DuPont. From Bunnell, Fla. From Los Angeles, Cal. To Miles To Miles Boston, Mass.1,321 New York, N. Y.. .1,091 Washington, D. C.. 863 Chicago, Ill.1,192 Kansas City, Mo...1,181 Boston, Mass.3,235 New York, N .Y. ..3,145 Washington, D. C..2,974 Chicago, Ill.2,260 Kansas City, Mo... 1,809 ExperiFlorida maintains a complete agriculment tural department and experiment sta_ tions. These publish results of investiotation gations in their lines and you may have these reports by simply writing to the proper authorities in Florida. CorreThe State Agricultural Department of the University of Florida is giving a sponaence correspondence course in truck growCourse ing for all non-residents who are ex pecting to make Florida their future home. Out-Door There is, perhaps, no state in the Union „ that enjoys so many lines of out-door oports sports as does Florida. You may have the sweetest water to bathe in, or you may enjoy the salt water bathing. You may fish for fresh water or salt water fish. Within a few hours’ ride of Bunnell you may yet find good deer shooting, while squirrel, rabbit, fox and other small animals abound in and around our colony. Ducks, geese, turkeys, quail and other wild fowl are to be found in profusion. A party of Bunnell buyers on the Atlantic beach. Close by our colony, to the east, lies the great Atlantic Ocean, and here you may have the finest kind of bathing, boating and fishing at the least possible expense. There is a complete chain of re sort hotels along the East Coast, adjacent to our colony, and the beautiful and quaint city of St. Au gustine lies but a short distance away. Own your own farm, can take it from you. No strikes, panics or fire 16

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.THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Your children may romp and play over your land to their hearts’ content, and your wife can take them to the seashore or other resorts almost any day of the year. Health Florida is one of the healthiest states ... in the Union, the death rate being Conditions slightly over six to each thousand in population. When you take into con sideration that the majority of Northern States have a death rate of from fifteen to twenty per thou sand, you will have some idea of the supremacy of Florida as a health community. Sunstrokes are absolutely unknown here, and the very fact that Florida today has tall pine trees, reaching one hundred feet into the air, and has them in large quantities, is best proof of the fact that high winds, tornadoes, electrical storms, etc., do not abound here to a distinctive degree. Down along the Keys of the coast winter storms sometimes as sail, but the state, as a whole, is free from any such disturbances. Insects ^ g reat many people have an idea that j Florida is full of insects and reptiles. We want to say that Florida is no Reptiles more afflicted in this regard than many other States in the Union. It is natural that in a region where the trees are thick and there is more or less low ground, that mosquitoes will lay their eggs, together with other insects, and breed rapidly. However, the moment that the land is cleared and the country given over to improvement, these pests disappear just as they do in other States. Florida is a land of worth—not a region of pests, but you will find mosquitoes here and you will find snakes, just as you will in Ohio, Minnesota, Iowa, or Illinois, and in the best farming sections of Flor ida you will find more improvements than you will find in these States mentioned. RecapituWe have tried in this booklet to be lation concise, conservative, and convincing. ’' 1 W e have avoided anything that would tend to mislead or misinform you; we have used no pretty language — Florida is beautiful enough, and no word of man’s pen can paint her picture. Into this State are pouring thousands of people from all over the world. They are coming here with all manner of ideas. They are bringing with them an enthusiasm and a desire for work that will make Florida go forward, in our opinion, faster than any of her sister States, along agricultural lines. These men and women are of the superior kind, simply be cause they show by their very actions in coming to Florida that they are instilled with great ambition. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Grasp your opportunities now, and prevent poverty in old age. 17

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BUNNELL-DUPONT COLON 1 What is true of Florida, as a whole, is particularly true of Bunnell-DuPont colony. We want you to make up your mind to own one of our colony farms and we want you to buy it with the distinct under standing that you are making an investment here that is a worthy one, and one that will place you in a position of independence, if you will only do onehalf the actual toil that is needed to make a firstclass daily wage in any of our Northern States. Bunnell’s hotel, where you will be made comfortable when you arrive. Every month of the year is a working month in Florida. While you work you may, at the same time, be enjoying her wonderful sunshine, her great gifts of natural pleasures, and the bounties of health from her incomparable climate, atmosphere, and general health-giving qualities. Do not buy one of our farms unless you make up vour mind fully that it is the place that you want to locate in. We do not need, or want, any but the serious-minded. You will find this Company always willing and ready to do everything to help you, but you must decide that you want to be helped before we can be of any assistance to you. Remember that when you come to Florida you will find everything as we say you will find it, but we advise you to come prepared in a financial way to build your house, clear your land, buy the neces sary tools with which to do your work, and, at the same time, have money enough left to take care of yourself and family until your farm begins to pro duce. “Where there’s a will, there’s a way.” 18

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HOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO We want you to thoroughly understand this ques tion, so that you may reach the point which our colonists have arrived at today, and to reach it in the shortest possible time. The fact that this colony is so far along now and has solved all the questions which you will be asked to solve, is an asset which you should not overlook. Bunnell-DuPont has only a small amount of land left for sale, and if you want to own one of these farms you should, by all means, make up your mind that the only sure way is to send in your application and remittance at once. There can be no other cer tainty, as practically every one who comes to see our land is charmed with it. If you will pay a visit you will be just like the rest. An inspection trip over the'Colonv is an easy matter n the Company's automobile. Our field manager at Bunnell will be glad to take you over the colony in the CompanyÂ’s automobile, at any time, and show you your allotment, or help you in the selection of your farm. In a booklet of this kind we cannot tell you everything we wish you to know. Our only aim is to convince you that Bunnell-DuPont is the most desirable colony in Florida. If you want any further infor mation regarding this colony, write us and we will take pleasure in sending you a personal letter. Do not hesitate to ask us any question. We can answer it to your complete satisfaction. Address all correspondence to THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle St. CHICAGO, ILL. A Final Word All orders for land should be sent to above address, but we wish to emphasize the fact that no allotments are made from this office. We are conscientious in the matter of al lotting our farms, hence our Engineer and Field Manager in charge at Bunnell, who are familiar with every foot of land in the colony, make each individual selection for our cus tomers. in

