Citation
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Home Builder papers and manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Development Company Bulletin no.1
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Housing development -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Real property -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Housing development ( fast )
Real property ( fast )
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
History. ( fast )
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
History ( fast )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Miscellaneous text and documents from the Bunnell Development Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10469 ( NOTIS )
1046991505 ( OCLC )
on1046991505
Classification:
F319.B92 B86 ( lcc )

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Related Item:
Bunnell home builder

UFDC Membership

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Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
OFFICE OF
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS
Biunnell Development Company
108 South La Salle Street, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
BULLETIN N o. 1
Thne Greatest Movement
for Peace
Back to the Land
Half the world is today plunged in war, and all the world, more or less, is suffering from same. Blood is flowing freely on the European continent, and no one can say just what the end will be. Business In almost every line Is practically at a standstill, and many men who a few months ago possessed great wealth are today paupers.
The American nation, as well as the European countries, is at the present time going through a crisis, and hundreds of thousands of men and women who formerly had permanent employment in our shops,, mills, factories and stores are now walking the streets and the highways looking for-begging for-Work.
Throughout these terrible months, the American FARMER has stood practically alone-the one giant figure on which the sun of prosperity has continued to shine. He has steady, profitable employment, a home for himself and his family from which -no landlord can eject him. His cellars are stored with vegetables and fruit for the winter; he has plenty of fuel to insure comfort and warmth; his barns are bulging with the crops from his fields, and notwithstand--ing the great financial depression throughout the country, the American FARMER Is able to live like a Prince-in peace and security. He has a neverending source-.of income, one tAhat will continue Indefinitely, amidst surroundings that are -superior toe.-any other form of endeavor.
Do you want to know what such independence means? Do you want to have the assurance that your livelihood is guaranteed, your independence protected, whether we are in the midst of PEACE or WAR? Then learn this lesson from the present war and hard times-BECOME THE OWNER OF A FARM. You owe it to yourself and to your family to make such a provision as this. If you are not able at the present time to become the, owner of a large farm, then secure a smaller one, and almost before you know it your income will have increased, your farm will be enlarged, and prosperity for you and yours will be assured. The man who owns a farm is wise-he alone faces the future with calm confidence. Believe me, you will never know real peace of mind until you can say: "I own a Farm."
Are you hesitating in regard to where you shall buy your farm? Then read the letters on the following pages of this Bulletin, and learn what these intelligent business men have to say about our great colony at Bunnell, Florida. You cannot do better than to invest here, and WHY HE,$ITATE LONGER ABOUT DOING SOMETHING THAT YOU HAVE KNOWN FOR A LONG TIME YOU OUGHT TO DO?
You who read this little Bulletin and who are already owners of farms at Bunnell, will appreciate the truth of all I have said above. You know just what your Bunnell farm means to you, and I am sure that you too will be interested in reading the following splendid letters.




Mr. A. S. Babcock, a Chicago Business Man
Finds The Bunnell Colony
The Pl "ace of his
Dreams
Chicago, Illinois, to completion within the past four January 9, 1915. years, when they would do credit to a colony in decades, was a surprise beMr. Thomas A. yond mvy power to describe here.
Verenis, hi' .I found the land assigned to me Nerenus Chi- just as represented, and very satiscago. factory. I was so perfectly satisfied
that I selected all the land available Dear Sir: adjoining my holdings. I was shown
by the Field Manager, over the lands I have recently of the Company not yet sold, from r et ur n ed from which I selected very desirably located Bunnell Dupont land for several of my northern
friends who are desirous of making Florida, where I their future, home in Florida. made 'a very
thorogh inpec- it might be interesting to you to tionoand invet- know that I spent the first twenty years of my life on a farm with my g a t ion of the ancestors, who for many generations Bunnell Development Company's lands were known as practical and scientific and colony. farmers and stockmien. I have always
been greatly interested in agriculture It is my desire to express to you at and livestock, and I have done much this time my firmly established con- study and tried to keep in touch with fidence in you and the Bunnell De- the husbandry, during the past thirty velopment Company, with whom I years since I have been in business. I
have been doing business for the past have always felt sure' that I would two years. eventually follow in, the paths of my
In all the descriptive literature you father and his ancestors. I am now have issued and all the statements happy to be able to catch a glimpse you have made about the officers, of that dawn.
lands and colony, I find you have always been candid and very conserva- This is' certainly a rambling letter,
tive. T~he above impressions have but believe me, my. dear sir, it was my been most thoroughly clinched by my desire to have you know my honest most rigid investigation while in Bun- convictions, and I- have so stated my nell. feelings about the Bunnell Development Company.
I, mingled with the business men and the farmers; I visited their places In closing, I would not, feel that I of business and their farms, and found had done you and -myself justice if [ whoever I met-busy, contented, hap- failed to recommend your most splenpy and prosperous. I was ever on the did proposition to any one seeking the alert to satisfy myself that I was safest, sanest, and most independent making no mistake in selecting Bun- life. neli-Dupont for my future home and environment. I have traveled and investigated the
The o~sitalty xtened e bythe United States from the Atlantic to the Thfier h a t extloened mfte by th Pacific, and from the Gulf toCanada, offiersand mplyeesof he Cin- and my conclusions are that no part pany, by the merchants and the farm- of this country has so desirable a ers surpassed all previous experience, proposition to offer as Florida, and and surprised me greatly. I was made the Bunnell-Dupont colony in particto feel at home from the time I left ular. The requisite, in my judgment, the train and throughout my stay in is intensive, diversified farming-in the colony. poultry, fruit, dairying and live stock,
.The wonderful and substantial de- for. the greatest financial success in velopments and improvements of your Florida. I would ever use as a worktowns in the colony, the good streets ing maxim-' 'A well balanced mixture and highways now under construction of cash, brawn. and brains" to achieve and the splendid water ajnd railway the maximum success. transportation facilities were really Yours for success,
marvelous to me, and to know that all this has been done and is being rushed A. S. BABC~OCK.




An Interesting Letter from Mr. Ed Johnson
One of Busy Bunnell's Most Prominent and
Progressive Retail Merchants
Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, locate in Bunnell, and here are the
Chicago, 111. answers that, I have worked out and
Dear Sir: proven to my own satisfaction.
You have asked me to write you as I have been intimately associated
to my opinion of the Bunnell Colony. with the people of the Bunnell Colony I do not know why you have made ever since I located here, and I must
this request, and it matters not to me; say that in all my life I have never though I presume that what you want lived in a community where there was is the cold, unvarnished truth, for I more congeniality and where everyone know that you would not ask for any- seemed to have the public welfare at thing but a straightforward statement. heart as there is here. Therefore, instead of conferring a favor upon you, I take great pleasure The founders of the Bunnell Colony, in complying with your request, and with whom I have had constant busifeel that you have honored me by ask- ness relations, have proven themselves ing for my opinion. to be gentlemen of the very highest
type. There has not been a single inI have now been a resident of Bun- stance, to my knowledge since, I came nell since March, 1913, and it is scarcely here, where anyone has asked these necessary to ask me if I am favorably men for a reasonable favor, that they impressed with the outlook here, and have not received it; and I personally whether I expect to make'this my fu- have known them to lend assistance to ture home. Just go out on the Moody men when they knew at the time there Boulevard, about one mile east of town, was but a bare possibility of ever and see if you think that things look realizing anything in return. I have known them to render assistance, where
they received a cold shoulder in return
for their trouble. I have known them
to give advice to newcomers of such
a nature that it was detrimental to
their financial interests. Be ye stranger or friend, if you ask these men an
honest question, you may rest assured
? that you will receive an honest reply.
Messrs. I. I. Moody and J. F. Lambert, the parties to whom I refer as
the founders of this town and colony,
are both self-made men, having come
to this country a number of years ago
with no other assets than their good
health, their energy, their determination
to succeed, and an insight to the future
of this country that has placed them
Mr. fohnson's home on his farm, cast of Bunnell where they are today. I like to deal with such men as these. They know
permanent, but for fear that you do not how to appreciate the conditions of see the things there as I see thern I men who are not on a financial level will state that I AM HERE TO STAY, with them. and here are some of the reasons why:
When a man is in search of a place I have met and had dealings with in which to build up a lifetime home, most every one who has come to this he naturally wants to know every- section of the country, and I can thing abouf the community that it is frankly say with but a few exceptions, possible for him to learn. He wants I have found them to be a high class to know what kind of people he will of refined men and women-the kind have to associate with; what the church that it takes to build up the right kind facilities are; what kind of schools of. a community. there are for the education of his BUNNELL has a nice church that
children. He wants to know that he would be a credit to any town, which is locating where health conditions are is presided over by an intelligent and good; where the standard of morality worthy minister, who has a warm place is high, and that his business associates in the hearts of everyone in the comwill be honest and trustworthy men. munity. He wants to know that there is enter- BUNNELL boasts as good a school prise and get-up in the community, as one could desire, and it is in the that the opportunities there are goo hands of an efficient corps of teachers. and that there is a chance for advancement along any line of business. BUNNELL has truthfully been laudThese are the questions that I had ed as a place where good health can t6 have settled before I decided to be enjoyed, and our physicians will