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BUNNELL-DUPONT COLON V/ J VamericuS __ S ^AN ANNAK YBEE Lake' Vorih PALM BEACH THE ROVA1 POiMOAHA)
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C/k/0& D/7&T/C/ OS. A. VERDENIUS CHICAGO How We Allot Our Land The plat below represents one section—640 acres—o£ land divided into four quarter sections or blocks, each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each, and 4 tracts of 20 acres each. PL/£ L/C PO./1P This diagram shows bow we allot our land. Each farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permitting every owner to enter and leave his land in the easiest possible manner. On the opposite page you will find a map of Florida, indicating the exact position of the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. If you are interested, write us for a large map of our colony lands. This map will g ive you a better i dea of how our farms are laid out; it will show you the location of the railroad, canal, ocean, country tioads and towns. 21

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS CHICAGO THIS IS THE STORY The check reproduced on the opposite page was paid to Mr. J. E. Pellicer for ten acres of potatoes by Lambert $ Moody on the 27th day of April, 1912, for potatoes planted Febru ary 1st, 1912, while these potatoes were still in the ground. This is the story of a single manÂ’s success in our colony. I could tell you of many other similar instances that should convince you, beyond a doubt, that here is the place for you to make your home if you desire to provide for your future and to do so with the least ex pense and the greatest promise of profit. If you wish to do so, you may write the following parties for information regarding the reliability of the Bunnell Development Co., and the fertility of its land. When doing so, enclose stamp for reply. THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle Street CHICAGO, ILL. REFERENCES: J. E. INGRAHAM, Vice-President of the Florida East Coast R. R., St. Augustine, Fla. WM. A. MACWILLIAMS, Member of the House of Representatives from St. Johns County, St. Augustine, Fla. HON. WM. S. JORDAN, Mayor, Jacksonville, Fla. I. A. CRAWFORD, Proprietor of large naval stores in terests, Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla. THREE HOME BANKS: BUNNELL STATE BANK, Bunnell, Fla. COMMERCIAL BANK, St. Augustine, Fla. ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, Jacksonville, Fla. 28

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“And Last, But Not Least.” I have tried to be brief and cover every point re garding our colony. I have set forth plain, unvar nished facts. There is but a page left for a short “man to man” talk. I want here to make an appeal to those who, like myself, know the value of a dol lar—to honest, hard-working men and women. Do you know that three-fourths of the persons who die leave nothing at all, and are dependent on some one else in old age; also that during the past ten years there have been more than 100,000 commercial failures with liabilities of over a billion and a half dollars? More than 600 banks and trust companies closed their doors with liabilities of over three hundred and eighty million dollars. Ninetythree railroads passed into the hands of receivers with over six hundred million dollars of bond and stock issues involved. Consider these figures thoughtfully. Are you going to be among the three-fourths described above? If you do not provide for old age you cer tainly will. If you put your savings in banks or stocks you may not be any better off in the long run. What you should do is to buy a home at Bunnell, not a home that you will have to keep, but A HOME THAT WILL KEEP YOU. It should be every man’s greatest desire — his highest ambition—to own a home of his own. Here is YOUR opportunity. Do not delay—buy now while you can secure your farm at the present price of only $30.00 an acre. Your land will be worth double or treble this amount by the time you have paid for it in full. Every man and woman can lay aside $5.00 each month. I have been frank and truthful with you in the preceding pages and it is your duty to be the same with yourself. Only 17 CENTS A DAY, an amount that the majority of people spend every day for unnecessary trifles, for cigars or candies, saved and invested in one of these farms will mean inde pendence for you and your loved one. Again I say, this is the chance of your life. Buy a home for yourself, for your old parents, or for your child. Lay aside 17 CENTS A DAY— put it in a Bunnell farm. There is no safer or wiser in vestment—it is better than in a savings bank. Read carefully our terms on the back of the en closed order blank. Every booklet should contain one. If you do not find it, write for a copy and study the terms on the back of same. They are most liberal and within the reach of all. Then fill out the order blank for the number of acres you desire and send it to me at once with your first payment. $5.00 for every ten acres you buy. If there is any choice in location our Bunnell office will allot these to the first orders received, but ) I assure you that everybody will get a square deal. 24

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle Street CHICAGO, ILL. General Manager of Sales BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY Capital Stock, $100,000.00. I. I. MOODY J. F. LAMBERT President Secretary and Treasurer Herschman & Cardy, Printers. Chicago

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w E shall be more than glad to mail you our literature, and all we ash in return is that you read it yourself and pass it on to some one else to read.

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“He who owns a home of his own, If only a cottage with vines over grown, Of the pleasures of life gets a larger per cent, Than his haughtier neighbor who has to pay rent.” Copyright Thomas A. Verdenius We shall be glad to mail you our literature; all we ask in return is that you read it yourself, and then pass it on to some one else to read.

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My Experience Your Gain d WAS born in Holland, ^P reared on my father’s farm, where we had to make every square foot of land yield something to eat— something to sell. In Hol land only a few farmers own their land—most of them must always rent. There the average farm is about three and one-half acres, and this land supports anywhere from eight to twelve people. I have known what it is to raise a family while working for wages, and I want to say here that I consider it the first duty of every man to see that his family is protected against the time when he is unable longer to provide for them. Not only must he protect them, but lie should be able to give them the necessities of life, if not the luxuries. Knowing, as I do, the needs and the wants of men of ordinary means, I have endeavored to set forth in this booklet what I believe to be a solution to these problems. I shall not attempt to paint pretty pic tures of impossible things, but I will tell you in the following pages in a simple and direct way, a few plain facts regarding a country that responds more readily, more abundantly and more continually to the intelligent, energetic man than any country I know of; and I shall tell you how you may secure a farmhome in the Bunnell colony, where you can, upon a few acres, if you will work, give yourself and family everything you need and at the same time save a goodly portion of your earnings every year. More than this, you can enjoy many luxuries in the nature of all manner of out-door sports, ocean bath ing, fishing, etc., and go through life under the most healthful conditions. This is all that I promise you in the following pages, but I want to say that I can positively prove to your satisfaction that this will be your reward if you will read carefully every page of this book. 1 ask no man to take my word, but I appeal only to his common sense, good judgment and his earnest desire. Very sincerely, My buyers are my partners. Your success is my success. 1

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BUNNELL COLONY FLORIDA AS IT WAS Ponce de Leon was governor of Porto Rico when there came to him a few Spaniards who told wonderful stories of a region of flowers where the Indians said there was a spring of eternal youth, and he, being an old man, sought to renew his years by bathing in the vvaters of this spring. Accordingly he set forth on an expedition to discover the marvelous fountain, and landed near St. Augustine, Fla., in 1513, on Easter Sun day, and as Easter is called in Spain Pascua Florida, or Flowery Easter, he named the new land Florida. The romance and the poetry of this foolish manÂ’s dream have always clung to Florida. Blood has been shed for this land; nations have quarreled over it; rich men have made it their playground, but is has been left to the man of ordinary means to develop it. Florida is now a region of cities, railroads, Florida county highways, truck gardens, citrus As It Is groves, winter and summer resorts, and is indeed, a modern, pulsing community. Her growth has been slow but sure. It is only in recent years that people have begun to realize FloridaÂ’s great possibilities, but now the development of the state is going forward at .a tremendous rate. Without fear of successful contradiction, we say that Florida produces more, in dollars and cents, per acre, than any other,State in the Union. However, you must not expect Florida to throw her bounties in your lap without toil and without sacrifice, but if you will do those things which common sense teaches one should be done, you may become prosperous and inde pendent in this great State. Florida East Coast Railroad CompanyÂ’s Depot at Bunnell. 'Florida is a peninsula about one hundred Climate and forty miles wide at its widest point and of a gigantic coast extent, being almost surrounded by the sea. It is constantly being swept by the sea breezes, which make mild its winters and take the sting from the summerÂ’s sun. In Florida, six months of the year are not devoted to the consumption of the products and the savings of the other six, as is the case in many states. There are no sudden changes in the weather. The nights are ever cool and restful. Although the summers are Rich men spend thousands for Florida climate. Â’Tis yours for laughter, love and life.

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO longer than in the northern states, there is never the intense heat which prevails in the north. The average temperature at St. Augustine, our county seat, given by the United States Weather Bureau, is 68 degrees. Heat prostrations or sunstrokes are unknown in Flor ida. As our colony almost adjoins the Atlantic coast we have the benefit of constant sea breezes. These breezes, mingled with the odors of the pine and mag nolia and laden with the salt of the ocean, make one feel that life is indeed worth living. Remember there is but one crop of soil, also that New York sold once for $2b.00. Bank and Office Building at Bunnell, modern in every way. Florida lies directly across the path of Location the most important sea highway, which will lead through the Panama canal to all ports of the world, either east or west. What she is today is nothing to what she will be during the next ten to twenty-five years. Within thirty-six hours by fast freight and passen ger train lies a market for more than fifty million peo ple to be supplied by Florida. Along both coasts and in the center of the State are mighty trunk line rail roads, reaching away to all markets, while at various points along her coast the products of the soil are sent by ocean vessels to the eager markets. Florida can supply New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, etc., from three to five One of BunnellÂ’s Pretty Residence Streets.

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BUNNELL COLONY weeks in advance of other sections of our so-called mid-winter farming communities. Every good has its bad; every hot its Soil cold; every sweet its bitter—and F'orida is no exception. It has its good soil and its poor soil; it has its extremely rich toil and its very barren ground. The general character, however, of Florida soil is a dark or gray sandy loam, under which lies a clay subsoil that has the tendency to retain the moisture during the period when the crops are grow ing. The above character of soil is the kind which is to day responsible for Florida’s fame, and this is the kind that the Bunnell colony mostly possesses. Acre No Other State Equals Florida in Average Yields Production. Per Acre Per Acre Missouri yields ....$ 9.38 Iowa yields .$12.22 Illinois yields.12.48 Ohio yields 13.36 FLORIDA YIELDS $109.76 PER ACRE The above is the average value of farm production in five great States, as per governmental statistics. Florida exceeds them all combined. Land in Mis souri, Iowa, Illinois and Ohio sells for from $100 to $250 an acre, with the earnings above mentioned. What can you not do on Bunnell land, worth 1,000 per cent in productive value over any State mentioned above? The Land As It Is Today As you can see from the photograph below, our land is cut-over pine land, slightly rolling. It has an elevation of about thirty feet. All of the valuable timber has been removed, but there is enough timber, however, left on the land for general purposes, such as fence posts, outbuildings, etc. Some people leave the stumps, cultivate around them and destroy them later, as they have more time. The stumps, being full of grease, burn very easily. There is some palmetto on a part of the land, but other underbrush is almost wholly lacking. The land as it is today—An inspection trip over the colony is an easy matter in the company’s automobile. A worthy land should be regarded worthily. 4

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO First M. E. Church and Parsonage at Bunreli. The Bunnell colony is a community Our built along co-operative lines. The peoColony pie who make up this colony and own its small farms are earnest, honest men and women. They are working for a purpose—they are not dreamers. Already they have accomplished much. They have built the beautiful little city of Bunnell that is the pride, not only of these colonists, but of every citizen of St. Johns county, Florida. The Bunnell colony is located about eighty-seven miles south of Jacksonville on the main line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. It is less than three miles from the Atlantic Ocean and about twenty-five miles from St. Augustine, in a direct line. This is a region that has, for hundreds of years, been known to man, and yet it is a spot that had not been fully ap preciated in a large way until about five years ago. Early settlers came to St. Johns county Early and became prosperous. They built exSettlers cellent homes, established very fine or ange groves and truck farms, and, upon the whole, have given the soil, the climate, and the county, every test necessary to prove their value. The Bunnell colony first began to atBunnell tract attention some four and a half years ago, and since that time has been steadily growing. Bunnell, which is the principal town in this colony, is also the largest town in the southern portion of St. Johns county. It is incorporated and has about seven hundred inhabitants. Already there are two churches, an excellent public school with two years of high school, and a state bank. The town has telegraph service, also local and long distance tel ephones. It has two hotels, garage, weekly newspa per, city waterworks, ice plant, drug store, physician, several general stores, including a large hardware and building material supply house, cement sidewalks, meat market, barber shop, lumber mill, barrel factory, bak ery, blacksmith shop; and there are the Masonic, Eastern Star, Knights of Pythias and Modern Wood men lodges. There are a number of trains going north and south that stop at Bunnell daily, with a good mail and express service. A few years of earnest labor will bring a real age of ease. 5