testify to this fact. The standards of successes, for those who knew t morality are high here, and with the business reaped re warda for thei
present efforts of the good women of bors.
the community, and the assistance of I have been termed a booster,
the better element of the male class, why not? Wtth all the opportun44 the time is not far distant when we and possbilities that this country
will have no such word as immorality sesses, there is no reason why an
here. The business element of Bunnell in this 16cality should not be a boos are men and women of the highest
class and proficient in their respective The above statements are from thelines; and of a more enterprising set heart, and are most humbly submite of people than we have here no place by one whom you will alwas find her,
can boast. until he is called to the Great Beyond.
Yours truly, .
The past season In farming has ED JOHNSON,
proven conclusively that there are
great possibilities in the field. There "The Tennesseean."
were failures of course, there were also Bunnell, Fla.
"Who Shall Despise the Day of Small Things"
Perhaps you are a prosperous business man today, your health good, your inome.sufficient to meet all your needs. Possibly you are quite satisfied with conditions jus. as they are, and feel that there is no need for you fo buy a little farm-home in iBunl, Florida.
But, did it never occur to you that these conditions may change, that your ro future may be overcast by clouds of adversity, and that what now seems almost a useless investment may become a Haven of Refuge?
If such thoughts have never come to your mind, it will be well for you to read carefully the following letter, which I received a short time ago from one of our buyers. There is pathos and tragedy in this letter, and yet there is the note of victory, for this husband and wife have found the "silver lining" to their cloud, and they are looklnng into the future with strong, courageous hearts.
"Mr. T. A. Verdenius,
Chicago, Illinois.
My Dear Sir:
I trust to be in Bunnell early in the spring. While I have n6ver ,seen mn land, having bought it on Mr. Moody's personal assurance, yet I regard it as a very fortunate investment. At the time I contracted for same, I had no anticipation of cu4tlvating it but bought simply because I was urged to do so.
. Since then I have seen my business ruined and all my prospects go to naught.
This little piece of land is about all that my wife and I have to fall. back on in ouol age. Had anyone- foretold my present circumstances when I signed my order for ten acres, some four years ago, I would have laughed atj them. As it is, ry wife a I feel that we can face future dificulties cheerfully, because when we have paid thirty dollars more, we iill hold title to that which will at least assure us of a living, and probably will give us a satiifactory income that no one can take from us.
As it is now, the fear of the poor house in our old age does not cast its shadow over us."
I want to add a final word to you, who have not yet secured your farm in the Southland. Now is the time for you to act. Do not wait longer to send in your order. Surely we can satisfy you with a farm, when we have over two thousand satisfied customers today. Ever keep this thought In mind, that whether we are in the mids, of PEACE OR WAR, the only really independent man is tke Farner-the man who owns a farm of his own, fully paid for.
If you have not read my booklet, "A Little Farm-A Big Living," write me for it today. It will be mailed you free of cost, and will tell you how you may obtain a farm home by saving just seventeen cents^ dX.
7/ THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
108 So. La Salle St., CHICAGO.