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BUNNELL COLONY Elsewhere in this book you will find views of this little city, and you will note that the town is not made up of cheap, unattractive buildings, but that the pub lic buildings and homes there would be a credit to any community. An application has been made for a free rural de livery of mail, and the first route is expected to be es tablished soon. pioneerWhen you come to the Bunnell colony, so far as your particular tract of land ln S is concerned, you will come as a pio neer; that is, you will have to do the work, or have it done for you, that is necessary to bring forth crops. You will have to erect your house, dig your well, build your fences, plant your crops and take care of them, but you will not have to suffer the inconveniences which others have had to undergo in many sections of Florida. You will have this beautiful town close by you, where the needs of your farm and your home can be supplied. You can get out of a Pullman car at Bunnell; you can have your freight sidetracked there; you can make all the arrangements you want for the improve ment of your farm. You can meet with, and talk to, those who are engaged in small farming and fruit raising, and can obtain the benefit of their experiences. You will find them an excellent class of men and women, who will be only too glad to welcome you and to tell you the things that you should know. You will find the company officials ready, willing and anxious to extend to you every courtesy in their power. They will take you to your farm and assist you as far as possible in getting settled. Every commission merchant who han dles potatoes has heard of Hastings, Florida, for it is one of the greatest po tato raising sections in the United States. Hastings lies but twelve miles from our colony. Here the many buyers for commission houses throughout the United States The Famous Hastings District Potatoes ready for shipment at Bunnell’s landing—We have water and rail transportation. Potatoes produce profits, not payment for plumb ers’ bills. No frozen water pipes here. n

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO A busy scene in a Bunnell Potato field. come each spring and purchase the entire early potato crop. The soil of our colony is like that of Hastings. Hastings land, which a few years ago could have been bought for a less price even than we are now offering our land for sale, cannot be purchased today for ten times the price before asked, and much of the land cannot be purchased at any price, so independent are the growers. Two hundred and fifty dollars per acre is not a large price for good Hastings land. Irish This year the potato crop sold around Potatoes $5.00 per barrel, and some of the com mission men who purchased potatoes at Hastings and also from our colonists, said that the best potatoes they had seen were grown in the Bunnell colony, thus placing the stamp of ap proval of expert buyers upon Bunnell potatoes. Blastings has specialized wholly upon potatoes, and her colonists as a result have grown wealthy, and have made a name, not only for themselves, but for Florida as well. Bunnell farmers are equally as successful in the raising of potatoes, for the short time their land has been under cultivation. One of our colonists sold fourteen acres of pota toes this season, in the ground, for $3,000.00; while another realized a little over $200.00 an acre net for his potato crop last season. These are only two of the scores of farmers who have made a great success of growing Irish potatoes. These potatoes were planted in January or the early part of February, and the owners had sold and received their checks for rame in about one hundred days. This is indeed the “proof of the pudding.’’ Sweet There is not a more certain, or a better p t t crop, than sweet potatoes. They require but little work, and a failure is un known. From two hundred to four hundred bushels per acre is a normal yield, and they never sell for less than fifty cents a bushel and often as high as $1.00 per bushel. “Ancient poetry and mythology suggest, at least, that husbandry was once a sacred art .”— Thoreau. 7

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BUNNELL COLONY Cornfield South of Bunnell. Corn Prof. Knapp of the Agricultural De partment, states that throughout the en tire South corn can be raised to good advantage with proper care. Bunnell colony farmers have demonstrated this statement to be a fact, and they are rapidly achieving wonders along this line. Corn is a splendid second crop. Before your po tatoes are harvested you can plant corn between the rows of potatoes in March and April. This corn will yield about 50 bushels per acre, at an average of 70 cents a bushel, or $35.00 an acre. The expense of this crop will not be more than $5.00 an acre for seed, cultivating and harvesting, and it is grown in the sum mer months when the North furnishes her own truck; hence is a crop consumed at home. Velvet Can be planted as a third crop, between Beans and ^ ie rows corn They will yield from p.. a two t two and one-half tons of excellent hay to the acre, worth at least $20 P e r ton. Seed, cultivating and harvest ing of this crop will not exceed $6.00 an acre. Both velvet beans and cow peas are great forage crops. They enrich the soil and at the same time are very profitable. Velvet beans are the greatest beef producers known. It takes less than sixty days to fatten cattle on this crop. There is always a ready market for the beans which sell for $2.00 a bushel. Cattle, hogs and sheep thrive splendidly on these crops. Work in Florida in your shirt sleeves, not in shackles. But remember, Florida only wants WORKMEN. 8

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Sugar Cane Possibly the safest and surest crop for the least amount of labor is syrup cane. It produces here from four hundred to six hundred gallons of cane syrup to the acre. The Florida cane syrup is famous. It is a staple product and finds a ready market. This syrup is sell ing at seventy-five cents a gallon, thus giving the owner a profit of $200.00 an acre. Total failure of cane crops here is unknown. The actual cultivation and labor is very light. It grows so rapidly that it can be plowed but two or three times before it becomes too tall. The cane needs to be replanted only every three or four years, and is therefore often called a “lazy man’s crop.” Florida is the region of three crops a Intensive year. While we advise all of our colcjFarming nists to plant potatoes for one crop, we also advise them to engage in intensive farming, to some extent at least. You will understand that by intensive farming is meant utilizing every day, taking advantage of every season and crowding the soil to its utmost. A great variety of vegetables may be grown and sold at a time when prices are positively the highest in the country. But you must remember that you cannot obtain these unless you fertilize your land and take care of it as you should. Successive planting will exhaust your soil unless you keep it built up properly. Modern science of agriculture has proven that fer tilization is not an expense, but it is an investment that pays handsomely year after year. It is a well-known fact that St. Johns Citrus county was the first place in Florida Fruits where oranges were grown, the seeds being brought here, it is supposed, by Ponce de Leon, and wild orange trees have been found growing throughout the State, the seeds being car ried, unquestionably, by the Seminole Indians. It is also an established fact that oranges grown in this latitude of Florida have a flavor peculiar to them selves and not approached by other sections. Oranges grow, they don’t drop in your lap. So come serious, not visionary. 9

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BUNNELL COLONY Grape The profit in grape fruit culture is a p ru j{. measured certainty. The demand for this fruit is constantly increasing. Flor ida is the only State adapted to its cul ture. Grape fruit has been sold in New York and Chicago at $5.00 to $6.00 a crate WHOLESALE, and it costs less than fifty cents a box to grow them. It is a common occurrence for owners of grape fruit groves to net $500.00 an acre. California and Texas grape fruit is so inferior to that raised in Florida that our State has a monopoly in its production. Florida oranges are admitted to be betOranges ter, more sweet and juicy, than those raised in any other State. Both Florida grape fruit and oranges lead in market prices. Florida fruit can be put on the market cheaper than California fruit. Immediately adjoining our colony is an orange grove comprising one hundred and five acres, which is a living demonstration of this regionÂ’s productivity. Over ten thousand boxes of oranges and grape fruit have been shipped in one year from this grove. Several small groves are found around and immediately adjoining our colony. An orange and grape fruit grove can be brought to a profitable state in six years, and when fully matured will produce an annual net income equal to, if not in excess, of the entire cost. The life of a grove is prac tically unlimited. You can make it possible for an orange or grape fruit grove to provide for you and your family for the balance of your lives, after the grove is five to six years of age. Berries of all kinds do well at Bunnell. Small Strawberries are especially prolific. Four Fruits thousand quarts to the acre are not un common in Florida, and at the high price of twenty cents a quart, which the market brings during FloridaÂ’s strawberry season, means an earning of $800.00 per acre. All manner of small fruits should be cultivated, for they pay well and are easy to raise. Home of. Mr. I. I. Moody, Pres, of the Bunnell Dev. Co. Your hands, money and desire with FloridaÂ’s cli mate and soil can make all worry weary. to

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Farm West of Bunneli Grapes Florida is the ideal home of the grape. ~ Such species as the Royal Malaga, the Seedless Raisin, the Scuppernong, are the more familiar and common kinds. They do excep tionally well all over the State and will certainly prove big money getters in the Bunnell colony. Peaches and plums do well in this secPeaches and tion of Florida. The Florida peach is Plums equal to any grown and bears before other peaches, thus taking advantage of the highest market prices. What is true of peaches is likewise true of plums. You should have an acre at least planted to peaches and plums. You may culti vate the ground between the trees without injury to your orchard. A good idea is to use this orchard as a chicken yard. Japanese persimmons are also adapted to our soil and bring fancy prices. Make up your mind, when you come to Pecan our colony, that you will plant pecans. Growing A first-class pecan tree will bear in five years at the rate of about five pounds and in eight or ten years anywhere from thirty-five to fifty pounds of nuts annually, increasing the yield as the tree grows older. The average price of good pecans is about 50 cents per pound, so that fifty full-grown trees would bring an annual income of $25.00 per tree, or $1,250 per year. A pecan tree is hardy and its product non-perishable. A physician living in Bunnell has a fine pecan grove on his farm just outside of town. Pecan trees do not interfere with the cultivation of other crops between the rows of trees for the first five or six years. Some Florida companies make a specialty of selling only pecan groves, and ask for one acre more money than we charge for ten acres of our land. We believe it is more profitable for the man who wishes to have a pecan grove to buy land from us and set out his own trees. He will not only save a great deal of money on his investment, but while he is rais ing small fruit and vegetables between the rows of trees, he can not only make a good living for himself, but also pay for the pecan grove by the time it is a paying investment for him. “The child is father of the man.” — Wordsworth. Help your child build a pure body and brain and leave it more than a memory of you. i i

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BUNNELL COLONY A few “mortgage lifters”—Bunnell Porkers. By all means make up your mind to go in for stock raising when you come to Bunnell. Cattle do well in the Bunnell colony and the business is profitable. Feed is cheap and it is not necessary to feed for warmth. No expensive buildings are required for shel tering—no extra winter expense at all. Don’t forget the hogs, either, and add a few of these to your farm. They will bring you good rev enue and demand but little attention on your part. Live Stock Tropical Pasture Scene at Bunnell. Dairying pays well on account of the easily raised forage crops, and there is a great local demand for milk and but ter. The many large hotels on the East Coast and the good railroad transportation for shipping milk give the dairy man in Bunnell unlimited opportunities. Milk sells in Bunnell for ten cents a quart, while in Jack sonville, St. Augustine and Daytona twelve cents a quart is obtained. When one considers that a carload of dairy prod ucts, comprising milk, cream and butter, is shipped every day from Chicago, during the tourists’ season, for the famous Florida East Coast hotels, one can form some idea of the opportunities that await those who will engage in the dairy business. “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose,” but he can’t make another acre of land. Dairying

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Poultry pays the pin money to the Florida house-wife. Above photo shows Mrs. Verdenius in her poultry yard in Florida. Poultry Poultry raising in the Bunnell colony as a business or a side line brings hand some profits. Florida has fewer diseases among poultry than practically any State in the Union. The market is always high and few are engaged in the business. Most of the poultry and eggs consumed in the State are shipped from Georgia and Tennessee. No expensive poultry houses are necessary, and the Florida hen lays the most of her eggs in the winter months, when the prices are highest. The great winter resorts of Florida, with their tourist hotels, which are mostly found along the East Coast, furnish a steady demand for all the fresh eggs and fryers one has for sale. Eggs sell for from forty to fifty cents per dozen and poultry from eighty cents to one dollar each. About a mile and a half west of Bunnell a New York man has begun the operation of a large poultry plant, covering more than a hundred acres. Drinking Water One can obtain good drinking water at a depth of from twelve to eighteen feet, almost anywhere in our colony, in inex haustible quantities, by merely driving a pipe through the subsoil and attaching thereto an ordinary sucker pump. The whole outlay will cost about $15.00. Artesian water can be obtained at from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet. The cost of these wells is about $1.00 per foot. Building Material Lumber is very cheap at Bunnell. You can build your house, barn, chicken house, etc., for about one-half of what they would cost in the North. This is due to two reasons: Lumber is plentiful in the State, hence cheap; and the mildness of the climate renders more expensive buildings unnecessary here. There are good contractors in Bunnell who will gladly furnish you plans and figures when you are ready to build your home. Florida is a real land for real men. DonÂ’t tell your grandchildren your failures. i3

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BUNNELL COLONY Paving Railroad Avenue, Bunnell, portion of the Dixie Highway. Roads The famous “DIXIE HIGHWAY,” which extends from Chicago to Miami, passing through 134 counties, and cost ing almost ten million dollars, runs through our colony lands for a distance of about fifteen miles. Our county built more than sixty miles of this great highway, at a cost of six hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and the value of such a road to our land owners cannot be estimated. The Bunnell Development Company originally laid out the Moody Road, which extends from Bunnell to Ocean City. This is now part of the DIXIE HIGH WAY. The Moody Road also extends south of Bun nell for a distance of about four miles and will be continued farther to the end of our colony, and thence to DeLand, the county seat of Volusia county. The Bunnell Development Company has also built a num ber of other roads. Ocean Close by the edge of the Bunnell colony is the town of Ocean City. It is ideally y located for all the pleasures of boating, bathing, etc. Many people from the North have spoken of the beauty of this spot. It is most desirable in every way and within a short time we believe it will be one of the resort spots of the fa mous East Coast. A railroad is to be built from Ormond to St. Augus tine, and we hope to have a railroad station at Ocean City before very long. Lots in Ocean City are now selling for $100.00 to $200.00 each, on monthly pay ments, or ten per cent less for cash. There is a school building in Ocean City, a number of homes, and a beautiful pavilion, which affords every comfort for the salt water bathers, as well as amusements of va rious kinds. Florida is a workshop where your children may romp at your feet. 14