Full Text

PAGE 1

OFFICE OF THOMAS A. VERDENIUS Bunnell Development Company 108 South La Salle Street, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS BULLETIN N o. 1 The Greatest Movement for Peace Back to the Land Half the world is today plunged in war, and all the world, more or less, is suffering from same. Blood is flowing freely on the European continent, and no one can say just what the end will be. Business in almost every line is practically at a standstill, and many men who a few months ago possessed great wealth are today paupers. The American nation, as well as the Euro pean countries, is at the present time going through a crisis, and hundreds of thousands of men and women who formerly had per manent employment in our shops, mills, factories and stores are now walking the streets and the highways looking for — beg ging for—Work. Throughout these terrible months, the American FARMER has stood prac tically alone—the one giant figure on which the sun of prosperity has continued to shine. He has steady, profitable employment, a home for himself and his family from which no landlord can eject him. His cellars are stored with vege tables and fruit for the winter; he has plenty of fuel to insure comfort and warmth; his barns are bulging with the crops from his fields, and notwithstand ing the great financial depression throughout the country, the American -FARMER Is able to live like a Prince .in peace and security. He has a neverending source~.of income, one that will continue indefinitely, amidst surround ings that are superior t@-any other form of endeavor. Do you want to know what such independence means? Do you want to have the assurance that your livelihood is guaranteed, your independence pro tected, whether we are in the midst of PEACE or WAR? Then learn this les son from the present war and hard times— BECOME THE OWNER OF A FARM. You owe it to yourself and to your family to make such a provision as this. If you are not able at the present time to become the owner of a large farm, then secure a smaller one, and almost before you know it your income will have increased, your farm will be enlarged, and prosperity for you and yours will be assured. The man who owns a farm is wise-—he alone faces the future with calm confidence. Believe me, you will never know real peace of mind until you can say; “I own a Farm.” Are you hesitating in regard to where you shall buy your farm? Then read the letters on the following pages of this Bulletin, and learn what these intelligent business men have to say about our great colony at Bunnell, Florida. You cannot do better than to invest here, and WRY HESITATE I.ONGER ABOUT DOING SOMETHING THAT YOU HAVE KNOWN FOR A CONG TIME YOU OUGHT TO DO? You who read this little Bulletin and who are already owners of farms at Bunnell, will appreciate the truth of all I have said above. You know just what your Bunnell farm means to you, and I am sure that you too will be interested, in reading the following splendid lette-rs.