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Du Pont DuPont is a small town about three and one-half miles south of Bunnell and is located in the heart of the colony. We predict a great future for this place. It has, at the present time, a school, store, hotel, etc. The DuPont Land and Railway Company have their lands south west of DuPont and have built a narrow gauge rail road from their land to DuPont. To the south of DuPont we have three more rail road stations—Korona, Harwood and Favorita, at which trains stop, and as soon as the country is more developed these will naturally grow into towns. Florida has sufficient rainfall during the Irrigation growing seasons to give the crops all the moisture they need, but the most up-to-date farmers in Florida install small irrigation plants on their farms, using artesian wells, so as to be able to produce larger results should a possible short age of moisture occur, and the fact that almost any where in this colony you can get artesian water is an asset in favor of the Bunnell colony that cannot be estimated too highly. Irrigation means more money for the same amount of work, and after the well is installed it will pay for itself very quickly in added profits, although you will understand that irrigation is not necessary and is not used except among those intensive farmers who go in for immense yieds per acre. If one wishes to engage in intensive farming and installs his own small irrigation plant, his initial ex pense will be all that he will have—no heavy yearly maintenance fees, such as the owners of irrigated farms in the West have to contend with. When you buy a farm in this colony, No Taxes, you pay no taxes whatever until after Fees, Etc. you have completed all the payments on your land. Every expense of this nature is borne by the Company. We pay all recording fees, taxes, etc., and there are no charges other than your regular payments on the land. This is so, even if you take possession of your farm after making but a single payment. Elegant Bunnell Home of formerly Iowa gentleman. Florida is a summer as well as a winter resort. Each night you sleep, each day you smile. 15

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BUNNELL COLONY Society and Schools A man, before he makes up his mind to go into a new community, should know that he is going to have good neighbors and good schools. At Bunnell there are some of the finest people in the United States and they are all working with a single interest just like one big family. The public school at Bunnell is ample for the needs of the colonists’ children at the present time. They have a superintendent and three assistants, two years of high school work also being taught. There are a number of other schools throughout the colony; while in Bunnell there is the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Christian Church, and the Catholic Church in Korona. Thus you may be assured that you will not be going into a wilderness or a place where your family will lose the finer influences of the home when you locate in the Bunnell colony. I i Jacksonville lies eighty-seven miles north J ” of Bunnell. It is one of the finest cities vl ^ e in the South and is growing very rapidly. In Jacksonville there are excellent department stores, theaters churches, secret societies, all manner of supply houses for your farm or your home, and the distance is so short from Bunnell that you may order by mail or telegraph and have whatever you need delivered within a few hours, or you may run up to Jacksonville and attend to such matters in person. You may call upon the big commission houses and buyers at Jacksonville, as most of the principal mar kets of the country have representatives here. Jacksonville morning and evening papers are deliv ered at Bunnell, so that you may keep constantly in touch with all of the important daily events. Nearby towns are Palatka to the northwest, St. Au gustine to the north, and Daytona to the south. So great is the fame of Hastings and our particular region of Florida for potatoes, oranges, produce of various kinds, that during the producing season buyers come to this section of Florida and buy the crops from farmers directly on their ground. Thus you see that the matter of marketing your crop is not left to you to Crop Buying Cow Pea Hay—3rd crop—Farm West of Bunnell. Own your own farm. No strikes, panics or fires can take it from you.

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Ocean Beaeh at Ocean City. solve, but is taken care of by these buyers, who repre sent large commission and export houses all over the country. They pay cash for the produce, delivered f. o. b. depot, if one prefers it, instead of shipping on consignment. The average rainfall of Florida, as a lemperawhole, is around 53 inches, although porture and tions of the State exceed this amount. Rainfall The lowest rainfall of the year generally occurs in December and the highest in August. The annual average temperature in Florida is 74 degrees. We will give you an idea of the average dur ing the summer months. August averages 83 degrees, and it is a well-known fact that Florida has fewer days in which the temperature stands at 90 degrees or over than any State in the Union, except, of course, those States where the thermometer may go to 95 and down to 45 within a few days thereafter, thereby breaking the average. Do not be afraid of Florida’s summers. They are ideal, and no one suffers so much from the heat in the North as a man who has lived for a number of years in Florida. Through the very heart of the Bunnell Markets colony runs the Florida East Coast Railroad. This system is thoroughly equipped with refrigerator car line service. It makes no difference what the condition of the weather may be, crops grown in Florida are placed in these cars and whisked away to the markets in the North. Another railroad is to be built from Ormond to St. Augustine, on the east side of our colony, and plans are now under consideration for the laying of double tracks from Key West to Jacksonville, on account of the heavy freight and passenger traffic. We consider the Florida East Coast Railroad one of the best rail roads of the South, well equipped and up-to-date in every respect. The Florida East Coast Canal, which extends from Miami to Jacksonville, passes just to the east of our colony. There is a landing at Ocean City, so that we | have the advantage of being able to ship our produce by water as well as by rail. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Grasp your opportunities now, and prevent poverty in old age. 17

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BUNNELL COLONY Distance to Florida enjoys the distinction of being Markets die ear ^' est marketing section of America, and she is many hundreds of miles nearer to the large Eastern markets than California and the Texas Gulf Coast country. Fifty million people can be served with Florida products within thirty-six hours after shipment has been placed upon cars in Florida. This is an advantage which you must consider of especial favor to you when you make up your mind to locate at Bunnell. From Bunnell, Fla. To Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y. Washington, D. C Chicago, Ill. Kansas City, Mo. From Los Angeles, Cal. Miles To Miles .1,321 Boston, Mass.3,235 .1,091 New York, N. Y.3,145 863 Washington, D. C.,.2,974 .1,192 Chicago, Ill.2,260 .1,181 Kansas City, Mo.1,809 The average haul to markets from Florida is 1,000 miles, against the average haul of 3,000 miles from California. The famous Dixie Highway, as it passes by the 106 acre orange grove— East of Bunnell. Florida maintains a complete agriculExperiment tural department and experiment staStation tion. These publish results of in vestigations in their lines and you may have these reports by simply writing to the proper authorities in Florida. The State Agricultural Department of Correthe LIniversity of Florida is giving a corpondence respondence course in truck growing for Course all non-residents who expect to make Florida their future home. There is, perhaps, no State in the LTnion where one may enjoy so many lines of out-door sports as in Florida. You may have the sweetest water to bathe in, or you may prefer salt water bathing. You may fish for Tesh water or salt water fish. Within a few hours’ ride tom Bunnell you may enjoy good deer hunting, while iquirrel, rabbit, fox and other small animals abound in and around our colony. Ducks, geese, turkeys, quail and other wild fowls are also to be found in profusion. Out-door Sports “Where there’s a will there’s a way.” 18

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Close by our colony, to the east, lies the great Atlantic Ocean, and here you may have the finest kind of bathing, boating and fishing at the least possible expense. There is a complete chain of resort hotels along the East Coast, adjacent to our colony, and the beautiful and quaint city of St. Augustine lies but a short distance away. Your children may romp and play over your land to their heartÂ’s content, and your wife can take them to the -seashore or other resorts almost any day of the year. Health Florida is one of the healthiest States in th e Union, the death rate being slightly over six to each thousand population. When you take into consideration that the majority of Northern States have a death rate of from fifteen to twenty per thousand, you will have some idea of the supremacy of Florida as a health community. I have many times met people, now robust and vigorous, who some years ago had come to Florida to die. It is a wonderful State in which to renew oneÂ’s health and prolong life. Many of the diseases so pre valent in Northern States are unknown in Florida. Occasionally there is a case of malaria, but it is not nearly so common as many are led to believe, and, indeed, there are few States, if any, which are entirely free from malaria. Sunstrokes are absolutely unknown here, and the very fact that Florida today has tall pine trees, reach ing one hundred feet into the air, and has them in large quantities, is best proof of the fact that high winds, tornadoes, electrical storms, etc., do not abound here to a distinctive degree. Down along the Keys of the coast winter storms sometimes assail, but the State, as a whole, is free from any such disturbances. A couple of hours catch. 19

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BUNNELL COLONY Tribune Building and adjacent stores in Bunnell. HomeseekersÂ’ Excursions On the first and third Tuesday of each month you can obtain, from most points in the Central and Eastern States, a round-trip ticket to Florida at a special reduced rate, with full stop-over privi leges. Your local ticket agent can give you the homeseekersÂ’ rate from your station. The fare from Chi cago to Bunnell and return on these occasions is $41.89. The round trip fare from Cincinnati to Bunnell is $29.75, and from DesMoines to Bunnell on such excur sions the round trip fare is $53.05. Bunnell Home Builder The Bunnell Home Builder is a small illustrated magazine published monthly and sent free of charge to all land buyers in the Bunnell colony. The pur pose of this publication is to keep our customers, who at the present time are located in practically every State in the Union, some in Canada, and a few in Europe, fully informed regarding the colony, and the development taking place there from month to month. This magazine is also sent to those who are interested in our colony and who are anxious to obtain more information regarding Bunnell colony. If you wish to receive the Home Builder free of cost for a few months, write us at once for same. We are offering for sale these splendid Terms Of farms in the Bunnell colony at a very Sale and reasonable price on the easy monthly Titles payment plan; free of taxes until paid for, and without interest on de ferred payments, or one-third cash, balance one and two years. If you prefer to pay cash for your farm, we will al low you a discount of 10 per cent. Our terms of purchase are so easy that every wage earner and salaried man and woman has the oppor tunity of obtaining a home and independence in our colony. Our prices and terms are subject to change at any time, but you will find enclosed an order blank giving our latest terms. On the back of same you will find an exact copy of the contract which you will enter into if you purchase a farm of the BunneJI De velopment Company. 20

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO Recapi tulation We have tried in this booklet to be concise, conservative, and convincing. We have avoided anything that would tend to mislead or misinform you; we have used no pretty language—Florida is beautiful enough, and no word of man’s pen can paint her picture. Into this State are pouring thousands of people from all over the country. They are coming here with all manner of ideas. They are bringing with them an enthusiasm and a desire for work that will make Florida go forward, in our opinion, faster than any of her sister States along agricultural lines. These men and women are of the superior kind, simply be cause they show by their very actions in coming to Florida that they are instilled with great ambition. What is true of Florida, as a whole, is particularly true of the Bunnell colony. We want you to make up your mind to own one of our colony farms, and we want you to buy it with the distinct understanding that you are making an investment here that is a worthy one, and one that will place you in a position of independence, if you will only do one-half the actual labor that is needed to make a first-class daily wage in any of our Northern States. Every month of the year is a working month in Florida. While you work you may, at the same time, be enjoying her wonderful sunshine, her great gifts of natural pleasures, and the bounties of health from her incomparable climate. Do not buy one of our farms unless you make up your mind fully that it is the place where you wish to locate. We do not need, or want, any but the serious-minded. You will find this Company always willing and ready to do everything to help you, but you must decide that you want to be helped before we can be of any assistance to you. Remember that when you come to Florida you will find everything as we say you will find it, but we advise you to come prepared in a financial way to build your house, clear your land, buy the necessary tools with which to do your work, and, at the same time, have money enough left to take care of yourself and One of the many attractive Bungalows In Bunnell. 21

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BUNNELL COLONY One of BunnellÂ’s Hotels where you may be made comfortable when you arrive. family until your farm begins to produce. We want you to thoroughly understand this ques tion, so that you may reach the point which our colo nists have arrived at today, and reach it in the short est possible time. The fact that this colony is so far along now and has solved all of the questions you will be asked to solve is an asset which you should not overlook. We are selling our Bunnell land very rapidly and if you want to own one of these farms you should, by all means, make up your mind that the only sure way is to send in your application and remittance at once. There can be no other certainty, as practically every one who comes to see our land is charmed with it, and does not leave without buying a farm for himself; often reserving tracts for his friends. If you will pay a visit you will be just like the rest. Our field manager at Bunnell will be glad to take you over the colony in the CompanyÂ’s automobile at any time, and show you your allotment, or help you in the selection of your farm. A Final In a booklet of this kind we cannot tell Word you everything we wish you to know. Our only aim is to convince you that the Bunnell colony is the most desir able community in Florida. If you want any further information regarding this colony, write us and we will take pleasure in sending you a personal letter. Do not hesitate to ask us any questions. We will answer them to the best of our ability, and we believe to your complete satisfaction. Address all correspondence to THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle St. Chicago, I'll. All orders for land should be sent to the above address, but we wish to emphasize the fact that no allotments are made from this office. We are conscientious in the matter of allotting our farms, hence our Engineer and Field Man ager in charge at Bunnell, who are familiar with every foot of land in the colony, make each indi vidual selection for our customers. 22