PAGE 2

Mr. A. S. Babcock, a Chicago Business Man Finds The Bunnell Colony The Place of his Dreams Chicago, Illinois, January 9, 1915. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chi cago. Dear Sir: I have recently returned from Bunnell Dupont, Florida, where I made a very thorough inspec tion and investig a t i o n of the Bunnell Development Company’s lands and colony. It is my desire to express to you at this time my firmly established con fidence in you and the Bunnell De velopment Company, with whom I have been doing business for the past two years. In all the descriptive literature you have issued and all the statements you have made about the officers, lands and colony, I find you have al ways been candid and very conserva tive. The above impressions have been most thoroughly clinched by my most rigid investigation while in Bun nell. I mingled with the business men and the farmers; I visited their places of business and their farms, and found whoever I met—busy, contented, hap py and prosperous. I was ever on the alert to satisfy myself that I was making no mistake in selecting Bunnell-Dupont for my future home and environment. The hoispitality extended me by the officers and employees of the Com pany, by the merchants and the farm ers, surpassed all previous experience, and surprised me greatly. I was made to feel at home from the time I left the train and throughout my stay in the colony. The wonderful and substantial de velopments and improvements of your towns in the colony, the good streets and highways now under construction, and the splendid water and railway transportation facilities were really marvelous to me, and to know that all this has been done and is being rushed to completion within the past four years, when they would do credit to a colony in decades, was a surprise be yond my power to describe here. I found the land assigned to me just as represented, and very satis factory. I was so perfectly satisfied that I selected all the land available adjoining my holdings. I was shown by the Field Manager, over the lands of the Company not yet sold, from which I selected very desirably located land for several of my northern friends who are desirous of making their future home in Florida. It might be interesting to you to know that I spent the first twenty years of my life on a farm with my ancestors, who for many generations were known as practical and scientific farmers and stockmen. I have always been greatly interested in agriculture and livestock, and I have done much study and tried to keep in touch with the husbandry, during the past thirty years since I have been in business. I have always felt sure that I would eventually follow in the paths of my father and his ancestors. I am now happy to be able to catch a glimpse of that dawn. This is certainly a rambling letter, but believe me, my dear sir, it was my desire to have you know my honest convictions, and I have so stated my feelings about the Bunnell Develop ment Company. In closing, I would not feel that I had done you and myself justice if I failed to recommend your most splen did proposition to any one seeking the safest, sanest, and most independent life. I have traveled and investigated the United States from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Gulf to Canada, and my conclusions are that no part of this country has so desirable a proposition to offer as Florida, and the Bunnell-Dupont colony in partic ular. The requisite, in my judgment, is intensive, diversified farming—in poultry, fruit, dairying and live stock, for the greatest financial success in Florida. I would ever use as a work ing maxim—"A well balanced mixture of cash, brawn and brains” to achieve the maximum success. Tours for success, A. S. BABCOCK.

PAGE 3

An Interesting Letter from Mr. Ed Johnson One of Busy Bunnell’s Most Prominent and Progressive Retail Merchants Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir: You have asked me to write you as to my opinion of the Bunnell Colony. I do not know why you have made this request, and it matters not to me; though I presume that what you want is the cold-, unvarnished truth, for I know that you would not ask for any thing but a straightforward statement. Therefore, instead of conferring a fa vor upon you, I take great pleasure in complying with your request, and feel that you have honored me by ask ing for my opinion. T have now been a resident of Bun nell since March, 1913, and it is scarcely necessary to ask me if I am favorably impressed with the outlook here, and whether I expect to make this my fu ture home. Just go out on the Moody Boulevard, about one mile east of town, and see if you think that things look Mr. Johnson's home on his farm, east of Bunnell permanent, but for fear that you do not see the things there as I see them, I will state that I AM HERE TO STAY, and here are some of the reasons why: When a man is in search of a place in which to build up a lifetime home, he naturally wants to know every thing about the community that it is possible for him to learn. He wants to know what kind of people he will have to associate with; what the church facilities are; what kind of schools there are for the education of his children. He wants to know that he is locating where health conditions are good; where the standard of morality is high, and that his business asociates will be honest and trustworthy men. He wants to know that there is enter prise and get-up in the community, that the opportunities there are good, and that there is a chance for advance ment along any line of business. These are the questions that I had to have settled before I decided to locate in Bunnell, and here are the answers that I have worked out and proven to my own satisfaction. I have been intimately associated with the people of the Bunnell Colony ever since I located here, and I must say that in all my life I have never lived in a community where there was more congeniality and where everyone seemed to have the public welfare at heart as there is here. The founders of the Bunnell Colony, with whom I have had constant busi ness relations, have proven themselves to be gentlemen of the very highest type. There has not been a single in stance, to my knowledge since I came here, where anyone has asked these men for a reasonable favor, that they have not received it; and I personally have known them to lend assistance to men when they knew at the time there was but a bare possibility of ever realizing anything in return. I have known them to render assistance, where they received a cold shoulder in return for their trouble. I have known them to give advice to newcomers of such a nature that it was detrimental to their financial interests. Be ye strang er or friend, if you ask these men an honest question, you may rest assured that you will receive an honest reply. Messrs. I. I. Moody and J. F. Lam bert, the parties to whom I refer as the founders of this town and colony, are both self-made men, having come to this country a number of years ago with no other assets than their good health, their energy, their determination to succeed, and an insight to the future of this country that has placed them where they are today. I like to deal with such men as these. They know how to appreciate the conditions of men who are not on a financial level with them. I have met and had dealings with most every one who has come to this section of the country, and I can frankly say with but a few exceptions, I have found them to be a high class of refined men and women—the kind that it takes to build up the right kind of a community. BUNNELL has a nice church that would be a credit to any town, which is presided over by an intelligent and worthy minister, who has a warm place in the hearts of everyone in the com munity. BUNNELL boasts as good a school as one could desire, and it is in the hands of an efficient corps of teachers. BUNNELL has truthfully been laud ed as a place where good health can be enjoyed, and our physicians will