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Gt/O & D/1&//U THOS. A. VERDENIUS, CHICAGO How We Allot Our Land The plat below represents one section—640 acres—of land divided into four quarter sections or blocks, each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each, and 4 tracts of 20 acres each. N \ — BL( CK 1 l AO/i£> r L_ BL( jCK I i /?o/w This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permitting every owner to enter and leave his land in the easiest possible manner. On the next page you will find a map of Florida, indicating the exact position of the Bunnell Colony. If you are interested, write us for a large map of our colony lands. This map will give you a better idea of how our farms are laid out; it will show you the location of the railroad, canal ocean, country roads and towns 23

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CULP BUNNELL COLONY Plan „ (longue BOCa ^ Her o chica „g LOWER MfI*l.0M6£ fl KEY WEST K L'S'/ it / iff // e\f OUR LOCATION IS IDEAL We are but 87 miles south of Florida’s great metropolis — Jacksonville. Our transportation facilities are the best by water and rail, and the ocean breezes prevail at all times. 24 B A

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Good Advice The Bunnell Development Company endorses the following from the Florida Times-Union: “There is not a shadow of doubt that many of the advertisements that have appeared concerning Florida land have been gross misrepresentations of the lands advertised and the conditions that exist where the lands are located. In almost every in stance such advertisements have been inserted by land companies or individuals who have their head quarters outside of Florida, and whose only interest in Florida is to dispose of as many acres of land as possible in as short a time as possible. They have secured some semblance of a title to a large tract of Florida land and through their misleading advertisements and illustrated literature, as well as bogus testimonials, have unloaded thousands of acres of perfectly worthless land—or worse still— swamps that it will cost thousands of dollars to drain, upon people who have bought in good faith. “There is not a particle of necessity of misrepre senting anything in connection with Florida. The land company telling the truth about the lands it owns will make more in the end than the swindler, for the honest company will gain the confidence of its patrons and the public generally and its reputa tion for honesty and fair dealings will become wide spread and secure for it a business that the dis honest company can never hope to attain. “Every person buying land in Florida should know with whom he is dealing. He should ascer tain from banks, boards of trade, public officials and newspapers the character and reputation of the persons composing such companies and also the general nature of the lands advertised. It is much safer to deal with a company organized and char tered in Florida, by citizens of Florida, who have the interests of Florida at heart, than it is to deal with a foreign corporation, having absolutely no interest in Florida except to sell Florida lands.” The Bunnell Development Company is a Florida corporation. Mr. I. I. Moody is president and Mr. J. F, Lambert is secretary. Its officials have their homes in Bunnell. The Chicago office is merely the General Sales Office The Bunnell Development Company is composed of men of high standing in Florida, and has the endorsement of prominent people and banks throughout the Slat" among whom are the follow ing: J. E. INGRAHAM, Vice-President of the Florida East Coast Railroad, St. Augustine, Fla. HON. WM. A. McWILLIAMS, Member of the House of Representatives from St. Johns County, St. Augustine, Fla. HON. WM. S. JORDAN, Ex-Mayor, Jacksonville, Fla. BUNNELL STATE BANK, Bunnell, Fla. COMMERCIAL BANK, St. Augustine, Fla. ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, Jacksonville, Fla.

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THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle Street CHICAGO, ILL. General Manager of Sales Bunnell Development Co. Capital Stock, $100,000.00 I. I. MOODY President J. F. LAMBERT Secretary and Treasurer Tomoka River, just East of our Colony lands, abounding in the gamestfish.

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It Is NotaQuestionThe Fact Is%  Can You Afford to Buy One of These Farms %  You Cannot Afford NOT to Buy One Order Blank for a Bunnell-Dupont Farm Price $ 3 5 2 2 Per Acre TERMS: $5.00 PER ACRE DOWN BALANCE : $1.00 Per Acre Per Month No Interest No Recording Fees No Taxes No Brokerage DO NOT WRITE IN THESE SPACES Tp. R. Bit. Tr. See Back of Order Blank for Terms of Contract THOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Ill. Please enter my order for a farm of_ Date_ 19. _Acres (Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchase, whether 10, 20 or 40 acres.) of land in Bunnell-Dupont Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of $5.00 per acre down and $1.00 per acre per month, until paid for, subject to the conditions on back hereof. Enclosed find $_as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of $_ hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment and advise me which tract has been allotted to me. Name. Street Town. R.F. D. No Age_ County. State .Married or Single .Occupation. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 S. LA SALLE ST., CHICAGO, ILL

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Terms and Conditions 1. The Bunnell Development Company agrees to pay all taxes due or about to become due on said land until a Warranty Deed therefor shall be issued to the purchaser in accordance with the terms hereof. 2. The Bunnell Development Company agrees that when 20% of the purchase price shall have been paid, the purchaser shall have 15 days grace on each monthly payment; that when 40% of the purchase price shall have been paid, the purchaser shall have 45 days grace on each monthly payment; and that no interest shall be charged on deferred payments during such days of grace. 3. It is agreed that any time before delivery of deed, the Company will, at the purchaserÂ’s option exchange the parcel of land herein agreed to be conveyed for any parcel of land of similar area and price owned by it and unallotted at the time application for exchange is made; such right of exchange shall not, however, apply to lands set aside by the Company for subdivision into town or city lots. 4. When the purchaser shall have made all of his payments, as herein agreed, the Company will deliver to .-....or.....heirs or assigns, a Warranty Deed conveying the title to the above described tract or parcel of land to such purchaser, free of all liens or encumbrances. 5. It is hereby agreed that a strip of land 15 feet wide is reserved on each section and half section line, said land to be used as one-lialf of the right-of-way for a public road. 6. Time shall be the essence of this contract and all its provisions, and if the purchaser shall fail to make the payments as herein specified, this contract shall, at the option of the Bunnell Development Com pany, without notice, be and become null and void, and all payments made under this contract shall be forfeited to and retained by said Company as liquidated damages. 7. This contract supersedes all other prior contracts, promises or statements, oral or written, between the parties hereto. 8. All payments shall be made to the Bunnell Development Company at its home office in Bunnell, Florida, or to Thos. A. Verdenius, 108 S. LaSalle Street, Chicago, Ill,