PAGE 4

testify to this fact. The standards of morality are high here, and with the present efforts of the good women of the community, and the assistance of the better element of the male class, the time is not far distant when *e will have no such word as immorality here. The business element of Bunnell are men and women of the highest class and proficient in their respective lines; and of a more enterprising set of people than we have here no place can boast. The past season in farming has proven conclusively that there are great possibilities in the field. There were failures of course, there were also successes, for those who knew their business reaped rewards for their la bors. I have been termed a booster, and why not? With all the opportunities and possibilities that this country pos sesses, there is no reason why any one in this locality should not be a booster. The above statements are from the heart, and are most humbly submitted by one whom you will always find here, until he is called to the Great Beyond.. Yours truly, ED JOHNSON, “The Tennesseean.” Bunnell, Fla. “Who Shall Despise the Day of Small Things?” Perhaps you are a prosperous business man today, your health good, your income sufficient to meet all your needs. Possibly you are quite satisfied with conditions just as they are, and feel that there is no need for you to buy a little farm-home in Bunnell, Florida. But, did it never occur to you that these conditions may change, that your rosy future may be overcast by clouds of adversity, and that what now seems almost a useless investment may become a Haven of Refuge? If such thoughts have never come to your mind, it will be well for you to read: carefully the following letter, which I received a short time ago from one of our buyers. There is pathos and tragedy in this letter, and yet there is the note of victory, for this husband and wife have found the “silver lining” to their cloud, and they are looking into the future with strong, courageous hearts. “Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Illinois. My Dear Sir: I trust to be in Bunnell early in the spring. While I have never seen my land, having bought it on Mr. Moody’s personal assurance, yet I regard it as a very fortunate investment. At the time I contracted for same, I had no anticipation of cultivating it, but bought simply because I was urged to do so. Since then I have seen my business ruined and all my prospects go to naught. This little piece of land is about all that my wife and I have to fall back on in our old age. Had am/one foretold my present circumstances when I signed my order for ten acres, some four years ago. I would have laughed at them. As it is, my wife and I feel that we can face future difficulties cheerfully, because when we have paid thirty dollars more, we will hold title to that which will at least assure us of a living, and probably will give us a satisfactory income that no one can take from us. As it is now, the fear of the poor house in our old age does not cast its shadow over us.” I want to add a final word to you, who have not yet secured your farm in the Southland. Now is the time for you to act. Do not wait longer to send in your order. Surely we can satisfy you with a farm, when we have over two thousand satisfied customers today. Ever keep this thought in mind, that whether we are in the midst:, of PEACE OR WAR, the only really independent man is the Farmer—the man who owns a farm of his own, fully paid for. If you have not read my booklet, “A Little Farm—A Big; Living,” write me for it today. It will be mailed you free of cost, and will tell you how you may obtain a farm home by saving just seventeen cents a day. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St„ CHICAGO.